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Sample records for anterior transpedicular screw

  1. A Novel Anterior Transpedicular Screw Artificial Vertebral Body System for Lower Cervical Spine Fixation: A Finite Element Study.

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    Wu, Weidong; Chen, Chun; Ning, Jinpei; Sun, Peidong; Zhang, Jinyuan; Wu, Changfu; Bi, Zhenyu; Fan, Jihong; Lai, Xianliang; Ouyang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    A finite element model was used to compare the biomechanical properties of a novel anterior transpedicular screw artificial vertebral body system (AVBS) with a conventional anterior screw plate system (ASPS) for fixation in the lower cervical spine. A model of the intact cervical spine (C3-C7) was established. AVBS or ASPS constructs were implanted between C4 and C6. The models were loaded in three-dimensional (3D) motion. The Von Mises stress distribution in the internal fixators was evaluated, as well as the range of motion (ROM) and facet joint force. The models were generated and analyzed by mimics, geomagic studio, and ansys software. The intact model of the lower cervical spine consisted of 286,382 elements. The model was validated against previously reported cadaveric experimental data. In the ASPS model, stress was concentrated at the connection between the screw and plate and the connection between the titanium mesh and adjacent vertebral body. In the AVBS model, stress was evenly distributed. Compared to the intact cervical spine model, the ROM of the whole specimen after fixation with both constructs is decreased by approximately 3 deg. ROM of adjacent segments is increased by approximately 5 deg. Facet joint force of the ASPS and AVBS models was higher than those of the intact cervical spine model, especially in extension and lateral bending. AVBS fixation represents a novel reconstruction approach for the lower cervical spine. AVBS provides better stability and lower risk for internal fixator failure compared with traditional ASPS fixation.

  2. Construction and accuracy assessment of patient-specific biocompatible drill template for cervical anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS insertion: an in vitro study.

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    Maoqing Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the properties of three-column fixation and anterior-approach-only procedure, anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS is ideal for severe multilevel traumatic cervical instabilities. However, the accurate insertion of ATPS remains challenging. Here we constructed a patient-specific biocompatible drill template and evaluated its accuracy in assisting ATPS insertion. METHODS: After ethical approval, 24 formalin-preserved cervical vertebrae (C2-C7 were CT scanned. 3D reconstruction models of cervical vertebra were obtained with 2-mm-diameter virtual pin tracts at the central pedicles. The 3D models were used for rapid prototyping (RP printing. A 2-mm-diameter Kirschner wire was then inserted into the pin tract of the RP model before polymethylmethacrylate was used to construct the patient-specific biocompatible drill template. After removal of the anterior soft tissue, a 2-mm-diameter Kirschner wire was inserted into the cervical pedicle with the assistance of drill template. Cadaveric cervical spines with pin tracts were subsequently scanned using the same CT scanner. A 3D reconstruction was performed of the scanned spines to get 3D models of the vertebrae containing the actual pin tracts. The deviations were calculated between 3D models with virtual and actual pin tracts at the middle point of the cervical pedicle. 3D models of 3.5 mm-diameter screws were used in simulated insertion to grade the screw positions. FINDINGS: The patient-specific biocompatible drill template was constructed to assist ATPS insertion successfully. There were no significant differences between medial/lateral deviations (P = 0.797 or between superior/inferior deviations (P = 0.741. The absolute deviation values were 0.82±0.75 mm and 1.10±0.96 mm in axial and sagittal planes, respectively. In the simulated insertion, the screws in non-critical position were 44/48 (91.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The patient-specific drill template is biocompatible, easy

  3. Biomechanical analysis of differential pull-out strengths of bone screws using cervical anterior transpedicular technique in normal and osteoporotic cervical cadaveric spines.

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    Wu, Changfu; Chen, Chun; Wu, Weidong; Zhao, Weidong; Sun, Peidong; Fan, Jihong; Bi, Zhenyu; Zhang, Jinyuan; Ouyang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical in vitro study. To determine whether the peak pull-out force (PPF) of cervical anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixed in osteoporotic vertebrae positively influence screw stability or not before and after fatigue. Multilevel cervical spine procedures with osteoporosis can challenge the stability of current screw-and-plate systems. A second surgical posterior approach is coupled with potential risks of increased morbidity and complications. Hence, anterior cervical instrumentation that increases primary construct stability, while avoiding the need for posterior augmentation, would be valuable. Sixty formalin-fixed vertebrae at different levels were randomly selected. The vertebrae were divided into healthy controls (groups A1, A2), osteoporotic controls (B1, B2), healthy ATPS groups (C1, C2), osteoporotic ATPS groups (D1, D2), and osteoporotic restoration controls (E1, E2). The procedure of ATPS insertion was simulated with 2 pilot holes being drilled on each side of 20 vertebral bodies that were implanted with either vertebral screw or polymethylmethacrylate. Each side randomly received either instant PPF or PPF beyond fatigue (2.5 Hz; 20,000 times). The prefatigue PPFs were significantly higher than the postfatigue PPFs in all groups (group A: 366.06 ± 58.78 vs. 248.93 ± 57.21 N; group B: 275.58 ± 23.18 vs. 142.79 ± 44.78 N; group C: 635.99 ± 185.28 vs. 542.57 ± 136.58 N; group D: 519.22 ± 122.12 vs. 393.16 ± 192.07 N, and group E: 431.78 ± 75.77 vs. 325.74 ± 95.10 N). The postfatigue PPFs were reduced by 32.00% (group A), 48.19% (group B), 14.69% (group C), 24.28% (group D), and 24.72% (group E). The acute and postfatigue PPFs of both control groups were significantly lower than that of ATPS groups (P osteoporotic vertebrae.

  4. Evaluation of cyanoacrylate augmentation of transpedicular screw pullout strength.

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    Milcan, Abtullah; Ayan, Irfan; Zeren, Adalet; Sinmazcelik, Tamer; Yilmaz, Ali; Zeren, Muzaffer; Kuyurtar, Fehmi

    2005-12-01

    Pedicle screw fixation of osteoporotic bone in the elderly is a challenge. Various augmentation methods have been studied by many authors. Although polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation is believed to be a standard method, its usage is fraught with complications. Butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is an alternative to PMMA as it is bioresorbable, biocompatible, inexpensive, and noninfective. The objective of the current study was to determine the pullout strength of the pedicle screws when butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is used for augmentation. Fresh calf lumbar vertebrae were obtained from male calves weighing 100-120 kg and implanted with pedicle screws. The screws were placed in native, unaugmented bone (group 1), butyl-2-cyanoacrylate-augmented bone (group 2), and PMMA-augmented bone (group 3). Axial pullout tests were done by an Instron 4411 universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 9.0 for Windows program. Paired samples t test was used, and P vertebrae was 1.6 +/- 0.1 g/cm2. The mean pullout strengths were 1.55 +/- 0.23 kN for group 1, 1.62 +/- 0.42 kN for group 2, and 2.55 +/- 0.22 kN for group 3. There was no statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2. PMMA augmentation increased the pullout strength significantly when compared with butyl-2-cyanoacrylate augmentation and native bone (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively). The results of this study show that butyl-2-cyanoacrylate has no contribution to the augmentation of pedicle screw fixation in a calf model when compared with native bone or PMMA augmentation. Further studies are required to evaluate the effectiveness of butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in osteoporotic specimens and under cyclic loading in calf vertebra and animal and cadaver models before dispensing with its utility as an augmentation method in the clinical setting.

  5. Evidence-based support for S1 transpedicular screw entry point modification

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    2014-01-01

    Background In the literature, ‘below and lateral to the superior S1 facet’ is defined as the basic technique for screw introduction. Until a recently published modification, no analysis for alternative starting point has been proposed nor evaluated, although some surgeons claim to use some modifications. In this study, we analyse the data from anatomical and radiological studies for optimal starting point in transpedicular S1 screw placement. Methods A Medline search for key word combination: sacrum, anatomy, pedicle, screws and bone density resulted in 26 publications relevant to the topic. After a review of literature, two articles were chosen, as those including the appropriate set of data. The data retrieved from the articles is used for the analysis. The spatial relation of S1 facet, pedicles and vertebral body with cortical thickness and bone density in normal, osteopenic and osteoporotic sacrum is analysed. Results Presented data advocates for more medial placement of the screws due to higher bone density and lower bone loss in osteoporosis. Medial shift of the starting point does not increase the risk of spinal canal perforation. Osteoarthritic changes within the facet can augment the posterior supporting point for screw. The facet angular orientation is similar to convergent screw trajectory. Conclusions Modified technique for S1 screw placement takes advantage of latest anatomical and clinical data. In our opinion, technique modification improves the reproducibility and may increase stability and the screws within the posterior cortex of the S1 vertebra. Further biomechanical and clinical study should be performed to prove its superiority to classical technique. PMID:24708681

  6. The Effect of Transpedicular Screw Design on Its Performance in Vertebral Bone Under Tensile Loads: A Parametric Study.

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    Alkaly, Ron N; Bader, Dan L

    2016-12-01

    A biomechanical study using bovine thoracolumbar spines. To study investigated whether thread design parameters aimed at altering the state of stress at the screw-bone interface increase the screw's holding power. Internal spinal fixators utilizing transpedicular screw fixation are used to achieve early stabilization of the injured spine in a range of clinical conditions. Despite advances in the design of internal spinal fixation systems, implant loosening, and catastrophic failures at the screw-bone interface remains a serious complication in adult spine surgery. Although the performance of the screws in the vertebral bone critically depends on ability of screw thread design to provide and maintain adequate bone purchase, the effect of individual thread design parameters on screw performance and the failure process of the screw-bone interface, remains unclear. On the basis of the AO Schanz thread, this parametric study used 96 lumbar bovine vertebrae instrumented with 19 screw designs to investigate the effects of pitch, ratio of major to minor diameter, screw insertion depth, and major diameter, on screw performance under pure tensile loading. The effect of vertebral morphometry on screw performance and the extent of damage within the failed screw-bone interface were evaluated. The increase in screw insertion depth, screw pitch, and the ratio of major to minor diameter, significantly affected screw performance under tensile loads. Complex interactions existed between the major diameter and each of the design variables. Vertebral morphometry had little effect on screw performance while the damage within the failed bone-screw interface confined to the immediate region of the screw threads. Design variables, able to reduce shear stresses or modify the complex stress profile at the bone-screw interface, are more effective in preventing early failure of the interface.

  7. Revision of the failed pedicle screw in osteoporotic lumbar spine: biomechanical comparison of kyphoplasty versus transpedicular polymethylmethacrylate augmentation.

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    Derinçek, Alihan; Türker, Mehmet; Cinar, Murat; Cetik, Ozgür; Kalaycioğlu, Bariş

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare of kyphoplasty versus transpedicular polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation biomechanically in the revision of the failed pedicle screw in osteoporotic lumbar spine. Bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar vertebrae collected from four bovines were measured. Each vertebra was decalcified with hydrochloric acid solution to obtain osteoporotic specimens. Primary polyaxial pedicle screws were inserted into the pedicles and pulled out until they failed. The pullout strength results of all specimens were recorded. Revision pedicle screws were randomly inserted into the same pedicles by either pedicle hole PMMA augmented (group 1) or kyphoplasty (Xvoid™) PMMA augmented pedicle screws (group 2). The pullout strength results of all specimens were re-recorded. The mean BMD significantly decreased from 1.686 ± 227.9 g/cm(2) to 1.432 ± 157.1 g/cm(2) following decalcification (posteoporotic bone, kyphoplasty augmented pedicle screw seems to be more effective method increasing the pullout strength.

  8. Intraoperative Computed Tomography Navigation for Transpedicular Screw Fixation to Treat Unstable Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

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    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures. From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C. In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2–3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws. The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  9. Radiological outcome of transpedicular screws fixation in the management of thoracolumbar spine injury

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    Haq, M.I.U.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic fracture of the spine is a serious neurosurgical condition that has serious impact on the patient's quality of life. Thoracolumbar junction is the most common site of spinal injuries. The aims of management of thoracolumbar spinal fractures are to restore vertebral column stability, and to obtain spinal canal decompression. This ultimately leads to early mobilization of the patients. This study was conducted to compare preoperative and post-operative vertebral height, kyphotic angle and sagittal index in patients treated with pedicle screws and rods in thoracolumbar spine fractures. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Neurosurgery, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar from 1st February 2010 to 31st July 2011. A total 161 patients with unstable thoracolumber spine fracture were included in this study. In these patients fixation was done through transpedicle screws with rods. Anteroposterior and lateral views X-rays of thoraco-lumbar spine were done pre and post operatively. Results: Out of 161 patients, 109 (67.7%) were males and 52 (32.3%) females. The age of patients ranged from 20 to 70 years (mean 42.2 years) with 71 (44.1%) in the age range of 31-40 years. Preoperative average vertebral height was 9.4194 mm while postoperative average was 19.642 mm. The mean kyphosis was 23.06 degree preoperatively. Immediately after surgery the average correction of kyphosis was 9.45 degree. The pre-operative average sagittal index was 19.38 degree, which was reduced to an average 5.41 degree post operatively. Conclusions: Transpedicular fixation for unstable thoraco-lumbar spinal fractures achieves a stable fracture segment with improvement of vertebral height, kyphotic angle and sagittal index. Hence, preventing the secondary spinal deformities. (author)

  10. Hybrid Stabilization of Thoracic Spine Fractures with Sublaminar Bands and Transpedicular Screws: Description of a Surgical Alternative and Review of the Literature

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    Marie-Therese Unterweger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stabilization of unstable thoracic fractures with transpedicular screws is widely accepted. However, placement of transpedicular screws can cause complications, particularly in the thoracic spine with physiologically small pedicles. Hybrid stabilization, a combination of sublaminar bands and pedicle screws, might reduce the rate of misplaced screws and can be helpful in special anatomic circumstances, such as preexisting scoliosis and osteoporosis. We report about two patients suffering from unstable thoracic fractures, of T5 in one case and T3, T4, and T5 in the other case, with preexisting scoliosis and extremely small pedicles. Additionally, one patient had osteoporosis. Patients received hybrid stabilization with pedicle screws adjacent to the fractured vertebral bodies and sublaminar bands at the level above and below the pedicle screws. No complications occurred. Follow-up was 12 months with clinically uneventful postoperative courses. No signs of implant failure or loss of reduction could be detected. In patients with very small thoracic pedicles, scoliosis, and/or osteoporosis, hybrid stabilization with sublaminar bands and pedicle screws can be a viable alternative to long pedicle screw constructs.

  11. Improving the trajectory of transpedicular transdiscal lumbar screw fixation with a computer-assisted 3D-printed custom drill guide

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    Zhen-Xuan Shao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Transpedicular transdiscal screw fixation is an alternative technique used in lumbar spine fixation; however, it requires an accurate screw trajectory. The aim of this study is to design a novel 3D-printed custom drill guide and investigate its accuracy to guide the trajectory of transpedicular transdiscal (TPTD lumbar screw fixation. Dicom images of thirty lumbar functional segment units (FSU, two segments of L1–L4 were acquired from the PACS system in our hospital (patients who underwent a CT scan for other abdomen diseases and had normal spine anatomy and imported into reverse design software for three-dimensional reconstructions. Images were used to print the 3D lumbar models and were imported into CAD software to design an optimal TPTD screw trajectory and a matched custom drill guide. After both the 3D printed FSU models and 3D-printed custom drill guide were prepared, the TPTD screws will be guided with a 3D-printed custom drill guide and introduced into the 3D printed FSU models. No significant statistical difference in screw trajectory angles was observed between the digital model and the 3D-printed model (P > 0.05. Our present study found that, with the help of CAD software, it is feasible to design a TPTD screw custom drill guide that could guide the accurate TPTD screw trajectory on 3D-printed lumbar models.

  12. Intraoperative computed tomography navigation for transpedicular screw fixation to treat unstable thoracic and lumbar spine fractures: clinical analysis of a case series (CARE-compliant).

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    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures.From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C.In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2-3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws.The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation.

  13. Biomechanical Comparison of Inter-fragmentary Compression Pressures: Lag Screw versus Herbert Screw for Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation.

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    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Park, Seong-Hyun; Seong, Ki-Woong; Cho, Dae-Chul

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare inter-fragmentary compression pressures after fixation of a simulated type II odontoid fracture with the headless compression Herbert screw and a half threaded cannulated lag screw. We compared inter-fragmentary compression pressures between 40- and 45-mm long 4.5-mm Herbert screws (n=8 and n=9, respectively) and 40- and 45-mm long 4.0-mm cannulated lag screws (n=7 and n=10, respectively) after insertion into rigid polyurethane foam test blocks (Sawbones, Vashon, WA, USA). A washer load cell was placed between the two segments of test blocks to measure the compression force. Because the total length of each foam block was 42 mm, the 40-mm screws were embedded in the cancellous foam, while the 45-mm screws penetrated the denser cortical foam at the bottom. This enabled us to compare inter-fragmentary compression pressures as they are affected by the penetration of the apical dens tip by the screws. The mean compression pressures of the 40- and 45-mm long cannulated lag screws were 50.48±1.20 N and 53.88±1.02 N, respectively, which was not statistically significant (p=0.0551). The mean compression pressures of the 40-mm long Herbert screw was 52.82±2.17 N, and was not statistically significant compared with the 40-mm long cannulated lag screw (p=0.3679). However, 45-mm Herbert screw had significantly higher mean compression pressure (60.68±2.03 N) than both the 45-mm cannulated lag screw and the 40-mm Herbert screw (p=0.0049 and p=0.0246, respectively). Our results showed that inter-fragmentary compression pressures of the Herbert screw were significantly increased when the screw tip penetrated the opposite dens cortical foam. This can support the generally recommended surgical technique that, in order to facilitate maximal reduction of the fracture gap using anterior odontoid screws, it is essential to penetrate the apical dens tip with the screw.

  14. Stability of pedicle screws after kyphoplasty augmentation: an experimental study to compare transpedicular screw fixation in soft and cured kyphoplasty cement.

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    Linhardt, Oliver; Lüring, Christian; Matussek, Jan; Hamberger, Corinna; Plitz, Wolfgang; Grifka, Joachim

    2006-04-01

    The goal of this cadaver study was to compare the stability of pedicle screws after implantation in soft or cured kyphoplasty cement. Pedicle screws were inserted in a total of 30 thoracolumbar vertebrae of 10 different human specimens: 10 screws were implanted in nonaugmented vertebrae (group 1), each 10 screws were placed in soft (group 2) and cured (group 3) cement. Pedicle screws were than evaluated for biomechanical axial pullout resistance. Mean axial pullout strength was 232 N (range 60-600 N) in group 1, 452 N (range 60-1125 N) in group 2 and 367 N (range 112-840 N) in group 3. The paired Student t-test demonstrated a significant difference between pullout strength of groups 1 and 2 (P = 0.0300). Between pullout strength of groups 1 and 3 and between groups 2 and 3 no significant difference was seen. We achieved a 1.9 times higher pullout strength with kyphoplasty augmentation of osteoporotic vertebrae compared with the pullout strength of nonaugmented vertebrae. Implantation of pedicle screws in cured cement is a sufficient method. With this method we found a 1.6 times higher pullout strength then in nonaugmented vertebrae.

  15. Bony healing of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures in the elderly using percutaneously applied titanium mesh cages and a transpedicular fixation system with expandable screws.

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    Anica Eschler

    Full Text Available There is a high incidence of vertebral burst fractures following low velocity trauma in the elderly. Treatment of unstable vertebral burst fractures using the same principles like in stable vertebral burst fractures may show less favourable results in terms of fracture reduction, maintenance of reduction and cement leakage. In order to address these shortcomings this study introduces cementless fixation of unstable vertebral burst fractures using internal fixators and expandable intravertebral titanium mesh cages in a one-stage procedure via minimum-invasive techniques.A total of 16 consecutive patients (median age 76 years, range 58-94 with unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures and concomitant osteoporosis were treated by an internal fixator inserted via minimum invasive technique one level above and below the fractured vertebra. Fracture reduction was achieved and maintained by transpedicular placement of two titanium mesh cages into the fractured vertebral body during the same procedure. Intra- and postoperative safety of the procedure as well as analysis of reduction quality was analysed by 3D C-arm imaging or CT, respectively. Clinical and radiographic follow-up averaged 10.4 months (range 4.5-24.5.Stabilization of the collapsed vertebral body was achieved in all 16 cases without any intraoperative complication. Surgical time averaged 102 ± 6.6 minutes (71-194. The postoperative kyphotic angle (KA and Cobb angle revealed significant improvements (KA 13.7° to 7.4°, p < 0.001; Cobb 9.6° to 6.0°, p < 0.002 with partial loss of reduction at final follow-up (KA 8.3°, Cobb 8.7°. VAS (Visual Analogue Scale improved from 7.6 to 2.6 (p < 0.001. Adjacent fractures were not observed. One minor (malposition of pedicle screw complication was encountered.Cementless fixation of osteoporotic burst fractures revealed substantial pain relief, adequate maintenance of reduction and a low complication rate. Bony healing after unstable osteoporotic burst

  16. Transoral screw and wire fixation for unstable anterior ½ atlas fracture

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    Semih Keskil

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Internal immobilization by this screw and wire osteosynthesis technique protects the mobility of the atlanto-occipital and atlantoaxial joints. The main advantage is that neither the twisted wires inserted under the anterior lamina, nor the laterally placed screw heads interfere with midline wound closure; unlike the plate/cage and rod systems used together with anterior screws. A computer navigation system with intraoperative 3D imaging facilities will be of benefit for safe placement of the screw, however we preferred a free-hand technique, as the starting point was at the fracture line along the trajectory of the routinely accessible anterior lamina.

  17. Randomized controlled trial of osteoconductive fixation screws for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a comparison of the Calaxo and Milagro screws.

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    Bourke, Henry E; Salmon, Lucy J; Waller, Alison; Winalski, Carl S; Williams, Heidi A; Linklater, James M; Vasanji, Amit; Roe, Justin P; Pinczewski, Leo A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the outcome of 2 bioabsorbable screws for tibial interference fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with reference to rate of absorption, osteoconductive properties, and clinical outcome. Patients undergoing primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring autograft in a single unit were invited to participate in this study. Patients were randomized to receive either the Calaxo screw (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA) or Milagro screw (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) for tibial fixation. Patients were reviewed with subjective and objective evaluation by use of the International Knee Documentation Committee form, Lysholm score, KT-1000 arthrometry (MEDmetric, San Diego, CA), and clinical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 1 year and computed tomography scanning at 1 week and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Sixty patients agreed to participate in the study, with 32 patients randomized to the Calaxo screw and 28 to the Milagro screw for tibial fixation. There was no significant difference in subjective or objective clinical outcome between the 2 groups. At 24 months, 88% of Calaxo screws showed complete screw resorption compared with 0% of Milagro screws (P Milagro group (P = .001). At 24 months, the mean volume of new bone formation for the Calaxo group was 21% of original screw volume. Ossification of the Milagro screw was unable to be accurately assessed as a result of incomplete screw resorption. Both screws showed similar favorable objective and subjective outcomes at 2 years. The Calaxo screw resorbed completely over a period of 6 months and was associated with a high incidence of intra-tunnel cyst formation. The Milagro screw increased in volume over a period of 6 months, followed by a gradual resorption, which was still ongoing at 2 years. Both screws were associated with tunnel widening, and neither showed evidence of significant tunnel ossification. We conclude that, despite satisfactory clinical outcomes, the

  18. Combined anterior C2-C3 fusion and C2 pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of unstable hangman's fracture: a contrast to anterior approach only.

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    Xie, Ning; Khoo, Larry T; Yuan, Wen; Ye, Xiao-Jian; Chen, De-Yu; Xiao, Jian-Ru; Ni, Bin

    2010-03-15

    A retrospective clinical study was used to evaluate the effect of a new surgical treatment of the hangman's fractures. To determine the treatment efficacy of combined anterior C2-C3 reduction and fusion and posterior compressive C2 pedicle screw fixation for the management of unstable hangman's fractures. The classification of hangman's fractures as proposed by Levine-Edwards was used to classify and guide the treatment of these injuries. Most of these fractures respond to a variety of conservative therapies, but recently, earlier surgery has been increasingly advocated by authors from several countries for the rapid stabilization of these fractures. If surgery is indicated, an anterior approach using a C2-C3 reduction and fusion is preferred usually. Another well-accepted surgical method is the direct transpedicular osteosynthesis by the dorsal approach. However, there was rare report of the combined use of these 2 techniques. A group of 45 surgical patients were all diagnosed with radiograph, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 3D CT scans. Initial and final radiographs were measured for anterior translation and angulation of the C2-C3 complex. Initial external skull traction with extension was used in all patients after admission to reduce the fracture. Then an anterior C2-C3 discectomy followed by an interbody fusion and locking plate fixation was performed. Intraoperative reduction was confirmed by fluoroscopic control. About 29 patients therefore received anterior surgeries only since satisfactory reduction was achieved during the procedure. For the 16 patients who had persistent large residual gaps after the anterior procedure, additional same stage posterior C2 compressive pedicle screws were placed. Clinical and radiologic comparisons were performed in these 2 groups. The follow-up ranged from 24 to 54 months, with an average 33.6 months. There was radiographic evidence of continuity of the fracture and the bone graft seen at 4.7 months on average. Neck

  19. Safe zone for placement of talar screws when fusing the ankle with an anterior plating system.

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    Haskell, Andrew; Dedini, Russell; Dini, Monara

    2015-06-01

    Ankle fusions fixed with anterior plates use fluoroscopic guidance to direct screws toward the subtalar joint. Special imaging views that visualize the subtalar joint are difficult to use and can be unreliable. This study evaluated whether a single lateral ankle view would provide adequate information to judge whether a screw penetrated the subtalar joint and identified strategies that would improve this technique. In 5 cadaveric ankles fixed with anterior plates, talar screws were placed up to the subtalar joint without penetration using lateral fluoroscopy to guide screw length. After dissection, the true distance from the screw tip to subchondral surface was measured. In addition, 4 readers measured the perceived distance from screw tip to subchondral surface using direct lateral, 10 degrees cephalad tilt lateral, and 10 degrees caudal tilt lateral fluoroscopic images on 2 separate occasions. Nineteen (63%) of 30 screws penetrated the subchondral bone, and screw length determined using fluoroscopy was significantly longer than screw length measured directly (29.4 ± 5.5 mm vs 27.3 ± 8.5 mm, P = .014). Measurement of screw tip to bone distance demonstrated a high level of within-reader (kappa = .871, P plates may minimize screw penetration into the subtalar joint and diminish development of subtalar arthropathy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Fixation strength of anteriorly inserted headless screws for talar neck fractures.

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    Capelle, Jonathan H; Couch, Cory G; Wells, Kevin M; Morris, Randal P; Buford, William L; Merriman, David J; Panchbhavi, Vinod K

    2013-07-01

    For noncomminuted talar neck fractures, traditional fixation is with small fragment screws or cannulated screws. Newer screw systems on the market allow placement of cannulated headless screws, which provide compression by virtue of a variable-pitch thread. The headless construct has an inherent advantage, particularly for the talus, when the screws must be countersunk to prevent wear of the joint articular surfaces. This study tested the biomechanical fixation strength of cannulated headless variable-pitch screws compared with conventional cannulated screws, both placed in an anterior to posterior direction. A reproducible talar neck fracture was created in nine paired, preserved, cadaver talar necks using a materials testing machine. Talar head fixation was then performed with two cannulated headless variable-pitch 4/5 screws or two 4.0-mm conventional cannulated screws. The specimens were tested to failure and the fixations were normalized to their intact pairs and compared. The headless variable-pitch screw fixation had significantly lower failure displacement than the conventional screw fixation. No significant differences were found between the two fixations for failure stiffness, load at failure or energy absorbed. Cannulated headless variable-pitch screws significantly improved failure displacement when compared to conventional cannulated screws in a cadaveric model, and may be a viable option for talus fracture fixation. Headless, fully threaded, variable-pitch screws have inherent advantages over conventional screws in that they may be less damaging to the articular surface and can compress the fracture for improved reduction. This study demonstrates these screws are also biomechanically similar to conventional screws.

  1. Gun barrel view of the anterior pelvic ring for percutaneous anterior column or superior pubic ramus screw placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercetti, Nicholas; Horne, Brandon; DiPaolo, Zac; Prayson, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Traditionally, operative fixation of pelvic and acetabular injuries involves complex approaches and significant complications. Accelerated rehabilitation, decreased soft tissue stripping and decreased wound complications are several benefits driving a recent interest in percutaneous fixation. We describe a new fluoroscopic view to guide the placement of screws within the anterior pelvic ring. Twenty retrograde anterior pelvic ring screws were percutaneously placed in ten cadaveric specimens. Arranging a standard C-arm in a position similar to obtaining a lateral hip image, with angles of 54° ± 2° beam to body, 75° ± 5° of reverse cantilever and 14° ± 6° of outlet, a gun barrel view of the anterior pelvic ring is identified. Fluoroscopic images were taken, and the hemipelvi were harvested to examine the dimensions of the anterior pelvic ring and inspected for any cortical or articular perforation. The minimum cranial-to-caudal distance in the anterior pelvic ring was 9 mm (range 6.5-12 mm), and the minimum anterior-to-posterior dimension was 9 mm (range 5-15 mm). All but 2 screws were completely confined within the osseous corridors. Identifiable on final fluoroscopic evaluation, one screw perforated the psoas groove and a second perforated the acetabular dome. Overall, 90 % of our screws were accurately and safely placed, upon the first attempt, within the anterior pelvic ring using the described gun barrel view. Employing either open reduction, or following a closed or percutaneous reduction, the anterior pelvic ring gun barrel view can reproducibly guide safe placement of anterior pelvic ring screw fixation. IV.

  2. Optimal Entry Point and Trajectory for Anterior C1 Lateral Mass Screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Dong, Wei-Xin; Spiker, William Ryan; Yuan, Zhen-Shan; Sun, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Jiao; Xie, Hui; Albert, Todd J

    2017-06-01

    A radiographic analysis of the anatomy of the C1 lateral mass using computed tomography (CT) scans and Mimics software. To define the anatomy of the C1 lateral mass and make recommendations for optimal entry point and trajectory for anterior C1 lateral mass screws. Although various posterior insertion angles and entry points for screw insertion have been proposed for posterior C1 lateral mass screws, no large series have been performed to assess the ideal entry point and optimal trajectory for anterior C1 lateral mass screw placement. The C1 lateral mass was evaluated using CT scans and a 3-dimensional imaging application (Mimics software). Measuring the space available for the anterior C1 lateral mass screw (SAS) at different camber angles from 0 to 30 degrees (5-degree intervals) was performed to identify the ideal camber angle of insertion. Measuring the range of sagittal angles was performed to calculate the ideal sagittal angle. Other measurements involving the height of the C1 lateral mass were also made. The optimal screw entry point was found to be located on the anterior surface of the atlas 12.88 mm (±1.10 mm) lateral to the center of the anterior tubercle. This optimal entry point was found to be 6.81 mm (±0.59 mm) superior to the anterior edge of the atlas inferior articulating process. The mean ideal camber angle was 20.92 degrees laterally and the mean ideal sagittal angle was 5.80 degrees downward. These measurements define the optimal entry point and trajectory for anterior C1 lateral mass screws and facilitate anterior C1 lateral mass screw placement. A thorough understanding of the local anatomy may decrease the risk of injury to the spinal cord, vertebral artery, and internal carotid artery. Delineating the anatomy in each case with preoperative 3D CT evaluation is recommended.

  3. Primary stability and stiffness in ankle arthrodes-crossed screws versus anterior plating

    OpenAIRE

    Betz, Michael M; Benninger, Emanuel E; Favre, Philipp P; Wieser, Karl K; Vich, Magdalena M; Espinosa, Norman

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ankle arthrodesis is commonly used for the treatment of osteoarthritis or failed arthroplasty. Screw fixation is the predominant technique to perform ankle arthrodesis. Due to a considerable frequency of failures research suggests the use of an anatomically shaped anterior double plate system as a reliable method for isolated tibiotalar arthrodesis. The purpose of the present biomechanical study was to compare two groups of ankle fusion constructs - three screw fixation and an ant...

  4. Transpedicular curettage and drainage of infective lumbar spondylodiscitis: technique and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Ho; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Hak-Sun; Moon, Eun-Soo; Park, Jin-Oh; Chong, Hyun-Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan

    2012-09-01

    Infective spondylodiscitis usually occurs in patients of older age, immunocompromisation, co-morbidity, and individuals suffering from an overall poor general condition unable to undergo reconstructive anterior and posterior surgeries. Therefore, an alternative, less aggressive surgical method is needed for these select cases of infective spondylodiscitis. This retrospective clinical case series reports our novel surgical technique for the treatment of infective spondylodiscitis. Between January 2005 and July 2011, among 48 patients who were diagnosed with pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis or tuberculosis lumbar spondylodiscitis, 10 patients (7 males and 3 females; 68 years and 48 to 78 years, respectively) underwent transpedicular curettage and drainage. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 29 months (range, 7 to 61 months). The pedicle screws were inserted to the adjacent healthy vertebrae in the usual manner. After insertion of pedicle screws, the drainage pedicle holes were made through pedicles of infected vertebra(e) in order to prevent possible seeding of infective emboli to the healthy vertebra, as the same instruments and utensils are used for both pedicle screws and the drainage holes. A minimum of 15,000 mL of sterilized normal saline was used for continuous irrigation through the pedicular pathways until the drained fluid looked clear. All patients' symptoms and inflammatory markers significantly improved clinically between postoperative 2 weeks and postoperative 3 months, and they were satisfied with their clinical results. Radiologically, all patients reached the spontaneous fusion between infected vertebrae and 3 patients had the screw pulled-out but they were clinically tolerable. We suggest that our method of transpedicular curettage and drainage is a useful technique in regards to the treatment of infectious spondylodiscitic patients, who could not tolerate conventional combined anterior and posterior surgery due to multiple co

  5. Augmentation of anterior vertebral body screw fixation by an injectable, biodegradable calcium phosphate bone substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, B; Kummer, F J; Spivak, J

    2001-12-15

    A biomechanical study to evaluate the effects of a biodegradable calcium phosphate (Ca-P) bone substitute on the fixation strength and bending rigidity of vertebral body screws. To determine if an injectable, biodegradable Ca-P bone substitute provides significant augmentation of anterior vertebral screw fixation in the osteoporotic spine. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmented screws have been used clinically; however, there is concern about thermal damage to the neural elements during polymerization of the PMMA as well as its negative effects on bone remodeling. Injectable, biodegradable Ca-P bone substitutes have shown enhanced fixation of pedicle screws. Sixteen fresh cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebrae were randomly divided into two groups: control (no augmentation) (n = 8) and Ca-P bone substitute augmentation (n = 8) groups. Bone-screw fixation rigidity in bending was determined initially and after 10(5) cycles, followed by pullout testing of the screw to failure to determine pullout strength and stiffness. The bone-screw bending rigidity for the Ca-P bone substitute group was significantly greater than the control group, initially (58%) and after cyclic loading (125%). The pullout strength for Ca-P bone substitute group (1848 +/- 166 N) was significantly greater than the control group (665 +/- 92 N) (P pullout for the Ca-P bone substitute groups (399 +/- 69 N/mm) was significantly higher than the control group (210 +/- 51 N/mm) (P screw fixation with a biodegradable Ca-P bone substitute is a potential alternative to the use of PMMA cement.

  6. Improved Accuracy of Minimally Invasive Transpedicular Screw Placement in the Lumbar Spine With 3-Dimensional Stereotactic Image Guidance: A Comparative Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Austin C; Faulkner, Austin R; Bradley, Yong C; Pasciak, Alexander S; Barlow, Patrick B; Gash, Judson R; Reid, William S

    2015-11-01

    This study compares the accuracy rates of lumbar percutaneous pedicle screw placement (PPSP) using either 2-dimensional (2-D) fluoroscopic guidance or 3-dimensional (3-D) stereotactic navigation in the setting of minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). This represents the largest single-operator study of its kind and first comprehensive review of 3-D stereotactic navigation in the setting of MISS. To examine differences in accuracy of lumbar pedicle screw placement using 2-D fluoroscopic navigation and 3-D stereotaxis in the setting of MISS. Surgeons increasingly rely upon advanced image guidance systems to guide minimally invasive PPSP. Three-dimensional stereotactic navigation with intraoperative computed tomography offers well-documented benefit in open surgical approaches. However, the utility of 3-D stereotaxis in the setting of MISS remains incompletely explored by few studies with limited patient numbers. A total of 599 consecutive patients underwent minimally invasive lumbar PPSP aided by 3-D stereotactic navigation. Postoperative imaging and medical records were analyzed for patient demographics, incidence and degree of pedicle breach, and other surgical complications. A total of 2132 screw were reviewed and compared with a meta-analysis created from published data regarding the placement of 4248 fluoroscopically navigated pedicle screws in the setting of MISS. In the 3-D navigation group, a total of 7 pedicle breaches occurred in 6 patients, corresponding to a per-person breach rate of 1.15% (6/518) and a per-screw breach rate of 0.33% (7/2132). Meta-analysis comprised of data from 10 independent studies showed overall breach risk of 13.1% when 2-D fluoroscopic navigation was utilized in MISS. This translates to a 99% decrease in odds of breach in the 3-D navigation technique versus the traditional 2-D-guided technique, with an odds ratio of 0.01, (95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.03), Pdimensional stereotactic navigation based upon intraoperative

  7. One versus two titanium screw fixation of autologous onlay bone grafts in the anterior maxilla: a randomised histological pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Evita A. C.; Meshkini, Hamid; Lindeboom, Jerome A. H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the histological presentation of local mandibular bone grafts fixed with one screw or two screws in buccal anterior maxillary augmentation procedures. Local buccal defects of the anterior maxilla were reconstructed in 12 patients (mean age 47 ± 17 years, range 18

  8. Application of bioabsorbable screw fixation for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the application of bioabsorbable screws for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting fixation and to study their clinical effects in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. METHODS: From March 2007 to September 2012, 56 patients, 36 males and 20 females (38-79 years old, average 58.3±9.47 years, underwent a novel operation. Grafts were fixed by bioabsorbable screws (PLLA, 2.7 mm in diameter after anterior decompression. The bioabsorbable screws were inserted from the midline of the graft bone to the bone surface of the upper and lower vertebrae at 45 degree angles. Patients were evaluated post-operatively to observe the improvement of symptoms and evaluate the fusion of the bone. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA score was used to evaluate the recovery of neurological functions. RESULTS: All screws were successfully inserted, with no broken screws. The rate of symptom improvement was 87.5%. All of the grafts fused well with no extrusion. The average time for graft fusion was 3.8±0.55 months (range 3-5 months. Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT scans demonstrated that the grafts fused with adjacent vertebrae well and that the screws were absorbed as predicted. The MRI findings showed that the cerebrospinal fluid was unobstructed. No obvious complications appeared in any of the follow-up evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical spondylosis with one- or two-level involvement can be effectively treated by anterior decompression and bone grafting with bioabsorbable screw fixation. This operative method is safe and can avoid the complications induced by metal implants.

  9. Posterior to Anteriorly Directed Screws for Management of Talar Neck Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Michael J; Mitchell, Phillip M; Collinge, Cory A

    2016-10-01

    Screws placed from posterior to anterior have been shown to be biomechanically and anatomically superior in the fixation of talar neck and neck-body fractures, yet most surgeons continue to place screws from an anterior start point. The safety and efficacy of percutaneously applied posterior screws has not been clinically defined, and functional outcomes after their use is lacking. After institutional review board approval, we performed a retrospective review of 24 consecutive talar neck fractures treated by a single surgeon that utilized posterior-to-anterior screw fixation. Clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes were assessed at a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Functional outcomes including the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score, Olerud-Molander Scores, and the Short Form 36 (SF-36) measurement were collected and reviewed. Average patient follow-up was 44 months. According to the classification system of Canale and Kelly, there were 4 type I fractures, 15 type II fractures, 4 type III fractures, and 1 type IV fracture. Four patients had open fractures. One superficial wound infection occurred, 1 patient reported FHL stiffness, and 6 complained of numbness or paresthesias in the distribution of the sural nerve (5 transient, 1 permanent). One reoperation was required to exchange a screw impinging on the talonavicular joint. Radiographically, 44% developed a positive Hawkins sign, and the specificity of this finding was 100% for talar dome viability. Avascular necrosis developed in 43% of patients, with 33% revascularizing and none going on to collapse. Subtalar arthrosis developed in 62% of patients. Screws placed from posterior to anterior are a useful technique in the treatment of talar neck fractures. Functional outcomes following their use appear favorable compared with recent reports with minimal risk to local structures. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Ankle Arthrodesis: A Retrospective Analysis Comparing Single Column, Locked Anterior Plating to Crossed Lag Screw Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prissel, Mark A; Simpson, G Alex; Sutphen, Sean A; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    Ankle arthrodesis is performed to eliminate pain due to end-stage osteoarthritis, regardless of etiology. This procedure remains the reference standard treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis, despite recent advancements in total ankle replacement. The objective of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the radiographic and clinical fusion rates and time to bony fusion for patients who underwent ankle arthrodesis using an anterior approach with a single column locked plate construct versus crossed lag screws. We identified 358 patients who had undergone ankle arthrodesis from January 2003 to June 2013. Of the 358 patients, 83 (23.2%) met the inclusion criteria for the present study. Of the 83 included patients, 47 received locked anterior (or anterolateral) plate fixation, and 36 received crossed lag screw constructs. The overall nonunion rate was 6.0% (n = 5), with 1 nonunion in the anterior plate group (2.1%) and 4 nonunions in the crossed lag screw group (11.1%; p = .217). No differences were identified between the 2 groups for normal talocrural angle [χ 2 (1) = 0.527; p = .468], normal tibial axis/talar ratio [χ 2 (1) = 0.004; p = .952], and lateral dorsiflexion angle (p = .565). Based on our findings in similar demographic groups, ankle arthrodesis using locked anterior plate fixation is a safe technique with similar complication rates and radiographic outcomes to those of crossed lag screws. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  12. Primary stability and stiffness in ankle arthrodes-crossed screws versus anterior plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Michael M; Benninger, Emanuel E; Favre, Philipp P; Wieser, Karl K; Vich, Magdalena M; Espinosa, Norman

    2013-09-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is commonly used for the treatment of osteoarthritis or failed arthroplasty. Screw fixation is the predominant technique to perform ankle arthrodesis. Due to a considerable frequency of failures research suggests the use of an anatomically shaped anterior double plate system as a reliable method for isolated tibiotalar arthrodesis. The purpose of the present biomechanical study was to compare two groups of ankle fusion constructs - three screw fixation and an anterior double plate system - in terms of primary stability and stiffness. Six matched-pairs human cadaveric lower legs (Thiel fixated) were used in this study. One specimen from each pair was randomly assigned to be stabilized with the anterior double plate system and the other with the three-screw technique. The different arthrodesis methods were tested by dorsiflexing the foot until failure of the system, defined as rotation of the talus relative to the tibia in the sagittal plane. Experiments were performed on a universal materials testing machine. The force required to make arthrodesis fail was documented. For calculation of the stiffness, a linear regression was fitted to the force-displacement curve in the linear portion of the curve and its slope taken as the stiffness. For the anatomically shaped double-plate system a mean load of 967N was needed (range from 570N to 1400N) to make arthrodesis fail. The three-screw fixation method resisted a mean load of 190N (range from 100N to 280N) (p=0.005). In terms of stiffness a mean of 56N/mm (range from 35N/mm to 79N/mm) was achieved for the anatomically shaped double-plate system whereas a mean of 10N/mm (range from 6N/mm to 18N/mm) was achieved for the three-screw fixation method (p=0.004). Our biomechanical data demonstrates that the anterior double-plate system is significantly superior to the three-screw fixation technique for ankle arthrodesis in terms of primary stability and stiffness. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle

  13. Percutaneous transpedicular management of discitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, S; Crow, W N; Hadjipaviou, A G; Nauta, H J; Borowski, A M; Vierra, L A; Walser, E

    1996-01-01

    To present the technique of percutaneous transpedicular biopsy and debridement of discs in diagnosis and management of discitis. Fifteen patients underwent disc biopsy through a transpedicular approach with local anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. An attempt was made to debride the disc as much as possible. A surgical vacuum drain was deployed through the transpedicular tract when there was persistent drainage. Fifteen patients underwent percutaneous transpedicular disc biopsy and debridement of disc for suspected discitis. Three patients underwent biopsy only and 12 underwent percutaneous discectomy. Six patients had at least one positive culture. Eight patients who underwent discectomy had immediate improvement of pain or neurologic symptoms, obviating emergency surgical debridement of the disc. Four patients did not improve and underwent surgical debridement and fusion. Transpedicular biopsy of the disc is an effective technique for adequate tissue retrieval and diagnosis of discitis. Adequate debridement in selected patients with antibiotic therapy may be definitive. Epidural extension of discitis and massive vertebral destruction precludes percutaneous treatment.

  14. Transpedicular fixation for fractures treatment of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta Maria, Victor Elias; Nino Caicedo, Jose Maria

    2003-01-01

    Roy Camille first reported this technique in the 60's, but it became popular in the late 90's. This technique itself has a great biomechanical stability since it involve the anterior, medium and posterior columns of Denis, which is valuable in traumatic, deforming and degenerative pathologies. Fifty patients were reviewed in a time span from 1992 to 2002; average age 32 years, average follow up 53 months. The analyzed variables were diagnostic, mechanism of trauma, neurological deficit, additional injuries, decompressive procedures, anatomic level, number of screws used and complications. There were 30 (60%) cases of burst fractures, 17 (34%) luxofractures, two wedge fractures and one flexion-distraction fracture. the causes of the injuries found were 25 (50%) cases of vehicular motor accidents and 21 (42%) falls. the most compromised level was l1: 23 (46%) cases. eight patients required posterior decompression and five (10%) anterior decompression and five (10%) anterior decompression. 200 transpedicular screws were placed without intraoperative complications. the complications presented were: deep infection 4% material breakdown 2% bone failure 2%. there were not pseudoarthrosis

  15. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Integrated Screw Cages: Intrinsic Load Generation, Subsidence, and Torsional Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Yusuf; Pelletier, Matthew H; Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-05-01

    To perform a repeatable idealized in vitro model to evaluate the effects of key design features and integrated screw fixation on unloaded surface engagement, subsidence, and torsional stability. We evaluated four different stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages with two, three, and four screw designs. Polyurethane (saw-bone) foam blocks were used to simulate the vertebral bone. Fuji Film was used to measure the contact footprint, average pressure, and load generated by fixating the cages with screws. Subsidence was tested by axially loading the constructs at 10 N/s to 400 N and torsional load was applied +/-1 Nm for 10 cycles to assess stability. Outcome measures included total subsidence and maximal torsional angle range. Cages 1, 2, and 4 were symmetrical and produced similar results in terms of contact footprint, average pressure, and load. The addition of integrated screws into the cage-bone block construct demonstrated a clear trend towards decreased subsidence. Cage 2 with surface titanium angled ridges and a keel produced the greatest subsidence with and without screws, significantly more than all other cages ( P < 0.05). Angular rotation was not significantly affected by the addition of screws ( P < 0.066). A statistically significant correlation existed between subsidence and reduced angular rotation across all cage constructs ( P = 0.018). Each stand-alone cage featured unique surface characteristics, which resulted in differing cage-foam interface engagement, influencing the subsidence and torsional angle. Increased subsidence significantly reduced the torsional angle across all cage constructs. © 2017 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Unilateral lag-screw technique for an isolated anterior 1/4 atlas fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih Keskil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Fractures of the atlas are classified based on the fracture location and associated ligamentous injury. Among patients with atlas fractures treated using external immobilization, nonunion of the fracture could be seen. Objective: Ideally, treatment strategy for an unstable atlas fracture would involve limited fixation to maintain the fracture fragments in a reduced position without restricting the range of motion (ROM of the atlantoaxial and atlantooccipital joints. Summary of Background Data: Such a result can be established using either transoral limited internal fixation or limited posterior lateral mass fixation. However, due to high infection risk and technical difficulty, posterior approaches are preferred but none of these techniques can fully address anterior 1/4 atlas fractures such as in this case. Materials and Methods: A novel open and direct technique in which a unilateral lag screw was placed to reduce and stabilize a progressively widening isolated right-sided anterior 1/4 single fracture of C 1 that was initially treated with a rigid cervical collar is described. Results: Radiological studies made after the surgery showed no implant failure, good cervical alignment, and good reduction with fusion of C 1 . Conclusions: It is suggested that isolated C 1 fractures can be surgically reduced and immobilized using a lateral compression screw to allow union and maintain both C 1-0 and C 1-2 motions, and in our knowledge this is the first description of the use of a lag screw to achieve reduction of distracted anterior 1/4 fracture fragments of the C1 from a posterior approach. This technique has the potential to become a valuable adjunct to the surgeon′s armamentarium, in our opinion, only for fractures with distracted or comminuted fragments whose alignment would not be expected to significantly change with classical lateral mass screw reduction.

  17. Unilateral lag-screw technique for an isolated anterior 1/4 atlas fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskil, Semih; Göksel, Murat; Yüksel, Ulaş

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Fractures of the atlas are classified based on the fracture location and associated ligamentous injury. Among patients with atlas fractures treated using external immobilization, nonunion of the fracture could be seen. Objective: Ideally, treatment strategy for an unstable atlas fracture would involve limited fixation to maintain the fracture fragments in a reduced position without restricting the range of motion (ROM) of the atlantoaxial and atlantooccipital joints. Summary of Background Data: Such a result can be established using either transoral limited internal fixation or limited posterior lateral mass fixation. However, due to high infection risk and technical difficulty, posterior approaches are preferred but none of these techniques can fully address anterior 1/4 atlas fractures such as in this case. Materials and Methods: A novel open and direct technique in which a unilateral lag screw was placed to reduce and stabilize a progressively widening isolated right-sided anterior 1/4 single fracture of C1 that was initially treated with a rigid cervical collar is described. Results: Radiological studies made after the surgery showed no implant failure, good cervical alignment, and good reduction with fusion of C1. Conclusions: It is suggested that isolated C1 fractures can be surgically reduced and immobilized using a lateral compression screw to allow union and maintain both C1-0 and C1-2 motions, and in our knowledge this is the first description of the use of a lag screw to achieve reduction of distracted anterior 1/4 fracture fragments of the C1 from a posterior approach. This technique has the potential to become a valuable adjunct to the surgeon's armamentarium, in our opinion, only for fractures with distracted or comminuted fragments whose alignment would not be expected to significantly change with classical lateral mass screw reduction. PMID:27041886

  18. Anterior transarticular C1-C2 fixation with contralateral screw insertion: a report of two cases and technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lvov, Ivan; Grin, Andrey; Kaykov, Aleksandr; Smirnov, Vladimir; Krylov, Vladimir

    2017-08-08

    Anterior transarticular fixation of the C1-C2 vertebrae is a well-known technique that involves screw insertion through the body of the C2 vertebra into the lateral masses of the atlas through an anterior transcervical approach. Meanwhile, contralateral screw insertion has been previously described only in anatomical studies. We describe two case reports of the clinical application of this new technique. In Case 1, the patient was diagnosed with an unstable C1 fracture. The clinical features of the case did not allow for any type of posterior atlantoaxial fusion, Halo immobilization, or routine anterior fixation using the Reindl and Koller techniques. The possible manner of screw insertion into the anterior third of the right lateral mass was via a contralateral trajectory, which was performed in this case. Case 2 involved a patient with neglected posteriorly dislocated dens fracture who could not lie in the prone position due to concomitant cardiac pathology. Reduction of atlantoaxial dislocation was insufficient, even after scar tissue resection at the fracture, while transdental fusion was not possible. Considering the success of the previous case, atlantoaxial fixation was performed through the small approach, using the Reindl technique and contralateral screw insertion. These two cases demonstrate the potential of anterior transarticular fixation of C1-C2 vertebrae in cases where posterior atlantoaxial fusion is not achievable. This type of fixation can be performed through a single approach if one screw is inserted using the Reindl technique and another is inserted via a contralateral trajectory.

  19. Internal Fixation of Transverse Patella Fractures Using Cannulated Cancellous Screws with Anterior Tension Band Wiring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan I

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of anterior tension band wiring technique using two cannulated cancellous screws in patients with transverse (AO34-C1 or transverse with mildly comminuted (AO34-C2 patellar fractures. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study of 25 patients with transverse fracture or transverse fracture with mildly comminuted patella fractures. All the patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using two parallel cannulated screws and 18G stainless steel wire as per the tension band principle. Results: There were eighteen males (72% and seven females (28%. The age group ranged from 24 to 58 years, with mean age of 38 years. The most common mode of injury was fall (72% followed by road traffic accident (20% and violent quadriceps contraction (8%. Transverse fracture was present in 60% and transverse fracture with mild comminution in 40% of patients. Mean time to achieve union was 10.7 weeks (range 8-12 weeks. Mean ROM at three months was 113.8 degree (90-130 and at final follow up this improved to 125.4 degrees (range 100-140. There was one case of knee stiffness and no case of implant failure was observed. Patients were evaluated using Bostman scoring, the mean score at three months being 26.04 which improved to 27.36 at the end of final follow up at one year. Conclusion: Cannulated cancellous screws with anterior tension band wiring is a safe, reliable and reproducible method in management of transverse patellar fractures, with less chances of implant failure and soft tissue irritation.

  20. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction.

  1. Influence of screw length and diameter on tibial strain energy density distribution after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Kuang, Guan-Ming; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Postoperative tunnel enlargement has been frequently reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Interference screw, as a surgical implant in ACL reconstruction, may influence natural loading transmission and contribute to tunnel enlargement. The aims of this study are (1) to quantify the alteration of strain energy den sity (SED) distribution after the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction; and (2) to characterize the influence of screw length and diameter on the degree of the SED alteration. A validated finite element model of human knee joint was used. The screw length ranging from 20 to 30mm with screw diameter ranging from 7 to 9 mm were investigated. In the post-operative knee, the SED increased steeply at the extra-articular tunnel aperture under compressive and complex loadings, whereas the SED decreased beneath the screw shaft and nearby the intra-articular tunnel aperture. Increasing the screw length could lower the SED deprivation in the proximal part of the bone tunnel; whereas increasing either screw length or diameter could aggravate the SED deprivation in the distal part of the bone tunnel. Decreasing the elastic modulus of the screw could lower the bone SED deprivation around the screw. In consideration of both graft stability and SED alteration, a biodegradable interference screw with a long length is recommended, which could provide a beneficial mechanical environment at the distal part of the tunnel, and meanwhile decrease the bone-graft motion and synovial fluid propagation at the proximal part of the tunnel. These findings together with the clinical and histological factors could help to improve surgical outcome, and serve as a preliminary knowledge for the following study of biodegradable interference screw. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

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    Chen Hsiang-Ho

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1 large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2 polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3 polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment

  3. Advantages of Direct Insertion of a Straight Probe Without a Guide Tube During Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation of Odontoid Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kang, Dong-Ho; Lee, Moon Kyu; Yoo, Byoungwoo; Jung, Sang Ku; Hwang, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Jeoung Hee; Oh, Sunkyu; Lee, Eun Jung; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Roh, Sung Woo; Rhim, Seung Chul

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to compare the anterior odontoid screw fixation (AOSF) with a guide tube or with a straight probe. AOSF associates with several complications, including malpositioning, fixation loss, and screw breakage. Screw pull-out from the C2 body is the most common complication. All consecutive patients with type II or rostral shallow type III odontoid fractures who underwent AOSFs during the study period were enrolled retrospectively. The guide-tube AOSF method followed the standard published method except C3 body and C2-3 disc annulus rimming was omitted to prevent disc injury; instead, the guide tube was anchored at the anterior inferior C2 vertebra corner. After 2 screw pull-outs, the guide-tube cohort was analyzed to identify the cause of instrument failure. Thereafter, the straight-probe method was developed. A guide tube was not used. A small pilot hole was made on the most anterior side of the inferior endplate, followed by insertion of a 2.5 mm straight probe through the C2 body. Non-union and instrument failure rates and screw-direction angles of the guide-tube and straight-probe groups were recorded. The guide-tube group (n = 13) had 2 screw pull-outs and 1 non-union. The straight-probe group (n = 8) had no complications and significantly larger screw-direction angles than the guide-tube group (60.5 ± 4.63 vs. 54.8 ± 3.82 degrees; P = 0.047). Straight-probe AOSF yielded larger direction angles without injuring bone and disc. Complications were absent. The procedure was easier than guide-tube AOSF and assured sufficient engagement, even in horizontal fracture orientation cases. 3.

  4. Biomechanical comparison of mono-segment transpedicular fixation with short-segment fixation for treatment of thoracolumbar fractures: a finite element analysis.

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    Xu, Guijun; Fu, Xin; Du, Changling; Ma, Jianxiong; Li, Zhijun; Tian, Peng; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Xinlong

    2014-10-01

    Mono-segment transpedicular fixation is a method for the treatment of certain types of thoracolumbar spinal fracture. Finite element models were constructed to evaluate the biomechanics of mono-segment transpedicular fixation of thoracolumbar fracture. Spinal motion (T10-L2) was scanned and used to establish the models. The superior half of the cortical bone of T12 was removed and the superior half of the cancellous bone of the T12 body was assigned the material properties of injured bone to mimic vertebral fracture. Transpedicular fixation of T11 and T12 was performed to produce a mono-segment fixation model; T11 and L1 were fixed to produce a short-segment fixation model. Motion differences between functional units and von Mises stress on the spine and implants were measured under axial compression, anterior bending, extensional bending, lateral bending and axial rotation. We found no significant difference between mono- and short-segment fixations in the motion of any functional unit. Stress on the T10/T11 nucleus pulposus and T10/T11 and L1/L2 annulus fibrosus increased significantly by about 75% on anterior bending, extensional bending and lateral bending. In the fracture model, stress was increased by 24% at the inferior endplate of T10 and by 43% at the superior endplate of L2. All increased stresses were reduced after fixation and lower stress was observed with mono-segment fixation. In summary, the biomechanics of mono-segment pedicle screw instrumentation was similar to that of conventional short-segment fixation. As a minimally invasive treatment, mono-segment fixation would be appropriate for the treatment of selected thoracolumbar spinal fractures. © IMechE 2014.

  5. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum

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    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture. A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups. There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture. The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  6. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture.A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups.There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture.The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy.

  7. [Cement-augmented anterior odontoid screw fixation of a Anderson-D'Alonzo type II fracture with massive osteoporosis. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, M; Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, R; Kandziora, F

    2011-06-01

    Anterior screw fixation is a standard treatment procedure in the case of an uncomplicated Anderson-D'Alonzo type II odontoid fracture in younger patients. Insufficient bony screw hold can cause severe procedure-related complications and result in screw breakouts with secondary fracture dislocation. Hence, the procedure is limited to patients with an adequate bone mineral density. This case report summarises a technical modification of anterior screw fixation in elderly patients suffering from severe osteoporosis to avoid a posterior spondylodesis of C1/2. Two patients with odontoid fractures of Anderson-D'Alonzo type II were operated using anterior screw fixation and additional vertebroplasty of C2 to increase the screw hold. During follow-up a regular bony healing without screw complication was observed. In conclusion, cement-augmented anterior screw fixation of odontoid fractures type II according to Anderson-D'Alonzo and persistent severe osteoporosis can be an alternative to posterior C1/2 spondylodesis in individual cases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for multiple-level isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-Sheng; Lee, Hyung Chang; Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Park, Sang-Joon; Hwang, Byeong-Wook; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2017-07-01

    Multiple-level lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis is rarely reported. Here, we report 23 consecutive patients who underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPF) for multiple-level isthmic spondylolisthesis. From June 2008 through December 2014, multiple-level lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis was diagnosed in 23 patients (6 men, 17 women) at Wooridul Spine Hospital (Busan, South Korea). Isthmic spondylolisthesis occurred at three spinal levels in 2 patients and at two levels in 21 patients. All patients underwent ALIF with PPF. We used the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale scores to evaluate the preoperative and postoperative functional outcome, low back pain, and radicular pain. We also evaluated segmental lordosis and the fusion status using radiographs and data from computed tomography. Isthmic spondylolisthesis occurred from L3 to S1 and mostly occurred at two consecutive spinal levels (i.e., L4-L5 and L5-S1). Significant improvements in the ODI and visual analog scale were observed in patients at final follow up (pspondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Neurovascular risk of bicortical tibial drilling for screw and spiked washer fixation of soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, William R.; King, Stephen S.

    2001-03-01

    PURPOSE: As the use of soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts, including hamstring grafts, has become more prominent and the benefits of aggressive rehabilitation have become clear, maximizing fixation with screw and spiked washers is important. Bicortical fixation may be superior. We were concerned about potential neurovascular risks and designed this study to define the posterior neurovasculature structures at risk when drilling for bicortical tibial screw fixation during ACL reconstruction. Type of Study: Consecutive sample. METHODS: We placed the tibial tunnel arthroscopically in 10 cadaveric knees using a standard tibial drill guide. Accurate tibial tunnel position was documented in each knee by lateral radiograph. A 4.5-mm bicortical drill hole was placed perpendicular to the tibial surface 1 cm distal to the tibial tunnel. The distances from the posterior tibial drill exit point to nearby neurovascular structures were measured with a caliper. RESULTS: The closest structure to the exit point was the bifurcation of the popliteal artery/vein (11.4 +/- 0.6 mm; range, 8.4 to 14.0 mm). The next closest was the anterior tibial vein (11.7 +/- 1.6 mm; range, 3.5 to 22.8 mm). The closest any individual hole came to a neurovascular structure was 3.5 mm from the anterior tibial vein. CONCLUSIONS: Bicortical drilling for fixation of soft tissue grafts appears reasonably safe. The structures at greatest risk for injury are the bifurcation of the popliteal artery/vein and the anterior tibial vein.

  10. A novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation

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    Ai-Min Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate a novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its potential use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation. Methods. We have used the reverse engineering software (image-processing software and computer-aided design software to create the approximate and optimal digital interarticular channel of atlas for 60 participants. Angles of channels, diameters of inscribed circles, long and short axes of ellipses were measured and recorded, and gender-specific analysis was also performed. Results. The channels provided sufficient space for one or two screws, and the parameters of channels are described. While the channels of females were smaller than that of males, no significant difference of angles between males and females were observed. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates the radiological features of approximate digital interarticular channels, optimal digital interarticular channels of atlas, and provides the reference trajectory of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. Additionally, we provide a protocol that can help make a pre-operative plan for accurate placement of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws.

  11. A novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Wenhai; Xu, Hui; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Xin-Dong; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi; Chi, Yong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate a novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its potential use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation. Methods. We have used the reverse engineering software (image-processing software and computer-aided design software) to create the approximate and optimal digital interarticular channel of atlas for 60 participants. Angles of channels, diameters of inscribed circles, long and short axes of ellipses were measured and recorded, and gender-specific analysis was also performed. Results. The channels provided sufficient space for one or two screws, and the parameters of channels are described. While the channels of females were smaller than that of males, no significant difference of angles between males and females were observed. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates the radiological features of approximate digital interarticular channels, optimal digital interarticular channels of atlas, and provides the reference trajectory of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. Additionally, we provide a protocol that can help make a pre-operative plan for accurate placement of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws.

  12. Broken Bioabsorbable Tibial Interference Screw after Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL Reconstruction using a Semitendinosus-gracilis Graft: A Case Report

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    Huang ME Deborah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available When a patient presents with knee pain and locking after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction, a new meniscal injury or an osteochondral loose body are usually considered for differential diagnosis. We present the case of a 22-year-old female with just these complaints 6 months after ACL reconstruction surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee showed a broken screw tip which was later arthroscopically removed. At arthroscopy, an 11mm long broken bioabsorbable interference screw tip was found lying in the intercondylar notch; this resulted in a 0.5cm Outerbridge grade II chondral ulcer located at mid- patella. Both menisci and cruciate ligaments were intact and no other loose bodies were found in the knee joint.

  13. Anterior transarticular atlantoaxial screw fixation in combination with dens screw fixation for type II odontoid fractures with associated atlanto-odontoid osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josten, Christoph; Jarvers, Jan-Sven; Glasmacher, Stefan; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Spiegl, Ulrich J

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the 1-year outcome after anterior transarticular atlantoaxial fixation and odontoid fusion (TAFOF) for type II odontoid fractures and atlanto-odontoid osteoarthritis (AO) in elderly patients. All geriatric patients, age 70 or older, with acute traumatic type II odontoid fractures and moderate or severe AO treated by TAFOF were included. The study was performed at a single institution between June 2008 and August 2013. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically after 1 year. Main parameter of interest were in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates, complication rates (re-operations, prolonged hospital stay, blood transfusion; non-union), and the patients' pain (0: no pain; 10: maximal pain) and satisfaction level (0: lowest satisfaction; 10: highest satisfaction) after 1 year. A total of 83 patients were included with an average age of 84.7 years (range 70-101 years). 39 patients were subdivided as "old" with an age 70-84 years and 44 patients were defined as "very old" with an age of 85 or higher. The average operation time was 64.7 min. Three patients died during the inpatient stay (3.6 %). Twenty patients (24.1 %) were lost contact follow-up. The 1-year mortality was 25.4 % with a significantly higher mortality rate in very old patient group (p = 0.01). At the 1-year follow-up, the mean pain level was 3.3 and the mean patient satisfaction level was 6.5. Osseous consolidation of the dens was visible in 90.2 % of patients. Revision surgery was performed in three patients (3.6 %). Generally, a significantly higher complication rate was seen after single-screw fixation of the dens compared to a double-screw fixation in combination with TAF (p = 0.042). Anterior TAFOF leads to promising 1-year results with low in-hospital mortality and a high fusion rate in geriatric patients with type II odontoid fractures and relevant AO. Double-screw dens fixation seems to reduce the complication rate.

  14. Evaluation of soft tissues around single tooth implants in the anterior maxilla restored with cemented and screw-retained crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrim, Emerson Souza; Peruzzo, Daiane Cristina; Benatti, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Implant-supported restorations can be attached as screw-retained or cemented prostheses. In both situations, the characteristics of the soft tissues around the implants are crucial for oral rehabilitation and patient satisfaction. Therefore, this study uses the Pink Esthetic Score (PES), which allows evaluation of gingival esthetics around implants, to evaluate the soft tissues around implants in the anterior maxilla rehabilitated with cemented prostheses (CP) and screw-retained prostheses (SP). Forty implants placed in the anterior maxilla were evaluated, and these had been rehabilitated with prosthetic crowns for a minimum of 1 year. Periodontal examination was performed to evaluate probing depth (PD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) of the implant and the corresponding natural tooth. The total mean (±SD) PES for SP was 10.73 (±1.98) and 10.41 (±2.67) for CP, which was not statistically significant (P ≥ .05). Periodontal examination revealed that CP and SP showed no difference for BOP (P ≥ .05). Differences were only detected in PD when comparing the reference teeth of both groups to CP and SP (P ≤ .05). The present study demonstrates that the PES proved to be an efficient index to assess peri-implant tissues, and that the type of crown retention does not influence the health and quality of the soft tissues around implants.

  15. Surgical results of a one-stage combined anterior lumbosacral fusion and posterior percutaneous pedicle screw fixation

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    Chien-Yuan Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lumbosacral fusion through either an anterior or a posterior approach to achieve good lordosis and stability is always a challenging surgical operation and is often accompanied by a higher rate of pseudarthrosis than when other lumbar segments are involved. This study evaluated the clinical and radiological results of lumbosacral fusions achieved through a combined anterior and posterior approach. Materials and Methods: From June 2008 to 2012, 20 patients who had L5–S1 instability and stenosis were consecutively treated, first by anterior interbody fusion using an allogenous strut bone graft through the pararectus approach and then by posterior pedicle screw fixation. A minimum of 1-year of clinical and radiological follow-up was conducted. Intraoperative blood loss, surgical time, and any surgery-related complications were recorded. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS and the patient's Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score. After 1 year, radiological outcomes were assessed by analyzing pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and segmental lordosis using static plain films, while fusion stability was assessed using dynamic plain films. Results: The mean operative time and blood loss were 215 min and 325 cc, respectively. After 1 year, the VAS and ODI scores had significantly improved, and stable fusion with good lordotic curvature was obtained in all cases. Conclusion: The surgical results of the combined procedure are satisfactory in terms of the functional and radiological outcomes. Our method offers advantages regarding both anterior fusion and posterior fixation.

  16. Interference screw versus Endoscrew fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A biomechanical comparative study in sawbones and porcine knees

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    Chu-Chih Hung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interference screw fixation is one of the most common methods for ligament reconstruction. Although the advantages and clinical outcomes of this procedure have been widely reported, post-surgical complications often arise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new femoral fixation device, the Endoscrew, for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. We performed a mechanical test in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards and an in vitro biomechanical study. An axial pullout test was conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the new device and the interference screw when implanted in solid rigid polyurethane foam test blocks. The biomechanical test used porcine femora to evaluate the initial fixation strength between these two implants. The maximum pullout force of the interference screw group [722.05 ± 130.49 N (N] was significantly greater (p < 0.01 than the Endoscrew group (440.79 ± 26.54 N when implanted in polyurethane foam 320 kg/m3 density. With polyurethane foam 160 kg/m3 density, the maximum pullout forces were (242.61 ± 37.36 N (p < 0.001 and (99.33 ± 30.01 N for the interference screw group and Endoscrew group, respectively. In the in vitro mechanical study, the Endoscrew (646.39 ± 72.38 N required a significantly greater ultimate load prior to failure (p < 0.05 when compared with the interference screw (489.72 ± 138.64 N. With regard to pullout stiffness, there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.13 between the Endoscrew group (99.15 ± 12.16 N/mm and the interference screw group (87.96 ± 11.12 N/mm. The cyclic stiffness was also not significantly different (p < 0.44 between the Endoscrew group (93.09 ± 16.07 N/mm and the interference screw group (85.78 ± 14.76 N/mm. The axial pullout test showed that the strength of the Endoscrew was close to the fixation strength required for daily activities, but it is

  17. Transpedicular fixation for the espondilolistesis treatment, espondilolisis and channel lumbar narrow of the lumbosacral column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta Javier Ernesto; Diaz, Cesar Jacobo; Gamba S, Cesar Enrique

    2002-01-01

    A descriptive, prospective study was designs with the objective of analyzing the experience with the technique of transpedicular fixation, for the treatment of degenerative espondilolistesis, espondilolisis and channel lumbar narrow. Eighty patients (42 men and 38 women) they were intervened between February of 1992 and February of 2002; the age average was of 46,3 years and the minimum pursuit of 7 months. The cases were tabulated according to the diagnostic, clinical presentation, previous interventions, descompressive procedures associated to the fixation, anatomical level of lesion, number of fixed vertebras, number of placed screws, type of bony implants and complications. In 33 patients (41,3%) it diagnose degenerative espondilolistesis, espondilolisis in 24 (30%), channel lumbar narrow in 20 (25%), displasic espondilolistesis in 2,5% and espondiloptosis in 1%. the clinical presentations more frequent were radicular and lumbar pain, with 33,8 each one; one carries out arthrodesis 15-S1 in 38 patients (47,5%) and 14 15 in 15 patients (18,7%). as complications we find deep infection in 7,5% of the cases, neurological deficit in 5%, rupture of duramadre 3,8%, false route of screws, bony failure and material rupture in 2,5% each one and seroma in 1,3%. Doesn't present seudoarthrosis. The transpedicular fixation is a sure technique for the treatment of the degenerative espondilolistesis, espondilolisis and channel lumbar narrow. With the transpedicular fixation the average of fixed vertebras is smaller than with the Harrington and Luque techniques, preserving in more degree the mobility to articulate. The association of the transpedicular fixation with arthrodesis and coalition by means of placement of autogenous implants diminishes the seudoarthrosis incidence

  18. Compressive Force With 2-Screw and 3-Screw Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis With Headless Compression Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Glisson, Richard R; Reidl, Markus; Easley, Mark E

    2016-12-01

    Joint compression is an essential element of successful arthrodesis. Although subtalar joint compression generated by conventional screws has been quantified in the laboratory, compression obtainable with headless screws that rely on variable thread pitch to achieve bony contact has not been assessed. This study measured subtalar joint compression achieved by 2 posteriorly placed contemporary headless, variable-pitch screws, and quantified additional compression gained by placing a third screw anteriorly. Ten, unpaired fresh-frozen cadaveric subtalar joints were fixed sequentially using 2 diverging posterior screws (one directed into the talar dome, the other into the talar neck), 2 parallel posterior screws (both ending in the talar dome), and 2 parallel screws with an additional anterior screw inserted from the plantar calcaneus into the talar neck. Joint compression was quantified directly during screw insertion using a novel custom-built measuring device. The mean compression generated by 2 diverging posterior screws was 246 N. Two parallel posterior screws produced 294 N of compression, and augmentation of that construct with a third, anterior screw increased compression to 345 N (P screw fixation was slightly less than that reported previously for subtalar joint fixation with 2 conventional lag screws, but was comparable when a third screw was added. Under controlled testing conditions, 2 tapered, variable-pitch screws generated somewhat less compression than previously reported for 2-screw fixation with conventional headed screws. A third screw placed anteriorly increased compression significantly. Because headless screws are advantageous where prominent screw heads are problematic, such as the load-bearing surface of the foot, their effectiveness compared to other screws should be established to provide an objective basis for screw selection. Augmenting fixation with an anterior screw may be desirable when conditions for fusion are suboptimal. © The Author

  19. Biomechanical comparison of pure magnesium interference screw and polylactic acid polymer interference screw in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction—A cadaveric experimental study

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    Bin Song

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: As there are no commercially available Mg-based interference screws for ACL reconstruction clinically and the in vivo degradation of pure Mg promotes bone formation, our cadaveric study supports its clinical tests for ACL reconstruction.

  20. Soft tissue repair for tibialis anterior tendon ruptures using plate and screw fixation technique in combination with anterolateral thigh flaps transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haijun; Xu, Guanyue

    2015-09-17

    Traumatic ruptures of the tibialis anterior tendon are rare but can cause substantial functional deficiencies. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a surgery for soft tissue repair of traumatic rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon by using a plate and screw fixation repair in combination with the free anterolateral thigh flaps transplantation. Eight consecutive patients with anterior tibialis tendon ruptures who visited orthopedics departments from February 2008 to February 2012 were included in our study. The ruptured tendon was reconstructed with plate and screw fixation technique, and the tissue defects were repaired with anterolateral thigh free flaps. The complications and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scores were evaluated. Postoperative manual strength test was performed using a 0 to 5 scale. All flaps survived without any complications. The average preoperative and postoperative AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scores of the patients were 51 and 95, respectively. Good ankle dorsiflexion strength against strong resistance was observed in eight ankles postoperatively (manual strength of one patient was 4/5, the others were 5/5), and a substantial improvement in strength was noted compared with the preoperative examination. Soft tissue repair for tibialis anterior tendon rupture using plate and screw fixation technique in combination with anterolateral thigh flaps transplantation is a feasible technique and yield satisfactory results.

  1. External transpedicular spine fixation in severe spondylodiscitis – salvage procedure

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    Spalteholz, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Specific and non-specific infections of the spine are rare. Due to their potential for severe instabilities, deformities and the impairment of neurological structures, the treatment is often prolonged and needs an interdisciplinary management. The clinical presentation is uncharacteristic, therefore diagnosis is often delayed. There are no prospective randomized studies for therapy recommendation. The surgical concept includes eradication of the infection and the reliable stabilization of involved segments. This concept is successful in most cases of endogenous vertebral osteomyelitis. The therapy of the exogenous spine infections after macro and micro surgery is more difficult, due to the critical wound situation and the involvement of the posterior parts of the spine. In these cases, infection-associated instability of the anterior part is complicated by critical posterior wound conditions.We present three cases of severe exogenous vertebral infections, where temporary external transpedicular spine fixation was used for salvage procedure, till soft tissue conditions have permitted a definitive internal stabilization.

  2. Hollow modular anchorage (HMA) screws for anterior transvertebral fixation in high-grade spondylolisthesis cases requiring 360 degrees in-situ fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Matthias A; Boszczyk, Bronek M

    2018-03-22

    360 degrees in-situ fusion for high-grade spondylolisthesis showed satisfying clinical long-term results. Combining anterior with posterior surgery increases fusion rates. Anteriorly inserted transvertebral HMA screws could be an alternative to strut graft constructs or cages, avoiding donor site complications. In addition, complete posterior muscle detachment is avoided and the injury risk of neural structures is minimized. This study investigates the use of HMA screws in this context. Five consecutive patients requiring L4-S1 in-situ fusion for isthmic spondylolisthesis (four Grade 3 and one Grade 4) were included. The L5/S1 level was fused with an HMA screw filled with local bone and bone morphogenic protein (BMP2), inserted via the L4/5 disc space level. An L4/5 stand-alone interbody fusion with additional minimal invasive posterior screw fixation was added. Transvertebral insertion of the HMA device was accomplished via a retroperitoneal approach to L4/L5 in all cases without exposure of L5/S1. Blood loss ranged from 150 ml-350 ml. No intraoperative complication occurred. One patient developed posterior wound infection requiring debridement. Solid fusion was confirmed with a CT scan after 6 months in all patients. All patients improved to unrestricted activities of daily living with two being limited by occasional back pain. HMA screws allow for effective lumbosacral fusion via a limited anterior exposure. This is technically easier than posterior exposure of the lumbosacral junction in high-grade spondylolisthesis requiring 360 degrees fusion.

  3. Posterior Debridement with Trans-Pedicular Screw Fixation For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... abscess formation, intractable pain or failure of medical management. The use of instrumentation is still controversial. Objective: Was to evaluate the surgical outcome of idiopathic lumbar spondylodiscitis treated with posterior debridement combined with single-stage posterior instrumentation and autologus bone grafting.

  4. Posterior Debridement with Trans-Pedicular Screw Fixation For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visual analogue scale (VAS), activities of daily living (ADL) (Barthel index), C reactive proteins (CRP), and Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in the preoperative, postoperative and final follow-up periods were used to evaluate the surgical outcome. Results: All 15 cases of lumbar infections resolved without recurrence.

  5. Delayed anterior cervical plate dislodgement with pharyngeal wall perforation and oral extrusion of cervical plate screw after 8 years: A very rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranath Kapu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with congenital anomaly of cervical spine, who presented with clinical features suggestive of cervical compressive spondylotic myelopathy. He underwent C3 median corpectomy, graft placement, and stabilization from C2 to C4 vertebral bodies. Postoperative period was uneventful and he improved in his symptoms. Eight years later, he presented with a difficulty in swallowing and occasional regurgitation of feeds of 2 months duration and oral extrusion of screw while having food. On oral examination, there was a defect in the posterior pharyngeal wall through which the upper end of plate with intact self-locking screw and socket of missed fixation screw was seen. This was confirmed on X-ray cervical spine. He underwent removal of the plate system and was fed through nasogastric tube and managed with appropriate antibiotics. This case is presented to report a very rare complication of anterior cervical plate fixation in the form of very late-onset dislodgement, migration of anterior cervical plate, and oral extrusion of screw through perforated posterior pharyngeal wall.

  6. Determining the Optimal Length and Safety of Pedicle Screws in the T12 Vertebra: A Morphometric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Mehmet F; Erdem, Mehmet N; Ozevren, Huseyin; Sevimli, Reşit

    2018-02-05

    Despite the developments in implant technology and imaging methods and the advances in surgical techniques, there are still potential problems and complications of transpedicular screw application. This is a morphometric study to examine the proximity of the T12 vertebra to the thoracic aorta. Our aim was to define the appropriate length of the pedicle screw to be used in the 12 th thoracic vertebra, using computed tomography (CT) data. Randomly selected cases from the same ethnic group in a specific age group were examined in terms of the length from the anterior vertebral body and the screw entry point of the T12 vertebra to the thoracic aorta. In light of these data, a statistical analysis was made for the selection of the most appropriate screw length. A statistically significant difference was detected in the distance from the T12 left screw entry point to the aorta between males and females (p=0.001). No statistically significant correlation was found between age and the distance between the left screw entry point and the aorta (p=0.105). Also, no statistically significant difference was detected between the T12 vertebral body-aorta distance in males and in females (p=0.212). The relationship between the shortest aorta-vertebral body distance and age was not statistically significant (p=0.7). Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference between the left screw entry point-aorta distance and the aorta-vertebral body shortest distance (p=0.731). Significant differences were observed between males and females in terms of the distance between the T12 vertebra left screw entry point and the thoracic aorta (p=0.001). Thus, we can assert the need for the preoperative evaluation of patients with computed tomography in selecting the appropriate screw length and avoiding complications.

  7. Simple New Screw Insertion Technique without Extraction for Broken Pedicle Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Jin-Sang; Park, Jong-Tae

    2018-05-01

    Spinal transpedicular screw fixation is widely performed. Broken pedicle screw rates range from 3%-7.1%. Several techniques have been described for extraction of broken pedicle screws. However, most of these techniques require special instruments. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. No special instruments or drilling in an adjacent pedicle are required. We used a high-speed air drill with a round burr. With C-arm fluoroscopy guidance, the distal fragment of a broken pedicle screw was palpated using free-hand technique through the screw entry hole. A high-speed air drill with a round burr (not a diamond burr) was inserted through the hole. Drilling began slowly and continued until enough space was obtained for new screw insertion. Using this space, we performed new pedicle screw fixation medially alongside the distal fragment of the broken pedicle screw. We performed the insertion with a previously used entry hole and pathway in the pedicle. The same size pedicle screw was used. Three patients were treated with this modified technique. New screw insertion was successful in all cases after partial drilling of the distal broken pedicle screw fragment. There were no complications, such as screw loosening, dural tears, or root injury. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. This technique is recommended in patients who require insertion of a new screw. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the bioabsorbable Milagro interference screw for graft fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, K-H; Sawallich, T; Schütze, G; Losch, A; Walde, T; Balcarek, P; Konietschke, F; Stürmer, K M

    2009-10-01

    Ligament graft fixation with bioabsorbable interference screws is a standard procedure in cruciate ligament replacement. Previous screw designs may resorb incompletely, and can cause osteolysis and sterile cysts despite being implanted for several years. The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo degradation and biocompatibility of the new Milagro interference screw (Mitek, Norderstedt, Germany). The Milagro interference screw is made of 30% ss-TCP (TriCalcium phosphate) and 70% PLGA (Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid). In the period between June 2005 and February 2006, 38 patients underwent graft fixation with Milagro screws in our hospital. Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction was performed using hamstring tendon grafts in all the patients. MR imaging was performed on 12 randomly selected patients out of the total of 38 at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. During the examination, the volume loss of the screw, tunnel enlargement, presence of osteolysis, fluid lines, edema and postoperative screw replacement by bone tissue were evaluated. There was no edema or signs of inflammation around the bone tunnels. At 3, 6 and 12 months, the tibial screws showed an average volume loss of 0, 8.1% (+/-7.9%) and 82.6% (+/-17.2%, P Milagro screw is closely linked to the graft healing process. The screws were rapidly resorbed after 6 months and, at 12 months, only the screw remnants were detectable. Moreover, the Milagro screw is biocompatible and osteoconductive, promoting bone ingrowth during resorption. Tunnel enlargement is not prevented in the first months but is reduced by bone ingrowth after 12 months.

  9. [Efficacy of Sacroiliac Joint Anterior Approach with Double Reconstruction Plate and Computer Assisted Navigation Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw for Treating Tile C1 Pelvic Fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhen; Fang, Yue; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Lei; Xiang, Zhou; Zhong, Gang; Huang, Fu-Guo; Wang, Guang-Lin

    2017-09-01

    To compare the efficacy of sacroiliac joint anterior approach with double reconstruction plate and computer assisted navigation percutaneous sacroiliac screw for treating Tile C1 pelvic fractures. Fifty patients with pelvic Tile C1 fractures were randomly divided into two groups ( n =25 for each) in the orthopedic department of West China Hospital of Sichuan University from December 2012 to November 2014. Patients in group A were treated by sacroiliac joint dislocation with anterior plate fixation. Patients in group B were treated with computerized navigation for percutaneous sacroiliac screw. The operation duration,intraoperative blood loss,incision length,and postoperative complications (nausea,vomiting,pulmonary infection,wound complications,etc.) were compared between the two groups. The postoperative fracture healing time,postoperative patient satisfaction,and postoperative fractures MATTA scores (to evaluate fracture reduction),postoperative MAJEED function scores,and SF36 scores of the patients were also recorded and compared. No significant differences in baseline characteristics were found between the two groups of patients. All of the patients in both groups had their operations successfully completed. Patients in group B had significantly shorter operations and lower intraoperative blood loss,incision length and postoperative complications than those in group A ( P 0.05). Sacroiliac joint anterior approach with double reconstruction plate and computer assisted navigation percutaneous sacroiliac screws are both effective for treating Tile C1type pelvic fractures,with similar longterm efficacies. However,computer assisted navigation percutaneous sacroiliac screw has the advantages of less trauma,less bleeding,and quicker.

  10. Two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. A minimum 3-year follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong-Yeob; Lee, Sang-Ho; Maeng, Dae-Hyeon

    2010-01-01

    The clinical and radiological outcomes of two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PSF) were evaluated in 24 consecutive patients who underwent two level ALIF with percutaneous PSF for segmental instability and were followed up for more than 3 years. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Sagittal alignment, bone union, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) were assessed using radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age of the patients at the time of operation was 56.3 years (range 39-70 years). Minor complications occurred in 2 patients in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 39.4 months (range 36-42 months), VAS scores for back pain and leg pain, and ODI score decreased significantly (from 6.5, 6.8, and 46.9% to 3.0, 1.9, and 16.3%, respectively). Clinical success was achieved in 22 of the 24 patients. The mean segmental lordosis, whole lumbar lordosis, and sacral tilt significantly increased after surgery (from 25.1deg, 39.2deg, and 32.6deg to 32.9deg, 44.5deg, and 36.6deg, respectively). Solid fusion was achieved in 21 patients. ASD was found in 8 of the 24 patients. No patient underwent revision surgery due to nonunion or ASD. Two-level ALIF with percutaneous PSF yielded satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes and could be a useful alternative to posterior fusion surgery. (author)

  11. DLC screw preload. Loosening prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mattias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The screw loosening is a reason to prosthetic rehabilitation failure. However, the DLC (Diamond-like carbon screw treatment lead thefriction decrease and sliding between the components, which increases the screw preload benefit and decreases the chance of looseningoccurrence. This case shows a clinical indication of the association of the correct preload applied and the DLC screw, which can be considered an optimized protocol to solve screw loosening recidivate of unitary prosthesis in anterior maxillary site.

  12. Effect of implant connection and restoration design (screwed vs. cemented) in reliability and failure modes of anterior crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Amilcar C; Bonfante, Estevam A; Rocha, Eduardo P; Silva, Nelson R F A; Marotta, Leonard; Coelho, Paulo G

    2011-08-01

    The mechanical performance of cemented or screw-retained implant-supported crowns with an internal or external configuration is yet to be understood. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of screw-retained and cement-retained prostheses on internal and external implant-abutment connections. Thereby, the reliability and failure modes of crowns were investigated. Eighty-four implants (Emfils; Colosso Evolution system) were divided into four groups (n=21 each): screw-retained and internal connection (Si), screw-retained and external connection (Se), cement-retained and internal connection (Ci), and cement-retained and external connection (Ce). Ti-6Al-4V abutments were torqued (30 Ncm) to the implants, and maxillary central incisor metal crowns were torqued (30 Ncm) or cemented (Rely X Unicem; 3M-ESPE) and subjected to accelerated life-testing in water. Use-level probability Weibull curves and reliability for 50,000 cycles at 150 N were calculated. The β values for Si (1.72), Se (1.50), Ci (1.34), and Ce (1.77) groups indicated that fatigue/damage accumulation accelerated their failure. The Ci group presented the highest reliability, the Se group presented the lowest reliability, and Si and Ce groups presented intermediate reliability. Screw-retained restorations presented mainly abutment fracture. Cement-retained restorations resulted in failures of the screw in the Ce group, but implant/screw fracture in the Ci group. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  13. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR ISTHMIC SPONDYLOLISTHESIS USING ANTERIOR AND POSTERIOR EXPOSURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rudenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective - to compare results of spondylolisthesis treatment using different surgical technologies. Material and methods: 84 patients (aged from 19 till 67 with spondylolisthesis of 1-3 degree (H.W Meyerding were operated. Two methods of surgical exposures were used for decompression and stabilization. Anterior decompression and stabilization exposures from retroperitoneal access were used for the first group of patients. The second group was operated using posteriolateral interbody fusion with transpedicular screw fixation. The following results were estimated after operation: the level of patients’ postoperative adaptation period and the rate of neurological and orthopedic rehabilitation during the postoperative period. Conclusions. The obtained functional results show no difference for both groups where posterior and anterior exposures were used for spondylolisthesis surgical treatment of 1-3 degree.

  14. Immediate placement and loading of implants in anterior maxilla using an altered screw-retained implant fixed prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig Mirza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the immediate placement and loading of implants in the aesthetic zone using an implant-retained, fixed prosthesis with a modified design. One section of the implant prosthesis has cemented crowns and the other section is the conventional screw-retained. This combined approach significantly offsets the unsuitable implant position, alignment or angulation, while ensuring the easy retrievability, repair and maintenance of the prosthesis at the same time.

  15. Multilevel decompressive laminectomy and transpedicular instrumented fusion for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy: A minimum follow-up of 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Kotil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cervical laminectomies with transpedicular insertion technique is known to be a biomechanically stronger method in cervical pathologies. However, its frequency of use is low in the routine practice, as the pedicle is thin and risk of neurovascular damage is high. In this study, we emphasize the results of cervical laminectomies with transpedicular fixation using fluoroscopy in degenerative cervical spine disorder. Materials and Methods: Postoperative malposition of the transpedicular screws of the 70 pedicles of the 10 patients we operated due to degenerative stenosis in the cervical region, were investigated. Fixation was performed between C3 and C7, and we used resected lamina bone chips for fusion. Clinical indicators included age, gender, neurologic status, surgical indication, and number of levels stabilized. Dominant vertebral artery of all the patients was evaluated with Doppler ultrasonography. Preoperative and postoperative Nurick grade of each patient was documented. Results: No patients experienced neurovascular injury as a result of pedicle screw placement. Two patients had screw malposition, which did not require reoperation due to minor breaking. Most patients had 32-mm screws placed. Postoperative computed tomography scanning showed no compromise of the foramen transversarium. A total of 70 pedicle screws were placed. Good bony fusion was observed in all patients. At follow-up, 9/10 (90% patients had improved in their Nurick grades. The cases were followed-up for an average of 35.7 months (30-37 months. Conclusions: Use of the cervical pedicular fixation (CPF provides a very strong three-column stabilization but also carries vascular injury without nerve damage. Laminectomies technique may reduce the risk of malposition due to visualization of the spinal canal. CPF can be performed in a one-stage posterior procedure. This technique yielded good fusion rate without complications and can be considered as a good

  16. Relationship between screw sagittal angle and stress on endplate of adjacent segments after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with internal fixation: a Chinese finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Yibo; Shen, Hongxing

    2017-12-01

    In order to reduce the incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD), the current study was designed to establish Chinese finite element models of normal 3rd~7th cervical vertebrae (C3-C7) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with internal fixation , and analyze the influence of screw sagittal angle (SSA) on stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments. Mimics 8.1 and Abaqus/CAE 6.10 softwares were adopted to establish finite element models. For C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate, their anterior areas had the maximum stress in anteflexion position, and their posterior areas had the maximum stress in posterior extension position. As SSA increased, the stress reduced. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on anterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 12.67% and 7.99% in anteflexion position, respectively. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on posterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 9.68% and 10.22% in posterior extension position, respectively. The current study established Chinese finite element models of normal C3-C7 and ACCF with internal fixation , and demonstrated that as SSA increased, the stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments decreased. In clinical surgery, increased SSA is able to play important role in protecting the adjacent cervical segments and reducing the incidence of ASD.

  17. Evaluation of apical root resorption in orthodontic patients with maxillary anterior intrusion using utility arches and mini screws: A comparative clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muraleedhara Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the amount of apical root resorption in orthodontic patients undergoing maxillary anterior intrusion using utility arches and mini screws; and to compare the efficacy of mini screws and utility arches in reducing over bite. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 20 patients, divided in two groups. Group A consisted of ten patients in whom titanium mini-screws were used Group B consisted of 10 patients in whom utility arches made of 0.017 × 0.25" TMA were used. Diagnostic records (study models and radiovisiography [RVG] were taken at 2 time intervals, T1 (just before implant/utility arch placement and T2 (at the end of intrusion 6 months later. The pre and post radiographic images were measured from incisal tip to the root apex with the help of intrascan DC software. Root resorption was computed as the difference between the pre-treatment total tooth length and the post treatment total tooth length. These values were subjected to statistical analyses using SPSS 16.00 statistical software. (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, IBM Corporation, December 2007 Results: The results showed that root resorption was seen in both groups. Amount of resorption seen was higher in mini implant group than utility arch group. Mini implants were more efficient in reducing the overbite when compared to utility arches. Conclusion: It was concluded from the study that intrusion using mini implant resulted in more root resorption than utility arch; and mini implant was more effective in intruding the incisors than utility arch.

  18. Anterior single odontoid screw placement for type II odontoid fractures: our modified surgical technique and initial results in a cohort study of 15 patients [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Munakomi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anterior odontoid screw fixation for type II odontoid fracture is the ideal management option. However in the context of unavailability of an O-arm or neuro-navigation and poor images from the available C-arm may be an obstacle to ideal trajectory and placement of the odontoid screw. We herein detail  our surgical technique so as to ensure a correct trajectory and subsequent good fusion in Type II odontoid fractures. This may be advantageous  in clinical set ups lacking state of the art facilities.  Methods and Results: In this cohort study we included 15 consecutive patients who underwent anterior odontoid screw placement. We routinely dissect the longus colli to completely visualize the entire width of C3 body. We then perform a median C2-C3 disectomy followed by creating a gutter in the superior end of C3 body. We then guide the Kirchsner (K wire purchasing adequate anterior cortex of C2. Rest of the procedure follows the similar steps as described for odontoid screw placement. We achieved 100% correct trajectory and screw placement in our study. There were no instances of screw break out, pull out or nonunion. There was one patient mortality following myocardial infarction in our study. Conclusion: Preoperative imaging details, proper patient positioning, meticulous dissection, thorough anatomical knowledge and few added surgical nuances are the cornerstones in ideal odontoid screw placement. This may be pivotal in managing  patients in developing nations having rudimentary neurosurgical set up.

  19. Primary pedicle screw augmentation in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae: biomechanical analysis of pedicle fixation strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burval, Daniel J; McLain, Robert F; Milks, Ryan; Inceoglu, Serkan

    2007-05-01

    Pedicle screw pullout testing in osteoporotic and control human cadaveric vertebrae, comparing augmented and control vertebrae. To compare the pullout strengths of pedicle screws fixed in osteoporotic vertebrae using polymethyl methacrylate delivered by 2 augmentation techniques, a standard transpedicular approach and kyphoplasty type approach. Pedicle screw instrumentation of the osteoporotic spine carries an increased risk of screw loosening, pullout, and fixation failure. Osteoporosis is often cited as a contraindication for pedicle screw fixation. Augmentation of the vertebral pedicle and body using polymethyl methacrylate may improve fixation strength and construct survival in the osteoporotic vertebrae. While the utility of polymethyl methacrylate has been demonstrated for salvage of screws that have been pulled out, the effect of the cement technique on pullout strength in osteoporotic vertebrae has not been previously studied. Thirteen osteoporotic and 9 healthy human lumbar vertebrae were tested. All specimens were instrumented with pedicle screws using a uniform technique. Osteoporotic pedicles were augmented with polymethyl methacrylate using either a kyphoplasty type technique or a transpedicular augmentation technique. Screws were tested in a paired testing array, randomly assigning the augmentation techniques to opposite sides of each vertebra. Pullout to failure was performed either primarily or after a 5000-cycle tangential fatigue conditioning exposure. After testing, following screw removal, specimens were cut in the axial plane through the center of the vertebral body to inspect the cement distribution. Pedicle screws placed in osteoporotic vertebrae had higher pullout loads when augmented with the kyphoplasty technique compared to transpedicular augmentation (1414 +/- 338 versus 756 +/- 300 N, respectively; P pedicle screws in osteoporotic vertebrae augmented by kyphoplasty showed higher pullout resistance than those placed in healthy control

  20. Delayed Tibial Osteomyelitis after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Hamstrings Autograft and Bioabsorbable Interference Screw: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S. Weiss

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis following arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has rarely been reported in the literature. We report a case of a 20-year-old female who had delayed tibial osteomyelitis and a pretibial cyst with culture-positive, oxacillin sensitive Staphylococcus epidermidis 15 months after an ACL reconstruction with hamstring autograft. Soft tissue fixation within the tibial tunnel was with a poly-L-D-lactic acid (PLDLA bioabsorbable interference screw. The patient underwent surgical treatment with curettage, debridement, hardware removal, and bone grafting of the tibial tunnel followed by a course of intravenous antibiotics. Arthroscopic evaluation demonstrated an intact ACL graft without any evidence of intra-articular infection. The patient returned to collegiate athletics without any complications. While the most common biologic complications include pretibial cysts, granuloma formation, tunnel widening, and inflammatory reactions, infection is exceedingly rare. Late infection and osteomyelitis are also rare but can occur and should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  1. Assessment of different screw augmentation techniques and screw designs in osteoporotic spines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanne, A.; Spitaler, R.; Kropik, K.; Aigner, N.; Ogon, M.; Redl, H.

    2008-01-01

    This is an experimental study on human cadaver spines. The objective of this study is to compare the pullout forces between three screw augmentation methods and two different screw designs. Surgical interventions of patients with osteoporosis increase following the epidemiological development. Biomechanically the pedicle provides the strongest screw fixation in healthy bone, whereas in osteoporosis all areas of the vertebra are affected by the disease. This explains the high screw failure rates in those patients. Therefore PMMA augmentation of screws is often mandatory. This study involved investigation of the pullout forces of augmented transpedicular screws in five human lumbar spines (L1–L4). Each spine was treated with four different methods: non-augmented unperforated (solid) screw, perforated screw with vertebroplasty augmentation, solid screw with vertebroplasty augmentation and solid screw with balloon kyphoplasty augmentation. Screws were augmented with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The pullout forces were measured for each treatment with an Instron testing device. The bone mineral density was measured for each vertebra with Micro-CT. The statistical analysis was performed with a two-sided independent student t test. Forty screws (10 per group and level) were inserted. The vertebroplasty-augmented screws showed a significant higher pullout force (mean 918.5 N, P = 0.001) than control (mean 51 N), the balloon kyphoplasty group did not improve the pullout force significantly (mean 781 N, P > 0.05). However, leakage occurred in some cases treated with perforated screws. All spines showed osteoporosis on Micro-CT. Vertebroplasty-augmented screws, augmentation of perforated screws and balloon kyphoplasty augmented screws show higher pullout resistance than non-augmented screws. Significant higher pullout forces were only reached in the vertebroplasty augmented vertebra. The perforated screw design led to epidural leakage due to the position of the

  2. Angled screw holes for anterior posts and a frame-positioning device for gamma knife radiosurgery: allowing for better targeting of intracranial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; McDermott, Michael W

    2007-04-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery requires frame positioning so that the treatment target is as close to the center of the frame and as low as possible to cover all of the posterior fossa contents. In this study, we report the use of two devices developed by the senior author (MWM) that facilitate these two crucial objectives in the treatment of intracranial targets using the gamma knife. Custom front posts with threaded screw holes drilled at 5-, 10-, and 15-degree angles were created by the manufacturer at our request. A U-shaped metal device for frame positioning was designed in-house and fits into the holes at the 100-mm mark on the lateral sides of the Leksell stereotactic frame base. This allowed the positioning device to snap securely into the frame for use in positioning. The positioning device was constructed so that the lowest possible frame position would be achieved with each frame application, while avoiding collisions with the magnetic resonance imaging localizer box. Angled front posts allowed for pin contacts with the cranium anterior and/or superior to the superior temporal line despite a lateral or posterior position of the frame. This avoided penetration of the temporalis muscle and reduced discomfort for patients. The U-shaped metal device was used in place of the Velcro straps or ear bars routinely used for frame positioning in which the distance from the frame base to the top of the head must always be measured to avoid collisions with the localizer box. During the past 2 years, these devices have been used on a daily basis, achieving the desired results. In many cases, their use has avoided the need for frame repositioning and rescanning for targets that cannot be reached because of inexact frame positioning. A new design with angled screw holes in the front posts used for gamma knife radiosurgery allows surgeons to avoid penetration of the temporalis muscle and to maintain a perpendicular orientation of the fixation screw to the outer table of the

  3. Circumferential fusion: a comparative analysis between anterior lumbar interbody fusion with posterior pedicle screw fixation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, Erik Y; Tanenbaum, Joseph E; Alonso, Andrea S; Xiao, Roy; Steinmetz, Michael P; Mroz, Thomas E; Savage, Jason W

    2018-03-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) or anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screws (ALIFPS) offer significantly higher radiographic fusion rates than other fusion techniques for L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS). As it stands, there is a relative paucity of comparative data of the two techniques. To define the clinical, radiographic, and financial differences between TLIF and ALIFPS for L5-S1 IS. A retrospective cohort study conducted at a single tertiary care center. Sixty-six patients who underwent either TLIF or ALIPFS for L5-S1 IS at a single tertiary care center between 2009 and 2014. Quality of life outcome scores including the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Sagittal balance parameters including: pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, segmental lordosis, total lordosis, degree of slip, disc height, and L1-axis S1 distance (LASD). Cost measures included in-hospital charges, hospital length of stay (LOS), and post-admission costs accrued over 1 year. Quality of life (QoL) outcome scores, radiographic data, and financial data were collected with a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Clinical results were investigated using the PDQ, PHQ-9, and EQ-5D. Radiographic measurements included lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, height of disc, L-1 axis S-1 distance, and the degree of slip. Cost data were generated based on patient-level resource utilization. Comparative data were presented as median with interquartile range (IQR). Continuous variables were compared using either independent Student t tests assuming unequal variance or Mann-Whitney U tests for parametric and nonparametric variables, respectively. The minimally clinical important difference (MCID) used for each questionnaire was as follows: PDQ (26), PHQ-9 (5), and EQ-5D (0.4). A total of 66 patients met inclusion criteria. In the ALIFPS cohort, PDQ scores

  4. Evaluation of surgical strategy of conventional vs. percutaneous robot-assisted spinal trans-pedicular instrumentation in spondylodiscitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keric, Naureen; Eum, David J; Afghanyar, Feroz; Rachwal-Czyzewicz, Izabela; Renovanz, Mirjam; Conrad, Jens; Wesp, Dominik M A; Kantelhardt, Sven R; Giese, Alf

    2017-03-01

    Robot-assisted percutaneous insertion of pedicle screws is a recent technique demonstrating high accuracy. The optimal treatment for spondylodiscitis is still a matter of debate. We performed a retrospective cohort study on surgical patients treated with pedicle screw/rod placement alone without the application of intervertebral cages. In this collective, we compare conventional open to a further minimalized percutaneous robot-assisted spinal instrumentation, avoiding a direct contact of implants and infectious focus. 90 records and CT scans of patients treated by dorsal transpedicular instrumentation of the infected segments with and without decompression and antibiotic therapy were analysed for clinical and radiological outcome parameters. 24 patients were treated by free-hand fluoroscopy-guided surgery (121 screws), and 66 patients were treated by percutaneous robot-assisted spinal instrumentation (341 screws). Accurate screw placement was confirmed in 90 % of robot-assisted and 73.5 % of free-hand placed screws. Implant revision due to misplacement was necessary in 4.95 % of the free-hand group compared to 0.58 % in the robot-assisted group. The average intraoperative X-ray exposure per case was 0.94 ± 1.04 min in the free-hand group vs. 0.4 ± 0.16 min in the percutaneous group (p = 0.000). Intraoperative adverse events were observed in 12.5 % of free-hand placed pedicle screws and 6.1 % of robot robot-assisted screws. The mean postoperative hospital stay in the free-hand group was 18.1 ± 12.9 days, and in percutaneous group, 13.8 ± 5.6 days (p = 0.012). This study demonstrates that the robot-guided insertion of pedicle screws is a safe and effective procedure in lumbar and thoracic spondylodiscitis with higher accuracy of implant placement, lower radiation dose, and decreased complication rates. Percutaneous spinal dorsal instrumentation seems to be sufficient to treat lumbar and thoracic spondylodiscitis.

  5. Interference screw fixation of soft tissue grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: part 1: effect of tunnel compaction by serial dilators versus extraction drilling on the initial fixation strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Janne T; Kannus, Pekka; Sievänen, Harri; Järvelä, Timo; Järvinen, Markku; Järvinen, Teppo L N

    2004-03-01

    Compaction of the bone-tunnel walls by serial dilation is believed to enhance the interference screw fixation strength of the soft tissue grafts in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Serial dilation enhances the fixation strength of soft tissue grafts in ACL reconstruction over extraction drilling. Randomized experimental study. Initial fixation strength of the doubled anterior tibialis tendon grafts (fixed with a bioabsorbable interference screw) was assessed in 21 pairs of human cadaver tibiae with either serially dilated or extraction-drilled bone tunnels. The specimens were subjected to a cyclic-loading test, and those surviving were then tested using the single-cycle load-to-failure test. During the cyclic-loading test, there were 3 fixation failures in the serially dilated and 6 failures in the extraction-drilled specimens but no significant stiffness or displacement differences between the groups. In the subsequent load-to-failure test, the average yield loads were 473 +/- 110 N and 480 +/- 115 N for the 2 groups respectively (P =.97) and no difference with regard to stiffness or mode of failure. Serial dilation does not increase the strength of interference fixation of soft tissue grafts in ACL reconstruction over extraction drilling. The results of this experiment do not support the use of serial dilators in ACL reconstruction.

  6. Skipping Posterior Dynamic Transpedicular Stabilization for Distant Segment Degenerative Disease

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    Bilgehan Solmaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To date, there is still no consensus on the treatment of spinal degenerative disease. Current surgical techniques to manage painful spinal disorders are imperfect. In this paper, we aimed to evaluate the prospective results of posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization, a novel surgical approach that skips the segments that do not produce pain. This technique has been proven biomechanically and radiologically in spinal degenerative diseases. Methods. A prospective study of 18 patients averaging 54.94 years of age with distant spinal segment degenerative disease. Indications consisted of degenerative disc disease (57%, herniated nucleus pulposus (50%, spinal stenosis (14.28%, degenerative spondylolisthesis (14.28%, and foraminal stenosis (7.1%. The Oswestry Low-Back Pain Disability Questionnaire and visual analog scale (VAS for pain were recorded preoperatively and at the third and twelfth postoperative months. Results. Both the Oswestry and VAS scores showed significant improvement postoperatively (P<0.05. We observed complications in one patient who had spinal epidural hematoma. Conclusion. We recommend skipping posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization for surgical treatment of distant segment spinal degenerative disease.

  7. Effectiveness of transfixation and length of instrumentation on titanium and stainless steel transpedicular spine implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovessis, P; Baikousis, A; Deligianni, D; Mysirlis, Y; Soucacos, P

    2001-04-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of transfixation on the stiffness of two pedicle screw-rod constructs of different manufacture, implant design, and alloy, applied in one-and two-level instability. Four screws composed of either stainless steel or Titanium were assembled in pairs to two polymethylmethacrylate blocks to resemble one-and two-level corpectomy models and the construct underwent nondestructive torsional, extension, and flexion loading. In every loading test, each construct was tested using stainless steel or titanium rods of 4.9-mm diameter in two different lengths (short, 10 cm; long, 15 cm), not augmented or augmented with different transfixation devices or a pair of devices. The authors compared the stiffness of stainless steel and titanium constructs without cross-link with the stiffness of that reinforced with single or double Texas Scottish Rite Hospital (TSRH) cross-link, closed new-type cross-link (closed NTC), or open new-type cross-link (open NTC). The results showed that augmentation or no augmentation of short rods conferred significantly more stiffness than that of long rods of the same material in all three loading modes. The closed NTC provided the greatest increase of torsional, extension, and flexion stiffness, and single TSRH provided the least amount of stiffness. Torsional stiffness of short stainless steel rods augmented or not augmented was significantly greater than that of their titanium counterparts. Torsional stiffness of long titanium rods was always greater than that of their stainless steel counterparts. Extension stiffness of short nonaugmented titanium rods was superior to that of long titanium rods, whereas extension stiffness of nonaugmented short and long stainless steel rods was similar. Nonaugmented short titanium rods showed greater flexion stiffness than that of long titanium rods. Long stainless steel rods displayed significantly greater flexion stiffness than did their titanium counterparts. This

  8. Cantilever Lengths and Anterior-Posterior Spreads of Interim, Acrylic Resin, Full-Arch Screw-Retained Prostheses and Their Relationship to Prosthetic Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Carl

    2017-08-01

    To retrospectively record the distal cantilever lengths (CL) of full-arch interim, all-acrylic resin prostheses used in an immediate occlusal loading protocol. Anterior/posterior (A/P) spreads were measured on master casts associated with the interim prostheses. Ratios were calculated (CL/AP). Prosthetic complications were recorded. The ratios and prosthetic complications were statistically compared and analyzed for statistical and clinical significance. One hundred twenty-eight patients with 192 edentulous arches (109 maxillary; 83 mandibular; 190 arches were restored with 4 implants; 2 maxillary arches were restored with 5 implants) were treated. Seven hundred seventy implants (Brånemark System) from September 1, 2011, until August 31, 2013 were included in this report. Patients were treated and followed in a single private practice for up to 40 months. Implants had to have at least 35 Ncm of insertion torque to be immediately loaded. All implants were immediately loaded with full functional occlusions on the day the implants were placed. Interim, full-arch, all-acrylic resin prostheses were fabricated and placed into full functional occlusion following an All-on-Four protocol. Measurements of the distal cantilevered segments were made on the prostheses prior to insertion. A/P spreads were measured on the master casts made from abutment level impressions made on the day of surgery. Prosthetic complications (denture base fracture, cohesive/adhesive denture tooth fractures) were recorded in the charts as they occurred. All charts were reviewed for this report; no patients were lost to follow-up. Interim prosthetic repairs were analyzed by type (tooth or denture base), arch, gender, and location within the edentulous arches. One patient experienced complete maxillary implant failure; the overall implant survival rate (SR) was 99.5% (766 of 770). Four hundred thirty of 434 maxillary implants and 336 of 336 mandibular implants survived for SRs of 99.1 and 100

  9. ADOLESCENT IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS: EVALUATION ON THE EFFECT OF SCREW DENSITY IN THE CORRECTION

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    Enguer Beraldo Garcia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The objective was to investigate implant density or the number of screws correlated with the correction of the main curve in patients undergoing surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Methods: We evaluated 112 medical records: 33 patients with screw density of up to 50%, and 79 patients with a density of 100%; all patients underwent surgical correction by posterior approach with transpedicular fixation. Results: In the group of patients with screw density of up to 50% the residual Cobb median was 10°; in the group with 100% density, the median was 7°. Conclusion: Biostatistical analysis showed that the group with up to 50% of screw density presented correction rate of 82.1% and the group with 100% density had correction of about 86.8%. It is therefore concluded that the difference is statistically significant in favor of the fixation with 100% density (p =0.010.

  10. Management of C2-C3 fracture subluxation by anterior cervical approach and C2-C3 trans-cortical screw placement

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    Agrawal Amit

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spine injuries are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma victims. Upper cervical spine injuries account for about 24% of acute fractures and dislocations and one third of fractures occur at the level of C2, while one half of injuries occur at the C6 or C7 levels. In contrast to this approach we used the transverse cervical, platysma splitting incision at a lower (C3-C4 disc to expose the upper cervical spine particularly lower border of C3 (entry point for the screw.

  11. Biomechanical analysis of the fixation systems for anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures

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    Jianyin Lei

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggested that all fixation systems enhance biomechanical stability significantly. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws has quite comparable results to double column plates, they were superior to anterior column plate combined with posterior screws.

  12. Embolization by Direct Puncture with a Transpedicular Approach Using an Isocenter Puncture (ISOP) Method in a Patient with a Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yukihisa; Hamaguchi, Shingo; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Kon, Yuri; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Sakurai, Yuka; Murakami, Kenji; Arai, Yasunori; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundEndovascular aortic repair (EVAR) requires further intervention in 20-30 % of cases, often due to type II endoleak (T2EL). Management options for T2EL include transarterial embolization, direct puncture (DP), or transcaval embolization. We report the case of an 80-year-old man with T2EL who successfully underwent DP embolization.MethodsEmbolization by DP was performed with a transpedicular approach using an isocenter puncture (ISOP) method. An isocenter marker (ICM) was placed at a site corresponding to the aneurysm sac on fluoroscopy in two directions (frontal and lateral views). A vertebroplasty needle was inserted tangentially to the ICM under fluoroscopy and advanced to the anterior wall of the vertebral body. A 20 cm-length, 20-G-PTCD needle was inserted through the outer needle of the 13-G needle and advanced to the ICM. Sac embolization using 25 % N-buty-2-cyanoacrylate diluted with Lipiodol was performed. After complete embolization, rotational DA confirmed good filling of the sac with Lipiodol. The outer cannula and 13-G needle were removed and the procedure was completed.ResultsThe patient was discharged the next day. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 and 8 months later showed no Lipiodol washout in the aneurysm sac, no endoleak recurrence, and no expansion of the excluded aneurysm.ConclusionDP with a transpedicular approach using ISOP may be useful when translumbar and transabdominal approaches prove difficult

  13. Assessing accuracy of sustentaculum screw placement during calcaneal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitajn, I Leah; Toussaint, Rull James; Kwon, John Y

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of the Harris heel view to confirm placement of the sustentacular screw during calcaneal fixation. A 4.0 cancellous screw was placed in a cadaveric specimen, from lateral to medial in 5 configurations: (1) within the sustentaculum, (2) misdirected inferiorly to sustentaculum, (3) misdirected superiorly to sustentaculum, (4) misdirected anteriorly to sustentaculum, and (5) misdirected posteriorly to sustentaculum. Harris heel views were obtained at 5 angulations and were analyzed to determine screw placement. A screw placed anatomically was radiographically confirmed by the Harris heel view to be within the sustentaculum in all views. An inferiorly misdirected screw appeared radiographically within the sustentaculum at 30, 40 and 50 degrees but was confirmed misplaced on the 10- and 20-degree views. A posteriorly misdirected screw was confirmed misplaced on all 5 views. An anteriorly misdirected screw appeared radiographically within the sustentaculum on the 10-degree view but was confirmed misplaced on all other views. A superiorly misdirected screw was confirmed misplaced on all views. Clinicians should be aware that several specific axial heel views are required to verify placement of the sustentacular screw. An inferiorly misdirected screw will appear to be within the sustentaculum with the standard Harris heel view. Heel views should be obtained from a range of 10 to 50 degrees to confirm accurate placement of the sustentacular screw.

  14. Poly (d/l) lactide/polycaprolactone/bioactive glasss nanocomposites materials for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction screws: The effect of glass surface functionalization on mechanical properties and cell behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Javad; Hesaraki, Saeed; Hadavi, Seyed Mohammad-Mehdi; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Esfandeh, Masoud

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, different nanocomposites made of a polymer blend (80% of PDLLA and 20% of PCL in w/w) and various amounts of a sol-gel derived bioactive glass nanoparticles (0, 1, 3 and 6wt%) were prepared using a solvent-evaporation technique. The morphology, mechanical properties and osteoblastic cell behaviors of the nanocomposites were evaluated. According to the early results, addition of bioactive glass nanoparticles to the polymer matrix reduced the tensile and flexural strength because of a non-uniform distribution of the nanoparticles. Thus, a homogeneous dispersion was obtained by surface modification of the glass nanoparticles using (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane as a coupling agent. The results showed that the tensile and flexural strength of the nanocomposite were improved by the nanoparticle functionalization, however the glass content was a crucial factor. The maximum tensile and flexural strength values of 38MPa and 94MPa were obtained for the polymer matrix loaded with 3wt% of the modified nanofiller and further increase of filler content led to sever agglomeration and hence a reduction of the mechanical properties. The obtained mechanical properties are favorable for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction screws. Besides, the results of cell culture using human osteoblastic cells illustrated better cell attachment and cell growth of the nanocomposites compared to the neat polymer blend. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior com duplo feixe utilizando os tendões dos músculos semitendíneo e grácil: fixação com dois parafusos de interferência Arthroscopic double- bundle reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament using hamstring tendon grafts: fixation with two interference screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Carneiro

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Procedimentos cirúrgicos de reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior com duplo feixe dos tendões dos músculos semitendíneo e grácil têm sido descritos na última década. A maioria das técnicas descritas utiliza o dobro de material de síntese empregado na reconstrução com feixe único. Relatamos uma técnica original para a reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior com duplo feixe, na qual mantemos as inserções tibiais dos tendões dos músculos semitendíneo e grácil e realizamos dois túneis tibiais e dois túneis femorais. Os túneis femorais são realizados "de fora para dentro" e a fixação do enxerto é realizada somente com dois parafusos de interferência.Surgical procedures for double-bundle reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament, which currently use semitendinous and gracilis tendon grafts, have been described in the last decade. Most of the techniques utilize twice the hardware used in single-bundle reconstructions. We report an original anterior cruciate ligament double-bundle reconstruction technique using semitendinous and gracilis tendon grafts, maintaining their tibial bone insertions with two tibial and two femoral tunnels. A simplified and precise outside-in femoral drilling technique is utilized, and the graft fixation is made utilizing only two interference screws.

  16. [Retrosternal luxation of the clavicle. Apropos of 4 cases surgically treated using a temporary screwed anterior plate and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfazadourian, H; Kouvalchouk, J F

    1997-01-01

    The authors report 4 new cases of retrosternal dislocation of the clavicle operated by capsular and ligament restoration, and temporary stabilization by anterior plating. The 4 patients were men with a mean age of 17.5 years. The lesion was caused by a sports injury (football, rugby) in 3 out of 4 cases and was related to an indirect mechanism. Clinical examination allowed the diagnosis, was related to based on painful palpation of a dip over the joint, supported by radiology and computed tomography. CT did not reveal the epiphyseal separation present in two cases. Complications were frequent: 1 case of tracheal compression, 2 cases of temporary paresthesia of the upper limb, 2 cases of venous compression with one case of subclavian and medial jugularis venous thrombosis, 1 hemopneumothorax. Surgical reduction was performed in all 4 cases after 2 failures of attempted orthopedic treatment under general anesthesia. All patients recovered a full range of movement, a painless shoulder and no recurrence has been observed. All complications resolved after reduction. Venous thrombosis responded favourably after 6 months of anticoagulant therapy. One plate breakage was observed with no clinical implications. On the basis of an extensive review of the literature, the authors discuss the epidemiology, pathology and the importance of associated injuries, which are frequent and sometimes serious, justifying urgent reduction. Computed tomography is the most useful radiologic modality, both for diagnosis and for investigation of complications. Orthopedic treatment must be attempted first (especially in children) according to a well systematized technique. One third of attempts fail, and cases of delayed diagnosis and serious vascular complications, then require surgical treatment. The costoclavicular ligament is repaired either by Burrows's ligamentoplasty or by bone suture; the clavicle is stabilized by bone suture or by anterior plating. The authors do not advocate either

  17. [Clinical application of percutaneous iliosacral screws combined with pubic ramus screws in Tile B pelvic fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi-Fei; Lin, Kui-Ran; Zhao, Dai-Jie; Zhang, Song-Qin; Feng, Sheng-Kai; Li, Chen

    2017-03-25

    To investigate the application and effect of minimally invasive percutaneous anterior pelvic pubic ramus screw fixation in Tile B fractures. A retrospective review was conducted on 56 patients with posterior pelvic ring injury combined with fractures of anterior pubic and ischiadic ramus treated between May 2010 and August 2015, including 31 males and 25 females with an average age of 36.8 years old ranging from 35 to 65 years old. Based on the Tile classification, there were 13 cases of Tile B1 type, 28 cases of Tile B2 type and 15 cases of Tile B3 type. Among them, 26 patients were treated with sacroiliac screws combined with external fixation (external fixator group) and the other 30 patients underwent sacroiliac screw fixation combined with anterior screw fixation (pubic ramus screw group). Postoperative complications, postoperative ambulation time, fracture healing, blood loss, Majeed pelvic function score and visual analogue scale(VAS) were compared between two groups. Fifty-four patients were followed up from 3 to 24 months with a mean of 12 months. There were no significant difference in the peri-operative bleeding and operation time between two groups( P >0.05). The postoperative activity time and fracture healing time of pubic ramus screw group were shorter than those of the external fixator group, the differences were statistically significant( P safty treatment method to the Tile B pelvic fracture. It has advantages of early ambulation, relief of the pain and few complications.

  18. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Mateusz; Kunert, Przemysław; Prokopienko, Marek; Nowak, Arkadiusz; Czernicki, Tomasz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points' location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Retrospective analysis was performed on the first 5 patients with foraminal (4) or central (1) stenosis operated on between December 2014 and February 2015. Three patients were fused at L4-L5 and two at the L5-S1 level. No intra- or post-operative complications occurred with this approach. An improvement regarding the leading symptom in the early postoperative period (sciatica 4/4, claudication 1/1) was achieved in all patients. The mean improvements in the visual analogue scale for low back and leg pain were 2.2 and 4.8 respectively. The mean Oswestry Disability Index scores were 52% (range: 16-82%) before surgery and 33% (range: 12-56%) at 3-month follow-up (mean improvement 19%). At the most recent follow-up, 4 patients reported the maintenance of the satisfactory result. The early standing and follow-up X-rays showed satisfactory screw placement in all patients. In our initial experience, the MIDLF technique seems to be an encouraging alternative to traditional transpedicular trajectory screws when short level lumbar fusion is needed. Nevertheless, longer observations on larger groups of patients are needed to reliably evaluate the safety of the method and the sustainability of the results.

  19. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Bielecki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points’ location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. Aim: To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis was performed on the first 5 patients with foraminal (4 or central (1 stenosis operated on between December 2014 and February 2015. Three patients were fused at L4–L5 and two at the L5–S1 level. Results: No intra- or post-operative complications occurred with this approach. An improvement regarding the leading symptom in the early postoperative period (sciatica 4/4, claudication 1/1 was achieved in all patients. The mean improvements in the visual analogue scale for low back and leg pain were 2.2 and 4.8 respectively. The mean Oswestry Disability Index scores were 52% (range: 16–82% before surgery and 33% (range: 12–56% at 3-month follow-up (mean improvement 19%. At the most recent follow-up, 4 patients reported the maintenance of the satisfactory result. The early standing and follow-up X-rays showed satisfactory screw placement in all patients. Conclusions : In our initial experience, the MIDLF technique seems to be an encouraging alternative to traditional transpedicular trajectory screws when short level lumbar fusion is needed. Nevertheless, longer observations on larger groups of patients are needed to reliably evaluate the safety of the method and the sustainability of the results.

  20. Biomechanical Comparisons of Pull Out Strengths After Pedicle Screw Augmentation with Hydroxyapatite, Calcium Phosphate, or Polymethylmethacrylate in the Cadaveric Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Seong; Rim, Dae-Cheol; Park, Seoung Woo; Murovic, Judith A; Lim, Jesse; Park, Jon

    2015-06-01

    In vertebrae with low bone mineral densities pull out strength is often poor, thus various substances have been used to fill screw holes before screw placement for corrective spine surgery. We performed biomechanical cadaveric studies to compare nonaugmented pedicle screws versus hydroxyapatite, calcium phosphate, or polymethylmethacrylate augmented pedicle screws for screw tightening torques and pull out strengths in spine procedures requiring bone screw insertion. Seven human cadaveric T10-L1 spines with 28 vertebral bodies were examined by x-ray to exclude bony abnormalities. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans evaluated bone mineral densities. Twenty of 28 vertebrae underwent ipsilateral fluoroscopic placement of 6-mm holes augmented with hydroxyapatite, calcium phosphate, or polymethylmethacrylate, followed by transpedicular screw placements. Controls were pedicle screw placements in the contralateral hemivertebrae without augmentation. All groups were evaluated for axial pull out strength using a biomechanical loading frame. Mean pedicle screw axial pull out strength compared with controls increased by 12.5% in hydroxyapatite augmented hemivertebrae (P = 0.600) and by 14.9% in calcium phosphate augmented hemivertebrae (P = 0.234), but the increase was not significant for either method. Pull out strength of polymethylmethacrylate versus hydroxyapatite augmented pedicle screws was 60.8% higher (P = 0.028). Hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate augmentation in osteoporotic vertebrae showed a trend toward increased pedicle screw pull out strength versus controls. Pedicle screw pull out force of polymethylmethacrylate in the insertion stage was higher than that of hydroxyapatite. However, hydroxyapatite is likely a better clinical alternative to polymethylmethacrylate, as hydroxyapatite augmentation, unlike polymethylmethacrylate augmentation, stimulates bone growth and can be revised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 2D and 3D assessment of sustentaculum tali screw fixation with or without Screw Targeting Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, A Siebe; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Vellekoop, Leonie; Knops, Simon P; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Verhofstad, Michael H J

    2017-12-01

    Precise placement of sustentaculum tali screw(s) is essential for restoring anatomy and biomechanical stability of the calcaneus. This can be challenging due to the small target area and presence of neurovascular structures on the medial side. The aim was to evaluate the precision of positioning of the subchondral posterior facet screw and processus anterior calcanei screw with or without a Screw Targeting Clamp. The secondary aim was to evaluate the added value of peroperative 3D imaging over 2D radiographs alone. Twenty Anubifix™ embalmed, human anatomic lower limb specimens were used. A subchondral posterior facet screw and a processus anterior calcanei screw were placed using an extended lateral approach. A senior orthopedic trauma surgeon experienced in calcaneal fracture surgery and a senior resident with limited experience in calcaneal surgery performed screw fixation in five specimens with and in five specimens without the clamp. 2D lateral and axial radiographs and a 3D recording were obtained postoperatively. Anatomical dissection was performed postoperatively as a diagnostic golden standard in order to obtain the factual screw positions. Blinded assessment of quality of fixation was performed by two surgeons. In 2D, eight screws were considered malpositioned when placed with the targeting device versus nine placed freehand. In 3D recordings, two additional screws were malpositioned in each group as compared to the golden standard. As opposed to the senior surgeon, the senior resident seemed to get the best results using the Screw Targeting Clamp (number of malpositioned screws using freehand was eight, and using the targeting clamp five). In nine out of 20 specimens 3D images provided additional information concerning target area and intra-articular placement. Based on the 3D assessment, five additional screws would have required repositioning. Except for one, all screw positions were rated equally after dissection when compared with 3D examinations

  2. Multicycle mechanical performance of titanium and stainless steel transpedicular spine implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienkowski, D; Stephens, G C; Doers, T M; Hamilton, D M

    1998-04-01

    This was a prospective in vitro study comparing titanium alloy and stainless steel alloy in transpedicular spine implants from two different manufactures. To compare the multicycle mechanical performance of these two alloys, used in each of two different implant designs. Transpedicular spine implants primarily have been manufactured from stainless steel, but titanium alloy offers imaging advantages. However, the notch sensitivity of titanium alloy has caused concern regarding how implants made from this material will compare in stiffness and fatigue life with implants made from stainless steel. Twenty-four implants (two alloys, two designs, six implants per group) were mounted in machined polyethylene wafers and repetitively loaded (up to 1 million cycles) from 80 N to 800 N using a 5-Hertz sinusoidal waveform. Load and displacement data were automatically and periodically sampled throughout the entire test. Implant stiffness increased with cycle load number, reached a steady state, then declined just before fatigue failure. Stiffness varied less in titanium transpedicular spine implants than in their stainless counterparts. All stainless steel implant types were stiffer (steady-state value, P titanium alloy counterparts. One titanium implant design failed with fewer (P stainless steel counterpart, whereas a stainless steel implant of another design failed with fewer (P titanium counterpart. Overall, fatigue life, i.e., the total number of load cycles until failure, was related to implant type (P implant material. A transpedicular spine implant's fatigue lifetime depends on both the design and the material and cannot be judged on material alone. Stainless steel implants are stiffer than titanium alloy implants of equal design and size; however, for those designs in which the fatigue life of the titanium alloy version is superior, enlargement of the implant's components can compensate for titanium's lower modulus of elasticity and result in an implant equally stiff

  3. Biomechanical analysis of an interference screw and a novel twist lock screw design for bone graft fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnis, S; Mullen, J; Asnis, P D; Sgaglione, N; LaPorta, T; Grande, D A; Chahine, N O

    2017-12-01

    Malpositioning of an anterior cruciate ligament graft during reconstruction can occur during screw fixation. The purpose of this study is to compare the fixation biomechanics of a conventional interference screw with a novel Twist Lock Screw, a rectangular shaped locking screw that is designed to address limitations of graft positioning and tensioning. Synthetic bone (10, 15, 20lb per cubic foot) were used simulating soft, moderate, and dense cancellous bone. Screw push-out and graft push-out tests were performed using conventional and twist lock screws. Maximum load and torque of insertion were measured. Max load measured in screw push out with twist lock screw was 64%, 60%, 57% of that measured with conventional screw in soft, moderate and dense material, respectively. Twist lock max load was 78% and 82% of that with conventional screw in soft and moderate densities. In the highest bone density, max loads were comparable in the two systems. Torque of insertion with twist lock was significantly lower than with conventional interference screw. Based on geometric consideration, the twist lock screw is expected to have 35% the holding power of a cylindrical screw. Yet, results indicate that holding power was greater than theoretical consideration, possibly due to lower friction and lower preloaded force. During graft push out in the densest material, comparable max loads were achieved with both systems, suggesting that fixation of higher density bone, which is observed in young athletes that require reconstruction, can be achieved with the twist lock screw. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. "NIMS technique" for minimally invasive spinal fixation using non-fenestrated pedicle screws: A technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alugolu Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Case series. Objective: To reduce the cost of minimally invasive spinal fixation. Background: Minimally invasive spine (MIS surgery is an upcoming modality of managing a multitude of spinal pathologies. However, in a resource-limited situations, using fenestrated screws (FSs may prove very costly for patients with poor affordability. We here in describe the Nizam′s Institute of Medical Sciences (NIMS experience of using routine non-FSs (NFSs for transpedicular fixation by the minimally invasive way to bridge the economic gap. Materials and Methods: A total of 7 patients underwent NFS-minimally invasive spine (MIS surgery. Male to female distribution was 6:1. The average blood loss was 50 ml and the mean operating time was 2 and 1/2 h. All patients were mobilized the very next day after confirming the position of implants on X-ray/computed tomography. Results: All 7 patients are doing well in follow-up with no complaints of a backache or fresh neurological deficits. There was no case with pedicle breach or screw pullout. The average cost of a single level fixation by FS and NFS was `1, 30,000/patient and `32,000/patient respectively ($2166 and $530, respectively. At the end of 1-year follow-up, we had two cases of screw cap loosening and with a displacement of the rod cranio-caudally in one case which was revised through the same incisions. Conclusions: Transpedicular fixation by using NFS for thoracolumbar spinal pathologies is a cost-effective extension of MIS surgery. This may extend the benefits to a lower socioeconomic group who cannot afford the cost of fenestrated screw (FS.

  5. Increased pedicle screw pullout strength with vertebroplasty augmentation in osteoporotic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzier, John S; Evans, Avery J; Cahill, David W

    2002-04-01

    The authors conducted a biomechanical study to evaluate pedicle screw pullout strength in osteoporotic cadaveric spines. Nonaugmented hemivertebrae were compared with pressurized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-augmented hemivertebrae. Six formalin-fixed cadaveric thoracolumbar spines at least two standard deviations below the mean bone mineral density (BMD) for age were obtained. Radiographic and BMD studies were correlated to grades I, II, and III osteoporosis according to the Jekei scale. Each of the 21 vertebrae underwent fluoroscopic placement of 6-mm transpedicular screws with each hemivertebra serving as the control for the contralateral PMMA-augmented hemivertebra. Pedicle screws were then evaluated for biomechanical axial pullout resistance. Augmented hemivertebrae axial pullout forces were increased (p = 0.0005). The mean increase in pullout force was 181% for Grade I, 206% for Grade II, and 213% for Grade III osteoporotic spines. Augmented Grade I osteoporotic spines demonstrated axial pullout forces near those levels reported in the literature for nonosteoporotic specimens. Augmented Grade II osteoporotic specimens demonstrated increases to levels found in nonaugmented vertebrae with low-normal BMD. Augmented Grade III osteoporotic specimens had increases to levels equal to those found in nonaugmented Grade I vertebrae. Augmentation of osteoporotic vertebrae in PMMA-assisted vertebroplasty can significantly increase pedicle screw pullout forces to levels exceeding the strength of cortical bone. The maximum attainable force appears to be twice the pullout force of the nonaugmented pedicle screw for each osteoporotic grade.

  6. Evaluacion de la biopsia transpedicular guiada por TAC Avaliação da biópsia transpedicular guiada por TC Evaluation of transpedicular percutaneous biopsy guided by CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Rosales Olivarez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Valorar la utilidad de la biopsia transpedicular percutánea guiada por Tomografía Axial Computarizada en conjunto con la sistematización de estudios como pruebas diagnósticas de la etiología de la destrucción vertebral. MÉTODOS: Estudio de serie de casos prospectivo transversal de 21 pacientes a los que se les realizó biopsia transpedicular percutánea guiada por Tomografía Axial Computarizada y estudios de laboratorio y gabinete de marzo a julio del 2011, para evaluar su utilidad en el diagnóstico de destrucción vertebral. RESULTADOS: Fueron 21 pacientes, 14 hombres y 7 mujeres, con edad media de 59,2 años, cuyos niveles más afectados estuvieron en L1, L2 y L3. El reporte de la biopsia tuvo una precisión diagnóstica del 90,4%. En 2 casos se realizó correlación clínica entre biopsia y sistematización de estudios para obtener el diagnóstico. CONCLUSIÓN: La biopsia guiada por Tomografía Axial Computarizada es una técnica sencilla, útil, de bajo costo y eficaz en el estudio de la destrucción vertebral; la sistematización de estudios permite corroborar el diagnóstico de la biopsia.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a utilidade da biópsia transpedicular percutânea guiada por tomografia axial computadorizada em conjunto com a sistematização de estudos, como exames diagnósticos da etiologia da destruição vertebral. MÉTODOS: Estudo de série de casos, prospectivo e transversal de 21 pacientes submetidos à biópsia transpedicular percutânea guiada por tomografia axial computadorizada e exames laboratoriais e radiológicos, de março a julho de 2011, para avaliar sua utilidade no diagnóstico de destruição vertebral. RESULTADOS: Foram analisados 21 pacientes, 14 homens e 7 mulheres, com média de idade de 59,2 anos, cujos níveis mais afetados foram L1, L2 e L3. O laudo da biópsia teve precisão diagnóstica de 90,4%. Em dois casos, realizou-se a correlação clínica entre biópsia e sistematização de exames para obter

  7. Computer tomography assessment of pedicle screw placement in lumbar and sacral spine: comparison between free-hand and O-arm based navigation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbermann, J; Riese, F; Allam, Y; Reichert, T; Koeppert, H; Gutberlet, M

    2011-06-01

    Transpedicular screw fixation has been accepted worldwide since Harrington et al. first placed pedicle screws through the isthmus. In vivo and in vitro studies indicated that pedicle screw insertion accuracy could be significantly improved with image-assisted systems compared with conventional approaches. The O-arm is a new generation intraoperative imaging system designed without compromise to address the needs of a modern OR like no other system currently available. The aim of our study was to check the accuracy of O-arm based and S7-navigated pedicle screw implants in comparison to free-hand technique described by Roy-Camille at the lumbar and sacral spine using CT scans. The material of this study was divided into two groups, free-hand group (group I) (30 patients; 152 screws) and O-arm group (37 patients; 187 screws). The patients were operated upon from January to September 2009. Screw implantation was performed during PLIF or TLIF mainly for spondylolisthesis, osteochondritis and post-laminectomy syndrome. The accuracy rate in our work was 94.1% in the free-hand group compared to 99% in the O-arm navigated group. Thus it was concluded that free-hand technique will only be safe and accurate when it is in the hands of an experienced surgeon and the accuracy of screw placement with O-arm can reach 100%.

  8. Accuracy of pedicle screw placement in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jun; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Leilei; Liu, Zhen; Sun, Xu; Qian, Bangping; Jiang, Qing; Zhu, Zezhang; Qiu, Yong

    2017-03-21

    There is no study concerning safety and accuracy of pedicle screw placement in Marfan syndrome. The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy and safety of pedicle screw placement in scoliosis associated with Marfan syndrome. CT scanning was performed to analyze accuracy of pedicle screw placement. Pedicle perforations were classified as medial, lateral or anterior and categorized to four grades: ≤ 2 mm as Grade 1, 2.1-4.0 mm as Grade 2, 4.1-6.0 mm as Grade 3, ≥6.1 mm as Grade 4. Fully contained screws or with medial wall perforation ≤ 2 mm or with lateral wall perforation ≤ 6 mm and without injury of visceral organs were considered acceptable, otherwise were unacceptable. 976 pedicle screws were placed, 713 screws (73.1%) were fully contained within the cortical boundaries of the pedicle. 924 (94.7%) screws were considered as acceptable, and 52 (5.3%) as unacceptable. The perforation rate was higher using free-hand technique than O-arm navigation technique (30.8% VS. 11.4%, P Marfan syndrome is accuracy and safe. O-arm navigation was an effective modality to ensure the safety and accuracy of screw placement. Special attention should be paid when screws were placed at the lumber spine and the concave side of spine deformity to avoid the higher rate of complications.

  9. Descompresión transpedicular en las fracturas vertebrales por estallido

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Benlloch, Juan Antonio; Soler Heredia, A.; Segura Llopis, Francisco; Laguía Garzarán, Manuel

    1993-01-01

    Se presentan 15 casos de fracturas vertebrales por estallido, a nivel toracolumbar y lumbar, tratadas mediante descompresión transpedicular y estabilización mediante instrumentación CD. Con un periodo mínimo de 1 año de seguimiento, se analiza la calidad de la descompresión del canal desde el punto de vista neurológico y la evolución de la reducción obtenida. Trece pacientes presentaban afectación neurológica incompleta, valorada según la escala de Frankel modificada por Bradfo...

  10. COMPARISON BETWEEN SHORT AND LONG SEGMENT TRANSPEDICULAR FIXATION OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makkena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Transpedicular instrumentation systems have distinct advantages such as rigid segmental fixation, stabilization of the three columns, least failure at bone metal interface, early post-operative mobilization with efficient nursing care and least complications in the management of thoracolumbar burst fractures. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the clinical and radiological outcome of thoracolumbar burst fractures treated by short segment and long segment transpedicular instrumentation. METHODS 34 patients who underwent posterior spinal stabilization with transpedicular instrumentation and posterolateral fusion for unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures with or without neurological deficit were included in the study. Load sharing classification (Gaines scoring was used retrospectively to correlate fracture comminution and displacement with progression of the deformity and implant failure. Neurological evaluation was done and patients were graded according to ASIA (American Spinal Cord Injury Association impairment scale as a part of physical examination. RESULTS The mean intra-operative correction in the short segment group was 14.4° and the loss of correction observed at the last follow-up evaluation was 7.48° with a final gain of 6.92°. The mean intra-operative correction in the long segment group was 19.77° and the loss of correction observed at the last follow-up evaluation was 6.61°. Final gain was 13.16°. On radiological evaluation, mean correction loss of 7.48 degrees and 3.4% implant failure was noted in the short segment group while the long segment group had 6.61 degrees of mean correction loss and no implant failure. There was no positive correlation found between Gaines score with progression of deformity. CONCLUSION Transpedicular fixation is a stable, reliable and less surgically extensive construct for addressing thoracolumbar burst fractures. About 6-8° loss of correction was observed with both

  11. Entry zone of iliac screw fixation to maintain proper entry width and screw length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-An; Kwak, Dai-Soon; You, Sung-Lim

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the entry zone of iliac screw fixation to maintain proper entry width and screw length. Computed tomography images of pelvic bones from 90 human cadavers were reconstructed into 3-dimensional models. In each model, a sectional image crossing the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS) and anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) and consecutive sectional images up to 20 mm superiorly and inferiorly from the PSIS with 1-mm intervals aiming the AIIS were obtained. One virtual iliac screw with 10-mm diameter was introduced onto the PSIS at the middle and at the lateral and medial 1/4 points on the prominence of the posterior iliac spine. The entry width of the bony prominence and the corresponding maximal screw length available were evaluated for each entry point. The entry width was smallest on the inferior 20 mm (4.7 ± 3.0 mm) and gradually increased up to the superior 10 mm (19.1 ± 3.9 mm) sectional images. The maximal screw length was smallest on the superior 20 mm (76.7 ± 39.7 mm) and gradually increased down to the inferior 10 mm (112.3 ± 15.1 mm) sectional images. The maximal screw lengths were significantly greatest at the most medial point and smallest at the most lateral point on the superior 20- and 10-mm sectional images and at the PSIS. The iliac screw fixation entry zone to maintain proper screw length and entry width is outlined from 20 mm superiorly to 10 mm inferiorly from the PSIS and is located more medially from the prominence of the posterior iliac spine.

  12. Surgery for ventral intradural thoracic spinal tumors with a posterolateral transpedicular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Aoyama, Tatsuro; Miyaoka, Yoshinari; Seguchi, Tatsuya; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Surgery for ventrally seated thoracic tumors requires an anatomically specific approach that is distinct from cervical or lumbar spinal cord surgery as the narrower spinal canal of the thoracic spinal cord makes it sensitive to surgical procedures. However, reports describing this operative technique are few. To obtain a wide operative field and minimize thoracic spinal cord retraction, we employed a posterolateral transpedicular approach in ventral-located tumors and investigated the efficacy and limitations of this technique. Eighteen patients with lesions (meningioma or neurinoma) located in the ventral intradural thoracic region were surgically treated between 2009 and 2014. The relationship among the clinical outcome, tumor location, and postoperative spinal alignment was analyzed. Postoperative neurological function improved in all patients, namely those with meningioma (p = 0.012) and schwannoma (p = 0.018). One patient who underwent removal of two facet joints suffered a postoperative compression fracture. Removal of two facet joints and pedicles resulted in a worsening of spinal alignment (p = 0.03), while this was not the case for the removal of one facet joint and pedicle (p = 0.72). This case series clarified the benefits of the posterolateral transpedicular approach for resection of ventral intradural extramedullary tumors. Removal of one pedicle and facet joint seems to be more beneficial.

  13. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  14. Percutaneous Anterior Column Fixation for Acetabulum Fractures, Does It Have to Be Difficult?-The New Axial Pedicle View of the Anterior Column for Percutaneous Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihai; Zhang, Wei; Mullis, Brian; Liu, Daohong; Xiong, Qi; Lv, Houchen; Ji, Xinran; Peng, Ye; Tang, Peifu

    2016-01-01

    Anterior column percutaneous screw fixation can be challenging. The purpose of this new technique is to offer a rapid, simple, and safe method to place an anterior screw. The authors used a 3-dimensional reconstruction simulation, cadaver study, and a clinical case series to demonstrate this new alternative to standard previously described techniques.

  15. Clinical experience with the screw extraction set for broken screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Titanium plate systems are used frequently for bone fractures and postosteotomy fixation in craniomaxillofacial surgery. However, sometimes the head of the screw for plate fixation is deformed or the screw breaks in the bone. Screw removal can be difficult in these cases. In this study, we examined the utility of the Screw Extraction Set (Synthes Inc) in facilitating the removal of screws broken in craniomaxillofacial bones. In the past, we often encountered screw head sockets that had become deformed. In the removal of such a screw, the extraction screw tip did not engage well with the deformed screw head socket because the extraction screw tip was angled obtusely. Thus, its removal was difficult, and this method was clearly problematic. Using the Screw Extraction Set, the removal method for a screw broken in the bone was relatively easy. In particular, it was very convenient in removing broken screws in the mandibular angle and ramus, where surgery is difficult under direct vision. This system was thought to be useful for craniofacial surgeons if proper patient selection is performed.

  16. PMMA-augmentation of incompletely cannulated pedicle screws: a cadaver study to determine the benefits in the osteoporotic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goost, H; Deborre, C; Wirtz, D C; Burger, C; Prescher, A; Fölsch, C; Pflugmacher, R; Kabir, K

    2014-01-01

    Pedicle screw pullout due to poor bone quality, mainly caused by osteoporosis, is a common problem in spine surgery. Special implants and techniques, especially PMMA augmentation, were developed to improve the fixation of pedicle screws. PMMA injection into a pilot hole or through a screw involves the same risks as vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, regardless of the technique used. Especially when using fully cannulated screws anterior leakage is possible. To prove PMMA injection is safe and possible without leakage through an incompletely cannulated screw and also increases pullout forces in the osteoporotic vertebra. Incompletely cannulated pedicle screws were tested by axial pullout in human cadavers, divided into osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic groups. Non-augmented and PMMA-augmented pedicle screws were compared. Twenty-five human vertebrae were measured by DEXA and divided into osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic groups. In each vertebra both pedicles were instrumented with the new screw (WSI-Expertise 6×45 mm, Peter Brehm Inc. Germany); the right screw was augmented with a 3 mL PMMA injection through the screw. On each screw axial pullout was performed after X-ray and CT scan. Radiographs and CT scans excluded PMMA leakage. Cement was distributed in the middle and posterior third of the vertebrae. Pullout forces were significantly higher after pedicle screw augmentation, especially in the osteoporotic bone. All augmented pedicle screws showed higher pullout forces compared with the unaugmented screws. We minimized the risk of leakage by using a screw with a closed tip. On the whole, PMMA augmentation through an incompletely cannulated pedicle screw is safe and increases pullout forces in osteoporotic bone to the level of healthy bone. Therefore the new incompletely cannulated screw can be used for pedicle screw augmentation.

  17. Screw as a Bladder Foreign Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Hosseini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the bladder are among the strangest differential diagnoses in the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and may be missed in initial medical evaluations. We present a 63-year-old man who was visited in the emergency department because of obstructive and irritative lower urinary tract symptoms. Two months earlier, he had a pelvic fracture due to motor vehicle accident and underwent an open reduction and internal fixation of the pubic rami and right acetabulum by an anterior ilioinguinal approach. After initial evaluation, an abdominopelvic X-ray revealed a 3 cm screw in the suprapubic area. He underwent urethrocystoscopy and a 3 cm screw was extracted by forceps.

  18. Modelo simulador para treinamento de punção transpedicular em vertebroplastia percutânea Manikin-type training simulator model for transpedicular puncture in percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitamar Abdala

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Desenvolver e testar a similaridade de modelo de coluna lombar tipo manequim para treinamento de punção transpedicular em vertebroplastia percutânea. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram confeccionadas 30 vértebras lombares à base, principalmente, de metacrilato, gesso e etil-vinil-acetato, a partir de molde de borracha baseado em vértebra humana. Os discos intervertebrais foram feitos com silicone para que houvesse similaridade anatômica e fusão de cinco vértebras. O segmento da coluna foi acondicionado no interior de um manequim coberto por tela de etil-vinil-acetato para que não fosse possível a visualização direta. Foi realizado curso teórico para seis especializandos de radiologia e neurorradiologia, que testaram o modelo para vários parâmetros de similaridade com a realidade, realizando 30 punções transpediculares, em três sessões de dez procedimentos por dia, com intervalo de uma semana entre cada sessão. RESULTADOS: Cada aluno realizou 30 punções transpediculares, porém oito punções foram desconsideradas, pois se observaram problemas de manufatura dos modelos durante estes procedimentos. Após a realização das punções, todos os participantes preencheram o formulário de similaridade, com 100% de respostas positivas em relação à similaridade do modelo. CONCLUSÃO: Foi possível o desenvolvimento de modelo para punção transpedicular com similaridade satisfatória com o ser humano, configurando um instrumento de treinamento de vertebroplastia.OBJECTIVE: To develop and test a model of the human lumbar vertebra for training transpedicular puncture in percutaneous vertebroplasty. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty lumbar vertebra models were constructed from methacrylate, plaster and ethyl-vinyl-acetate, using a rubber mold of human vertebrae. The intervertebral discs were made of silicone to provide anatomical similarity and fusion of five vertebrae. This model of spinal column segment was positioned within a

  19. Latarjet Fixation: A Cadaveric Biomechanical Study Evaluating Cortical and Cannulated Screw Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, Hasham M; Monroe, Emily J; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option.

  20. Biomechanical Evaluation of Strength and Stiffness of Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis Screw Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastifer, James R; Alrafeek, Saif; Howard, Peter; Gustafson, Peter A; Coughlin, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Subtalar arthrodesis is a common treatment for end-stage subtalar joint arthritis as well as many other clinical problems. The best method of subtalar arthrodesis fixation is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the strength of subtalar arthrodesis fixation methods including a single posterior screw (SP), 2 posterior minimally divergent screws (MD) and a 2 screw highly divergent screw (HD) construct for subtalar arthrodesis. A biomechanical study was performed including the three different screw configurations (SP, MD, HD). These surrogate bone specimens were subjected to applied inversion and eversion torques about the subtalar joint axis on a servo-hydraulic load frame. Torsional stiffness of the construct and the maximum torque for each configuration were measured. Additionally, a cadaver study was performed using 5 fresh-frozen cadaver specimens. The perpendicular distance from the divergent screw guide-wire placement was measured from anatomic structures. The HD screw configuration was found to have the highest torsional stiffness in both inversion and eversion, followed by the MD construct and then the SP construct. Similarly, the HD construct had the highest maximum torque versus the MD and SP constructs. All between-group differences were statistically significant (P screw included the sural nerve (13 mm), peroneus brevis tendon (18 mm), tibialis anterior tendon (8 mm), and tibialis posterior tendon (21 mm). This biomechanical and cadaver study supports the use of 2 screws for fixation of subtalar arthrodesis over a single posterior screw. Additionally, we describe a biomechanically superior and potentially safe, alternative 2-screw divergent construct. This study gives biomechanical support for 2 screw, divergent fixation of subtalar arthrodesis or a single over a single screw or two screw minimally divergent construct. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Fixação transpedicular da coluna toraco-lombo-sagrada: análise de 124 parafusos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVO: Avaliar a técnica free hand de colocação de parafusos transpediculares na coluna torácica, lombar e sagrada. MÉTODOS: Avaliação clínica e imagiológica (tomografia computorizada de 25 pacientes (13 mulheres e 12 homens submetidos a instrumentação vertebral num total de 124 parafusos transpediculares aplicados, utilizando a técnica free hand. Os parafusos foram inseridos de T11 a S1, e a maioria destes foram colocados nos níveis L4, L5 e S1. RESULTADOS: 94% dos parafusos transpediculares estavam correctamente colocados no pedículo. Verificou-se que 6% (7 parafusos estavam mal colocados e destes apenas dois violavam a cortical inferomedial, um destes apresentava uma perfuração inferior a 2 mm e o outro entre 2 e 4 mm. Nenhum dos pacientes seguidos apresentou complicações associadas ao incorrecto posicionamento dos parafusos. CONCLUSÃO: A técnica free hand é segura na instrumentação da coluna torácica e lombo-sagrada.

  2. Extra-articular and transcutaneous migration of the poly-l/D-lactide interference screw after popliteal tendon reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Partezani Helito

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Knee ligament reconstructions are commonly performed orthopedic procedures. Graft fixation is generally performed with metallic or absorbable interference screws. In a recent study, only ten reports of screw migration were retrieved; of these, only one was not related to the anterior cruciate ligament, and the majority was related to the use of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA screws. Only one case retrieved in the literature reported screw migration in reconstructions of the posterolateral corner, and that was to the intra-articular region. In the present article, the authors report a case of extra-articular and transcutaneous migration of a poly-l/D-lactide (PDLLA interference screw following popliteal tendon reconstruction. Besides being the first case of popliteal tendon migration with extra-articular screw migration, no reports of PDLLA screw migration were retrieved in the literature.

  3. Improving the pullout strength of pedicle screws by screw coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Abe, E; Okuyama, K; Sato, K

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of pedicle screw coupling on the pullout strength of pedicle screws in the osteoporotic spine. The vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) of 33 cadaveric lumbar vertebrae were measured by quantitative computed tomography. Pedicle screws were inserted into each pedicle. The pullout strength and displacement of the screws, without coupling and with single or double couplers, were studied, and the relationship between pullout strength and BMD was analyzed. The average pullout strength of the pedicle screws without screw coupling was 909.3 +/- 188.6 N (n = 9), that coupled with a single coupler was 1,409.0 +/- 469.1 N (n = 9), and that with double couplers was 1,494.0 +/- 691.6 N (n = 9). The pullout strength of the screws coupled with single or double couplers was significantly greater than that of screws without couplers (p pullout strength by screw coupling was significant in a test group with BMD of more than 90 mg/ml (p pedicle screws improves pullout strength; however, the effect tends to be less significant in severely osteoporotic spines.

  4. Anterior or posterior approach of thoracic disc herniation? A comparative cohort of mini-transthoracic versus transpedicular discectomies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, M.P.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: The optimal surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniations remains controversial and depends on the consistency of the herniation and its location related to the spinal cord. PURPOSE: To compare the outcomes of patients with symptomatic thoracic disc herniations treated with

  5. Strength comparison of allogenic bone screws, bioabsorbable screws, and stainless steel screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rano, James A; Savoy-Moore, Ruth T; Fallat, Lawrence M

    2002-01-01

    Allogenic bone screws are new to the fixation market and have yet to be tested against current fixation materials. An in vitro comparison of the same sizes of stainless steel, bioabsorbable, and allogenic bone screws was undertaken to assess screw resistance to the forces of bending, pullout, and shear. Using aluminum plates to support the screws, forces up to 1000 Newtons were applied to six to eight samples of each type of screw. During each test, stainless steel screws withstood the maximum force that could be exerted by the testing apparatus without failing (bending, 113.9 +/- 11.8 N mean +/- SE; pullout 999.1 +/- 33.7 N; and shear, 997.5 +/- 108.8 N). In each test, compared to bioabsorbable screws, allogenic bone screws failed faster (pullout, allogenic: 12.4 +/- 1.1 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 120.6 +/- 13.8 seconds; p = .001; bending, allogenic: 53.4 +/- 4.8 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 201.9 +/- 11.1 seconds; p = .001; shear, allogenic 13.5 +/- 1.4 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 43.8 +/- 0.9 seconds; p = .001) under equivalent (pullout: bioabsorbable, 385.0 +/- 18.4 N vs. allogenic, 401.0 +/- 35.9 N; p = .001) or lower (bending, allogenic: 4.7 +/- 0.2 N vs. bioabsorbable, 11.0 +/- 0.9 N; p = .675; shear, allogenic: 312.1 +/- 15.5 N vs. bioabsorbable 680.9 +/- 8.5 N; p = .001) loads, and in a highly variable fashion. Overall, the bioabsorbable screws withstood the forces of bending, pullout, and shear better than the allogenic screws, and stainless steel screws outperformed both bioabsorbable and allogenic screws. Despite these results, allogenic screws could still be useful in compliant patients who would benefit from their osteoconductive properties.

  6. ROTARY SCREW SYSTEMS IN CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Taratuta V. D.; Belokur K. A.; Serga G. V.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of research of rotary-screw systems in relation to the creation of rotary kilns for the annealing of-cuttings in the preparation of cement clinker. Using the proposed design, in comparison with known designs of similar purpose, it significantly improves performance, reduces size and power consumption through the use of rotary screw systems in the form of screw rotors and drums made hollow with sidewalls assembled from separate strips or plates of different geometr...

  7. Treatment of Andersson lesion-complicating ankylosing spondylitis via transpedicular subtraction and disc resection osteotomy, a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Wang, Yao; Wu, Bing; Hu, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhifa; Wang, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Andersson lesion (AL) can occur in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Surgical instrumentation and fusion is considered the principle management in symptomatic AL that fails to resolve from a conservative treatment. However, there is significant controversy over the ideal management. The purpose of this study is to introduce our experience and explore the efficacy and feasibility of transpedicular subtraction and disc resection osteotomy technique for patients with AL-complicating AS. From January 2009 to January 2013, 17 consecutive patients with Andersson lesion-complicating ankylosing spondylitis treated with transpedicular subtraction and disc resection osteotomy technique were retrospectively reviewed. All patients completed a follow-up of at least 2 years. The average surgical time was 219 min with a mean intraoperative blood loss of 876 ml. The average preoperative regional angle was 29.1°, 4.9° postoperatively, and 5.9° at the final follow-up. The global angle changed from 59.1° preoperatively to 24.7° after surgery with the sagittal vertical axis (SVA) changed from 153.7 to 41.1 mm. The mean VAS back pain scores decreased from 6.4 preoperatively to 1.1 postoperatively and the ODI score improved from 50.9 preoperatively to 16.9 at the final follow-up. Solid fusion was obtained in all patients. The transpedicular subtraction and disc resection osteotomy achieve satisfactory kyphosis correction, good fusion and favorable clinical outcomes with less blood loss and complications than other approaches, implying an alternative method in patients with Andersson lesion-complicating ankylosing spondylitis.

  8. SCREW SELECTION FOR SCREW OPERATION USING EXPERT SYSTEM APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüdayim BAŞAK

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a expert system has been developed using Leonardo expert system package programming for screw operation, According to DIN standard norm. The designed program decide the most suitable screw type considering to material, cutting speed, working condition etc. This program also directs to user.

  9. Antegrade-retrograde opposing lag screws for internal fixation of simple displaced talar neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkafy, Ashraf; Imam, Mohamed Abdelnabi; Sokkar, Sherif; Hirschmann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The talar neck is deviated medially with reference to the long axis of the body of the talus. In addition, it deviates plantarward. The talar neck fracture line is sometimes observed to be oriented obliquely (not perpendicular to the long axis of the talar neck). This occurs when the medially deviated talar neck strikes the horizontally oriented anterior lower tibial edge. Internal fixation of a simple displaced talar neck fracture usually requires 2 lag screws. Because the fracture line is obliquely oriented, a better method for positioning the screws perpendicular to the fracture line is to place them in a reversed direction to provide maximum interfragmentary compression at the fracture site, which could increase the likelihood of absolute stability with subsequent improvement in the incidence of fracture union and a reduction of complications, such as avascular necrosis of the body of the talus. Two lag screws are used, with the first inserted from posteriorly to anteriorly (perpendicular to the fracture line) using a medial approach after medial malleolar chevron osteotomy. The second screw is inserted from anteriorly to posteriorly (perpendicular to the fracture line) using an anterolateral approach. Both screw heads should be countersunk. A series of 8 patients underwent this form of internal fixation for talar neck fracture repair, with satisfactory functional outcomes. In conclusion, the use of antegrade-retrograde opposing lag screws is a reasonable method of internal fixation for simple displaced talar neck fractures. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fixation strength of biocomposite wedge interference screw in ACL reconstruction: effect of screw length and tunnel/screw ratio. A controlled laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary stability of the graft is essential in anterior cruciate ligament surgery. An optimal method of fixation should be easy to insert and provide great resistance against pull-out forces. A controlled laboratory study was designed to test the primary stability of ACL tendinous grafts in the tibial tunnel. The correlation between resistance to traction forces and the cross-section and length of the screw was studied. Methods The tibial phase of ACL reconstruction was performed in forty porcine tibias using digital flexor tendons of the same animal. An 8 mm tunnel was drilled in each specimen and two looped tendons placed as graft. Specimens were divided in five groups according to the diameter and length of the screw used for fixation. Wedge interference screws were used. Longitudinal traction was applied to the graft with a Servohydraulic Fatigue System. Load and displacement were controlled and analyzed. Results The mean loads to failure for each group were 295,44 N (Group 1; 9 × 23 screw, 564,05 N (Group 2; 9 × 28, 614,95 N (Group 3; 9 × 35, 651,14 N (Group 4; 10 × 28 and 664,99 (Group 5; 10 × 35. No slippage of the graft was observed in groups 3, 4 and 5. There were significant differences in the load to failure among groups (ANOVA/P Conclusions Longer and wider interference screws provide better fixation in tibial ACL graft fixation. Short screws (23 mm do not achieve optimal fixation and should be implanted only with special requirements.

  11. Preoperative CT planning of screw length in arthroscopic Latarjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Alexandre; Gerometta, Antoine; Granger, Benjamin; Massein, Audrey; Casabianca, Laurent; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The Latarjet procedure has shown its efficiency for the treatment of anterior shoulder dislocation. The success of this technique depends on the correct positioning and fusion of the bone block. The length of the screws that fix the bone block can be a problem. They can increase the risk of non-union if too short or be the cause of nerve lesion or soft tissue discomfort if too long. Suprascapular nerve injuries have been reported during shoulder stabilisation surgery up to 6 % of the case. Bone block non-union depending on the series is found around 20 % of the cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of this CT preoperative planning to predict optimal screws length. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the efficiency of CT planning to predict screw length. Inclusion criteria were patients with chronic anterior instability of the shoulder with an ISIS superior to 4. Exclusion criteria were patients with multidirectional instability or any previous surgery on this shoulder. Thirty patients were included prospectively, 11 of them went threw a CT planning, before their arthroscopic Latarjet. Optimal length of both screws was calculated, adding the size of the coracoid at 5 and 15 mm from the tip to the glenoid. Thirty-two-mm screws were used for patients without planning. On a post-operative CT scan with 3D reconstruction, the distance between the screw tip and the posterior cortex was measured. A one-sample Wilcoxon test was used to compare the distance from the tip of the screw to an acceptable positioning of ±2 mm from the posterior cortex. In the group without planning, screw 1 tended to differ from the acceptable positioning: mean 3.44 mm ± 3.13, med 2.9 mm, q1; q3 [0.6; 4.75] p = 0.1118, and screw 2 differed significantly from the acceptable position: mean 4.83 mm ± 4.11, med 3.7 mm, q1; q3 [1.7; 5.45] p = 0.0045. In the group with planning, position of

  12. Frictional performance of ball screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Katuhiro; Takafuji, Kazuki

    1985-01-01

    As feed screws, ball screws have become to be adopted in place of trapezoidal threads. The structure of ball screws is complex, but those are the indispensable component of NC machine tools and machining centers, and are frequently used for industrial robots. As the problems in the operation of ball screws, there are damage, life and the performance related to friction. As to the damage and life, though there is the problem of the load distribution on balls, the results of the research on rolling bearings are applied. The friction of ball screws consists of the friction of balls and a spiral groove, the friction of a ball and a ball, the friction in a ball-circulating mechanism and the viscous friction of lubricating oil. It was decided to synthetically examine the frictional performance of ball screws, such as driving torque, the variation of driving torque, efficiency, the formation of oil film and so on, under the working condition of wide range, using the screws with different accuracy and the nuts of various circuit number. The experimental setup and the processing of the experimental data, the driving performance of ball screws and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. The pullout performance of pedicle screws

    CERN Document Server

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-01-01

    This brief book systematically discusses all subjects that affect the pullout strength of pedicle screws. These screws are used in spinal surgeries to stabilize the spine. The holding strength of the pedicle screw is vital since loosening of the pedicle screws can cause revision surgeries. Once the pedicle screw is pulled out, it is harder to obtain same stabilization for the fused vertebrae. The book reviews the effect of screw designs, application techniques, cement augmentation, coating of the screw and test conditions on the pullout strength. The studies with finite element analysis were also included.

  14. Designing screws for polymer compounding in twin-screw extruders =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Cristina Ferreira

    Considering its modular construction, co-rotating twin screw extruders can be easily adapted to work with polymeric systems with more stringent specifications. However, their geometrical flexibility makes the performance of these machines strongly dependent on the screw configuration. Therefore, the definition of the adequate screw geometry to use in a specific polymer system is an important process requirement which is currently achieved empirically or using a trial-and-error basis. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic optimization methodology able to define the best screw geometry/configuration to use in a specific compounding/reactive extrusion operation, reducing both cost and time. This constitutes an optimization problem where a set of different screw elements are to be sequentially positioned along the screw in order to maximize the extruder performance. For that, a global modeling program considering the most important physical, thermal and rheological phenomena developing along the axis of an intermeshing co-rotating twin screw extruder was initially developed. The accuracy and sensitivity of the software to changes in the input parameters was tested for different operating conditions and screw configurations using a laboratorial Leistritz LSM 30.34 extruder. Then, this modeling software was integrated into an optimization methodology in order to be possible solving the Twin Screw Configuration Problem. Multi-objective versions of local search algorithms (Two Phase Local Search and Pareto Local Search) and Ant Colony Optimization algorithms were implemented and adapted to deal with the combinatorial, discrete and multi-objective nature of the problem. Their performance was studied making use of the hypervolume indicator and Empirical Attainment Function, and compared with the Reduced Pareto Search Genetic Algorithm (RPSGA) previously developed and applied to this problem. In order to improve the quality of the results and/or to decrease the

  15. Designation and Validation of a Posterior Anatomical Plate for the Anterior Column of the Acetabulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifeng; Lin, Chuangxin; Cao, Shenglu; Wang, Yiran; Peng, Geng; Xu, Yongqiang; Feng, Yongzeng; Wang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment of acetabular fractures is one of the greatest challenges for orthopedic surgeons. Fixation of most displaced fractures requires extensive exposure, which may lead to complications, including blood loss, neural or vascular injury, postoperative infection, wound healing problems, and heterotopic bone formation. Material/Methods This study was conducted to certify an anatomic plate with an anterior column lag screw guiding device to repair the posterior acetabulum. Complete pelvic spiral computed tomography (CT) scan data were collected from 56 patients. The posterior column of the acetabulum was simulated with a lag screw. The guiding device for the plate was designed by measuring the position of the screw point and the direction and maximum diameter of the screw. Results The distance from the screw point to the apex of the greater sciatic notch was farther in women than in men. The distance from the screw point to the ischial spine was also farther in women than in men. The θ angle (front inclination angle) of the screw was lower in women than in men. The ϕ angle (camber screw angle) was greater in women than in men. The success rate when using the guided device was significantly higher than when using traditional pedicle screws. Conclusions The guided device was very useful for improving placement success and accuracy rates of the acetabular posterior anatomical anterior column plate using antegrade lag screws, and for reducing surgical risk and injury. PMID:28222067

  16. Do Newer-Generation Bioabsorbable Screws Become Incorporated into Bone at Two Years After ACL Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon Graft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles L.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Leonard, James P.; Morris, Brent J.; Dunn, Warren R.; Reinke, Emily K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bioabsorbable interference screws are used frequently for graft fixation in ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) reconstruction. The resorption properties of many available screws that are marketed as bioabsorbable are not well defined. The CALAXO (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy) and MILAGRO (DePuy Synthes) bioabsorbable screws contain polymers of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) plus additives to encourage osseointegration over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) properties and compare patient-reported outcomes at a minimum of two years of follow-up after ACL reconstruction using CALAXO or MILAGRO bioabsorbable interference screws. Methods: A cohort of patients who underwent ACL reconstruction in which the fixation used was either CALAXO or MILAGRO screws returned for repeat radiographs for evaluation of tunnel widening, repeat MRI for evaluation of graft integrity and screw breakdown, and completion of the pain and symptom items of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) questionnaire. Results: At a mean of three years (range, 2.5 to 4.0 years) after surgery, thirty-one patients with sixty-two CALAXO screws and thirty-six patients with seventy-two MILAGRO screws returned for repeat evaluation. Two blinded, independent reviewers found no significant differences between the two screw types when comparing radiographs for tibial or femoral tunnel widening or MRIs for graft integrity, tibial and femoral foreign body reactions, or femoral screw degradation. Both reviewers found a significant difference between the two screw types when comparing tibial screw degradation properties (p MILAGRO screws were more likely to be rated as intact. No significant differences were noted between the two screw types when comparing the two KOOS subscales. Conclusions: CALAXO screws in the tibial tunnel were more likely to be rated as degraded or partially degraded compared with MILAGRO screws at a mean

  17. Treatment of atlanto-axial subluxation secondary to rheumatoid arthritis by short segment stabilization with polyaxial screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Petr; Bradac, Ondrej; de Lacy, Patricia; Pavelka, Karel; Votavova, Martina; Benes, Vladimir

    2017-09-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyse the compex clinical and radiographic findings in a group of RA patients with atlanto-axial slip (AAS) treated with free-hand short C1 lateral mass and C2 trans-pedicular screw fixation. The surgical technique used and the pathology treated were the same in all patients, producing a very homogeneous cohort of patients This allowed the study and measurement of radiographic parameters and fusion process. Twenty-nine patients (21 female, 8 male, mean age 54.9 years, duration of RA 17.3 years) with AAS and without CS were treated by short C1/2 fixation. Mean follow-up was 4.5 years. Pain intensity was monitored using VAS. Radiographic assessment consisted of lateral cervical radiographs in neutral and dynamic views, MR and CT of the cervical spine. The AADI, PADI, AAA, sub-axial cervical Cobb angle and canal-clivus angle (CCA) were measured pre-operatively and during the follow-up. Significant malposition was recorded in 4 (3.4%) out of 116 inserted screws. AADI, PADI, AAA and CCA values changed significantly after surgery and remained stable during follow-up. The Cobb C angle value showed no significant change after surgery. There was a significant decrease of the VAS after the surgery. Fusion or a stable situation was achieved in all patients at 2-year follow-up. Pannus regression was observed in the vast majority of patients; only in two cases was rheumatic tissue detected on MR at 2 years post-operatively. C1 lateral mass and C2 trans-pedicular fixation with polyaxial screws followed by an autograft between C1 and C2 lamina allowed, with an acceptable complication rate and favourable clinical results, adequate slip reposition, introduction of optimal sagittal alignment in terms of the final AAA with no radiographic consequences for the sub-axial cervical spine and assurance of long-term stability.

  18. Advantages of the paraspinal muscle splitting approach in comparison with conventional midline approach for s1 pedicle screw placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Masato; Neo, Masashi; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2010-05-15

    A retrospective comparative study of the S1 pedicle screw (S1PS) position obtained using 2 surgical approaches. To determine whether the paraspinal approach leads to more medially oriented placement of the S1PS compared with the midline approach. To obtain a stronger as well as safer fixation of the S1PS, medially oriented screw placement is very important. However, no study has recommended a surgical approach to achieve this object. The positions of 32 screws placed by the midline approach and 34 screws placed by the paraspinal approach were compared using postoperative computed tomography. The location of the bilateral common iliac veins (CIV) in relation to the S1PS tips was also analyzed to evaluate their safety. There was no statistical difference in screw insertion point regardless of the approach employed. However, in the paraspinal group the S1PS were placed with significantly greater medial direction and with longer screws. In addition, they pierced the anterior sacral cortex closer to the midline compared with the midline approach. Four left screws in the midline approach group made contact with the left CIV, whereas no screw in the paraspinal approach group lay adjacent to the CIV. Our results demonstrate that the paraspinal approach for S1PS placement may be superior to the midline approach in terms of the medially oriented screw placement that is biomechanically stronger and less risky for the CIV.

  19. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masala, Salvatore, E-mail: salva.masala@tiscali.it [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Tarantino, Umberto [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Nano, Giovanni, E-mail: gionano@gmail.com [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Iundusi, Riccardo [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Fiori, Roberto, E-mail: fiori.r@libero.it; Da Ros, Valerio, E-mail: valeriodaros@hotmail.com; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  20. The principles of interference screw fixation: application to foot and ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Kent A

    2005-01-01

    Based on the success of the anterior cruciate ligament model, interference screw fixation is now being applied to a wide variety of orthopedic conditions that require the fixation of tendon or ligament to bone. The primary focus of this article is to present the principles of interference screw fixation. By understanding the principles of interference screw fixation, the foot and ankle surgeon will be able to apply this fixation technique to a wide variety of surgical applications for tendon transfers or ligament repairs. The surgical technique, history, principles of fixation, studies of fixation strength, tissue healing, and foot and ankle indications are reviewed. A modified Girdlestone digital flexor tendon transfer procedure description is included to illustrate how interference screw techniques may be applied to foot surgery.

  1. EMG-Guided Percutaneous Placement of Cement-Augmented Pedicle Screws for Osteoporotic Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Certo, Francesco; Graziano, Francesca; Basile, Luigi; Gulì, Carlo; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Conti, Alfredo; Maugeri, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous techniques have increasingly gained popularity in recent years. The application of technological innovation, including neuromonitoring techniques, has the potential to increase the safety and efficacy of these procedures. Thirty patients suffering from osteoporotic dorsolumbar burst fracture were prospectively enrolled in this study. The patients underwent percutaneous fenestrated pedicle screw fixation augmented with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) injection. A novel surgeon-dedicated neuromonitoring device was used in order to increase the safety and the accuracy of the screw insertion. A second group of 30 patients who did not undergo neuromonitoring during percutaneous pedicle screw placement, matched for demographic characteristics, constituted the control group. A total of 296 screws were inserted. All treated patients had a good outcome, documented by an improvement in visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Excellent trajectories were achieved in all patients. Cobb's angle and anterior vertebral height were satisfactorily restored in all study group patients. Three misplaced screws in three patients and a case of PMMA leakage without neurological deficits were observed in the control group, whereas no complication was recorded in the study group (p = 0.03). Neuromonitoring in cement-augmented percutaneous pedicle screw placement appears to improve surgeon confidence during surgery, reducing the risk of screw misplacement or cement leakage.

  2. Lumbar pedicle screw salvage: pullout testing of three different pedicle screw designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, R F; Fry, M F; Moseley, T A; Sharkey, N A

    1995-02-01

    Although research has determined pedicle screw pullout strengths for normal and osteoporotic bone, this study provides the first biomechanical analysis of pedicle screw salvage. Ten fresh frozen human lumbar spines were separated into individual vertebrae; 6.0 x 40 mm pedicle screws were placed in each pedicle; and an axial pullout test was performed to establish control values. Ultimate load, initial stiffness, work, and displacement data were calculated. Each vertebra was reinstrumented with one 7.0 x 40 mm variable screw placement (VSP) screw side by side with either a 7.0 mm Cotrel Dubousset sacral screw (CD) or a 7.0 mm Compact Cotrel Dubousset pedicle screw (CCD). Pullout tests were repeated and compared to control data for individual screws and for each VSP/CD or VSP/CCD pair. Vertebrae were then reinstrumented with 8.0 mm VSP and CD screws and paired pullouts repeated. Statistical analysis was carried out using a paired T test. Analysis of intravertebral and intergroup variation of controls was carried out using a Paired Two Sample T test. The 7.0 mm CCD screws restored pullout strength to 62% of control pullouts; 7.0 mm CD screws, to 85%; 7.0 mm VSP screws, to 99%; 8.0 mm CD screws, to 109%; and 8.0 mm VSP screws, to 148% of control pullouts. The 7.0 mm VSP salvage screws exceeded CD screws in ultimate load by 22.5% (p screws by 33.5% (p screws significantly increased pullout relative to both controls and all 7.0 mm salvage screws, with 8.0 mm VSP exceeding 8.0 mm CD by 34% (p screws. Although applied in a smaller number of vertebrae, 8.0 mm screws sufficiently outperformed smaller screws to provide statistically significant differences. The 7.0 mm VSP salvage screws restored pullout to control levels, roughly equivalent to outcomes previously obtained with unpressurized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA).

  3. Biomechanical properties of a novel biodegradable magnesium-based interference screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ezechieli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57. Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05. Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesiumbased screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32. MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future.

  4. Biomechanical Properties of a Novel Biodegradable Magnesium-Based Interference Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezechieli, Marco; Meyer, Hanna; Lucas, Arne; Helmecke, Patrick; Becher, Christoph; Calliess, Tilman; Windhagen, Henning; Ettinger, Max

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA) were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57). Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05). Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesium-based screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32). MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future. PMID:27433303

  5. Misplaced Cervical Screws Requiring Reoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeremy C; Arnold, Paul M; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Nassr, Ahmad; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Mroz, Thomas E; Currier, Bradford L; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Jobse, Bruce C; Massicotte, Eric M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective case series. In the past several years, screw fixation of the cervical spine has become commonplace. For the most part, this is a safe, low-risk procedure. While rare, screw backout or misplaced screws can lead to morbidity and increased costs. We report our experiences with this uncommon complication. A multicenter, retrospective case series was undertaken at 23 institutions in the United States. Patients were included who underwent cervical spine surgery from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011, and had misplacement of screws requiring reoperation. Institutional review board approval was obtained at all participating institutions, and detailed records were sent to a central data center. A total of 12 903 patients met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 11 instances of screw backout requiring reoperation, for an incidence of 0.085%. There were 7 posterior procedures. Importantly, there were no changes in the health-related quality-of-life metrics due to this complication. There were no new neurologic deficits; a patient most often presented with pain, and misplacement was diagnosed on plain X-ray or computed tomography scan. The most common location for screw backout was C6 (36%). This study represents the largest series to tabulate the incidence of misplacement of screws following cervical spine surgery, which led to revision procedures. The data suggest this is a rare event, despite the widespread use of cervical fixation. Patients suffering this complication can require revision, but do not usually suffer neurologic sequelae. These patients have increased cost of care. Meticulous technique and thorough knowledge of the relevant anatomy are the best means of preventing this complication.

  6. Effect of surface coating on the screw loosening of dental abutment screws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Ik; Choe, Han-Cheol; Chung, Chae-Heon

    2004-12-01

    Regardless of the type of performed restoration, in most cases, a screw connection is employed between the abutment and implant. For this reason, implant screw loosening has remained a problem in restorative practices. The purpose of this study was to compare the surface of coated/plated screws with titanium and gold alloy screws and to evaluate the physical properties of coated/plated material after scratch tests via FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) investigation. GoldTite, titanium screws provided by 3i (Implant Innovation, USA) and TorqTite, titanium screws by Steri-Oss (Nobel Biocare, USA) and gold screws and titanium screws by AVANA (Osstem Implant, Korea) were selected for this study. The surface, crest, and root of the abutment screws were observed by FE-SEM. A micro-diamond needle was also prepared for the scratch test. Each abutment screw was fixed, and a scratch on the surface of the head region was made at constant load and thereafter the fine trace was observed with FE-SEM. The surface of GoldTite was smoother than that of other screws and it also had abundant ductility and malleability compared with titanium and gold screws. The scratch tests also revealed that teflon particles were exfoliated easily in the screw coated with teflon. The titanium screw had rough surface and low ductility. The clinical use of gold-plated screws is recommended as a means of preventing screw loosening.

  7. Using Ultrasound to Prevent Screw Penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, George W

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound is a readily available, inexpensive, easy-to-use, and rapid diagnostic tool. Physicians can use ultrasound to identify excessively long screws or screw penetration into joints. This article illustrates ultrasound identification of problem screws. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Percutaneous Cement-Augmented Screws Fixation in the Fractures of the Aging Spine: Is It the Solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Pesenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Management of elderly patients with thoracolumbar fractures is still challenging due to frequent osteoporosis and risk of screws pull-out. The aim of this study was to evaluate results of a percutaneous-only procedure to treat these fragile patients using cement-augmented screws. Methods. 12 patients diagnosed with a thoracolumbar fracture associated with an important loss of bone stock were included in this prospective study. Surgical procedure included systematically a percutaneous osteosynthesis using cemented fenestrated screws. When necessary, additional anterior support was performed using a kyphoplasty procedure. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed using CT scan. Results. On the whole series, 15 fractures were diagnosed and 96 cemented screws were inserted. The difference between the pre- and postoperative vertebral kyphosis was statistically significant (12.9° versus 4.4°, P=0.0006. No extrapedicular screw was reported and one patient was diagnosed with a cement-related pulmonary embolism. During follow-up period, no infectious complications, implant failures, or pull-out screws were noticed. Discussion. Aging spine is becoming an increasing public health issue. Management of these patients requires specific attention due to the augmented risk of complications. Using percutaneous-only screws fixation with cemented screw provides satisfactory results. A rigorous technique is mandatory in order to achieve best outcomes.

  9. Biomechanical Comparison of External Fixation and Compression Screws for Transverse Tarsal Joint Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, L Daniel; Glisson, Richard R; Adams, Samuel B; Schuh, Reinhard; Narron, John A; Easley, Mark E

    2015-10-01

    Transverse tarsal joint arthrodesis is commonly performed in the operative treatment of hindfoot arthritis and acquired flatfoot deformity. While fixation is typically achieved using screws, failure to obtain and maintain joint compression sometimes occurs, potentially leading to nonunion. External fixation is an alternate method of achieving arthrodesis site compression and has the advantage of allowing postoperative compression adjustment when necessary. However, its performance relative to standard screw fixation has not been quantified in this application. We hypothesized that external fixation could provide transverse tarsal joint compression exceeding that possible with screw fixation. Transverse tarsal joint fixation was performed sequentially, first with a circular external fixator and then with compression screws, on 9 fresh-frozen cadaveric legs. The external fixator was attached in abutting rings fixed to the tibia and the hindfoot and a third anterior ring parallel to the hindfoot ring using transverse wires and half-pins in the tibial diaphysis, calcaneus, and metatarsals. Screw fixation comprised two 4.3 mm headless compression screws traversing the talonavicular joint and 1 across the calcaneocuboid joint. Compressive forces generated during incremental fixator foot ring displacement to 20 mm and incremental screw tightening were measured using a custom-fabricated instrumented miniature external fixator spanning the transverse tarsal joint. The maximum compressive force generated by the external fixator averaged 186% of that produced by the screws (range, 104%-391%). Fixator compression surpassed that obtainable with screws at 12 mm of ring displacement and decreased when the tibial ring was detached. No correlation was found between bone density and the compressive force achievable by either fusion method. The compression across the transverse tarsal joint that can be obtained with a circular external fixator including a tibial ring exceeds that

  10. Paradoxical tunnel enlargement after ACL reconstruction with hamstring autografts when using β-TCP containing interference screws for tibial aperture fixation- prospectively comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joon Ho; Lee, Eun Su; Lee, Byung Hoon

    2017-09-16

    Tibial aperture fixation with a bioabsorbable interference screw is a popular fixation method in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). An interference screw containing β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) to improve bony integration and biocompatibility was recently introduced. This study aims to compare the clinical outcomes and radiological results of tunnel enlargement effect between the 2 bioabsorbable fixative devices of pure poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) interference screws and β-TCP-containing screws, for tibial interference fixation in ACLR using hamstring autografts. Eighty consecutive patients who had undergone double-bundle ACLR between 2011 to 2012 were prospectively reviewed and randomly divided into two groups based on the type of tibial interference screw: 28 were assigned to the pure PLLA screw group (Group A), while the other 29 were assigned to the β-TCP-containing screw fixation group (Group B). Clinical evaluations and radiological analyses were conducted in both groups with a minimum 2- year follow-up. There was no significant difference in subjective or objective clinical outcome between the 2 groups. In radiological analyses, the use of a β-TCP-containing screw reduced tunnel widening in the portion of the tunnel with screw engagement compared to the pure PLLA screw, while the use of a β-TCP-containing screw resulted in greater tunnel enlargement in the proximal portion of the tunnel without screw engagement than use of a pure PLLA screw. Use of a β-TCP-containing interference screw in tibial aperture fixation reduced tunnel enlargement in the vicinity of the screw, whereas greater enlargement occurred proximal to the screw end relative to use of a pure PLLA interference screw. These paradoxical enlargements in use of β-TCP containing screws suggest that for reducing tunnel enlargement, the length of the interference screw should be as fit as possible with tunnel length in terms of using soft grafts. II, Prospectively comparative

  11. Metallurgical examination of gun barrel screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, E.L.; Clift, T.L.

    1996-06-01

    The examination was conducted to determine the extent of degradation that had occurred after a series of firings; these screws prevent live rounds of ammunition from being loaded into the firing chamber. One concern is that if the screw tip fails and a live round is accidentally loaded into the chamber, a live round could be fired. Another concern is that if the blunt end of the screw begins to degrade by cracking, pieces could become small projectiles during firing. All screws used in firing 100 rounds or more exhibited some degree degradation, which progressively worsened as the number of rounds fired increased. (SEM, metallography, x-ray analysis, and microhardness were used.) Presence of cracks in these screws after 100 fired rounds is a serious concern that warrants the discontinued use of these screws. The screw could be improved by selecting an alloy more resistant to thermal and chemical degradation.

  12. Transpedicular fixation and fusion-arthrodesis circumferential for the treatment of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis of high degree - Multi centric experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javier Matta Ibarra; Mauricio Rozo Franco; Francisco Restrepo Suarez

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to present the high-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis surgical experience. Spondylolisthesis causes chronic disabling pain, postural alteration and/or motor and sensory deficits in the lower extremities. Surgical stabilization is recommended in symptomatic adult and even in children or adolescents without symptoms because of the deformity progression potential. Stabilization can be done with or without reduction of the slippage; reduction implies neurological damage risk, bone (loosening) or implant (rupture) failure. Many authors recommended to do an in situ circumferential fusion arthrosis (inter body and inter transverse) associated with a transpedicular fixation in order to minimize the described risk. Eight patients were operated from 1993 to 2002. spondylolisthesis was analyzed according to clinical presentation, neurological dysfunction, postural alterations (slip angle, sacral inclination) complications and follow up. During follow up solid fusion was obtained with a better neurological function in all cases. One patient presented with a drop foot that reverted posteriorly; other patient had a superficial infection of the wound that was controlled. Slip angle improved between 8 - 42 and sacral inclination to 20 degrades. Present technique is recommended because it can be done a circumferential in situ arthrodesis in a single stage operation

  13. Maximizing safety in screw placement for posterior facet fixation in calcaneus fractures: a cadaveric radio-anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phisitkul, Phinit; Sullivan, Jaron P; Goetz, Jessica E; Marsh, John L

    2013-09-01

    Successful screw fixation of reduced posterior facet fragments to the unexposed, nondisplaced sustentaculum tali avoids breaching the subtalar joint or disrupting surrounding soft tissue structures. Safe passage for screw fixation through this narrow bony corridor has not been rigorously defined. Computed tomography scans of 8 cadaveric feet were digitally reconstructed in 3-D; 3.5-mm-diameter screws were simulated, aiming at the center of the sustentaculum tali from 5 locations (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) along the posterolateral facet joint. The range of entry points, screw paths trajectories, and screw lengths that did not breach the subtalar joint or the medial calcaneal cortex were evaluated. To prevent violation of the subtalar joint or the medial calcaneal cortex while reaching the center of the sustentaculum tali, screws must be inserted at least 5 mm below the joint line. Screw placement 15 ± 1 mm below the posterior facet measured perpendicular to the joint line provided the widest safe corridor with the trajectory of the ranges from 6 to 36 degrees parallel to the joint depending on the location along the posterior facet and 20 ± 2 degrees perpendicular to the joint at all locations. The average maximal length of screws placed at the ideal entry points ranged from 44 to 46 mm, longest at the 100% location and shortest at the 25% location. Operative guidelines facilitating instrumentation into the sustentaculum tali have been defined applying to most calcanei, assuming the fractures are well reduced: screws, approximately 40 mm in length, should be started 15 mm below the posterior facet measured perpendicular to the joint line and aimed 20 degrees perpendicular to the joint line toward the joint and 6 to 36 degrees anteversion parallel to the joint line increasing at each position from anterior to posterior. The operative guidelines described in this study may assist surgeons in the placement of screws for the fixation of posterior facet fragments to

  14. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  15. Compression screw fixation of the syndesmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Husam H; Glisson, Richard R; DeOrio, James K

    2012-10-01

    Screw fixation of syndesmotic injuries facilitates ligament healing and restoration of ankle stability, but little information regarding screw performance is available. This study quantified the reduction obtained with three common 2-screw configurations using different methods of reduction and novel methods of subsequently provoking and measuring diastasis. Seven fresh-frozen lower extremities were subjected to 100 N medial and lateral tibia loads with the talus restrained. Tibia displacement, indicative of ankle clear space, was recorded. The syndesmosis and distal interosseous ligament were disrupted and measurements repeated. A pressure sensor was inserted into the syndesmosis and three 2-screw fixation methods were evaluated in each specimen: 3.5-mm screws engaging both fibula cortices and the lateral tibial cortex, inserted while using a clamp to achieve syndesmosis reduction; 3.5-mm lag screws engaging both tibia cortices; and 4.5-mm lag screws engaging both tibia cortices. One thousand 100 N medial and lateral loads were applied and clear space and syndesmosis compression were quantified every 100 cycles. Normal ankle clear space averaged 1.98 mm and increased to 3.02 mm after syndesmosis disruption. Fixation decreased the clear space to 1.36 mm, 1.22 mm, and 1.19 mm for the 3.5-mm tricortical, 3.5-mm lag, and 4.5-mm lag screws, respectively, remaining steady throughout cyclic loading. Syndesmosis compression dropped markedly from 61N to 23 N on clamp release after tricortical screw insertion. The 3.5-mm and 4.5-mm lag screws exerted 112 N and 131 N, respectively, after insertion, and maintained compression several-fold greater than the tricortical screws during cyclic loading. No difference was demonstrable between the two lag screw sizes. While all screw configurations successfully reduced ankle clear space, syndesmosis reduction was more effectively maintained by lag screws than by tricortical screws inserted with clamp reduction. The transient nature of

  16. Management of anterior dental crossbite with removable appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayca Tuba Ulusoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the treatment of an 8-year-old girl with anterior dental crossbite using a series of removable appliances to bring the teeth into a normal position. Clinical presentation and intervention: A removable acrylic appliance with a bite plate incorporating a screw was used to correct the anterior dental crossbite and align the incisors. The subsequent eruption of the maxillary left lateral incisor on the palatinal side was treated with a second acrylic plate incorporating a labiolingual spring. After an 8-month period, the anterior crossbite involving multiple incisors was corrected.

  17. Optimal trajectory for the atlantooccipital transarticular screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Yeom, Jin S; Lee, Joon Oh; Buchowski, Jacob M; Park, Kun-Woo; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Riew, K Daniel

    2010-07-15

    Radiologic evaluation of computed tomography (CT) scans using screw insertion simulation software. To investigate the optimal entry point and trajectory of atlantooccipital transarticular screws. To our knowledge, no large series focusing on the placement of atlantooccipital transarticular screws have been published. We used 1.0-mm sliced CT scans and 3-dimensional screw trajectory software to simulate 4.0-mm screw placement. Four entry points were evaluated. Screw placement success rate, safe range of medial angulation, and screw length using each entry point were determined. CT scans of 126 patients were evaluated, for a total of 252 screws for each entry point. On simulation, the 2 lateral entry points showed significantly higher success rates and safe range of medial angulation than the 2 middle points. The 2 lateral entry points had similar success rates (98.0% for anteriolateral (AL) point and 97.6% for posteriolateral (PL) point). Although the safe range of medial angulation was significantly wider for the AL point (26.1 degrees) than for the PL point (23.7 degrees), the screw lengths were significantly longer for the PL point (32.6 mm) than for the AL point (29.4 mm). For both points, 30 degrees of medial angulation led to highest rate of successful screw placement, but the rate was only 79.4% and 80.2%, respectively. Although there was no significant difference in success rates between AL and PL points, PL is likely the best entry point. Although 30 degrees medial and approximately 5 degrees upward angulation led to the highest rate of successful screw placement, the rate was only around 80%. Given the wide individual variation, we recommend that a preoperative 3-dimensional CT scan be obtained when attempting atlantooccipital transarticular screw fixation.

  18. Biomechanical Analysis of Latarjet Screw Fixation: Comparison of Screw Types and Fixation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jason J; Hamamoto, Jason T; Leroux, Timothy S; Saccomanno, Maristella F; Jain, Akshay; Khair, Mahmoud M; Mellano, Christen R; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Nicholson, Gregory P; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-09-01

    To compare the initial fixation stability, failure strength, and mode of failure of 5 different screw types and fixation methods commonly used for the classic Latarjet procedure. Thirty-five fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulder specimens were allocated into 5 groups. A 25% anteroinferior glenoid defect was created, and a classic Latarjet coracoid transfer procedure was performed. All grafts were fixed with 2 screws, differing by screw type and/or fixation method. The groups included partially threaded solid 4.0-mm cancellous screws with bicortical fixation, partially threaded solid 4.0-mm cancellous screws with unicortical fixation, fully threaded solid 3.5-mm cortical screws with bicortical fixation, partially threaded cannulated 4.0-mm cancellous screws with bicortical fixation, and partially threaded cannulated 4.0-mm captured screws with bicortical fixation. All screws were stainless steel. Outcomes included cyclic creep and secant stiffness during cyclic loading, as well as load and work to failure during the failure test. Intergroup comparisons were made by a 1-way analysis of variance. There were no significant differences among different screw types or fixation methods in cyclic creep or secant stiffness after cyclic loading or in load to failure or work to failure during the failure test. Post-failure radiographs showed evidence of screw bending in only 1 specimen that underwent the Latarjet procedure with partially threaded solid cancellous screws with bicortical fixation. The mode of failure for all specimens analyzed was screw cutout. In this biomechanical study, screw type and fixation method did not significantly influence biomechanical performance in a classic Latarjet procedure. When performing this procedure, surgeons may continue to select the screw type and method of fixation (unicortical or bicortical) based on preference; however, further studies are required to determine the optimal method of treatment. Surgeons may choose the screw type and

  19. Influence of Diamondlike Carbon Coating of Screws on Axial Tightening Force and Stress Distribution on Overdenture Bar Frameworks with Different Fit Levels and Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Bacchi, Atais; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the axial tightening force applied by conventional and diamondlike carbon (DLC)-coated screws and to verify, through three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA), the stress distribution caused by different framework materials and prosthetic screws in overdenture frameworks with different misfit levels. The axial tightening force applied by the screw was evaluated by means of a titanium matrix connected to a load cell. Conventional titanium or DLC-coated screws were tightened with a digital torque wrench, and the load values were recorded. The values were applied in an FEA to a bar-clip attachment system connected to two 4.0 × 11-mm external-hexagon titanium implants placed in an anterior edentulous arch. DLC-coated and conventional screws were modeled with their respective axial forces obtained on the experimental evaluation for three bar framework materials (titanium, nickel-chromium, and cobalt-chromium) and three levels of misfit (100, 150, and 200 μm). Von Mises stresses for prosthetic components and maximum principal stress and microstrains (maximum principal strains) for bone tissue were measured. The mean force applied by the conventional screw was 25.55 N (± 1.78); the prosthetic screw coated with a DLC layer applied a mean force of 31.44 N (± 2.11), a statistically significant difference. In the FEA, the DLC screw led to higher stresses on the framework; however, the prosthetic screw suffered lower stress. No influence of screw type was seen in the bone tissue. Titanium frameworks reduced the stress transmitted to the bone tissue and the bar framework but had no influence on the screws. Higher misfit values resulted in an increased stress/strain in bone tissue and bar framework, which was not the case for retention screws.

  20. [Fracture of implant abutment screws and removal of a remaining screw piece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.M. van den; Baat, C. de

    2008-01-01

    Fracture of the implant abutment screws is a complication which can render an implant useless. The prevalence of abutment screw fracture does not exceed 2.5% after 10 years. Causes are loosening of implant abutment screw, too few, too short or too narrow implants, implants not inserted perpendicular

  1. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kyun Sim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  2. Graft osteolysis and recurrent instability after the Latarjet procedure performed with bioabsorbable screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestro, Jean-Christian; Young, Allan; Maccioni, Cristobal; Walch, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    The Latarjet procedure is a reliable treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The coracoid process is usually fixed with metallic screws; however, these can lead to irritation and the necessity for hardware removal and also can produce artifacts on imaging studies. The use of resorbable screws could avoid these complications. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical results of the Latarjet procedure performed with bioabsorbable screws in addition to healing of the graft and resorption of the screws. In 2009, we performed a prospective study (case series, IV) of 11 patients (12 shoulders) who underwent a Latarjet procedure fixed with resorbable screws. Each patient was observed clinically and had a computed tomography scan at 3 months and 2 years of follow-up. Every graft healed at 3-month follow-up. At 2-year follow-up, 4 patients had at least one instability episode, and one underwent a revision surgery. Three of these 4 patients were unhappy or disappointed. The Walch-Duplay score was excellent or good for 7 shoulders and medium or poor for 5. Screw resorption appeared complete in every case. No drill hole enlargement was observed. Every drill hole was partially filled with bone. Of 12 shoulders, 8 (66.67%) were associated with a severe osteolysis and an almost complete disappearance of the graft. Coracoid graft osteolysis, previously reported after the Latarjet procedure, appears to be exacerbated with a risk of complete disappearance of the graft when the procedure is performed with the bioabsorbable screws used in this study. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [A method to avoid the fixator failure by using pedicle screw combined vertebroplasty for spine fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Sheng; Mao, Ke-ya; Liu, Bao-wei; Wang, Yan; Liang, Yu-tian; Tang, Pei-fu; Wang, Hui-xian

    2006-08-15

    To study a new implant material (carbonated hydroxyapatite, CHA) united pedicle screw to cure spine fracture. Thirty-two cases of spine compressed fracture were used with pedicle screw fixator and vertebroplasty. Before operation, patients' vertebral body were compressed (46 + 21)% (20% approximately 70%) on average. In operation, broken vertebral body was reposition through pedicle screw technique, then used self-made syringe to inject CHA into anterior and central column of broken vertebral body through pedicle. And all of patients were not given any bone-graft. In 6 - 26 months followed-up, no immunologic rejection was found about hydroxyapatite, and no any broken of the screws and shafts was found, no loosing and other complications either. All the patients could move in 3 - 5 days after operation. The height of the broken vertebral body were reduced 97% compared with pre-operation. And CHA in vertebral body was degraded gradually, and at the same time it was replace by new bone in vertebral body. After operation, VAS score was 61 +/- 32, and there was significant difference compared with pre-operation. The pedicle screw fixation united vertebroplasty is an efficient way to prevent the failure of the treatment of spine fracture.

  4. Biomechanical comparison of screw versus plate/screw construct for talonavicular fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Shelby E; Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S; Adelaar, Robert S

    2009-02-01

    Talonavicular fusion is performed for a variety of indications. This study examined the effects of fixation techniques on plantar pressures, construct stiffness, and strength. Eight matched pairs of cadaveric lower extremities were axially loaded intact and after talonavicular fixation with a 3.5 reconstruction plate, reconstruction plate plus cancellous screw (plate/screw), or three screws (screws). Recorded plantar pressures were divided into three forefoot, two midfoot, and two hindfoot regions. Cantilevered bending of excised constructs provided stiffness data for plantar and lateral directions, and failure characteristics in plantar bending. Relative to the intact state, all fixations decreased peak pressure in the medial forefoot, while generally increasing it in the lateral forefoot and midfoot. Average pressure shifted laterally for all fixation methods in the forefoot, generally in the hindfoot and the lateral midfoot. Generally, contact areas decreased in the medial forefoot, midfoot, and hindfoot while increasing laterally in the midfoot and hindfoot. The only difference among fixation methods was a decreased medial midfoot contact area for screws. No differences were found between screws and plate/screw in bending stiffness or failure (p screw method averaged approximately 363 N/mm while stiffness of the screw only construct averaged approximately 380 N/mm. The load to failure averaged 946 N for the plate/screw construct and 1099 N for the screw construct. This study showed lateralization of plantar pressures following talonavicular fixation. Minimal differences were found between plate/screw and screws. Fixation across the joint may be key to achieving stability sufficient to resist shear and rotational stresses. Plate/screw or screws would likely be similarly effective in fusing the talonavicular joint. However, the fusion induced lateralization of plantar pressures may unintentionally result in adjacent joint arthritis and foot pain.

  5. Pedicle screw anchorage of carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws under cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindtner, Richard A; Schmid, Rene; Nydegger, Thomas; Konschake, Marko; Schmoelz, Werner

    2018-03-01

    Pedicle screw loosening is a common and significant complication after posterior spinal instrumentation, particularly in osteoporosis. Radiolucent carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF/PEEK) pedicle screws have been developed recently to overcome drawbacks of conventional metallic screws, such as metal-induced imaging artifacts and interference with postoperative radiotherapy. Beyond radiolucency, CF/PEEK may also be advantageous over standard titanium in terms of pedicle screw loosening due to its unique material properties. However, screw anchorage and loosening of CF/PEEK pedicle screws have not been evaluated yet. The aim of this biomechanical study therefore was to evaluate whether the use of this alternative nonmetallic pedicle screw material affects screw loosening. The hypotheses tested were that (1) nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resist an equal or higher number of load cycles until loosening than standard titanium screws and that (2) PMMA cement augmentation further increases the number of load cycles until loosening of CF/PEEK screws. In the first part of the study, left and right pedicles of ten cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (BMD 70.8 mg/cm 3  ± 14.5) were randomly instrumented with either CF/PEEK or standard titanium pedicle screws. In the second part, left and right pedicles of ten vertebrae (BMD 56.3 mg/cm 3  ± 15.8) were randomly instrumented with either PMMA-augmented or nonaugmented CF/PEEK pedicle screws. Each pedicle screw was subjected to cyclic cranio-caudal loading (initial load ranging from - 50 N to + 50 N) with stepwise increasing compressive loads (5 N every 100 cycles) until loosening or a maximum of 10,000 cycles. Angular screw motion ("screw toggling") within the vertebra was measured with a 3D motion analysis system every 100 cycles and by stress fluoroscopy every 500 cycles. The nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resisted a similar number of load cycles until loosening as the contralateral standard

  6. Comparison of interfaces of different pedicle screws with micro-CT technique in lumbar vertebrae with osteoporosis of sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da LIU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the changes in interfaces of expandable pedicle screw (EPS and polymethylmethacrylateenhanced pedicle screw (PMMA-PS after being used in osteoporotic sheep lumbar vertebrae with micro-CT technique. Methods Six lumbar vertebrae (L1-L6 in each sheep were randomly divided into three different screw-insertion groups (two vertebrae with four pedicles in each group after reproduction of osteoporosis in sheep. After making the pilot hole using the same method, CPS was inserted through the pilot hole into vertebral body in CPS group, while PMMA (1.0ml was injected into the pilot hole prior to the insertion of CPS in PMMA-PS group, and EPS was inserted through pedicle into vertebral body in EPS group. All the sheep were sacrificed, and lumbar vertebrae (L1-L6 were harvested respectively at the 6- and 12-week postoperatively. The micro-CT three dimensional reconstruction and histomorphometric analysis were performed to evaluate the interfacial conditions. Results  It was clearly demonstrated that interface was formed where the bone trabeculae was directly in contact with the screw to form "screw-bone" interface in both CPS and EPS groups both 6 weeks and 12 weeks after the operation. The screw was fully surrounded by PMMA and formed "screw-PMMA-bone" interface in PMMA-PS group. The anterior part of EPS expanded in vertebral body to form a clawlike structure, pressing against the surrounding bone trabeculae, thus significantly improved the local bone quality (amount and density of bone trabeculae. From 6 weeks to 12 weeks after the operation, there was no visual difference in bone quality around the screw in both CPS and PMMA-PS groups. There was no degradation and absorption of PMMA, and it led to form the second non-biological interface in PMMA-PS group. Nevertheless, bone quality around expanding part of EPS at 12-week post-operation was significantly improved compared with that at 6-week post-operation, thus forming a good

  7. Reducible valgus flat-foot: assessment of posterior subtalar joint surface displacement by posterior arthroscopy during sinus tarsi expansion screwing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarissi, N; Vallée, A; Dujardin, F; Duparc, F; Roussignol, X

    2014-12-01

    Subtalar arthroereisis corrects childhood and adult reducible valgus flat-foot in certain indications. Inserting an expansion screw in the sinus tarsi simultaneously corrects the calcaneal valgus of the talocalcaneal divergence and first-ray pronation if these are reducible. The displacement induced in the posterior subtalar joint (decoaptation, translation, rotation) is, however, poorly known. The present study involved arthroscopic assessment of posterior subtalar joint surface displacement during insertion of a talocalcaneal arthroereisis screw, with the hypothesis that displacement varies in three dimensions according to screw size. Eight specimens were used for the study. All ankles were supple, taken from adult subjects. A 4.5-mm arthroscope was used and measurements were taken with a graduated palpator in the posterior subtalar joint. Three sinus tarsi expansion screws of incremental diameter were assessed. Before and after insertion measurements were made of posterolateral and posteromedial talar exposure on the calcaneus, anteroposterior and lateromedial translation, and talocalcaneal joint-line opening. Medial rotation, varization and anterior translation of the calcaneus were comparable in all cases. Mean lateral opening of the posterior subtalar joint was 0.88 mm with 8-mm screws and 1.25 mm with 16-mm screws. Significant differences between 8 and 16 mm screws were found for lateral subtalar joint opening (P=0.028) and for lateromedial translation (P=0.004). Sinus tarsi expansion screwing corrects hindfoot valgus and talocalcaneal divergence by inducing medial translation of the calcaneus under the talus and talar medial rotation and varization, proportional to screw size (medial translation and lateral opening of the subtalar joint). III. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Preservation of soft tissue contours with immediate screw-retained provisional implant crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Saad A; Edgin, Wendell A

    2007-10-01

    When a patient with a missing or failing maxillary anterior tooth desires immediate tooth replacement, fabrication of a provisional restoration can be challenging. Due to individual anatomical variations in tooth shape, size, and supporting soft and hard tissue structures, there are no premanufactured components with an anatomical emergence profile that universally suits all individual situations. This article describes the fabrication of a screw-retained immediate provisional restoration that fulfills anatomic, biologic, and esthetic requirements.

  9. Simple Technique for Removing Broken Pedicular Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agrawal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The procedure for removing a broken pedicle screw should ideally be technically easy and minimally invasive, as any damage to the pedicle, during removal of the broken screw, may weaken the pedicle, thus compromising on the success of re-instrumentation. We describe the case of a 32-year old man who had undergone surgery for traumatic third lumbar vertebral body fracture three years prior to current admission and had developed the complication of pedicle screw breakage within the vertebral body. The patient underwent re-exploration and removal of the distal screws. Through a paravertebral incision and muscle separation, the screws and rods were exposed and the implants were removed.

  10. Twin screw subsurface and surface multiphase pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dass, P. [CAN-K GROUP OF COMPANIES, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    A new subsurface twin screw multiphase pump has been developed to replace ESP and other artificial lift technologies. This technology has been under development for a few years, has been field tested and is now going for commercial applications. The subsurface twin screw technology consists of a pair of screws that do not touch and can be run with a top drive or submersible motor; and it carries a lot of benefits. This technology is easy to install and its low slippage makes it highly efficient with heavy oil. In addition twin screw multiphase pumps are capable of handling high viscosity fluids and thus their utilization can save water when used in thermal applications. It also induces savings of chemicals because asphaltenes do not break down easily as well as a reduction in SOR. The subsurface twin screw multiphase pump presented herein is an advanced technology which could be used in thermal applications.

  11. [Screw arthrodesis of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, S; Berndt, T; Lipka, W; Rühmann, O

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the procedure is arthrodesis of the shoulder by osteosynthesis of the glenohumeral and the acromiohumeral joint each with three screws, which results in preservation of scapulothoracic motion and pain relief. Traumatic brachial plexus lesions, palsy in infancy, poliomyelitis with preserved or restorable function of the elbow and the hand. Paralysis of the deltoid muscle and the rotator cuff. Nonrestorable vast defect of the rotator cuff with pseudoparalysis. Chronic infectious arthritis resistant to therapy. Unsuccessful attempts to treat glenohumeral instability. Alternative procedure to shoulder arthroplasty in young patients with omarthrosis, who perform hard physical work. Insufficient strength of the scapular muscles (Weaning from the splint after the end of the week 6 postoperatively, full range of motion allowed. In a prospective study from January 2007 to September 2008, 4 patients with a medium age of 35.7 years underwent screw arthrodesis of the shoulder with a follow-up of 1.0 (0.6-1.5) year. Primary fusion of all arthrodesis surfaces was achieved in all patients; no revision surgery was necessary. All patients improved in shoulder function with an average range of motion of 60° abduction and 40° anteversion.

  12. [A biomechanical comparison of Acutrak headless compression screw and AO cannulated lag screw for the fixation of Hoffa fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Zhang, Shu-Liang; Feng, Pin; Jiang, Yong; Zou, Chang; Zhang, Hui; Tu, Chong-Qi

    2013-03-01

    To compare the stability, strength of Letenneur type I Hoffa fractures fixed by Acutrak headless compression screws and AO cannulated lag screws. 12 models of Letenneur type I Hoffa fractures were randomly divided into 4 groups, which were fixed with two AO cannulated lag screws or Acutrak headless compression screws anteroposteriorly or posteroanteriorly. The stress between two fragments of all specimens was tested. Axial compression test, the cycle load test and the limit load test were successively performed in every specimen. In axial compression test, displacement of Acutrak headless compression screw groups was lower than that of AO cannulated lag screw anteroposteriorly (P AO cannulated lag screws (P AO cannulated lag screw. The direction of screw affects the initial stability for AO cannulated lag screw, other than Acutrak headless compression screw.

  13. Biomechanical comparison of lag screw versus self-drilling screw fixation of oblique metatarsal osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenhorst, Brien M; Smith, Michael P; James, C Roger; Grimes, Jerry S

    2011-08-01

    Several fixation methods for a Weil metatarsal osteotomy have been proposed. Lag screw fixation has been described as the preferred fixation technique. The self-drilling screw has been introduced and can be used for fixation of the Weil osteotomy. The current study compared self-drilling screws with lag screw fixation. A Weil metatarsal osteotomy was performed on the second, third, and fourth metatarsals of five matched pairs of fresh frozen cadaver feet. The feet of each pair were randomly assigned ical to fixation with either a 2.0-mm cortical lag screw or a 2.0-mm self-drilling screw. The second metatarsals were stressed using cantilever bending. The third and fourth metatarsals were stressed under a shear force. Yield load, deformation at yield load, structural stiffness, and energy stored at yield load were recorded. There were no statistically significant differences (p screw. There were no significant differences in the stability of fixation of the self-drilling screw and lag screw. There was a trend toward the lag screw fixation being more stable. The clinical significance of this trend is uncertain but suggests there is not a large difference between the two methods of fixation.

  14. S2 Alar-Iliac Screw Insertion: Technical Note with Pictorial Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Emre; Abdul-Jabbar, Amir; Tawfik, Tamir; Iwanaga, Joe; Schmidt, Cameron K; Chapman, Jens; Blecher, Ronen; Tubbs, R Shane; Oskouian, Rod J

    2018-02-10

    The S2 alar-iliac (S2AI) screw is a modification of the iliac fixation technique using the space between the neuroforamina of S1 and S2 as an insertion point to fix the sacrum to the ilium. To our knowledge, an anatomic review of the S2AI technique has not been described and the insertion point is vague and angles differ in reports from the literature. The purpose of the current anatomic illustration is to provide step-by-step techniques with fluoroscopic imaging to help confirm the safe placement of S2AI screws. The procedure was performed on the left and rights sides of a fresh, frozen, and thawed predissected male cadaver in a surgical training facility through a standard posterior midline exposure for placement of the S2AI screws. All screws were placed by a fellowship-trained spine surgeon and an attending spine surgeon. The specimen was placed prone, and a midline incision begun at the L4 or L5 spinous process. Using the anteroposterior and inlet views, the S1 dorsal sacral foramen, the S1 endplate, and the sacroiliac joint can be identified. The insertion point is 10 mm laterally between the S1 and S2 foramina and near to the sacroiliac joint. Aim toward the anterior inferior iliac spine is ensured by using a 30°-40° lateral angulation in the transverse plane and 20°-30° caudal angulation in the sagittal plane depending on the sacral angulation. Using lateral fluoroscopy, the acetabulum and greater sciatic notch can be identified and screw misplacement can be avoided. The screw length is measured and is usually between 60 and 90 mm (8- to 9-mm diameter). An elevator is used to identify the outer sacral cortex. Anteroposterior, obturator-outlet, and teardrop views are used to ensure correct screw insertion. Fluoroscopic guidance is crucial for optimal S2AI screw placement. Using the described technique allows a safe and correct insertion of the S2AI screw. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Screw-type implants used as anchorage for lingual orthodontic mechanics: a case of bimaxillary protrusion with second premolar extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Masayoshi; Miyawaki, Shouichi; Noguchi, Haruhiro; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2004-10-01

    We present a case of bialveolar protrusion treated with second premolar extraction. The patient did not agree to placement of a visible labial appliance or to the use of a headgear. Therefore, a lingual orthodontic appliance was used, and titanium screws were placed into the buccal alveolar bone for orthodontic absolute anchorage and support of en masse retraction of the anterior teeth. Cephalometric superimposition and panoramic radiographs showed little anchorage loss and good occlusion at the end of treatment. Our results suggest that lingual treatment combined with a screw-type implant anchorage provides reliable and comfortable results for those seeking invisible treatment.

  16. Cortical bone trajectory for lumbosacral fixation: penetrating S-1 endplate screw technique: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Keitaro; Yato, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Takashi; Imabayashi, Hideaki; Asazuma, Takashi; Nemoto, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    A cortical bone trajectory (CBT) is a new pedicle screw trajectory that maximizes the thread contact with cortical bone surface, providing enhanced screw purchase. Despite the increased use of the CBT in the lumbar spine, little is known about the insertion technique for the sacral CBT. The aim of this study was to introduce a novel sacral pedicle screw trajectory. This trajectory engages with denser bone maximally by the screw penetrating the S-1 superior endplate through a more medial entry point than the traditional technique, and also has safety advantages, with the protrusion of the screw tip into the intervertebral disc space carrying no risk of neurovascular injury. In this study, the CT scans of 50 adults were studied for morphometric measurement of the new trajectory. The entry point was supposed to be the junction of the center of the superior articular process of S-1 and approximately 3 mm inferior to the most inferior border of the inferior articular process of L-5. The direction was straight forward in the axial plane without convergence, angulated cranially in the sagittal plane penetrating the middle of the sacral endplate. The cephalad angle to the sacral endplate, length of trajectory, and safety of the trajectory were investigated. Next, the insertional torque of pedicle screws using this technique was measured intraoperatively in 19 patients and compared with the traditional technique. The mean cephalad angle in these 50 patients was 30.7° ± 5.1°, and the mean length of trajectory was 31.5 ± 3.5 mm. The CT analysis revealed that the penetrating S-1 endplate technique did not cause any neurovascular injury anteriorly in any case. The new technique demonstrated an average of 141% higher insertional torque than the traditional monocortical technique. The penetrating S-1 endplate technique through the medial entry point is suitable for the connection of lumbar CBT, has revealed favorable stability for lumbosacral fixation, and has reduced the

  17. Biomechanical analysis of the fixation systems for anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jianyin; Dong, Pengfei; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Zhihua; Cai, Xianhua

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of common fixation systems for complex acetabular fractures. A finite element (FE) pelvic model with anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures was created. Three common fixation systems were used to fix the posterior wall acetabular fractures: 1. Anterior column plate combined with posterior column screws (group I), 2. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws (group II) and 3. Double-column plates (group III). And 600 N, representing the body weight, was loaded on the upper surface of the sacrum to simulate the double-limb stance. The amounts of total and relative displacements were compared between the groups. The total amount of displacement was 2.76 mm in group II, 2.81 mm in group III, and 2.83 mm in group I. The amount of relative displacement was 0.0078 mm in group II, 0.0093 mm in group III and 0.014 mm in group I. Our results suggested that all fixation systems enhance biomechanical stability significantly. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws has quite comparable results to double column plates, they were superior to anterior column plate combined with posterior screws. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 10(6) cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws.

  19. Ergotropic effect of bone cement on pedicle screw fixation in treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the ergotropic effect of bone cement on pedicle screw fixation in treatment of osteopo¬rotic thoracolumbar fracture. Methods Fifty-three patients with osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture, admitted from Jun. 2013 to Dec. 2014, were included for treatment by augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with bone cement. All patients underwent pre-operative examination of bone mineral density with T-score ≤-2.5 and augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with injection of 1.5 ml bone cement in adjacent to fractured vertebra. All patients were treated with anti-osteoporosis therapy pre- and post-operation, ob¬served and recorded with basic conditions and complications. At pre-operation, one-week post-operation and last follow-up, pain vi¬sual analogue scale (VAS and neurological function score (ASIA of all patients were recorded, and the compression rats of anterior and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, and compression rats of spinal canal and Cobb angel of all patients were measured. Results All the 53 patients were successfully undergone operation in about 90-140 min with blood loss of about 150-350 ml. No spinal cord or nerve injury, dural tear and obvious leakage of bone cement and screw loosening occurred during operation. All patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months and the neurological function obviously recovered contrasted with pre-operation. X-ray and CT examination at last follow-up showed good fractures healing, good position and non-loosening of internal fixation device and non-leakage of bone cement. At one week post-operation and last follow-up, VAS, compression rats of anterior edge and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, compression rats of spinal canal and Cobb angel were significantly lower than those at pre-operation (P0.05. Conclusions Augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with bone cement can effectively strengthen the initial stability of pedicle screw in osteo¬porosis, restore the

  20. Twin Screw Mixer/Fine Grind Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 40-mm Twin-Screw Mixer/Extruder (TSE) pilot plant is a continuous, remotely operated, flexible facility that can significantly enhance safety and environmental...

  1. Effect on pedicle screw stability of polymethylmethacrylate volume and distribution in synthetic bone block for patients with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun LIU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the stability of injectable pedicle screw with different lateral holes augmented with different volume of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA in synthetic bone block used for patients with osteoporosis, and analyze the relationship between screw stability and injected volume and distribution pattern of PMMA. Methods The synthetic bone blocks used for patients with osteoporosis were randomly divided into groups A, B, C and D according to the screw difference, and the blocks in each group were then randomly divided again into subgroups 0, 1, 2 and 3 according to the difference of PMMA volume. A pilot hole was prepared in advance using the same method in all samples. Pedicle screws of type A–C were directly inserted into vertebrae of groups A–C respectively, and then different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0ml were injected through screw into the blocks of subgroups 0, 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The pilot hole was filled with different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0ml followed by insertion of screw in groups D0, D1, D2 and D3 respectively. X-ray examination was performed to evaluate the screw position and PMMA distribution, and axial pull-out test was performed to measure the maximum axial pullout strength (Fmax. Results X-ray examination revealed that PMMA wrapt the anterior 1/3 part of screw in groups A1–A3, wrapt the middle 1/3 part of screw in groups B1–B3 and groups C1–C3, and evenly wrapt the full length of screw in groups D1–D3. Two factor ANOVA showed that both volume and distribution of PMMA significantly influenced Fmax (P0.05, but the Fmax was significantly higher in groups with injection of 2.0ml PMMA than that in groups with injection of 1.0ml PMMA (P0.05. The Fmax was significantly lower in group A1 than in group D1 (P=0.026, and no significant differences existed between the other two groups injected with the same volume of PMMA (P>0.05. Conclusion PMMA can significantly enhance the stability of

  2. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report

    OpenAIRE

    Bielecki, Mateusz; Kunert, Przemys?aw; Prokopienko, Marek; Nowak, Arkadiusz; Czernicki, Tomasz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points’ location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. Aim: To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis was...

  3. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  4. Insertion profiles of 4 headless compression screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of -3.1 mm, -2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of -2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of -2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws, and enable the surgeon to optimize compression. Copyright

  5. Effects of Removal and Reinsertion of Headless Compression Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Simon M; Niu, Rui; Jones, Christopher W; Smith, Belinda J; Clarke, Elizabeth C; Lawson, Richard D

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates the loss of compression when 3 commonly used headless compression screws are backed out (reversed), and assesses the ability to re-establish compression with screws of greater diameter. Two investigators tested 3 screw designs (Acutrak 2, Synthes HCS, Medartis SpeedTip CCS) in 2 diameters and lengths. Each design had 10 test cycles in a polyurethane foam bone model with compression recorded using a washer load cell. A 28-mm screw of the narrower diameter was inserted until 2 mm recessed and then reversed 30°, 60°, 90°, 180°, 270°, 360°, and 720°. After this the screw was removed completely and a 24-mm screw of greater diameter inserted until recessed 2 mm with the compressive force again recorded. All screws showed an immediate, statistically significant loss of compression at 30° of reversing. The Acutrak 2 Micro screw demonstrated not only the greatest mean compressive force, but also the fastest compressive loss. Insertion of the shorter screw of greater diameter was associated with re-establishment of compression to levels comparable with the original screw. This study reaffirms the importance of establishing the correct screw length before insertion due to the immediate loss of compression with reversal of these devices. If a headless compression screw penetrates the far joint surface, the screw should be completely removed and replaced with a shorter screw of greater diameter. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Axial loading cross screw fixation for the Austin bunionectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Ryan B; Fallat, Lawrence M; Kish, John P

    2011-01-01

    The Austin procedure has become a common method of osteotomy for the correction of hallux abductovalgus when indicated. The V-type configuration is intrinsically stable but not without complications. One complication encountered is rotation and/or displacement of the capital fragment. We present the use of an axial loading screw in conjunction with a dorsally placed compression screw. The benefit to this technique lies in the orientation of the axial loading screw, because it is directed to resist the ground reactive forces while also providing a second point of fixation in a crossing screw design. In a head-to-head biomechanical comparison, we tested single dorsal screw fixation versus double screw fixation, including both the dorsal and the axial loading screws in 10 metatarsal Sawbones(®) (Pacific Research Laboratories Inc, Vashon, WA). Five metatarsals received single dorsal screw fixation and five received the dorsal screw and the additional axial loading screw. The metatarsals were analyzed on an Instron compression device for comparison; 100% of the single screw fixation osteotomies failed with compression at an average peak load of 205 N. Four of five axial loading double screw fixation osteotomies did not fail. This finding suggests that the addition of an axial loading screw providing cross screw orientation significantly increases the stability of the Austin osteotomy, ultimately decreasing the likelihood of displacement encountered in the surgical repair of hallux abductovalgus. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lapidus bunionectomy: Early evaluation of crossed lag screws versus locking plate with plantar lag screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amol; Nguyen, Aidan; Nelsen, Elise

    2009-01-01

    We compared outcomes of the Lapidus bunionectomy fixated with crossed lag screws versus a locking plate with a plantar lag screw. Forty patients who underwent Lapidus bunionectomy between August 2001 and May 2006 were evaluated in a combined retrospective and prospective fashion. Crossed lag screws were used in 19 of the patients, and a locking plate with a plantar lag screw was used in 21 of the patients. Other than fixation, the only interventional difference pertained to postoperative weight bearing, where those receiving the plate initiated full weight bearing on the operated foot at 4 weeks postoperative, as compared to 6 weeks for those receiving crossed screws. Overall, the mean preoperative AOFAS hallux score was 41.75 +/- 2.52, and the postoperative score was 90.48 +/- 8.41 (P fixation, use of an adjunct Akin osteotomy and surgery performed before 2003 were statistically significantly associated with crossed screw fixation, and the preoperative AOFAS score was statistically significantly higher in the locking plate fixation group. There were no statistically significant differences related to postoperative complications between the 2 fixation groups. In conclusion, the Lapidus bunionectomy fixated with a locking plate and a plantar lag screw allows earlier weight bearing in comparison with crossed lag screws, without a difference in complications. 2.

  8. Anterior Horn Cell Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Firinciogullari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior horn cells control all voluntary movement. Motor activity, respiratory, speech, and swallowing functions are dependent upon signals from the anterior horn cells. Diseases that damage the anterior horn cells, therefore, have a profound impact. Symptoms of anterior horn cell loss (weakness, falling, choking lead patients to seek medical attention. In this article, anterior horn diseases were reviewed, diagnostic criteria and management were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 269-303

  9. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  10. Effect of pedicle screw diameter on screw fixation efficacy in human osteoporotic thoracic vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Dar-Ming; Shih, Yu-Tang; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Chien, Andy; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2018-03-21

    The selection of an ideal screw size plays a crucial role in the success of spinal instrumentation as larger diameter screws are thought to provide better fixation strength but increase the risk of pedicle failure during insertion. On the other hand, smaller diameter screws are with lesser risk of pedicle breakage but are thought to compromise the stability of the instrumentation. By investigating the relationship between screw diameter and the pullout strength of pedicle screws after fatigue loading, this study seeks to find quantitative biomechanical data for surgeons in determining the most ideal diameter size screws when performing surgical implementations on osteoporotic vertebrae. Twenty-seven osteoporotic (BMD ranged: 0.353-0.848 g/cm 2 ) thoracic vertebrae (T3-T8) were harvested from 5 human cadavers. Two sizes of poly-axial screws (5.0 mm × 35 and 4.35 mm × 35) were implanted into each pedicles of the vertebrae by an experienced surgeon. Specimens were randomly distributed into control group, fatigue group of 5000 and 10,000 cycles with peak-to-peak loadings of 10-100 N at 1 Hz. Each specimen was then axial pullout tested at a constant rate of 5 mm/min. The ultimate pullout strength (N) & stiffness (N/mm) were obtained for analysis. The results showed that although the larger diameter screws achieved superior pullout strength immediately after the implantation, both sizes of screws exhibited comparable pullout strengths post fatigue loading. This indicates that the smaller diameter screws may be considered for surgical techniques performed on osteoporotic vertebrae for reduced risk of pedicle breakage without sacrificing fixation strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stability of medial locking plate and compression screw versus two crossed screws for lapidus arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Kajetan; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Mückley, Thomas; Fröber, Rosemarie; Hofmann, Gunther O; Schwieger, Karsten; Windolf, Markus

    2010-02-01

    Lapidus (first metatarsocuneiform joint) arthrodesis is an established procedure for the management of hallux valgus. This study investigated the utility of fixation with a medial locking plate with adjunct compression screw versus fixation with two crossed screws. Eight pairs of fresh-frozen human specimens were used in a matched pair test. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Fixation with two 4-mm-diameter crossed screws was compared versus a medial locking plate (X-Locking Plate 2.4/2.7; Synthes, Solothurn, Switzerland) with adjunct 4-mm-diameter compression screw. The specimens were tested in a four-point bending test. Parameters obtained were initial stiffness; plantar joint-line gapping after one cycle, 100 and 1000 cycles; and number of cycles to failure. Failure was defined as more than or equal to 3 mm plantar gapping. The groups did not differ significantly with regard to BMD (p = 0.866) and initial stiffness (p = 0.889). The plate-and-screw construct showed significantly less movement during testing, and significantly (p = 0.001) more cycles to failure than did the crossed-screw construct. There was a significant correlation (crossed-screw construct: p = 0.014; plate-and-screw construct: p = 0.010) between BMD and the number of cycles to failure. Under cyclic loading conditions, the construct using a medial locking plate with adjunct compression screw was superior to the construct using two crossed screws. The medial locking-plate technique described could help shorten the period of nonweightbearing and reduce the risk of non-union.

  12. Dysphagia in the Elderly Following Anterior Cervical Surgery: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Osuafor, C N.

    2017-11-01

    Dysphagia is a risk factor for adverse health outcomes like aspiration, recurrent chest infections and malnutrition. Here, we describe a case of an 82-year-old lady who presented with a two-month history of dysphagia after an anterior odontoid screw fixation for a type II odontoid process fracture. This case highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to patient care.

  13. Reconstructing mandibular anterior region by Branemark and Bonefit joint implants: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    AR. Rokn; F. Geramipanah

    1998-01-01

      A 48 year old patient was candidate for anterior mandibular reconstruction by 2 fixtures of Branemark implant. Residual infection lead to removal of one of the implants from the extracted tooth socket. Afterwards, 2 fixtures of Bonefit was inserted adjacent to previously placed Branemark implants and final prosthesis were loaded in a joint cemented and screwed design.

  14. Reconstructing mandibular anterior region by Branemark and Bonefit joint implants: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR. Rokn

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available   A 48 year old patient was candidate for anterior mandibular reconstruction by 2 fixtures of Branemark implant. Residual infection lead to removal of one of the implants from the extracted tooth socket. Afterwards, 2 fixtures of Bonefit was inserted adjacent to previously placed Branemark implants and final prosthesis were loaded in a joint cemented and screwed design.

  15. An alternative clinical approach to achieve greater anterior than posterior maxillary expansion in cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Dauro Douglas; Bartolomeo, Flávia Uchôa Costa; Cardinal, Lucas; Figueiredo, Daniel Santos Fonseca; Palomo, Juan Martin; Andrade, Ildeu

    2014-11-01

    Cleft lip and palate patients commonly present maxillary constriction, particularly in the anterior region. The aim of this case report was to describe an alternative clinical approach that used a smaller Hyrax screw unconventionally positioned to achieve greater anterior than posterior expansion in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. The idea presented here is to take advantage of a reduced dimension screw to position it anteriorly. When only anterior expansion was needed (patient 1), the appliance was soldered to the first premolar bands and associated to a transpalatal arch cemented to the first molars. However, when overall expansion was required (patient 2), the screw was positioned anteriorly, but soldered to the first molar bands. Intercanine, premolar, and first molar widths were measured on dental casts with a digital caliper. Pre-expansion and postexpansion radiographs and tomographies were also evaluated. A significant anterior expansion and no intermolar width increase were registered in the first patient. Although patient 2 also presented a greater anterior than posterior expansion, a noteworthy expansion occurred at the molar region. The alternative approach to expand the maxilla in cleft patients reported here caused greater anterior than posterior expansion when the Mini-Hyrax was associated to a transpalatal arch, and its reduced dimension also minimized discomfort and facilitated hygiene.

  16. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Ankle Fusion Rates With and Without Anterior Plate Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Phillip M; Douleh, Diana G; Thomson, A Brian

    2017-04-01

    The optimal fixation construct for tibiotalar arthrodesis continues to be debated. While biomechanical data and clinical series support anterior plate augmentation, comparative studies assessing its use are sparse. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of successful tibiotalar arthrodesis with and without anterior plate augmentation of a compression screw construct. We studied 64 patients (65 ankles) undergoing tibiotalar arthrodesis done by a single surgeon over a 10-year period (2006-2016) with anterior plate augmentation beginning in 2010. Twenty-six ankles had a construct using compression screws only and 39 ankles had anterior plate augmentation of a compression screw construct. We reviewed clinical notes, operative reports, and postoperative radiographs to evaluate for union, incidence of revision, and postoperative complications. The nonunion rate in the compression screw (CS) cohort was 15.4% and 7.7% in the anterior plate augmentation (AP) cohort ( P = .33). The revision rate was 7.7% in the CS group and 2.6% in the AP cohort ( P = .34). The use of autograft harvested through a separate incision was 19.2% and 17.9% in the CS and AP cohorts, respectively. There were 2 deep postoperative infections in the AP group and none in the patients with CS only ( P = .24). There were no superficial wound complications in either group. Anterior plate augmentation was a viable fixation strategy in tibiotalar arthrodesis. In a trend toward an improved rate of fusion and decreased revision rate in the anterior plate augmentation cohort. Level III, retrospective comparative series.

  19. The movement of screw dislocations in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Xiaogeng; Woo Chungho

    2004-03-25

    Using Acland potential for tungsten, the movement of 1/2a<1 1 1> screw dislocation under shear stress was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Equilibrated core structure was obtained by relaxation of screw dislocation with proper boundary conditions. We found that the equilibrium dislocation core has three-fold symmetry and spread out in three <1 1 2> direction on {l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} planes. The screw dislocation core could not keep the original shape when the shear stress applied. The dislocation could not move until the shear stress became large enough. The dislocation moved in zigzag when the shear stress neared the Peierls stress. When the shear stress became larger, the dislocation moved in zigzag at the beginning and than moved almost in straight line in [2-bar11] direction. The large shear stress applied, the long distance moved before the dislocation stilled in z-direction and the large velocity in y-direction.

  20. Interfacial sliding properties of bone screw materials and their effect on screw fixation strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koistinen, Arto P; Korhonen, Hannu; Kröger, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2014-09-05

    This study examined the effect of interfacial sliding and test material properties on the fixation strength and insertional properties of self-tapping bone screws. Various substitute materials (polyacetal [POM], poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] and E-glass-filled Epoxy [Sawbones®]) for human bone were evaluated, and the results were compared with the findings for cadaver bone.
 Initial coefficient of friction (CoF) of the screw material stainless steel AISI316 was tested using a pin-on-disk apparatus, and the screws were exposed to pullout tests after insertion torque tests. The effect of a smooth diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating was studied by applying the coating on both CoF test balls and bone screws.
 Mechanical properties of test blocks strongly correlated to both pullout strength and insertion torque of the screws: for noncoated 2.7-mm screws, tensile strength correlated to pullout strength and insertion torque, with Pearson correlation coefficients r=0.977 and r=0.738, respectively. In contrast, CoF correlated strongly to screw insertion torque but not to pullout strength in bone substitute materials (for noncoated 2.7-mm screws, r=0.652 and r=0.248, respectively). There were no significant differences in CoF using noncoated and DLC-coated screw materials against bone substitutes.
 Proper materials for in vitro testing help in evaluating the biomechanics of the implants in advance. However, choosing the material needs attention, as their ability to model human bone depends on test type.

  1. Torque de inserção e resistência ao arrancamento dos parafusos vertebrais com alma cilíndrica e cônica Insertion torque and pullout strength of vertebral screws with cylindrical and conic core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Zamarioli

    2008-10-01

    para fixação anterior da coluna vertebral são influenciados pela densidade do corpo de prova, desenho da rosca do parafuso e diâmetro do orifício-piloto.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate insertion torque and pullout strength of three different screws used in the anterior fixation of the spine, considering the influence of the diameter of the pilot hole (DOP, the test specimen density (CDP, and the screw thread design. METHODS: The authors used polyurethane test specimens with two densities: 0.16 and 0.32 g/cm³, and three types of screws (USS I, USS II posterior, and USS II anterior. In the first stage, the pilot hole was made with a 3.8 mm probe for all screws; in the second stage, with a probe smaller than the inner diameter of the screws (3.5 mm for screws USS I; 3.4 mm for USS II posterior screws, and 3.0 mm for USS II anterior screws. 12 experimental groups were formed with ten specimen tests in each group, according to the polyurethane density, DOP, and the type of screw used. Torque was measured during insertion of the screws and the pullout strength by a mechanical assay in a universal test machine. RESULTS: The maximum insertion torque presented a decreasing value in test specimens of 0.16 g/cm³ and 0.32 g/cm³ and in all pilot hole diameters. Maximum pullout strength in test specimens of 0.16 g/cm³ and 3.8 mm of perforation diameter was greater in USS II posterior screws than in USS I screws. With the perforation diameter smaller than the inner screw diameter, USS II posterior and anterior screws presented higher values than the USS I screw. In test specimens with 0.32 g/cm³ of density and perforation diameter of 3.8 mm, the pullout strength of USS II posterior and USS I screws was greater than that of USS II anterior screws. With the smaller perforation diameter than the inner diameter, the values were decreasing between the USS II posterior screw, then the USS II anterior screw, and then the USS I screw. CONCLUSION: Insertion torque and pullout strength of the

  2. OSTEOSYNTHESIS OF FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES: TWO OR THREE SCREWS?

    OpenAIRE

    Basile, Ricardo; Pepicelli, Gustavo Roberto; Takata, Edmilson Takehiro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of osteosynthesis on femoral neck fractures using two instead of three screws. Methods: Thirty-nine fractures were retrospectively evaluated, divided into groups in which two screws were used in parallel (n = 28) or three screws (n =11) in an inverted triangle configuration (in accordance with the AO technique). The patients were then followed up until reaching the outcome of either consolidation or failure. Results: In the group in which two screws were u...

  3. A processing method for orthodontic mini-screws reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Noorollahian

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Cleaning of used mini-screws with phosphoric acid 37% (10 minutes and sodium hypochlorite 5.25% (30 minutes reduces tissue remnants to the level of as-received mini-screws. So it can be suggested as a processing method of used mini-screws. Previous insertion of mini-screws into the bone and above-mentioned processing method and resterilization with autoclave had no adverse effects on insertion, removal, and fracture torque values as mechanical properties indices.

  4. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  5. Hollow Mill for Extraction of Stripped Titanium Screws: An Easy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Removal of jammed titanium screws can be difficult due to the problem of stripping of the hexagonal heads of the screws. We present a technique of extraction of stripped screws with the use of a standard 4.5 mm stainless steel hollow mill in a patient of peri‑implant fracture of the radius fixed with a titanium locking plate 2 ...

  6. Hollow Mill for Extraction of Stripped Titanium Screws: An Easy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    screws. We present a technique of extraction of stripped screws with the use of a standard 4.5 mm stainless steel hollow mill in a patient of peri-implant fracture of the radius fixed with a titanium locking plate 2 years back. The technique is quick, safe, and cost effective. Key words: Hollow mill, stripped screws, titanium locked.

  7. Dual-worm screw compressors; Compresseurs bi-vis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleydier, J.P. [Bitzer France, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    Low power worm-screw moto-compressors are used in any king of refrigerating machineries and more and more in air conditioning systems. This paper presents the principle of dual-screw moto-compressors: worm-screw technology, role of oil (lubrication, tightness, cooling), compression, internal pressure, power reduction, lubrication, economizer, operation, model selection and accessories. (J.S.)

  8. Inadvertent Screw Stripping During Ankle Fracture Fixation in Elderly Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinah, A. Feroz; Mears, Simon C.; Knight, Trevor A.; Soin, Sandeep P.; Campbell, John T.; Belkoff, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Poor screw purchase because of osteoporosis presents difficulties in ankle fracture fixation. The aim of our study was to determine if cortical thickness, unicortical versus bicortical purchase, and bone mineral density are predictors of inadvertent screw stripping and overtightening. Ten paired cadaver ankles (average donor age, 81.7 years; range, 50-97 years) were used for the study. Computed tomography scanning with phantoms of known density was used to determine the bone density along the distal fibula. A standard small-fragment, 7-hole, one-third tubular plate was applied to the lateral surface of the fibula, with 3 proximal bicortical cortical screws and 2 distal unicortical cancellous screws. A posterior plate, in which all 5 screws were cortical and achieved bicortical purchase, was subsequently applied to the same bones and positioned so that the screw holes did not overlap. A torque sensor was used to measure the torque of each screw during insertion (Ti) and then stripping (Ts). The effect of bone density, screw location, cortical thickness, and unicortical versus bicortical purchase on Ti and Ts was checked for significance (P screws were inadvertently stripped and 12% were overtightened. Despite 21% of the screws being stripped or being at risk for stripping, we found no significant predictors to warn of impending screw stripping. Additional work is needed to identify clinically useful predictors of screw stripping. PMID:23569675

  9. Biomechanical comparative study of the stability of injectable pedicle screws with different lateral holes augmented with different volumes of polymethylmethacrylate in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Yang; Huang, Chen; Wu, Hong-Hua; Zhou, Jiang-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Zheng, Wei

    2018-03-19

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is widely used for pedicle screw augmentation in osteoporosis. Until now, there had been no studies of the relationship between screw stability and the distribution and volume of PMMA. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between screw stability and the distribution pattern and injected volume of PMMA. This is a biomechanical comparison of injectable pedicle screws with different lateral holes augmented with different volumes of PMMA in cadaveric osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae. Forty-eight osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae were randomly divided into Groups A, B, and C with different pedicle screws (16 vertebrae in each group), and then each group was randomly divided into Subgroups 0, 1, 2, and 3 with different volumes of PMMA (four vertebra with eight pedicles in each subgroup). A pilot hole was prepared in advance using the same method in all samples. Type A and type B pedicle screws were directly inserted into vertebrae in Groups A and B, respectively, and then different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mL) were injected through the screws and into vertebrae in Subgroups 0, 1, 2, and 3. The pilot holes were filled with different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mL), and then the screws were inserted in Groups C0, C1, C2, and C3. Screw position and distribution of PMMA were evaluated radiographically, and axial pullout tests were performed to measure maximum axial pullout strength (F max ). Polymethylmethacrylate surrounded the anterior one-third of screws in the vertebral body in Groups A1, A2, and A3; the middle one-third of screws in the junction area of the vertebral body and the pedicle in Groups B1, B2, and B3; and the full length of screws evenly in both the vertebral body and the pedicle in Groups C1, C2, and C3. There was no malpositioning of screws or leakage of PMMA in any sample. Two-way analysis of variance revealed that two factors-distribution and volume of PMMA-significantly influenced

  10. Ribbon-wise customized lingual appliance and orthodontic anchor screw for the treatment of skeletal high-angle maxillary protrusion without bowing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Toru; Ito, Goshi; Miyazawa, Ken; Tabuchi, Masako; Goto, Shigemi

    2018-05-02

    This case report demonstrates the treatment of a skeletal Class II high-angle adult patient with bimaxillary protrusion, angle Class I occlusion, and crowded anterior teeth. A ribbon-wise arch wire and a customized lingual appliance with anterior vertical slots were used to achieve proper torque control of the maxillary anterior teeth. An orthodontic anchor screw and a palatal bar were used for vertical control to avoid increasing the Frankfort-mandibular plane angle (FMA) by maxillary molar extrusion. Through the combined use of the ribbon-wise customized lingual appliance, palatal bar, and orthodontic anchor screw, vertical control and an excellent treatment result were achieved without the vertical and horizontal bowing effects peculiar to conventional lingual treatment.

  11. Tangential View and Intraoperative Three-Dimensional Fluoroscopy for the Detection of Screw-Misplacements in Volar Plating of Distal Radius Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Sascha; Marintschev, Ivan; Graul, Isabel; Wilharm, Arne; Klos, Kajetan; Hofmann, Gunther O.; Florian Gras, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volar locking plate fixation has become the gold standard in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. Juxta-articular screws should be placed as close as possible to the subchondral zone, in an optimized length to buttress the articular surface and address the contralateral cortical bone. On the other hand, intra-articular screw misplacements will promote osteoarthritis, while the penetration of the contralateral bone surface may result in tendon irritations and ruptures. The intraoperative control of fracture reduction and implant positioning is limited in the common postero-anterior and true lateral two-dimensional (2D)-fluoroscopic views. Therefore, additional 2D-fluoroscopic views in different projections and intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) fluoroscopy were recently reported. Nevertheless, their utility has issued controversies. Objectives: The following questions should be answered in this study; 1) Are the additional tangential view and the intraoperative 3D fluoroscopy useful in the clinical routine to detect persistent fracture dislocations and screw misplacements, to prevent revision surgery? 2) Which is the most dangerous plate hole for screw misplacement? Patients and Methods: A total of 48 patients (36 females and 13 males) with 49 unstable distal radius fractures (22 x 23 A; 2 x 23 B, and 25 x 23 C) were treated with a 2.4 mm variable angle LCP Two-Column volar distal radius plate (Synthes GmbH, Oberdorf, Switzerland) during a 10-month period. After final fixation, according to the manufactures' technique guide and control of implant placement in the two common perpendicular 2D-fluoroscopic images (postero-anterior and true lateral), an additional tangential view and intraoperative 3D fluoroscopic scan were performed to control the anatomic fracture reduction and screw placements. Intraoperative revision rates due to screw misplacements (intra-articular or overlength) were evaluated. Additionally, the number of surgeons

  12. Sacroiliac screw fixation for tile B fractures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, E.W. van den; Zwienen, C.M. van; Hoek van Dijke, G.A.; Snijders, C.J.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this comparative cadaveric study was to investigate whether the stability of partially unstable pelvic fractures can be improved by combining plate fixation of the symphysis with a posterior sacroiliac screw. METHODS: In six specimens, a Tile B1 (open-book) pelvic fracture

  13. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  14. A comparison of screw insertion torque and pullout strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, William M; Tornetta, Paul; Petteys, Timothy; Gerlach, Darin; Cartner, Jacob; Walker, Zakiyyah; Russell, Thomas A

    2010-06-01

    Pullout strength of screws is a parameter used to evaluate plate screw fixation strength. However, screw fixation strength may be more closely related to its ability to generate sufficient insertion because stable nonlocked plate-screw fracture fixation requires sufficient compression between plate and bone such that no motion occurs between the plate and bone under physiological loads. Compression is generated by tightening of screws. In osteoporotic cancellous bone, sufficient screw insertion torque may not be generated before screw stripping. The effect of screw thread pitch on generation of maximum insertion torque (MIT) and pullout strength (POS) was investigated in an osteoporotic cancellous bone model and the relationship between MIT and POS was analyzed. Stainless steel screws with constant major (5.0 mm) and minor (2.7 mm) diameters but with varying thread pitches (1, 1.2, 1.5, 1.6, and 1.75 mm) were tested for MIT and POS in a validated osteoporotic surrogate for cancellous bone (density of 160 kg/m(3) [10 lbs/ft(3)]). MIT was measured with a torque-measuring hex driver for screws inserted through a one-third tubular plate. POS was measured after insertion of screws to a depth of 20 mm based on the Standard Specification and Test Methods for Metallic Medical Bone Screws (ASTM F 543-07). Five screws were tested for each failure mode and screw design. The relationship between MIT and compressive force between the plate and bone surrogate was evaluated using pressure-sensitive film. There was a significant difference in mean MIT based on screw pitch (P compression between the plate and bone surrogate was found for increasing screw torque (R(2) = 0.97). These results indicate that the ability of different screw designs to generate high screw insertion torque in a model of osteoporotic cancellous bone is unrelated to their pullout strength. Therefore, extrapolation of results for POS to identify optimal screw design for osteoporotic bone may not be valid

  15. Traditional Versus Congruent Arc Latarjet Technique: Effect on Surface Area for Union and Bone Width Surrounding Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Guillaume D; Vopat, Bryan G; Parada, Stephen; Cohn, Randy; Makani, Amun; Sanchez, George; Golijanin, Petar; Beaulieu-Jones, Brendin R; Sanchez, Anthony; Provencher, Matthew T

    2017-05-01

    To compare the surface area available for bony contact and the width of bone on each side of the Latarjet fixation screws in the traditional Latarjet technique versus the congruent arc modification of the Latarjet technique. Computed tomographic scans of 24 shoulders in patients with glenohumeral instability who underwent multiplanar reconstruction measurements with multiple dimensions of the coracoid. The surface area of the coracoid available for bony contact with the anterior glenoid and width of bone on each side of a 3.5-mm screw was compared for the traditional Latarjet technique versus the congruent arc modification. The surface area available for bony contact to the anterior glenoid was 5.65 ± 1.08 cm 2 using the traditional Latarjet technique compared with 3.64 ± 0.93 cm 2 using the congruent arc modification of the Latarjet technique (P Latarjet technique compared with 4.1 ± 1.0 mm using the congruent arc modification (P Latarjet technique has greater bony contact with the glenoid and greater bone width on each side of the screws compared with the congruent arc modification of the Latarjet technique. This potentially allows for a larger surface for healing in the traditional Latarjet technique. Moreover, because of smaller width of the bone around the screw, the congruent arc modification is potentially less tolerant of screw-positioning error compared with the traditional Latarjet technique. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomechanical analysis on transverse tibial fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmar Stieven Filho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify whether the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw fixation presents biomechanical advantages when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw fixation for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL.METHODS: Thirty-eight porcine knees and bovine extensor digitorum tendons were used as the graft materials. The tests were performed in three groups: (1 standard, used fourteen knees, and the grafts were fixated with the combination of femoral cross pin and a tibial screw; (2 inverted, used fourteen knees with an inverted combination of tibial cross pin and a femoral screw; (3 control, ten control tests performed with intact ACL. After the grafts fixation, all the knees were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength and ultimate strength.RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in survival techniques in regard to strength, yield load and tension. There was a higher survival compared in the standard curves of yield stress (p < 0.05.CONCLUSION: There is no biomechanical advantage, observed in animal models testing, in the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw.

  17. OSTEOSYNTHESIS OF FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES: TWO OR THREE SCREWS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Ricardo; Pepicelli, Gustavo Roberto; Takata, Edmilson Takehiro

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of osteosynthesis on femoral neck fractures using two instead of three screws. Thirty-nine fractures were retrospectively evaluated, divided into groups in which two screws were used in parallel (n = 28) or three screws (n =11) in an inverted triangle configuration (in accordance with the AO technique). The patients were then followed up until reaching the outcome of either consolidation or failure. In the group in which two screws were used, consolidation was observed in 23 of the 28 fractures (82%). In the group in which three screws were used, consolidation was observed in 6 of the 11 fractures (55%). There was no statistically significant difference between these percentages. There was no difference in the prognosis for these fractures when treated using two screws in parallel or three screws in an inverted triangle in accordance with the AO technique. Further studies are needed in order to establish a definitive conclusion.

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of intercondylar eminence fractures with intraepiphyseal screws in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdi, H; Thévenin-Lemoine, C; Sales de Gauzy, J; Accadbled, F

    2016-06-01

    Tibial intercondylar eminence fracture rarely occurs in childhood. Its treatment requires anatomic reduction to provide knee stability and a rigid fixation to minimize postoperative immobilization time. Arthroscopy combined with fluoroscopy with intra-epiphyseal ASNIS screw fixation can meet the requirements of this treatment. The series comprised 24 patients (mean age: 11 years) with Meyers and McKeever type II tibial intercondylar eminence fractures (n=15) or type III (n=9), operated on between 2011 and 2013. Fixation with 4-mm ASNIS screws was placed arthroscopically. The demographic data, associated lesions, radiological union, stability, functional result, and the Lysholm score were evaluated. With a mean follow-up of 2 years, the mean Lysholm score was 99.3 for type II and 98.6 for type III fractures. At the 6th postoperative week, range of motion in the operated knees was identical to the healthy knees. At the 12th postoperative week, there was no sign of anterior laxity. Twelve cases included meniscal entrapment, but no significant difference was observed in the functional results. ASNIS screw fixation under arthroscopy can be successfully applied in the treatment of types II and III tibial intercondylar eminence fractures in children. This technique provides excellent stability, allows early weigh-tbearing, and preserves function of the knee and its growth. IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Research and application of absorbable screw in orthopedics: a clinical review comparing PDLLA screw with metal screw in patients with simple medial malleolus fracture

    OpenAIRE

    TANG Jin; HU Jin-feng; GUO Wei-chun; YU Ling; ZHAO Sheng-hao

    2013-01-01

    【Abstract】Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of absorbable screw in medial malleolus fracture and discuss its clinical application in orthopedics. Methods: A total of 129 patients with simple medial malleolus fracture were studied. Among them, 64 patients were treated with poly-D, L-lactic acid (PDLLA) absorbable screws, while the others were treated with metal screws. All the patients were followed up for 12-20 months (averaged 18.4 months) and the the...

  20. Biomechanical study of pedicle screw fixation in severely osteoporotic bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stephen D; Salkeld, Samantha L; Stanley, Tom; Faciane, Albert; Miller, Scot D

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining adequate purchase with standard pedicle screw techniques remains a challenge in poor quality bone. The development of alternate insertion techniques and screw designs was prompted by recognition of potential fixation complications. An expandable pedicle screw design has been shown to significantly improve fixation compared to a conventional screw in poor quality bone. The purpose of this study was to determine if polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement augmentation of an expandable pedicle screw can further improve fixation strength compared to the expandable screw alone in severely osteoporotic bone. A technique for cement insertion into the pedicle by means of the cannulated central portion of the expandable screw is also described. The axial pullout strength, stiffness and energy absorbed of cemented and noncemented expandable pedicle screws was determined in cadaveric vertebrae. Twenty-one fresh unembalmed vertebrae from the thoracolumbar spine were used. Radiographs and bone mineral density measurements (BMD) were used to characterize bone quality. Paired cemented and noncemented pedicle screw axial pullout strength was determined through mechanical testing. Mechanical pullout strength, stiffness and energy to failure was correlated with BMD. Overall, there was a 250% increase in mean pullout strength with the cemented expandable screw compared with a noncemented expandable screw including a greater than twofold increase in pullout strength in the most severely osteoporotic bone. The mean stiffness and energy absorbed to failure was also significantly increased. A cemented conventional screw achieved a pullout strength similar to the noncemented expandable screw. PMMA cement augmentation of the expandable pedicle screw may be a viable clinical option for achieving fixation in severely osteoporotic bone.

  1. Screw Versus Plate Fixation for Chevron Osteotomy: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Boyd J; Fallat, Lawrence M; Kish, John P

    2016-01-01

    The chevron osteotomy is a popular procedure used for the correction of moderate hallux abducto valgus deformity. Fixation is typically accomplished with Kirschner wires or bone screws; however, in cystic or osteoporotic bone, these could be inadequate, resulting in displacement of the capital fragment. We propose using a locking plate and interfragmental screw for fixation of the chevron osteotomy that could reduce the healing time and decrease the incidence of displacement. We performed a retrospective cohort study for chevron osteotomies on 75 feet (73 patients). The control groups underwent fixation with 1 screw in 30 feet (40%) and 2 screws in 30 feet (40%). A total of 15 feet (20%) were included in the locking plate and interfragmental screw group. The patients were followed up until bone healing was achieved at a median of 7 (range 6 to 14) weeks. Our hypothesis was that those treated with the locking plate and interfragmental screw would have a faster healing time and fewer incidents of capital fragment displacement compared with the 1- or 2-screw groups. The corresponding mean intervals to healing for the 1-screw group was 7.71 ± 1.28 (range 6 to 10) weeks, for the 2-screw group was 7.27 ± 1.57 (range 6 to 14) weeks, and for the locking plate and interfragmental screw group was 7.01 ± 1.00 (range 6 to 9) weeks. One case of capital fragment displacement occurred in the single screw group and one in the 2-screw group. No displacement occurred in the locking plate and interfragmental screw group. Neither finding was statistically significant. However, we believe the locking plate and interfragmental screw could be a viable option in patients with osteoporotic and cystic bone changes for correction of hallux abducto valgus. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Research and application of absorbable screw in orthopedics: a clinical review comparing PDLLA screw with metal screw in patients with simple medial malleolus fracture

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    TANG Jin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of absorbable screw in medial malleolus fracture and discuss its clinical application in orthopedics. Methods: A total of 129 patients with simple medial malleolus fracture were studied. Among them, 64 patients were treated with poly-D, L-lactic acid (PDLLA absorbable screws, while the others were treated with metal screws. All the patients were followed up for 12-20 months (averaged 18.4 months and the therapeutic effect was evaluated ac-cording to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Soci-ety clinical rating systems. Results: In absorbable screw group, we obtained excel-lent and good results in 62 cases (96.88%; in steel screw group, 61 cases (93.85% achieved excellent and good results. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: In the treatment of malleolus fracture, absorbable screw can achieve the same result compared with metal screw fixation. Absorbable screw is preferred due to its advantages of safety, cleanliness and avoiding the removal procedure associated with metallic implants. Key words: Ankle; Bone screws; Fractures, bone

  3. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN TENSION BAND WIRING OF PATELLAR FRACTURES WITH KIRSCHNER WIRES AND CANNULATED SCREWS IN TERMS OF FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME AND COMPLICATIONS

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    Kumaran Chettiar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Various treatment modalities are described for the treatment of displaced transverse fractures of patella. As patella is very important biomechanically, open reduction and internal fixation with maximal preservation of patella is the standard treatment. Most commonly used method is modified tension band wiring with Kirschner wires. In a modification, cannulated screws are used instead of K wires and wire is passed through the cannulation of the screw and anterior surface of the patella. The aim of our study was to compare the complications and functional outcomes after surgical treatment of patellar fractures using modified tension band wiring with Kirschner wires and with cannulated screws. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted in Department of Orthopaedics, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, during the period 2014- 2015. Total sample size was 36. They were randomised into two groups. Among them, 17 had undergone tension band wiring with cannulated screws and 19 with Kirschner wires. They were evaluated in postoperative period at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months by looking for complications like postoperative infection, postoperative loss of reduction, skin irritation by prominent hardware. Functional outcome was assessed by knee pain score and Good Fellows grading of range of motion. RESULTS According to this study while comparing these two surgical techniques, there are no statistically significant differences in terms of complications and functional outcome. We observed that cannulated screw with tension band wiring has better patient tolerance, less complications like skin irritation by prominent hardware, loss of fixation and knee pain. We found that tension band wiring through cannulated screws is technically more difficult than using Kirschner wires. CONCLUSION Although, the statistical analysis showed no significant differences regarding the union and final outcome, cannulated screw with tension band wiring has

  4. Does pedicle screw fixation of the subaxial cervical spine provide adequate stabilization in a multilevel vertebral body fracture model? An in vitro biomechanical study.

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    Duff, John; Hussain, Mir M; Klocke, Noelle; Harris, Jonathan A; Yandamuri, Soumya S; Bobinski, Lukas; Daniel, Roy T; Bucklen, Brandon S

    2018-03-01

    Cervical vertebral body fractures generally are treated through an anterior-posterior approach. Cervical pedicle screws offer an alternative to circumferential fixation. This biomechanical study quantifies whether cervical pedicle screws alone can restore the stability of a three-column vertebral body fracture, making standard 360° reconstruction unnecessary. Range of motion (2.0 Nm) in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation was tested on 10 cadaveric specimens (five/group) at C2-T1 with a spine kinematics simulator. Specimens were tested for flexibility of intact when a fatigue protocol with instrumentation was used to evaluate construct longevity. For a C4-6 fracture, spines were instrumented with 360° reconstruction (corpectomy spacer + plate + lateral mass screws) (Group 1) or cervical pedicle screw reconstruction (C3 and C7 only) (Group 2). Results are expressed as percentage of intact (100%). In Group 1, 360° reconstruction resulted in decreased motion during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, to 21.5%, 14.1%, and 48.6%, respectively, following 18,000 cycles of flexion-extension testing. In Group 2, cervical pedicle screw reconstruction led to reduced motion after cyclic flexion-extension testing, to 38.4%, 12.3%, and 51.1% during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, respectively. The 360° stabilization procedure provided the greatest initial stability. Cervical pedicle screw reconstruction resulted in less change in motion following cyclic loading with less variation from specimen to specimen, possibly caused by loosening of the shorter lateral mass screws. Cervical pedicle screw stabilization may be a viable alternative to 360° reconstruction for restoring multilevel vertebral body fracture. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The safe screw path along inferior border of the arcuate line at acetabular area: an anatomical study based on CT scans

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    Chun Bi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Misplaced screw during the internal fixation of acetabular fractures may penetrate the hip joint which might cause chondrolysis and traumatic osteoarthritis in the future. This study aims to acquire the safe path for screw insertion along inferior border of the arcuate line fixation route at acetabular area. Methods Computed tomography (CT scans of 98 patients without pelvic trauma were rebuilt for three-dimensional models of pelvis. After depicting the fixation route curve, five cross-sections perpendicularly to the curve were established from the anterior of pelvis to the posterior along inferior border of the arcuate line. The safe screw lengths for section 1 and 5 were measured from the computer models. In section 2, 3 and 4, a line from the screw entry point tangent to the inferior edge of the acetabulum was depicted and the measurements of minimum safe direction of screw insertion were performed then marked with angle θ. Results The safe screw lengths for section 1 and 5 were 22.29 ± 4.41 mm and 32.64 ± 4.70 mm (n = 98. The minimum safe angles of screw insertion for the middle three sections 2, 3, and 4 were 65.38 ± 10.23°, 74.20 ± 10.20°, and 57.88 ± 11.11°(n = 98, respectively. The results for the male group (n = 98 indicated smaller minimum safe angles in these three sections compared with the female (n = 98. Conclusions Compared to male, the minimum safe angles of screw placement at acetabular area for female should be more away from inferior edge of acetabulum and tilt to the bottom of pelvis along inferior border fixation route in surgical management of acetabular fractures.

  6. Cephalomedullary screws as the standard proximal locking screws for nailing femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinge, Cory; Liporace, Frank; Koval, Kenneth; Gilbert, George T

    2010-12-01

    In 2004, we modified our technique for the stabilization of femoral shaft fractures so that all fractures were stabilized using a reconstruction nail with proximal locking screws oriented into the femoral head. The rationale for this was twofold: first, potentially "missed" associated femoral neck fractures would be stabilized. Second, hip fractures that might occur later in life above the intramedullary nail might be avoided. The purpose of this study therefore was to determine whether there were any risks to patients treated for femoral shaft fractures with antegrade nails using cephalomedullary proximal locking screws. Retrospective. Two regional trauma centers. Eighty-seven consecutive patients were treated for a femoral shaft fracture treated with antegrade femoral nailing with a cephalomedullary locked nail. Reamed, trochanteric insertion of an intramedullary nail with proximal locking screws placed in a cephalomedullary direction. Patient and injury data, radiographic analyses, and complications of treatment were assessed at a minimum of 12 months. Sixty-one of 87 patients (70%) were available at a mean of 19.8 months (range, 12-44 months). Sixty of 61 fractures united after the index procedure. Complications included one delayed union successfully treated with exchange nailing, one distal locking screw fracture (allowing dynamization and completion of fracture healing), two patients with postoperative deformity that required a derotation procedure, and two drill bits that broke intraoperatively and were retained. There were no major complications at the hip, no migration or failure of proximal locking screws, and no screws required removal. Using a reconstruction nail and cephalomedullary proximal locking screws for antegrade femoral nailing of femoral shaft fractures was not associated with major complications in this series. This modification of standard femoral nailing offers potential advantages, including fixation of any "missed" associated femoral

  7. 1997 Volvo Award winner in clinical studies. The effect of pedicle screw instrumentation on functional outcome and fusion rates in posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion: a prospective, randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, K; Christensen, F B; Eiskjaer, S P; Hansen, E S; Fruensgaard, S; Bünger, C E

    1997-12-15

    A prospective randomized clinical study. To evaluate supplementary pedicle screw fixation (Cotrel-Dubousset) in posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. The rationale behind lumbar fusion is to eliminate pathologic motion to relieve pain. To improve fusion rates and to allow reduction, a rigid transpedicular screw fixation may be beneficial, but the positive effect of this may be counter-balanced by an increase in complications. The inclusion criteria were severe, chronic low back pain from spondylolisthesis Grades 1 and 2 or from primary or secondary degenerative segmental instability. One hundred thirty patients were randomly allocated to receive no instrumentation (n = 66) or Cotrel-Dubousset instrumentation (n = 64) in posterolateral lumbar fusion. Variables were registered at the time of surgery and at 1 and 2 years after surgery. Follow-up was achieved in 97.7% of the patients. Fusion rates deduced from plain radiographs were not significantly different between instrumented and noninstrumented groups. The functional outcome assessed by the Dallas Pain Questionnaire improved significantly in both groups, and there were no significant differences in results between the two groups, except for significantly better (P < 0.06) functional outcome in relation to daily activities in the instrumented group when neural decompression had been performed. The global patients' satisfaction was 82% in the instrumented group versus 74% in the noninstrumented group (not significant). Fixation of instrumentation increased operation time, blood loss, and early reoperation rate significantly. Patients experienced only a few minor postoperative complications; none were major. Two infections appeared in the Cotrel-Dubousset group. Significant symptoms from misplacement of pedicle screws were seen in 4.8% of the instrumented patients. Lumbar posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw fixation increases the operation time, blood loss, and reoperation rate, and leads to a significant risk

  8. Closed reduction with CT-guided screw fixation for unstable sacroiliac joint fracture-dislocation.

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    Baskin, Kevin M; Cahill, Ann Marie; Kaye, Robin D; Born, Christopher T; Grudziak, Jan S; Towbin, Richard B

    2004-12-01

    Unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures and dislocations are uncommon but potentially life-threatening injuries in children. Early definitive management reduces risk of immediate complications as well as chronic pain and gait dysfunction. Conventional operative therapy carries substantial risk of extensive blood loss and iatrogenic neurological and vascular injury. Minimally invasive image-guided intervention may further reduce immediate risk and improve long-term outcome. To describe CT-guided closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) and review outcomes of unstable fracture-dislocation of the sacroiliac (SI) joint in children. Between 2000 and 2003, three children (two girls, one boy) age 8-14 years were referred to interventional radiology for treatment of unstable SI joint fracture-dislocation not adequately treated with anterior external fixation alone. The three affected SI joints (two left, one right) were treated in a combined approach by pediatric interventional radiologists and orthopedic surgeons, using a percutaneous approach under CT guidance. Over a threaded guiding pin, 7.3 mm cannulated screws were used to achieve stable reduction of the affected SI joints. One screw was removed after slight (2 mm) migration. No neurovascular or other complications occurred. All patients had satisfactory healing with near-anatomic reduction, although recovery of the youngest was delayed by associated spinal injury. Compared to open surgical alternatives, CRIF under CT guidance reduces operating time, decreases blood loss, and allows early definitive fixation and immediate non-weight-bearing mobilization with a low rate of complication for unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures. In addition, CT-guided placement of the guide pin may allow safer screw positioning and may minimize the total number of screws needed to achieve pelvic stability.

  9. Closed reduction with CT-guided screw fixation for unstable sacroiliac joint fracture-dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Cahill, Ann Marie; Kaye, Robin D.; Born, Christopher T.; Grudziak, Jan S.; Towbin, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures and dislocations are uncommon but potentially life-threatening injuries in children. Early definitive management reduces risk of immediate complications as well as chronic pain and gait dysfunction. Conventional operative therapy carries substantial risk of extensive blood loss and iatrogenic neurological and vascular injury. Minimally invasive image-guided intervention may further reduce immediate risk and improve long-term outcome. To describe CT-guided closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) and review outcomes of unstable fracture-dislocation of the sacroiliac (SI) joint in children. Between 2000 and 2003, three children (two girls, one boy) age 8-14 years were referred to interventional radiology for treatment of unstable SI joint fracture-dislocation not adequately treated with anterior external fixation alone. The three affected SI joints (two left, one right) were treated in a combined approach by pediatric interventional radiologists and orthopedic surgeons, using a percutaneous approach under CT guidance. Over a threaded guiding pin, 7.3 mm cannulated screws were used to achieve stable reduction of the affected SI joints. One screw was removed after slight (2 mm) migration. No neurovascular or other complications occurred. All patients had satisfactory healing with near-anatomic reduction, although recovery of the youngest was delayed by associated spinal injury. Compared to open surgical alternatives, CRIF under CT guidance reduces operating time, decreases blood loss, and allows early definitive fixation and immediate non-weight-bearing mobilization with a low rate of complication for unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures. In addition, CT-guided placement of the guide pin may allow safer screw positioning and may minimize the total number of screws needed to achieve pelvic stability. (orig.)

  10. Surgical complications in neuromuscular scoliosis operated with posterior- only approach using pedicle screw fixation

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    Singh Surya Udai

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no reports describing complications with posterior spinal fusion (PSF with segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI using pedicle screw fixation in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis. Methods Fifty neuromuscular patients (18 cerebral palsy, 18 Duchenne muscular dystrophy, 8 spinal muscular atrophy and 6 others were divided in two groups according to severity of curves; group I ( 90°. All underwent PSF and SSI with pedicle screw fixation. There were no anterior procedures. Perioperative (within three months of surgery and postoperative (after three months of surgery complications were retrospectively reviewed. Results There were fifty (37 perioperative, 13 postoperative complications. Hemo/pneumothorax, pleural effusion, pulmonary edema requiring ICU care, complete spinal cord injury, deep wound infection and death were major complications; while atelectesis, pneumonia, mild pleural effusion, UTI, ileus, vomiting, gastritis, tingling sensation or radiating pain in lower limb, superficial infection and wound dehiscence were minor complications. Regarding perioperative complications, 34(68% patients had at least one major or one minor complication. There were 16 patients with pulmonary, 14 with abdominal, 3 with wound related, 2 with neurological and 1 cardiovascular complications, respectively. There were two deaths, one due to cardiac arrest and other due to hypovolemic shock. Regarding postoperative complications 7 patients had coccygodynia, 3 had screw head prominence, 2 had bed sore and 1 had implant loosening, respectively. There was a significant relationship between age and increased intraoperative blood loss (p = 0.024. However it did not increased complications or need for ICU care. Similarly intraoperative blood loss > 3500 ml, severity of curve or need of pelvic fixation did not increase the complication rate or need for ICU. DMD patients had higher chances of coccygodynia postoperatively. Conclusion

  11. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

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    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte Junior, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study.

  12. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

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    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  13. Achieving interfragmentary compression without special drilling technique or screw design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jonathan; Deafenbaugh, Bradley; Christiansen, Blaine; Garcia-Nolen, Tanya; Lee, Mark

    2017-09-08

    Traditional fracture fixation teaching suggests that fully threaded screws do not provide interfragmentary compression unless placed through a glide hole. Based on this assumption, pelvic surgeons typically use fully threaded screws in the treatment of comminuted transforaminal sacral fractures to limit iatrogenic neuroforaminal stenosis. Clinical experience with fully threaded screws suggests that interfragmentary compression actually does occur. We hypothesized that the use of a fully threaded screw does not produce any interfragmentary compression and that there is no difference in insertional torque between partially threaded and fully threaded screws. To test this hypothesis, fully and partially threaded 7.0 millimeter (mm) cannulated screws were placed across two synthetic bone blocks fabricated to simulate normal and osteoporotic bone. We compared two groups of normal and osteoporotic blocks for compression achieved and maximal insertional torque generated with fully threaded and partially threaded screw insertion. A micro computed tomography (CT) scan of the composite blocks was obtained to investigate for structural changes created during screw insertion. For both groups, compression was achieved with fully threaded screws and the maximal insertional torque was higher using fully threaded screws. Micro CT analysis demonstrated local bone damage with structural disruption in the near segment of the fully threaded screw path in comparison to the partially threaded. this study demonstrates that compression is generated using fully threaded screws without using a predrilled glide hole. The insertional torque required to generate compression with fully threaded screws is increased but is clinically applicable. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion andin SituScrew Fixation for Rostral Adjacent Segment Stenosis of the Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Hoon; Kwon, Shin Won; Moon, Jung Hyeon; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Heo, Won

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the detailed surgical technique and short-term clinical and radiological outcomes of lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and in situ lateral screw fixation using a conventional minimally invasive screw fixation system (MISF) for revision surgery to treat rostral lumbar adjacent segment disease. The medical and radiological records were retrospectively reviewed. The surgery was indicated in 10 consecutive patients with rostral adjacent segment stenosis and instability. After the insertion of the interbody cage, lateral screws were inserted into the cranial and caudal vertebra using the MISF through the same LLIF trajectory. The radiological and clinical outcomes were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 3-48 months). Transient sensory changes in the left anterior thigh occurred in 3 patients, and 1 patient experienced subjective weakness; however, these symptoms normalized within 1 week. Back and leg pain were significantly improved ( p fusion was confirmed in 7 patients. Subsidence and mechanical failure did not occur in any patients. This study demonstrates that LLIF and in situ lateral screw fixation may be an alternative surgical option for rostral lumbar adjacent segment disease.

  15. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique.

  16. Calculating Characteristics of the Screws with Constant And Variable Step

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    B. N. Zotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to creating a technique for calculating power characteristics of the screws with constant and variable step for the centrifugal pumps. The technique feature is that the reverse currents, which are observed in screws working at low flow, are numerically taken into account. The paper presents a diagram of the stream in the screw with flow to the network Q=0, and the static pressure of the screw in this mode is computed according to reverse current parameters. Maximum flow of screw is determined from the known formulas. When calculating the power characteristics and computing the overall efficiency of the screw, for the first time a volumetric efficiency of the screw is introduced. It is defined as a ratio between the flow into the network and the sum of the reverse current flows and a flow into the network. This approach allowed us to determine the efficiency of the screw over the entire range of flows.A comparison of experimental characteristics of the constant step screw with those of calculated by the proposed technique shows their good agreement.The technique is also used in calculating characteristics of the variable step screws. The variable step screw is considered as a screw consisting of two screws with a smooth transition of the blades from the inlet to the outlet. Screws in which the step at the inlet is less than that of at the outlet as well as screws with the step at the inlet being more than that of at the outlet were investigated. It is shown that a pressure of the screw with zero step and the value of the reverse currents depend only on the parameters of the input section of the screw, and the maximum flow, if the step at the inlet is more than the step at the outlet, is determined by the parameters of the output part of the screw. Otherwise, the maximum flow is determined a little bit differently.The paper compares experimental characteristics with characteristics calculated by the technique for variable step

  17. Optimal trajectory for the occipital condyle screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien V; Vivas, Andrew C; Baaj, Ali A; Vale, Fernando L; Uribe, Juan S

    2014-04-01

    Retrospective analysis. To understand what may constitute an optimal trajectory for an occipital condyle (OC) screw. OC screws are an alternative to standard occipital plates as a cephalad fixation point in occipitocervical fusion. An optimal trajectory for placement of OC screws has not been described. We conducted a computed tomography-based study of 340 human occipital condyls. All computed tomographies were negative for traumatic, degenerative, and neoplastic pathology. On the basis of the current literature, linear measurements of distances were made based on a constant entry point. Medial angulations of 10, 20, and 25 degrees relative to the sagittal midline were used. In addition, 10-, 5-degree cranial, 10- and 30-degree caudal angulations were studied to evaluate the incidence of hypoglossal canal and atlantooccipital joint compromise. Average distances were 17.1±2.8, 20.4±2.8, and 22.2±2.9 for 10, 20, and 25 degrees of medial angulation, respectively. Right-sided and left-sided measurements for each category were not significantly different. However, the difference in the measured distances between 10 versus 20 degrees, 10 versus 25 degrees, and 20 versus 25 degrees was all significantly different (PAtlantooccipital joint compromise incidence was 21.8% and 99.1% for 10- and 30-degree caudal angulation, respectively. The condylar entry point should be medial to the condylar fossa, midcondylar, and ≥2 mm caudal to the skull base. An optimal trajectory for the OC screw should have a medial angulation of ≥20 degrees relative to the sagittal midline, trying to stay parallel to the skull base. Minor adjustments in angulation can be made, but any adjustment approaching 10 degrees cranial or caudal leads to an increased risk of hypoglossal canal cranially or atlantooccipital joint compromise caudally.

  18. The Use of Percutaneous Lumbar Fixation Screws for Bilateral Pedicle Fractures with an Associated Dislocation of a Lumbar Disc Prosthesis

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    William D. Harrison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. Case report. Objective. To identify a safe technique for salvage surgery following complications of total disc replacement. Summary of Background Data. Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR is considered by some as the gold standard for discogenic back pain. Revision techniques for TDR and their complications are in their infancy. This case describes a successful method of fixation for this complex presentation. Methods and Results. A 48-year-old male with lumbar degenerative disc disease and no comorbidities. Approximately two weeks postoperatively for a TDR, the patient represented with acute severe back pain and the TDR polyethylene inlay was identified as dislocated anteriorly. Subsequent revision surgery failed immediately as the polyethylene inlay redislocated intraoperatively. Further radiology identified bilateral pedicle fractures, previously unseen on the plain films. The salvage fusion of L5/S1 reutilized the anterior approach with an interbody fusion cage and bone graft. The patient was then turned intraoperatively and redraped. The percutaneous pedicle screws were used to fix L5 to the sacral body via the paracoccygeal corridor. Conclusion. The robust locking screw in the percutaneous screw allowed a complete fixation of the pedicle fractures. At 3-year followup, the patient has an excellent result and has returned to playing golf.

  19. Accurate and Simple Screw Insertion Procedure With Patient-Specific Screw Guide Templates for Posterior C1-C2 Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Taku; Higashiyama, Naoki; Kaneyama, Shuichi; Sumi, Masatoshi

    2017-03-15

    Prospective clinical trial of the screw insertion method for posterior C1-C2 fixation utilizing the patient-specific screw guide template technique. To evaluate the efficacy of this method for insertion of C1 lateral mass screws (LMS), C2 pedicle screws (PS), and C2 laminar screws (LS). Posterior C1LMS and C2PS fixation, also known as the Goel-Harms method, can achieve immediate rigid fixation and high fusion rate, but the screw insertion carries the risk of injury to neuronal and vascular structures. Dissection of venous plexus and C2 nerve root to confirm the insertion point of the C1LMS may also cause problems. We have developed an intraoperative screw guiding method using patient-specific laminar templates. Preoperative bone images of computed tomography (CT) were analyzed using three-dimensional (3D)/multiplanar imaging software to plan the trajectories of the screws. Plastic templates with screw guiding structures were created for each lamina using 3D design and printing technology. Three types of templates were made for precise multistep guidance, and all templates were specially designed to fit and lock on the lamina during the procedure. Surgery was performed using this patient-specific screw guide template system, and placement of the screws was postoperatively evaluated using CT. Twelve patients with C1-C2 instability were treated with a total of 48 screws (24 C1LMS, 20 C2PS, 4 C2LS). Intraoperatively, each template was found to exactly fit and lock on the lamina and screw insertion was completed successfully without dissection of the venous plexus and C2 nerve root. Postoperative CT showed no cortical violation by the screws, and mean deviation of the screws from the planned trajectories was 0.70 ± 0.42 mm. The multistep, patient-specific screw guide template system is useful for intraoperative screw navigation in posterior C1-C2 fixation. This simple and economical method can improve the accuracy of screw insertion, and reduce operation time and

  20. In vitro evaluation of force-expansion characteristics in a newly designed orthodontic expansion screw compared to conventional screws

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    Oshagh Morteza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Expansion screws like Hyrax, Haas and other types, produce heavy interrupted forces which are unfavorable for dental movement and could be harmful to the tooth and periodontium. The other disadvantage of these screws is the need for patient cooperation for their regular activation. The purpose of this study was to design a screw and compare its force- expansion curve with other types. Materials and Methods : A new screw was designed and fabricated in the same dimension, with conventional types, with the ability of 8 mm expansion (Free wire length: 12 mm, initial compression: 4.5 mm, spring wire diameter: 0.4 mm, spring diameter: 3 mm, number of the coils: n0 ine, material: s0 tainless steel. In this in vitro study, the new screw was placed in an acrylic orthodontic appliance, and after mounting on a stone cast, the force-expansion curve was evaluated by a compression test machine and compared to other screws. Results : Force-expansion curve of designed screw had a flatter inclination compared to other screws. Generally it produced a light continuous force (two to 3.5 pounds for every 4 mm of expansion. Conclusion : In comparison with heavy and interrupted forces of other screws, the newly designed screw created light and continuous forces.

  1. In vitro evaluation of force-expansion characteristics in a newly designed orthodontic expansion screw compared to conventional screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshagh, Morteza; Momeni Danaei, S H; Hematian, M R; Oshagh, M R; Zade, A Hadiun; Saboori, A A

    2009-01-01

    Expansion screws like Hyrax, Haas and other types, produce heavy interrupted forces which are unfavorable for dental movement and could be harmful to the tooth and periodontium. The other disadvantage of these screws is the need for patient cooperation for their regular activation. The purpose of this study was to design a screw and compare its force- expansion curve with other types. A new screw was designed and fabricated in the same dimension, with conventional types, with the ability of 8 mm expansion (Free wire length: 12 mm, initial compression: 4.5 mm, spring wire diameter: 0.4 mm, spring diameter: 3 mm, number of the coils: n0 ine, material: s0 tainless steel). In this in vitro study, the new screw was placed in an acrylic orthodontic appliance, and after mounting on a stone cast, the force-expansion curve was evaluated by a compression test machine and compared to other screws. Force-expansion curve of designed screw had a flatter inclination compared to other screws. Generally it produced a light continuous force (two to 3.5 pounds) for every 4 mm of expansion. In comparison with heavy and interrupted forces of other screws, the newly designed screw created light and continuous forces.

  2. Hydraulic screw fastening devices - design, maintenance, operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachner.

    1976-01-01

    With hydraulic screw fastening devices, pretension values with a maximum deviation of +-2.5% from the rated value can be achieved. This high degree of pretension accuracy is of considerable importance with regard to the safety factor required for the screw connection between reactor vessel head and reactor vessel. The operating rhythm of a nuclear power station with its refuelling art regular intervals makes further demands on the screw fastening device, in particular in connection with the transport of screws and for nuts. The necessary installations extend the screw fastening device into a combination of a high-pressure hydraulic cylinder system with an electrical or pneumoelectrical driving unit and an electrical control unit. Maintenance work is complicated by the large number of identical, highly stressed structural elements in connection with an unfavourable relation operating time/outage time. The problems have been perpetually reduced by close cooperation between the manufacturers and users of screw fastening devices. (orig./AK) [de

  3. Self-Inflicted Drywall Screws in the Sagittal Sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guppy, Kern H; Ochi, Calvin

    2018-02-01

    A 30-year-old right-handed man with a history of schizophrenia presented with 2 self-inflicted drywall screws in the skull. The patient was sleepy but easily arousable; blood tests showed he had taken methamphetamines. Computed tomography and computed tomography angiography of the head showed the frontal screw abutted left of the superior sagittal sinus, and the posterior screw went through the superior sagittal sinus with no extravasation of contrast material at either site. Both screws were removed with exposure of the sagittal sinus using U-shaped craniectomies. There was no bleeding on the removal of the screws. It appears the posterior screw entered between the leaflets of the sagittal sinus dura mater. The patient had returned to work without any sequelae 1 month after injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tightening techniques for the retaining screws of universal abutment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wittcinski REGALIN

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This study evaluated the torque maintenance of universal abutment retaining screws using different tightening techniques, and coated or uncoated screws. Material and method The screws were tightened to implants as following: Control – 32 Ncm torque; H20 – holding 32 Ncm torque for 20 s; R – 32 Ncm torque, repeated after 10 min (retorque; and H20+R – combining the two tightening techniques. Titanium and coated screws were also evaluated. Result Statistical analysis showed higher maintained torque for titanium screws (p<0.001. The H20+R technique showed the highest maintained torque (p=0.003, but the H20 technique’s maintained torque was similar. Conclusion Titanium screws associating the two tightening techniques can improve maintained torque.

  5. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  6. Translaminar screw fixation in the lumbar spine: technique, indications, results

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, D.; Humke, T.

    1998-01-01

    Translaminar screw fixation of the lumbar spine represents a simple and effective technique for short segment fusion in the degenerative spine. Clinical experience with 173 patients who underwent translaminar screw fixation revealed a fusion rate of 94%. The indications for translaminar screw fixation as a primary fixation procedure are: segmental dysfunction, lumbar spinal stenosis with painful degenerative changes, segmental revision surgery after discectomies, and painful disc-related synd...

  7. The gauge theory of dislocations: A nonuniformly moving screw dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazar, Markus, E-mail: lazar@fkp.tu-darmstadt.d [Emmy Noether Research Group, Department of Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Hochschulstr. 6, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-07-05

    We investigate the nonuniform motion of a straight screw dislocation in infinite media in the framework of the translational gauge theory of dislocations. The equations of motion are derived for an arbitrarily moving screw dislocation. The fields of the elastic velocity, elastic distortion, dislocation density and dislocation current surrounding the arbitrarily moving screw dislocation are derived explicitly in the form of integral representations. We calculate the radiation fields and the fields depending on the dislocation velocities.

  8. Cervical Pedicle Screw Placement Using Medial Funnel Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Choi, Byung Kwan; Han, In Ho; Choi, Won Gyu; Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Kim, Hwan Soo

    2017-09-01

    Cervical pedicle screw (CPS) placement is very challenging due to high risk of neurovascular complications. We devised a new technique (medial funnel technique) to improve the accuracy and feasibility of CPS placement. We reviewed 28 consecutive patients undergoing CPS instrumentation using the medial funnel technique. Their mean age was 51.4 years (range, 30-81 years). Preoperative diagnosis included degenerative disease (n=5), trauma (n=22), and infection (n=1). Screw perforations were graded with the following criteria: grade 0 having no perforation, grade 1 having 50% of screw diameter. Grades 0 and 1 were considered as correct position. The degree of perforation was determined by 2 junior neurosurgeons and 1 senior neurosurgeon. A total of 88 CPSs were inserted. The rate of correct placement was 94.3%; grade 0, 54 screws; grade 1, 29 screws; grade 2, 4 screws; and grade 3, 1 screw. No neurovascular complications or failure of instrumentation occurred. In perforated screws (34 screws), lateral perforations were 4 and medial perforations were 30. We performed CPS insertion using medial funnel technique and achieved 94.3% (83 of 88) of correct placement. And it can decrease lateral perforation.

  9. Minimally Invasive Technique for PMMA Augmentation of Fenestrated Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Helge Klingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the minimally invasive technique for cement augmentation of cannulated and fenestrated screws using an injection cannula as well as to report its safety and efficacy. Methods. A total of 157 cannulated and fenestrated pedicle screws had been cement-augmented during minimally invasive posterior screw-rod spondylodesis in 35 patients from January to December 2012. Retrospective evaluation of cement extravasation and screw loosening was carried out in postoperative plain radiographs and thin-sliced triplanar computed tomography scans. Results. Twenty-seven, largely prevertebral cement extravasations were detected in 157 screws (17.2%. None of the cement extravasations was causing a clinical sequela like a new neurological deficit. One screw loosening was noted (0.6% after a mean follow-up of 12.8 months. We observed no cementation-associated complication like pulmonary embolism or hemodynamic insufficiency. Conclusions. The presented minimally invasive cement augmentation technique using an injection cannula facilitates convenient and safe cement delivery through polyaxial cannulated and fenestrated screws during minimally invasive screw-rod spondylodesis. Nevertheless, the optimal injection technique and design of fenestrated screws have yet to be identified. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials DRKS00006726.

  10. A Universal Pedicle Screw and V-Rod System for Lumbar Isthmic Spondylolysis: A Retrospective Analysis of 21 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiong-sheng; Zhou, Sheng-yuan; Jia, Lian-shun; Gu, Xiao-min; Fang, Lei; Zhu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the surgical outcome of a universal pedicle screw-V rod system and isthmic bone grafting for isthmic spondylolysis. Methods Twenty-four patients with isthmic spondylolysis at L5 and grade 0–I spondylolisthesis (Meyerding classification) received isthmic bone graft and stabilization using the universal pedicle screw-V rod system. Back pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and time to bone healing, improvement in spondylolisthesis and intervertebral space height at L5/S1 and L4/L5 were assessed. Results Twenty-one patients were followed up for 24 months and included in the analysis. Back pain was markedly improved at 3 months postoperatively with a statistical difference in VAS scores compared with preoperative VAS scores (Pspondylolysis and reduces back pain, prevents anterior displacement of the diseased segment and maintains intervertebral space height, thus offering a promising alternative to current approaches for isthmic spondylolysis. PMID:23691090

  11. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Wieding

    Full Text Available The use of finite element analysis (FEA has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with

  12. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  13. Biomechanical efficacy of monoaxial or polyaxial pedicle screw and additional screw insertion at the level of fracture, in lumbar burst fracture: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The addition of intermediate screws at the level of a burst fracture significantly increased the stability of short-segment pedicle screw fixation in both the MPS and PPS groups. However, in short-segment fixation group, monoaxial pedicle screw exhibited more stability in flexion and extension than the polyaxial pedicle screw.

  14. Injury to the anterior tibial system during percutaneous plating of a proximal tibial fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Joshua L; Sciadini, Marcus F

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures has grown in popularity in recent years. This article describes a patient with a Schatzker type VI proximal tibial fracture (AO/OTA type 41.C3) and previous compartment syndrome treated with definitive fixation 8 weeks after initial injury with a precontoured proximal tibial plate and a distal targeting device. Brisk bleeding occurred during percutaneous insertion of a cortical screw at the midshaft of the tibia. Surgical exploration revealed sidewall tearing of the anterior tibial artery and vein, which were clipped at the screw insertion site. After the bleeding was controlled, the patient had a strong palpable posterior tibial pulse with no palpable dorsalis pedis pulse, and the foot remained well perfused. Function of the deep peroneal nerve was normal postoperatively. Previous concerns regarding the percutaneous treatment of proximal tibial fractures have focused on the risks of damage to the superficial peroneal nerve from distal screws. Based on cadaveric studies, percutaneously and laterally based screw placement in the distal tibial metaphysis threatens injury to the anterior tibial system. However, with alterations to the normal anatomy caused by severe trauma, previously described safe zones may be changed and neurovascular structures may be exposed to risk in locations that were previously thought safe. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Larry E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traditional surgical management of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis is technically challenging and is associated with significant complications. The advent of minimally invasive surgical techniques offers patients treatment alternatives with lower operative morbidity risk. The combination of percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and an axial presacral approach for lumbosacral discectomy and fusion offers an alternative procedure for the surgical management of low-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Case presentation Three patients who had L5-S1 grade 2 spondylolisthesis and who presented with axial pain and lumbar radiculopathy were treated with a minimally invasive surgical technique. The patients-a 51-year-old woman and two men (ages 46 and 50-were Caucasian. Under fluoroscopic guidance, spondylolisthesis was reduced with a percutaneous pedicle screw system, resulting in interspace distraction. Then, an axial presacral approach with the AxiaLIF System (TranS1, Inc., Wilmington, NC, USA was used to perform the discectomy and anterior fixation. Once the axial rod was engaged in the L5 vertebral body, further distraction of the spinal interspace was made possible by partially loosening the pedicle screw caps, advancing the AxiaLIF rod to its final position in the vertebrae, and retightening the screw caps. The operative time ranged from 173 to 323 minutes, and blood loss was minimal (50 mL. Indirect foraminal decompression and adequate fixation were achieved in all cases. All patients were ambulatory after surgery and reported relief from pain and resolution of radicular symptoms. No perioperative complications were reported, and patients were discharged in two to three days. Fusion was demonstrated radiographically in all patients at one-year follow-up. Conclusions Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction combined with axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion offers a promising and minimally invasive alternative for the management

  16. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Fibular Motion After Fixation of Syndesmotic Injuries With a Screw or Suture-Button Construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMothe, Jeremy M; Baxter, Josh R; Murphy, Conor; Gilbert, Susannah; DeSandis, Bridget; Drakos, Mark C

    2016-12-01

    Suture-button constructs are an alternative to screw fixation for syndesmotic injuries, and proponents advocate that suture-button constructs may allow physiological motion of the syndesmosis. Recent biomechanical data suggest that fibular instability with syndesmotic injuries is greatest in the sagittal plane, but the design of a suture-button construct, being a rope and 2 retention washers, is most effective along the axis of the rope (in the coronal plane). Some studies report that suture-button constructs are able to constrain fibular motion in the coronal plane, but the ability of a tightrope to constrain sagittal fibular motion is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess fibular motion in response to an external rotation stress test in a syndesmotic injury model after fixation with a screw or suture-button constructs. Eleven fresh-frozen cadaver whole legs with intact tibia-fibula articulations were secured to a custom fixture. Fibular motion (coronal, sagittal, and rotational planes) in response to a 6.5-Nm external rotation moment applied to the foot was recorded with fluoroscopy and a high-resolution motion capture system. Measures were taken for the following syndesmotic conditions: intact, complete lateral injury, complete lateral and deltoid injury, repair with a tetracortical 4.0-mm screw, and repair with a suture button construct (Tightrope; Arthrex, Naples, FL) aimed from the lateral fibula to the anterior medial malleolus. The suture-button construct allowed significantly more sagittal plane motion than the syndesmotic screw. Measurements acquired with mortise imaging did not detect differences between the intact, lateral injury, and 2 repair conditions. External rotation of the fibula was significantly increased in both injury conditions and was not restored to intact levels with the screw or the suture-button construct. A single suture-button placed from the lateral fibula to the anterior medial malleolus was unable to replicate the motion

  17. Biomechanical cadaver testing of a fixed-angle plate in comparison to tension wiring and screw fixation in transverse patella fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Simon; Schneppendahl, Johannes; Jopen, Eva; Eichler, Christian; Koebke, Jürgen; Schönau, Eckhard; Hakimi, Mohssen; Windolf, Joachim; Wild, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Operative treatment of patella fractures is frequently associated with implant failure and secondary dislocation which can be attributed to the employed hardware. Therefore, a 2.7 mm fixed-angle plate designed for the treatment of patella fractures was tested biomechanically against the currently preferred methods of fixation. It was hypothesized that under simulated cyclic loading fixed-angle plating would be superior to modified anterior tension wiring or cannulated lag screws with anterior tension wiring. Eighteen human cadaver knees, matched by bone mineral density and age, were divided into three groups of six. After setting a transverse patella fracture each group received one of the osteosyntheses mentioned above. Repetitive testing over 100 cycles was performed at non-destructive loads by simulating knee motion from 90° flexion to full extension. Anterior tension wiring as well as lag screws with tension wiring showed significant fracture displacement after the initial cycle already. Both constructs, lag screws plus wiring (3.7 ± 2.7 mm) as well as tension wiring alone (7.1 ± 2.2 mm) displayed fracture displacement of >2 mm which is clinically regarded as failure. Those patellae stabilized with fixed-angle plates showed no significant fracture gap widening after completion of 100 cycles (0.7 ± 0.5 mm). The differences between the fixed-angle plate group and the other two groups were statistically significant (pwiring and cannulated lag screws with anterior tension wiring the bilateral fixed-angle plate was the only fixation device to stabilize transverse patella fractures securely and sustainably. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Sub; Chung, Young Sun; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of congenital anterior urethral diverticular which have occurred in a 4 year old and one month old boy are presented. Etiology, diagnostic procedures, and its clinical results are briefly reviewed

  19. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thighbone where the kneecap normally rests is too shallow. You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  20. Immediate postoperative anterior knee stability: double- versus triple-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mae, Tatsuo; Shino, Konsei; Matsumoto, Norinao; Yoneda, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakata, Ken

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the triple-bundle (TB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with the double-bundle (DB) ACL reconstruction in immediate postoperative anterior knee stability. This study involved 133 patients who had undergone the anatomic ACL reconstruction with autogenous hamstring tendon unilaterally. Then 83 patients (mean age, 28.8 years) underwent the DB between November 2004 and December 2005, and 50 patients (mean age, 29.6 years) underwent the TB ACL reconstruction between January and December 2006. The 2 femoral tunnels were created in the ideal ACL attachment area, whereas 2 tibial tunnels for the DB and 3 tunnels for the TB were created in the ACL footprint. The 2 doubled tendon grafts were fixed with EndoButton-CL (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) on the femur. The grafts were fixed to the tibia using a Double Spike Plate and a screw under the total initial tension of 20 N at 20° of flexion, after meticulous in situ pretensioning using a tensioning boot. Then immediate postoperative anterior knee laxity in response to 89 N of anterior load was measured by one experienced examiner (T.M.) with the KT-2000 Knee Arthrometer (MEDmedtric, San Diego, CA) under general anesthesia at 30° of knee flexion with muscle relaxants. The measured anterior laxity was 3.4 ± 1.2 mm in the DB and 2.5 ± 0.7 mm in the TB ACL reconstruction, a statistically significant difference. The side-to-side difference of the laxity was -3.2 ± 1.6 mm in the DB and -4.2 ± 2.0 mm in the TB, again a significant difference. TB ACL reconstruction resulted in better immediate postoperative anterior knee stability than DB ACL reconstruction under 89 N of anterior tibial load (P = .031). Level III, therapeutic retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative study of the pullout strength of the 2.4-mm AO locking screw, 2.0-mm AO cortical screw and Herbert screw in sawbones: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat; Sompan, Soon; Luenam, Suriya

    2014-02-01

    Headless screw is a standard implant for an osteochondral fragment fixation. With a threaded design, the screw head can be buried under the articular cartilage to prevent a post-traumatic arthritis. However, the screw is expensive and maybe not available in the emergency situation. The 2.4-mm AO locking screw also has a threaded head which is able to advance underneath the cartilage. This has been usedfor fixation of the osteochondal fracture clinically. We compared the pullout strength of 2.4-mm AO locking screw with those ofHerbert screw and 2.0-mm AO cortical screw. The studies pemformed by using Instron 4502 to measure the pullout strength in 12 models for each type of the screw. The pullout strength of the 2.4-mm AO locking screw from a corticocancellous bone model was compared with the pullout strength of the Herbert screw from a cancellous bone model and the 2.0-mm AO cortical screw ifom the corticocancellous bone model. The differences in pullout strength between the 2.4-mm AO locking screw and the other two screws were determined by independent t-test. The pullout strength of the 2.4-mm AO locking screw, Herbert screw and 2.0-mm AO cortical screw were 143.49+46.18 N, 72.83 +/- 16.64 N, and 80.38 +/- 1.42 N, respectively. The pullout strength of2.4-mm AO locking screw was signi2ficantly higher than those ofHerbert screw and 2.0-mm AO cortical screw (pAO locking screw in the corticocancellous bone model had pullout strength higher than the Herbert screw in the cancellous bone model and the 2.0-mm AO cortical screw in corticocancellous bone model. The 2.4-mm AO locking screw may use instead of headless screw for intra-articular fixation in a specific situation, such as when the headless screw is unavailable.

  2. Identifying anterior segment crystals.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, I W; Brooks, A M; Reinehr, D P; Grant, G B; Gillies, W E

    1991-01-01

    A series of 22 patients with crystals in the anterior segment of the eye was examined by specular microscopy. Of 10 patients with hypermature cataract and hyperrefringent bodies in the anterior chamber cholesterol crystals were identified in four patients and in six of the 10 in whom aspirate was obtained cholesterol crystals were demonstrated in three, two of these having shown crystals on specular microscopy. In 10 patients with intracorneal crystalline deposits, cholesterol crystals were f...

  3. Evaluation of two styles of slotted, flat-head screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, C.A. Jr.; Johnson, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed to evaluate the relative merits of two different flat-head screws fabricated from a uranium--6% niobium alloy. The screws tested were machined with both normal, straight-through slots in the head and with slots having radiused bottoms. Test results indicate that both designs easily surpass the required 20-inch-pound-proof torque

  4. scaphoid dimensions and appropriate screw sizes in a kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dimensions will aid in identifying appropriate screw systems. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the dimensions of the scaphoid and its distal pole and relating this to commonly used screw systems. Methods: One hundred and four human scaphoids were studied and their dimensions determined. These.

  5. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-10

    Aug 10, 2015 ... Materials and Methods: Three different three-dimensional finite element models of the mandible were developed to simulate the biomechanical responses of titanium plates and screws. The fracture lines were fixed with double 4-hole straight, 4-hole square, and 5-hole Y plates with monocortical screws.

  6. Torsion strenght of biodegradable and titanium screws: a comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Gerrit J.; van der Houwen, Eduard B.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Bos, Rudolf R.M.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine 1) the differences in maximum torque between 7 biodegradable and 2 titanium screw systems, and 2) the differences of maximum torque between “hand tight” and break of the biodegradable and the titanium osteofixation screw systems. Materials and Methods: Four oral and

  7. Electromagnetic Lead Screw for Potential Wave Energy Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type electromagnetic lead screw (EMLS) intended for wave energy application. Similar to the mechanical lead screw, this electromagnetic version can transfer slow linear motion to high-rotational motion, offering gearing effects. Compared with the existing pure magnetic...

  8. Anterior avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity in adolescents - Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleilimar Teixeira da Silva Júnior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective here was to report two rare cases of anterior avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity in adolescents. Case 1 was a 15-year-old male who became injured through landing on his left knee and presented limited extension. Case 2 was a 16-year-old basketball player who presented sudden pain in the right knee and functional incapacity, after a jump. Imaging examinations (radiographs and computed tomography showed anterior avulsion fractures of the tibial tuberosity. Surgical fixation was performed using screws and anchors, while avoiding growth plate injury. The cases evolved without lower-limb deformities.

  9. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasinski Adam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of screw displacement piles (SDP is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  10. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  11. In vitro performance of two-piece zirconia implant systems for anterior application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Verena; Kammermeier, Armin; Handel, Gerhard; Rosentritt, Martin

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the influence of the implant-abutment connection on the long-term in vitro performance and fracture resistance of two-piece zirconia implant systems for anterior application. Six groups of two-piece zirconia implant systems (n=10/group) with screw-retained (5×) or bonded (1×) connections were restored with full-contour zirconia crowns. A two-piece screw-retained titanium system served as reference. For simulating anterior loading the specimens (n=8/group) were mounted at an angle of 135° in the chewing simulator, and subjected to thermal cycling (TC: 2×9000×5°/55°C) and mechanical loading (ML: 3.6×10(6)×100N). Failed restorations were examined (scanning electron microscopy). Fracture resistance and maximum bending stress of surviving restorations were determined. 2 specimens per group were loaded to fracture after 24h water storage without TCML. Data were statistically analyzed (ANOVA; Bonferroni; Kaplan-Meier-Log-Rank; α=0.05). The bonded zirconia system and the titanium reference survived TCML without any failures. Screw-retained zirconia systems showed fractures of abutments and/or implants, partly combined with screw fracture/loosening. Failure frequency (F) varied between the groups (F=8×: 3 groups, F=3×: 1 group, F=1×: 1 group). The Log-Rank-test showed significant (p=0.000) differences. Fracture forces and maximum bending stresses (mean±standard deviation) differed significantly ( p=0.000) between 233.4±31.4N/317.1±42.6N/mm(2) and 404.3±15.1N/549.2±20.5N/mm(2). Fracture forces after TCML were similar to 24h fracture forces. Screw-retained two-piece zirconia implant systems showed higher failure rates and lower fracture resistance than a screw-retained titanium system, and may be appropriate for clinical anterior requirements with limitations. Failures involved the abutment/implant region around the screw, indicating that the connecting design is crucial for clinical success. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials

  12. Complications associated with thoracic pedicle screws in spinal deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lv, Guohua; Passias, Peter; Kozanek, Michal; Metkar, Umesh S.; Liu, Zhongjun; Wood, Kirkham B.; Rehak, Lubos

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic pedicle screws have superior anchoring strength compared with other available fixation techniques. However, these are not universally accepted in many developing countries because of the concerns regarding safety and complications. In addition, there is evidence that pedicle morphology is unique in Chinese patients. The goal of this study was to analyze the complications seen at our institution, while using thoracic pedicle screws for the treatment of thoracic deformity, and to determine the safety of our techniques for the treatment of thoracic deformity in a Chinese population. From 1998 to 2005, there were 208 thoracic deformity patients treated at our institution, 70 of whom were male and 138 were female. Their age ranged from 11 to 55 years (mean of 14.9 years). All of them underwent corrective deformity surgery using posterior pedicle screw systems and follow-up was available for at least 3 years. Etiologic diagnoses included adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in 119 patients, congenital kyphoscoliosis in 38, adult scoliosis in 37 and undetermined in 14. Screw positions were evaluated using intraoperative and postoperative radiographs and a CT scan was performed when a concern for screw malposition was present. All radiographic evaluations were carried out in a double-blinded fashion. A total of 1,123 thoracic pedicle screws were inserted (5.4 thoracic screws/patient). The deformity correction rate was 81, 65 and 62% for idiopathic, congenital and adult scoliosis patients, respectively. The overall complication rate was 16.5% at the final follow-up. Complication rates directly and indirectly related to pedicle screws were 7.2 and 9.3%, respectively. There were no significant screw-related neurologic or visceral complications that adversely affected long-term results. The complications seen with thoracic pedicle screws in a Chinese population were similar to other populations and could be utilized safely for the treatment of thoracic deformity in this

  13. The head to foot screw fixation. A new technique of percutaneous screw fixation of the scaphoid bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraa, Mourad; Ben Slama, Safouane; Mahjoub, Sabri; Sehli, Heithem; Hadj Salah, Méhdi; Mbarek, Mondher

    2017-01-01

    Many techniques have been described for screw fixation of the scaphoid bone. The approach is either proximal or dorsal. A new percutaneous technique is presented by the authors called the head to foot screw fixation. Indications and results are evaluated. It is a percutaneous technique with fixation of the scaphoid bone by two screws introduced in an opposite direction: a proximal screw and a distal screw. No postoperative immobilization was necessary. A prospective study was conducted in 40 patients over a period of three years. The average age was 25 years with extremes of 14 and 44 years. This technique was practiced in fractures (30 cases) and nonunion (10 cases) in which the localization was proximal, corresponding to Schernberg types I, II and III. Forms associated with perilunate dislocation of the carpus were excluded from the study. The results were analysed with a mean of 8 months (6-30). Union was obtained in all the cases. No tendon injury related to percutaneous approach was noted. The technique required a learning curve with progressive decrease in operative time from 45 to 15 minutes. It was necessary in two cases to change protruding screws which were not diagnosed during the first intervention. Percutaneous screw fixation was achieved again in both cases.   Conclusions: The combination in our experience of two screws allowed us to prevent rotation around the unthreated area of a single screw. Our technique, bringing together the head to the foot of the screw, reduces the crowding at the proximal part of the scaphoid bone. This non-invasive method permitted early mobilization with no pain until biological union.

  14. Delayed Union of a Sacral Fracture: Percutaneous Navigated Autologous Cancellous Bone Grafting and Screw Fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huegli, R. W.; Messmer, P.; Jacob, A. L.; Regazzoni, P.; Styger, S.; Gross, T.

    2003-01-01

    Delayed or non-union of a sacral fracture is a serious clinical condition that may include chronic pain, sitting discomfort, gait disturbances, neurological problems, and inability to work. It is also a difficult reconstruction problem. Late correction of the deformity is technically more demanding than the primary treatment of acute pelvic injuries. Open reduction, internal fixation (ORIF), excision of scar tissue, and bone grafting often in a multi-step approach are considered to be the treatment of choice in delayed unions of the pelvic ring. This procedure implies the risk of neurological and vascular injuries, infection, repeated failure of union, incomplete correction of the deformity, and incomplete pain relief as the most important complications. We report a new approach for minimally invasive treatment of a delayed union of the sacrum without vertical displacement. A patient who suffered a Malgaigne fracture (Tile C1.3) was initially treated with closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation (CRPF) of the posterior pelvic ring under CT navigation and plating of the anterior pelvic ring. Three months after surgery he presented with increasing hip pain caused by a delayed union of the sacral fracture. The lesion was successfully treated percutaneously in a single step procedure using CT navigation for drilling of the delayed union, autologous bone grafting, and screw fixation

  15. Intra-operative measurement of applied forces during anterior scoliosis correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhurst, H; Little, J P; Adam, C J

    2016-12-01

    Spinal instrumentation and fusion for the treatment of scoliosis is primarily a mechanical intervention to correct the deformity and halt further progression. While implant-related complications remain a concern, little is known about the magnitudes of the forces applied to the spine during surgery, which may affect post-surgical outcomes. In this study, the compressive forces applied to each spinal segment during anterior instrumentation were measured in a series of patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis. A force transducer was designed and retrofit to a routinely used surgical tool, and compressive forces applied to each segment during surgery were measured for 15 scoliosis patients. Cobb angle correction achieved by each force was measured on intra-operative fluoroscope images. Relative changes in orientation of the screw within the vertebra were also measured to detect intra-operative screw plough. Intra-operative forces were measured for a total of 95 spinal segments. The mean applied compressive force was 540N (SD 230N, range 88N-1019N). There was a clear trend for higher forces to be applied at segments toward the apex of the scoliosis. Fluoroscopic evidence of screw plough was detected at 10 segments (10.5%). The magnitude of forces applied during anterior scoliosis correction vary over a broad range. These forces do reach magnitudes capable of causing intra-operative vertebral body screw plough. Surgeons should be aware there is a risk for tissue overload during correction, however the clinical implications of intra-operative screw plough remain unclear. The dataset presented here is valuable for providing realistic input parameters for in silico surgical simulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Positioning of pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Moreira Gavassi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the occurrence of poor positioning of pedicle screws inserted with the aid of intraoperative electromyographic stimulation in the treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS.METHODS: This is a prospective observational study including all patients undergoing surgical treatment for AIS, between March and December 2013 at a single institution. All procedures were monitored by electromyography of the inserted pedicle screws. The position of the screws was evaluated by assessment of postoperative CT and classified according to the specific AIS classification system.RESULTS: Sixteen patients were included in the study, totalizing 281 instrumented pedicles (17.5 per patient. No patient had any neurological deficit or complaint after surgery. In the axial plane, 195 screws were found in ideal position (69.4% while in the sagittal plane, 226 screws were found in ideal position (80.4%. Considering both the axial and the sagittal planes, it was observed that 59.1% (166/281 of the screws did not violate any cortical wall.CONCLUSION: The use of pedicle screws proved to be a safe technique without causing neurological damage in AIS surgeries, even with the occurrence of poor positioning of some implants.

  17. Experiments on screw-pinch plasmas with elongated cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassing, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described carried out with SPICA II, a toroidal screw-pinch plasma device. this device is the last one in a series of plasma machines of the toroidal screw-pinch differing from its predecessor in its race-track shaped section. In devices of the type toroidal screw-pinch stable confinement is possible of plasmas with larger β values than in a tokamak discharge. In a pinch the plasma is screwed up, during the formation, in such a way that in a relatively small volume a plasma is formated with a high pressure. During the screwing up the plasma is heated by shock heating as well as adiabatic compression. With the modified snowplow model the density and temperature after the formation can be calculated, starting from the initial conditions. When all ions arrive into the plasma column, the density in the column is determined by the volume compression. First purpose of the experiments was to find a stable discharge. Subsequently discharges have been made with a high as possible β in order to investigate at which maximum β it is possible to confine screw-pinch plasmas stably. When these had been found, the nature and importance could be investigated of the processes following which the screw-pinch plasma looses its energy. (author), 75 res.; 95 figs.; 8 tabs

  18. Multiaxial pedicle screw designs: static and dynamic mechanical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Ralph Edward; Loefler, Andreas Herman; Stanford, Philip Mark; Walsh, William R

    2004-02-15

    Randomized investigation of multiaxial pedicle screw mechanical properties. Measure static yield and ultimate strengths, yield stiffness, and fatigue resistance according to an established model. Compare these measured properties with expected loads in vivo. Multiaxial pedicle screws provide surgical versatility, but the complexity of their design may reduce their strength and fatigue resistance. There is no published data on the mechanical properties of such screws. Screws were assembled according to a vertebrectomy model for destructive mechanical testing. Groups of five assemblies were tested in static tension and compression and subject to three cyclical loads. Modes of failure, yield, and ultimate strength, yield stiffness, and cycles to failure were determined for six designs of screw. Static compression yield loads ranged from 217.1 to 388.0 N and yield stiffness from 23.7 to 38.0 N/mm. Cycles to failure ranged from 42 x 10(3) to 4,719 x 10(3) at 75% of static ultimate load. There were significant differences between designs in all modes of testing. Failure occurred at the multiaxial link in static and cyclical compression. Bending yield strengths just exceeded loads expected in vivo. Multiaxial designs had lower static bending yield strength than fixed screw designs. Five out of six multiaxial screw designs achieved one million cycles at 200 N in compression bending. "Ball-in-cup" multiaxial locking mechanisms were vulnerable to fatigue failure. Smooth surfaces and thicker material appeared to be protective against fatigue failure.

  19. Immediate loading of titanium hexed screw-type implants in the edentulous patient: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M P; Muller, E; Garg, A K

    2000-01-01

    Histologic and histomorphometric studies in both animals and humans have shown that more rapid and greater bone-to-implant contact can be achieved with implants that incorporate certain surface characteristics compared with the original machined-surface implants. Such findings are significant because various implant designs may allow the fixtures to sufficiently resist functional loading sooner than originally thought. The case report presented here indicates that immediate loading of hexed titanium screw-type implants in the anterior mandible can lead to successful osseointegration and clinical outcome. The number of implants placed, their distribution, and the type of rigid connection are critical considerations for immediate loading. A bone height that can accommodate dental implants > or = 10 mm long is recommended. Biomechanically, the implants to be immediately loaded must be stable and resistant to macromovement to ensure good osseointegration.

  20. Engineering Aspects of Single- and Twin-screw Extrusion-cooking of Biopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuilichem, D.J. van; Stolp, W.; Janssen, L.P.B.M.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the properties of single- and twin-screw extruders. The influence on the design of the different leakage gaps existing in co-rotating, counter-rotating, self-wiping, twin-screw extruders and single-screw equipment is discussed. The mixing effects in single- and twin-screw

  1. Pedicle screw rupture: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio E.O. Giacaglia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a technical description related to the rupture of a titanium alloy pedicle screw and connecting bar implanted in dorsal vertebras of a patient. Only metallurgical facts are described, with no attempt to identify any imperfections in the clinical aspects related to the rupture. The results described here are based on extensive analysis of the broken materials in a material sciences specialized laboratory. Excluding an incorrect prosthesis implantation in the surgical procedure and a possible low bone density, an information not available to the research team, with high probability the rupture of metallic pieces used in the prosthetic implant, was produced by the low fatigue resistance resulting by an improper machining process and excessive bending of the connecting bar prior to implant.

  2. Intrusion of maxillary incisors by mini-screw anchorage of Angle Class II division 2 malocclusion cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Falahi, Bilal A; Hammad, Shaza M; El-Kenawy, Mohammed H; Fouda, Maher A

    2012-01-01

    to evaluate the effects of the upper incisor teeth intrusion by mini-screw on the amount of overbite and on the dental and skeletal parameters of the jaws. Ten patients were selected from the outpatient clinic of the Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Mansoura University with Angle's Class II division 2 malocclusions. Ages ranged from 13 to 19 years with deep overbite of 4mm or more requiring intrusion of the maxillary incisors. Alignment of the upper and lower dental arches was done with a pre-adjusted edgewise technique, then a mini-screw as anchorage for the intrusion of the upper incisor segment was inserted for every patient below the anterior nasal spine connected to a utility arch wire. The overbite was corrected from 6 mm to 1.8 mm (p<.001) by upper incisor intrusion and the gummy smile was improved. No extrusion of upper first permanent molars was observed. The maxillary incisors were effectively intruded by using mini-screws as orthodontic anchorage. Good occlusion and facial esthetics were achieved with no counteractive movements in the molars.

  3. Screw pyrolysis technology for sewage sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi Morgano, Marco; Leibold, Hans; Richter, Frank; Stapf, Dieter; Seifert, Helmut

    2018-03-01

    Sewage sludge quantities have grown continuously since the introduction of the European Directive (UWWTD 91/271/EEC) relating to the treatment of urban wastewater. In the present, most of the sewage sludge is combusted in single fuels incineration plants or is co-fired in waste incineration or coal power plants. The combustion of sewage sludge is a proven technology. Other treatments, such as fluidized bed gasification, were successfully adopted to produce suitable syngas for power production. Besides, the number of large wastewater treatment plants is relatively small compared to the local rural ones. Moreover, alternative technologies are arising with the main target of nutrients recovery, with a special focus on phosphorus. The aforementioned issues, i.e. the small scale (below 1MW) and the nutrients recovery, suggest that pyrolysis in screw reactors may become an attractive alternative technology for sewage sludge conversion, recovery and recycling. In this work, about 100kg of dried sewage sludge from a plant in Germany were processed at the newly developed STYX Reactor, at KIT. The reactor combines the advantages of screw reactors with the high temperature filtration, in order to produce particle and ash free vapors and condensates, respectively. Experiments were carried out at temperatures between 350°C and 500°C. The yield of the char decreased from 66.7wt.% to 53.0wt.%. The same trend was obtained for the energy yield, while the maximum pyrolysis oil yield of 13.4wt.% was obtained at 500°C. Besides mercury, the metals and the other minerals were completely retained in the char. Nitrogen and sulfur migrated from the solid to the condensate and to the gas, respectively. Based on the energy balance, a new concept for the decentral production of char as well as heat and power in an externally fired micro gas turbine showed a cogeneration efficiency up to about 40%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inline screw feeding vacuum arc thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronhaus, Igal; Laterza, Matteo; Maor, Yonatan

    2017-04-01

    A new type of micropropulsion device for nanosatellite applications is presented—the inline-screw-feeding vacuum-arc thruster (ISF-VAT). This thruster couples a conventional "triggerless" ignition geometry with a feeding mechanism that maintains a steady state discharge performance. The feeding mechanism implements a screw action on a central cathode rod. At a predetermined rate, a complete and uniform erosion of the cathodes tip is obtained as well as "healing" of the insulator coating. The inline feeding of the cathode forces the arc to emerge on the tip of the cathode, flush with the exit plane of the anode. This enables the plasma plume to efficiently accelerate away from the thruster, eliminating the need for an additional ion acceleration stage. The ISF-VAT feeding mechanism is computer controlled and offers reliable operation of the thruster over a large number of pulses. Characterization of the ISF-VAT performance is presented, conducted on an experimental prototype in the Aerospace Plasma Laboratory, Technion. Measurement results of the mass flow rate, electrical parameters of the discharge, and thrust are presented. Using a Ti cathode at a discharge power of 3 W, a mass flow rate of ≈1.8 ×10-9 kg/s and a thrust level ≈ 7 μN were measured. More than 106 pulses were demonstrated in a single run, accumulating a total impulse of 0.2 Ns. The thruster prototype dimensions are 15 × 15 × 65 mm3 and are ≈ 60 g in mass.

  5. Design of platform for removing screws from LCD display shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zimei; Qin, Qin; Dou, Jianfang; Zhu, Dongdong

    2017-11-01

    Removing the screws on the sides of a shield is a necessary process in disassembling a computer LCD display. To solve this issue, a platform has been designed for removing the screws on display shields. This platform uses virtual instrument technology with LabVIEW as the development environment to design the mechanical structure with the technologies of motion control, human-computer interaction and target recognition. This platform removes the screws from the sides of the shield of an LCD display mechanically thus to guarantee follow-up separation and recycle.

  6. Modelling of porous biomass pyrolysis in screw reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, A. A.; Kozlov, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a model of wood pyrolysis in a screw reactor as the first stage of the multistage gasification process. To prevent clinkering of particles and thermal inhomogeneities, screw-type transportation is used to transport fuel. In order to describe kinetics of pyrolysis and transport of volatiles within the wood particles and their transition to the gas phase we carried out the studies using a complex of synchronous thermal analysis. A detailed numerical modeling of pyrolyzer was performed with the Comsol Multiphysics software which makes it possible to optimize the design and operating parameters of the pyrolysis process in a screw reactor.

  7. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Reddy Gooty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants.

  8. [Positions of Sustentacular Screw in Osteosynthesis of Calcaneal Fractures: Clinical and Radiographic Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazour, J; Křivohlávek, M; Lukáš, R

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of the study was to analyse the options for sustentacular screw placement in osteosynthesis of intra-articular fractures of the heel bone and to assess the effect of various screw positions on failure to maintain the reduction in the postoperative period. In addition, problems related to screw-end protrusion over the medial cortical bone or to screw penetration into the talocalcaneal joint were assessed. MATERIAL AND METHODS The group comprised 23 patients with a total of 25 intra-articular fractures of the heel bone treated by surgery. The procedure involved insertion of a sustentacular screw under fluoroscopic guidance. Post-operatively, screw position in the sustentacular fragment was evaluated on CT scans. During follow-up, attention was focused on the effect of screw placement on maintenance of fracture reduction, and clinical symptoms potentially associated with screw malposition were recorded. RESULTS All sustentacular screws were fixed sustentacular fragments. Seven screws (28%) were inserted in the talar shelf, seven (28%) were placed under and nine (36%) over the sustentaculum tali. Two screws penetrated into the talocalcaneal joint (8%). The end of a screw projecting by 2 mm over the medial wall of the calcaneus was found in 11 cases (44%). Two patients with screws penetrating into the talocalcaneal joint had problems. On the other hand, no clinical effect of a screw extending over the medial wall of the calcaneus was recorded. No significant association of screw position with late //delayed failure of fracture reduction was detected. DISCUSSION Although the ideal trajectory for a sustentacular screw have been defined using a model of the calcaneus, it is not easy to achieve optimal screw placement due to the complex anatomy of the calcaneus and limited possibilities of intra-operative control of screw insertion. Any sustentacular screw malposition is a potential risk factor, particularly if the screw has penetrated into the

  9. When do anterior external or internal fixators provide additional stability in an unstable (Tile C) pelvic fracture? A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, E; Theologis, A A; Horst, P; Kandemir, U; Pekmezci, M

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the additional stability that is provided by anterior external and internal fixators in an unstable pelvic fracture model (OTA 61-C). An unstable pelvic fracture (OTA 61-C) was created in 27 synthetic pelves by making a 5-mm gap through the sacral foramina (posterior injury) and an ipsilateral pubic rami fracture (anterior injury). The posterior injury was fixed with either a single iliosacral (IS) screw, a single trans-iliac, trans-sacral (TS) screw, or two iliosacral screws (S1S2). Two anterior fixation techniques were utilized: external fixation (Ex-Fix) and supra-acetabular external fixation and internal fixation (In-Fix); supra-acetabular pedicle screws connected with a single subcutaneous spinal rod. The specimens were tested using a nondestructive single-leg stance model. Peak-to-peak (P2P) displacement and rotation and conditioning displacement (CD) were calculated. The Ex-Fix group failed in 83.3 % of specimens with concomitant single-level posterior fixation (Total: 15/18-7 of 9 IS fixation, 8 of 9 TS fixation), and 0 % (0/9) of specimens with concomitant two-level (S1S2) posterior fixation. All specimens with the In-Fix survived testing except for two specimens treated with In-Fix combined with IS fixation. Trans-sacral fixation had higher pubic rotation and greater sacral and pubic displacement than S1S2 (p pelvic fracture (OTA 61-C), anterior fixation with an In-Fix was biomechanically superior to an anterior Ex-Fix in the setting of single-level posterior fixation. There was no biomechanical difference between the In-Fix and Ex-Fix when each was combined with two levels of posterior sacral fixation.

  10. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion with integrated fixation and adjunctive posterior stabilization: A comparative biomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Matthew S; Dupre, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Oh, Michael Y; Altman, Daniel T; Cheng, Boyle C

    2015-10-01

    Interbody fusion cages with integrated fixation components have become of interest due to their ability to provide enhanced post-operative stability and mitigate device migration. A recently approved anterior lumbar interbody fusion cage with integrated fixation anchors has yet to be compared in vitro to a standard polyetheretherketone cage when used in combination with an interspinous process clamp. Twelve human cadaveric lumbar segments were implanted at L4-L5 with a Solus interbody cage (n=6) or standard polyetheretherketone cage (n=6) following Intact testing and discectomy. Each cage was subsequently evaluated in all primary modes of loading after supplementation with the following posterior constructs: interspinous process clamp, bilateral transfacet screws, unilateral transfacet screw with contralateral pedicle screws, and bilateral pedicle screws. Range of motion results were normalized to Intact, and a two-way mixed analysis of variance was utilized to detect statistical differences. The Solus cage in combination with all posterior constructs provided significant fixation compared to Intact in all loading conditions. The polyetheretherketone cage also provided significant fixation when combined with all screw based treatments, however when used with the interspinous process clamp a significant reduction was not observed in lateral bending or axial torsion. Interbody cages with integrated fixation components enhance post-operative stability within the intervertebral space, thus affording clinicians the potential to utilize less invasive methods of posterior stabilization when seeking circumferential fusion. Interspinous process clamps, in particular, may reduce peri-operative and post-operative comorbidities compared to screw based constructs. Further study is necessary to corroborate their effectiveness in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomechanical analysis of anterior ring fixation of the ramus in type C pelvis fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlin, S; Lesieur, M; Stephen, D; Kreder, H; Whyne, C

    2017-04-08

    This biomechanical study compared the stability of four different ramus fracture fixation methods for Type C pelvic ring injuries in the absence of posterior fixation. A 5-mm vertical osteotomy of the mid-superior and inferior pubic ramus was created in 12 synthetic pelvic models. Four surgical constructs were compared: (1) two-pin AIIS external fixation, (2) 3.5-mm reconstruction plating, (3) bicortical, fully threaded 3.5-mm, and (4) 6.5-mm pubic ramus screws. Specimens were tested in a simulated one-legged stance on a hemiarthroplasty implant in three stages: (1) no applied load, (2) application of the loading fixture preload to the sacrum (6N), and (3) following six cycles of a 250N load. Stability was assessed based on resultant displacement of the fracture sites at the superior ramus and the anterior sacroiliac joint. The bicortical, fully threaded 6.5-mm pubic ramus screw provided the most stable ramus fracture fixation (0.5 ± 0.4 mm) displacement under load and was the only construct to finish testing without gross posterior pelvic disruption. Plate constructs finished the final loading stage with only a small increase (3.1 ± 2.3 mm) in ramus fracture gap size, but had significant displacement at the SI joint (>20 mm). 3.5-mm screw constructs had 1.6 ± 0.7 mm of ramus displacement in the preload stage, but had complete posterior pelvic disruption (>20 mm) that prevented further testing. External fixation was unstable at the ramus and sacroiliac sites in the initial setup. The bicortical, fully threaded 6.5-mm pubic ramus screw was the only anterior fixation construct tested that controlled motion at both the anterior and posterior pelvic rings in the absence of posterior fixation.

  12. Measurement of Tip Apex Distance and Migration of Lag Screws and Novel Blade Screw Used for the Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Chieh-Szu Yang

    Full Text Available Fixation with a dynamic hip screw (DHS is one of the most common methods for stabilizing intertrochanteric fractures, except for unstable and reverse oblique fracture types. However, failure is often observed in osteoporotic patients whereby the lag screw effectively 'cuts out' through the weak bone. Novel anti-migration blades have been developed to be used in combination with a lag screw ('Blade Screw' to improve the fixation strength in osteoporotic intertrochanteric fractures. An in-vitro biomechanical study and a retrospective clinical study were performed to evaluate lag screw migration when using the novel Blade Screw and a traditional threaded DHS. The biomechanical study showed both the Blade Screw and DHS displayed excessive migration (≥10 mm before reaching 20,000 loading cycles in mild osteoporotic bone, but overall migration of the Blade Screw was significantly less (p ≤ 0.03. Among the patients implanted with a Blade Screw in the clinical study, there was no significant variation in screw migration at 3-months follow-up (P = 0.12. However, the patient's implanted with a DHS did display significantly greater migration (P<0.001 than those implanted with the Blade Screw. In conclusion, the Blade Screw stabilizes the bone fragments during dynamic loading so as to provide significantly greater resistance to screw migration in patients with mild osteoporosis.

  13. anterior hyaloidal fibrovascular proliferation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okonkwo

    It most commonly occurs after phakic vitrectomy and scleral buckling for diabetic traction retinal detachment. It usually manifests with haemorrhage into the vitreous cavity or anterior hyaloid 3 to 12 weeks after vitrectomy and is the result of fibrovascular proliferation from the peripheral retina extending toward the equator of ...

  14. Characteristics of immediate and fatigue strength of a dual-threaded pedicle screw in cadaveric spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasiliense, Leonardo B C; Lazaro, Bruno C R; Reyes, Phillip M; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Turner, Joseph L; Crandall, Dennis G; Crawford, Neil R

    2013-08-01

    Novel dual-threaded screws are configured with overlapping (doubled) threads only in the proximal shaft to improve proximal cortical fixation. Tests were run to determine whether dual-threaded pedicle screws improve pullout resistance and increase fatigue endurance compared with standard pedicle screws. In vitro strength and fatigue tests were performed in human cadaveric vertebrae and in polyurethane foam test blocks. Seventeen cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (14 pedicles) and 40 test sites in foam blocks were tested. Measures for comparison between standard and dual-threaded screws were bone mineral density (BMD), screw insertion torque, ultimate pullout force, peak load at cyclic failure, and pedicular side of first cyclic failure. For each vertebral sample, dual-threaded screws were inserted in one pedicle and single-threaded screws were inserted in the opposite pedicle while recording insertion torque. In seven vertebrae, axial pullout tests were performed. In 10 vertebrae, orthogonal loads were cycled at increasing peak values until toggle exceeded threshold for failure. Insertion torque and pullout force were also recorded for screws placed in foam blocks representing healthy or osteoporotic bone porosity. In bone, screw insertion torque was 183% greater with dual-threaded than with standard screws (pscrews pulled out at 93% of the force required to pull out dual-threaded screws (p=.42). Of 10 screws, five reached toggle failure first on the standard screw side, two screws failed first on the dual-threaded side, and three screws failed on both sides during the same round of cycling. In the high-porosity foam, screw insertion torque was 60% greater with the dual-threaded screw than with the standard screw (p=.005), but 14% less with the low-porosity foam (p=.07). Pullout force was 19% less with the dual-threaded screw than with the standard screw in the high-porosity foam (p=.115), but 6% greater with the dual-threaded screw in the low-porosity foam (p=.156

  15. Lumbar pedicle screw placement: Using only AP plane imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Sethi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Placement of pedicle screws under fluoroscopic guidance using AP plane imaging alone with tactile guidance is safe, fast, and reliable. However, a good understanding of the radiographic landmarks is a prerequisite.

  16. Centrifuging Step-Screw Conveyor for Regolith Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A variety of ISRU operations will utilize lunar regolith as feedstock. The proposed centrifuging step-screw conveyor concept will provide a well controlled robust,...

  17. Kinematic analysis of parallel manipulators by algebraic screw theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gallardo-Alvarado, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the fundamentals of screw theory concerned with velocity analysis of rigid-bodies, confirmed with detailed and explicit proofs. The author additionally investigates acceleration, jerk, and hyper-jerk analyses of rigid-bodies following the trend of the velocity analysis. With the material provided in this book, readers can extend the theory of screws into the kinematics of optional order of rigid-bodies. Illustrative examples and exercises to reinforce learning are provided. Of particular note, the kinematics of emblematic parallel manipulators, such as the Delta robot as well as the original Gough and Stewart platforms are revisited applying, in addition to the theory of screws, new methods devoted to simplify the corresponding forward-displacement analysis, a challenging task for most parallel manipulators. Stands as the only book devoted to the acceleration, jerk and hyper-jerk (snap) analyses of rigid-body by means of screw theory; Provides new strategies to simplify the forward kinematic...

  18. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hole Y plates with monocortical screws. 150 N incisal occlusal loads were simulated on the models. The commercial ANSYS software was utilized to calculate the Von Mises stresses on fixative appliances. Results: The highest Von Mises stress ...

  19. Biomechanical comparison of the stable efficacy of two anterior plating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Saiwei; Wang, Lee-Wei

    2003-07-01

    To compare the immediate stable efficacy and load sharing effect of two types of anterior cervical screw-plating instrumentations: the Morscher Synthes titanium locking screw-plate system and the Caspar trapezoidal screw-plate system. Fresh porcine cervical spines with intact, two surgery unstable models, and then reconstructed with or without screw-plating instruments were compared in three physiological loading conditions. Two markedly instrumentation systems--Morscher Synthes titanium cervical locking screw-plate and Caspar trapezoidal screw-plate systems are commonly used in management of complex cervical spine disorders. Although the biomechanical study showed that the lower cost Caspar system performed superior in extension before and after plate fatigue, the clinic evaluations of two systems were contradictory. So (1) does the titanium cervical locking plate system pay for its higher cost? and (2) what is the load sharing character of strut graft in one level corpectomy? Eight fresh ligamentous porcine cervical spines from C3 to C7 were undergone axial compression, rotation and sagittal flexion tests. The biomechanical experiment was sequentially repeated for the intact, C5-6 discectomy, C5 corpectomy, and then stabilized by either type of plate fixation devices with or without polymethylmethacrylate bone cement grafting. Strains measured by an extensometer across the operated motion segment were used as the index of stability. Analysis of the strain data showed both types of anterior fixation plate systems provided adequate-restored stability for the spinal column only aided with polymethylmethacrylate construction. Statistically, there was no significant difference in biomechanical evaluation for the stability effect between much cost Morscher Synthes plate and Caspar plate system (pfailure. Statistically both systems showed similar stable efficacy, however, the Morscher Synthes cervical locking plate system might provide better stable effect in higher

  20. Pull out Strength of Dual Outer Diameter Pedicle Screws Compared to Uncemented and Cemented Standard Pedicle Screws: A Biomechanical in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Andrea; Leichtle, Carmen I; Frantz, Sandra; Bumann, Marte; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Shiozawa, Thomas; Leichtle, Ulf G

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the potential of the dual outer diameter screw and systematically evaluate the pull-out force of the dual outer diameter screw compared to the uncemented and cemented standard pedicle screws with special regard to the pedicle diameter and the vertebra level. Sixty vertebrae of five human spines (T 6 -L 5 ) were sorted into three study groups for pairwise comparison of the uncemented dual outer diameter screw, the uncemented standard screw, and the cemented standard screw, and randomized with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and vertebra level. The vertebrae were instrumented, insertion torque was determined, and pull-out testing was performed using a material testing machine. Failure load was evaluated in pairwise comparison within each study group. The screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio was determined and the uncemented dual outer diameter and standard screws were compared for different ratios as well as vertebra levels. Significantly increased pull-out forces were measured for the cemented standard screw compared to the uncemented standard screw (+689 N, P dual outer diameter screw (+403 N, P dual outer diameter screw to the uncemented standard screw in the total study group, a distinct but not significant increase was measured (+149 N, P = 0.114). Further analysis of these two screws, however, revealed a significant increase of pull-out force for the dual outer diameter screw in the lumbar region (+247 N, P = 0.040), as well as for a screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio between 0.6 and 1 (+ 488 N, P = 0.028). For clinical application, cement augmentation remains the gold standard for increasing screw stability. According to our results, the use of a dual outer diameter screw is an interesting option to increase screw stability in the lumbar region without cement augmentation. For the thoracic region, however, the screw-to-pedicle diameter should be checked and attention should be paid to screw cut out, if the dual outer diameter screw is considered.

  1. Accelerated Tooth Movement with Orthodontic Mini-Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksakalli, S; Balaban, A; Nazaroglu, K; Saglam, E

    2017-01-01

    This case report outlines the possibility of accelerated tooth movement with the combination of microosteoperforation and mini-screws. A 14-year-old male patient presented Class II malocclusion with maxillary incisor protrusion. Upper first premolars were extracted, and after leveling, accelerated canine distalization started. For pre- and postdistalization times, amount of distalization, periodontal health, and root resorption were assessed. Within the limitations of this case report, micro-osteoperforations with mini-screw have a potential for shortening the treatment time.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking lifetime prediction of spring screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Ryu, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    A lifetime prediction of holddown spring screw in nuclear fuel assembly was performed using fracture mechanics approach. The spring screw was designed such that it was capable of sustaining the loads imposed by the initial tensile preload and operational loads. In order to investigate the cause of failure and to predict the stress corrosion cracking life of the screw, a stress analysis of the top nozzle spring assembly was done using finite element analysis. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded than the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Normalized stress intensity factors for PWSCC life prediction was proposed. Primary water stress corrosion cracking life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by using integration of the Scott model and resulted in 1.78 years, which was fairly close to the actual service life of the holddown spring screw

  3. Modeling and Analyzing the Slipping of the Ball Screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Xu

    Full Text Available AbstractThis paper aims to set up the ball systematic slipping model and analyze the slipping characteristics caused by different factors for a ball screw operating at high speeds. To investigate the ball screw slipping mechanism, transformed coordinate system should be established firstly. Then it is used to set up mathematical modeling for the ball slipping caused by the three main reasons and the speed of slipping can be calculated. Later, the influence of the contact angle, helix angle and screw diameter for ball screw slipping will be analyzed according to the ball slipping model and slipping speeds equation and the slipping analysis will be obtained. Finally, curve of slipping analysis and that of mechanical efficiency of the ball screw analysis by Lin are compared, which will indirectly verify the correctness of the slipping model. The slipping model and the curve of slipping analysis established in this paper will provide theory basis for reducing slipping and improving the mechanical efficiency of a ball screw operating at high speeds.

  4. Treatment Outcomes for Isolated Maxillary Complex Fractures with Maxillomandibular Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Rahul; Gohil, Amish Jayantilal; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Koshy, Santosh

    2017-12-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) is a basic and fundamental principle in the management of patients with fractures of the maxillomandibular complex. There are several shortcomings related to the conventionally recommended tooth-mounted devices that are used to achieve IMF. To circumvent these, the use of bone-borne screws has been advocated. We present a series of maxillary fractures treated with IMF screws. Over a 12-month period, 15 cases of maxillary fracture were managed with open reduction and bone plate fixation. IMF screws were used to achieve IMF intraoperatively and for a short duration postoperatively. Eight cortical titanium screws were inserted transmucosally, two for each quadrant at the junction of the attached and mobile mucosa. Satisfactory occlusion was achieved in all the patients with few complications. IMF screw fixation was observed to be a safe and quick method for open reduction of maxillary fractures. Tooth-borne devices are associated with problems such as poor oral hygiene and periodontal health, extrusion of teeth, loss of tooth vitality, traumatic ulcers of buccal and labial mucosa, and needle stick injury to the operator. These procedures are also time consuming. The use of cortical bone screws is a quicker and safe alternative for achieving satisfactory IMF.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100230.htm Anterior cruciate ligament repair - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a ligament in the center of ...

  6. Multidisciplinary management of anterior diastemata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Herkrath, Fernando José; Franco, Eduardo Jacomino

    2007-01-01

    Anterior diastemata may compromise the harmony of a patient's smile. Consideration of etiologic factors, previous gingival conditioning, and individual treatment planning are essential in the proper management of anterior diastemata. An integrated orthodontic-restorative approach may enhance...

  7. Pullout strength of misplaced pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae - A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam K Saraf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this cadaveric study was to analyze the effects of iatrogenic pedicle perforations from screw misplacement on the mean pullout strength of lower thoracic and lumbar pedicle screws. We also investigated the effect of bone mineral density (BMD, diameter of pedicle screws, and the region of spine on the pullout strength of pedicle screws. Materials and Methods: Sixty fresh human cadaveric vertebrae (D10-L2 were harvested. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA scan of vertebrae was done for BMD. Titanium pedicle screws of different diameters (5.2 and 6.2 mm were inserted in the thoracic and lumbar segments after dividing the specimens into three groups: a standard pedicle screw (no cortical perforation; b screw with medial cortical perforation; and c screw with lateral cortical perforation. Finally, pullout load of pedicle screws was recorded using INSTRON Universal Testing Machine. Results: Compared with standard placement, medially misplaced screws had 9.4% greater mean pullout strength and laterally misplaced screws had 47.3% lesser mean pullout strength. The pullout strength of the 6.2 mm pedicle screws was 33% greater than that of the 5.2 mm pedicle screws. The pullout load of pedicle screws in lumbar vertebra was 13.9% greater than that in the thoracic vertebra ( P = 0.105, but it was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference between pullout loads of vertebra with different BMD ( P = 0.901. Conclusion: The mean pullout strength was less with lateral misplaced pedicle screws while medial misplaced pedicle screw had more pullout strength. The pullout load of 6.2 mm screws was greater than that of 5.2 mm pedicle screws. No significant correlation was found between bone mineral densities and the pullout strength of vertebra. Similarly, the pullout load of screw placed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae was not significantly different.

  8. Valgus osteotomy of the tibia with a Puddu plate combined with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albuquerque Roberto Freire da Mota e

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior knee instability associated with a varus deformity is a complex condition with several treatment possibilities. Among these, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL associated to a simultaneous valgus tibial osteotomy is a increasing indication. This simultaneous procedure adds technical issues to those related to the isolated surgeries. Thus, the osteotomy plane and location of fixation hardware shouldn?t conflict with tibial tunnel and ACL graft fixation. Authors analyze the relations between a opening tibial valgus osteotomy stabilized with a Puddu plate and ACL reconstruction with a patellar tendon graft fixated with interference screws in 10 human cadaver knees. A straight oblique tibial osteotomy starting on the medial tibial cortex and oriented laterally and proximally was performed on all knees with a 10mm opening medially and stabilized with a Puddu plate on the most posterior aspect of the medial tibia, and a tibial tunnel drilled 50° to tibial plateau. With this technique there was no intersection between tibial tunnel or interference screw and the osteotomy or the plate fixation screws.

  9. Anterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyadhar P. Mali

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the clinical presentation and management of four patients with anterior urethral valves; a rare cause of urethral obstruction in male children. One patient presented antenatally with oligohydramnios, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder thickening suggestive of an infravesical obstruction. Two other patients presented postnatally at 1 and 2 years of age, respectively, with poor stream of urine since birth. The fourth patient presented at 9 years with frequency and dysuria. Diagnosis was established on either micturating cystourethrogram (MCU (in 2 or on cystoscopy (in 2. All patients had cystoscopic ablation of the valves. One patient developed a postablation stricture that was resected with an end-to-end urethroplasty. He had an associated bilateral vesicoureteric junction (VUJ obstruction for which a bilateral ureteric reimplantation was done at the same time. On long-term follow-up, all patients demonstrated a good stream of urine. The renal function is normal. Patients are continent and free of urinary infections. Anterior urethral valves are rare obstructive lesions in male children. The degree of obstruction is variable, and so they may present with mild micturition difficulty or severe obstruction with hydroureteronephrosis and renal impairment. Hence, it is important to evaluate the anterior urethra in any male child with suspected infravesical obstruction. The diagnosis is established by MCU or cystoscopy and the treatment is always surgical, either a transurethral ablation or an open resection. The long-term prognosis is good.

  10. Experimental study of the density distribution of the particles of the material in screw installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demidov S. F.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available the experimental studies of density distribution of the particles of a mixture of wheat, oats, rye to feed pigs by infrared heating at the time of stay and temperature at the exit of the installation. The purpose of the work is to study the quality of treatment of the product with the settings with the screw and the screw with installed round jumper on the pen of the screw. Screw installations with infrared emitters of selected wavelength give the opportunity for intense and continuous heat treatment process. The authors used the optimal parameters of the process with the screw and the screw with installed round jumper on the pen of the screw. The parameters of screw installation during the study were the following: the number of revolutions of the screw was 10 rpm, density of heat flux was 12 kW/m2, output capacity – 250 kg/h.

  11. Prediction of Deformity Correction by Pedicle Screw Instrumentation in Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Nagura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    In segmental pedicle screw instrumentation, the relationship between the combinations of pedicle screw placements and the degree of deformity correction was investigated with a three-dimensional rigid body and spring model. The virtual thoracolumbar scoliosis (Cobb’s angle of 47 deg.) was corrected using six different combinations of pedicle-screw placements. As a result, better correction in the axial rotation was obtained with the pedicle screws placed at or close to the apical vertebra than with the screws placed close to the end vertebrae, while the correction in the frontal plane was better with the screws close to the end vertebrae than with those close to the apical vertebra. Additionally, two screws placed in the convex side above and below the apical vertebra provided better correction than two screws placed in the concave side. Effective deformity corrections of scoliosis were obtained with the proper combinations of pedicle screw placements.

  12. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  13. CT provides precise size assessment of implanted titanium alloy pedicle screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael J; Slakey, Joseph B

    2014-05-01

    After performing instrumented spinal fusion with pedicle screws, postoperative imaging using CT to assess screw position may be necessary. Stainless steel implants produce significant metal artifact on CT, and the degree of distortion is at least partially dependent on the cross-sectional area of the implanted device. If the same effect occurs with titanium alloy implants, ability to precisely measure proximity of screws to adjacent structures may be adversely affected as screw size increases. We therefore asked whether (1) CT provides precise measurements of true screw widths; and (2) precision degrades based on the size of the titanium implant imaged. CT scans performed on 20 patients after instrumented spinal fusion for scoliosis were reviewed. The sizes of 151 titanium alloy pedicle screws were measured and compared with known screw size. The amount of metal bloom artifact was determined for each of the four screw sizes. ANOVA with Tukey's post hoc test were performed to evaluate differences in scatter, and Spearman's rho coefficient was used to measure relationship between screw size and scatter. All screws measured larger than their known size, but even with larger 7-mm screws the size differential was less than 1 mm. The four different screw sizes produced scatter amounts that were different from each other (p titanium alloy pedicle screws produces minimal artifact, thus making this the preferred imaging modality to assess screw position after surgery. Although the amount of artifact increases with the volume of titanium present, the degree of distortion is minimal and is usually less than 1 mm.

  14. Pullout performance comparison of pedicle screws based on cement application and design parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolunay, Tolga; Başgül, Cemile; Demir, Teyfik; Yaman, Mesut E; Arslan, Arslan K

    2015-11-01

    Pedicle screws are the main fixation devices for certain surgeries. Pedicle screw loosening is a common problem especially for osteoporotic incidents. Cannulated screws with cement augmentation are widely used for that kind of cases. Dual lead dual cored pedicle screw has already given promising pullout values without augmentation. This study concentrates on the usage of dual lead dual core with cement augmentation as an alternative to cannulated and standard pedicle screws with cement augmentation. Five groups (dual lead dual core, normal pedicle screw and cannulated pedicle screw with augmentation, normal pedicle screw, dual lead dual cored pedicle screw) were designed for this study. Healthy bovine vertebrae and synthetic polyurethane foams (grade 20) were used as embedding test medium. Test samples were prepared in accordance with surgical guidelines and ASTM F543 standard testing protocols. Pullout tests were conducted with Instron 3300 testing frame. Load versus displacement values were recorded and maximum pullout loads were stated. The dual lead dual cored pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation exhibited the highest pullout values, while dual lead dual cored pedicle screw demonstrated similar pullout strength as cannulated pedicle screw and normal pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation. The dual lead dual cored pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation can be used for osteoporotic and/or severe osteoporotic patients according to its promising results on animal cadaver and synthetic foams. © IMechE 2015.

  15. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jen Chang

    Full Text Available Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide.

  16. Biomechanical comparison of two locking plate constructs under cyclic torsional loading in a fracture gap model. Two screws versus three screws per fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilmont, A; Palierne, S; Verset, M; Swider, P; Autefage, A

    2015-01-01

    The number of locking screws required per fragment during bridging osteosynthesis in the dog has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to assess the survival of two constructs, with either two or three screws per fragment, under cyclic torsion. Ten-hole 3.5 mm stainless steel locking compression plates (LCP) were fixed 1 mm away from bone surrogates with a fracture gap of 47 mm using two bicortical locking screws (10 constructs) or three bicortical locking screws (10 constructs) per fragment, placed at the extremities of each LCP. Constructs were tested in cyclic torsion (range: 0 to +0.218 rad) until failure. The 3-screws constructs (29.65 ± 1.89 N.m/rad) were stiffer than the 2-screws constructs (23.73 ± 0.87 N.m/rad), and therefore, were subjected to a greater torque during cycling (6.05 ± 1.33 N.m and 4.88 ± 1.14 N.m respectively). The 3-screws constructs sustained a significantly greater number of cycles (20,700 ± 5,735 cycles) than the 2-screws constructs (15,600 ± 5,272 cycles). In most constructs, failure was due to screw damage at the junction of the shaft and head. The remaining constructs failed because of screw head unlocking, sometimes due to incomplete seating of the screw head prior to testing. Omitting the third innermost locking screw during bridging osteosynthesis led to a reduction in fatigue life of 25% and construct stiffness by 20%. Fracture of the screws is believed to occur sequentially, starting with the innermost screw that initially shields the other screws.

  17. Pedicle screw augmentation with bone cement enforced Vicryl mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Samuel L; Bachmann, Elias; Fischer, Michael; Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christoph A; Snedeker, Jess G; Farshad, Mazda

    2018-01-01

    Achieving sufficient mechanical purchase of pedicle screws in osteoporotic or previously instrumented bone is technically and biologically challenging. Techniques using different kinds of pedicle screws or methods of cement augmentation have been used to address this challenge, but are associated with difficult revisions and complications. The purpose of this biomechanical trial was to investigate the use of biocompatible textile materials in combination with bone cement to augment pullout strength of pedicle screws while reducing the risk of cement extrusion. Pedicle screws (6/40 mm) were either augmented with standard bone-cement (Palacos LV + G) in one group (BC, n = 13) or with bone-cement enforced by Vicryl mesh in another group (BCVM, n = 13) in osteoporosis-like saw bone blocks. Pullout testing was subsequently performed. In a second experimental phase, similar experiments were performed using human cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (n = 10). In osteoporosis-like saw bone blocks, a mean screw pullout force of 350 N (±125) was significantly higher with the Bone cement (BC) compared to bone-cement enforced by Vicryl mesh (BCVM) technique with 240 N (±64) (p = 0.030). In human cadaveric lumbar vertebrae the mean screw pullout force was 784 ± 366 N with BC and not statistically different to BCVM with 757 ± 303 N (p = 0.836). Importantly, cement extrusion was only observed in the BC group (40%) and never with the BCVM technique. In vitro textile reinforcement of bone cement for pedicle screw augmentation successfully reduced cement extrusion compared to conventionally delivered bone cement. The mechanical strength of textile delivered cement constructs was more reproducible than standard cementing. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:212-216, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Preload, Coefficient of Friction, and Thread Friction in an Implant-Abutment-Screw Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentaschek, Stefan; Tomalla, Sven; Schmidtmann, Irene; Lehmann, Karl Martin

    To examine the screw preload, coefficient of friction (COF), and tightening torque needed to overcome the thread friction of an implant-abutment-screw complex. In a customized load frame, 25 new implant-abutment-screw complexes including uncoated titanium alloy screws were torqued and untorqued 10 times each, applying 25 Ncm. Mean preload values decreased significantly from 209.8 N to 129.5 N according to the number of repetitions. The overall COF increased correspondingly. There was no comparable trend for the thread friction component. These results suggest that the application of a used implant-abutment-screw complex may be unfavorable for obtaining optimal screw preload.

  19. The dual-zone therapeutic concept of managing immediate implant placement and provisional restoration in anterior extraction sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Stephen J; Salama, Maurice A; Salama, Henry; Garber, David A; Saito, Hanae; Sarnachiaro, Guido O; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in implant designs have helped advance successful immediate anterior implant placement into fresh extraction sockets. Clinical techniques described in this case enable practitioners to achieve predictable esthetic success using a method that limits the amount of buccal contour change of the extraction site ridge and potentially enhances the thickness of the peri-implant soft tissues coronal to the implant-abutment interface. This approach involves atraumatic tooth removal without flap elevation, and placing a bone graft into the residual gap around an immediate fresh-socket anterior implant with a screw-retained provisional restoration acting as a prosthetic socket seal device.

  20. Perawatan Ortodontik Gigitan Terbuka Anterior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuniar Zen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior telah lama dianggap sebagai tantangan bagi ortodontis. Prevalensi gigitan terbuka anterior antara 3,5% hingga 11% terdapat pada berbagai usia dan kelompok etnis, serta ada sekitar 17% pasien ortodonti memiliki gigitan terbuka. Stabilitas hasil perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior sangat sulit, karena adanya kombinasi diskrepansi anteroposterior dengan gigitan terbuka skeletal sehingga dibutuhkan tingkat keterampilan diagnosis dan klinis yang tinggi. Etiologi gigitan terbuka anterior sangat kompleks karena dapat melibatkan skeletal, dental, dan faktor-faktor habitual. Eliminasi faktor etiologi merupakan hal yang penting dalam perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior. Berbagai cara perawatan untuk koreksi gigitan terbuka anterior diantaranya bedah ortognatik dan perawatan ortodontik kamuflase, seperti high-pull headgear, chincup, bite blocks, alatfungsional, pencabutan gigi, multi-loop edgewise archwires dan mini implan. Stabilitas hasil perawatan adalah kriteria yang paling penting dalam menentukan cara perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior. Orthodontic Treatment of Anterior Open Bite. An anterior open bite therapy has long been considered a challenge to orthodontist. The prevalence of anterior openbite range from 3,5 % to 11% among various age and ethnic groups and it has been shown that approximately 17% of orthodontic patients have open bite. Stability of treatment result of anterior open bite with well-maintained results is difficult, because the combination of anteroposteriorly discrepancy with skeletal open bite requires the highest degree of diagnostic and clinical skill. The etiology is complex, potentially involving skeletal, dental and habitual factors. The importance of an anterior open bite therapy is to eliminate the cause of the open bite. Various treatment modalities for the correction of an anterior open bite have been proposed, orthognatic surgery and orthodontic camouflage treatment such as high

  1. [Clinical efficacy of unilateral percutaneous transfacet screws combined with contralateral pedicle screw versus bilateral pedicle screws fixation in the treatment of the degenerative lumbar disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rong-Xue; Zhou, Hui; Pan, Hao; Yue, Jun; Chen, Hui-Guo; Yang, He-Jie; Jia, Gao-Yong; Wang, Dong; Lin, Yan; Xu, Hua-Zi

    2017-09-25

    To investigate the surgical outcome of unilateral pedicle screw(UPS) after TLIF technique combined with contralateral percutaneous transfacet screw(PTS) fixation vs bilateral pedicle screws(BPS) fixation in treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. From January 2009 to June 2012, 46 patients with degenerative lumbar diseases, including 30 males and 16 females with an average age of 51.5 years old, who were divided into two groups according to different fixation methods. Twenty-two cases underwent UPS after TLIF technique combined with contralateral PTS fixation (group A), while the others underwent BPS fixation(group B). The relative data were analyzed, such as blood loss volume, operative time, fusion rate, ODI score, JOA score and so on. All the patients were followed up for 1 to 3 years with an average of 22 months. Except one case of each group was uncertainty fusion, the rest have obtained bony fusion, and the fusion rates in group A and B were 95.5% and 95.8%, respectively. No displacement and breakage of screw were found during follow-up. Operative time and blood loss volume in group A were better than of group B( P 0.05). Two approaches had similar clinical outcomes for degenerative lumbar disease with no severe instability. Compared with BPS fixation, the UPS after TLIF technique and contralateral PTS fixation has the advantages of less trauma, shorter operative time and less blood loss, and it is a safe and feasible surgical technique.

  2. Anterior knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLopis, Eva [Hospital de la Ribera, Alzira, Valencia (Spain) and Carretera de Corbera km 1, 46600 Alzira Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: ellopis@hospital-ribera.com; Padron, Mario [Clinica Cemtro, Ventisquero de la Condesa no. 42, 28035 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: mario.padron@clinicacemtro.com

    2007-04-15

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries.

  3. The Study of Vibration Processes in Oil Flooded Screw Compressors

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    I. V. Filippov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration processes that accompany most of machines and mechanisms are of interest to the researcher, as a source of information about the technical condition and the nature of the business processes flow. Vibration-based diagnostics of oil flooded screw compressors allows us to estimate the deviation of their operation from the main mode in accordance with changing the settings of vibration processes.The oil flooded screw compressor transition from the main mode of operation to the abnormal one is accompanied by complex gas-dynamic phenomena i.e. the initial gaps and their decays. This leads to changes in the nature of vibration processes, prompting suggestions that there is a relationship to a change of vibration parameters and mode of compressor operation.Studies were conducted by combined method using an analytical calculation of the decay parameters of the initial discontinuity and an experimental one based on the measurement of acceleration on the body of the real oil flooded screw compressor. A virtually adequate reaction of the decay parameters of the initial gap and the peak values of vibration acceleration to the change of operation mode of oil flooded screw compressor has been received. The peak value of the vibration acceleration was selected by the method of Gating being time-coinciding with the beginning discharge phase of the oil flooded screw compressor, and therefore, with the decay time of the initial discontinuity.This indicates a large degree of hypothesis likelihood on an existing initial break in oil flooded screw compressor when operating in abnormal conditions. This work contains the study results of vibration processes and their relationship to the operating mode of the oil flooded screw compressor, which distinguish it from the other works studied vibration processes in reciprocating compressors. The vibration parameters control of operating oil flooded screw compressor allows us to create an automatic capacity control

  4. Evaluating anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Engene; Kraft, Michael C

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints account for about 20% to 30% of all primary care office visits; of these visits, discomfort in the knee, shoulder, and back are the most prevalent musculoskeletal symptoms. Having pain or dysfunction in the front part of the knee is a common presentation and reason for a patient to see a health care provider. There are a number of pathophysiological etiologies to anterior knee pain. This article describes some of the common and less common causes, and includes sections on diagnosis and treatment for each condition as well as key points. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The anterior cingulate cortex

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    Pavlović D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC has a role in attention, analysis of sensory information, error recognition, problem solving, detection of novelty, behavior, emotions, social relations, cognitive control, and regulation of visceral functions. This area is active whenever the individual feels some emotions, solves a problem, or analyzes the pros and cons of an action (if it is a right decision. Analogous areas are also found in higher mammals, especially whales, and they contain spindle neurons that enable complex social interactions. Disturbance of ACC activity is found in dementias, schizophrenia, depression, the obsessive-compulsive syndrome, and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  6. Theoretical investigation of flash vaporisation in a screw expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasuthevan, Hanushan; Brümmer, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    In the present study flash vaporisation of liquid injection in a twin screw expander for a Trilateral Flash Cycle (TFC) is examined theoretically. The TFC process comprises a pressure increase in the working fluid, followed by heating the liquid close to boiling point. The hot liquid is injected into the working chamber of a screw expander. During this process the pressure of the liquid drops below the saturation pressure, while the temperature of the liquid remains virtually constant. Hence the liquid is superheated and in a metastable state. The liquid jet seeks to achieve a stable state in thermodynamic equilibrium and is therefore partially vaporised. This effect is referred to as flash vaporisation. Accordingly, a two-phase mixture, consisting of vapour and liquid, exists in the working chamber. Thermodynamic simulations were carried out using water as the working fluid for representative screw expander geometry. The simulations presented are performed from two different aspects during the filling process of a screw expander. The first case is the vaporisation of the injected liquid in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium, whereby the two-phase mixture is treated entirely as a compressible and homogeneous gas. The second case considers flashing efficiency. It describes the quantity of flashed vapour and consists of a liquid and vapour domain. Both models are compared and analysed with respect to the operational behaviour of a screw expander.

  7. Numerical simulation of a twin screw expander for performance prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papes, Iva; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing use of twin screw expanders in waste heat recovery applications, the performance prediction of these machines plays an important role. This paper presents a mathematical model for calculating the performance of a twin screw expander. From the mass and energy conservation laws, differential equations are derived which are then solved together with the appropriate Equation of State in the instantaneous control volumes. Different flow processes that occur inside the screw expander such as filling (accompanied by a substantial pressure loss) and leakage flows through the clearances are accounted for in the model. The mathematical model employs all geometrical parameters such as chamber volume, suction and leakage areas. With R245fa as working fluid, the Aungier Redlich-Kwong Equation of State has been used in order to include real gas effects. To calculate the mass flow rates through the leakage paths formed inside the screw expander, flow coefficients are considered as constant and they are derived from 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic calculations at given working conditions and applied to all other working conditions. The outcome of the mathematical model is the P-V indicator diagram which is compared to CFD results of the same twin screw expander. Since CFD calculations require significant computational time, developed mathematical model can be used for the faster performance prediction.

  8. Treatment of scaphoid waist fractures with the HCS screw

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    Gehrmann, Sebastian V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical results of the Headless Compression Screw (HCS, Synthes when used for treatment of acute scaphoid waist fractures. The new screw design generates interfragmentary compression with use of a compression sleeve. Twenty-one patients were treated for acute scaphoid waist fractures type B2 with HCS screws. The average time to the final follow-up examination was 12.8 months. All 21 fractures united after a mean time of 7.2 weeks. The mean DASH score was 7.1. The average motion of the wrist in extension was 61°, flexion was 46°, radial abduction reached 25° and the ulnar abduction was 31°. The maximally achieved grip strength was 86% compared to the uninjured side. Treatment of type B2 scaphoid fractures with the Headless Compression Screw showed good functional and radiographic results. The results are similar to those identified using other screw fixation systems.

  9. Percutaneous Iliac Screws for Minimally Invasive Spinal Deformity Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females. Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs.

  10. Studies on positive conveying in helically channeled single screw extruders

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    L. Pan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A solids conveying theory called double-flight driving theory was proposed for helically channeled single screw extruders. In the extruder, screw channel rotates against static barrel channel, which behaves as cooperative embedded twin-screws for the positive conveying. They turn as two parallel arc plates, between which an arc-plate solid-plug was assumed. By analyzing the forces on the solid-plug in the barrel channel and screw channel, the boundary conditions when the solid-plug is waived of being cut off on barrel wall, were found to have the capacity of the positive conveying. Experimental data were obtained using a specially designed extruder with a helically channeled barrel in the feeding zone and a pressure-adjustable die. The effects of the barrel channel geometry and friction coefficients on the conveying mechanism were presented and compared with the experimental results. The simulations showed that the positive conveying could be achieved after optimizing extruder designs. Compared with the traditional design with the friction-drag conveying, the throughput is higher while screw torque and energy consumption are decreased. Besides, the design criteria of the barrel channel were also discussed.

  11. Numerical and experimental study of an Archimedean Screw Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, G.; Garambois, P.-A.; Dufresne, M.; Terfous, A.; Vazquez, J.; Ghenaim, A.

    2016-11-01

    Finding new, safe and renewable energy is becoming more and more of a priority with global warming. One solution that is gaining popularity is the Archimedean Screw Generator (ASG). This kind of hydroelectric plant allows transforming potential energy of a fluid into mechanical energy and is convenient for low-head hydraulic sites. As it is a new and growing technology, there are few references dealing with their design and performance optimization. The present contribution proposes to investigate experimentally and numerically the ASG performances. The experimental study is performed for various flow conditions and a laboratory scale screw device installed at the fluid mechanics laboratory of the INSA of Strasbourg. The first results show that the screw efficiencies are higher than 80% for various hydraulic conditions. In order to study the structure of 3D turbulent flows and energy losses in a screw, the 3D Navier Stokes equations are solved with the k-w SST turbulence model. The exact geometry of the laboratory-scale screw was used in these simulations. Interestingly, the modeled values of efficiency are in fairly good agreement with experimental results while any friction coefficient is involved.

  12. A biomechanical study of two different pedicle screw methods for fixation in osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Kosaku; Kim, Jin Hwan; Horton, William C; Hutton, William C

    2012-01-01

    In reconstruction of the osteoporotic spine, patients often show poor outcome because of pedicle screw failure. This study used osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae to determine the difference in fixation strength between pedicle screws inserted straight forward and pedicle screws inserted in an upward trajectory toward the superior end plate (i.e., end-plate screws). There is some evidence to suggest that end-plate screws have a strength advantage. The particular focus was on osteoporotic vertebrae. Thirty-three vertebrae (T10-L2) were harvested. The bone mineral density (BMD) was measured: 15 vertebrae were greater than 0.8 g/cm(2) and designated as nonosteoporotic (average BMD 1.146 ± 0.186 g/cm(2)) and 18 vertebrae were designated as osteoporotic (average BMD 0.643 ± 0.088 g/cm(2)). On one pedicle the screw was inserted straight forward and on the other pedicle the screw was inserted as an end-plate screw. The torque of insertion was measured (Proto 6106 torque screwdriver). Using an MTS Mini Bionix, two types of mechanical testing were carried out on each pedicle: (a) cephalocaudad toggling was first carried out to simulate some physiological type loading: 500 cycles at 0.3 Hz, at ±50 N; and (b) then each pedicle screw was pulled out at a displacement rate of 12.5 cm/min.There was no difference in pullout force between the pedicle screws inserted straight forward and the pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws. This result applies whether the vertebrae were osteoporotic or nonosteoporotic. For both the straight-forward screws and the end-plate screws, a statistically significant correlation was observed between torque of insertion and pullout force. The results of this experiment indicate that pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws do not provide a strength advantage over pedicle screws inserted straight forward, whether the vertebrae are osteoporotic or not.

  13. The best location for proximal locking screw for femur interlocking nailing: A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Ahmet A; Karakaşli, Ahmet; Aycan, Hakan; Çeçen, Berivan; Yildiz, Didem Venüs; Sesli, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Proximal locking screw deformation and screw fracture is a frequently seen problem for femur interlocking nailing that affects fracture healing. We realized that there is lack of literature for the right level for the proximal locking screw. We investigated the difference of locking screw bending resistance between the application of screws on different proximal femoral levels. We used a total of 80 proximal locking screws for eight groups, 10 screws for each group. Three-point bending tests were performed on four types of screws in two different trochanteric levels (the lesser trochanter and 20 mm proximal). We determined the yield points at three-point bending tests that a permanent deformation started in the locking screws using an axial compression testing machine. The mean yield point value of 5 mm threaded locking screws applied 20 mm proximal of lesser trochanter was 1022 ± 49 (range 986-1057) (mean ± standard deviation, 95% confidence interval). On the other hand, the mean yield point value of the same type of locking screws applied on the lesser trochanteric level was 2089 ± 249 (range 1911-2268). Which means 103% increase of screw resistance between two levels (P = 0.000). In all screw groups, on the lesser trochanter line we determined 98-174% higher than the yield point values of the same type of locking screws in comparison with 20 mm proximal to the lesser trochanter (P = 0.000). According to our findings, there is twice as much difference in locking screw bending resistance between these two application levels. To avoid proximal locking screw deformation, locking screws should be placed in the level of the lesser trochanter in nailing of 1/3 middle and distal femur fractures.

  14. Detections of Screw Penetration during Volar Plating for Distal Radius Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Soo Min; Shin, Hyun Dae

    2017-11-01

    Background  We evaluated the detection for screw penetration on the dorsal cortex of the radius in serial oblique, dorsal tangential, and radial groove radiographic views in volar plating fixation. Materials and Methods  Eight screw positions were set in each of the four cadaveric radii. Screw 1 was placed in the styloid subregion, whereas screws 2 and 3 were placed just proximal to the styloid and were defined for the radial region of the radius. Screws 4 (distal to the extensor pollicis longus [EPL] groove), 5 (the distal half of the groove), and 6 (the proximal half of the groove) were placed in the central region of the radius. Screws 7 (just medial to the groove) and 8 (sigmoid notch subregion) were positioned in the ulnar region of the radius. The screws were overlengthened by 1 and 2 mm and were evaluated in three radiographic views. Results  Penetrations in the radial region were fully visible in supinated oblique views with 1- and 2-mm overlengthened screws. The penetration of screw 4 was clearly observable over a considerable range of views. However, the 1-mm penetration of screw 5 was not detectable at any angle of projection. Detection of the ulnar region screw was the most difficult among the three regions with oblique views. In the dorsal tangential view, the 1-mm penetration of screw 4 was not observed in any of the four radii, but the penetration of screw 5 was detectable in all the radii. The screws 2, 3, 5, 7, and 8 were readily detectable. The screw 4 was barely seen in the radial groove view, while the screws 5 and 6 were readily detectable. Conclusion/Clinical Relevance  Appropriate combinations of these well-known radiological views are essential for the overall detection of penetrated screws during plating in distal radius fractures.

  15. Biomechanical efficacy of monoaxial or polyaxial pedicle screw and additional screw insertion at the level of fracture, in lumbar burst fracture: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Li, Changqing; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Zhou, Yue

    2012-07-01

    Use of a pedicle screw at the level of fracture, also known as an intermediate screw, has been shown to improve clinical results in managing lumbar fracture, but there is a paucity of biomechanical studies to support the claim. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding intermediate pedicle screws at the level of a fracture on the stiffness of a short-segment pedicle fixation using monoaxial or polyaxial screws and to compare the strength of monoaxial and polyaxial screws in the calf spine fracture model. Flexibility of 12 fresh-frozen calf lumbar spine specimens was evaluated in all planes. An unstable burst fracture model was created at the level of L3 by the pre-injury and dropped-mass technique. The specimens were randomly divided into monoaxial pedicle screw (MPS) and polyaxial pedicle screw (PPS) groups. Flexibility was retested without and with intermediate screws (MPSi and PPSi) placed at the level of fracture in addition to standard screws placed at L2 and L4. The addition of intermediate screws significantly increased the stability of the constructs, as measured by a decreased range of motion (ROM) in flexion, extension, and lateral bending in both MPS and PPS groups (P 0.05), but there was a significant difference between MPS and PPS in flexion and extension in the short-segment fixation group (P < 0.05). The addition of intermediate screws at the level of a burst fracture significantly increased the stability of short-segment pedicle screw fixation in both the MPS and PPS groups. However, in short-segment fixation group, monoaxial pedicle screw exhibited more stability in flexion and extension than the polyaxial pedicle screw.

  16. [Biomechanical study on the posterior screw fixation in the lower cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hua-jie; Xu, Rong-min; Liu, Guan-yi

    2011-06-01

    So far, the fixation in the lower cervical spine through posterior approach technology has commonly been used, besides the lateral screw and pedicle screw techniques, transarticular screw and laminar screw techniques have being paid more attention recently. This article introduced four screw fixation ways in the lower cervical spine through posterior approach and reviewed the recent biomechanics studies of four screw fixation techniques. The biomechanics study includes stabilization, pollout strength, insertion technique, and screw characteristic and so on. Lateral screw and pedicle screw techniques have become an effective internal fixation way for the lower cervical spine instability because of their superior stabilization and higher pollout strength. Transarticular screw fixation has become a new way to fix the lower cervical spine through posterior approach, which has widely surgical indications. Besides, this technique is relatively safe, simple and has achieved favorable curative effect in clinic. Laminar screw fixation technique is rarely used in clinic, but the study of anatomy and biomechanics confirmed that this technique can be applied as a salvage technique in clinic. Above four techniques of the screw fixation in the lower cervical spine through posterior approach have advantages and disadvantages, respectively, and the application in clinic is different. Through the biomechanics study of these techniques will contribute to the development of the techniques of the screw fixation in the lower cervical spine through posterior approach and guide the clinical work effectively.

  17. The Effect of Polymethyl Methacrylate Augmentation on the Primary Stability of Cannulated Bone Screws in an Anterolateral Plate in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: A Human Cadaver Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüger, Matthias; Sellei, Richard M.; Stoffel, Marcus; von Rüden, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Objective Expandable anterolateral plates facilitate the reduction of posttraumatic deformities of thoracolumbar spine injuries and are commonly used in cases of unstable injuries or compromised bone quality. In this in vitro study, the craniocaudal yield load of the osseous fixation of an anterior angular stable plate fixation system and the effect of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) screw augmentation on the primary stability of the screw–bone interface during kyphosis reduction was evaluated in 12 osteoporotic human thoracolumbar vertebrae. Methods The anterolateral stabilization device used for this study is comprised of two swiveling flanges and an expandable midsection. It facilitates the controlled reduction of kyphotic deformities in situ with a geared distractor. Single flanges were attached to 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae. Six specimens were augmented with PMMA by means of cannulated bone screws. The constructs were subjected to static, displacement-controlled craniocaudal loading to failure in a servohydraulic testing machine. Results The uncemented screws cut out at a mean 393 ± 66 N, whereas the cemented screws showed significantly higher yield load of 966 ± 166 N (p < 0.02). We detected no significant correlation between bone mineral density and yield load in this setting. Conclusion Our results indicate that PMMA augmentation is an effective method to increase two- to threefold the primary stability of the screw–bone interface of an anterolateral spine stabilization system in osteoporotic bone. We recommend it in cases of severely compromised bone quality to reduce the risk of screw loosening during initial kyphosis correction and to increase long-term construct stability. PMID:26835201

  18. Bioabsorbable metal screws in traumatology: A promising innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Biber

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available MAGNEZIX® CS (Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany is a bioabsorbable compression screw made of a magnesium alloy (MgYREZr. Currently there are only two clinical studies reporting on a limited number of elective patients who received this screw in a hallux valgus operation. We applied MAGNEZIX® CS for fixation of distal fibular fracture in a trauma patient who had sustained a bimalleolar fracture type AO 44-B2.3. Clinical course was uneventful, fracture healing occurred within three months. Follow-up X-rays showed a radiolucent area around the implant for some months, yet this radiolucent area had disappeared in the 17-months follow-up X-ray. Keywords: Magnesium, Bioabsorbable, Compression screw, Osteosynthesis, Ankle fracture

  19. New concept single screw compressors and their manufacture technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Q.; Liu, F.; Chang, L.; Feng, C.; Peng, C.; Xie, J.; van den Broek, M.

    2017-08-01

    Single screw compressors were generally acknowledged as one of the nearly perfect machines by compressor researchers and manufacturers. However the rapid wear of the star-wheel in a single screw compressor during operation is a key reason why it hasn’t previously joined the main current compressors’ market. After more than ten years of effective work, the authors of this paper have proposed a new concept single screw compressor whose mesh-couple profile is enveloped with multi-column. Also a new design method and manufacture equipment for this kind of compressor have been developed and are described in this paper. A lot of prototype tests and a long period of industrial operations under full loading conditions have shown that the mesh-couple profiles of the new concept single compressors have excellent anti-wearness.

  20. Internally Heated Screw Pyrolysis Reactor (IHSPR) heat transfer performance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, S. H.; Gan, H. L.; Alias, A.; Gan, L. M.

    2018-04-01

    1.5 billion end-of-life tyres (ELT) were discarded globally each year and pyrolysis is considered the best solution to convert the ELT into valuable high energy-density products. Among all pyrolysis technologies, screw reactor is favourable. However, conventional screw reactor risks plugging issue due to its lacklustre heat transfer performance. An internally heated screw pyrolysis reactor (IHSPR) was developed by local renewable energy industry, which serves as the research subject for heat transfer performance study of this particular paper. Zero-load heating test (ZLHT) was first carried out to obtain the operational parameters of the reactor, followed by the one dimensional steady-state heat transfer analysis carried out using SolidWorks Flow Simulation 2016. Experiments with feed rate manipulations and pyrolysis products analyses were conducted last to conclude the study.

  1. Influence of bacterial colonization of the healing screws on peri-implant tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta D'Ercole

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: The healing screws left in situ for a period of 90 days caused a peri-implant inflammation and the presence of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in the peri-implant sulcus, due to the plaque accumulation on screw surfaces.

  2. Anatomy of Lamina in the Subaxial Cervical Spine With the Special Reference to Translaminar Screws: CT and Cadaveric Analysis With Screw Trajectory Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woojin; Le, Jason T; Shimer, Adam L; Werner, Brian C; Glaser, John A; Shen, Francis H

    2017-06-01

    A cadaveric study. Translaminar screws were initially developed for C2 fixation. Since then, their usage has expanded to include the subaxial cervical spine, and thoracic and lumbar spine. To the best of our knowledge, special anatomy for inserting translaminar screws in the subaxial cervical spine has not been studied. To report the special anatomy for inserting translaminar screws in the subaxial cervical spine. A total of 18 cadaveric spines were harvested from C3 to C7 and 1 mm computed tomography (CT) scans and 3D reconstructions were obtained. Bilateral translaminar screw entry points and trajectories were simulated at each level from C3 to C7 utilizing Kodak Carestream/Pacs Ver 10.2. Constructs were selected to achieve maximal bony purchase with 1 screw, designated the "primary screw." The contralateral screw, designated the "secondary screw," was selected to achieve the optimal allowable diameter possible while avoiding a simulated cortical breach, which was not always necessarily the "best purchase" diameter. Initial screw diameters selected were 3.5 mm; however, in the event that a narrower portion was encountered, then a 3.0 mm diameter screw was utilized instead. The crossing area of both screws were calculated geometrically. Maximal thickness of the lamina was considered in determining the diameter of screws. Whenever possible, 3.5 mm screws were selected in both lamina (3.5/3.5 mm); however, if a 3.5 mm screw was utilized as the primary screw, but the permissible range (P) for the secondary screw was <3.5 mm, then a hybrid construct was utilized (3.5/3.0 mm). In cases where P was <3 mm, then both screws were studied at 3 mm (3.0/3.0 mm). Screw diameters that optimized trajectory and bony purchase, while remaining within the permissible range, were analyzed, tabulated, and recorded. On CT, along the trajectory of the screws, the image was cut and measured in terms of screw length, the narrowest portion of the lamina, vertical angle, and horizontal

  3. Torsional stability of interference screws derived from bovine bone - a biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Jan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present biomechanical study, the torsional stability of different interference screws, made of bovine bone, was tested. Interference screws derived from bovine bone are a possible biological alternative to conventional metallic or bioabsorbable polymer interference screws. Methods In the first part of the study we compared the torsional stability of self-made 8 mm Interference screws (BC and a commercial 8 mm interference screw (Tutofix®. Furthermore, we compared the torsional strength of BC screws with different diameters. For screwing in, a hexagon head and an octagon head were tested. Maximum breaking torques in polymethyl methacrylate resin were recorded by means of an electronic torque screw driver. In the second part of the study the tibial part of a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was fixed in porcine test specimens using an 8 mm BC screw and the maximum insertion torques were recorded. Each interference screw type was tested 5 times. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the different 8 mm interference screws (p = 0.121. Pairwise comparisons did not reveal statistically significant differences, either. It was demonstrated for the BC screws, that a larger screw diameter significantly leads to higher torsional stability (p = 9.779 × 10-5. Pairwise comparisons showed a significantly lower torsional stability for the 7 mm BC screw than for the 8 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079 and the 9 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079. Statistically significant differences between the 8 mm and the 9 mm BC screw could not be found (p = 0.15. During screwing into the tibial graft channel of the porcine specimens, insertion torques between 0.5 Nm and 3.2 Nm were recorded. In one case the hexagon head of a BC screw broke off during the last turn. Conclusions The BC screws show comparable torsional stability to Tutofix® interference screws. As expected the torsional strength of the screws increases significantly with the

  4. Torsional stability of interference screws derived from bovine bone - a biomechanical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In the present biomechanical study, the torsional stability of different interference screws, made of bovine bone, was tested. Interference screws derived from bovine bone are a possible biological alternative to conventional metallic or bioabsorbable polymer interference screws. Methods In the first part of the study we compared the torsional stability of self-made 8 mm Interference screws (BC) and a commercial 8 mm interference screw (Tutofix®). Furthermore, we compared the torsional strength of BC screws with different diameters. For screwing in, a hexagon head and an octagon head were tested. Maximum breaking torques in polymethyl methacrylate resin were recorded by means of an electronic torque screw driver. In the second part of the study the tibial part of a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was fixed in porcine test specimens using an 8 mm BC screw and the maximum insertion torques were recorded. Each interference screw type was tested 5 times. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the different 8 mm interference screws (p = 0.121). Pairwise comparisons did not reveal statistically significant differences, either. It was demonstrated for the BC screws, that a larger screw diameter significantly leads to higher torsional stability (p = 9.779 × 10-5). Pairwise comparisons showed a significantly lower torsional stability for the 7 mm BC screw than for the 8 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079) and the 9 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079). Statistically significant differences between the 8 mm and the 9 mm BC screw could not be found (p = 0.15). During screwing into the tibial graft channel of the porcine specimens, insertion torques between 0.5 Nm and 3.2 Nm were recorded. In one case the hexagon head of a BC screw broke off during the last turn. Conclusions The BC screws show comparable torsional stability to Tutofix® interference screws. As expected the torsional strength of the screws increases significantly with the diameter. The safety

  5. [Anterior guidance in complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, J; Trevelo, A

    1990-01-01

    Although the anterior guidance in complete dentures is not really a guide, the arrangement of the anterior maxillary and mandibular prosthetic teeth, defines a propulsive line called the virtual anterior guidance, a part from the cinematic criterias. The influence of this guide on cuspal movement is superior, in all mandibular points, to the influence of the condylar pathway. If this line is not respected, the practitioner may have to do excessive grindings during occlusal adjustments.

  6. Multidisciplinary management of anterior diastemata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Herkrath, Fernando José; Franco, Eduardo Jacomino

    2007-01-01

    Anterior diastemata may compromise the harmony of a patient's smile. Consideration of etiologic factors, previous gingival conditioning, and individual treatment planning are essential in the proper management of anterior diastemata. An integrated orthodontic-restorative approach may enhance...... the aesthetic results when orthodontic therapy itself is not feasible. This article presents integrated orthodonticrestorative solutions of anterior diastemata, associated with the conditioning of the gingival tissue with composite resin, and discusses the most relevant aspects related to their etiology...

  7. Single-screw fixation for subtalar joint fusion does not increase nonunion rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarbo, William T; Berlet, Gregory C; Hyer, Christopher F; Smith, W Bret

    2010-08-01

    A philosophical shift toward more joint-sparing procedures has led to increased use of isolated subtalar joint (STJ) versus triple arthrodesis. Union rates for STJ fusion range from 47% to 100%, leading to controversy regarding the optimal type, orientation, and amount of internal fixation. The purpose of this study was to determine if single-screw fixation is a predisposing factor to nonunion. Single-screw fixation is parallel to the STJ axis and may result in motion. It is hypothesized that higher nonunion rates will be observed in single-screw versus 2-screw fusions. Isolated STJ arthrodeses performed in 113 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Single screws were used in 89 (78.8%) fusions; 2 screws were used in 24 (21.2%) fusions. The mean follow-up was 11 months (range, 9-17 months). Nonunion occurred in 13 (14.6%) single-screw and 6 (25.0%) 2-screw fusions. Twenty (22.5%) single-screw and 3 (12.5%) 2-screw fusions required hardware removal. Revision surgery was performed in 6 (6.7%) single-screw and 3 (12.5%) 2-screw fusions. No significant differences in demographics were calculated between single and 2-screw fusions. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in nonunion rate, postoperative complication incidence, or subsequent surgeries. The results from this study do not support the contention that single-screw fixation predisposes STJ fusions to nonunion. Comparable nonunion and complication incidences were observed between single and 2-screw fusions. These data suggest that the motion occurring from single-screw fixation may not be significant enough to directly affect the rate of union.

  8. [The biomechanics of screws, cerclage wire and cerclage cable].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, C; Woiczinski, M; Utzschneider, S; Kraxenberger, M; Weber, P; Jansson, V

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to fracture fixation, when performing an osteotomy the surgeon is able to plan preoperatively. The resulting fixation and compression of the bone fragments are the most important points. A stable osteosynthesis should prevent dislocation of bone fragments and improve bone healing. Beside plates, cerclages can be used for tension band or diaphysis bone fixation. Moreover, cortical or cancellous screws can be used for osteotomy fixation. This work describes biomechanical principles for fixation after an osteotomy with cerclages and cortical or cancellous screws. It also summarizes the materials and geometries used, as well as their influence on the stability of the osteosynthesis.

  9. Accelerated Tooth Movement with Orthodontic Mini-Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aksakalli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report outlines the possibility of accelerated tooth movement with the combination of microosteoperforation and mini-screws. A 14-year-old male patient presented Class II malocclusion with maxillary incisor protrusion. Upper first premolars were extracted, and after leveling, accelerated canine distalization started. For pre- and postdistalization times, amount of distalization, periodontal health, and root resorption were assessed. Within the limitations of this case report, micro-osteoperforations with mini-screw have a potential for shortening the treatment time.

  10. Determination of the of rate cross slip of screw dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs; Rasmussen, Torben; Leffers, Torben

    2000-01-01

    The rate for cross slip of screw dislocations during annihilation of screw dipoles in copper is determined by molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature dependence of the rate is seen to obey an Arrhenius behavior in the investigated temperature range: 225-375 K. The activation energy...... and the effective attempt frequency can therefore he extracted from the simulations. The transition state energy for the annihilation process is calculated by identifying the transition state using the nudged elastic band path technique. The two activation energies agree very well, indicating that transition state...

  11. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  12. Radiological analysis on femoral tunnel positioning between isometric and anatomical reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Barreiros Vieira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the aim of this study was to radiologically evaluate the femoral tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstructions using the isometric and anatomical techniques.METHODS: a prospective analytical study was conducted on patients undergoing ACL reconstruction by means of the isometric and anatomical techniques, using grafts from the knee flexor tendons or patellar tendon. Twenty-eight patients were recruited during the immediate postoperative period, at the knee surgery outpatient clinic of FCMMG-HUSJ. Radiographs of the operated knee were produced in anteroposterior (AP view with the patient standing on both feet and in lateral view with 30◦ of flexion. The lines were traced out and the distances and angles were measured on the lateral radiograph to evaluate the sagittal plane. The distance from the center of the screw to the posterior cortical bone of the lateral condyle was measured and divided by the Blumensaat line. In relation to the height of the screw, the distance from the center of the screw to the joint surface of the lateral condyle of the knee was measured. On the AP radiograph, evaluating the coronal plane, the angle between the anatomical axis of the femur and a line traced at the center of the screw was measured.RESULTS: with regard to the pmeasurement (posteriorization of the interference screw, the tests showed that the p-value (0.4213 was greater than the significance level used (0.05; the null hypothesis was not rejected and it could be stated that there was no statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. With regard to the H measurement (height of the screw in relation to the lower cortical bone of the knee, the p-value observed (0.0006 was less than the significance level used (0.05; the null hypothesis was rejected and it could be stated that there was a statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. It can be

  13. Interfragmentary Compression Forces Vary Based on Scaphoid Bone Screw Type and Fracture Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Samik; Tiedeken, Nathan; Qvick, Lars; Debski, Richard E; Kaufmann, Robert; Fowler, John R

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the interfragmentary compression forces generated in a foam model as a function of headless compression screw type (fully threaded and central threadless) and fracture location. Eighty-eight polyurethane foam models were fixed across a simulated transverse fracture with either a fully threaded screw or a central threadless screw. The location of the transverse fracture varied along the length of the foam model in 2 mm increments for 11 fracture locations. The force generated at the fracture site upon fixation was utilized to determine the interfragmentary compression. Interfragmentary compression was compared using a paired t test and 2-way analysis of variance, with significance set at P compression was found to vary based on fracture location and screw type. The fully threaded screw generated significantly greater compression for fracture locations at 12 mm and 18 mm from the top edge of the foam model, while the central threadless screw generated significantly greater compression for fractures located 2 mm from the top edge of the foam model. The central threadless screw and the fully threaded screw had different fracture locations where maximum compression force occurred. The fully threaded screw generated greater compression force toward the screw center due to greater thread purchase. However, the central threadless screw generated greater compression at the most proximal fracture location due to its greater thread pitch toward the screw head. Maximizing interfragmentary compression may aid in reducing nonunion rates associated with the internal fixation of proximal scaphoid fractures.

  14. The best location for proximal locking screw for femur interlocking nailing: A biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet A Karaarslan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: According to our findings, there is twice as much difference in locking screw bending resistance between these two application levels. To avoid proximal locking screw deformation, locking screws should be placed in the level of the lesser trochanter in nailing of 1/3 middle and distal femur fractures.

  15. Bioabsorbable Versus Metallic Screw Fixation for Tibiofibular Syndesmotic Ruptures: A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eng, Dorien M.; Schep, Niels W. L.; Schepers, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Ankle fractures with syndesmotic rupture require operative treatment. In most cases, this consists of fixation of the tibiofibular joint with 1 or more screws. Bioabsorbable screws are used for the same purpose but have the advantage that screw removal is unnecessary. The aim of the present study

  16. Screw size and insertion technique compared with removal rates for calcaneal displacement osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Douglas E; Simpson, G Alexander; Berlet, Gregory C; Philbin, Terrence M; Smith, J Luke

    2015-04-01

    The calcaneal displacement osteotomy is frequently used by foot and ankle surgeons to correct hindfoot angular deformity. Headed compression screws are often used for this purpose, but a common complication is postoperative plantar heel pain from prominent hardware. We evaluated hardware removal rates after calcaneal displacement osteotomies and analyzed technical factors including screw size, position, and angle. We hypothesized that larger screws placed more plantarly would have been removed more frequently. We also believed that although 2 smaller screws cost more initially, when removal rates and cost are accounted for, savings would be demonstrated with this technique. We retrospectively collected data on type of fixation, cost of fixation, and frequency of removal. After exclusions we had 30 patients in our screw removal cohort and 119 in our screws retained cohort. A basic cost analysis and statistical analysis was performed. The small screw group had a hardware removal rate of 9% (4/43) compared to 25% (26/104) of the larger screw group (P = .032). While the cost of 2 smaller screws is more than that of 1 larger screw, when the cost of removal and the rates of doing so are considered, the smaller screws resulted in substantial cost savings. Technical considerations for the medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy, including the use of multiple smaller screws, provided for a lower rate of hardware removal and likely decreased long-term costs. Level III, comparative series. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. What is the best internal fixation in pelvic fracture models with open-book injury and anterior sacroiliac joint disruption?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail H. Dilogo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The best operative management for open-book pelvic injury with anterior sacroiliac disruption (OTA/AO B1.1 classification is still debated. This biomechanical study aimed to find the best internal fixation technique for such injury. Methods: Open-book injury with anterior sacroiliac joint disruption was simulated on 25 artificial pelvic bones. Twenty five artificial pelvic bones were divided into 5 groups (n=5 /group and fixated with five different fixation techniques: 1. 1SP+1IS; 2. 2SP; 3. 2SP+2SIP; 4. 1SP+2IS S1, and 5. 1SP+1IS S1+S2. Biomechanical properties of each fixation technique were assessed using Tensilon® RTF-1310 to measure the resistance to translation and load to failure. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Bonferroni test.Results: The highest mean load to failure of axial forces (1490.36 N was achieved by the fixation technique using one symphyseal plate and two iliosacral screws located at S1 dan S2. The addition of one iliosacral screw significantly increased the mean load to failure for axial compression (p<0.05.Conclusion: The addition of sacroiliac joint posterior fixation, either with plate or screw, will increase the fixation biomechanical strength. Single symphyseal plate and two iliosacral screws on S1 and S2 provided the best mechanical resistance to axial loading. Thus, it can be concluded that such fixation technique is best for open-book pelvic injury with anterior sacroiliac disruption.

  18. Mini-implants as provisional anchorage for the replacement of missing anterior teeth: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel, Júlio A; Tavarez, Rudys R; Ursi, Weber J; Neves, Murilo G; Bramante, Fausto S; Pinzan-Vercelino, Célia R M

    2014-10-01

    This clinical report describes an adult patient referred for orthodontic treatment with mini-implants as anchorage to correct the root angulation of maxillary lateral incisors. The purpose of this report was to demonstrate the versatility of mini-implants placed in a vertical direction in esthetic areas. During orthodontic treatment, some aspects must be observed to preserve the interim restoration against the occlusal loads to avoid screw fracture. A fixed appliance was placed to correct the position of the maxillary anterior teeth and to complete the treatment. Acceptable esthetics and function were achieved. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: is optimal positioning of the bone block and screws possible? A prospective computed tomography scan analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kany, Jean; Flamand, Olivier; Grimberg, Jean; Guinand, Régis; Croutzet, Pierre; Amaravathi, Rajkumar; Sekaran, Padmanaban

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure could be performed with accurate bone block positioning and screw fixation with a similar rate of complications to the open Latarjet procedure. In this prospective study, 105 shoulders (104 patients) underwent the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure performed by the same senior surgeon. The day after surgery, an independent surgeon examiner performed a multiplanar bidimensional computed tomography scan analysis. We also evaluated our learning curve by comparing 2 chronologic periods (30 procedures performed in each period), separated by an interval during which 45 procedures were performed. Of the 105 shoulders included in the study, 95 (90.5%) (94 patients) were evaluated. The coracoid graft was accurately positioned relative to the equator of the glenoid surface in 87 of 95 shoulders (91.5%). Accurate bone-block positioning on the axial view with "circle" evaluation was obtained for 77 of 95 shoulders (81%). This procedure was performed in a lateralized position in 7 of 95 shoulders (7.3%) and in a medialized position in 11 shoulders (11.6%). The mean screw angulation with the glenoid surface was 21°. One patient had transient axillary nerve palsy. Of the initial 104 patients, 3 (2.8%) underwent revision. The analysis of our results indicated that the screw-glenoid surface angle significantly predicted the accuracy of the bone-block positioning (P = .001). Our learning curve estimates showed that, compared with our initial period, the average surgical time decreased, and the risk of lateralization showed a statistically significant decrease during the last period (P = .006). This study showed that accurate positioning of the bone block onto the anterior aspect of the glenoid is possible, safe, and reproducible with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure without additional complications compared with open surgery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc

  20. A universal pedicle screw and V-rod system for lumbar isthmic spondylolysis: a retrospective analysis of 21 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong-sheng Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the surgical outcome of a universal pedicle screw-V rod system and isthmic bone grafting for isthmic spondylolysis.Twenty-four patients with isthmic spondylolysis at L5 and grade 0-I spondylolisthesis (Meyerding classification received isthmic bone graft and stabilization using the universal pedicle screw-V rod system. Back pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS and time to bone healing, improvement in spondylolisthesis and intervertebral space height at L5/S1 and L4/L5 were assessed.Twenty-one patients were followed up for 24 months and included in the analysis. Back pain was markedly improved at 3 months postoperatively with a statistical difference in VAS scores compared with preoperative VAS scores (P<0.001. The VAS scores were 0 to 3 at 6 months postoperatively in all patients and no back pain was reported in all patients except 2 patients who complained of back pain after prolonged sitting. X-ray examination showed a bone graft healing time of 3 to 12 months. Grade I spondylolisthesis improved to grade 0 in 4 patients and no noticeable change was observed in the remaining 17 cases. The intervertebral space height at L5/S1 was statistically increased (P<0.05 while no statistically significant change was seen at L4/L5. There was no statistically significant difference in the ROM of the intervertebral disks of L5/S1 and L4/5 before and after surgery.The universal pedicle screw-V rod system and isthmic bone grafting directly repairs isthmic spondylolysis and reduces back pain, prevents anterior displacement of the diseased segment and maintains intervertebral space height, thus offering a promising alternative to current approaches for isthmic spondylolysis.

  1. Biomechanical evaluation of a second generation headless compression screw for ankle arthrodesis in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somberg, Andrew Max; Whiteside, William K; Nilssen, Erik; Murawski, Daniel; Liu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Many types of screws, plates, and strut grafts have been utilized for ankle arthrodesis. Biomechanical testing has shown that these constructs can have variable stiffness. More recently, headless compression screws have emerged as an evolving method of achieving compression in various applications but there is limited literature regarding ankle arthrodesis. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical stability provided by a second generation fully threaded headless compression screw compared to a standard headed, partially threaded cancellous screw in a cadaveric ankle arthrodesis model. Twenty fresh frozen human cadaver specimens were subjected to simulated ankle arthrodesis with either three standard cancellous-bone screws (InFix 7.3mm) or with three headless compression screws (Acumed Acutrak 2 7.5mm). The specimens were subjected to cyclic loading and unloading at a rate of 1Hz, compression of 525 Newtons (N) and distraction of 20N for a total of 500 cycles using an electromechanical load frame (Instron). The amount of maximum distraction was recorded as well as the amount of motion that occurred through 1, 10, 50, 100, and 500 cycles. No significant difference (p=0.412) was seen in the amount of distraction that occurred across the fusion site for either screw. The average maximum distraction after 500 cycles was 201.9μm for the Acutrak 2 screw and 235.4μm for the InFix screw. No difference was seen throughout each cycle over time for the Acutrak 2 screw (p-value=0.988) or the InFix screw (p-value=0.991). Both the traditional InFix type screw and the second generation Acumed Acutrak headless compression screws provide adequate fixation during ankle arthrodesis under submaximal loads. There is no demonstrable difference between traditional cannulated partially threaded screws and headless compression screws studied in this model. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Resorbable screws for fixation of autologous bone grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, GM; Liem, RSB; Bos, RRM; van der Wal, JE; Vissink, A

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of resorbable screws made of poly (D,L-lactide) acid (PDLLA) for fixation of autologous bone grafts related to graft regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants. In eight edentulous patients suffering from insufficient retention of their

  3. Modeling The Effect Of Extruder Screw Speed On The Mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanical properties of HDPE blown films produced at extruder screw speed between 15 and 40 rpm were measured experimentally. The results were modeled using LINEST function in Microsoft Excel. Two sets of multiple linear regression models were developed to predict impact failure weight and tenacity respectively.

  4. Performance evaluation of Magnus screw press (Model MS-100) for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One-factor-at-a-time (OFAT), completely randomized designed (CRD) experimental approach with 4 factor levels and 2 replications was used to determine the effect of kernel moisture contents (KMC), kernel heating temperatures (KHTs), and kernel heating durations (KHDs) on the (OEE) of the screw press. Analysis of ...

  5. Technical Note: Comparative Effects of Screw Press for Honey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design related engineering properties of honeycomb should also be determined. Finally, containers and processing equipments such as stainless steel and other related food grade plastics compatible with acidic food should used for the construction. Keywords: honey extraction, screw press, beekeeping, combs, ...

  6. Scaphoid dimensions and appropriate screw sizes in a Kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While most injuries are amenable to non operative management, internal fixation is gaining traction due to predictable results and early return to physical activities. As scaphoid dimensions vary across populations, determining our population specific dimensions will aid in identifying appropriate screw systems. Objective: ...

  7. Kinematics and Dynamic Evaluation of the Screw Conveyor of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis of the vortex motion in a horizontal screw conveyor of a Cassava Centrifuge Dewatering Machine is presented. It is shown that the vortex motion is characterised by the tangential component of the absolute grain velocity being constant with the radial position of a point on the blade. On this basis, an expression ...

  8. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: It was concluded that the use of double 4-hole straight plates provided the sufficient stability on the osteotomy site when compared with the other rigid fixation methods used in this study. Key words: Bone plates, bone screws, finite element analysis, jaw fixation techniques, mandible, mandibular osteotomy ...

  9. Granulation of increasingly hydrophobic formulations using a twin screw granulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shen; Reynolds, Gavin K; Huang, Zhenyu; de Matas, Marcel; Salman, Agba D

    2014-11-20

    The application of twin screw granulation in the pharmaceutical industry has generated increasing interest due to its suitability for continuous processing. However, an understanding of the impact of formulation properties such as hydrophobicity on intermediate and finished product quality has not yet been established. Hence, the current work investigated the granulation behaviour of three formulations containing increasing amounts of hydrophobic components using a Consigma™-1 twin screw granulator. Process conditions including powder feed rate, liquid to solid ratio, granulation liquid composition and screw configuration were also evaluated. The size of the wet granules was measured in order to enable exploration of granulation behaviour in isolation without confounding effects from downstream processes such as drying. The experimental observations indicated that the granulation process was not sensitive to the powder feed rate. The hydrophobicity led to heterogeneous liquid distribution and hence a relatively large proportion of un-wetted particles. Increasing numbers of kneading elements led to high shear and prolonged residence time, which acted to enhance the distribution of liquid and feeding materials. The bimodal size distributions considered to be characteristic of twin screw granulation were primarily ascribed to the breakage of relatively large granules by the kneading elements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Irradiation to control the screw-worm fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.

    1988-01-01

    The screw-worm fly, widespread in tropical areas, could pose a threat to Australia's livestock industry. The CSIRO is testing methods for its eradication which involve a radiation dose of 4 kilorads (0.04 kilogray) to render both male and female files permanently sterile

  11. Ankle fusion using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, R. P. M.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Stufkens, S. A. S.; van Dijk, C. N.; Marti, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable fusion and optimal correction of the alignment of the ankle joint using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique. Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint after insufficient other treatment, severe deformity of the osteoarthritic ankle joint, or salvation procedure after failed arthroplasty.

  12. Use of locking plate and screws for triple pelvic osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Scott A; Bruecker, Ken A; Petersen, Steve W; Uddin, Nizam

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and complication rate associated with use of a purpose-specific locking triple pelvic osteotomy (LTPO) plate. Prospective study. Dogs (n = 9; 15 hips). Physical examination, plain film radiography, computed tomography (CT) of the pelvis, and coxofemoral arthroscopy were performed before unilateral triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO) or staged bilateral TPO. Radiographs were taken after each procedure and 3-5, 6-8, and ≥12 weeks postoperatively. Pelvic width was measured at 3 locations to evaluate pelvic canal narrowing. No screw loosening occurred. Complications occurred in only 1 hip (7%) where pullout of the locking plate-screw construct from the caudal iliac segment occurred because of a fracture of the cis-cortex; the dog made a full recovery after a salvage procedure. There was no significant reduction in the cranial pelvic width but a small reduction at the level of the acetabuli and ischiatic tuberosities was noted 3-5 weeks after the 2nd TPO. The LTPO plate was associated with a lower complication rate than previously reported for TPOs using Slocum canine pelvic osteotomy plates (CPOP) and warrants further investigation. Pullout of the caudal plate-screw construct is a complication specific to LTPO implants. Bicortical screw purchase is recommended to prevent fracture of the cis-cortex and implant pullout. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Influence of the screw augmentation technique and a diameter increase on pedicle screw fixation in the osteoporotic spine: pullout versus fatigue testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueny, Rebecca A; Kolb, Jan P; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Püschel, Klaus; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2014-10-01

    For posterior spinal stabilization, loosening of pedicle screws at the bone-screw interface is a clinical complication, especially in the osteoporotic population. Axial pullout testing is the standard pre-clinical testing method for new screw designs although it has questioned clinical relevance. The aim of this study was to determine the fixation strength of three current osteoporotic fixation techniques and to investigate whether or not pullout testing results can directly relate to those of the more physiologic fatigue testing. Thirty-nine osteoporotic, human lumbar vertebrae were instrumented with pedicle screws according to four treatment groups: (1) screw only (control), (2) prefilled augmentation, (3) screw injected augmentation, and (4) unaugmented screws with an increased diameter. Toggle testing was first performed on one pedicle, using a cranial-caudal sinusoidal, cyclic (1.0 Hz) fatigue loading applied at the screw head. The initial compressive forces ranged from 25 to 75 N. Peak force increased stepwise by 25 N every 250 cycles until a 5.4-mm screw head displacement. The contralateral screw then underwent pure axial pullout (5 mm/min). When compared to the control group, screw injected augmentation increased fatigue force (27 %, p = 0.045) while prefilled augmentation reduced fatigue force (-7 %, p = 0.73). Both augmentation techniques increased pullout force compared to the control (ps osteoporotic spine, screw injected augmentation showed the best biomechanical stability. Although pullout testing was more sensitive, the differences observed were not reflected in the more physiological fatigue testing, thus casting further doubt on the clinical relevance of pullout testing.

  14. Plates, Screws, or Combination? Radiologic Outcomes After Lisfranc Fracture Dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Simon; Howells, Nicholas; Millar, Michael; De Villiers, Daniel; Joseph, Samuel; Oppy, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, Lisfranc fracture dislocations have been treated with transarticular screw fixation. A more recent development has been the use of dorsal bridging plates. The aim of the present study was to compare the radiologic outcomes for these 2 methods. Currently, no data comparing the outcomes of these 2 treatment options have been reported. A total of 62 patients were treated for Lisfranc fracture dislocations during a 6-year period. The inclusion criteria included ≥6 months of follow-up data available. Each fracture was classified using the Hardcastle classification system. Each fracture was also allocated into 1 of 4 groups: transarticular screw fixation, dorsal plating, a combination of plate and screw fixation, and nonoperative management. The outcome measures included the Kellgren-Lawrence grading of osteoarthritis and the Wilppula classification of anatomic reduction. In terms of results, radiologic osteoarthritis is not associated with the type of injury according to the Hardcastle classification nor with having an open or closed fracture. The Hardcastle classification is not associated with the type of fixation used. Fractures fixed with a combination of plates and screws had a 3.01 (95% confidence interval 1.036 to 8.74) increased risk of having stage 3 or 4 radiologic osteoarthritis compared with being fixed solely with bridging plates (p = .009). Multivariate analysis revealed that this increased risk of osteoarthritis was dependent on the quality of reduction, with good reductions having a 18.2 (95% confidence interval 15.9 to 21.8) times decreased risk of severe osteoarthritis compared with fair or poor reductions, independent of the type of fixation used (p screw fixation for Lisfranc fracture dislocations (although screw fixation might be associated with a less planus foot and fewer complications). Instead, a good anatomic reduction was the only predictor of the radiologic outcome, and the Hardcastle classification of fractures did not

  15. Covering the screw-access holes of implant restorations in the esthetic zone: a clinical report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Saboury

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Screw-retained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention as well as retrievability, and obviate the risk of excessive sub-gingival cement commonly associated with cement retained implant restorations. Screw-retained restorations generally have screw access holes, which can compromise esthetics and weaken the porcelain around the holes. The purpose of this study is to describe the use of a separate overcasting crown design to cover the screw access hole of implant screw-retained prosthesis for improved esthetics.

  16. Effects of lag screw design and lubrication on sliding in trochanteric nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the sliding characteristics of three lag screw designs used with trochanteric nails and determined the effects of lubrication on sliding. They were tested by an established method to measure initiation and ease of lag screw sliding. These tests were then repeated with calf serum lubrication. There were significant differences (p Lubrication did not affect either parameter. Lag screw design aspects, such as diameter and, particularly, surface finish, affect sliding. Due to the small contact area between the lag screw and nail creating high interface stresses, lubrication had no effect on lag screw sliding.

  17. Use of computational fluid dynamics simulations for design of a pretreatment screw conveyor reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, R Eric; Hanley, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations were employed to compare performance of various designs of a pretreatment screw conveyor reactor. The reactor consisted of a vertical screw used to create cross flow between the upward conveying solids and the downward flow of acid. Simulations were performed with the original screw design and a modified design in which the upper flights of the screw were removed. Results of the simulations show visually that the modified design provided favorable plug flow behavior within the reactor. Pressure drop across the length of the reactor without the upper screws in place was predicted by the simulations to be 5 vs 40 kPa for the original design.

  18. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  19. A Biomechanical Study Comparing Helical Blade with Screw Design for Sliding Hip Fixations of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic hip screw (DHS is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC, superior-centre (SC, inferior-center (IC, centre-anterior (CA, and centre-posterior (CP. All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups.

  20. Inestabilidad Anterior de Hombro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo David Flint Kuran

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ción La luxación recidivante de hombro es una patología frecuente en pacientes jóvenes, laboralmente activos. Existen numerosas técnicas quirúrgicas para la inestabilidad glenohumeral. La técnica de Bristow, discutida por no ser anatómica y por sus complicaciones, continúa vigente debido al bajo índice de reluxaciones. Los objetivos fueron determinar el índice de recidiva, alteraciones funcionales e índice de consolidación del injerto. Materiales­ y­ Métodos Se evaluaron 24 pacientes del sexo masculino, de entre 19 y 40 años, operados por luxación anterior recidivante de hombro según la técnica de Bristow, entre enero de 2003 y agosto de 2011. Se evaluó la tasa de reluxación, la función articular según el puntaje de Constant y el posicionamiento del injerto con respecto a la superficie articular con tomografía y radiografías para evaluar la consolidación del injerto. Se registraron las complicaciones quirúrgicas. Resultados ­Todos los pacientes eran hombres, con rango de edad de 19 a 40 años. La causa fue traumática en 24 pacientes. Dieciséis pacientes presentaron más de 3 episodios de luxación prequirúrgicos. Según la escala de Constant, 21 obtuvieron entre 96 y 100 puntos, y los restantes, entre 90 y 95 puntos. No hubo nuevos episodios de luxaciones. La tomografía mostró la consolidación en todos los casos. Un paciente tuvo una imagen osteolítica alrededor del tornillo, sin compromiso funcional del hombro. Conclusión La técnica de Bristow para tratar la luxación anterior recidivante de hombro provocó un bajo índice de complicaciones, con resultados funcionales entre excelentes y buenos. No hubo episodios de reluxación y se logró la consolidación del injerto óseo en todos los casos.

  1. Minimally invasive treatment of clavicular fractures with cannulated screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-zhan; Zheng, Guo-hai; Zhao, Ke-yi

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate minimally invasive treatment of clavicular fractures with cannulated screw. Data of 65 patients who had undergone minimally invasive treatment with cannulated screws for clavicular fractures from April 2009 to October 2010 were retrospectively analyzed and compared with those of 65 patients with clavicular fractures who had been treated by the same surgeons with plates. In the study group, there were 41 males and 24 females, aged from 19-67 years (mean, 35.8 years). According to Craig's classification, there were 29 group 1 and 36 of group 2-II. Neer scores were used to evaluate shoulder function and radiographs to assess fracture union. The incision length was 4-5 cm in the cannulated screw group (CSG) and 10-11 cm in the reconstructive plate group (RPG). Radiographs showed bone union was achieved in both groups, the bone healing time being 13.2 ± 6.9 weeks in the CSG and 16.3 ± 8.7 weeks in the RPG. All patients were followed up for 6 to 20 months (average, 10.6 months). The average Neer score was 96.6 ± 3.4 in the CSG and 94.2 ± 5.8 in the RPG. In the CSG, screw loosening occurred in five, and fracture displacement in three. There was a significant difference in fracture healing time between two groups but not in Neer score. Minimally invasive treatment of clavicular fractures with cannulated screws has the advantages of minimal invasion, short bone healing time, good clinical outcomes, and being relatively inexpensive. © 2014 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Dorsal bridge plating or transarticular screws for Lisfranc fracture dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirzner, N; Zotov, P; Goldbloom, D; Curry, H; Bedi, H

    2018-04-01

    Aims The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional and radiological outcomes of bridge plating, screw fixation, and a combination of both methods for the treatment of Lisfranc fracture dislocations. Patients and Methods A total of 108 patients were treated for a Lisfranc fracture dislocation over a period of nine years. Of these, 38 underwent transarticular screw fixation, 45 dorsal bridge plating, and 25 a combination technique. Injuries were assessed preoperatively according to the Myerson classification system. The outcome measures included the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, the validated Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) functional tool, and the radiological Wilppula classification of anatomical reduction. Results Significantly better functional outcomes were seen in the bridge plate group. These patients had a mean AOFAS score of 82.5 points, compared with 71.0 for the screw group and 63.3 for the combination group (p Foot Questionnaire score was 25.6 points in the bridge plate group, 38.1 in the screw group, and 45.5 in the combination group (p plate fixation is associated with a better anatomical reduction (p = 0.06). Myerson types A and C2 significantly predicted a poorer functional outcome, suggesting that total incongruity in either a homolateral or divergent pattern leads to worse outcomes. The greater the number of columns fixed the worse the outcome (p plating have better functional and radiological outcomes than those treated with transarticular screws or a combination technique. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:468-74.

  3. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Aloisio Fleck NEUMANN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1, polyetheretherketone (PEEK screws (Group 2, and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3. The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05. Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  4. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Eduardo Aloisio Fleck; Villar, Cristina Cunha; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) screws (Group 2), and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3). The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load) was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p 0.05). Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  5. A rationale method for evaluating unscrewing torque values of prosthetic screws in dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Miguel Saliba

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Previous studies that evaluated the torque needed for removing dental implant screws have not considered the manner of transfer of the occlusal loads in clinical settings. Instead, the torque used for removal was applied directly to the screw, and most of them omitted the possibility that the hexagon could limit the action of the occlusal load in the loosening of the screws. The present study proposes a method for evaluating the screw removal torque in an anti-rotational device independent way, creating an unscrewing load transfer to the entire assembly, not only to the screw. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty hexagonal abutments without the hexagon in their bases were fixed with a screw to 20 dental implants. They were divided into two groups: Group 1 used titanium screws and Group 2 used titanium screws covered with a solid lubricant. A torque of 32 Ncm was applied to the screw and then a custom-made wrench was used for rotating the abutment counterclockwise, to loosen the screw. A digital torque meter recorded the torque required to loosen the abutment. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the means of Group 1 (38.62±6.43 Ncm and Group 2 (48.47±5.04 Ncm, with p=0.001. CONCLUSION: This methodology was effective in comparing unscrewing torque values of the implant-abutment junction even with a limited sample size. It confirmed a previously shown significant difference between two types of screws.

  6. [Finite element analysis of the initial stability of subtalar arthrodesis with double-screw fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhuang; Yu, Bin; Li, Xue; Xu, Changpeng; Song, Jinqi; Ouyang, Hanbin; Diao, Xicai; Chen, Liguang

    2012-11-01

    To assess the optimal configuration of double-screw fixation for subtalar arthrodesis using finite element analysis. Three-dimensional finite element double-screw models of subtalar arthrodesis were reconstructed using Mimics 13.0, Geomagic 10.0 and solid works software based on the 3-D images of the volunteer's right foot. The external and internal rotation torques of 4 N·m were applied, and the micromotion at the bone-to-bone interface were measured to evaluate the initial stability of subtalar arthrodesis. A neck screw plus an anterolateral dome screw was the most stable model. The peak micromotion at the fusion site of this fixation configuration were 41.67mnplus;0.49 and 42.64mnplus;0.75 µm in response to the respectively. A neck screw plus a posteromedial dome screw was the least stable model, with peak micromotion at the bone-to-bone interface of 61.76mnplus;1.00 and 62.32mnplus;0.90 µm, respectively. A neck screw plus an anterolateral dome screw is the best fixation configuration while a neck screw plus a posteromedial screw provides the least stability of subtalar arthrodesis. Three-dimensional finite element models allow effective preoperative planning of the screw number and placement.

  7. Bioabsorbable Versus Metallic Screw Fixation for Tibiofibular Syndesmotic Ruptures: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Eng, Dorien M; Schep, Niels W L; Schepers, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Ankle fractures with syndesmotic rupture require operative treatment. In most cases, this consists of fixation of the tibiofibular joint with 1 or more screws. Bioabsorbable screws are used for the same purpose but have the advantage that screw removal is unnecessary. The aim of the present study was to compare the results of bioabsorbable and metallic syndesmotic screws. A systematic search was performed in the Ovid MEDLINE electronic database and Google Scholar. Three randomized controlled trials and one comparison study, with 260 patients, were included. The experimental group consisted of patients with syndesmotic injuries treated with bioabsorbable screws versus the control group (patients treated with metallic screws). The primary outcomes were complications and wound infections. No statistically significant difference was demonstrable in the overall number of complications between the 2 groups. In the group of patients with a bioabsorbable screw, 32 of 137 (23.4%) experienced a complication versus 7 of 123 patients (5.7%) with a metallic screw. Data on wound-related complications showed no statistically significant difference, 19.7% versus 5.7%. The average maximum range of motion in both groups was comparable. Bioabsorbable syndesmotic screws and metallic syndesmotic screws were comparable with respect to the incidence of complications and range of motion. However, the absolute number of complications was greater with bioabsorbable screws. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioresorbable screws reinforced with phosphate glass fibre: manufacturing and mechanical property characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfel, R M; Ahmed, I; Parsons, A J; Rudd, C D

    2013-01-01

    Use of bioresorbable screws could eliminate disadvantages associated with metals such as removal operations, corrosion, MRI interference and stress shielding. Mechanical properties of bioresorbable polymers alone are insufficient for load bearing applications application as screws. Thus, reinforcement is necessary to try and match or surpass the mechanical properties of cortical bone. Phosphate based glass fibres were used to reinforce polylactic acid (PLA) in order to produce unidirectionally aligned (UD) and unidirectionally plus randomly distributed (UD/RM) composite screws (P40 UD and P40 UD/RM). The maximum flexural and push-out properties for the composite screws (P40 UD and P40 UD/RM) increased by almost 100% in comparison with the PLA screws. While the pull-out strength and stiffness of the headless composite screws were ∼80% (strength) and ∼130% (stiffness) higher than for PLA, those with heads exhibited properties lower than those for PLA alone as a result of failure at the heads. An increase in the maximum shear load and stiffness for the composite screws (∼30% and ∼40%) in comparison to the PLA screws was also seen. Maximum torque for the PLA screws was ∼1000 mN m, while that for the composite screws were slightly lower. The SEM micrographs for P40 UD and P40 UD/RM screws revealed small gaps around the fibres, which were suggested to be due to buckling of the UD fibres during the manufacturing process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anterior ankle arthrodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gordon L; Sayres, Stephanie C; O’Malley, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common procedure that resolves many conditions of the foot and ankle; however, complications following this procedure are often reported and vary depending on the fixation technique. Various techniques have been described in the attempt to achieve ankle arthrodesis and there is much debate as to the efficiency of each one. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of anterior plating in ankle arthrodesis using customised and Synthes TomoFix plates. We present the outcomes of 28 ankle arthrodeses between 2005 and 2012, specifically examining rate of union, patient-reported outcomes scores, and complications. All 28 patients achieved radiographic union at an average of 36 wk; the majority of patients (92.86%) at or before 16 wk, the exceptions being two patients with Charcot joints who were noted to have bony union at a three year review. Patient-reported outcomes scores significantly increased (P plate offers added compression and provides a rigid fixation for arthrodesis stabilization. PMID:24649408

  10. Screw-worm eradication in the Americas - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyss, John H.

    2000-01-01

    Screw-worms (Cochliomyia hominivorax, Coquerel) are found only in the Americas, and are known, therefore, as the New World Screw-worm (NWS). The larval stages of the fly feed on the living flesh of their host. A screw-worm infestation can kill an adult animal in 7-10 days if not treated. All warm-blooded animals are affected including man. Although screw-worms had long been recognised as a severe pest of animals in the southwestern United States, they had never been detected east of the Mississippi River before 1933. In July 1933, screw-worms were transported on infested cattle to Georgia and became established east of the Mississippi River. Screw-worms spread quickly in the southeastern United States and were able to overwinter in southern Florida. Being new to the region, they were quickly recognised as a severe pest with a tremendous economic impact on livestock production. The livestock owners in the southeastern United States immediately noticed an increase in the number of animal deaths and increased costs of insecticides, veterinary medicines, veterinary services, inspection and handling. At the same time, they observed a decrease in animal weights and in milk production. Due to these observations, the livestock industry in the southeastern United States requested help in controlling screw-worms. Because of these requests, the research community became interested in control and eradication measures for this pest. Early work by Crushing and Patton in 1933 recognised that C. hominivorax was an obligatory animal parasite and different from the secondary blowfly, Cochliomyia macellaria. In 1934, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS) opened a research station in Valdosa, Georgia, and E.W. Laake and E.F. Knipling were assigned to work there. In September 1935, R.C. Bushland was hired by ARS to do research related to screw-worms at an ARS Research Laboratory in Dallas, Texas. Melvin and Bushland in 1936 developed artificial

  11. Process and remote device for unscrewing and extracting an assembly screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagarrigue, F.

    1990-01-01

    The device comprises a C-shaped frame, with two parallel arms and a joining section fixed at one end of a long support, an extraction screw engaged in a hole through one arm and having one end made of a centre punch directed towards the inside of the frame and a remote mean for screwed or unscrewed the extraction screw. A supporting and centering piece can also be fixed to the second branch of the frame. The screw is extracted by exerting a moment about the axis of the screw through the support and frame after tightening the extraction screw. This device can be used particularly for the unscrewing and the extraction of the screw of the springs of a nuclear fuel assembly [fr

  12. The biomechanical effect of pedicle screw hubbing on pullout resistance in the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Haines; Dmitriev, Anton E; Lehman, Ronald A; Gaume, Rachel E; Ambati, Divya V; Kang, Daniel G; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2012-05-01

    The biomechanical fixation strength afforded by pedicle screws has been strongly correlated with bone mineral density. It has been postulated that "hubbing" the head of the pedicle screw against the dorsal laminar cortex provides a load-sharing effect, thereby limiting cephalocaudad toggling and improving the pullout resistance of the pedicle screw. To evaluate the pullout strength (POS) of monoaxial hubbed pedicle screws versus standard fixation in the thoracic spine. Biomechanical investigation. Twenty-two human cadaveric thoracic vertebrae were acquired and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanned. Osteoporotic (n = 16) and normal (n = 6) specimens were instrumented with a 5.0 × 35-mm pedicle screw on one side in a standard fashion. In the contralateral pedicle, 5.0 × 30-mm screw was inserted with hubbing of the screw into the dorsal lamina. A difference in screw length was used to achieve equivalent depth of insertion. After 2,000 cycles of cephalocaudad toggling, screws were pulled out with the tensile force oriented to the midline of the spine and peak POS measured in newtons (N). Four additional specimens were subjected to microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis to evaluate internal pedicle architecture after screw insertion. Hubbed screws resulted in significantly lower POS (290.5 ± 142.4 N) compared with standard pedicle screws (511.5 ± 242.8 N; p = .00). This finding was evident in both normal and osteoporotic vertebrae based on independent subgroup post hoc analyses (pscrews with and without fracture; however, further micro-CT analysis revealed the presence of internal fracture propagation for those specimens that did not have any external signs of failure. Hubbing pedicle screws results in significantly decreased POS compared with conventional pedicle screws. Hubbing predisposes toward iatrogenic fracture of the dorsal lamina, transverse process, or SAF during insertion. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Biomechanical Evaluation of Plate Versus Lag Screw Only Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaghi, Amirhossein; Doan, Josh; Bastrom, Tracey; Pennock, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional fixation of unstable Orthopaedic Trauma Association type B/C ankle fractures consists of a lag screw and a lateral or posterolateral neutralization plate. Several studies have demonstrated the clinical success of lag screw only fixation; however, to date no biomechanical comparison of the different constructs has been performed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biomechanical strength of these different constructs. Osteotomies were created in 40 Sawbones(®) distal fibulas and reduced using 1 bicortical 3.5-mm stainless steel lag screw, 2 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, 3 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, or a single 3.5-mm lag screw coupled with a stainless steel neutralization plate with 3 proximal cortical and 3 distal cancellous screws. The constructs were tested to determine the stiffness in lateral bending and rotation and failure torque. No significant differences in lateral bending or rotational stiffness were detected between the osteotomies fixed with 3 lag screws and a plate. Constructs fixed with 1 lag screw were weaker for both lateral bending and rotational stiffness. Osteotomies fixed with 2 lag screws were weaker in lateral bending only. No significant differences were found in the failure torque. Compared with lag screw only fixation, plate fixation requires larger incisions and increased costs and is more likely to require follow-up surgery. Despite the published clinical success of treating simple Orthopaedic Trauma Association B/C fractures with lag screw only fixation, many surgeons still have concerns about stability. For noncomminuted, long oblique distal fibula fractures, lag screw only fixation techniques offer construct stiffness similar to that of traditional plate and lag screw fixation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interfragmentary compression profile of 4 headless bone screws: an analysis of the compression lost on reinsertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, A W; Yew, Y T; Neo, P Y; Lau, C C; Tay, S C

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the interfragmentary compression force generated by 4 different types of headless compression screws and to examine the effects of removal and reinsertion of the screw. We chose foot bones rather than scaphoids for the model because they were larger and would enable comparison of 2 screw designs in the same bone, thereby controlling for the effect of interspecimen variability. A transverse osteotomy was made in 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric navicular bones and 10 medial cuneiforms. A load cell was used to measure compression between the 2 fragments as a screw was inserted across the fracture. Each bone was tested twice, with an Acutrak Mini (Acumed, Hillsboro, OR; n = 10) and an SBi AutoFIX screw (SBi, Morrisville, PA; n = 10) or an Extremifix (Osteomed, Addison, TX; n = 10) and a Barouk screw (Depuy, Warsaw, IN; n = 10). Compression was recorded at initial insertion and on removal and reinsertion of the screw twice to the same position. Compression was also measured after one additional full turn further than the initial position. The mean interfragmentary compression generated by the Acutrak Mini screw was greater than that of the SBi AutoFIX screw (96 N vs 22 N). There was a trend toward a greater mean compression generated by the Extremifix screw compared to the Barouk screw (85 N vs 22 N). There was a significant loss of compression upon removal and reinsertion of the screws. An additional full turn of the screw was able to re-establish a large proportion of the original compression. The compression forces achieved by headless screw systems appeared to vary according to the screw design, depth of insertion, and the quality of the bone. Substantial compression was lost if the screw was removed and replaced. Some screw designs appeared to require a greater depth of insertion to achieve effective compression, and the number of additional turns required to re-establish compression might vary according to the thread design. Surgeons should be aware of the

  15. [Three-dimensional finite element investigation of lateral mass screw fixation and transarticular screw fixation in lower cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yang; Jin, Anmin; Zhang, Hui; Min, Shaoxiong; Hu, Konghe

    2010-12-01

    To establish sophisticated three-dimensional finite element model of the lower cervical spine and reconstruct lower cervical model by different fixation systems after three-column injury, and to research the stress distribution of the internal fixation reconstructed by different techniques. The CT scan deta were obtained from a 27-year-old normal male volunteer. Mimics 10.01, Geomagic Studio10.0, HyperMesh10.0, and Abaqus 6.9.1 softwares were used to obtain the intact model (C3-7), the model after three-column injury, and the models of reconstructing the lower cervical spine after three-column injury through different fixation systems, namely lateral mass screw fixation (LSF) and transarticular screw fixation (TSF). The skull load of 75 N and torsion preload of 1.0 N*m were simulated on the surface of C3. Under conditions of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and rotation, the Von Mises stress distribution regularity of internal fixation system was evaluated. The intact model of C3-7 was successfully established, which consisted of 177 944 elements and 35 668 nodes. The results of the biomechanic study agreed well with the available cadaveric experimental data, suggesting that they were accord with normal human body parameters and could be used in the experimental research. The finite element models of the lower cervical spine reconstruction after three-column injury were established. The stress concentrated on the connection between rod and screw in LSF and on the middle part of screw in TSF. The peak values of Von Mises stress in TSF were higher than those in LSF under all conditions. For the reconstruction of lower cervical spine, TSF has higher risk of screw breakage than LSF.

  16. Anterior segment indocyanine green angiography in anterior scleritis and episcleritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guex-Crosier, Yan; Durig, Jacques

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the pattern of anterior segment indocyanine green (ICG) angiography in episcleritis and scleritis. Prospective comparative (paired-eye) observational case series. Twenty subjects presenting clinical diseases compatible with episcleritis or scleritis. Anterior segment ICG angiography was performed according to a standard protocol in subjects presenting either episcleritis or scleritis. Photographs of the anterior segment were taken in the early phase (up to 3 minutes after dye injection), intermediate phase (10-12 minutes) and late phase (30-45 minutes). The inflamed zones were compared with the same regions of the controlateral eye. The amount of protein ICG exudation was scored by a masked observer as follows: zero for no exudation, one for slight exudation, two for moderate exudation, and three for severe exudation. Evaluation of dye leakage, which reflects protein exudation, with anterior segment ICG angiography in episcleritis and scleritis. Twenty subjects with a mean age of 43 +/- 15 years (7 male, 13 female) were enrolled in the study. Thirteen subjects had anterior scleritis (7 nodular, 5 diffuse, and 1 scleromalacia perforans), and 7 subjects had episcleritis. Only 1 out of 7 subjects with episcleritis showed a slight ICG leakage (a score of one), whereas all subjects with scleritis had ICG leakage scores of one or more (P = 0.0005, Fisher exact test). ICG angiography of the anterior segment of the eye is a good clinical test to differentiate episcleritis from scleritis.

  17. Pedicle screw design and cement augmentation in osteoporotic vertebrae: effects of fenestrations and cement viscosity on fixation and extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Theodore J; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Swope, Ryan W; Hirner, Jesse P

    2012-12-15

    Experimental, human cadaveric study. To assess the fixation effects of injecting cement augmentation before screw insertion or after insertion of fenestrated screws; the effect of modulating cement viscosity; and the effects of these techniques on screw removal. It seems clear that cement augmentation can enhance pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic bone. What remains to be demonstrated is the aspects of optimal technique such that fixation is enhanced with the greatest safety profile. Part I: Human osteoporotic vertebrae were instrumented with solid (nonaugmented) screws, solid screws with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), partially cannulated fenestrated (Pfen) screws, or fully cannulated fenestrated (Ffen) screws through which PMMA was injected. Screw fixation was tested in pullout. Part II: Ffen screws were augmented with standard low-viscosity PMMA versus high-viscosity PMMA. Part III: Sample cohorts were extracted from vertebrae to assess required torque and characterize difficulty of extraction. Part I: Pfen screws demonstrated the greatest fixation with mean failure force of 690 ± 182 N. All methods of cement augmentation demonstrated significant increases in screw fixation. Part II: Ffen screws did not demonstrate a significant difference in pullout strength when high-viscosity PMMA was used as compared with low-viscosity PMMA. Part III: Mean extraction torque values for solid augmented screws, Ffen screws, and Pfen screws were 1.167, 1.764, and 1.794 Nm, respectively, but these differences did not reach significance. None of the osteoporotic vertebrae sustained catastrophic failure during augmented screw extraction. Polymethylmethacrylate cement augmentation clearly enhances pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic vertebrae when tested in pure pullout. The technique used for cement injection and choice of specialty screws can have a significant impact on the magnitude of this effect. Fenestrated screws have the capacity to confine cement placement in the

  18. Numerical Investigation on the Biomechanical Performance of Laparoscopic-Assisted Plate Used for Fixing Pelvic Anterior Ring Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqian He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the minimal soft tissue injury, the laparoscopic-assisted internal fixation is a promising technique in fixing the pelvic anterior ring fracture. The aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanical performance of the laparoscopic-assisted plate by the finite element method. Four kinds of implants were investigated, that is, the laparoscopic-assisted plate (LAP, the percutaneous anterior pelvic bridge (PAPB, the transramus intraosseous screw (TIS, and the open reduction (OR. The stability of the implants was investigated under three loading cases, showing that when the LAP was used, the stress at the fracture site was smaller than that at other parts, while for other implants, the high stress was always around the fracture site. In conclusion, the LAP demonstrated a good biomechanical performance in fixing the pelvic anterior ring fracture and is a promising technique in clinical applications.

  19. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  20. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurlo, J.V.; Towers, J.D.; Golla, S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  1. Cyclic long-term loading of a bilateral fixed-angle plate in comparison with tension band wiring with K-wires or cannulated screws in transverse patella fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Simon; Schneppendahl, Johannes; Baumgärtner, Ralf; Eichler, Christian; Koebke, Jürgen; Betsch, Marcel; Hakimi, Mohssen; Windolf, Joachim; Wild, Michael

    2013-02-01

    A bilateral fixed-angle plate was biomechanically compared to the two currently preferred methods of osteosynthesis for transverse patella fractures. It was hypothesized that the new angle-stable implant would provide a secure and sustainable fracture fixation, superior to the established standard techniques. Twenty-one identical patellae made of polyurethane foam (Sawbones(®)), osteotomized to create a transverse two-part fracture, were fixed with modified anterior tension wiring, cannulated lag screws with anterior tension wiring or bilateral polyaxial 2.7-mm fixed-angle plates. The testing protocol consisted of 10,000 repetitive cycles using a non-destructive physiological load between 100 and 300 N at a simulated knee flexion of 60°. All 21 Sawbone(®)-patellae sustained repetitive loading up to 10,000 cycles without failing. The anterior tension wire group displayed significant displacement of the fracture gap (0.7 ± 0.2 mm) during cyclic loading, while both lag screws with tension wiring and bilateral fixed-angle plates showed no fracture gap widening at all (p wiring preserved a constantly reduced fracture gap over 10,000 tensile cycles in contrast to modified anterior tension wiring, which exhibited significant widening of the gap after initial loading. Results of in vitro testing indicate that bilateral fixed-angle plates provide sustainable fixation stability offering a promising new option in the treatment for transverse patella fractures.

  2. The biomechanical consequences of rod reduction on pedicle screws: should it be avoided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Haines; Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A; Gaume, Rachel E; Ambati, Divya V; Dmitriev, Anton E

    2013-11-01

    Rod contouring is frequently required to allow for appropriate alignment of pedicle screw-rod constructs. When residual mismatch is still present, a rod persuasion device is often used to achieve further rod reduction. Despite its popularity and widespread use, the biomechanical consequences of this technique have not been evaluated. To evaluate the biomechanical fixation strength of pedicle screws after attempted reduction of a rod-pedicle screw mismatch using a rod persuasion device. Fifteen 3-level, human cadaveric thoracic specimens were prepared and scanned for bone mineral density. Osteoporotic (n=6) and normal (n=9) specimens were instrumented with 5.0-mm-diameter pedicle screws; for each pair of comparison level tested, the bilateral screws were equal in length, and the screw length was determined by the thoracic level and size of the vertebra (35 to 45 mm). Titanium 5.5-mm rods were contoured and secured to the pedicle screws at the proximal and distal levels. For the middle segment, the rod on the right side was intentionally contoured to create a 5-mm residual gap between the inner bushing of the pedicle screw and the rod. A rod persuasion device was then used to engage the setscrew. The left side served as a control with perfect screw/rod alignment. After 30 minutes, constructs were disassembled and vertebrae individually potted. The implants were pulled in-line with the screw axis with peak pullout strength (POS) measured in Newton (N). For the proximal and distal segments, pedicle screws on the right side were taken out and reinserted through the same trajectory to simulate screw depth adjustment as an alternative to rod reduction. Pedicle screws reduced to the rod generated a 48% lower mean POS (495±379 N) relative to the controls (954±237 N) (ppedicle screws had failed during the reduction attempt with visible pullout of the screw. After reduction, decreased POS was observed in both normal (posteoporotic (pscrew resulted in no significant

  3. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katonis Pavlos G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with

  4. Anatomical Location of the Common Iliac Veins at the Level of the Sacrum: Relationship between Perforation Risk and the Trajectory Angle of the Screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Akhgar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the safety of transarticular surface screw (TASS insertion and the anatomical location of the common iliac veins (CIVs at the level of the promontorium. Materials and Methods. The locations of the CIVs on 1 mm computed tomography-myelography slices of 50 patients at the level of the promontorium and 20 human cadavers were investigated. Results. Among the patients, the left CIV was closer to the S1 anterior wall than the right CIV (mean distance: 5.0 ± 3.0 and 7.0 ± 4.2 mm, resp.. The level of the inferior vena cava (IVC formation varied among the cadavers. The mean distance between the IVC formation and promontorium tip was 30.2 ± 12.8 mm. The height of the IVC formation and distance between the right and the left CIVs at the level of the promontorium were significantly correlated (P<0.001. Conclusion. The TASS trajectory is safe as long as the screw does not penetrate the anterior cortex of S1. The level of the IVC formation can help to predict the distance between the right and the left CIVs at the level of the promontorium. The CIVs do not have a uniform anatomical location; therefore, preoperative computed tomography is necessary to confirm their location.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking life estimation of hold-down spring screw for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Hold-down spring screw fractures due to primary water stress corrosion cracking were observed in nuclear fuel assemblies. The screw fastens hold-down springs that are required to maintain the nuclear fuel assembly in contact with upper core plate and permit thermal and irradiation-induced length changes. In order to investigate the primary causes of the screw fractures, the finite element stress analysis and fracture mechanics analysis were performed on the hold-down spring assembly. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Preloading on the screw applied for tightening had beneficial effects on the screw strength by reducing the stress level at the critical regions, compared to the screw without preload. Calculated deflections and strains at the hold-down springs using the finite element analysis were in very close agreements with the experimentally measured deflections and strains. Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by integrating the Scott's model and resulted in a life of 1.42 years, which was fairly close to the field experience. Cracks were expected to originate at the threaded region of the screw and propagated to the opposite side of the spring, which was confirmed by the fractographic analysis of the fractured screws. (orig.)

  6. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Le Cann

    Full Text Available The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level, the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout.

  7. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Sophie; Cachon, Thibaut; Viguier, Eric; Miladi, Lotfi; Odent, Thierry; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Chabrand, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age) of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic) and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical) on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old) tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level), the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout.

  8. Effectiveness of screw surface coating on the stability of zirconia abutments after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basílio, Mariana de Almeida; Butignon, Luis Eduardo; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir

    2012-01-01

    Different surface treatments have been developed in attempts to prevent the loosening of abutment screws. The aim of the current study was to compare the effectiveness of titanium alloy screws with tungsten-doped diamond-like carbon (W-DLC) coating and uncoated screws in providing stability to zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic abutments after cyclic loading. Twenty prefabricated ZrO2 ceramic abutments on their respective external-hex implants were divided into two groups of equal size according to the type of screw used: uncoated titanium alloy screw (Ti) or titanium alloy screw with W-DLC coating (W-DLC/Ti). The removal torque value (preload) of the abutment screw was measured before and after loading. Cyclic loading between 11 and 211 N was applied at an angle of 30 degrees to the long axis of the implants at a frequency of 15 Hz. A target of 0.5 X 106 cycles was defined. Group means were calculated and compared using analysis of variance and the F test (α = .05). Before cyclic loading, the preload for Ti screws was significantly higher than that for W-DLC/Ti screws (P = .021). After cyclic loading, there was no significant difference between them (P = .499). Under the studied conditions, it can be concluded that, after cyclic loading, both abutment screws presented a significant reduction in the mean retained preload and similar effectiveness in maintaining preload.

  9. Process and device for the ultrasonic testing of slotted screws screwed into a head of a nuclear reactor fuel element for cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpenberg, R.

    1986-01-01

    To achieve correct echo signals, a test head is set separately on each area limited by a slot of the top of the slotted screw and the screw head is ultrasonically sounded in the direction of the suspected cracks. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications in a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasiou, Anastasia; Giannis, Theofanis; Brotis, Alexandros G; Siasios, Ioannis; Georgiadis, Iordanis; Gatos, Haralampos; Tsianaka, Eleni; Vagkopoulos, Konstantinos; Paterakis, Konstantinos; Fountas, Kostas N

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cervical spine procedures have been associated with satisfactory outcomes. However, the occurrence of troublesome complications, although uncommon, needs to be taken into consideration. The purpose of our study was to assess the actual incidence of anterior cervical spine procedure-associated complications and identify any predisposing factors. A total of 114 patients undergoing anterior cervical procedures over a 6-year period were included in our retrospective, case-control study. The diagnosis was cervical radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy due to degenerative disc disease, cervical spondylosis, or traumatic cervical spine injury. All our participants underwent surgical treatment, and complications were recorded. The most commonly performed procedure (79%) was anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Fourteen patients (12.3%) underwent anterior cervical corpectomy and interbody fusion, seven (6.1%) ACDF with plating, two (1.7%) odontoid screw fixation, and one anterior removal of osteophytes for severe Forestier's disease. Mean follow-up time was 42.5 months (range, 6-78 months). The overall complication rate was 13.2%. Specifically, we encountered adjacent intervertebral disc degeneration in 2.7% of our cases, dysphagia in 1.7%, postoperative soft tissue swelling and hematoma in 1.7%, and dural penetration in 1.7%. Additionally, esophageal perforation was observed in 0.9%, aggravation of preexisting myelopathy in 0.9%, symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in 0.9%, mechanical failure in 0.9%, and superficial wound infection in 0.9%. In the vast majority anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications are minor, requiring no further intervention. Awareness, early recognition, and appropriate management, are of paramount importance for improving the patients' overall functional outcome.

  11. Determination of Screw and Nail Withdrawal Resistance of Some Important Wood Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Aytekin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, screw and nail withdrawal resistance of fir (Abies nordmanniana, oak (Quercus robur L. black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold and Stone pine (Pinus pinea L. wood were determined and compared. The data represent the testing of withdrawal resistance of three types of screws as smart, serrated and conventional and common nails. The specimens were prepared according to TS 6094 standards. The dimensions of the specimens were 5x5x15cm and for all of the directions. Moreover, the specimens were conditioned at ambient room temperature and 65±2% relative humidity. The screws and nails were installed according to ASTM-D 1761 standards. Nail dimensions were 2.5mm diameter and 50 mm length, conventional screws were 4x50mm, serrated screws were 4x45mm and smart screws were 4x50mm. Results show that the maximum screw withdrawal resistance value was found in Stone pine for the serrated screw. There were no significant differences between Stone pine and oak regarding screw withdrawal resistance values. Conventional screw yielded the maximum screw withdrawal resistance value in oak, followed by Stone pine, black pine and fir. Oak wood showed the maximum screw withdrawal resistance value for the smart screw, followed by Stone pine, black pine, and fir. Oak wood showed higher nail withdrawal resistances than softwood species. It was also determined that oak shows the maximum nail withdrawal resistance in all types. The nail withdrawal resistances at the longitudinal direction are lower with respect to radial and tangential directions.

  12. SU-E-T-609: Perturbation Effects of Pedicle Screws On Radiotherapy Dose Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Deroma, R; Borzov, E; Nevelsky, A [Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy in conjunction with surgical implant fixation is a common combined treatment in case of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced (CFR) PEEK material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary screws and plates. Gold powder can be added to the CFR-PEEK material in order to enhance visibility of the screws during intraoperative imaging procedures. In this work, we investigated the perturbation effects of the pedicle screws made of CFR-PEEK, CFR-PEEK with added gold powder (CFR-PEEK-AU) and Titanium (Ti) on radiotherapy dose distributions. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using the EGSnrc code package for 6MV beams with 10×10 fields at SSD=100cm. By means of MC simulations, dose distributions around titanium, CFR- PEEK and CFR-PEEK-AU screws (manufactured by Carbo-Fix Orthopedics LTD, Israel) placed in a water phantom were calculated. The screw axis was either parallel or perpendicular to the beam axis. Dose perturbation (relative to dose in homogeneous water phantom) was assessed. Results: Maximum overdose due to backscatter was 10% for the Ti screws, 5% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and effectively zero for the CFR-PEEK screws. Maximum underdose due to attenuation was 25% for the Ti screws, 15% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and 5% for the CFR-PEEK screws. Conclusion: Titanium screws introduce the largest distortion on the radiation dose distribution. The gold powder added to the CFR-PEEK material improves visibility at the cost of increased dose perturbation. CFR-PEEK screws caused minimal alteration on the dose distribution. This can decrease possible over and underdose of adjacent tissue and thus favorably influence treatment efficiency. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantage in the treatment of neoplastic bone disease.

  13. Biomechanical comparison of sagittal-parallel versus non-parallel pedicle screw placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad, Mazda; Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Bachmann, Elias; Snedeker, Jess G; Schmid, Samuel L

    2014-11-01

    While convergent placement of pedicle screws in the axial plane is known to be more advantageous biomechanically, surgeons intuitively aim toward a parallel placement of screws in the sagittal plane. It is however not clear whether parallel placement of screws in the sagittal plane is biomechanically superior to a non-parallel construct. The hypothesis of this study is that sagittal non-parallel pedicle screws do not have an inferior initial pull-out strength compared to parallel placed screws. The established lumbar calf spine model was used for determination of pull-out strength in parallel and non-parallel intersegmental pedicle screw constructs. Each of six lumbar calf spines (L1-L6) was divided into three levels: L1/L2, L3/L4 and L5/L6. Each segment was randomly instrumented with pedicle screws (6/45 mm) with either the standard technique of sagittal parallel or non-parallel screw placement, respectively, under fluoroscopic control. CT was used to verify the intrapedicular positioning of all screws. The maximum pull-out forces and type of failure were registered and compared between the groups. The pull-out forces were 5,394 N (range 4,221 N to 8,342 N) for the sagittal non-parallel screws and 5,263 N (range 3,589 N to 7,554 N) for the sagittal-parallel screws (p = 0.838). Interlevel comparisons also showed no statistically significant differences between the groups with no relevant difference in failure mode. Non-parallel pedicle screws in the sagittal plane have at least equal initial fixation strength compared to parallel pedicle screws in the setting of the here performed cadaveric calf spine experiments.

  14. Accuracy of spinal navigation for Magerl-screws

    CERN Document Server

    Herz, T

    2001-01-01

    Study design: assessment of the accuracy of frameless stereotactic navigation at the second cervical vertebra. Objectives: to assess the influence of the protocol of preoperative CT-scan and the registration technique on the accuracy of navigation for implanting Magerl-screws. Summary of background data: the use of navigation systems for implanting Magerl-screws could help to decrease the risk of complications and to reduce the required skin incision. Two parameters conceivably affecting the accuracy are the protocol of the preoperative CT-scan and the registration technique. Methods: four cervical spine segments of human cadavers were scanned with two different protocols (3 mm slice thickness/2 mm table increment, 1 mm slice thickness/1 mm table increment). Registration was performed either based on anatomical landmarks or using a specially designed percutaneous registration device. For the accuracy-check, the pointer tip was exactly placed on markers. The distance between the pointer and the marker displaye...

  15. Numerical Simulation and Performance Analysis of Twin Screw Air Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Lee

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model is proposed in this paper in order to study the performance of oil-less and oil-injected twin screw air compressors. Based on this model, a computer simulation program is developed and the effects of different design parameters including rotor profile, geometric clearance, oil-injected angle, oil temperature, oil flow rate, built-in volume ratio and other operation conditions on the performance of twin screw air compressors are investigated. The simulation program gives us output variables such as specific power, compression ratio, compression efficiency, volumetric efficiency, and discharge temperature. Some of the above results are then compared with experimentally measured data and good agreement is found between the simulation results and the measured data.

  16. Simulation of structure and annihilation of screw dislocation dipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben; Vegge, Tejs; Leffers, Torben

    2000-01-01

    Large scale atomistic simulations are used to investigate the properties of screw dislocation dipoles in copper. Spontaneous annihilation is observed for dipole heights less than 1 nm. Equilibrated dipoles of heights larger than 1 nm adopt a skew configuration due to the elastic anisotropy of Cu....... The equilibrium splitting width of the screw dislocations decreases with decreasing dipole height, as expected from elasticity theory. The energy barriers, and corresponding transition states for annihilation of stable dipoles are determined for straight and for flexible dislocations for dipole heights up to 5.......2 nm. In both cases the annihilation is initiated by cross-slip of one of the dislocations. For straight dislocations the activation energy shows a linear dependence on the inverse dipole height, and for flexible dislocations the dependence is roughly linear for the dipoles investigated....

  17. Range of motion, sacral screw and rod strain in long posterior spinal constructs: a biomechanical comparison between S2 alar iliac screws with traditional fixation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutterlin, Chester E; Field, Antony; Ferrara, Lisa A; Freeman, Andrew L; Phan, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    S1 screw failure and L5/S1 non-union are issues with long fusions to S1. Improved construct stiffness and S1 screw offloading can help avoid this. S2AI screws have shown to provide similar stiffness to iliac screws when added to L3-S1 constructs. We sought to examine and compare the biomechanical effects on an L2-S1 pedicle screw construct of adding S2AI screws, AxiaLIF, L5-S1 interbody support via transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), and to examine the effect of the addition of cross connectors to each of these constructs. Two S1 screws and one rod with strain gauges (at L5/S1) were used in L2-S1 screw-rod constructs in 7 L1-pelvis specimens (two with low BMD). ROM, S1 screw and rod strain were assessed using a pure-moment flexibility testing protocol. Specimens were tested intact, and then in five instrumentation states consisting of: (I) Pedicle screws (PS) L2-S1; (II) PS + S2AI screws; (III) PS + TLIF L5/S1; (IV) PS + AxiaLIF L5/S1; (V) PS + S2AI + AxiaLIF L5/S1. The five instrumentation conditions were also tested with crosslinks at L2/3 and S1/2. Tests were conducted in flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial torsion with no compressive preload. S2A1 produces reduced S1 screw strain for flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial torsion, as well as reduced rod strain in lateral bending and axial torsion in comparison to AxiaLIF and interbody instrumentation, at the expense of increased rod flexion-extension strain. Cross-connectors may have a role in further reduction of S1 screw and rod strain. From a biomechanical standpoint, the use of the S2AI technique is at least equivalent to traditional iliac screws, but offers lower prominence and ease of assembly compared to conventional sacroiliac stabilization.

  18. Primary stability of three different iliosacral screw fixation techniques in osteoporotic cadaver specimens-a biomechanical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkircher, Ludwig; Masaeli, Adrian; Bliemel, Christopher; Debus, Florian; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Krüger, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic and insufficiency fractures of the pelvic ring is increasing. Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation with cannulated sacroiliac screws is well-established in the operative treatment of osteoporotic posterior pelvic ring fractures. However, osteoporotic bone quality might lead to the risk of screw loosening. For this reason, cement augmentation of the iliosacral screws is more frequently performed and recommended. The aim of the present biomechanical study was to evaluate the primary stability of three methods of iliosacral screw fixation in human osteoporotic sacrum specimens. This study used methodical cadaver study. A total of 15 fresh frozen human cadaveric specimens with osteoporosis were used (os sacrum). After matched pair randomization regarding bone quality (T-score), three operation technique groups were generated: screw fixation (cannulated screws) without cement augmentation (Group A); screw fixation with cement augmentation before screw placement (cannulated screws) (Group B); and screw fixation with perforated screws and cement augmentation after screw placement (Group C). In all specimens both sides of the os sacrum were used for operative treatment, resulting in a group size of 10 specimens per group. One operation technique was used on each side of the sacral bone to compare biomechanical properties in the same bone quality. Pull-out tests were performed with a rate of 6 mm/min. A load versus displacement curve was generated. Subgroup 1 (Group A vs. Group B): Screw fixation without cement augmentation: 594.4 N±463.7 and screw fixation with cement augmentation before screw placement: 1,020.8 N±333.3; values were significantly different (p=.025). Subgroup 2 (Group A vs. Group C): Screw fixation without cement augmentation: 641.8 N±242.0 and perforated screw fixation with cement augmentation after screw placement: 1,029.6 N±326.5; values were significantly different (p=.048). Subgroup 3 (Group B vs. Group C): Screw

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of fixation strength of conventional and expansive pedicle screws with or without calcium based cement augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingxuan; Lei, Wei; Wu, Zixiang; Liu, Da; Shi, Lei

    2011-03-01

    The expansive pedicle screw was originally developed to be installed in the bone of compromised quality, but there are some concerns whether it can provide enough fixation strength in the spine with osteoporosis or severe osteoporosis. Twelve fresh human cadaver spines were stratified into four levels: normal, osteopenia, osteoporosis and severe osteoporosis. The vertebra was bilaterally instrumented with pedicle screws according to four protocols, including conventional pedicle screw without augmentation, expansive pedicle screw without augmentation, conventional screw with augmentation and expansive screw with augmentation. Screw pullout tests were conducted. Given the same specimen, the fixation strength of expansive screw was significantly higher than that of the conventional screw. When the same type of screw was used, the fixation strength of the calcium based cement augmented group was stronger than that of the non-augmented group. The pullout strength and stiffness of the expansive screw, augmented conventional screw and augmented expansive screw groups at the osteoporotic level were comparable to those of the conventional pedicle screw group at the osteopenic level. However, under the severely osteoporotic bone environment, the pullout strength of pedicle screw with whatever placement protocol was significantly lower than that of the conventional screw group at the osteopenic level. Our results demonstrate that (i) the expansive pedicle screw appears feasible and safe in either osteopenic or osteoporotic spine; (ii) calcium based cement augmentation can offer improved initial fixation strength of pedicle screws.; and (iii) no screw placement protocol we examined is efficacious in the bone at the severely osteoporotic level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of the Pullout Strength of Different Pedicle Screw Designs and Augmentation Techniques in an Osteoporotic Bone Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, Gorkem; Balikci, Tevfik; Heydar, Ahmed Majid; Bezer, Murat

    2018-02-01

    Mechanical study. To compare the pullout strength of different screw designs and augmentation techniques in an osteoporotic bone model. Adequate bone screw pullout strength is a common problem among osteoporotic patients. Various screw designs and augmentation techniques have been developed to improve the biomechanical characteristics of the bone-screw interface. Polyurethane blocks were used to mimic human osteoporotic cancellous bone, and six different screw designs were tested. Five standard and expandable screws without augmentation, eight expandable screws with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or calcium phosphate augmentation, and distal cannulated screws with PMMA and calcium phosphate augmentation were tested. Mechanical tests were performed on 10 unused new screws of each group. Screws with or without augmentation were inserted in a block that was held in a fixture frame, and a longitudinal extraction force was applied to the screw head at a loading rate of 5 mm/min. Maximum load was recorded in a load displacement curve. The peak pullout force of all tested screws with or without augmentation was significantly greater than that of the standard pedicle screw. The greatest pullout force was observed with 40-mm expandable pedicle screws with four fins and PMMA augmentation. Augmented distal cannulated screws did not have a greater peak pullout force than nonaugmented expandable screws. PMMA augmentation provided a greater peak pullout force than calcium phosphate augmentation. Expandable pedicle screws had greater peak pullout forces than standard pedicle screws and had the advantage of augmentation with either PMMA or calcium phosphate cement. Although calcium phosphate cement is biodegradable, osteoconductive, and nonexothermic, PMMA provided a significantly greater peak pullout force. PMMA-augmented expandable 40-mm four-fin pedicle screws had the greatest peak pullout force.

  1. Fatigue life prediction of pedicle screw for spinal surgery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Major, Štěpán; Kocour, Vladimír; Cyrus, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 35 (2016), s. 379-388 ISSN 1971-8993. [European Conference on Fracture. ECF21. Catania, 20.06.2015-20.06.2015] Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : pedicle-screw * titan alloy * fatigue life * finite element analysis Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://www.fracturae.com/index.php/fis/article/view/IGF-ESIS.35.43

  2. Outcomes of Distal Femur Fracture Treated with Dynamic Condylar Screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razaq, M. N. U.; Muhammad, T.; Ahmed, A.; Adeel, M.; Ahmad, S.; Ahmad, S.; Sultan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Implants for open reduction and internal fixation of distal femoral fracture includes angle blade plate, rush nails, enders nail and interlocking nails. But all these devices are technically demanding and less effective in providing inter-fragmentary compression in osteoporotic bones. These problems can be solved with dynamic condylar screw (DCS).The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of different outcomes of distal femoral fracture treated with dynamic condylar screw Methods: This case series study was carried out in the Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 1st October 2014 to August 2015, after approval of the ethical committee of the institution. Data of all patients with distal femoral fractures aged 20-70 years, recruited through emergency, OPD or consultant clinic collected on a proforma. Standard treatment of trauma was given to the patients. Detailed history was taken including the past medical and surgical history. Detailed examination including air-way, breathing and circulation, general physical examination and abdomino-pelvic examination was done in each patient. Investigations including urinalysis, haemoglobin percent, full blood count, X-ray (both AP and lateral view) of the involved femur (including hip and knee) was done. Results: Mean age of the patients was 43.18±14.647 ranging from 20 to 70 years. Mean duration of hospital stay in days was 2.21±1.111 ranging from 1 to 6 days. Patients follow-up assessment after 4 months of surgery for union of femoral fracture treated with dynamic condylar screw was found in 96 (94.1 percent), wound infection was found in 7 (6.9 percent), knee stiffness was found in 21 (20.6 percent) and limb shortening was found in 7 (6.9 percent). Conclusion: Dynamic condylar screw is an easy, scientifically less difficult and satisfying method of treatment for fractures of femur. (author)

  3. External jig in the placement of distal interlocking screws | Ikem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retrograde (52.2%) was the commonest surgical approach used for femur. The main indication for SIGN interlocking surgery was recent fracture 77.8%. Open reduction 97.8% was the commonest method of reduction used. The mean±SD bone union time was 3.58±0.56 months and range 3-5 months. Distal screw insertion ...

  4. Clinical Performance of One-Piece, Screw-Retained Implant Crowns Based on Hand-Veneered CAD/CAM Zirconia Abutments After a Mean Follow-up Period of 2.3 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnider, Nicole; Forrer, Fiona Alena; Brägger, Urs; Hicklin, Stefan Paul

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of one-piece, screw-retained implant crowns based on hand-veneered computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) zirconium dioxide abutments with a crossfit connection at least 1 year after insertion of the crown. Consecutive patients who had received at least one Straumann bone level implant and one-piece, screw-retained implant crowns fabricated with CARES zirconium dioxide abutments were reexamined. Patient satisfaction, occlusal and peri-implant parameters, mechanical and biologic complications, radiologic parameters, and esthetics were recorded. A total of 50 implant crowns in the anterior and premolar region were examined in 41 patients. The follow-up period of the definitive reconstructions ranged from 1.1 to 3.8 years. No technical and no biologic complications had occurred. At the reexamination, 100% of the implants and reconstructions were in situ. Radiographic evaluation revealed a mean distance from the implant shoulder to the first visible bone-to-implant contact of 0.06 mm at the follow-up examination. Screw-retained crowns based on veneered CAD/CAM zirconium dioxide abutments with a crossfit connection seem to be a promising way to replace missing teeth in the anterior and premolar region. In the short term, neither failures of components nor complications were noted, and the clinical and radiographic data revealed stable hard and soft tissue conditions.

  5. Toxic anterior segment syndrome following deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Sevimli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present the case of a 31-year-old patient with toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS that developed after undergoing deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK. She had keratoconus, and despite wearing hard contact lenses for many years in the left eye, her vision had deteriorated; therefore, DALK was performed on this eye. The preoperative visual acuity (VA was finger counting at 3 m. Routine DALK was performed using the "big-bubble" technique. The corneal entry incision was hydrated at the end of the surgery, which was terminated by air injection into the anterior chamber. On postoperative day 1, VA was at the level of hand movements, and the cornea was edematous. Topical high-dose dexamethasone and oral steroids were initiated considering the diagnosis of TASS. Subsequently, the patient's VA increased, and the corneal edema decreased. We believe that the use of re-sterilized cannulas may have been the likely cause of TASS. Although DALK can be performed without interfering with the anterior chamber, one should keep in mind that TASS may occur in response to the solution used to hydrate the incision site and the air injected into the anterior chamber.

  6. [Intraoperative three-dimensional navigation for pedicle screw placement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützner, P A; Beutler, T; Wendl, K; von Recum, J; Wentzensen, A; Nolte, L-P

    2004-10-01

    The mobile SIREMOBIL Iso-C(3D) C-arm (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) is the first device permitting intraoperative, three-dimensional representation of bone structures. A high-resolution, isotropic 3D data cube in the isocenter with sides of approximately 12 cm is calculated simultaneously. The SIREMOBIL Iso-C(3D) is linked to the navigation system. This makes it possible to transfer the generated 3D data directly to the linked navigation system without the need for surgeon-dependent registration. In this prospective clinical trial, we evaluated the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using this device. In 61 patients, a total of 302 pedicle screws were placed. Only in five cases (1.7%) were misplacements of > or =2 mm shown in postoperative control CT. The average fluoroscopy time was 1.28+/-0.56 min, and the average operative duration was 103.26+/-23.3 min. There were no postoperative neurological complications in any of the 30 patients. From these data, we conclude that Iso-C(3D) navigation is a very accurate method for the placement of pedicle screws.

  7. Modelling of the Heating Process in a Thermal Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Veje, Christian T.; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-11-01

    The procedure of separating efficiently dry-stuff (proteins), fat, and water is an important process in the handling of waste products from industrial and commercial meat manufactures. One of the sub-processes in a separation facility is a thermal screw where the raw material (after proper mincing) is heated in order to melt fat, coagulate protein, and free water. This process is very energy consuming and the efficiency of the product is highly dependent on accurate temperature control of the process. A key quality parameter is the time that the product is maintained at temperatures within a certain threshold. A detailed mathematical model for the heating process in the thermal screw is developed and analysed. The model is formulated as a set of partial differential equations including the latent heat for the melting process of the fat and the boiling of water, respectively. The product is modelled by three components; water, fat and dry-stuff (bones and proteins). The melting of the fat component is captured as a plateau in the product temperature. The model effectively captures the product outlet temperature and the energy consumed. Depending on raw material composition, "soft" or "dry", the model outlines the heat injection and screw speeds necessary to obtain optimal output quality.

  8. Upgrading of the extruder screw design for secondary polymers processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Володимир Валентинович Кухар

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Some methods of polymeric materials waste recycling have been analyzed in this paper and the prospects of the theory development as well as extrusion technology and co-extruding processes have been shown. The purpose of this work was an analytical research of the backpressure in different sectors of the extruder when the pressed bulk moves through it and improvement of the working conditions of the device to fit the technology of plastics waste processing. The recommendations as to the calculation of the required design parameters of the screw, as the main structural element of the extruder, have been developed as a result of research, which makes it possible to achieve better processing of the pressed bulk under specified temperature and rate conditions due to the levelling of the backpressure and pumping effect in all sections of the device. The proposed upgrading provides productivity levelling in all sections of the extruder, which excludes intermittent work, breaks and thickness unevenness of the manufactured products. Through the analytical consideration of the extrusion process theory in various sectors of the extruder, which are characterized by different temperature conditions and the pumping effect, the equation for calculating of the auger screw inclination angle for each sector of the extruder has been obtained which makes it possible to improve the machine design. The example of the calculation of the screw design parameters for physical and chemical characteristics of low-pressure polyethylene under the conditions of its processing has been furnished

  9. Optimization and Numerical Simulation of Outlet of Twin Screw Extruder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the unreasonable design of non-intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruder die, the problem of productivity reduction was discussed. Firstly, the mathematical model of extruder productivity was established. The extruder die model was improved. Secondly, the force analysis of twin screw extruder physical model was carried out. Meanwhile, A combination of mechanical analysis and numerical simulation was adopted. The velocity field, pressure field and viscosity field were calculated by Mini-Element interpolation method, linear interpolation method and Picard iterative convergence method respectively. The influence of die model on the quantity of each field before and after improvement was analyzed. The results show that the improved model had increased the rheological parameters of the flow field, the leakage and reverse flow decreased. Through post-processing calculation, the productivity of the third dies extruder was 10% higher than before. The research results provide a theoretical basis for the design and optimization of die model of non intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruder.

  10. Biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyaw, Thein Aung; Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Yoshikawa, Takamasa; Inaba, Tadashi; Kasai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    Various biomechanical investigations have attempted to clarify the aetiology of adjacent segment disease (ASD). However, no biomechanical study has examined in detail the deformation behaviour of the adjacent segments when both pure torque and an angular displacement load are applied to the vertebrae along multiple segments. The purpose of this study is to investigate the biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments. Ten cadaveric lumbar spines (L2-L5) of boars were used. Control and fusion models were prepared by disc damage and pedicle screw fixation of each specimen, and then, bending and rotation tests were performed using a six-axis material tester. In the biomechanical tests regulated by an angular displacement load, the range of motion (ROM) of the cranial and caudal adjacent segments in antero-posterior flexion and lateral bending was increased by about 20 % (p fusion surgery as a mechanism to compensate for the ROM lost due to excessive fusion by pedicle screw fixation, so that a large torque may be applied to adjacent segments within a physiologically possible range, and it might gradually lead to a degenerative intervertebral disc or progression of spondylolisthesis in the adjacent segments.

  11. Mechanical characteristics of connection for GFRP plates using tapping screws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuya; Duong, Nguyen Ngoc; Satake, Chito; Matsumoto, Yukihiro

    2017-10-01

    FRP material has good characteristics such as light-weight, high-strength and high-corrosion resistance. Light-weight structure possesses some advantages over the rational constructing procedure such as self-building structures. In recent years, mechanical characteristics of FRP joints using bolts and/or rivet are investigated in detail, and they are used in many FRP structures. However, the bolts lack bearing strength compared with material strength and the joint needs the prepared bolt hole. In this paper, an alternative joint system for FRP structures using tapping screw is proposed and mechanical characteristics are investigated through experiment. Tapping screw has some advantages; easy-to-use, light-weight and high bearing strength. Then, the results of double-lapped tensile shear tests having one, four and eight tapping screws along longitudinal direction are shown. Moreover, it is shown that longitudinal stress distribution is approximately corresponding to the theoretical stress distribution of double-lapped adhesively bonded joints. Based on these, it is proposed that joint strength can be estimated by using the present calculation method.

  12. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Golanó, P.; Clavero, J.A.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly

  13. d = 2 transverse-field Ising model under the screw-boundary condition: an optimization of the screw pitch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    A length-N spin chain with the √N(=v)th neighbor interaction is identical to a two-dimensional (d = 2) model under the screw-boundary (SB) condition. The SB condition provides a flexible scheme to construct a d ≥ 2 cluster from an arbitrary number of spins; the numerical diagonalization combined with the SB condition admits a potential applicability to a class of systems intractable with the quantum Monte Carlo method due to the negative-sign problem. However, the simulation results suffer from characteristic finite-size corrections inherent in SB. In order to suppress these corrections, we adjust the screw pitch v(N) so as to minimize the excitation gap for each N. This idea is adapted to the transverse-field Ising model on the triangular lattice with N ≤ 32 spins. As a demonstration, the correlation-length critical exponent ν is analyzed in some detail

  14. Failure analysis of top nozzle holddown spring screw for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Ryu, C. H.; Na, E. G.; Baek, T. H.; Jeon, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    A failure analysis of holddown spring screw was performed using fracture mechanics approach. The spring screw was designed such that it was capable of sustaining the loads imposed by the initial tensile preload and operational loads. In order to investigate the cause of failure, a stress analysis of the top nozzle spring assembly was done using finite element analysis and a life prediction of the screw was made using a fracture mechanics approach. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded than the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Primary water stress corrosion cracking life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by using integration of the Scott model and resulted in 1.42 years, which was fairly close to the actual service life of the holddown spring screw

  15. [Progress on atlanto-axial pedicle screw fixation through posterior approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Qing; Ma, Wei-Hu; Liu, Guan-Yi

    2014-06-01

    The present of atlanto-axial pedicle screw fixation through posterior approach provide a new remedy for treating instability of pillow and cervical. A lot of researches have reported feasibility of atlanto-axial pedicle screw fixation, the results showed that it had advantages of easily exposure, less blood loss, shorter operative time, especially in treating as remedy fixation for atlanto-axial joint screw, atlas lateral mass screws and pedicle screw caused by injuries of tumor,inflammation and trauma. If not done properly, it can cause serious complications, such as iatrogenic fracture,injuries of vertebral artery and cervical spinal cord. Therefore,the safty and effectiveness of atlanto-axial pedicle screw fixation may be focus of research.

  16. Self-tapping and self-drilling screws for intermaxillary fixation in management of mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccia, Fabio; Rossi, Paolo; Gallesio, Cesare; Boffano, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the success and the possible complication of intermaxillary fixation with self-tapping and self-drilling screws (STSDSs) in nondislocated or slightly dislocated mandibular fractures.Forty patients with mandibular fractures, treated with intermaxillary fixation using STSDSs, were clinically assessed by means of a dental vitality test and evaluation of tooth mobility adjacent to the cortical screw holes, and radiologically by means of a panoramic dental radiograph upon removal of the screws.The main complication was screw loss in 4.4% of cases, followed by coverage by oral mucosa in 1.2% of cases. However, no dental root damage, screw breakage, malocclusion, or poor consolidation of mandibular fractures was observed.The use of STSDSs for intermaxillary fixation is a useful alternative to the use of arch bars in the treatment of some types of mandibular fractures. In addition, there is no risk of dental lesions as with self-tapping screws.

  17. CT-based bone density assessment for iliosacral screw trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schicho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sacroiliac screw placement is one standard treatment option for stabilization of posterior pelvic ring injuries encountering high intra- and inter-individual variations of bone stock quality as well as a vast variety and prevalence of sacral dysmorphism. An individual, easy-to-use preoperative bone stock quality estimation would be of high value for the surgeon. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 36 standard computed tomography datasets with the uninjured pelvic ring. Using a two-plane cross-referencing technique, we assessed the Hounsfield unit (HU mean values as well as standard deviation and minimum/maximum values within selected region of interests (ROIs at five key areas: os ilium left and right, massa lateralis of os sacrum left and right, and central vertebral body on levels S1 and S2. Results: Results showed no difference in mean HU at any ROI when comparing male and female data. For all ROIs set on S1 and S2, there was an age-related decline of HU with a calculated slope significantly different from zero. There was no statistical difference of slopes when comparing S1- and S2-level with respect to any distinct ROI. Comparison of levels S1 and S2 revealed differences at the vertebral body and at the right os ilium. The right and left massa lateralis of os sacrum had lower bone density than the center of the vertebral body, the right, or left os ilium on S1; right and left massa lateralis density did not differ significantly. On level S2, results were comparable with no difference of massa lateralis density. Conclusion: With our easy-to-use preoperative assessment of bone density of five key areas of sacroiliac screw anchoring we were able to find the lowest bone density in both the left and right massa lateralis on levels S1 and S2 with high inter- and intra-individual variations. Significantly lower bone density was found in the center of the vertebral bodies S2 in comparison to S1, which both are crucial for iliosacral

  18. Hollow Mill for Extraction of Stripped Titanium Screws: An Easy, Quick, and Safe Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ravi; Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Amit; Garg, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Removal of jammed titanium screws can be difficult due to the problem of stripping of the hexagonal heads of the screws. We present a technique of extraction of stripped screws with the use of a standard 4.5 mm stainless steel hollow mill in a patient of peri-implant fracture of the radius fixed with a titanium locking plate 2 years back. The technique is quick, safe, and cost effective.

  19. In Vivo Evaluation of Immediately Loaded Stainless Steel and Titanium Orthodontic Screws in a Growing Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluate...

  20. Removal of Hardware After Syndesmotic Screw Fixation: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley, Kempland C; Hofmann, Kurt J; Velasco, Brian T; Kwon, John Y

    2017-06-01

    While trans-syndesmotic fixation with metal screws is considered the gold standard in treating syndesmotic injuries, controversy exists regarding the need and timing of postoperative screw removal. Formal recommendations have not been well established in the literature and clinical practice is highly variable in this regard. The purpose of this systematic review is to critically examine the most recent literature regarding syndesmotic screw removal in order to provide surgeons an evidence-based approach to management of these injuries. The Cochrane Library and PubMed Medline databases were explored using search terms for syndesmosis and screw removal between October 1, 2010 and June 1, 2016. A total of 9 studies (1 randomized controlled trial and 8 retrospective cohort studies) were found that described the outcomes of either retained or removed syndesmotic screws. Overall, there was no difference in functional, clinical or radiographic outcomes in patients who had their syndesmotic screw removed. There was a higher likelihood of recurrent syndesmotic diastasis when screws were removed between 6 and 8 weeks. There was a higher rate of postoperative infections when syndesmotic screws were removed without administering preoperative antibiotics. Removal of syndesmotic screws is advisable mainly in cases of patient complaints related to the other implanted perimalleolar hardware or malreduction of the syndesmosis after at least 8 weeks postoperatively. Broken or loose screws should not be removed routinely unless causing symptoms. Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended on removal. Radiographs should be routinely obtained immediately prior to removal and formal discussions should be had with patients prior to surgery to discuss management options if a broken screw is unexpectedly encountered intraoperatively. Radiographs and/or computed tomography imaging should be obtained after syndesmotic screw removal when indicated for known syndesmotic malreduction. Level IV

  1. Which salvage fixation technique is best for the failed initial screw fixation at the cervicothoracic junction? A biomechanical comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jae Taek; Tomoyuki, Takigawa; Jain, Ashish; Orías, Alejandro A Espinoza; Inoue, Nozomu; An, Howard S

    2017-09-01

    The pedicle screw construct is the most widely used technique for instrumentation at cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) because of its high biomechanical stability. However, we may need salvage fixation options for it as there might be a situation when pedicle screw is not available or it initially fails in order to obviate the need to instrument an additional motion segment. We aimed to evaluate the ability of using salvage screw fixations at CTJ (C7, T1, T2), when the initial fixation method fails. Fifteen fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens (C7-T2) were tested for pull-out strength (POS, N) and insertion torque (IT, Nm) of three C7 fixation techniques (lateral mass, pedicle and laminar screw) and three upper thoracic spine instrumentation (pedicle screws with straight trajectory, anatomical trajectory pedicle screws and laminar screw). Data are shown as mean ± standard deviation (SD). C7 pedicle screws generated statistically greater IT and POS than other C7 fixation techniques (P technique, there was no significant difference between laminar screw and a pedicle screw with different trajectory (P > 0.05). Laminar screws appear to provide stronger and more reproducible salvage fixation than lateral mass screws for C7 fixation, if pedicle screw should fail. If failure of initial pedicle screw is verified at the upper thoracic spine, both laminar screw and pedicle screw with different trajectory could be an option of salvage fixation. Our results suggest that pedicle screws and laminar screw similarly provide a strong fixation for salvage applications in the cervicothoracic junction.

  2. Spinous process wiring versus lateral mass fixation for the treatment of anterior cervical pseudarthrosis: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hideki; Jarrett, Claude; Rhee, John M; Tsai, Luke; Hutton, William

    2011-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the stiffness of lateral mass screws versus two different spinous process wiring constructs in a cadaveric model of plated anterior cervical pseudoarthrosis. When treating an anterior plated pseudoarthrosis via a posterior approach, it is unclear whether the added expense, muscle exposure, and risk of lateral mass fixation are justified biomechanically versus a simpler, cheaper, and potentially less morbid wiring technique, because the presence of the anterior plate likely reduces motion over the unplated situation. Seven cadaveric cervical spines were loaded in compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion. Each load sequence was applied to: 1) the intact spine; 2) after application of a plated ACDF construct (pACDF); and 3) after the insertion of lateral mass (LM) screws, ``modified'' triple wiring (TW), or Roger's wiring (RW), in alternating order for each specimen. For each sequence, load deformation curves and stiffness were obtained. Supplemental LM fixation significantly (p ≤ 0.05) increased stiffness versus pACDF in all six modes tested. TW significantly increased stiffness versus pACDF in compression, flexion, and torsion, but not in extension, or lateral bending. RW significantly increased stiffness versus pACDF only in axial torsion. When comparing LM to the wiring constructs, LM fixation was significantly stiffer than RW in flexion, extension, and lateral bending; LM fixation was stiffer than TW in lateral bending. LM fixation produced the stiffest overall constructs in stabilizing a plated pseudarthrosis ACDF model. It was significantly stiffer in more modes versus RW than TW.

  3. Football cleat design and its effect on anterior cruciate ligament injuries. A three-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambson, R B; Barnhill, B S; Higgins, R W

    1996-01-01

    A 3-year prospective study was initiated to evaluate torsional resistance of modern football cleat designs and the incidence of surgically documented anterior cruciate ligament tears in high school football players wearing different cleat types. We compared four styles of football shoes and evaluated the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament tears among 3119 high school football players during the 1989 to 1991 competitive seasons. The four cleat designs were 1) Edge, longer irregular cleats placed at the peripheral margin of the sole with a number of smaller pointed cleats positioned interiorly (number of players wearing this shoe, 2231); 2) Flat, cleats on the forefoot are the same height, shape, and diameter, such as found on the soccer-style shoe (N = 832); 3) Screw-in, seven screw-in cleats of 0.5 inch height and 0.5 inch diameter (N = 46); and 4) Pivot disk, a 10-cm circular edge is on the sole of the forefoot, with one 0.5-inch cleat in the center (N = 10). The results showed that the Edge design produced significantly higher torsional resistance than the other designs (P < 0.05) and was associated with a significantly higher anterior cruciate ligament injury rate (0.017%) than the other three designs combined (0.005%).

  4. Double-segment Wilhelm Tell technique for anterior lumbar interbody fusion in unstable isthmic spondylolisthesis and adjacent segment discopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Markus; Vogt, Emanuel; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2006-02-01

    The Wilhelm Tell technique is a novel instrumented anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) procedure using a specially designed composite carbon fibre cage and a single short-threaded cancellous screw that obliquely passes through the upper adjacent vertebral body, the interbody cage itself and through the lower adjacent vertebral body. This single-stage fusion method, which is in principle a combination of the Louis technique and modern cage surgery, is reported to have a lower rate of pseudoarthrosis formation than stand-alone cage techniques. In addition, it eliminates both the surgical trauma of paravertebral muscle retraction and the risk of neural damage by poorly located pedicular screws. This anterior approach allows decompression of neural structures within the anterior part of the spinal canal and the foraminal region. It is the purpose of this case report, to present the successful application of this novel technique in a 32-year-old woman who concurrently suffered from severe instability-related back pain from L4/5 isthmic spondylolisthesis and marked L5/S1 degenerative disc disease.

  5. Canine Vertebral Screw and Rod Fixation System: Design and Mechanical Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewchalermwong, Pakthorn; Suwanna, Nirut; Meij, Björn P

    2018-02-01

     To develop the canine vertebral screw and rod fixation system (CVSRF) and to compare the biomechanical properties between CVSRF and the screw and polymethylmethacrylate (Screw-PMMA) technique for internal fixation of the vertebral column in dogs.  The CVSRF consisted of vertebral screws with monoaxial side-loaded head, rods and specific inner screws connecting rod to the screw head. The CVSRF prototype was made from titanium alloy and manufactured by the rapid prototype machine. Vertebrectomy models were simulated by ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene blocks and tested with the CVSRF system ( n  = 8) and the Screw-PMMA technique ( n  = 8). The models were developed according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM F-1717-04). The biomechanical parameters were the compressive bending yield load, the compressive bending stiffness, the compressive ultimate load and the load displacement curve.  The mean values of the compressive bending yield load, compressive bending stiffness and compressive ultimate load of the CVSRF were significantly higher than those of the Screw-PMMA technique ( p  mechanical study indicated that the CVSRF system can be used for canine vertebral stabilization and the biomechanical properties were better than those for the Screw-PMMA device. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  6. In vitro evaluation of flexural strength of different brands of expansion screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kádna Fernanda Mendes de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the flexural strength of the stems of three maxillary expanders screws of Morelli, Forestadent and Dentaurum brands. METHODS: The sample consisted of nine expander screws (totalizing of 36 stems, three from each brand, all stainless steel and 12 mm of expansion capacity. The stems of the expander screws were cut with cutting pliers close to the weld region with screw body, then fixed in a universal testing machine Instron 4411 for tests of bending resistance of three points. The ultimate strength in kgF exerted by the machine to bend the stem of the 5 mm screw was recorded and the flexural strength was calculated using a mathematical formula. During the flexural strength test it was verified the modulus of elasticity of the stems by means of Bluehill 2 software. The flexural strength data were subjected to ANOVA with one criterion and Tukey's test, with significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Forestadent screw brand showed the greatest bending strength, significantly higher than Dentaurum. Morelli showed the lowest resistance. CONCLUSION: The flexural strength of the screws varied according to the brand. Forestadent screw showed the greatest resistance and Morelli the lowest. All the three screws were found adequate for use in procedures for rapid maxillary expansion.

  7. Screw engine used as an expander in ORC for low-potential heat utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lukáš

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with a screw motor that is used as an expander in an ORC (Organic Rankin Cycle) system, whose organic working substance allows the transformation of low-potential heat (waste heat, solar and geothermal energy) into electrical energy. The article describes the specific properties of an organic substance and a screw motor that must be considered when designing and assembling a complete power unit. Screw machines are not commonly used as expansion devices, so it is necessary to perform an analysis that makes it possible to adapt the screw machine to the expansion process in terms of profiling and design.

  8. Anterior ethmoid anatomy facilitates dacryocystorhinostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, W K; Moore, C A; Linberg, J V

    1990-12-01

    The ethmoid air cell labyrinth lies adjacent to the medial orbital wall, extending even beyond the sutures of the ethmoid bone. Its anatomic relationship to the lacrimal sac fossa is important in lacrimal surgery. We evaluated computed tomographic scans of 190 orbits with normal ethmoid anatomy to define the anatomic relationship of anterior ethmoid air cells to the lacrimal sac fossa. In 93% of the orbits, the cells extended anterior to the posterior lacrimal crest, with 40% entering the frontal process of the maxilla. This anatomic relationship may be used to facilitate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. During a 10-year period (310 cases), one of us routinely entered the anterior ethmoid air cells to initiate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. This technique has helped to avoid lacerations of the nasal mucosa.

  9. Intraoperative neuromonitoring: can the results of direct stimulation of titanium-alloy pedicle screws in the thoracic spine be trusted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Miriam L; Swaminathan, Viswaminathan; Gilbert, Jeremy L; Fox, Charles W; Smale, John; Moquin, Ross R; Calancie, Blair

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTVIE: Intraoperative neuromonitoring of thoracic-level pedicle screw implantation for detecting breaches in the pedicle cortex has adopted methods originally developed in the early 1990s for stainless steel (SS) alloy screws used at lumbosacral levels. In our recent attempts to monitor thoracic-level pedicle screw placement, we were surprised to find that these widely used stimulation parameters were largely ineffectual when stimulating directly through titanium alloy (Ti-alloy) pedicle screws. The objectives of this study, then, were twofold: (1) to report the number of episodes in which intraoperative neuromonitoring of thoracic screw position failed to detect a medially directed breach (or malplacement) in a previously described and limited sample set; and (2) to compare the frequency-specific impedance of a sample of Ti-alloy pedicle screws to comparably sized screws made of SS alloys. We predicted that Ti-alloy screws would demonstrate impairment in conduction properties that could help explain the difficulties we, and others, have recently experienced with neuromonitoring of thoracic pedicle screw placement. Based on threshold values for train-of-four stimulation of spinal motor pathways, we quantified the incidence of medial breaches of thoracic-level pedicles in a small cohort of subjects. We also evaluated the conductive properties of Ti-alloy pedicle screws and compared these with SS screws. Eleven pedicle screws were examined using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to identify their alloys, after which DC resistance and AC impedance for each screw was measured. Furthermore, a subset of five screws was used to investigate the current delivery under dynamic testing conditions. Postoperative computed tomography of 6 subjects revealed 10 instances of significant medial screw malpositioning, out of a total of 88 screws placed. In each of these 10 instances, direct stimulation of thoracic pedicle screws at intensities considered in the literature to be

  10. Comparison of surgical treatment in Lenke 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: anterior dual rod versus posterior pedicle fixation surgery: a comparison of two practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geck, Matthew J; Rinella, Anthony; Hawthorne, Dana; Macagno, Angel; Koester, Linda; Sides, Brenda; Bridwell, Keith; Lenke, Lawrence; Shufflebarger, Harry

    2009-08-15

    Multicenter analysis of 2 groups of patients surgically treated for Lenke 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Compare patients with Lenke 5C scoliosis surgically treated with anterior spinal fusion with dual rod instrumentation and anterior column support with patients surgically treated with posterior release and pedicle screw instrumentation. Treatment of single, structural, lumbar, and thoracolumbar curves in patients with AIS has been the subject of some debate. Advocates of the anterior approach assert that their technique spares posterior musculature and may save distal fusion levels, and that with dual rods and anterior column support the issues with nonunion and kyphosis have been obviated. Advocates of the posterior approach assert that with the change to posterior pedicle screw based instrumentation that correction and levels are equivalent, and the posterior approach avoids the issues with nonunion and kyphosis. This report directly compares the results of posterior versus anterior instrumented fusions in the operative treatment of adolescent idiopathic Lenke 5C curves. We analyzed 62 patients with Lenke 5C based on radiographic and clinical data at 2 institutions: 31 patients treated with posterior, pedicle-screw instrumented fusions at 1 institution (group PSF); and 31 patients with anterior, dual-rod instrumented fusions at another institution (group ASF). Multiple clinical and radiographic parameters were evaluated and compared. The mean age, preoperative major curve magnitude, and preoperative lowest instrumented vertebral (LIV) tilt were similar in both groups (age: PSF = 15.5 years, ASF = 15.6 years; curve size: PSF = 50.3 degrees +/- 7.0 degrees , ASF = 49.0 degrees +/- 6.6 degrees ; LIV tilt: PSF = 27.5 degrees +/- 6.5 degrees , ASF = 27.8 degrees +/- 6.2 degrees ). After surgery, the major curve corrected to an average of 6.3 degrees +/- 3.2 degrees (87.6% +/- 5.8%) in the PSF group, compared with 12.1 degrees +/- 7.4 degrees (75

  11. A 2-screw fixation technique for subtalar joint fusion: a retrospective case series introducing a novel 2-screw fixation construct with operative pearls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Reinking, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    A variety of fixation methods are used in fusion of the subtalar joint (STJ) including 1 screw and 2 screw constructs. The rate of union is generally high for STJ fusion, regardless of the fixation method, provided the joint surfaces have been properly prepared and compressed and the patient avoids premature stress on the fusion site. Certain populations are known to have an increased risk of nonunion or delayed union including diabetics, smokers, and those undergoing revision of failed fusion. In this high-risk patient population, we propose that our novel 2-screw construct might have advantages over traditional fixation constructs without identified disadvantages. The technique is simple enough to be used in all primary and revision STJ fusion procedures, and this has become our practice. In the present study, 15 feet in 15 consecutive patients who underwent STJ fusion using a novel 2-screw fixation construct were retrospectively reviewed to assess the fusion outcome and complications. Specifically, we offer a novel 2-screw construct that offers the stability of the traditional parallel 2-screw construct while maintaining a maximum raw bone surface area at the posterior facet achieved by single-screw fixation. A retrospective review of radiographs taken 10 weeks postoperatively indentified a 100% fusion rate (15 of 15). All patients in our series achieved fusion, including several high-risk cases, and no significant complications were identified. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of diameter of the drill hole on torque of screw insertion and pushout strength for headless tapered compression screws in simulated fractures of the lateral condyle of the equine third metacarpal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Ryan S; Galuppo, Larry D; Stover, Susan M

    2006-05-01

    To compare variables for screw insertion, pushout strength, and failure modes for a headless tapered compression screw inserted in standard and oversize holes in a simulated lateral condylar fracture model. 6 pairs of third metacarpal bones from horse cadavers. Simulated lateral condylar fractures were created, reduced, and stabilized with a headless tapered compression screw by use of a standard or oversize hole. Torque, work, and time for drilling, tapping, and screw insertion were measured during site preparation and screw implantation. Axial load and displacement were measured during screw pushout. Effects of drill hole size on variables for screw insertion and screw pushout were assessed by use of Wilcoxon tests. Drill time was 59% greater for oversize holes than for standard holes. Variables for tapping (mean maximum torque, total work, positive work, and time) were 42%, 70%, 73%, and 58% less, respectively, for oversize holes, compared with standard holes. Variables for screw pushout testing (mean yield load, failure load, failure displacement, and failure energy) were 40%, 40%, 47%, and 71% less, respectively, for oversize holes, compared with standard holes. Screws could not be completely inserted in 1 standard and 2 oversize holes. Enlarging the diameter of the drill hole facilitated tapping but decreased overall holding strength of screws. Therefore, holes with a standard diameter are recommended for implantation of variable pitch screws whenever possible. During implantation, care should be taken to ensure that screw threads follow tapped bone threads.

  13. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: reducing anterior tibial subluxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Bart; Duerr, Eric R. H.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2016-01-01

    To measure and compare the amount of anterior tibial subluxation (ATS) after anatomic ACL reconstruction for both acute and chronic ACL-deficient patients. Fifty-two patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated after primary, unilateral, anatomic ACL reconstruction. Post-operative true

  14. TREATMENT APPROACHES FOR TRAUMATIZED ANTERIOR TEETH WITH EXCESSIVE TISSUE LOSS: THREE CASE REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal YILDIRIM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Use of direct composite and indirect laminate veneers has been an alternative to metal- and all-ceramic crowns for anterior teeth restorations. Dental traumas are the most common reasons for excessive tissue loss. Treatment options depend on the amount of remaining tissue, the extent of the damage to dental pulp and periapical tissues and the time elapsed before dental treatment. The aim of this case report was to evaluate the direct and indirect techniques used in the treatments of traumatically fractured anterior teeth. In Case 1, a 29-year-old male patient attended to the clinics of the Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul University for the replacement of old composite restorations. According to anamnesis, the anterior teeth had fractured because of falling from bicycle. Dentinal pins used to retain the composite restorations were screwed out and indirect composite laminate veneers were placed. In Case 2, a 27-year-old male patient attended to our clinic for the treatment of his anterior teeth which were fractured due to a fall. A different type of technique, a silicon guide, was used to mimic the natural teeth surfaces precisely. In Case 3, a 16-year-old female patient attended to our clinic for the treatment of her anterior teeth which were fractured in a car accident. On clinical evaluation, related teeth were found to be non-vital and application of fiber posts was considered suitable before direct composite restorations. In conclusion, all of these techniques may be used for traumatized anterior teeth. Esthetical necessities and functional forces should be taken into consideration in material choice.

  15. Management of severe anterior open-bite in an adult patient using miniscrews as skeletal anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachala, Madhukar Reddy; Harikrishnan, Pandurangan

    2010-01-01

    Anterior open bite is often caused by a downward rotation of the mandible and/or by excessive eruption of the posterior teeth. In such cases, it is difficult to establish absolute anchorage for molar intrusion by traditional orthodontic mechanics. This is a case report of successful treatment of a severe anterior open bite using miniscrew anchorage. A female patient of 20 yrs presented with symmetrical frontal facial appearance, increased anterior facial height, convex profile and incompetent lips. Dentally, she had lost both mandibular first molars due to caries and both maxillary first molars were extruded. She had class II canine relationship, 5 mm overjet, 5 mm anterior open bite, 3 mm mandibular midline diastema and a spacing of 2 mm in the maxillary arch. The treatment objectives were to correct the anterior open bite and establish ideal overjet and overbite and to restore the mandibular first molars with fixed prosthesis. Titanium miniscrews (1.3 mm diameter and 9 mm length) were implanted bilaterally in the maxillary arch between the second premolar and the first molar, and an intrusion force was applied with NiTi closed coil springs for 8 months. After molar intrusion, the same screws were used for en masse retraction of the entire dentition (third molars were extracted) for 4 months. The results showed that, after an active treatment of 20 months, the maxillary molars were intruded about 4 mm each and good occlusion was achieved. In conclusion, the miniscrews were very useful in the non-surgical management of adult anterior open bite cases.

  16. When Planning Screw Fracture Fixation Why the 5.5 mm Screw is the Goldilocks Screw. An Observational Computer Tomographic Study of Fifth Metatarsal Bone Anatomy in a Sample of Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Iselin, Lukas D.; Ramawat, Sunil; Hanratty, Brian; Klammer, Georg; Stavrou, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We wanted to verify our clinical experience that the 5.5 mm screw was ideal in the majority of fifth metatarsal fracture fixation. The size of a screw is important for the successful surgical treatment of these fractures in order to obtain the maximal stability while reducing the risk for iatrogenic fracture. A sample of patients undergoing computer tomographic imaging of the foot for investigation other than fifth metatarsal pathology were recruited. The parameters of the fifth meta...

  17. Influence of screw augmentation in posterior dynamic and rigid stabilization systems in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae: a biomechanical cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Sven; Sven, Hoppe; Loosli, Yannick; Yannick, Loosli; Baumgartner, Daniel; Daniel, Baumgartner; Heini, Paul; Paul, Heini; Benneker, Lorin; Lorin, Benneker

    2014-03-15