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Sample records for anterior circulation strokes

  1. Reflux of Anterior Spinal Artery Predicts Recurrent Posterior Circulation Stroke in Bilateral Vertebral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Kosuke; Handa, Akira; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Lo, Benjamin; Yamagata, Sen

    2015-11-01

    Predictive value of reflux of anterior spinal artery for recurrent posterior circulation ischemia in bilateral vertebral arteries steno-occlusive disease was evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed 55 patients with symptomatic posterior circulation stroke caused by bilateral stenotic (>70%) lesions of the vertebral artery. We investigated any correlation of clinical and angiographic characteristics including collateral flow patterns, with recurrent stroke. Risk factors for poor 3-month functional outcome were also evaluated. Recurrent posterior circulation stroke was observed in 15 (27.3%) patients. Multivariable analysis using Cox proportional hazards model showed anterior spinal artery reflux as a significant risk factor for stroke recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio, 19.3 [95% confidence interval, 5.35-69.9]; Pdisease, anterior spinal artery reflux predicted recurrent posterior circulation stroke and poor functional outcome. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Risk factors between intracranial-extracranial atherosclerosis and anterior-posterior circulation stroke in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Cai, Yefeng; Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingbo

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an important cause of stroke and remains a challenge for stroke prevention. Risk factors involved in atherosclerotic stroke and anterior and posterior circulation strokes (ACS and PCS, respectively) are different. The purpose of this study is to investigate differences in risk factors between intracranial and extracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS and ECAS), ACS and PCS, and ICAS/ECAS with ACS/PCS in a Chinese acute ischaemic stroke population. We analysed 551 ischaemic stroke patients who had been enrolled between August 2005 and July 2008. First, risk factors were compared between non-atherosclerosis, ICAS, ECAS, and combined ICAS and ECAS groups. ICAS and ECAS were assessed with transcranial Doppler and carotid colour Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Second, risk factors were compared between ACS and PCS groups. Stroke lesion was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. Third, risk factors were compared in ICAS/ECAS associated with ACS/PCS. The risk factor for ICAS was high diastolic blood pressure (OR, 1.075; 95% CI, 1.016-1.138; p = 0.013), and the risk factors for ECAS were age (OR, 1.113; 95% CI, 1.046-1.183; p = 0.001) and low density lipoprotein (OR, 1.450; 95% CI, 1.087-1.935; p = 0.012). Hypertension (OR, 1.090; 95% CI, 1.001-1.109; p = 0.027) was associated with PCS. Age (OR, 1.026; 95% CI, 1.011-1.128; p = 0.003), male gender (OR, 2.278; 95% CI, 1.481-3.258; p = 0.003) and age (OR, 1.067; 95% CI, 1.013-1.123; p = 0.014), scores of NIHSS (OR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.012-1.130; p = 0.018) were risk factors for ICAS and ECAS with ACS, respectively. Risk factors are different between ICAS and ECAS, ACS and PCS, and ICAS/ECAS with ACS/PCS. Thus, targeted strategies are needed to consider these differences to prevent, treat and manage these diseases.

  3. Local intra-arterial thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongwei; Liu Jianmin; Hong Bo; Deng Benqiang; Xu Yi; Ding Suju

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of local intra-arterial thrombolysis (LIT) using urokinase in patients with acute ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation. Methods: Fifty-four patients were treated with LIT using urokinase. The locations of occlusion included 3 of internal carotid artery (ICA), 46 of middle cerebral artery (MCA) and 5 of anterior cerebral artery. Results: Outcome was good in 41 patients (75.9%). Recanalization >50% was obtained in 72.2% of patients and <50% recanalization in 27.8% of patients. Cerebral hemorrhage occurred in 11 patients (20.4%). Four patients died (7.4%). Conclusion: LIT using urokinase can improve the recanalization rate and achieve better functional recovery in patients of acute ischemic stroke

  4. Efficacy of Balloon-Guiding Catheter for Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients with Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Yoon, Seok-Mann; Shim, Jai-Joon; Doh, Jae-Won; Bae, Hack-Gun; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of balloon guiding catheter (BGC) during thrombectomy in anterior circulation ischemic stroke. Sixty-two patients with acute anterior circulation ischemic stroke were treated with thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent from 2011 to 2016. Patients were divided into the BGC group (n=24, 39%) and the non-BGC group (n=38, 61%). The number of retrievals, procedure time, thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) grade, presence of distal emboli, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were evaluated. Successful recanalization was more frequent in BGC than in non-BGC (83% vs. 66%, p =0.13). Distal emboli occurred less in BGC than in non-BGC (23.1% vs. 57.1%, p =0.02). Good clinical outcome was more frequent in BGC than in non-BGC (50% vs. 16%, p =0.03). The multivariate analysis showed that use of BGC was the only independent predictor of good clinical outcome (odds ratio, 5.19: 95% confidence interval, 1.07-25.11). More patients in BGC were successfully recanalized in internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion with small retrieval numbers (<3) than those in non-BGC (70% vs. 24%, p =0.005). In successfully recanalized ICA occlusion, distal emboli did not occur in BGC, whereas nine patients had distal emboli in non-BGC (0% vs. 75%, p =0.001) and good clinical outcome was superior in BGC than in non-BGC (55.6% vs. 8.3%, p =0.01). A BGC significantly reduces the number of retrievals and the occurrence of distal emboli, thereby resulting in better clinical outcomes in patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke, particularly with ICA occlusion.

  5. Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Strokes Based on Variant Vascular Anatomy of the Posterior Circulation: Clinical Deficits and Imaging Territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Melissa M; Chen, Stephen R; Diaz-Marchan, Pedro; Schomer, Donald; Kumar, Vinodh A

    2018-04-01

    We report imaging findings of 3 patients with anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarcts who presented with atypical clinical findings of cerebellar strokes. AICA strokes are rare, and diagnosis can be difficult because of the high variability of the posterior circulation vascular anatomy. We describe the embryology and variant anatomy of AICA so that clinicians can understand and recognize the patterns of these infarcts. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The ABCD2 score is better for stroke risk prediction after anterior circulation TIA compared to posterior circulation TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjun; Wu, Jimin; Liu, Rongyi; Gao, Feng; Hu, Haitao; Yin, Xinzhen

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) are divided into anterior and posterior circulation types (AC-TIA, PC-TIA, respectively). In the present study, we sought to evaluate the ABCD2 score for predicting stroke in either AC-TIA or PC-TIA. We prospectively studied 369 consecutive patients who presented with TIA between June 2009 and December 2012. The 7 d occurrence of stroke after TIA was recorded and correlated with the ABCD2 score with regards to AC-TIA or PC-TIA. Overall, 273 AC-TIA and 96 PC-TIA patients were recruited. Twenty-one patients with AC-TIA and seven with PC-TIA developed a stroke within the subsequent 7 d (7.7% vs. 7.3%, p = 0.899). The ABCD2 score had a higher predictive value of stroke occurrence in AC-TIA (the AUC was 0.790; 95% CI, 0.677-0.903) than in PC-TIA (the AUC was 0.535; 95% CI, 0.350-0.727) and the z-value of two receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 2.24 (p = 0.025). AC-TIA resulted in a higher incidence of both unilateral weakness and speech disturbance and longer durations of the symptoms. Inversely, PC-TIA was associated with a higher incidence of diabetes mellitus (19.8% vs. 10.6%, p = 0.022). Evaluating each component of scores, age ≥ 60 yr (OR = 7.010, 95% CI 1.599-30.743), unilateral weakness (OR = 3.455, 95% CI 1.131-10.559), and blood pressure (OR = 9.652, 95% CI 2.202-42.308) were associated with stroke in AC-TIA, while in PC-TIA, diabetes mellitus (OR = 9.990, 95% CI 1.895-52.650) was associated with stroke. In our study, the ABCD2 score could predict the short-term risk of stroke after AC-TIA, but might have limitation for PC-TIA.

  7. Mechanical Thrombectomy for Minor and Mild Stroke Patients Harboring Large Vessel Occlusion in the Anterior Circulation: A Multicenter Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargazanli, Cyril; Arquizan, Caroline; Gory, Benjamin; Consoli, Arturo; Labreuche, Julien; Redjem, Hocine; Eker, Omer; Decroix, Jean-Pierre; Corlobé, Astrid; Mourand, Isabelle; Gaillard, Nicolas; Ayrignac, Xavier; Charif, Mahmoud; Duhamel, Alain; Labeyrie, Paul-Emile; Riquelme, Carlos; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Gascou, Grégory; Lefèvre, Pierre-Henri; Mantilla-García, Daniel; Cagnazzo, Federico; Coskun, Oguzhan; Mazighi, Mikael; Riva, Roberto; Bourdain, Frédéric; Labauge, Pierre; Rodesch, Georges; Obadia, Michael; Bonafé, Alain; Turjman, Francis; Costalat, Vincent; Piotin, Michel; Blanc, Raphaël; Lapergue, Bertrand

    2017-12-01

    Proximal large vessel occlusion (LVO) is present in up to 30% of minor strokes. The effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy (MT) in the subgroup of minor stroke with LVO in the anterior circulation is still open to debate. Data about MT in this subgroup of patients are sparse, and their optimal management has not yet been defined. The purpose of this multicenter cohort study was to evaluate the effectiveness of MT in patients experiencing acute ischemic stroke (AIS) because of LVO in the anterior circulation, presenting with minor-to-mild stroke symptoms (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of stroke centers having 2 therapeutic approaches (urgent thrombectomy associated with best medical treatment [BMT] versus BMT first and MT if worsening occurs) about management of patients with minor and mild acute ischemic stroke harboring LVO in the anterior circulation. An intention-to-treat analysis was conducted. The primary end point was the rate of excellent outcome defined as the achievement of a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 1 at 3 months. Three hundred one patients were included, 170 with urgent MT associated with BMT, and 131 with BMT alone as first-line treatment. Patients treated with MT were younger, more often received intravenous thrombolysis, and had shorter time to imaging. Twenty-four patients (18.0%) in the medical group had rescue MT because of neurological worsening. Overall, excellent outcome was achieved in 64.5% of patients, with no difference between the 2 groups. Stratified analysis according to key subgroups did not find heterogeneity in the treatment effect size. Minor-to-mild stroke patients with LVO achieved excellent and favorable functional outcomes at 3 months in similar proportions between urgent MT versus delayed MT associated with BMT. There is thus an urgent need for randomized trials to define the effectiveness of MT in this patient subgroup. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. CT angiography and CT perfusion improve prediction of infarct volume in patients with anterior circulation stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeters, Tom van; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Horsch, Alexander D.; Niesten, Joris M.; Luitse, Merel J.A.; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, Geert Jan; Kappelle, L.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Majoie, Charles B.L.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vos, Jan Albert [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Schonewille, Wouter J. [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Neurology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Walderveen, Marianne A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Wermer, Marieke J.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands); Duijm, Lucien E.M. [Catharina Hospital, Department of Radiology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Keizer, Koos [Catharina Hospital, Department of Neurology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bot, Joseph C.J. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Visser, Marieke C. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lugt, Aad van der [Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Dippel, Diederik W.J. [Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kesselring, F.O.H.W. [Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Hofmeijer, Jeannette [Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Neurology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Lycklama a Nijeholt, Geert J. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Boiten, Jelis [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Neurology, The Hague (Netherlands); Rooij, Willem Jan van [St. Elisabeth Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Kort, Paul L.M. de [St. Elisabeth Hospital, Department of Neurology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Roos, Yvo B.W.E.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijer, Frederick J.A. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pleiter, C.C. [St. Franciscus Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: Dutch acute stroke study (DUST) investigators

    2016-04-15

    We investigated whether baseline CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP) in acute ischemic stroke could improve prediction of infarct presence and infarct volume on follow-up imaging. We analyzed 906 patients with suspected anterior circulation stroke from the prospective multicenter Dutch acute stroke study (DUST). All patients underwent baseline non-contrast CT, CTA, and CTP and follow-up non-contrast CT/MRI after 3 days. Multivariable regression models were developed including patient characteristics and non-contrast CT, and subsequently, CTA and CTP measures were added. The increase in area under the curve (AUC) and R{sup 2} was assessed to determine the additional value of CTA and CTP. At follow-up, 612 patients (67.5 %) had a detectable infarct on CT/MRI; median infarct volume was 14.8 mL (interquartile range (IQR) 2.8-69.6). Regarding infarct presence, the AUC of 0.82 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.79-0.85) for patient characteristics and non-contrast CT was improved with addition of CTA measures (AUC 0.85 (95 % CI 0.82-0.87); p < 0.001) and was even higher after addition of CTP measures (AUC 0.89 (95 % CI 0.87-0.91); p < 0.001) and combined CTA/CTP measures (AUC 0.89 (95 % CI 0.87-0.91); p < 0.001). For infarct volume, adding combined CTA/CTP measures (R{sup 2} = 0.58) was superior to patient characteristics and non-contrast CT alone (R{sup 2} = 0.44) and to addition of CTA alone (R{sup 2} = 0.55) or CTP alone (R{sup 2} = 0.54; all p < 0.001). In the acute stage, CTA and CTP have additional value over patient characteristics and non-contrast CT for predicting infarct presence and infarct volume on follow-up imaging. These findings could be applied for patient selection in future trials on ischemic stroke treatment. (orig.)

  9. Safety and Tolerability of SonoVue® in Patients with Large Artery Anterior Circulation Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracchini, Claudio; Viaro, Federica; Favaretto, Silvia; Palmieri, Anna; Kulyk, Caterina; Causin, Francesco; Farina, Filippo; Ballotta, Enzo

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are routinely used to improve the visualization of intracranial arteries. Since a higher rate of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has been observed in patients undergoing sonothrombolysis in combination with UCAs, we conducted this study with the aim of assessing safety and tolerability of SonoVue® in patients with acute ischemic stroke due to anterior circulation large artery occlusion (LAO) and eligible to intravenous thrombolysis and/or mechanical thrombectomy. Among 474 patients consecutively admitted to our Stroke Unit with anterior circulation ischemic stroke, SonoVue® was administered during transcranial ultrasound evaluation to 48 patients with suspected LAO for diagnostic confirmation (group I) and to 44 patients with inadequate temporal bone window. Forty-eight stroke patients with LAO diagnosed only by computed tomography (CT) angiography /magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and matched for age, gender, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score with group I represented the control group (group II). Thrombolysis, thrombectomy, or combined treatment were offered to all eligible patients. Brain MR imaging/CT was performed in both groups in case of neurological deterioration or after 1 week to check for ICH. SonoVue® did not cause any serious adverse event; only mild and transient side effects were reported in six cases (6.5%). Among patients in groups I and II, there were 31 (32.3%) secondary cerebral bleedings with no statistically significant difference between the groups, but only 2 (2.1%) were symptomatic. According to our study, SonoVue® can be safely administered to acute ischemic stroke patients with suspected anterior circulation LAO and/or inadequate temporal bone window. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  10. Effect of general anaesthesia on functional outcome in patients with anterior circulation ischaemic stroke having endovascular thrombectomy versus standard care: a meta-analysis of individual patient data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, Bruce C. V.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Goyal, Mayank; Menon, Bijoy K.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Bracard, Serge; White, Philip; Dávalos, Antoni; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; van der Lugt, Aad; Ford, Gary A.; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Kelly, Michael; Bourcier, Romain; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; Bang, Oh Young; Nogueira, Raul G.; Devlin, Thomas G.; van den Berg, Lucie A.; Clarençon, Frédéric; Burns, Paul; Carpenter, Jeffrey; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Yavagal, Dileep R.; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Ducrocq, Xavier; Dixit, Anand; Quesada, Helena; Epstein, Jonathan; Davis, Stephen M.; Jansen, Olav; Rubiera, Marta; Urra, Xabier; Micard, Emilien; Lingsma, Hester F.; Naggara, Olivier; Brown, Scott; Guillemin, Francis; Muir, Keith W.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Jovin, Tudor G.; Hill, Michael D.; Mitchell, Peter J.; Fransen, Puck Ss; Beumer, Debbie; Yoo, Albert J.; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Vos, Jan Albert; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Wermer, Marieke Jh; van Walderveen, Marianne Aa; Staals, Julie; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van Oostayen, Jacques A.; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J.; Boiten, Jelis; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Emmer, Bart J.; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F.; van Dijk, Lukas C.; Kappelle, Jaap; Lo, Rob H.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; de Vries, Joost; de Kort, Paul L. M.; van Rooij, Willem Jan J.; van den Berg, Jan S. P.; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A. A. M.; Aerden, Leo A. M.; Dallinga, René J.; Visser, Marieke C.; Bot, Joseph C. J.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Eshghi, Omid; Schreuder, Tobien H. C. M. L.; Heijboer, Roel J. J.; Keizer, Koos; Tielbeek, Alexander V.; den Hertog, Heleen M.; Gerrits, Dick G.; van den Berg-Vos, Renske M.; Karas, Giorgos B.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Flach, Zwenneke; Marquering, Henk A.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; van den Berg, René; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Brown, Martin M.; Liebig, Thomas; Stijnen, Theo; Andersson, Tommy; Mattle, Heinrich; Wahlgren, Nils; van der Heijden, Esther; Ghannouti, Naziha; Fleitour, Nadine; Hooijenga, Imke; Puppels, Corina; Pellikaan, Wilma; Geerling, Annet; Lindl-Velema, Annemieke; van Vemde, Gina; de Ridder, Ans; Greebe, Paut; de Bont-Stikkelbroeck, José; de Meris, Joke; Janssen, Kirsten; Struijk, Willy; Licher, Silvan; Boodt, Nikki; Ros, Adriaan; Venema, Esmee; Slokkers, Ilse; Ganpat, Raymie-Jayce; Mulder, Maxim; Saiedie, Nawid; Heshmatollah, Alis; Schipperen, Stefanie; Vinken, Stefan; van Boxtel, Tiemen; Koets, Jeroen; Boers, Merel; Santos, Emilie; Borst, Jordi; Jansen, Ivo; Kappelhof, Manon; Lucas, Marit; Geuskens, Ralph; Barros, Renan Sales; Dobbe, Roeland; Csizmadia, Marloes; Hill, M. D.; Goyal, M.; Demchuk, A. M.; Menon, B. K.; Eesa, M.; Ryckborst, K. J.; Wright, M. R.; Kamal, N. R.; Andersen, L.; Randhawa, P. A.; Stewart, T.; Patil, S.; Minhas, P.; Almekhlafi, M.; Mishra, S.; Clement, F.; Sajobi, T.; Shuaib, A.; Montanera, W. J.; Roy, D.; Silver, F. L.; Jovin, T. G.; Frei, D. F.; Sapkota, B.; Rempel, J. L.; Thornton, J.; Williams, D.; Tampieri, D.; Poppe, A. Y.; Dowlatshahi, D.; Wong, J. H.; Mitha, A. P.; Subramaniam, S.; Hull, G.; Lowerison, M. W.; Salluzzi, M.; Maxwell, M.; Lacusta, S.; Drupals, E.; Armitage, K.; Barber, P. A.; Smith, E. E.; Morrish, W. F.; Coutts, S. B.; Derdeyn, C.; Demaerschalk, B.; Yavagal, D.; Martin, R.; Brant, R.; Yu, Y.; Willinsky, R. A.; Weill, A.; Kenney, C.; Aram, H.; Stys, P. K.; Watson, T. W.; Klein, G.; Pearson, D.; Couillard, P.; Trivedi, A.; Singh, D.; Klourfeld, E.; Imoukhuede, O.; Nikneshan, D.; Blayney, S.; Reddy, R.; Choi, P.; Horton, M.; Musuka, T.; Dubuc, V.; Field, T. S.; Desai, J.; Adatia, S.; Alseraya, A.; Nambiar, V.; van Dijk, R.; Newcommon, N. J.; Schwindt, B.; Butcher, K. S.; Jeerakathil, T.; Buck, B.; Khan, K.; Naik, S. S.; Emery, D. J.; Owen, R. J.; Kotylak, T. B.; Ashforth, R. A.; Yeo, T. A.; McNally, D.; Siddiqui, M.; Saqqur, M.; Hussain, D.; Kalashyan, H.; Manosalva, A.; Kate, M.; Gioia, L.; Hasan, S.; Mohammad, A.; Muratoglu, M.; Cullen, A.; Brennan, P.; O'Hare, A.; Looby, S.; Hyland, D.; Duff, S.; McCusker, M.; Hallinan, B.; Lee, S.; McCormack, J.; Moore, A.; O'Connor, M.; Donegan, C.; Brewer, L.; Martin, A.; Murphy, S.; O'Rourke, K.; Smyth, S.; Kelly, P.; Lynch, T.; Daly, T.; O'Brien, P.; O'Driscoll, A.; Martin, M.; Collins, R.; Coughlan, T.; McCabe, D.; O'Neill, D.; Mulroy, M.; Lynch, O.; Walsh, T.; O'Donnell, M.; Galvin, T.; Harbison, J.; McElwaine, P.; Mulpeter, K.; McLoughlin, C.; Reardon, M.; Harkin, E.; Dolan, E.; Watts, M.; Cunningham, N.; Fallon, C.; Gallagher, S.; Cotter, P.; Crowe, M.; Doyle, R.; Noone, I.; Lapierre, M.; Coté, V. A.; Lanthier, S.; Odier, C.; DUROCHER, A.; Raymond, J.; Daneault, N.; Deschaintre, Y.; Jankowitz, B.; Baxendell, L.; Massaro, L.; Jackson-Graves, C.; DeCesare, S.; Porter, P.; Armbruster, K.; Adams, A.; Billigan, J.; Oakley, J.; Ducruet, A.; Jadhav, A.; Giurgiutiu, D.-V.; Aghaebrahim, A.; Reddy, V.; Hammer, M.; Starr, M.; Totoraitis, V.; Wechsler, L.; Streib, S.; Rangaraju, S.; Campbell, D.; Rocha, M.; Gulati, D.; Krings, T.; Kalman, L.; Cayley, A.; Williams, J.; Wiegner, R.; Casaubon, L. K.; Jaigobin, C.; del Campo, J. M.; Elamin, E.; Schaafsma, J. D.; Agid, R.; Farb, R.; ter Brugge, K.; Sapkoda, B. L.; Baxter, B. W.; Barton, K.; Knox, A.; Porter, A.; Sirelkhatim, A.; Devlin, T.; Dellinger, C.; Pitiyanuvath, N.; Patterson, J.; Nichols, J.; Quarfordt, S.; Calvert, J.; Hawk, H.; Fanale, C.; Bitner, A.; Novak, A.; Huddle, D.; Bellon, R.; Loy, D.; Wagner, J.; Chang, I.; Lampe, E.; Spencer, B.; Pratt, R.; Bartt, R.; Shine, S.; Dooley, G.; Nguyen, T.; Whaley, M.; McCarthy, K.; Teitelbaum, J.; Poon, W.; Campbell, N.; Cortes, M.; Lum, C.; Shamloul, R.; Robert, S.; Stotts, G.; Shamy, M.; Steffenhagen, N.; Blacquiere, D.; Hogan, M.; AlHazzaa, M.; Basir, G.; Lesiuk, H.; Iancu, D.; Santos, M.; Choe, H.; Weisman, D. C.; Jonczak, K.; Blue-Schaller, A.; Shah, Q.; MacKenzie, L.; Klein, B.; Kulandaivel, K.; Kozak, O.; Gzesh, D. J.; Harris, L. J.; Khoury, J. S.; Mandzia, J.; Pelz, D.; Crann, S.; Fleming, L.; Hesser, K.; Beauchamp, B.; Amato-Marzialli, B.; Boulton, M.; Lopez-Ojeda, P.; Sharma, M.; Lownie, S.; Chan, R.; Swartz, R.; Howard, P.; Golob, D.; Gladstone, D.; Boyle, K.; Boulos, M.; Hopyan, J.; Yang, V.; da Costa, L.; Holmstedt, C. A.; Turk, A. S.; Navarro, R.; Jauch, E.; Ozark, S.; Turner, R.; Phillips, S.; Shankar, J.; Jarrett, J.; Gubitz, G.; Maloney, W.; Vandorpe, R.; Schmidt, M.; Heidenreich, J.; Hunter, G.; Kelly, M.; Whelan, R.; Peeling, L.; Burns, P. A.; Hunter, A.; Wiggam, I.; Kerr, E.; Watt, M.; Fulton, A.; Gordon, P.; Rennie, I.; Flynn, P.; Smyth, G.; O'Leary, S.; Gentile, N.; Linares, G.; McNelis, P.; Erkmen, K.; Katz, P.; Azizi, A.; Weaver, M.; Jungreis, C.; Faro, S.; Shah, P.; Reimer, H.; Kalugdan, V.; Saposnik, G.; Bharatha, A.; Li, Y.; Kostyrko, P.; Marotta, T.; Montanera, W.; Sarma, D.; Selchen, D.; Spears, J.; Heo, J. H.; Jeong, K.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, B. M.; Kim, Y. D.; Song, D.; Lee, K.-J.; Yoo, J.; Bang, O. Y.; Rho, S.; Lee, J.; Jeon, P.; Kim, K. H.; Cha, J.; Kim, S. J.; Ryoo, S.; Lee, M. J.; Sohn, S.-I.; Kim, C.-H.; Ryu, H.-G.; Hong, J.-H.; Chang, H.-W.; Lee, C.-Y.; Rha, J.; Campbell, Bruce Cv; Churilov, Leonid; Yan, Bernard; Dowling, Richard; Yassi, Nawaf; Oxley, Thomas J.; Wu, Teddy Y.; Silver, Gabriel; McDonald, Amy; McCoy, Rachael; Kleinig, Timothy J.; Scroop, Rebecca; Dewey, Helen M.; Simpson, Marion; Brooks, Mark; Coulton, Bronwyn; Krause, Martin; Harrington, Timothy J.; Steinfort, Brendan; Faulder, Kenneth; Priglinger, Miriam; Day, Susan; Phan, Thanh; Chong, Winston; Holt, Michael; Chandra, Ronil V.; Ma, Henry; Young, Dennis; Wong, Kitty; Wijeratne, Tissa; Tu, Hans; MacKay, Elizabeth; Celestino, Sherisse; Bladin, Christopher F.; Loh, Poh Sien; Gilligan, Amanda; Ross, Zofia; Coote, Skye; Frost, Tanya; Parsons, Mark W.; Miteff, Ferdinand; Levi, Christopher R.; Ang, Timothy; Spratt, Neil; Kaauwai, Lara; Badve, Monica; Rice, Henry; de Villiers, Laetitia; Barber, P. Alan; McGuinness, Ben; Hope, Ayton; Moriarty, Maurice; Bennett, Patricia; Wong, Andrew; Coulthard, Alan; Lee, Andrew; Jannes, Jim; Field, Deborah; Sharma, Gagan; Salinas, Simon; Cowley, Elise; Snow, Barry; Kolbe, John; Stark, Richard; King, John; Macdonnell, Richard; Attia, John; D'Este, Cate; Diener, Hans Christoph; Levy, Elad I.; Bonafé, Alain; Mendes Pereira, Vitor; Jahan, Reza; Albers, Gregory W.; Cognard, Christophe; Cohen, David J.; Hacke, Werner; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; von Kummer, Ruüdiger; Smith, Wade; Turjman, Francis; Hamilton, Scott; Chiacchierini, Richard; Amar, Arun; Sanossian, Nerses; Loh, Yince; Baxter, B.; Reddy, V. K.; Horev, A.; Star, M.; Siddiqui, A.; Hopkins, L. N.; Snyder, K.; Sawyer, R.; Hall, S.; Costalat, V.; Riquelme, C.; Machi, P.; Omer, E.; Arquizan, C.; Mourand, I.; Charif, M.; Ayrignac, X.; Menjot de Champfleur, N.; Leboucq, N.; Gascou, G.; Moynier, M.; du Mesnil de Rochemont, R.; Singer, O.; Berkefeld, J.; Foerch, C.; Lorenz, M.; Pfeilschifer, W.; Hattingen, E.; Wagner, M.; You, S. J.; Lescher, S.; Braun, H.; Dehkharghani, S.; Belagaje, S. R.; Anderson, A.; Lima, A.; Obideen, M.; Haussen, D.; Dharia, R.; Frankel, M.; Patel, V.; Owada, K.; Saad, A.; Amerson, L.; Horn, C.; Doppelheuer, S.; Schindler, K.; Lopes, D. K.; Chen, M.; Moftakhar, R.; Anton, C.; Smreczak, M.; Carpenter, J. S.; Boo, S.; Rai, A.; Roberts, T.; Tarabishy, A.; Gutmann, L.; Brooks, C.; Brick, J.; Domico, J.; Reimann, G.; Hinrichs, K.; Becker, M.; Heiss, E.; Selle, C.; Witteler, A.; Al'Boutros, S.; Danch, M.-J.; Ranft, A.; Rohde, S.; Burg, K.; Weimar, C.; Zegarac, V.; Hartmann, C.; Schlamann, M.; Göricke, S.; Ringlestein, A.; Wanke, I.; Mönninghoff, C.; Dietzold, M.; Budzik, R.; Davis, T.; Eubank, G.; Hicks, W. J.; Pema, P.; Vora, N.; Mejilla, J.; Taylor, M.; Clark, W.; Rontal, A.; Fields, J.; Peterson, B.; Nesbit, G.; Lutsep, H.; Bozorgchami, H.; Priest, R.; Ologuntoye, O.; Barnwell, S.; Dogan, A.; Herrick, K.; Takahasi, C.; Beadell, N.; Brown, B.; Jamieson, S.; Hussain, M. S.; Russman, A.; Hui, F.; Wisco, D.; Uchino, K.; Khawaja, Z.; Katzan, I.; Toth, G.; Cheng Ching, E.; Bain, M.; Man, S.; Farrag, A.; George, P.; John, S.; Shankar, L.; Drofa, A.; Dahlgren, R.; Bauer, A.; Itreat, A.; Taqui, A.; Cerejo, R.; Richmond, A.; Ringleb, P.; Bendszus, M.; Möhlenbruch, M.; Reiff, T.; Amiri, H.; Purrucker, J.; Herweh, C.; Pham, M.; Menn, O.; Ludwig, I.; Acosta, I.; Villar, C.; Morgan, W.; Sombutmai, C.; Hellinger, F.; Allen, E.; Bellew, M.; Gandhi, R.; Bonwit, E.; Aly, J.; Ecker, R. D.; Seder, D.; Morris, J.; Skaletsky, M.; Belden, J.; Baker, C.; Connolly, L. S.; Papanagiotou, P.; Roth, C.; Kastrup, A.; Politi, M.; Brunner, F.; Alexandrou, M.; Merdivan, H.; Ramsey, C.; Given Ii, C.; Renfrow, S.; Deshmukh, V.; Sasadeusz, K.; Vincent, F.; Thiesing, J. T.; Putnam, J.; Bhatt, A.; Kansara, A.; Caceves, D.; Lowenkopf, T.; Yanase, L.; Zurasky, J.; Dancer, S.; Freeman, B.; Scheibe Mirek, T.; Robison, J.; Roll, J.; Clark, D.; Rodriguez, M.; Fitzsimmons, B.-Fm; Zaidat, O.; Lynch, J. R.; Lazzaro, M.; Larson, T.; Padmore, L.; Das, E.; Farrow Schmidt, A.; Hassan, A.; Tekle, W.; Cate, C.; Jansen, O.; Cnyrim, C.; Wodarg, F.; Wiese, C.; Binder, A.; Riedel, C.; Rohr, A.; Lang, N.; Laufs, H.; Krieter, S.; Remonda, L.; Diepers, M.; Añon, J.; Nedeltchev, K.; Kahles, T.; Biethahn, S.; Lindner, M.; Chang, V.; Gächter, C.; Esperon, C.; Guglielmetti, M.; Arenillas Lara, J. F.; Martínez Galdámez, M.; Calleja Sanz, A. I.; Cortijo Garcia, E.; Garcia Bermejo, P.; Perez, S.; Mulero Carrillo, P.; Crespo Vallejo, E.; Ruiz Piñero, M.; Lopez Mesonero, L.; Reyes Muñoz, F. J.; Brekenfeld, C.; Buhk, J.-H.; Kruützelmann, A.; Thomalla, G.; Cheng, B.; Beck, C.; Hoppe, J.; Goebell, E.; Holst, B.; Grzyska, U.; Wortmann, G.; Starkman, S.; Duckwiler, G.; Jahan, R.; Rao, N.; Sheth, S.; Ng, K.; Noorian, A.; Szeder, V.; Nour, M.; McManus, M.; Huang, J.; Tarpley, J.; Tateshima, S.; Gonzalez, N.; Ali, L.; Liebeskind, D.; Hinman, J.; Calderon Arnulphi, M.; Liang, C.; Guzy, J.; Koch, S.; DeSousa, K.; Gordon Perue, G.; Elhammady, M.; Peterson, E.; Pandey, V.; Dharmadhikari, S.; Khandelwal, P.; Malik, A.; Pafford, R.; Gonzalez, P.; Ramdas, K.; Andersen, G.; Damgaard, D.; Von Weitzel Mudersbach, P.; Simonsen, C.; Ruiz de Morales Ayudarte, N.; Poulsen, M.; Sørensen, L.; Karabegovich, S.; Hjørringgaard, M.; Hjort, N.; Harbo, T.; Sørensen, K.; Deshaies, E.; Padalino, D.; Swarnkar, A.; Latorre, J. G.; Elnour, E.; El Zammar, Z.; Villwock, M.; Farid, H.; Balgude, A.; Cross, L.; Hansen, K.; Holtmannspötter, M.; Kondziella, D.; Hoejgaard, J.; Taudorf, S.; Soendergaard, H.; Wagner, A.; Cronquist, M.; Stavngaard, T.; Cortsen, M.; Krarup, L. H.; Hyldal, T.; Haring, H.-P.; Guggenberger, S.; Hamberger, M.; Trenkler, J.; Sonnberger, M.; Nussbaumer, K.; Dominger, C.; Bach, E.; Jagadeesan, B. D.; TAYLOR, R.; Kim, J.; Shea, K.; Tummala, R.; Zacharatos, H.; Sandhu, D.; Ezzeddine, M.; Grande, A.; Hildebrandt, D.; Miller, K.; Scherber, J.; Hendrickson, A.; Jumaa, M.; Zaidi, S.; Hendrickson, T.; Snyder, V.; Killer Oberpfalzer, M.; Mutzenbach, J.; Weymayr, F.; Broussalis, E.; Stadler, K.; Jedlitschka, A.; Malek, A.; Mueller Kronast, N.; Beck, P.; Martin, C.; Summers, D.; Day, J.; Bettinger, I.; Holloway, W.; Olds, K.; Arkin, S.; Akhtar, N.; Boutwell, C.; Crandall, S.; Schwartzman, M.; Weinstein, C.; Brion, B.; Prothmann, S.; Kleine, J.; Kreiser, K.; Boeckh Behrens, T.; Poppert, H.; Wunderlich, S.; Koch, M. L.; Biberacher, V.; Huberle, A.; Gora Stahlberg, G.; Knier, B.; Meindl, T.; Utpadel Fischler, D.; Zech, M.; Kowarik, M.; Seifert, C.; Schwaiger, B.; Puri, A.; Hou, S.; Wakhloo, A.; Moonis, M.; Henniger, N.; Goddeau, R.; Massari, F.; Minaeian, A.; Lozano, J. D.; Ramzan, M.; Stout, C.; Patel, A.; Tunguturi, A.; Onteddu, S.; Carandang, R.; Howk, M.; Ribó, M.; Sanjuan, E.; Rubiera, M.; Pagola, J.; Flores, A.; Muchada, M.; Meler, P.; Huerga, E.; Gelabert, S.; Coscojuela, P.; Tomasello, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Santamarina, E.; Maisterra, O.; Boned, S.; Seró, L.; Rovira, A.; Molina, C. A.; Millán, M.; Muñoz, L.; Pérez de la Ossa, N.; Gomis, M.; Dorado, L.; López-Cancio, E.; Palomeras, E.; Munuera, J.; García Bermejo, P.; Remollo, S.; Castaño, C.; García-Sort, R.; Cuadras, P.; Puyalto, P.; Hernández-Pérez, M.; Jiménez, M.; Martínez-Piñeiro, A.; Lucente, G.; Dávalos, A.; Chamorro, A.; Urra, X.; Obach, V.; Cervera, A.; Amaro, S.; Llull, L.; Codas, J.; Balasa, M.; Navarro, J.; Ariño, H.; Aceituno, A.; Rudilosso, S.; Renu, A.; Macho, J. M.; San Roman, L.; Blasco, J.; López, A.; Macías, N.; Cardona, P.; Quesada, H.; Rubio, F.; Cano, L.; Lara, B.; de Miquel, M. A.; Aja, L.; Serena, J.; Cobo, E.; Lees, Kennedy R.; Arenillas, J.; Roberts, R.; Al-Ajlan, F.; Zimmel, L.; Patel, S.; Martí-Fàbregas, J.; Salvat-Plana, M.; Bracard, S.; Anxionnat, René; Baillot, Pierre-Alexandre; Barbier, Charlotte; Derelle, Anne-Laure; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Richard, Sébastien; Samson, Yves; Sourour, Nader; Baronnet-Chauvet, Flore; Clarencon, Frédéric; Crozier, Sophie; Deltour, Sandrine; Di Maria, Federico; Le Bouc, Raphael; Leger, Anne; Mutlu, Gurkan; Rosso, Charlotte; Szatmary, Zoltan; Yger, Marion; Zavanone, Chiara; Bakchine, Serge; Pierot, Laurent; Caucheteux, Nathalie; Estrade, Laurent; Kadziolka, Krzysztof; Leautaud, Alexandre; Renkes, Céline; Serre, Isabelle; Desal, Hubert; Guillon, Benoît; Boutoleau-Bretonniere, Claire; Daumas-Duport, Benjamin; de Gaalon, Solène; Derkinderen, Pascal; Evain, Sarah; Herisson, Fanny; Laplaud, David-Axel; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Lintia-Gaultier, Alina; Pouclet-Courtemanche, Hélène; Rouaud, Tiphaine; Rouaud Jaffrenou, Violaine; Schunck, Aurélia; Sevin-Allouet, Mathieu; Toulgoat, Frederique; Wiertlewski, Sandrine; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Ronziere, Thomas; Cahagne, Vincent; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Pinel, Jean-François; Raoult, Hélène; Mas, Jean-Louis; Meder, Jean-François; Al Najjar-Carpentier, Amen-Adam; Birchenall, Julia; Bodiguel, Eric; Calvet, David; Domigo, Valérie; Godon-Hardy, Sylvie; Guiraud, Vincent; Lamy, Catherine; Majhadi, Loubna; Morin, Ludovic; Trystram, Denis; Turc, Guillaume; Berge, Jérôme; Sibon, Igor; Menegon, Patrice; Barreau, Xavier; Rouanet, François; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Kazadi, Annabelle; Renou, Pauline; Fleury, Olivier; Pasco-Papon, Anne; Dubas, Frédéric; Caroff, Jildaz; Godard Ducceschi, Sophie; Hamon, Marie-Aurélie; Lecluse, Alderic; Marc, Guillaume; Giroud, Maurice; Ricolfi, Frédéric; Bejot, Yannick; Chavent, Adrien; Gentil, Arnaud; Kazemi, Apolline; Osseby, Guy-Victor; Voguet, Charlotte; Mahagne, Marie-Hélène; Sedat, Jacques; Chau, Yves; Suissa, Laurent; Lachaud, Sylvain; Houdart, Emmanuel; Stapf, Christian; Buffon Porcher, Frédérique; Chabriat, Hugues; Guedin, Pierre; Herve, Dominique; Jouvent, Eric; Mawet, Jérôme; Saint-Maurice, Jean-Pierre; Schneble, Hans-Martin; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Berhoune, Nadia-Nawel; Bouhour, Françoise; Cho, Tae-Hee; Derex, Laurent; Felix, Sandra; Gervais-Bernard, Hélène; Gory, Benjamin; Manera, Luis; Mechtouff, Laura; Ritzenthaler, Thomas; Riva, Roberto; Salaris Silvio, Fabrizio; Tilikete, Caroline; Blanc, Raphael; Obadia, Michaël; Bartolini, Mario Bruno; Gueguen, Antoine; Piotin, Michel; Pistocchi, Silvia; Redjem, Hocine; Drouineau, Jacques; Neau, Jean-Philippe; Godeneche, Gaelle; Lamy, Matthias; Marsac, Emilia; Velasco, Stephane; Clavelou, Pierre; Chabert, Emmanuel; Bourgois, Nathalie; Cornut-Chauvinc, Catherine; Ferrier, Anna; Gabrillargues, Jean; Jean, Betty; Marques, Anna-Raquel; Vitello, Nicolas; Detante, Olivier; Barbieux, Marianne; Boubagra, Kamel; Favre Wiki, Isabelle; Garambois, Katia; Tahon, Florence; Ashok, Vasdev; Coskun, Oguzhan; Rodesch, Georges; Lapergue, Bertrand; Bourdain, Frédéric; Evrard, Serge; Graveleau, Philippe; Decroix, Jean Pierre; Wang, Adrien; Sellal, François; Ahle, Guido; Carelli, Gabriela; Dugay, Marie-Hélène; Gaultier, Claude; Lebedinsky, Ariel Pablo; Lita, Lavinia; Musacchio, Raul Mariano; Renglewicz-Destuynder, Catherine; Tournade, Alain; Vuillemet, Françis; Montoro, Francisco Macian; Mounayer, Charbel; Faugeras, Frederic; Gimenez, Laetitia; Labach, Catherine; Lautrette, Géraldine; Denier, Christian; Saliou, Guillaume; Chassin, Olivier; Dussaule, Claire; Melki, Elsa; Ozanne, Augustin; Puccinelli, Francesco; Sachet, Marina; Sarov, Mariana; Bonneville, Jean-François; Moulin, Thierry; Biondi, Alessandra; de Bustos Medeiros, Elisabeth; Vuillier, Fabrice; Courtheoux, Patrick; Viader, Fausto; Apoil-Brissard, Marion; Bataille, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Laure; Cogez, Julien; Touze, Emmanuel; Leclerc, Xavier; Leys, Didier; Aggour, Mohamed; Aguettaz, Pierre; Bodenant, Marie; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Deplanque, Dominique; Girot, Marie; Henon, Hilde; Kalsoum, Erwah; Lucas, Christian; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Zuniga, Paolo; Arquizan, Caroline; Costalat, Vincent; Machi, Paolo; Mourand, Isabelle; Riquelme, Carlos; Bounolleau, Pierre; Arteaga, Charles; Faivre, Anthony; Bintner, Marc; Tournebize, Patrice; Charlin, Cyril; Darcel, Françoise; Gauthier-Lasalarie, Pascale; Jeremenko, Marcia; Mouton, Servane; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Lamy, Chantal; Hervé, Deramond; Hassan, Hosseini; Gaston, André; Barral, Francis-Guy; Garnier, Pierre; Beaujeux, Rémy; Wolff, Valérie; Herbreteau, Denis; Debiais, Séverine; Murray, Alicia; Ford, Gary; Clifton, Andy; Freeman, Janet; Ford, Ian; Markus, Hugh; Wardlaw, Joanna; Molyneux, Andy; Robinson, Thompson; Lewis, Steff; Norrie, John; Robertson, Fergus; Perry, Richard; Cloud, Geoffrey; Clifton, Andrew; Madigan, Jeremy; Roffe, Christine; Nayak, Sanjeev; Lobotesis, Kyriakos; Smith, Craig; Herwadkar, Amit; Kandasamy, Naga; Goddard, Tony; Bamford, John; Subramanian, Ganesh; Lenthall, Rob; Littleton, Edward; Lamin, Sal; Storey, Kelley; Ghatala, Rita; Banaras, Azra; Aeron-Thomas, John; Hazel, Bath; Maguire, Holly; Veraque, Emelda; Harrison, Louise; Keshvara, Rekha; Cunningham, James

    2018-01-01

    Background General anaesthesia (GA) during endovascular thrombectomy has been associated with worse patient outcomes in observational studies compared with patients treated without GA. We assessed functional outcome in ischaemic stroke patients with large vessel anterior circulation occlusion

  11. 24-Hour Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score Assessment in Post-Stroke Spasticity Development in Patients with a First Documented Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volny, Ondrej; Justanova, Maria; Cimflova, Petra; Kasickova, Linda; Svobodova, Ivana; Muzik, Jan; Bares, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Neuroanatomic substrates responsible for development of post-stroke spasticity are still poorly understood. The study is focused on identification of brain regions within the territory of the middle cerebral artery associated with spasticity development. This is a single-center prospective cohort study of first documented anterior circulation ischemic strokes with a neurologic deficit lasting >7 days (from March 2014 to September 2016, all patients are involved in a registry). Ischemic cerebral lesions within the territory of middle cerebral artery were evaluated using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on control 24-hour computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Spasticity was assessed with modified Ashworth scale. Seventy-six patients (mean age 72 years, 45% females; 30% treated with IV tissue plasminogen activator, 6.5% mechanical thrombectomy) fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. Forty-nine (64%) developed early elbow or wrist flexor spasticity defined as modified Ashworth scale >1 (at day 7-10), in 44 (58%) the spasticity remained present at 6 months. There were no differences between the patients who developed spasticity and those who did not when comparing admission stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 5 [interquartile range {IQR} 4-8] versus 6 [IQR 4-10]) and vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease). Nor was there a difference in 24-hour ASPECTS score (9 [IQR 8-10] versus 9 [IQR 7-10]). No differences were found between the groups with and without the early upper limb flexor spasticity of particular regions (M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, lentiform, insula, caudate, internal capsule) and precentral-postcentral gyrus, premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, posterior limb of internal capsule, and thalamus were compared. We did not find any middle cerebral artery territory associated with post-stroke spasticity development by detailed

  12. Predictors of the Aspiration Component Success of a Direct Aspiration First Pass Technique (ADAPT) for the Endovascular Treatment of Stroke Reperfusion Strategy in Anterior Circulation Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Raphaël; Redjem, Hocine; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Orng, Eliane; Taylor, Guillaume; Drumez, Elodie; Fahed, Robert; Labreuche, Julien; Mazighi, Mikael; Lapergue, Bertrand; Piotin, Michel

    2017-06-01

    A direct aspiration first pass technique (ADAPT) has been reported to be fast, safe, and effective for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study is to determine the preoperative factors that affect success of the aspiration component of the technique in ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation. We enrolled all 347 consecutive patients with anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke admitted for mechanical thrombectomy at our institution from August 2013 to October 2015 and treated by ADAPT for the endovascular treatment of stroke. Baseline and procedural characteristics, modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction scores, and 3-month modified Rankin Scale were captured and analyzed. Among the 347 patients (occlusion sites: middle cerebral artery=200, 58%; internal carotid artery Siphon=89, 25%; Tandem=58, 17%), aspiration component led to successful reperfusion (modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2b/3 scores) in 55.6% (193/347 patients), stent retrievers were required in 40%, and a total successful final reperfusion rate of 83% (288/347) was achieved. Overall, procedural complications occurred in 13.3% of patients (48/347). Modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 2 at 90 days was reported in 45% (144/323). Only 2 factors positively influenced the success of the aspiration component: an isolated middle cerebral artery occlusion ( P stroke onset to clot contact ( P =0.018). In this large retrospective study, ADAPT was shown to be safe and effective for anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke with a final successful reperfusion achieved in 83%. The site of arterial occlusion and delay of the procedure were predictors for reperfusion. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02523261, NCT02678169, and NCT02466893. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. [Collateral score based on CT perfusion can predict the prognosis of patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke after thrombectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Meixia; Chen, Zhicai; Lou, Min

    2017-07-25

    To evaluate the value of collateral score based on CT perfusion (CTP-CS) in predicting the clinical outcome of patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke after thrombectomy. Clinical data of acute ischemic stroke patients with anterior artery occlusion undergoing endovascular treatment in the Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine during October 2013 and October 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Collateral scores were assessed based on CTP and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images, respectively. And DSA-CS or CTP-CS 3-4 was defined as good collateral vessels. Good clinical outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ≤ 2 at 3 months after stroke. The binary logistic regression model was used to analyze the correlation between the collateral score and clinical outcome, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze the value of DSA-CS and CTP-CS in predicting the clinical outcome. Among 40 patients, 33 (82.5%) acquired recanalization and 16 (40.0%) got good outcome. Compared with poor outcome group, the collateral score (all P collateral vessels were higher in good outcome group (all P collateral vessels were independent factor of good outcome (CTP-CS: OR =48.404, 95% CI :1.373-1706.585, P Collateral scores based on CTP and DSA had good consistency ( κ =0.697, P <0.01), and ROC curve showed that the predictive value of CTP-CS and DSA-CS were comparable (both AUC=0.726, 95% CI :0.559-0.893, P <0.05). CTP-CS can predict the clinical outcome of patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke after thrombectomy.

  14. Associations Between Collateral Status and Thrombus Characteristics and Their Impact in Anterior Circulation Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Heitor C; Treurniet, Kilian M; Dutra, Bruna G; Jansen, Ivo G H; Boers, Anna M M; Santos, Emilie M M; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Dippel, Diederik W J; van der Lugt, Aad; van Zwam, Wim H; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Lingsma, Hester F; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Yoo, Albert J; Marquering, Henk A; Majoie, Charles B L M

    2018-02-01

    Thrombus characteristics and collateral score are associated with functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. It has been suggested that they affect each other. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between clot burden score, thrombus perviousness, and collateral score and to determine whether collateral score influences the association of thrombus characteristics with functional outcome. Patients with baseline thin-slice noncontrast computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography images from the MR CLEAN trial (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands) were included (n=195). Collateral score and clot burden scores were determined on baseline computed tomographic angiography. Thrombus attenuation increase was determined by comparing thrombus density on noncontrast computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography using a semiautomated method. The association of collateral score with clot burden score and thrombus attenuation increase was evaluated with linear regression. Mediation and effect modification analyses were used to assess the influence of collateral score on the association of clot burden score and thrombus attenuation increase with functional outcome. A higher clot burden score (B=0.063; 95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.118) and a higher thrombus attenuation increase (B=0.014; 95% confidence interval, 0.003-0.026) were associated with higher collateral score. Collateral score mediated the association of clot burden score with functional outcome. The association between thrombus attenuation increase and functional outcome was modified by the collateral score, and this association was stronger in patients with moderate and good collaterals. Patients with lower thrombus burden and higher thrombus perviousness scores had higher collateral score. The positive effect of thrombus perviousness on clinical outcome was only present in patients with

  15. Computer modelling of anterior circulation stroke: Proof of concept in Cerebrovascular Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THANH G PHAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current literature emphasizes the role of the Circle of Willis (CoW in salvaging ischemic brain tissue but not that of leptomeningeal anastomoses (LA. We developed a computational model of the cerebral circulation to 1 evaluate the roles of the CoW and LA in restoring flow to the superficial compartment of the middle cerebral artery territory and 2 estimate the size of the LA required to maintain flow above the critical ischemic threshold (>30% of baseline under simulated occlusion. Methods: Cerebral vasculature was modelled as a network of junctions connected by cylindrical pipes. The experiments included occlusion of successive distal branches of the intracranial arteries while the diameters of LA were varied. Results: The model showed that the region of reduced flow became progressively smaller as the site of occlusion was moved from the large proximal to the smaller distal arteries. There was no improvement in flow in the MCA territory when the diameters of the inter-territorial LA were varied from 0.0625 mm to 0.5 mm while keeping the intra-territorial LA constant. By contrast, the diameter of the inter-territorial LA needed to be greater than 1.0 mm in order to provide adequate (>30% flow to selected arteries in the occluded MCA territory. Conclusions: The CoW and inter-territorial LA together play important supportive roles in intracranial artery occlusion. Computational modelling provides the ability to experimentally investigate the effect of arterial occlusion on CoW and LA function.

  16. Blink Reflex as a Complementary Test to MRI in Early Detection of Brainstem Infarctions: Comparison of Blink Reflex Abnormalities in Anterior Versus Posterior Circulation Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Basiri

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early detection of vertebro-basilar insufficiency is of paramount importance. Brain MRI was the only method of diagnosis for many years, but in addition to high cost and delay in report, it may not detect all brain stem lesions. In this study Blink reflex (BR was evaluated as a complementary test to MRI. Methods: Fifty-four patients were studied [27 anterior circulation stroke patients (ACSP and 27 posterior circulation stroke patients (PCSP]. MRI was performed within the first week after the onset of stroke. Nineteen age and sex matched healthy people enrolled as controls. BR was performed within the first 24 hours of the onset. Frequency of abnormal blink reflex in ACSP and PCSP was compared with MRI findings. Then abnormal responses in two groups were compared by chi-square test. Results: In both ACSP and PCSP, two patients had normal BR responses, and in 25 patients R1 or R2 components of blink responses were absent or prolonged (92.5%. R1was absent or delayed in 16 PCSP, but it was abnormal in only two ACSP (P < 0.001. Abnormal R2 responses were detected in 22 PCSP and 24 ACSP. Conclusion: BR abnormalities had high correlation with MRI findings in PCSP (92.5% BR can be performed within the first 24 hours of onset of stroke, and its results is available immediately. This test is easy to perform and comfortable for the patient, has low cost, and is available every where. Therefore we introduced BR as a complementary (but not replacing test to MRI in early detection of brainstem infarctions. Comparison of BR responses in ACSP and PCSP showed that abnormalities of R1 responses had high accuracy in differentiation between anterior and posterior circulation strokes. We concluded that BR responses not only can detect brainstem infarctions rapidly and readily in its early stages, but also can differentiate ACSP from PCSP with high accuracy. Keywords: Blink Reflex, Anterior Circulation Stroke, Posterior Circulation Stroke Patients

  17. Effect of general anaesthesia on functional outcome in patients with anterior circulation ischaemic stroke having endovascular thrombectomy versus standard care: a meta-analysis of individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce C V; van Zwam, Wim H; Goyal, Mayank; Menon, Bijoy K; Dippel, Diederik W J; Demchuk, Andrew M; Bracard, Serge; White, Philip; Dávalos, Antoni; Majoie, Charles B L M; van der Lugt, Aad; Ford, Gary A; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Kelly, Michael; Bourcier, Romain; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Bang, Oh Young; Nogueira, Raul G; Devlin, Thomas G; van den Berg, Lucie A; Clarençon, Frédéric; Burns, Paul; Carpenter, Jeffrey; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Yavagal, Dileep R; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Ducrocq, Xavier; Dixit, Anand; Quesada, Helena; Epstein, Jonathan; Davis, Stephen M; Jansen, Olav; Rubiera, Marta; Urra, Xabier; Micard, Emilien; Lingsma, Hester F; Naggara, Olivier; Brown, Scott; Guillemin, Francis; Muir, Keith W; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Jovin, Tudor G; Hill, Michael D; Mitchell, Peter J

    2018-01-01

    General anaesthesia (GA) during endovascular thrombectomy has been associated with worse patient outcomes in observational studies compared with patients treated without GA. We assessed functional outcome in ischaemic stroke patients with large vessel anterior circulation occlusion undergoing endovascular thrombectomy under GA, versus thrombectomy not under GA (with or without sedation) versus standard care (ie, no thrombectomy), stratified by the use of GA versus standard care. For this meta-analysis, patient-level data were pooled from all patients included in randomised trials in PuMed published between Jan 1, 2010, and May 31, 2017, that compared endovascular thrombectomy predominantly done with stent retrievers with standard care in anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients (HERMES Collaboration). The primary outcome was functional outcome assessed by ordinal analysis of the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 90 days in the GA and non-GA subgroups of patients treated with endovascular therapy versus those patients treated with standard care, adjusted for baseline prognostic variables. To account for between-trial variance we used mixed-effects modelling with a random effect for trials incorporated in all models. Bias was assessed using the Cochrane method. The meta-analysis was prospectively designed, but not registered. Seven trials were identified by our search; of 1764 patients included in these trials, 871 were allocated to endovascular thrombectomy and 893 were assigned standard care. After exclusion of 74 patients (72 did not undergo the procedure and two had missing data on anaesthetic strategy), 236 (30%) of 797 patients who had endovascular procedures were treated under GA. At baseline, patients receiving GA were younger and had a shorter delay between stroke onset and randomisation but they had similar pre-treatment clinical severity compared with patients who did not have GA. Endovascular thrombectomy improved functional outcome at 3 months both in

  18. Ischemic Posterior Circulation Stroke: A Review of Anatomy, Clinical Presentations, Diagnosis and Current Management

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    Amre eNouh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior circulation (PC strokes represent approximately 20% of all ischemic strokes. In contrast to the anterior circulation (AC several differences in presenting symptoms, clinical evaluation, diagnostic testing and management strategy exist which may present a challenge to the treating physician. This review will discuss the anatomical, etiological and clinical classification of PC strokes, identify diagnostic pitfalls and overview current therapeutic regimens.

  19. Multidetector computed tomography angiography in clinically suspected hyperacute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation: an etiological workup in a cohort of Brazilian patients

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    Felipe Torres Pacheco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective The potential of computed tomography angiography (CTA was assessed for early determination of stroke subtypes in a Brazilian cohort of patients with stroke. Method From July 2011 to July 2013, we selected patients with suspected hyperacute stroke (< 6 hours. Intracranial and cervical arteries were scrutinized on CTA and their imaging features were correlated with concurrent subtype of stroke. Results Stroke was documented in 50/106 selected patients (47.2% based on both clinical grounds and imaging follow-up (stroke group, with statistically significant arterial stenosis and vulnerable plaques on CTA. Intracranial large artery disease was demonstrated in 34% of patients in the stroke group. Partial territorial infarct prevailed (86% while artery-to-artery embolization was the most common stroke mechanism (52%. Conclusion Multidetector CTA was useful for the etiologic work-up of hyperacute ischemic stroke and facilitated the knowledge about the topographic pattern of brain infarct in accordance with its causative mechanism.

  20. Initial clinical experience using the two-stage aspiration technique (TSAT) with proximal flow arrest by a balloon guiding catheter for acute ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Hirokazu; Tetsuo, Yoshiaki; Takemoto, Hideki; Nakao, Naoyuki

    2017-12-01

    Our initial experience using the two-stage aspiration technique (TSAT) with proximal flow arrest by a balloon guiding catheter is presented. In TSAT, aspiration is applied with the 5MAX ACE and also with the 3MAX catheter with a Penumbra aspiration pump, while arresting proximal flow by balloon inflation. In patients treated with TSAT, clinical data including National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at discharge, as well as procedural data including the Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score, procedural time, and complications were analyzed. Thirty-four consecutive patients (19 men (56%); mean age 73 years) were treated with TSAT using a balloon guiding catheter. The patients presented with a mean NIHSS score of 17.4 and 23 (68%) patients received IV tissue plasminogen activator. Median time from groin puncture to successful recanalization was 41 min (range 15-160 min). All patients were successfully revascularized; TICI 2b or better recanalization was achieved in 30 (88%) patients. No patient required an additional procedure such as use of a stent retriever. Procedure-related complications occurred in two (5.9%) patients (vessel injury and guidewire perforation). Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in one patient and asymptomatic hemorrhagic infarction occurred in two patients. There were no cases of embolization to new territory (ENT). The mean NIHSS score at discharge improved to 6.1. Sixteen patients (47%) achieved a good outcome with an mRS score of 0-2 at discharge (mean hospitalization period 20 days). TSAT with proximal flow arrest by a balloon guiding catheter is an effective and safe method to achieve good clinical and angiographic outcomes. This method may reduce ENT in the direct aspiration first-pass thrombectomy (ADAPT) technique. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  1. Blood pressure and collateral circulation in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wufuer, A; Mijiti, P; Abudusalamu, R; Dengfeng, H; Jian, C; Jianhua, M; Xiaoning, Z

    2018-03-20

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different blood pressure (BP) parameters on the collateral circulation in a retrospective cohort of patients with acute ischemic stroke and ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. The degree of intracranial collaterals was graded according to the American Society of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology/Society of Interventional Radiology (ASITN/SIR) Collateral Flow Grading System. At 12-72 h after stroke onset, six BP measurements were obtained in 124 patients with ICA occlusion. Baseline clinical and imaging characteristics were collected. Group comparisons were performed, and the collateral score (CS) was assessed and entered into a logistic regression analysis. In all, 80 (64.5%) patients displayed good collateral filling (CS ≥ 2). Good intracranial collaterals were more frequently associated with the development of collaterals in the anterior communicating artery, posterior communicating artery, and leptomeningeal artery. The systolic blood pressure (SBP; p = 0.018), diastolic blood pressure (DBP; p = 0.013), and mean arterial pressure (MAP; p = 0.016) were significantly associated with good CS. Median CS was highest when SBP was 120-130 mm Hg (p = 0.034). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension (p = 0.026, OR: 0.380, 95% CI: 0.163-0.890) was a significant predictor of poor CS. The development of collateral circulation in patients with acute ischemic stroke with ICA occlusion may be influenced by BP. A moderately decreased SBP is associated with good integrity of the collateral circulation in patients with acute ischemic stroke with occlusion of the ICA.

  2. Infratentorial posterior circulation stroke in a Nigerian population: Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and predictors of outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukman Femi Owolabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior circulation stroke (PCS, though less common, differs from stroke in anterior circulation in many aspects. Relatively, it portends a poorer prognosis. However, there is a paucity of data from African countries, in particular, where stroke is a menace. Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the etiology, clinical characteristics, outcome, and predictors of outcome in a cohort of patients with IPCS in Northwestern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Out of 595 patients with stroke, we prospectively analyzed 57 patients with PCS in a Tertiary Care Center in Kano, Northwestern Nigeria. Patients were analyzed for demographic data, risk factors, clinical characteristics, stroke subtypes, mortality, and predictors of mortality. Results: Posterior circulation ischemic stroke accounted for 57 (9.6% of 595 of all strokes seen in the study period. They comprised 44 males (mean age 47.8 ± 17.7 and 13 females (mean age 46.3 ± 13.7. Overall, their age ranged between 24 and 90 (mean age 47.4 ± 16.7. However, 52.7% of the patients were < 45 years of age. The most common site affected was the cerebellum seen in 33 (57.9% patients. Hypertension was the most common risk factor (86%. Headache and vertigo were the most common features accounting for 83.6% and 86.3%, respectively. Thirty-eight (66.7% patients had an ischemic stroke. Twenty-one (36.8% of the patients died during the 1-month period of follow-up. Independent predictors of death in the study were hyperglycemia on admission and hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions: IPCS occurred in a relatively younger age group. Headache and vertigo were the most common symptoms. The independent predictors of death in the study were hyperglycemia at presentation and hemorrhagic stroke.

  3. Mechanical thrombectomy for basilar artery thrombosis: a comparison of outcomes with anterior circulation occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, María; Kawiorski, Michal M; Ximénez-Carrillo, Álvaro; Cruz-Culebras, Antonio; García-Pastor, Andrés; Martínez-Sánchez, Patricia; Fernández-Prieto, Andrés; Caniego, José Luis; Méndez, Jose Carlos; Zapata-Wainberg, Gustavo; De Felipe-Mimbrera, Alicia; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Frutos, Remedios; Bárcena-Ruiz, Eduardo; Fandiño, Eduardo; Marín, Begoña; Vivancos, José; Masjuan, Jaime; Gil-Nuñez, Antonio; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Fuentes, Blanca

    2017-12-01

    The benefits of mechanical thrombectomy (MT) in basilar artery occlusions (BAO) have not been explored in recent clinical trials. We compared outcomes and procedural complications of MT in BAO with anterior circulation occlusions. Data from the Madrid Stroke Network multicenter prospective registry were analyzed, including baseline characteristics, procedure times, procedural complications, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and mortality at 3 months. Of 479 patients treated with MT, 52 (11%) had BAO. The onset to reperfusion time lapse was longer in patients with BAO (median (IQR) 385 min (320-540) vs 315 min (240-415), p<0.001), as was the duration of the procedures (100 min (40-130) vs 60 min (39-90), p=0.006). Moreover, the recanalization rate was lower (75% vs 84%, p=0.01). A trend toward more procedural complications was observed in patients with BAO (32% vs 21%, p=0.075). The frequency of SICH was 2% vs 5% (p=0.25). At 3 months, patients with BAO had a lower rate of independence (mRS 0-2) (40% vs 58%, p=0.016) and higher mortality (33% vs 12%, p<0.001). The rate of futile recanalization was 50% in BAO versus 35% in anterior circulation occlusions (p=0.05). Age and duration of the procedure were significant predictors of futile recanalization in BAO. MT is more laborious and shows more procedural complications in BAO than in anterior circulation strokes. The likelihood of futile recanalization is higher in BAO and is associated with greater age and longer procedure duration. A refinement of endovascular procedures for BAO might help optimize the results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Hyperdense basilar artery sign diagnoses acute posterior circulation stroke and predicts short-term outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xiaoping [Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University at Shenyang, Department of Neurology, Shengjing Hospital, Shenyang (China); Guo, Yang [Shengjing Hospital, Department of Neurology, Shenyang (China)

    2010-12-15

    It is well established that the hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign is a specific marker for early ischemia in anterior circulation. However, little is known about the hyperdense basilar artery sign (HDBA) in posterior circulation. Our aim was to determine whether the HDBA sign has utility in early diagnosis of acute posterior circulation stroke and prediction of short-term outcome. Three-blinded readers examined unenhanced computed tomography scans for the HDBA sign, and materials were classified into two groups according to this sign. Vascular risk factors, admission and discharge National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, short-term outcome, and radiological findings between the two groups were compared. One hundred and twenty-six cases of acute posterior circulation stroke (PCS) were included in the study. No statistically significant differences were found in risk factors of ischemic stroke, except atrial fibrillation (P = 0.025). Admission and discharge NIHSS scores for the positive HDBA group were significantly higher than scores for the negative HDBA group (P = 0.001, 0.002, respectively). The infarction territory for the positive HDBA group was mainly multi-region in nature (51.6%, P < 0.001), while the negative HDBA group showed mainly middle territory infarction. Significant independent predictors of short-term outcome included the HDBA sign (P < 0.001) and admission NIHSS scores (P < 0.001). Approximately half of the HDBA patients showed multi-region infarction and a serious neurological symptom. Based on our results, this sign might not only be helpful in early diagnosis of acute PCS but also be able to correlate with a poor short-term outcome. (orig.)

  5. Selective associative phonagnosia after right anterior temporal stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzi, Simona; Coccia, Michela; Polonara, Gabriele; Reverberi, Carlo; Ceravolo, Gabriella; Silvestrini, Mauro; Fringuelli, Fabio; Baldinelli, Sara; Provinciali, Leandro; Gainotti, Guido

    2017-05-12

    We report the case of a 48 year old men who developed a selective impairment in famous voice recognition after ischemic stroke in right subcortical structures (lenticular nucleus and head of the caudate) and right anterior temporal lobe. He underwent fibrinolytic treatment. During the following days he progressively recovered and was discharged without neurological focal sign. Patent foramen ovale was found. When he got back to his house he noticed that he was unable to recognize the voice of his favoured singers and needed to ask who was the singer to his relatives. Neuropsychological examination revealed a selective impairment in famous voice recognition in the absence of alteration of voice perception, face perception and famous face recognition. All other neuropsychological domains were spared. In particular language, memory and executive functions were intact. Neuroimaging carried out by means of PET and MRI revealed two small ischemic lesions in the right subcortical region, involving lenticular and caudate nuclei and in the right temporal pole. To our knowledge, this is the first case described in literature of a patient showing a selective associative phonagnosia after right anterior temporal stroke. The present case helps to clarify the brain circuits underlying famous voice recognition and adds evidence in favour of a right hemisphere involvement in processing knowledge of familiar voices. These findings are discussed in relation to current models of brain organization of person-specific and general semantic knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole brain CT perfusion in acute anterior circulation ischemia: coverage size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmer, B.J. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Postbus 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rijkee, M.; Walderveen, M.A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Niesten, J.M.; Velthuis, B.K. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wermer, M.J.H. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Our aim was to compare infarct core volume on whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) with several limited coverage sizes (i.e., 3, 4, 6, and 8 cm), as currently used in routine clinical practice. In total, 40 acute ischemic stroke patients with non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTP imaging of anterior circulation ischemia were included. Imaging was performed using a 320-multislice CT. Average volumes of infarct core of all simulated partial coverage sizes were calculated. Infarct core volume of each partial brain coverage was compared with infarct core volume of whole brain coverage and expressed using a percentage. To determine the optimal starting position for each simulated CTP coverage, the percentage of infarct coverage was calculated for every possible starting position of the simulated partial coverage in relation to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in Acute Stroke Triage (ASPECTS 1) level. Whole brain CTP coverage further increased the percentage of infarct core volume depicted by 10 % as compared to the 8-cm coverage when the bottom slice was positioned at the ASPECTS 1 level. Optimization of the position of the region of interest (ROI) in 3 cm, 4 cm, and 8 cm improved the percentage of infarct depicted by 4 % for the 8-cm, 7 % for the 4-cm, and 13 % for the 3-cm coverage size. This study shows that whole brain CTP is the optimal coverage for CTP with a substantial improvement in accuracy in quantifying infarct core size. In addition, our results suggest that the optimal position of the ROI in limited coverage depends on the size of the coverage. (orig.)

  7. Prediction of Recurrent Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack After Noncardiogenic Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Wang, ChunXue; Pu, Yuehua; Zou, Xinying; Pan, Yuesong; Wong, Ka Sing; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-07-01

    Posterior circulation ischemic stroke (IS) is generally considered an illness with a poor prognosis. However, there are no effective rating scales to predict recurrent stroke following it. Therefore, our aim was to identify clinical or radiological measures that could assist in predicting recurrent cerebral ischemic episodes. We prospectively enrolled 723 noncardiogenic posterior circulation IS patients with onset of symptoms Stroke risk factors, admission symptoms and signs, topographical distribution and responsible cerebral artery of acute infarcts, and any recurrent IS or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within 1 year were assessed. Cox regression was used to identify risk factors associated with recurrent IS or TIA within the year after posterior circulation IS. A total of 40 patients (5.5%) had recurrent IS or TIA within 1 year of posterior circulation IS. Multivariate Cox regression identified chief complaint with dysphagia (hazard ratio [HR], 4.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69-10.2; P =0.002), repeated TIAs within 3 months before the stroke (HR, 15.4; 95% CI, 5.55-42.5; P <0.0001), responsible artery stenosis ≥70% (HR, 7.91; 95% CI, 1.00-62.6; P =0.05), multisector infarcts (HR, 5.38; 95% CI, 1.25-23.3; P =0.02), and not on antithrombotics treatment at discharge (HR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.09-8.58; P =0.03) as independent predictors of recurrent IS or TIA. Some posterior circulation IS patients are at higher risk for recurrent IS or TIA. Urgent assessment and preventive treatment should be offered to these patients as soon as possible. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Isolated vestibular syndrome in posterior circulation stroke: Frequency and involved structures

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Kwang-Dong; Kim, Min-Ji; Choi, Yu Ri; Cho, Han-Jin; Sung, Sang-Min; Kim, Hak-Jin; Kim, Ji-Soo; Jung, Dae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Dizziness/vertigo is a common symptom of posterior circulation stroke and usually accompanies other neurologic symptoms and signs. Although strokes involving the brainstem or cerebellum may produce isolated vestibular syndrome (isolated vertigo or imbalance), the overall frequency and involved structures of isolated vestibular syndrome in the posterior circulation stroke remain uncertain. Isolated vestibular syndrome occurs in approximately 25% of the patients with posterior circulation strok...

  9. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke subtypes assessed four OCSP (Oxfordshire Communi-. African Health Sciences Vol 15 Issue 1, March 2015. 68. 69 ty Stroke Project Classification) subtypes classification. 13 was used with lacunar circulation infarct (LACI) and total anterior (TACI), partial anterior (PACI), posterior. (POCI) circulation infarcts as non ...

  10. Isolated vestibular syndrome in posterior circulation stroke: Frequency and involved structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Kwang-Dong; Kim, Min-Ji; Choi, Yu Ri; Cho, Han-Jin; Sung, Sang-Min; Kim, Hak-Jin; Kim, Ji-Soo; Jung, Dae-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Dizziness/vertigo is a common symptom of posterior circulation stroke and usually accompanies other neurologic symptoms and signs. Although strokes involving the brainstem or cerebellum may produce isolated vestibular syndrome (isolated vertigo or imbalance), the overall frequency and involved structures of isolated vestibular syndrome in the posterior circulation stroke remain uncertain. Isolated vestibular syndrome occurs in approximately 25% of the patients with posterior circulation stroke, and mostly involves the cerebellum, inferior or superior cerebellar peduncles, and caudal lateral or rostral dorsolateral medulla. The occasional negative neuroimaging in patients with acute isolated vascular vertigo highlights the importance of appropriate bedside evaluation in acute vestibular syndrome.

  11. Surgical experience of minipterional craniotomy with 102 ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Welling, Leonardo C; Preul, Mark C; Sakaya, Gabriel Reis; Neville, Iuri; Spetzler, Robert F; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2016-05-01

    The pterional approach was described in the 1970s and has become the most utilized cranial approach with many variations described, including the minipterional technique. Although described recently as an alternative to the pterional approach for anterior circulation aneurysms, to our knowledge a large series of cases using the minipterional approach in both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has not been described. We present our clinical experience with the minipterional craniotomy in more than 100 ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. The results of 86 consecutive patients with 102 ruptured non-giant, anterior circulation aneurysms treated with early surgery utilizing the minipterional craniotomy were analyzed. Postoperative angiography was carried out in all cases. Outcome results were classified as excellent in 67 (77.9%), and good in seven (8.1%), while 16 (13.9%) patients died. The minipterional technique provides adequate surgical exposure and excellent outcomes for both ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysm clipping. It constitutes a safe and effective alternative to the pterional approach, with equivalent or potentially better aesthetic and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The outcome of a surgical protocol based on ischemia overprotection in large and giant aneurysms of the anterior cerebral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Hideaki; Watanabe, Katsushige; Miyagishima, Takaaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Kin, Taichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-07-01

    Aiming to define the optimal treatment of large and giant aneurysms (LGAs) in the anterior circulation, we present our surgical protocol and patient outcome. A series of 42 patients with intracavernous LGAs (n = 16), paraclinoid (C2) LGAs (n = 17), and peripheral (middle cerebral artery-MCA or anterior cerebral artery-ACA) LGAs (n = 9) were treated after bypass under motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring. Preoperatively, three categories of ischemic tolerance during internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion were defined on conventional angiography: optimal, suboptimal, and insufficient collaterals. Accordingly, three types of bypass: low flow (LFB), middle flow (MFB) and high flow (HFB) were applied for the cases with optimal, suboptimal, and insufficient collaterals, respectively. Outcome was evaluated by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). All patients had excellent GOS score except one, who suffered a major ischemic stroke immediately after surgery for a paraclinoid lesion. Forty-one patients were followed up for 87.1 ± 40.1 months (range 13-144 months). Intracavernous LGAs were all treated by proximal occlusion with bypass surgery. Of paraclinoid LGA patients, 15 patients had direct clipping under suction decompression and other 2 patients with recurrent aneurysms had ICA (C2) proximal clipping with HFB. MEP monitoring guided for temporary clipping time and clip repositioning, observing significant MEP changes for up to 6 min duration. Of 9 peripheral LGAs patients 7 MCA LGAs had reconstructive clipping (n = 4) or trapping (n = 3) with bypass including LFB in 3 cases, MFB in 1 and HFB in 1. Two ACA LGAs had clipping (n = 1) or trapping (n = 1) with A3-A3 bypass. The applied protocol provided excellent results in intracavernous, paraclinoid, and peripheral thrombosed LGAs of the anterior circulation.

  13. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers of Acute Stroke

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    Sugunavathi Sepramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have been identified as key regulators of gene expression and thus their potential in disease diagnostics, prognosis and therapy is being actively pursued. Deregulation of microRNAs in cerebral pathogenesis has been reported to a limited extent in both animal models and human. Due to the complexity of the pathology, identifying stroke specific microRNAs has been a challenge. This study shows that microRNA profiles reflect not only the temporal progression of stroke but also the specific etiologies. A panel of 32 microRNAs, which could differentiate stroke etiologies during acute phase was identified and verified using a customized TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA. Furthermore we also found 5 microRNAs, miR-125b-2*, -27a*, -422a, -488 and -627 to be consistently altered in acute stroke irrespective of age or severity or confounding metabolic complications. Differential expression of these 5 microRNAs was also observed in rat stroke models. Hence, their specificity to the stroke pathology emphasizes the possibility of developing these microRNAs into accurate and useful tools for diagnosis of stroke.

  14. Chicken primordial germ cells use the anterior vitelline veins to enter the embryonic circulation

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    Ana De Melo Bernardo

    2012-09-01

    During gastrulation, chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs are present in an extraembryonic region of the embryo from where they migrate towards the genital ridges. This is also observed in mammals, but in chicken the vehicle used by the migratory PGCs is the vascular system. We have analysed the migratory pathway of chicken PGCs, focusing on the period of transition from the extraembryonic region to the intraembryonic vascular system. Our findings show that at Hamburger and Hamilton developmental stage HH12–HH14 the majority of PGCs concentrate axially in the sinus terminalis and favour transport axially via the anterior vitelline veins into the embryonic circulation. Moreover, directly blocking the blood flow through the anterior vitelline veins resulted in an accumulation of PGCs in the anterior region and a decreased number of PGCs in the genital ridges. We further confirmed the key role for the anterior vitelline veins in the correct migration of PGCs using an ex ovo culture method that resulted in defective morphogenetic development of the anterior vitelline veins. We propose a novel model for the migratory pathway of chicken PGCs whereby the anterior vitelline veins play a central role at the extraembryonic and embryonic interface. The chicken model of PGC migration through the vasculature may be a powerful tool to study the process of homing (inflammation and metastasis due to the striking similarities in regulatory signaling pathways (SDF1–CXCR4 and the transient role of the vasculature.

  15. Increased risk of posterior circulation infarcts among ischemic stroke patients with cervical spondylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chi; Chung, Chia-Ying; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Chang, Wei-Han; Tang, Simon FT; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical spondylosis is one of the extrinsic factors causing vertebral artery stenosis. Several case studies have reported compression of the vertebral artery induced by cervical osteophytes that has resulted in posterior circulation infarcts (POCI). However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have yet analyzed differences in the risk factors and stroke subtypes between ischemic stroke patients with cervical spondylosis and those without. Purpose In the case-controlled study reported here, we analyzed the risk factors and stroke subtypes in ischemic stroke patients with and without cervical spondylosis. Characteristics in all the recruited patients with POCI and non-POCI were further compared to extract other risk factors that could predict the occurrence of POCI. Methods and patients We filtered out ischemic stroke patients with cervical spondylosis (“Stroke+C” group) by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. We analyzed the data of 38 subjects in the Stroke+C group and 152 sex- and age-comparable ischemic stroke patients without cervical spondylosis (“Stroke−C” group). We recorded the demographic characteristics including sex and age, and stroke risk factors, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart disease, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habits. The stroke classifications were defined by the Oxford Community Stroke Project classification. All subjects were further categorized into POCI or non-POCI groups. The ultrasound findings of the vertebral arteries (extracranial and intracranial) in the Stroke+C group were also recorded. Results More patients in the Stroke+C group tended to have POCI (34.2%) than patients in the Stroke−C group (17.5%) (odds ratio [OR] =2.41, Pspondylosis (OR=2.41, Pspondylosis are more prone to POCI than those without cervical spondylosis. Hypertension is another identified risk factor for POCI in ischemic stroke patients. The occurrence of POCI should be highlighted for patients

  16. Flow diverter stents for unruptured saccular anterior circulation perforating artery aneurysms: safety, efficacy, and short-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Anna Luisa; Hou, Samuel Y; Perras, Mary; Brooks, Christopher; Gounis, Matthew J; Wakhloo, Ajay K; Puri, Ajit S

    2015-09-01

    Anterior circulation perforating artery aneurysms including anterior choroidal artery and lenticulostriate artery aneurysms are rare. Injury to these vessels can lead to severe debilitating symptoms. To present a new approach to treatment using flow diversion technology. Patients treated with a Pipeline embolization device (PED) for perforator artery aneurysms at our institution between June 2012 and May 2013 were identified and included in our retrospective analysis. We evaluated patient vascular risk factors; family history of aneurysms; aneurysm characteristics; National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on admission; and angiography follow-up and patient clinical outcome at discharge, 6 months, and 1 year. We included four patients with a mean age of 59.8 years. Two patients had a positive family history of aneurysms. Patient vascular risk factors included smoking, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. All patients presented with a NIHSS and mRS of 0 on admission. Aneurysms were located at the anterior choroidal (n=2) or lenticulostriate artery (n=2) and were treated with a single PED. No periprocedural or postprocedural complications occurred. The patients were discharged with no change in NHISS or mRS score. Six-month and 1-year follow-up angiography showed complete aneurysm occlusion. Mild intimal hyperplasia was seen in 2 cases at 6 months, but was resolved at the 1-year follow-up. No re-treatment was necessary. NIHSS and mRS remained 0 at follow-up time points. Our preliminary results show that flow diversion technology is an effective and safe therapy for complex, hard-to-treat aneurysms in perforating arteries. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are needed to validate our promising results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Frequencies of circulating B- and T-lymphocytes as indicators for stroke outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Yanling Wang,1 Jihong Liu,1 Xuemei Wang,1 Zongjian Liu,2 Fengwu Li,1 Fenghua Chen,3 Xiaokun Geng,1 Zhili Ji,2 Huishan Du,1 Xiaoming Hu1,3 1Department of Neurology, China-America Institute of Neuroscience, 2Central Laboratory, Beijing Luhe Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Neurology, Pittsburgh Institute of Brain Disorders and Recovery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Background: Stroke has high mortality and morbidity. Biomarkers are required for to predict stroke outcomes, which could help clinicians to provide rationale approaches for patient management. The dynamic changes in circulating immune cells have been reported in stroke patients and animal models of stroke.Aim: The aim of this study was to explore biomarkers to predict stroke outcomes by investigating the relationship between the frequencies of circulating immune cells and stroke outcomes.Methods: In all, 50 acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients were enrolled. Their blood samples were collected upon hospital admission and on day 1 and day 7 after stroke, and the leukocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. The dynamic changes in some types of immune cells in the AIS course and their correlation with clinical parameters were analyzed. Blood samples from 123 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were used as controls.Results: The proportions of T-lymphocytes and NK cells in stroke patients were significantly lower than in healthy controls. The frequencies of B- and T-lymphocytes were negatively correlated with stroke severity at onset, including neurological deficits as assessed by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, and infarct volume as measured by the diffusion-weighted images (DWIs of magnetic resonance (MR. Logistic regression analysis showed that modified Rankin scale (mRs scores, a score system for the long-term neurological dysfunctions, were negatively correlated

  18. The Effect of Pitching Phase on the Vortex Circulation for a Flapping Wing During Stroke Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Matthew; Ringuette, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    We study the effect of pitching-phase on the circulation behavior for the 3D flow structures produced during stroke reversal for a 2-degree-of-freedom flapping wing executing hovering kinematics. Previous research has related the choice in pitching-phase with respect to the wing rotation during stroke reversal (advanced vs. symmetric pitch-timing) to a lift peak preceding stroke reversal. However, results from experiments on the time-varying circulation contributions from the 3D vortex structures across the span produced by both rotation and pitching are lacking. The objective of this research is to quantitatively examine how the spanwise circulation of these structures is affected by the pitching-phase for several reduced pitching frequencies. We employ a scaled wing model in a glycerin-water mixture and measure the time-varying velocity using multiple planes of stereo digital particle image velocimetry. Data-plane positions along the wing span are informed by the unsteady behavior of the 3D vortex structures found in our prior flow visualization movies. Individual vortices are identified to calculate their circulation. This work is aimed at understanding how the behavior of the vortex structures created during stroke reversal vary with key motion parameters. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Award Number 1336548, supervised by Dr. Ronald Joslin.

  19. The relationship between anterior pelvic tilt and gait, balance in patient with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Kim, Seong-Gil; Shin, Young-Jun; Choi, Eun-Hong; Choe, Yu-Won

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study is to find out the association between anterior pelvic tilt and gait and balance in chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. A palpation meter was employed to measure the anterior inclination of the pelvis. A GAITRite system automates measuring temporal and spatial gait parameters. A 10-Meter Walk test was used to measure gait speed. The Timed Up and Go test was used to measure the dynamic balance ability and gait ability of the participants. A BioRescue was used to assess balance by measuring the moving distance and area of the center of pressure. [Results] There were significant negative correlations between pelvic anterior tilt and velocity, step length, and stride. There were significant positive correlations between velocity and cadence, step length, and stride length. There were significant negative correlations between velocity and cycle time, H-H base, TUG, and 10MWT. There was significant negative correlation between cadence and cycle time and H-H base. [Conclusion] This study showed a negative correlation between pelvic anterior tilt and gait function including gait speed and step length.

  20. Outcome of patients with proximal vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation and DWI-PWI mismatch is time-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundiyanapurath, Sibu; Diatschuk, Sascha; Loebel, Sarah; Pfaff, Johannes; Pham, Mirko; Möhlenbruch, Markus Alfred; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Ringleb, Peter A; Radbruch, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Patients with ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion are assumed to benefit from endovascular therapy (ET) independent of the symptom onset-to-treatment time (OTT) if they present with a mismatch of diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging (DWI-PWI mismatch). We aimed at studying the influence of OTT on clinical outcome in these patients. Retrospective database review in a tertiary care university hospital. All patients presented with proximal vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation and DWI-PWI mismatch. Primary outcome was the influence of OTT on modified Rankin scale (mRS) score three months after treatment, dichotomized in favourable (0-2) and unfavourable outcome (3-6). Secondary outcome was the effect of OTT on the shift of the mRS score. Patients treated within an early time window (mismatch according to the definitions from large trials (DEFUSE 2, DEFUSE 3, SWIFT-PRIME, EXTEND-IA). Outcome of patients with comparable DWI-PWI mismatch is time-dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The cerebral collateral circulation: Relevance to pathophysiology and treatment of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Myron D

    2017-08-09

    The brain's collateral circulation consists of arterial anastomotic channels capable of providing nutrient perfusion to brain regions whose normal sources of flow have become compromised, as occurs in acute ischemic stroke. Modern CT-based neuroimaging is capable of providing detailed information as to collateral extent and sufficiency and is complemented by magnetic resonance-based methods. In the present era of standard-of-care IV thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke, and following the recent therapeutic successes of randomized clinical trials of acute endovascular intervention, the sufficiency of the collateral circulation has been convincingly established as a key factor influencing the likelihood of successful reperfusion and favorable clinical outcome. This article reviews the features of the brain's collateral circulation; methods for its evaluation in the acute clinical setting; the relevance of collateral circulation to prognosis in acute ischemic stroke; the specific insights into the collateral circulation learned from recent trials of endovascular intervention; and the major influence of genetic factors. Finally, we emphasize the need to develop therapeutic approaches to augment collateral perfusion as an adjunctive strategy to be employed along with, or prior to, thrombolysis and endovascular interventions, and we highlight the possible potential of inhaled nitric oxide, albumin, and other approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Circulating Tissue Factor Levels and Risk of Stroke: Findings From the EPICOR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoviello, Licia; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; de Curtis, Amalia; Agnoli, Claudia; Frasca, Graziella; Mattiello, Amalia; Matullo, Giuseppe; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Grioni, Sara; Tumino, Rosario; Napoleone, Emanuela; Lorenzet, Roberto; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Panico, Salvatore; Donati, Maria Benedetta

    2015-06-01

    Tissue factor (TF) expression is increased in inflammatory atherosclerotic plaques and has been related to their thrombogenicity. Blood-borne TF has been also demonstrated to contribute to thrombogenesis. However, few studies have evaluated the association of circulating levels of TF with stroke. We investigated the association of baseline circulating levels of TF with stroke events occurred in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Italy cohort. Using a nested case-cohort design, a center-stratified random sample of 839 subjects (66% women; age range, 35-71 years) was selected as subcohort and compared with 292 strokes in a mean follow-up of 9 years. Blood samples were collected at baseline in citrate, plasma was stored in liquid nitrogen and TF was measured by ELISA (IMUBIND, TF ELISA, Instrumentation Laboratory, Milan, Italy). The odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted by relevant confounders (covariates of TF) and stratified by center, were estimated by a Cox regression model using Prentice method. Individuals in the highest compared with the lowest quartile of TF plasma levels had significantly increased risk of stroke (odds ratioIVvsI quartile, 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-3.23). The association was independent from several potential confounders (odds ratioIVvsI quartile, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-3.19). No differences were observed between men and women. The increase in risk was restricted to ischemic strokes (odds ratioIVvsI quartile, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-4.12; fully adjusted model), whereas high levels of TF were not associated with the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (odds ratioIVvsI quartile, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-2.55; fully adjusted model). Our data provide evidence that elevated levels of circulating TF are potential risk factors for ischemic strokes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Functional electrical stimulation applied to gluteus medius and tibialis anterior corresponding gait cycle for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Chung, Yijung; Kim, Young; Hwang, Sujin

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of functional electrical stimulation (FES) applied to the tibialis anterior and gluteus medius muscles on the improvement of the spatiotemporal parameters of gait in individuals with a hemiparetic stroke. Thirty-six patients who had suffered a hemiparesis post stroke were enrolled in this study. The participants walked at a self-selected velocity on three different FES applications: (1) FES-triggered gait on the gluteus medius in the stance phase and the tibialis anterior in the swing phase (GM+TA), (2) FES-triggered gait on the tibialis anterior in the swing phase (TA only), and (3) gait without FES-triggered (Non-FES). FES was triggered when the heel in the affected lower limb was placed in contact with an on or off foot switch sensor. The effect of FES applications was assessed using GAITRite for spatiotemporal data. The gait speed, cadence, and stride length were significantly higher under the GM+TA condition than under the TA only and None-FES conditions. The gait speed, cadence and stride length were increased significantly in the TA only condition compared with the Non-FES condition. The double support time and gait symmetry were significantly improved in the GM+TA condition compared to the TA only and Non-FES conditions. These findings suggest that walking with FES of the gluteus medius in the stance phase and tibialis anterior in the swing phase can improve the spatiotemporal parameters of gait in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Incidence and risk factors of chronic subdural hematoma after surgical clipping for unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Jae; Jo, Kyung-Il; Yeon, Je Young; Hong, Seung-Chyul; Kim, Jong-Soo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare complication of unruptured aneurysm clipping surgery. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and risk factors of postoperative CSDH after surgical clipping for unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. This retrospective study included 518 patients from a single tertiary institute from January 2008 to December 2013. CSDH was defined as subdural hemorrhage which needed surgical treatment. The degree of brain atrophy was estimated using the bicaudate ratio (BCR) index. We used uni- and multivariate analyses to identify risk factors correlated with CSDH. Sixteen (3.1%) patients experienced postoperative CSDH that required burr hole drainage surgery. In univariate analyses, male gender (p<0.001), size of aneurysm (p=0.030), higher BCR index (p=0.004), and the use of antithrombotic medication (p=0.006) were associated with postoperative CSDH. In multivariate analyses using logistic regression test, male gender [odds ratio (OR) 4.037, range 1.287-12.688], high BCR index (OR 5.376, range 1.170-25.000), and the use of antithrombotic medication (OR 4.854, range 1.658-14.085) were associated with postoperative CSDH (p<0.05). Postoperative subdural fluid collection and arachnoid plasty were not showed statistically significant difference in this study. The incidence of CSDH was 3.1% in unruptured anterior circulation aneurysm surgery. This study shows that male gender, degree of brain atrophy, and the use of antithrombotic medication were associated with postoperative CSDH.

  5. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: outcome of aneurysm clipping versus coiling in anterior circulation aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadd, I.H.; Haroon, A.; Ansari, S.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the neurological outcome of microsurgical clipping versus coiling in patients with anterior circulation aneurysm. Study Design: Comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Neurosurgery, Lahore General Hospital, Lahore, from January 2010 to December 2013. Methodology: Patients aged 14 - 60 years, with ruptured cerebral aneurysm of anterior circulation and World Federation of Neurosurgical Society (WFNS) grades 1, 2 and 3 were included. Patients more than 60 years, medically unfit patient and posterior circulation aneurysms and WFNS grades 4 and 5 were excluded. Aneurysm sac obliteration was done in randomized manner with microsurgical clipping or coiling. Postoperatively, the patients were assessed and followed-up upto one year for outcome parameters on the bases of WFNS grade and Modified Ranking Scale (mRS) as favourable (mRS =2 ) and unfavourable (mRS > 2). Results: Among 140 subjects selected for study, 70 were included in group A, i.e. coiling and other 70 were in group B, i.e. clipping. The median age of patients in group A was 52.5 ± 10 years and in group B was 51.00 ± years. Overall, 56 (40%) males, 28 (60%) males in each group; and 84 (60%) females, 42 (60%) in each group were included. The male to female ratio in this study was 1:1.5. In group A, i.e. coiling, 27 (38.6%) patients had no disability (grades 1 and 2), 25 (35.7%) were slightly disabled (grade 3) and 18 (25.7%) had moderate disability (grade 4); whereas in group B, i.e. clipping group 23 (32.9%) patients had no disability (grades 1 and 2), 23 (32.9%) were slightly disabled (grade 3) and 24 (34.3%) had moderate disability (grade 4). At one year follow-up, in group A, favourable outcome was achieved in 56 (80%) of patients compared to 48 (68.6%) in group B; whilst, 14 (20%) patients in group A and 22 (33.1%) in group B showed unfavourable outcome. Although mortality rate was higher in clipping (n=3, 4.3%) as compared to coiling (n=1, 1.4%), but was not statistically

  6. Acute development of collateral circulation and therapeutic prospects in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasawa, Eri; Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, collateral circulation plays an important role in maintaining blood flow to the tissue that is at risk of progressing into ischemia, and in increasing the successful recanalization rate without hemorrhagic transformation. We have reported that well-developed collateral circulation is associated with smaller infarct volume and better long-term neurological outcome, and it disappears promptly once the effective recanalization is achieved. Contrary to the belief that collateral vessels develop over time in chronic stenotic condition, there exists a phenomenon that collateral circulation develops immediately in acute stenosis or occlusion of the arteries and it seems to be triggered by fluid shear stress, which occurs between the territories of stenotic/occluded arteries and those fed by surrounding intact arteries. We believe that this acute development of collateral circulation is a target of novel therapeutics in ischemic stroke and refer our recent attempt in enhancing collateral circulation by modulating sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1, which is a known shear-stress mechanosensing protein.

  7. Acute development of collateral circulation and therapeutic prospects in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Iwasawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In acute ischemic stroke, collateral circulation plays an important role in maintaining blood flow to the tissue that is at risk of progressing into ischemia, and in increasing the successful recanalization rate without hemorrhagic transformation. We have reported that well-developed collateral circulation is associated with smaller infarct volume and better long-term neurological outcome, and it disappears promptly once the effective recanalization is achieved. Contrary to the belief that collateral vessels develop over time in chronic stenotic condition, there exists a phenomenon that collateral circulation develops immediately in acute stenosis or occlusion of the arteries and it seems to be triggered by fluid shear stress, which occurs between the territories of stenotic/occluded arteries and those fed by surrounding intact arteries. We believe that this acute development of collateral circulation is a target of novel therapeutics in ischemic stroke and refer our recent attempt in enhancing collateral circulation by modulating sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1, which is a known shear-stress mechanosensing protein.

  8. [Post-stroke constipation treated with acupuncture therapy of regulating qi circulation of fu-organ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhen; Wu, Qing-Ming; Li, Dan-Dan; Liu, Wei-Ai; Li, Xiang-Rong; Lin, Xu-Ming

    2013-10-01

    To compare the difference in the efficacy on post-stroke constipation between acupuncture therapy of regulating qi circulation of fe-organ and Shengxue Tongbian Capsules. Seventy-five patients of post-stroke constipation were randomized into an acupuncture group (39 cases) and a Chinese medicine group (36 cases). The unit mode comprehensive therapy of stroke was adopted as basic treatment in the two groups. In the acupuncture group, acupuncture therapy of regulating qi circulation of fu-organ was added at Tianshu (ST 25), Zhigou (TE 6), Qihai (CV 6) and Zusanli (ST 36), once every day. In the Chinese medicine group, Shengrue Tongbian Capsules were supplemented for oral administration, once every day, 10 g each time. The clinical symptom score of constipation was observed before treatment, after 1 and 2 weeks treatment in the two groups, respectively. The efficacy in 1 week and 2 weeks of treatment and the adverse reaction were observed. In 1 and 2 weeks of treatment, the clinical symptom score of constipation was reduced significantly as compared with that before treatment in the two groups (all P acupuncture group were significant than those in the Chinese medicine group in 2 weeks of treatment (8.03 +/- 2.38 vs 9.20 +/- 2.45, P acupuncture group; and there were 1 case of abdominal pain, 3 cases of diarrhea and 2 cases of nausea and vomiting in the Chinese medicine group. Both the acupuncture therapy of regulating qi circulation of fu-organ and Shengxue Tongbian Capsules achieve the significant efficacy on post-stroke constipation. The efficacy of the acupuncture therapy of regulating qi circulation of fe-organ is better and the adverse reaction is less after long-term persistent treatment.

  9. The minipterional craniotomy for anterior circulation aneurysms: initial experience with 72 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Justin M; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Yang, Wuyang; Colby, Geoffrey P; Coon, Alexander L; Olivi, Alessandro; Tamargo, Rafael J; Huang, Judy

    2014-06-01

    The pterional craniotomy is well established for microsurgical clipping of most anterior circulation aneurysms. The incision and temporalis muscle dissection impacts postoperative recovery and cosmetic outcomes. The minipterional (MPT) craniotomy offers similar microsurgical corridors, with a substantially shorter incision, less muscle dissection, and a smaller craniotomy flap. To report our experience with the MPT craniotomy in select unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. From January 2009 to July 2013, 82 unruptured aneurysms were treated in 72 patients, with 74 MPT craniotomies. Seven patients had multiple aneurysms treated with a single MPT craniotomy. The average patient age was 56 years (range: 24-87). Aneurysms were located along the middle cerebral artery (n = 36), posterior communicating (n = 22), paraophthalmic (n = 22), choroidal (n = 1), and dorsal ICA segments (n = 1). The MPT craniotomy utilized an incision just posterior to the hairline and a single myocutaneous flap. The average aneurysm size was 5.45 mm (range: 1-14). There were no instances of compromised operative corridors requiring craniotomy extension. Three significant early postoperative complications included epidural and subdural hematomas requiring evacuation, and a middle cerebral artery infarction. Average length of hospitalization was 3.96 days (range: 2-20). Two patients required reoperation for wound infections. Average follow-up was 421 days (range: 5-1618). Minimal to no temporalis muscle wasting was noted in 96% of patients. The MPT craniotomy is a worthwhile alternative to the standard pterional craniotomy. There were no instances of suboptimal operative corridors and clip applications when the MPT craniotomy was utilized in the treatment of unruptured middle cerebral artery and supraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysms proximal to the terminal internal carotid artery bifurcation.

  10. Minimally Invasive Thumb-sized Pterional Craniotomy for Surgical Clip Ligation of Unruptured Anterior Circulation Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshaies, Eric M; Villwock, Mark R; Singla, Amit; Toshkezi, Gentian; Padalino, David J

    2015-01-01

    Less invasive surgical approaches for intracranial aneurysm clipping may reduce length of hospital stay, surgical morbidity, treatment cost, and improve patient outcomes. We present our experience with a minimally invasive pterional approach for anterior circulation aneurysms performed in a major tertiary cerebrovascular center and compare the results with an aged matched dataset from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). From August 2008 to December 2012, 22 elective aneurysm clippings on patients ≤55 years of age were performed by the same dual fellowship-trained cerebrovascular/endovascular neurosurgeon. One patient (4.5%) experienced transient post-operative complications. 18 of 22 patients returned for follow-up imaging and there were no recurrences through an average duration of 22 months. A search in the NIS database from 2008 to 2010, also for patients aged ≤55 years of age, yielded 1,341 hospitalizations for surgical clip ligation of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Inpatient length of stay and hospital charges at our institution using the minimally invasive thumb-sized pterional technique were nearly half that of NIS (length of stay: 3.2 vs 5.7 days; hospital charges: $52,779 vs. $101,882). The minimally invasive thumb-sized pterional craniotomy allows good exposure of unruptured small and medium-sized supraclinoid anterior circulation aneurysms. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage from key subarachnoid cisterns and constant bimanual microsurgical techniques avoid the need for retractors which can cause contusions, localized venous infarctions, and post-operative cerebral edema at the retractor sites. Utilizing this set of techniques has afforded our patients with a shorter hospital stay at a lower cost compared to the national average. PMID:26325337

  11. Minimally Invasive Thumb-sized Pterional Craniotomy for Surgical Clip Ligation of Unruptured Anterior Circulation Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshaies, Eric M; Villwock, Mark R; Singla, Amit; Toshkezi, Gentian; Padalino, David J

    2015-08-11

    Less invasive surgical approaches for intracranial aneurysm clipping may reduce length of hospital stay, surgical morbidity, treatment cost, and improve patient outcomes. We present our experience with a minimally invasive pterional approach for anterior circulation aneurysms performed in a major tertiary cerebrovascular center and compare the results with an aged matched dataset from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). From August 2008 to December 2012, 22 elective aneurysm clippings on patients ≤55 years of age were performed by the same dual fellowship-trained cerebrovascular/endovascular neurosurgeon. One patient (4.5%) experienced transient post-operative complications. 18 of 22 patients returned for follow-up imaging and there were no recurrences through an average duration of 22 months. A search in the NIS database from 2008 to 2010, also for patients aged ≤55 years of age, yielded 1,341 hospitalizations for surgical clip ligation of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Inpatient length of stay and hospital charges at our institution using the minimally invasive thumb-sized pterional technique were nearly half that of NIS (length of stay: 3.2 vs 5.7 days; hospital charges: $52,779 vs. $101,882). The minimally invasive thumb-sized pterional craniotomy allows good exposure of unruptured small and medium-sized supraclinoid anterior circulation aneurysms. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage from key subarachnoid cisterns and constant bimanual microsurgical techniques avoid the need for retractors which can cause contusions, localized venous infarctions, and post-operative cerebral edema at the retractor sites. Utilizing this set of techniques has afforded our patients with a shorter hospital stay at a lower cost compared to the national average.

  12. Vertebral Artery Hypoplasia and Posterior Circulation Infarction in Patients with Isolated Vertigo with Stroke Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dao Pei; Lu, Gui Feng; Zhang, Jie Wen; Zhang, Shu Ling; Ma, Qian Kun; Yin, Suo

    2017-02-01

    We aimed in this study to investigate the prevalence of vertebral artery hypoplasia (VAH) in a population with isolated vertigo in association with stroke risk factors, to determine whether VAH is an independent risk factor for posterior circulation infarction (PCI). We sequentially enrolled 245 patients with isolated vertigo with at least 1 vascular risk factor, who were divided into PCI and non-PCI groups, according to present signs of acute infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. All patients underwent magnetic resonance angiography and cervical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to screen for VAH. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the significant risk factors for PCI. VAH was found in 64 of 245 patients (26%). VAH (odds ratio [OR] = 2.70, 95%confidence interval [CI] 1.17-6.23, P = .020), median stenosis of the posterior circulation (OR = 7.09, 95%CI = 2.54-19.79, P diabetes mellitus (OR = 3.13, 95%CI 1.38-7.12, P = .006) were independent risk factors for PCI. The predominant Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtype in our patients with isolated vertigo with PCI complicated by VAH was mainly small-artery occlusion. Our findings suggest that VAH is an independent risk factor for PCI in patients with isolated vertigo with confirmed risk from stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Surgical outcome of primary clipping for anterior circulation aneurysms of size 2 centimeters or larger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Sunil V; Saikiran, Narayanam A; Thakar, Sumit; Dadlani, Ravi; Mohan, Dilip; Aryan, Saritha; Hegde, Alangar S

    2014-07-01

    Aneurysms of the anterior circulation larger than 2cm have a complex relationship to the anterior skull base, requiring a multi-modality management approach. This retrospective study of 54 patients with such aneurysms who underwent clipping between 2001 and 2012 analyzes clinical and surgical data, aneurysm characteristics and correlates them with respect to the Glasgow outcome score at follow-up and immediate post-operative clinical status. Patients with an outcome score of 5 or 4 were categorized as "good", while those with score 3-1 were "poor". Fisher's exact test and paired T-test (p<0.5) were used to test statistical significance for discrete and continuous variables respectively. 44 (81.4%) patients had a good outcome. Patients with non-ophthalmic/paraclinoid aneurysms had significantly lower incidence of adverse intra-operative events (p=0.035). Patients older than 50 years (p=0.045), with adverse intra-operative events (p=0.015) and post-operative infarction (p<0.001) had a poor outcome compared to those younger than 50 years age and those without adverse intra-operative events or infarctions. The grouped age variable had maximum influence on patient outcome. Location and size of aneurysm did not have an overall impact on surgical outcome. There were 4 mortalities. Primary clipping of proximal non-cavernous aneurysms on the internal carotid artery is associated with adverse intra-operative events. A multi-modality treatment approach in these aneurysms should be individualized, more so in patients older than 50 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantifying cerebrovascular reactivity in anterior and posterior cerebral circulations during voluntary breath holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Christina D; Steinback, Craig D; Chauhan, Uday V; Pfoh, Jamie R; Abrosimova, Maria; Vanden Berg, Emily R; Skow, Rachel J; Davenport, Margie H; Day, Trevor A

    2016-12-01

    What is the central question of this study? We developed and validated a 'stimulus index' (SI; ratio of end-tidal partial pressures of CO 2 and O 2 ) method to quantify cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in anterior and posterior cerebral circulations during breath holding. We aimed to determine whether the magnitude of CVR is correlated with breath-hold duration. What is the main finding and its importance? Using the SI method and transcranial Doppler ultrasound, we found that the magnitude of CVR of the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations is not positively correlated with physiological or psychological break-point during end-inspiratory breath holding. Our study expands the ability to quantify CVR during breath holding and elucidates factors that affect break-point. The central respiratory chemoreflex contributes to blood gas homeostasis, particularly in response to accumulation of brainstem CO 2 . Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) affects chemoreceptor stimulation inversely through CO 2 washout from brainstem tissue. Voluntary breath holding imposes alterations in blood gases, eliciting respiratory chemoreflexes, potentially contributing to breath-hold duration (i.e. break-point). However, the effects of cerebrovascular reactivity on break-point have yet to be determined. We tested the hypothesis that the magnitude of CVR contributes directly to breath-hold duration in 23 healthy human participants. We developed and validated a cerebrovascular stimulus index methodology [SI; ratio of end-tidal partial pressures of CO 2 and O 2 (P ET ,CO2/P ET ,O2)] to quantify CVR by correlating measured and interpolated values of P ET ,CO2 (r = 0.95, P breath hold. The MCAv CVR magnitude was larger than PCAv (P = 0.001; +70%) during breath holding. We then correlated MCAv and PCAv CVR with the physiological (involuntary diaphragmatic contractions) and psychological (end-point) break-point, within individuals. There were significant inverse but modest relationships

  15. Extending the indications of flow diversion to small, unruptured, saccular aneurysms of the anterior circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M; Yang, Steven; Bovenzi, Cory D; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Hasan, David; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Rosenwasser, Robert; Jabbour, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters are currently indicated for treatment of large and complex intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the indications of flow diversion can be safely extended to unruptured, small, saccular aneurysms (<10 mm) of the anterior circulation. Forty patients treated with the pipeline embolization device (PED) were matched in a 1:4 fashion with 160 patients treated with stent-assisted coiling based on patient age, sex, aneurysm location, and aneurysm size. Procedural complications, angiographic results, and clinical outcomes were analyzed and compared. The rate of periprocedural complications was 5% in the PED group and 3% in the stent-coil group (P=0.7). In multivariable analysis, increasing age was the only predictor of complications. At follow-up, a higher proportion of aneurysms treated with PED (80%) achieved complete obliteration compared with stent-coiled aneurysms (70%) but the difference did not reach statistical significance (P=0.2). In multivariable analysis, increasing aneurysm size and aneurysm location were predictors of nonocclusion. The rate of favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale, 0-2 and modified Rankin Scale, 0-1) was similar in the PED group and the coil group. The PED was associated with similar periprocedural risks, clinical outcomes, and angiographic results compared with stent-assisted coiling. These findings suggest that the indications of PED can be safely extended to small intracranial aneurysms that are amenable to conventional endovascular techniques. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are necessary to determine the optimal treatment that leads to the highest rate of obliteration and best clinical outcomes.

  16. Optimal Guiding Catheter Length for Endovascular Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms in Anterior Circulation in Era of Flourishing Distal Access System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhen Yu; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Young Eun; Choi, Joon Ho; Hwang, Sun Moon; Lee, Ga Young; Youn, Jin Ho; Lee, Deok Hee

    2017-09-01

    To determine the minimum required guiding catheter length for embolization of various intracranial aneurysms in anterior circulation and to analyze the effect of various patient factors on the required catheter length and potential interaction with its stability. From December 2016 to March 2017, 90 patients with 93 anterior circulation aneurysms were enrolled. Three types of guiding catheters (Envoy, Envoy DA, and Envoy DA XB; Codman Neurovascular, Raynham, MA, USA) were used. We measured the in-the-body length of the catheter and checked the catheter tip location in the carotid artery. We analyzed factors affecting the in-the-body length and stability of the guiding catheter system. The average (±standard deviation) in-the-body length of the catheter was 84.2±5.9 cm. The length was significantly longer in men (89.1±5.6 vs. 82.1±4.6 cm, Pguiding catheter was 84 cm on average for elective anterior-circulation aneurysm embolization. The length increased in men older than 65 years with a more tortuous arch. We could reach a higher position with distal access catheters with little difference in the stability once we reached the target location.

  17. [Short-term outcome of single stenting technique for unruptured wide-necked tiny aneurysms of the anterior circulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Wang, Daming; Liu, Jiachun; Wang, Lijun; Qi, Peng

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the short-term outcome of single stenting technique for unruptured, wide-necked, tiny aneurysms of the anterior circulation. Eleven unruptured, wide-necked, tiny aneurysms of the anterior circulation were treated by a single stent deployed in the parent artery between January 2008 and July 2013 in Department of Neurosurgery in Beijing Hospital. The maximum diameter of the aneurysms ranged from 2.0 to 3.0 mm, mean (2.4 ± 0.4) mm, and the dome-to-neck ratios were all ≤ 1.2. The locations were clinoid segment of internal carotid artery (n=2), posterior communicating artery origin (n=4), anterior choroidal artery origin (n=2) and middle cerebral artery bifurcation (n=3). All internal carotid aneurysms were located in the medial and/or ventral wall of the internal carotid artery. The rate of aneurysm obliteration and rupture during follow-up was obtained by repeat angiography and clinic or telephone interview respectively. Sole stent placement in the parent artery was intentionally performed for nine aneurysms, while attempt of coiling after stent deployment for the other two aneurysms failed due to unsuccessful microcatherization. Ten stents were successfully deployed, of which one was used to treat two tandem lesions simultaneously. Only one aneurysm became smaller immediately postprocedure. No perioperative complications occurred. Angiographic follow-up after a mean period of (13 ± 6) months (range 8-24 months) revealed that 8 aneurysms did no change in size, 2 became smaller and only one was totally occluded. Asymptomatic in-stent stenosis of the parent artery was found in all 3 shrinking or occluded aneurysms. No aneurysm rupture was observed in the clinical follow-up. For those unruptured, wide-necked, tiny aneurysms arising at branching sites in the anterior circulation, single stenting technique seems to be a safe alternative treatment, while the short-term rate of aneurysm occlusion is low.

  18. Relevance of Post-Stroke Circulating BDNF Levels as a Prognostic Biomarker of Stroke Outcome. Impact of rt-PA Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, Marion; Quirié, Aurore; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Béjot, Yannick; Jacquin, Agnès; Mossiat, Claude; Marie, Christine; Garnier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant form of tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the only curative treatment for ischemic stroke. Recently, t-PA has been linked to the metabolism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a major neurotrophin involved in post-stroke neuroplasticity. Thus, the objective of our study was to investigate the impact of rt-PA treatment on post-stroke circulating BDNF levels in humans and in animals. Serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity were measured at hospital admission and at up to 90 days in stroke patients receiving (n = 24) or not (n = 14) rt-PA perfusion. We investigated the relationships between serum BDNF with concurrent t-PA/plasmin activity, neurological outcomes and cardiovascular scores at admission. In parallel, serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity were assessed before and after (1, 4 and 24h) the induction of ischemic stroke in rats. Our study revealed higher serum BDNF levels and better neurological outcome in rt-PA-treated than non-treated patients. However, serum BDNF levels did not predict stroke outcome when the whole cohort of stroke patients was analyzed. By contrast, serum BDNF levels when measured at admission and at day 90 correlated with cardiovascular scores, and those at day 1 correlated with serum t-PA/plasmin activity in the whole cohort of patients whereas no association could be found in the rt-PA-treated group. In rats devoid of cardiovascular risk, no difference in post-stroke serum BDNF levels was detected between rt-PA- and vehicle-treated animals and no correlation was found between serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity. Overall, the data suggest that serum BDNF levels may not be useful as a prognostic biomarker of stroke outcome and that endothelial dysfunction could be a confounding factor when serum BDNF levels after stroke are used to reflect of brain BDNF levels.

  19. Associations of Circulating Growth Differentiation Factor-15 and ST2 Concentrations With Subclinical Vascular Brain Injury and Incident Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Preis, Sarah R; Beiser, Alexa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) and soluble (s)ST2 are markers of cardiac and vascular stress. We investigated the associations between circulating concentrations of these biomarkers and incident stroke and subclinical vascular brain injury in a sample from the F...

  20. Emergent intracranial balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation: Experience of a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Young Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Jeong, Hae Woong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of angioplasty for recanalization after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study population was selected from 134 patients who underwent endovascular revascularization therapy (ERT) for AIS between October 2011 and May 2014. Of those 134 patients, 39 who underwent balloon angioplasty with or without stent insertion were included in this study. Balloon angioplasty was the primary treatment for nine patients and a rescue method for 30 patients. The revascularization rate at 7 days, procedure-related complications, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were analyzed. The occlusion sites were the middle cerebral artery (n = 26), intracranial internal carotid artery (n = 10), and middle cerebral artery branch (n = 3). Angioplasty achieved successful revascularization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia grade 2b–3) in 76.9% of patients. Computed tomography angiography performed 7 days post-procedure revealed a maintained reperfusion in 82.8% of successful cases. Only two patients had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. At the 3-month follow-up, 18 (48.6%) and 10 (27.0%) patients showed good and poor functional outcomes, respectively (modified Rankin Scale scores, 0–2 and 5–6). Emergent balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement may be safe and effective for achieving successful revascularization in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. It could be a feasible rescue method as well as a primary method for ERT

  1. Novel Interactive Data Visualization: Exploration of the ESCAPE Trial (Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing CT to Recanalization Times) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigdan, Matthew; Hill, Michael D; Jagdev, Abhijeet; Kamal, Noreen

    2018-01-01

    The ESCAPE (Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing CT to Recanalization Times) randomized clinical trial collected a large diverse data set. However, it is difficult to fully understand the effects of the study on certain patient groups and disease progression. We developed and evaluated an interactive visualization of the ESCAPE trial data. We iteratively designed an interactive visualization using Python's Bokeh software library. The design was evaluated through a user study, which quantitatively evaluated its efficiency and accuracy against traditional modified Rankin Scalegraphic. Qualitative feedback was also evaluated. The novel interactive visualization of the ESCAPE data are publicly available at http://escapevisualization.herokuapp.com/. There was no difference in the efficiency and accuracy when comparing the use of the novel with the traditional visualization. However, users preferred the novel visualization because it allowed for greater exploration. Some insights obtained through exploration of the ESCAPE data are presented. Novel interactive visualizations can be applied to acute stroke trial data to allow for greater exploration of the results. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01778335. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Emergent intracranial balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation: Experience of a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Jeong, Hae Woong [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the outcomes of angioplasty for recanalization after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study population was selected from 134 patients who underwent endovascular revascularization therapy (ERT) for AIS between October 2011 and May 2014. Of those 134 patients, 39 who underwent balloon angioplasty with or without stent insertion were included in this study. Balloon angioplasty was the primary treatment for nine patients and a rescue method for 30 patients. The revascularization rate at 7 days, procedure-related complications, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were analyzed. The occlusion sites were the middle cerebral artery (n = 26), intracranial internal carotid artery (n = 10), and middle cerebral artery branch (n = 3). Angioplasty achieved successful revascularization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia grade 2b–3) in 76.9% of patients. Computed tomography angiography performed 7 days post-procedure revealed a maintained reperfusion in 82.8% of successful cases. Only two patients had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. At the 3-month follow-up, 18 (48.6%) and 10 (27.0%) patients showed good and poor functional outcomes, respectively (modified Rankin Scale scores, 0–2 and 5–6). Emergent balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement may be safe and effective for achieving successful revascularization in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. It could be a feasible rescue method as well as a primary method for ERT.

  3. Comparison of changes in mean flow velocity in anterior cerebral artery before and during cognitive stimulation between non-stroke and post-stroke people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, F. I.; Erwin, I.; Batubara, C. A.; Rambe, A. S.; Anwar, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is a tool that has been used widely to measure cerebral blood flow and changes in the cerebral autoregulatory mechanism that can be observed during cognitive stimulation task as changes in mean flow velocity (MFV). This cross-sectional study was to compare the anterior cerebral arteries (ACA) MFV changes during cognitive stimulation using TCD in post-stroke and control group in Neurology Department Adam Malik General Hospital. From August to December 2016, all subject underwent TCD examination to assess baseline characteristic both side of ACA; then the patients were stimulated using Stroop Task. During stimulation, we measured changes in MFV that were correlated with cerebral autoregulation in total 13 pairs of post-stroke and control recruited. Paired t-test was used to evaluate the difference in baseline and during stimulation for each post stroke and control group while independent t-test was used to determine the MFV changes difference between both groups. There were significant differences for MFV changes in each artery for control [R- ACA (p=0.001), L-ACA (p=0.001)] and post-stroke [R-ACA (p=0.001), L-ACA (p=0.001)]. Meanwhile, there was no significant difference for MFV elevation for arteries compared between groups [R-ACA (p=0.374) and L-ACA (0.272)].

  4. Pathological Sub-Types, Risk Factors And Outcome Of Stroke At The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy five patients (93.8%) were discharged and four (5%) died in hospital. All patients who died had anterior circulation ischaemic stroke as per Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification. Conclusion: Ischaemic stroke is the most common pathological sub-type observed in this study.

  5. Assessment of the Anterior Talofibular Ligament Thickness in Patients with Chronic Stroke: An Ultrasonographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Turgut Yildizgoren

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Chronic stroke patients have a thicker ATFL on both the affected and unaffected sides, compared with healthy individuals. This architectural feature of the ATFL may be a result of equinovarus deformity together with spastic muscles. For this reason, early treatment of deformed ligaments and spastic muscles is needed to prevent equinovarus deformity in patients with stroke.

  6. Clinical and video head impulse test in the diagnosis of posterior circulation stroke presenting as acute vestibular syndrome in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Ayse; Karbek Akarca, Funda; Eraslan, Cenk; Tarhan, Ceyda; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazli, Tayfun; Celebisoy, Nese

    2017-01-01

    Head impulse test (HIT) is the critical bedside examination which differentiates vestibular neuritis (VN) from posterior circulation stroke (PCS) in acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). Video-oculography based HIT (vHIT) may have aadditional strength in making the differentiation. Patients admitted to the emergency department of a tertiary-care medical center with AVS were studied. An emergency specialist and a neurologist performed HIT. vHIT was conducted by an neuro-otology research fellow. Forty patients 26 male, 14 female with a mean age of 49 years were included in the analyses. Final diagnoses were VN in 24 and PCS in 16 patients.In the VN group, clinical HIT was assessed as abnormal in 19(80%) cases by the emergency specialist and in 20(83%) by the neurologist. In all PCS patients, HIT was recorded as normal both by the emergency specialist and the neurologist (100%).On vHIT, patients with VN had significantly low gain values for both the ipsilesional and contralesional sides when compared with the healthy controls, with significantly lower figures for the ipsilesional side (p < 0.001). All patients in this group had normal DWI-MRI.PCS patients had bilaterally low gain (p < 0.05) on vHIT. However, gain asymmetry was not significant. Subgroup analyses according to presence of brainstem involvement revealed bilateral low gain (p < 0.05) in patients with brainstem infarction (anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery stroke, AICA-PICA stroke) whereas patients with pure cerebellar infarction (posterior inferior cerebellar artery-superior cerebellar artery stroke, PICA-SCA stroke) had gain values similar to healthy controls.With a gain cut-off ≤0.75 and gain asymmetry cut-off ≥17%, as determined by ROC analysis, 100% of PCS patients and 80% of VN patients were correctly diagnosed. Clinical HIT, either performed by an emergency specialist or neurologist is equivalent to vHIT gain and gain asymmetry analysis as conducted

  7. Lucid dreams, an atypical sleep disturbance in anterior and mediodorsal thalamic strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnier, S; Coulon, P; Chaufton, C; Poli, M; Debruxelles, S; Renou, P; Rouanet, F; Olindo, S; Sibon, I

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive, affective, and behavioural disturbances are commonly reported following thalamic strokes. Conversely, sleep disorders are rarely reported in this context. Herein, we report the cases of two young patients admitted for an ischemic stroke located in the territories of the left pre-mammillary and paramedian arteries. Together with aphasia, memory complaint, impaired attention and executive functions, they reported lucid dreams with catastrophic content or conflicting situations. Lucid dreams are an atypical presentation in thalamic strokes. These cases enlarge the clinical spectrum of sleep-wake disturbances potentially observed after an acute cerebrovascular event. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Demethylation of Circulating Estrogen Receptor Alpha Gene in Cerebral Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Fen Lin

    Full Text Available Estrogen is involved in neuron plasticity and can promote neuronal survival in stroke. Its actions are mostly exerted via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα. Previous animal studies have shown that ERα is upregulated by DNA demethylation following ischemic injury. This study investigated the methylation levels in the ERα promoter in the peripheral blood of ischemic stroke patients.The study included 201 ischemic stroke patients, and 217 age- and sex-comparable healthy controls. The quantitative methylation level in the 14 CpG sites of the ERα promoter was measured by pyrosequencing in each participant. Multivariate regression model was used to adjust for stroke traditional risk factors. Stroke subtypes and sex-specific analysis were also conducted.The results demonstrated that the stroke cases had a lower ERα methylation level than controls in all 14 CpG sites, and site 13 and site 14 had significant adjusted p-values of 0.035 and 0.026, respectively. Stroke subtypes analysis showed that large-artery atherosclerosis and cardio-embolic subtypes had significantly lower methylation levels than the healthy controls at CpG site 5, site 9, site 12, site 13 and site 14 with adjusted p = 0.039, 0.009, 0.025, 0.046 and 0.027 respectively. However, the methylation level for the patients with small vessel subtype was not significant. We combined the methylation data from the above five sites for further sex-specific analysis. The results showed that the significant association only existed in women (adjusted p = 0.011, but not in men (adjusted p = 0.300.Female stroke cases have lower ERα methylation levels than those in the controls, especially in large-artery and cardio-embolic stroke subtypes. The study implies that women suffering from ischemic stroke of specific subtype may undergo different protective mechanisms to reduce the brain injury.

  9. Associations of Circulating GDF-15 and ST2 concentrations with Subclinical Vascular Brain Injury and Incident Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Preis, Sarah R.; Beiser, Alexa; DeCarli, Charles; Wollert, Kai C.; Wang, Thomas J; Januzzi, James L.; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Seshadri, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) and soluble (s)ST2 are markers of cardiac and vascular stress. We investigated the associations between circulating concentrations of these biomarkers and incident stroke and subclinical vascular brain injury in a sample from the Framingham Offspring cohort. Methods We followed 3374 stroke- and dementia-free individuals (mean age 59.0±9.7 years, 53% women) attending the Framingham Offspring 6th examination cycle 11.8±3.0 years for incident stroke. A subsample of 2463 individuals underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological testing approximately 4.0±1.7 years after the 6th examination. Results After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, B-type natriuretic peptide, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and urine albumin levels, higher stress biomarker levels were associated cross-sectionally with lower brain volumes (βs for intracranial volume comparing 4rth [Q4] vs. 1st biomarker [Q1] quartiles −0.71% for GDF-15, p=0.002, and 0.47% for sST2, p=0.02) and worse performance on the visual reproduction test (βs for Q4 vs. Q1=−0.62 for GDF-15, p=0.009, and −0.40 for sST2, p=0.04). Higher GDF-15 concentrations were also associated with greater log-transformed white-matter hyperintensity volumes (β for Q4 vs. Q1=0.19, p=0.01). Prospectively, a total of 203 (6%) individuals developed incident stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) during follow-up. After multivariable adjustment, sST2 remained significantly associated with stroke/TIA, hazard ratio for Q4 vs. Q1 of 1.76, 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.92, p=0.03. Conclusions Circulating GDF-15 and sST2 are associated with subclinical brain injury and cognitive impairment. Higher sST2 concentrations are also associated with incident stroke, suggesting potential links between cardiac stress biomarkers and brain injury. PMID:26219649

  10. Kinematic features of rear-foot motion using anterior and posterior ankle-foot orthoses in stroke patients with hemiplegic gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chi; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Wang, Chin-Man; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Wu, Katie Pei-Hsuan; Kang, Chao-Fu; Tang, Simon F

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the kinematic features of rear-foot motion during gait in hemiplegic stroke patients, using anterior ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs), posterior AFOs, and no orthotic assistance. Crossover design with randomization for the interventions. A rehabilitation center for adults with neurologic disorders. Patients with hemiplegia due to stroke (n=14) and able-bodied subjects (n=11). Subjects with hemiplegia were measured walking under 3 conditions with randomized sequences: (1) with an anterior AFO, (2) with a posterior AFO, and (3) without an AFO. Control subjects were measured walking without an AFO to provide a normative reference. Rear-foot kinematic change in the sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes. In the sagittal plane, compared with walking with an anterior AFO or without an AFO, the posterior AFO significantly decreased plantar flexion to neutral at initial heel contact (P=.001) and the swing phase (PRehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intra- and inter-rater reliabilities of measurement of ultrasound imaging for muscle thickness and pennation angle of tibialis anterior muscle in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ki Hun; Lee, Hwang Jae; Lee, Wan Hee

    2017-07-01

    Dysfunction of skeletal muscle has been commonly reported in stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the intra- and inter-rater reliabilities of measurement of ultrasound imaging (USI) for pennation angle (PA) and muscle thickness (MT) of tibialis anterior muscle in stroke patients. Thirty-four stroke patients (19 men) participated in this study. USI was used for measurement of PA and MT of the tibialis anterior muscles at rest and during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Two examiners acquired images from all participants during two separate testing sessions, seven days apart. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs), confidence interval (CI), standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change, and Bland-Altman plots were used for estimation of reliability. In the intra-rater reliability between measures, for all variables (PA and MT of the paretic and non-paretic sides of tibialis anterior muscles at rest and during MVC), the ICCs ranged between 0.639 and 0.998 and the CI was within an acceptable range of 0.388-0.999. In inter-rater reliability between examiners for the two tests, for all variables, the ICCs ranged between 0.690 and 0.995 and the CI was within an acceptable range of 0.463-0.997. In addition, significant difference was observed between the paretic and non-paretic sides of the tibialis anterior muscle architecture (p stroke patients. In addition, objective and quantitative measurements of tibialis anterior muscle using USI may provide appropriate management for the walking recovery of stroke patients.

  12. Anterior Circulation Steal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motahareh Afrakhteh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arteriovenous fistula (AVF can be congenital or acquired. Congenital AVF are less common while acquired fistula are most frequently the result of penetrating trauma or iatrogenic action. Acquired common carotid jugular fistulas are uncommon in the head and neck region, accounting only 4 to 7% of all the traumatic AVFs encountered throughout the body that is not usually detected during the acute injury phase. Objective: For the first time in our center we diagnose and treat a carotid jugular vein fistula due to neck stab wound. Case Description: A 48 years old man with neck stab wound and strangulation was treated as an outpatient in a clinic with suturing the wound. he was stable and discharged without apparent neurologic deficit, after two days he was referred to our center due to left hemiparesis .in our assessment, Brain imaging showed right side hemodynamic infarct, in carotid duplex the flow was bidirectional and low RI, in angiography there was fistula from Right ICA to jugular vein, in left ICA angiography there was reversible flow from Right distal ICA to the fistula. After two times of brachychardia and asystolic cycle the patient was intubated and CPR was done. Cardiac arrest maybe because of cardiac problems dueto carotid jugular fistula. Approach: Due to carotid injury and high flow fistula, the Right ICA jugular fistula was obliterated by Balloon and ICA was also sacrificed. in left ICA Angiography the flow to Right ICA was stopped and MCA  and ACA got flow from left side .the patient was stable and after few days he could be extubated and he was discharged with stable condition. Discussion: Carotid jugular fistula is a rare complication of neck trauma, because its symptoms appear late, with neurologic deficit many times neurologist was suspect to dissection and maybe MRA and CTA report Carotid occlusion but Duplex is an efficient device to differentiated between these two disease. in dissection  there is prestenotic pattern and we can see the Flap flow in pseudolumen but in Carotid jugular fistula there is bidirectional and low resistance flow in proximal ICA. Meanwhile jugular vein have pulsatile flow due to direct carotid arterial flow.we presented a case of carotid-jugular fistula following cervical trauma.we are implicating on the role of carotid duplex for evaluation of cervical trauma. Duplex could efficiently differentiate between the two major  complication of trauma that is cervical arteries dissection and carotid-jugular fistula.

  13. A study on regional cerebral circulation in stroke patients with aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Ryozo

    1985-01-01

    To study the pathophysiology of aphasia due to cerebral stroke, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by the 133 Xe clearance method and the volume of low density area (LDA) was estimated on the basis of computerized tomography in 43 thrombotic (24 aphasia and 19 non-aphasia), 30 hemorrhagic (16 aphasia and 14 non-aphasia) and 6 non-stroke cases. 1) In the healthy hemisphere, rCBF showed no significant difference between aphasia and non-aphasia in both thrombotic and hemorrhagic cases. In the affected hemisphere, thrombotic cases showed significantly decreased rCBF in aphasic cases as compared to non-aphasic, however, hemorrhagic cases revealed no difference. 2) LDA volume showed no significant difference between aphasia and non-aphasia in cerebral thrombosis, however, LDA volume in non-aphasia was smaller than that in aphasia in cerebral hemorrage. 3) Significant differences in the pathophysiology of aphasia due to cerebral stroke were recognized between cerebral thrombosis and cerebral hemorrhage. Such differences should be taken into consideration in the management and treatment of aphasia caused by cerebral stroke. (author)

  14. EEG indices in patients with high risk of ischemic stroke as predictors of initial disturbed cerebral circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Isaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal changes were detected in EEG in patients with high risk of ischemic stroke (higher level than in the population. These changes show the disturbances in forming mechanisms of functional condition of cerebrum during the calm wakeful period. Changes were represented by: the registration of EEG IV- type (the E.A. Zhirmunsky type which was characterized by disorganization of alpha activity and of slow waves; the instability of pattern during the record of background activity; the paroxysmal activity in form of flashes of the bilateral synchronized waves; the strengthening of low-frequency and high-amplitude β-activity. Revealed changes in EEG show the presence of initial disturbed cerebral circulation and can be recommended as predictors of these disturbances.

  15. Can the FAST and ROSIER adult stroke recognition tools be applied to confirmed childhood arterial ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babl Franz E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke recognition tools have been shown to improve diagnostic accuracy in adults. Development of a similar tool in children is needed to reduce lag time to diagnosis. A critical first step is to determine whether adult stoke scales can be applied in childhood stroke. Our objective was to assess the applicability of adult stroke scales in childhood arterial ischemic stroke (AIS Methods Children aged 1 month to Results 47 children with AIS were identified. 34 had anterior, 12 had posterior and 1 child had anterior and posterior circulation infarcts. Median age was 9 years and 51% were male. Median time from symptom onset to ED presentation was 21 hours but one third of children presented within 6 hours. The most common presenting stroke symptoms were arm (63%, face (62%, leg weakness (57%, speech disturbance (46% and headache (46%. The most common signs were arm (61%, face (70% or leg weakness (57% and dysarthria (34%. 36 (78% of children had at least one positive variable on FAST and 38 (81% had a positive score of ≥1 on the ROSIER scale. Positive scores were less likely in children with posterior circulation stroke. Conclusion The presenting features of pediatric stroke appear similar to adult strokes. Two adult stroke recognition tools have fair to good sensitivity in radiologically confirmed childhood AIS but require further development and modification. Specificity of the tools also needs to be determined in a prospective cohort of children with stroke and non-stroke brain attacks.

  16. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  17. Collateral circulation is an independent radiological predictor of outcome after thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, T.; Koch, C.; Eckert, B.; Grzyska, U.; Freitag, H.J.; Zeumer, H.; Becker, V.; Kroemer, H.; Heesen, C.; Roether, J.

    2003-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the type of vascular occlusion, recanalisation and collateralisation are predictive of outcome after thrombolytic therapy in acute ischaemic stroke. We carried out angiography and local intra-arterial (97) or systemic (14) thrombolysis within 6 h of the onset in patients with an ischaemic stroke in the territory of the internal carotid artery. Early ischaemic signs (EIS) on pretreatment CT and angiographic findings were classified and analysed in relation to clinical outcome at 3 months. A favourable outcome (Barthel index [BI]≥ 90) was found in 40% of patients with an occlusion of the middle cerebral artery trunk whereas intracranial occlusion of the internal carotid artery (''carotid T occlusion'') was followed by death or severe disability (BI<50) in 87%. Significant univariate predictors of favourable outcome were occlusion type (P<0.01), recanalisation (P<0.01) and collateralisation (P<0.01). However, multivariate analysis revealed a significant relationship only between collateralisation and favourable outcome (odds ratio 5.9, 95% confidence interval 1.3-26.7, P=0.02). EIS were not predictive in either case. Occlusion type and recanalisation, are related to outcome only if adequate collateralisation prevents infarction until recanalisation occurs. (orig.)

  18. Higher admission fasting plasma glucose levels are associated with a poorer short-term neurologic outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients with good collateral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Jiang, Beisi; Kanesan, Lasheta; Zhao, Yuwu; Yan, Bernard

    2018-04-12

    In this retrospective study, we sought to delineate the collateral circulation status of acute ischemic stroke patients by CT perfusion and evaluate 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores of patients with good or poor collaterals and its correlation with admission fasting plasma glucose (FPG). We enrolled acute ischemic stroke patients who presented to our hospital 4.5 h within an onset of the first episode between January 2009 and December 2015. Neurological assessment was performed using the 90-day mRS scores (0-2 for a favorable and 3-6 for an unfavorable neurologic outcome). Relative filling time delay (rFTD) was evaluated by CT perfusion scan. The primary outcomes were 90-day mRS scores stratified by good (rFTD ≤ 4 s) versus poor collateral circulation (rFTD > 4 s). Totally 270 patients were included, and 139 (51.5%) patients achieved a favorable neurologic outcome. One hundred eighty-five (68.5%) patients had good collateral circulation. Significantly greater portions of patients with good collateral circulation (60.5%, 112/185) achieved a favorable neurologic outcome compared to those with poor collateral circulation (31.8%, 27/85) (P collateral circulation achieving a favorable neurologic outcome had significantly lower baseline FPG (6.6 ± 1.96) than those with good collateral circulation achieving an unfavorable neurologic outcome (8.12 ± 4.02; P = 0.002). Spearman correlation analysis showed that rFTD significantly correlated with 90-day mRS scores (adjusted r = 0.258; P collateral circulation. FPG and rFTD may serve as useful predictors of short-term patient outcome and could be used for risk stratification in clinical decision making.

  19. Post-stroke seizures are clinically underestimated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentes, Carla; Martins, Hugo; Peralta, Ana Rita; Casimiro, Carlos; Morgado, Carlos; Franco, Ana Catarina; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Geraldes, Ruth; Canhão, Patrícia; Pinho E Melo, Teresa; Paiva, Teresa; Ferro, José M

    2017-09-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is the leading cause of epilepsy in adults, although post-stroke seizures reported frequency is variable and few studies used EEG in their identification. To describe and compare EEG and clinical epileptic manifestations frequency in patients with an anterior circulation ischaemic stroke. Prospective study of acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients, consecutively admitted to a Stroke Unit over 24 months and followed-up for 1 year. All patients underwent standardized clinical and diagnostic assessment. Seizure occurrence was clinically evaluated during hospitalization and by a telephone interview at 6 months and a clinical appointment at 12 months after stroke. Video-EEG was performed in the first 72 h (1st EEG), daily after the 1st EEG for the first 7 days after the stroke, or later if neurological worsening, at discharge, and at 12 months. 151 patients were included (112 men) with a mean age of 67.4 (11.9) years. In the 1st year after stroke, 38 patients (25.2%) had an epileptic seizure. During hospitalization, 27 patients (17.9%) had epileptiform activity (interictal or ictal) in the EEG, 7 (25.9%) of them electrographic seizures. During the first week after stroke, 22 (14.6%) patients had a seizure and 4 (2.6%) non-convulsive status epilepticus criteria. Five (22.7%) acute symptomatic seizures were exclusively electrographic. At least one remote symptomatic seizure occurred in 23 (16%) patients. In the first 7 days after stroke, more than one-fifth of patients with seizures had exclusively electrographic seizures. Without a systematic neurophysiological evaluation the frequency of post-stroke seizures are clinically underestimated.

  20. Diagnosis in stroke - an uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aichner, F.T.

    2003-01-01

    In practical day-to-day terms, most patients have one of the common causes of stroke: ischemic stroke caused by the complications of atherothrombosis, intracranial small vessel disease, embolism from the heart, primary intracerebral hemorrhage caused by hypertension, or subarachnoid hemorrhage as a result of a ruptured saccular aneurysm. There are three issues to be considered in assessing the reliability of the clinical diagnosis of stroke: the diagnosis of stroke itself: is it a stroke or not; whether the stroke is caused by an infarct or a hemorrhage and particular in ischemic stroke the site and size of the lesion (anterior vs. posterior circulation, lacunar vs. cortical, etc.). No clinical scoring method can differentiate with absolute reliability ischemic stroke from primary intracerebral hemorrhage. To do this brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is required. For vascular diagnosis ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography are ideal and complementary non-invasive techniques. Both have no risks and are reasonably sensitive. Catheterangiography is only reserved for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage with a view to surgical or endovascular treatment or in exceptional cases to establish a more firm prognosis. The diagnosis of ischemic stroke caused by embolism from the heart can only be considered at all if there is an identifiable cardioembolic source which is the case in about 30 % of ischemic stroke, a higher proportion in recent studies using transoesophageal echocardiography. It is not clear that transoesophageal echocardiography provides much more information for clinical decision-making than transthoracic echocardiography, although it certainly provides more anatomical information in selected patients. This article summarizes the diagnostic armamentarium which is used for the diagnosis of stroke and gives an overview of clinically reliable and relevant measures. Refs. 23 (author)

  1. Stroke etiology and collaterals: atheroembolic strokes have greater collateral recruitment than cardioembolic strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, L C; Bouslama, M; Haussen, D C; Grossberg, J A; Dehkharghani, S; Anderson, A; Belagaje, S R; Bianchi, N A; Grigoryan, M; Frankel, M R; Nogueira, R G

    2017-06-01

    Chronic hypoperfusion from athero-stenotic lesions is thought to lead to better collateral recruitment compared to cardioembolic strokes. It was sought to compare collateral flow in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) versus stroke patients with cervical atherosclerotic steno-occlusive disease (CASOD). This was a retrospective review of a prospectively collected endovascular database. Patients with (i) anterior circulation large vessel occlusion stroke, (ii) pre-treatment computed tomography angiography (CTA) and (iii) intracranial embolism from AF or CASOD were included. CTA collateral patterns were evaluated and categorized into two groups: absent/poor collaterals (CTA collateral score 0-1) versus moderate/good collaterals (CTA collateral score 2-4). CT perfusion was also utilized for baseline core volume and evaluation of infarct growth. A total of 122 patients fitted the inclusion criteria, of whom 88 (72%) had AF and 34 (27%) CASOD. Patients with AF were older (P Collateral scores were lower in the AF group (P = 0.01) with patients having poor collaterals in 28% of cases versus 9% in the CASOD group (P = 0.03). Mortality rates (20% vs. 0%; P = 0.02) were higher in the AF patients whilst rates of any parenchymal hemorrhage (6% vs. 26%; P collaterals (odds ratio 4.70; 95% confidence interval 1.17-18.79; P = 0.03). Atheroembolic strokes seem to be associated with better collateral flow compared to cardioembolic strokes. This may in part explain the worse outcomes of AF-related stroke. © 2017 EAN.

  2. Supplementary motor complex and disturbed motor control – a retrospective clinical and lesion analysis of patients after anterior cerebral artery stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eBrugger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both the supplementary motor complex (SMC, consisting of the supplementary motor area (SMA-proper, the pre-SMA and the supplementary eye field, and the rostral cingulate cortex (ACC are supplied by the anterior cerebral artery (ACA and are involved in higher motor control. The Bereitschaftspotential (BP originates from the SMC and reflects cognitive preparation processes before volitional movements. ACA strokes may lead to impaired motor control in the absence of limb weakness and evoke an alien-hand syndrome (AHS in its extreme form.Aim: To characterize the clinical spectrum of disturbed motor control after ACA strokes including signs attributable to AHS and to identify the underlying neuroanatomical correlates.Methods: A clinical assessment focusing on signs of disturbed motor control including intermanual conflict (i.e. bilateral hand movements directed at opposite purposes, lack of self-initiated movements, exaggerated grasping, motor perseverations, mirror movements and gait apraxia was performed. Symptoms were grouped into A AHS specific and B non-AHS specific signs of upper limbs and C gait apraxia. Lesion summation mapping was applied to the patients’ MRI or CT scans to reveal associated lesion patterns. The BP was recorded in two patients.Results: Ten patients with ACA strokes (9 unilateral, 1 bilateral; mean age: 74.2 years; median NIH-SS at admission: 13.0 were included in this case series. In the acute stage, all cases had marked difficulties to perform volitional hand movements, while movements in response to external stimuli were preserved. In the chronic stage (median follow-up: 83.5 days initiation of voluntary movements improved, although all patients showed persistent signs of disturbed motor control. Impaired motor control is predominantly associated with damaged voxels within the SMC and the anterior and medial cingulate cortex, while lesions within the pre-SMA are specifically related to AHS. No BP was detected

  3. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: relation to stroke severity and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyrexia after stroke (temperature ≥37.5°C) is associated with poor prognosis, but information on timing of body temperature changes and relationship to stroke severity and subtypes varies. Methods We recruited patients with acute ischemic stroke, measured stroke severity, stroke subtype and recorded four-hourly tympanic (body) temperature readings from admission to 120 hours after stroke. We sought causes of pyrexia and measured functional outcome at 90 days. We systematically summarised all relevant previous studies. Results Amongst 44 patients (21 males, mean age 72 years SD 11) with median National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) 7 (range 0–28), 14 had total anterior circulation strokes (TACS). On admission all patients, both TACS and non-TACS, were normothermic (median 36.3°C vs 36.5°C, p=0.382 respectively) at median 4 hours (interquartile range, IQR, 2–8) after stroke; admission temperature and NIHSS were not associated (r2=0.0, p=0.353). Peak temperature, occurring at 35.5 (IQR 19.0 to 53.8) hours after stroke, was higher in TACS (37.7°C) than non-TACS (37.1°C, ptemperatures. Sixteen (36%) patients became pyrexial, in seven (44%) of whom we found no cause other than the stroke. Conclusions Normothermia is usual within the first 4 hours of stroke. Peak temperature occurs at 1.5 to 2 days after stroke, and is related to stroke severity/subtype and more closely associated with poor outcome than admission temperature. Temperature-outcome associations after stroke are complex, but normothermia on admission should not preclude randomisation of patients into trials of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:23075282

  4. Endovascular treatment of tandem occlusions of the anterior cerebral circulation with solitaire FR thrombectomy system. Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.machi@gmail.com [Montpellier University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Lobotesis, Kyriakos, E-mail: kyriakos@lobotesis.co.uk [Montpellier University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Maldonado, Igor Lima, E-mail: imaldonado@terra.com.br [Montpellier University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Costalat, Vincent, E-mail: vincentcost@hotmail.com [Montpellier University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Vendrell, Jean Francois, E-mail: jfvendrell@yahoo.fr [Montpellier University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Riquelme, Carlos, E-mail: riquelme.carlos@neuf.fr [Montpellier University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Bonafe, Alain, E-mail: bonafeh@aol.com [Montpellier University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal treatment in the acute phase of cervical internal carotid occlusion associated with intracranial obstruction is a matter of debate. In this study, we report our experience using the Solitaire FR revascularization device and synchronous intravenous fibrinolysis. The distal occlusion was treated with Solitaire FR before the proximal one in all cases, a technique not reported so far in the literature. Methods: We examined all cases of tandem occlusion treated in our institution between November 2009 and November 2010. The proximal occlusion was treated using manual thromboaspiration in order to achieve intracranial recanalization as rapid as possible. When necessary, stenting was performed after the reconstitution of the intracranial vessel. Morphological and clinical results were recorded in the immediate post-operative phase and at the three-month follow-up. Clinical success was defined as a mRS at 3 months {<=}2. Results: Four male and six female patients were treated (mean age 66 years). The cervical carotid was recanalized in all cases and the intracranial vessel (TICI {>=} 2b) in eight. Adverse events were recorded in four patients of which three were asymptomatic. These included two cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, one case of traumatic dissection, and one case of fatal intra-cerebral hemorrhage seven days following the procedure. At the three-month follow-up a mRS {<=} 2 was observed in four patients. Conclusions: The described approach for the treatment of tandem occlusions is promising with regard to both morphological and clinical assessments and thus may be considered a valid tool in acute stroke.

  5. Endovascular treatment of tandem occlusions of the anterior cerebral circulation with solitaire FR thrombectomy system. Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Paolo; Lobotesis, Kyriakos; Maldonado, Igor Lima; Costalat, Vincent; Vendrell, Jean Francois; Riquelme, Carlos; Bonafé, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal treatment in the acute phase of cervical internal carotid occlusion associated with intracranial obstruction is a matter of debate. In this study, we report our experience using the Solitaire FR revascularization device and synchronous intravenous fibrinolysis. The distal occlusion was treated with Solitaire FR before the proximal one in all cases, a technique not reported so far in the literature. Methods: We examined all cases of tandem occlusion treated in our institution between November 2009 and November 2010. The proximal occlusion was treated using manual thromboaspiration in order to achieve intracranial recanalization as rapid as possible. When necessary, stenting was performed after the reconstitution of the intracranial vessel. Morphological and clinical results were recorded in the immediate post-operative phase and at the three-month follow-up. Clinical success was defined as a mRS at 3 months ≤2. Results: Four male and six female patients were treated (mean age 66 years). The cervical carotid was recanalized in all cases and the intracranial vessel (TICI ≥ 2b) in eight. Adverse events were recorded in four patients of which three were asymptomatic. These included two cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, one case of traumatic dissection, and one case of fatal intra-cerebral hemorrhage seven days following the procedure. At the three-month follow-up a mRS ≤ 2 was observed in four patients. Conclusions: The described approach for the treatment of tandem occlusions is promising with regard to both morphological and clinical assessments and thus may be considered a valid tool in acute stroke.

  6. Basics of acute stroke treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haass, A.

    2005-01-01

    Acute stroke presents an emergency that requires immediate referral to a specialized hospital, preferably with a stroke unit. Disability and mortality are reduced by 30% in patients treated in stroke units compared to those treated on regular wards, even if a specialized team is present on the ward. Systolic blood pressure may remain high at 200-220 mmHg in the acute phase and should not be lowered too quickly. Further guidelines for basic care include: optimal O 2 delivery, blood sugar levels below 100-150 mg%, and lowering body temperature below 37.5 C using physical means or drugs. Increased intracranial pressure should be treated by raising the upper body of the patient, administration of glycerol, mannitol, and/or sorbitol, artificial respiration, and special monitoring of Tris buffer. Decompressive craniectomy may be considered in cases of ''malignant'' media stroke and expansive cerebellar infarction. Fibrinolysis is the most effective stroke treatment and is twice as effective in the treatment of stroke than myocardial infarction. Fibrinolysis may be initiated within 3 h of a stroke in the anterior circulation. If a penumbra is detectable by ''PWI-DWI mismatch MRI,'' specialized hospitals may perform fibrinolysis up to 6 h after symptom onset. In cases of stroke in the basilar artery, fibrinolysis may be performed even later after symptom onset. Intra-arterial fibrinolysis is performed in these cases using rt-PA or urokinase. Follow-up treatment of stroke patients should not only address post-stroke depression and neuropsychological deficits, but also include patient education about risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmias. (orig.) [de

  7. Stent-retriever thrombectomy after intravenous t-PA vs. t-PA alone in stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saver, Jeffrey L; Goyal, Mayank; Bonafe, Alain

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among patients with acute ischemic stroke due to occlusions in the proximal anterior intracranial circulation, less than 40% regain functional independence when treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) alone. Thrombectomy with the use of a stent retriever, in addit...

  8. Bilateral Anterior Opercular Syndrome With Partial Kluver?Bucy Syndrome in a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Ah-Ra; Lim, Young-Ho; Chung, Sae-Hoon; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral anterior opercular syndrome and partial Kluver?Bucy syndrome are associated with bilateral middle cerebral artery lesions. The combination of these two syndromes has only been reported in a child with limbic encephalitis. In this case, a 44-year-old woman with bilateral middle cerebral artery infarction, which occurred 2 years prior, could walk independently. However, she showed automatic-voluntary dissociation and anarthria with preserved writing skills. She also presented hypersex...

  9. Distribution territories and causative mechanisms of ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, A.; Grive, E.; Alvarez-Sabin, J. [Unidad de Resonancia Magnetica, Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic stroke prognosis, risk of recurrence, clinical assessment, and treatment decisions are influenced by stroke subtype (anatomic distribution and causative mechanism of infarction). Stroke subtype diagnosis is better achieved in the early phase of acute ischemia with the use of multimodal MR imaging. The pattern of brain lesions as shown by brain MR imaging can be classified according to a modified Oxfordshire method, based on the anatomic distribution of the infarcts into six groups: (1) total anterior circulation infarcts, (2) partial anterior circulation infarcts, (3) posterior circulation infarcts, (4) watershed infarcts, (5) centrum ovale infarcts, and (6) lacunar infarcts. The subtype of stroke according to its causative mechanism is based on the TOAST method, which classifies stroke into five major etiologic groups: (1) large-vessel atherosclerotic disease, (2) small-vessel atherosclerotic disease, (3) cardioembolic source, (4) other determined etiologies, and (5) undetermined or multiple possible etiologies. The different MR imaging patterns of acute ischemic brain lesions visualized using diffusion-weighted imaging and the pattern of vessel involvement demonstrated with MR angiography are essential factors that can suggest the most likely causative mechanism of infarction. This information may have an impact on decisions regarding therapy and the performance of additional diagnostic tests. (orig.)

  10. Acetazolamide-augmented dynamic BOLD (aczBOLD imaging for assessing cerebrovascular reactivity in chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation: An initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR in chronic steno-occlusive disease using a novel approach that couples BOLD imaging with acetazolamide (ACZ vasoreactivity (aczBOLD, to evaluate dynamic effects of ACZ on BOLD and to establish the relationship between aczBOLD and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC perfusion MRI. Eighteen patients with unilateral chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation underwent a 20-min aczBOLD imaging protocol, with ACZ infusion starting at 5 min of scan initiation. AczBOLD reactivity was calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis to generate CVR maps for subsequent quantitative analyses. Reduced CVR was observed in the diseased vs. the normal hemisphere both by qualitative and quantitative assessment (gray matter (GM: 4.13% ± 1.16% vs. 4.90% ± 0.98%, P = 0.002; white matter (WM: 2.83% ± 1.23% vs. 3.50% ± 0.94%, P = 0.005. In all cases BOLD signal began increasing immediately following ACZ infusion, approaching a plateau at ~8.5 min after infusion, with the tissue volume of reduced augmentation increasing progressively with time, peaking at 2.60 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 0–4.43 min for the GM and 1.80 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 1.40–3.53 min for the WM. In the diseased hemisphere, aczBOLD CVR significantly correlated with baseline DSC time-to-maximum of the residue function (Tmax (P = 0.008 for the WM and normalized cerebral blood flow (P = 0.003 for the GM, and P = 0.001 for the WM. AczBOLD provides a novel, safe, easily implementable approach to CVR measurement in the routine clinical environments. Further studies can establish quantitative thresholds from aczBOLD towards identification of patients at heightened risk of recurrent ischemia and cognitive decline.

  11. Acetazolamide-augmented dynamic BOLD (aczBOLD) imaging for assessing cerebrovascular reactivity in chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation: An initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjie; Dehkharghani, Seena; Nahab, Fadi; Qiu, Deqiang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in chronic steno-occlusive disease using a novel approach that couples BOLD imaging with acetazolamide (ACZ) vasoreactivity (aczBOLD), to evaluate dynamic effects of ACZ on BOLD and to establish the relationship between aczBOLD and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI. Eighteen patients with unilateral chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation underwent a 20-min aczBOLD imaging protocol, with ACZ infusion starting at 5 min of scan initiation. AczBOLD reactivity was calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis to generate CVR maps for subsequent quantitative analyses. Reduced CVR was observed in the diseased vs. the normal hemisphere both by qualitative and quantitative assessment (gray matter (GM): 4.13% ± 1.16% vs. 4.90% ± 0.98%, P  = 0.002; white matter (WM): 2.83% ± 1.23% vs. 3.50% ± 0.94%, P  = 0.005). In all cases BOLD signal began increasing immediately following ACZ infusion, approaching a plateau at ~ 8.5 min after infusion, with the tissue volume of reduced augmentation increasing progressively with time, peaking at 2.60 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 0-4.43 min) for the GM and 1.80 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 1.40-3.53 min) for the WM. In the diseased hemisphere, aczBOLD CVR significantly correlated with baseline DSC time-to-maximum of the residue function (T max ) ( P  = 0.008 for the WM) and normalized cerebral blood flow ( P  = 0.003 for the GM, and P  = 0.001 for the WM). AczBOLD provides a novel, safe, easily implementable approach to CVR measurement in the routine clinical environments. Further studies can establish quantitative thresholds from aczBOLD towards identification of patients at heightened risk of recurrent ischemia and cognitive decline.

  12. Damage to Broca’s area OR the anterior temporal lobe is implicated in stroke-induced agrammatic comprehension: it depends on the task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corianne Rogalsky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The neurobiology of sentence comprehension remains unresolved. Previous large-scale studies of stroke patients have yielded conflicting results regarding sentence comprehension, implicating inferior frontal, anterior temporal and/or posterior temporal regions (Dronkers et al., 2004; Magnusdottir et al., 2013; Thothathiri et al. 2012. Furthermore, only one large-scale lesion study (Magnusdottir et al. 2013 has examined the neural underpinnings of agrammatic comprehension (i.e. substantially worse performance on sentences with noncanonical word orders compared to canonical word order sentences in English, a hallmark of Broca’s aphasia. This one previous study of noncanonical < canonical sentence performance on a sentence picture-matching task implicated damage to the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL and to a lesser degree Broca’s area damage (i.e. < 10% of significant voxels (Magnusdottir et al. 2013. The present study investigated the neurobiology of agrammatic comprehension with two sentence comprehension tasks in the MARC test battery: a sentence-picture matching task (the SOAP Test: a test of syntactic complexity; Love & Oster, 2002 and a sentence plausibility judgment task. Each task contained active, passive, subject-relative and object-relative sentences. Participants included 91 patients with chronic focal cerebral damage. First, we conducted voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM; Bates et al. 2003 for each sentence type in each task. Consistent with previous studies (Magnusdottir et al. 2013; Thothathiri et al. 2012, the VLSMs identified a significant association between sentence comprehension impairments and damage to a large left temporal-inferior parietal network for all sentences (peak t values were in posterior temporal and inferior parietal voxels; no areas of frontal lobe damage were significant for any sentence type/task. We then conducted VLSMs to identify areas of damage associated specifically with agrammatic

  13. Is it important to classify ischaemic stroke?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iqbal, M

    2012-02-01

    Thirty-five percent of all ischemic events remain classified as cryptogenic. This study was conducted to ascertain the accuracy of diagnosis of ischaemic stroke based on information given in the medical notes. It was tested by applying the clinical information to the (TOAST) criteria. Hundred and five patients presented with acute stroke between Jan-Jun 2007. Data was collected on 90 patients. Male to female ratio was 39:51 with age range of 47-93 years. Sixty (67%) patients had total\\/partial anterior circulation stroke; 5 (5.6%) had a lacunar stroke and in 25 (28%) the mechanism of stroke could not be identified. Four (4.4%) patients with small vessel disease were anticoagulated; 5 (5.6%) with atrial fibrillation received antiplatelet therapy and 2 (2.2%) patients with atrial fibrillation underwent CEA. This study revealed deficiencies in the clinical assessment of patients and treatment was not tailored to the mechanism of stroke in some patients.

  14. Subcallosal artery stroke: infarction of the fornix and the genu of the corpus callosum. The importance of the anterior communicating artery complex. Case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meila, Dan; Saliou, Guillaume; Krings, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variable anatomy of the anterior communicating artery (AcoA) complex, three main perforating branches can be typically identified the largest of which being the subcallosal artery (ScA). We present a case series of infarction in the vascular territory of the ScA to highlight the anatomy, the clinical symptomatology, and the presumed pathophysiology as it pertains to endovascular and surgical management of vascular pathology in this region. In this retrospective multicenter case series study of patients who were diagnosed with symptomatic ScA stroke, we analyzed all available clinical records, MRI, and angiographic details. Additionally, a review of the literature is provided. We identified five different cases of ScA stroke, leading to a subsequent infarction of the fornix and the genu of the corpus callosum. The presumed pathophysiology in non-iatrogenic cases is microangiopathy, rather than embolic events; iatrogenic SCA occlusion can present after both surgical and endovascular treatment of AcoA aneurysms that may occur with or without occlusion of the AcoA. Stroke in the vascular territory of the ScA leads to a characteristic imaging and clinical pattern. Ischemia involves the anterior columns of the fornix and the genu of the corpus callosum, and patients present with a Korsakoff's syndrome including disturbances of short-term memory and cognitive changes. We conclude that despite its small size, the ScA is an important artery to watch out for during surgical or endovascular treatment of AcoA aneurysms.

  15. Association between arterial calcifications and nonlacunar and lacunar ischemic strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Anouk C; Fonville, Susanne; Zadi, Taihra; van Hattem, Antonius M G; Saiedie, Ghesrouw; Koudstaal, Peter J; van der Lugt, Aad

    2014-03-01

    Nonlacunar cerebral infarcts are presumed to be caused by thromboembolism from the heart or extracranial arteries, whereas lacunar infarcts are thought to be caused by small vessel disease. We investigated to what extent arterial calcifications differ between nonlacunar and lacunar ischemic strokes. We studied 820 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation who underwent multidetector computed tomography angiography and had no rare cause of stroke. The presence of likely cardioembolic pathogenesis was determined according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. The remaining 708 patients were categorized as nonlacunar or lacunar strokes, either transient ischemic attacks or strokes, based on clinical symptoms corrected by brain imaging results. We measured volume of calcifications in the aortic arch, symptomatic extracranial and intracranial carotid artery using multidetector computed tomography angiography. The difference in calcifications between nonlacunar and lacunar strokes was assessed with a multivariable logistic regression analysis. We adjusted for degree of symptomatic carotid artery stenosis and cardiovascular risk factors. We found an independent association between volume of aortic arch calcifications and nonlacunar ischemic strokes (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.11 [1.02-1.21]). No independent associations between extracranial and intracranial carotid artery calcifications and nonlacunar strokes were present. The only difference we found between nonlacunar and lacunar strokes was a higher calcification volume in the aortic arch in nonlacunar strokes. Our findings only partially confirm the notion of distinct etiologies and suggest that the potential role of other plaque components, plaque morphology, and aortic arch calcifications in ischemic stroke subtypes awaits further evaluation.

  16. Stroke in central nervous system infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carod-Artal Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke subtypes and etiology may differ between developing and developed countries. Infections are a relatively common cause of stroke in tropical regions. Objective: To review the main infectious diseases associated with stroke. Discussion: Prevalence of stroke in HIV patients is around 1%. Pathogenic mechanisms include HIV vasculopathy, vasculitis, cardioembolism, acquired hypercoagulability, and the effect of opportunistic infections. Treatment with protease inhibitors has been associated with premature atherosclerotic vascular disease. Emerging viral infections that are associated with stroke include viral hemorrhagic fevers, Japanese encephalitis, dengue, and West Nile virus. Vasculitis involving perforating vessels of the brain is a cerebrovascular complication of tuberculous meningitis. Small, medium, and large arteries of the anterior circulation can be involved. A progressive intracranial arteriopathy after Leptospira interrogans infection has been described, which involves the large intracranial arteries. Cerebrovascular complications of mycosis are associated with large vessel vasculitis, direct vessel damage by invasion or embolization, and subarachnoid hemorrhage due to mycotic aneurysm rupture. Pathological findings of cerebral malaria include diffuse cerebral edema, perivascular ring hemorrhages, white matter necrosis, parenchyma petechial hemorrhages, occlusion of brain vessels, and sequestration of infected erythrocytes in cortical and perforating arteries. Stroke can occur in subarachnoid neurocysticercosis and the lesions in such cases consist mostly of deep lacunar infarctions resulting from endarteritis of small penetrating arteries. Cardiac arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, apical aneurysm, and mural thrombus are the conditions that predispose patients with American trypanosomiasis to cardioembolism. Gnathostoma spinigerum infestation is a cause of hemorrhagic stroke in Asia. Conclusion: Infectious and

  17. Superdominant Right Coronary Artery with Absence of Left Circumflex and Anomalous Origin of the Left Anterior Descending Coronary from the Right Sinus: An Unheard Coronary Anomaly Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Danillo Peixoto Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery anomalies are congenital changes in their origin, course, and/or structure. Most of them are discovered as incidental findings during coronary angiographic studies or at autopsies. We present herein the case of a 70-year-old man with symptomatic severe aortic valvar stenosis whose preoperative coronary angiogram revealed a so far unreported coronary anomaly circulation pattern.

  18. Pediatric ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Mohandas, Surath

    2014-10-01

    Dengue infection is an important arboviral infection in southeast Asia, especially in India. Neurological manifestations of dengue are increasingly recognized. We report an ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis in an 8-year-old child. We present a girl with a short febrile illness followed by episodic severe headache, with gradually progressive hemiparesis and visual impairment. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple infarctions in the anterior and posterior circulation. The magnetic resonance angiogram revealed irregular narrowing of bilateral middle cerebral arteries, right anterior cerebral artery, left posterior cerebral, and bilateral vertebral arteries suggestive of vasculitis. Her dengue serology was strongly positive for immunoglobulin M with 68.9 panbio units. The rest of the evaluation for pediatric stroke was unremarkable. She was treated with intravenous followed by oral corticosteroids and recovered totally with resolution of vasculitis on magnetic resonance angiogram over the next 3 months. This child illustrates possible immune-mediated vasculitis caused by dengue infection which is rather a rare presentation in a child who subsequently recovered well. One should consider dengue in childhood strokes in endemic regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The course of unilateral intracranial arteriopathy in young adults with arterial ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulder, Marcel M M; Braun, Kees P J; Leeuwis, Jan Willem; Lo, Rob T H; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Kappelle, L Jaap; Klijn, Catharina J M

    2012-07-01

    Unilateral intracranial focal nonprogressive arteriopathy is often found in children with arterial ischemic stroke. We aimed to investigate the course of unilateral intracranial arteriopathy in young adults. We searched the Utrecht Stroke Database for patients between 16 and 50 years of age diagnosed with anterior circulation arterial ischemic stroke and a nonatherosclerotic, unilateral intracranial large-artery arteriopathy between 1991 and 2005. We assessed clinical features, potential causes, risk factors, extent of infarction and arteriopathy at presentation, long-term angiographic course, and clinical outcome. Of 356 patients with anterior circulation arterial ischemic stroke, 17 (5%) had a documented unilateral intracranial arteriopathy, of whom 14 could be included for follow-up investigations (median age, 34 years; range, 27-49 years). Median duration of follow-up was 8.8 years (range, 1.7-12.8 years). In 11 patients, onset of symptoms was not abrupt. The arteriopathy normalized completely in 5 and improved in 3 patients; in none of the patients did the arteriopathy worsen. Two of 14 patients had recurrent symptoms. Ten patients (71%) had a good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score≤2). In young adults, arterial ischemic stroke is rarely caused by a unilateral intracranial arteriopathy. Similar to children, onset of symptoms in young adults is often not abrupt and the arteriopathy may improve over time. Late recurrences were rare. Possibly, a monophasic inflammatory process, as has been suggested for childhood intracranial focal nonprogressive arteriopathies, also occurs in young adults.

  20. Role of brain natriuretic peptide as a novel prognostic biomarker in acute ischemic stroke

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    Bindu Menon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We investigated to study the prognostic importance of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled 100 patients with acute ischemic stroke and measured plasma BNP levels and compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Risk factors, biochemical parameters, lipid profile, carotid and vertebral Doppler, imaging, and cardiac evaluation were done. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score on admission and functional disability by Barthel Index (BI at 3 months. Ischemic stroke subtype was classified according to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP. Data were entered in MS Excel, and appropriate statistical analysis was done using the SPSS software version 21.0. A P = 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Mean age of patients was 55.17 ± 11.37 years with a male:female ratio 3:1. OCSP showed total anterior circulation infarct (TACI 35, partial anterior circulation infarct 9, lacunar infarct 12, and posterior circulation infarct 44. NIHSS on admission was average 10 ± 7 and BI was 57 ± 30. BNP in patients (435 ng/ml was very high as compared to controls (<60 ng/ml (P < 0.001. There was a positive correlation between age and BNP (R2 = 0.34; P < 0.00; NIHSS and BNP (R2 = 0.255; P < 0.01, negative correlation between BI and BNP (R2 = −0.064; P < 0.01. Mean BNP levels across the OCSP showed higher values in TACI (F = 4.609 P = 0.005. Regression analysis showed that BNP can predict BI which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Plasma BNP levels was significantly elevated in patients with ischemic stroke. Our study concludes that high BNP levels are seen in large anterior circulation stroke and is a predictor for the poor functional outcome at 3 months. Determination of BNP levels as a biomarker could be helpful in predicting the outcome in stroke patients.

  1. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

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    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  2. Morphological risk factors of stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelis, Drosos; Bischoff, Moritz S; Jobst, Bertram; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Hinz, Ulf; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Böckler, Dittmar

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to identify independent factors correlating to an increased risk of perioperative stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A prospective maintained TEVAR database, medical records, and imaging studies of 300 patients (205 men; median age of all, 66 years, range 21-89), who underwent TEVAR between March 1997 and February 2011, were reviewed. Preoperative CT data sets were reviewed by two experienced radiologists with focus on the atheroma burden in the aortic arch (grade I, normal, to grade V, ulcerated or pedunculated atheroma). Aortic arch geometry (arch types I-III) was documented. Further parameters included in the univariate analysis were age, gender, urgency of repair, duration of procedure, adenosine-induced cardiac arrest or rapid pacing, proximal landing zone, left subclavian artery (LSA) coverage, and number of stent grafts. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent correlations of potential risk factors. Atherosclerotic aneurysm was the most common pathology (44%). One hundred and fifty-four of our patients (51%) were treated under urgent or emergent conditions. Seventeen percent of all patients had significant arch atheroma (grade IV or V), and 43% had a steep type III aortic arch. The perioperative stroke was 4% (12 patients; median age, 73 years, range 31-78). Two strokes were lethal (0.7%). All strokes were classified as embolic based on imaging characteristics. In eight patients, strokes were located in the left cerebral hemisphere (seven of them in the anterior and one in the posterior circulation). Four stroke patients (one in the left posterior circulation) underwent LSA coverage without revascularization. Three stroke patients had severe arch atheroma grade V. Five patients suffering stroke were recognized to have a type III aortic arch. Strokes were equally distributed between zones 0-2 vs. 3-4 (n = 6 each, 5 vs. 3.3%). The highest incidence was found in zone 1 (11

  3. Polymorphism of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha gene promoter, circulating TNF-alpha level, and cardiovascular risk factor for ischemic stroke

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    Cui Guanglin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α is one of the most typical pro-inflammatory cytokines with both beneficial and destructive properties for the central nervous system. Increasing evidences have demonstrated the important role of TNF-α in the development of ischemic stroke, but studies examining the possible association with stroke or direct functional effects of polymorphisms in TNF-α have been contradictory. Findings In this study, a 2-kb length of the proximal promoter of the TNF-α was screened and four polymorphisms were investigated in the case–control study. Our data confirmed the association between -308G/A variant with stroke in 1,388 stroke patients and 1,027 controls and replicated in an independent population of 961 stroke patients and 821 controls (odds ratio (OR = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI =1.02 to 1.77 and OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.09 to 2.23, respectively. To reconcile the association between polymorphisms and stroke and to give a comprehensive picture of the genetic architecture of this important gene, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 published studies in an Asian population. Our results demonstrated an association between rs1800629 and ischemic stroke (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.21 to 1.69. Another meta-analysis results of 14 studies demonstrated that ischemic stroke patients have higher serum TNF-α level than the control subjects (standardized mean difference (SMD = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.85 to 2.81. In vitro evaluation of potential interaction between variants of the TNF-α gene (−308G/A, -857C/T, and -1031T/C demonstrated that these three polymorphisms could interact together to determine the overall activity of the TNF-α gene. Conclusions These findings strongly implicate the involvement of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of stroke.

  4. Predictors for Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yonggang; Yang, Dong; Wang, Huaiming; Zi, Wenjie; Zhang, Meng; Geng, Yu; Zhou, Zhiming; Wang, Wei; Xu, Haowen; Tian, Xiguang; Lv, Penghua; Liu, Yuxiu; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Xinfeng; Xu, Gelin

    2017-05-01

    Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH) pose a major safety concern for endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke. This study aimed to evaluate the risk and related factors of SICH after endovascular treatment in a real-world practice. Patients with stroke treated with stent-like retrievers for recanalizing a blocked artery in anterior circulation were enrolled from 21 stroke centers in China. Intracranial hemorrhage was classified as symptomatic and asymptomatic ones according to Heidelberg Bleeding Classification. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors for SICH. Of the 632 enrolled patients, 101 (16.0%) were diagnosed with SICH within 72 hours after endovascular treatment. Ninety-day mortality was higher in patients with SICH than in patients without SICH (65.3% versus 18.8%; P 0.83 (odds ratio [OR], 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-3.46), pretreatment Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score of stroke of cardioembolism type (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.13-3.25), poor collateral circulation (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.16-3.36), delay from symptoms onset to groin puncture >270 minutes (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.03-2.80), >3 passes with retriever (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.40-4.65) were associated with SICH after endovascular treatment. Incidence of SICH after thrombectomy is higher in Asian patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardioembolic stroke, poor collateral circulation, delayed endovascular treatment, multiple passes with stent retriever device, lower pretreatment Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score, higher baseline neutrophil ratio may increase the risk of SICH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Association of ideomotor apraxia with lesion site, etiology, neglect, and functional independence in patients with first ever stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2015-04-01

    Ideomotor apraxia (IMA) is characterized by the inability to correctly imitate hand gestures and voluntarily pantomime tool use. The relationship between IMA and characteristics of stroke has not been totally elucidated. This study aimed to find out associations between presence of IMA and stroke etiology, site of the lesions, neglect, and temporal and functional parameters of stroke in patients with first ever stroke. Thirty-nine patients with first ever stroke were included. Patients with severe cognitive deficits were excluded. Assessment tools included Ideomotor Apraxia Test, Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Brunnstrom recovery stages, Mini Mental Test (MMT), and star cancellation test. Etiology (hemorrhagic or ischemic) and site of stroke was assessed through brain imaging methods. Location and size of ischemic lesion was determined by using the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project system. IMA was identified in 35.9% of the patients. Patients with IMA had significantly lower FIM scores both on admission and discharge (P = 0.001, P = 0.001). Presence of IMA was significantly associated with the presence of neglect (P = 0.004), total anterior circulation ischemia (TACI) (P stroke etiology had no impact on the presence of IMA. IMA was in concordance with poor cognitive and functional state and was not limited to left hemisphere lesions. The study revealed strong associations between IMA, neglect, and TACI. Every patient with stroke should be evaluated for the presence of IMA on admission to rehabilitation unit.

  6. Pattern of hospitalized-stroke patients in ASEAN countries an ASNA stroke epidemiological study

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    Jusuf Misbach

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available To better understanding the demographic characteristics, admission time, clinical pattern, risk factors, stroke type, length of stay, and discharge outcome of hospitalized acute stroke patients in ASEAN member countries, ASEAN   Neurological Association (ASNA formed a Standing Commiltee for Stroke in 1996 and this is the first ASNA Stroke Epidemiological Study using the same stroke protocol. This prospective hospital based study was conducted in seven ASEAN countries (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam by participating neurologists from October 1996 to March 1997. Of the 3723 consecutive hospitalized stroke patients (2030 males and 1660 females from 44 participating hospitals in this study ie Brunei (n=53, Indonesia (n=2065, Malaysia (n=300,Philippines (n=545,Singapore (n=232, Thailand (n=244 and Vietnam (n=284, the mean age was 59.0 ± 13,8 years 16% of patients were younger than 45 years and 37% of patients were older than 65 years. There were no significant differences in age at onset among stroke subjects except in Vietnam (younger and Singapore (older. The sex distribution showed a slight higher prevalence of women in Singapore and in the age group > 64 years. The mean adrnission time was 41.5 ± 87.0 hours, 19% of patients were admitted within 3 hours, 29% within 6 hours and 66% more than 6 hours (delayed admission especially in Malaysia and Singapore (80% and 77% respectively. Motor disability was the most prevalent clinical feature in all countries and carotid bruit was the rarest (1%. Hypertension was the most common risk factor (68% in all countries, followed by TIA (35%, smoking, diabetes mellitus, ischnemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia. CT scan was performed on 76% of subjects. The diagnostic classification was non lacunar anterior circulation (32%, lacunar infarction (14%, hemorrhagic stroke (26%, SAH (4%. Mean length of stay was 11.4 ± 11.8 days. Most of the patients

  7. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  8. Factors Associated With Intestinal Constipation in Chronic Patients With Stroke Sequelae Undergoing Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Tânia Mara Nascimento de Miranda; Aguiar, Márcia Helena de Assis; Furtado, Íris Aline Brito; Ribeiro, Samile Pereira; de Oliveira, Pérola; Mello, Paulo Andrade; Padula, Marcele Pescuma Capeletti; Beraldo, Paulo Sérgio Siebra

    The objective of this study was to define which stroke-related factors constitute independent variables in the incidence of intestinal constipation (IC) of chronic patients admitted to a hospital rehabilitation program. All patients consecutively admitted for rehabilitation were recruited for the study. In the Poisson multiple regression analysis using a hierarchical model, sociodemographic variables, comorbidities, medication, previous history of constipation, life habits, and stroke-related variables were considered for defining factors associated with IC. A 31% prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]: 25.3-37.1) of IC was detected. Among the factors associated, female gender (adjusted prevalence ratio [PRadjusted] = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.20-2.68), intestinal complaints prior to stroke (PRadjusted = 3.71; 95% CI: 2.60-5.31), intake of less than 800 ml of fluid per day (PRadjusted = 1.72; 95% CI: 1.20- 2.45), age greater than 65 years at brain injury (PRadjusted = 1.67; 95% CI: 1.01-2.75), and partially impaired anterior brain circulation (PRadjusted = 3.35; 95% CI: 1.02-10.97) were associated with IC. Female gender, elderly, prior history of IC, low fluid intake, and partial impairment of anterior brain circulation were factors independently associated with IC in stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. These findings require further validation and may serve toward improving bowel retraining programs for this patient group.

  9. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia...

  10. Stroke Neurologist's Perspective on the New Endovascular Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotta, James C; Hacke, Werner

    2015-06-01

    Before December 2014, the only proven effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke was recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA). This has now changed with the publication of the Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands (MR CLEAN), Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing CT to Recanalization Times (ESCAPE), Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits--Intra-Arterial (EXTEND IA), Solitaire With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment Trial (SWIFT PRIME), and Randomized Trial of Revascularization With the Solitaire FR Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in the Treatment of Acute Stroke Due to Anterior Circulation Large Vessel Occlusion Presenting Within Eight Hours of Symptom Onset (REVASCAT) studies. We review the main results of these studies and how they inform stroke patient management going forward. The main take home points for neurologists are (1) intra-arterial thrombectomy is a potently effective treatment and should be offered to patients who have documented occlusion in the distal internal carotid or the proximal middle cerebral artery, have a relatively normal noncontrast head computed tomographic scan, severe neurological deficit, and can have intra-arterial thrombectomy within 6 hours of last seen normal; (2) benefits are clear in patients receiving r-tPA before intra-arterial thrombectomy; r-tPA should not be withheld if the patient meets criteria, and benefit in patients who do not receive r-tPA or have r-tPA exclusions requires further study; and (3) these favorable results occur when intra-arterial thrombectomy is performed in an endovascular stroke center by a coordinated multidisciplinary team that extends from the prehospital stage to the endovascular suite, minimizes time to recanalization, uses stent-retriever devices, and avoids general

  11. Effect of General Anesthesia and Conscious Sedation During Endovascular Therapy on Infarct Growth and Clinical Outcomes in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Claus Ziegler; Yoo, Albert J; Sørensen, Leif Hougaard

    2018-01-01

    Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 18 (interquartile range [IQR], 14-21). Four patients (6.3%) in the CS group were converted to the GA group. Successful reperfusion was significantly higher in the GA arm than in the CS arm (76.9% vs 60.3%; P = .04). The difference in the volume of infarct growth......Importance: Endovascular therapy (EVT) is the standard of care for select patients who had a stroke caused by a large vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation, but there is uncertainty regarding the optimal anesthetic approach during EVT. Observational studies suggest that general anesthesia...... was a single-center prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point evaluation that enrolled patients from March 12, 2015, to February 2, 2017. Although the trial screened 1501 patients, it included 128 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large vessel occlusions in the anterior...

  12. Muscle pedicle bone grafting using the anterior one-third of the gluteus medius attached to the greater trochanter for treatment of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage II osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-Jin; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Taek-Rim

    2018-02-24

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of our technique on further collapse of the femoral head in Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) stage II, patient's functional improvements, and analyze the survival rate of the affected hip. Between June 2007 and March 2015, 24 hips diagnosed with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) were treated with our muscle pedicle bone grafting (MPBG) technique using anterior one-third of gluteus medius attached to the greater trochanter. The group was consisted of 15 men and eight women, mean age of 36 years at the time of surgery. Mean follow-up was 6.2 years. Four hips showed regeneration, 11 hips showed no progression, and nine hips showed slight extent of the lesion. But during the follow-up, three hips underwent total hip arthroplasty at the mean follow-up of 5.8 years after the surgery. The survival rate at the last follow-up was approximately 87.5%. Excluding the three failed cases, the mean total Harris hip score was improved from 57.2 to 82.3 points (p < 0.05). We had no case of complications such as limping, numbness, wound infection, heterotopic ossification, nor intra- and post-operative fracture. We showed 87.5% of survival rate by average of 6.2-year follow-up, maximum of 10.1 years. And compared to other reports, our technique showed relatively good results. In the short term, our modified MPBG technique seems to be effective in ARCO stage II ONFH. We, therefore, suggest this technique as one of the promising treatments of choices for patients with ARCO stage II ONFH.

  13. Serum Soluble Corin is Decreased in Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Fangfang; Shi, Jijun; Han, Xiujie; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Yan; Zhi, Zhongwen; Zhang, Fuding; Shen, Yun; Ma, Juanjuan; Song, Yulin; Hu, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    Soluble corin was decreased in coronary heart disease. Given the connections between cardiac dysfunction and stroke, circulating corin might be a candidate marker of stroke risk. However, the association between circulating corin and stroke has not yet been studied in humans. Here, we aimed to examine the association in patients wtith stroke and community-based healthy controls. Four hundred eighty-one patients with ischemic stroke, 116 patients with hemorrhagic stroke, and 2498 healthy controls were studied. Serum soluble corin and some conventional risk factors of stroke were examined. Because circulating corin was reported to be varied between men and women, the association between serum soluble corin and stroke was evaluated in men and women, respectively. Patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke had a significantly lower level of serum soluble corin than healthy controls in men and women (all P values, stroke than men in the highest quartile. Women in the lowest quartile of serum soluble corin were also more likely to have ischemic (OR, 3.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.76-5.44) and hemorrhagic (OR, 8.54; 95% confidence interval, 2.35-31.02) stroke than women in the highest quartile. ORs of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were significantly increased with the decreasing levels of serum soluble corin in men and women (all P values for trend, stroke compared with healthy controls. Our findings raise the possibility that serum soluble corin may have a pathogenic role in stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Screening, prevalence and ethnic variation of diabetes mellitus in people with acute stroke and transient ischaemic attack: a cross-sectional study in Northland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Steven Wm; McGrath, Nicole N

    2016-06-10

    To assess our prevalence and screening rate for diabetes and pre-diabetes in people presenting with acute stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) in Northland, New Zealand, as well as identifying discrepancies between Māori and non-Māori, rates of atrial fibrillation (AF) and effect of metformin on stroke. Data was collected retrospectively on people diagnosed with stroke or TIA in Northland, between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2014. 345 people presented with acute stroke/TIA. 49.5% had dysglycaemia: 24.3% diabetes, 25.2% pre-diabetes. An HbA1c was performed on 70.4%. Māori had more diabetes (41.6%) than non-Māori (19.4%), with an HbA1c 12 mmol/mol (3.2%) higher, and were 12 years younger on average. There was no difference in AF prevalence between people with and without diabetes, and in the proportion of severe stroke (total anterior circulation infarction) between people with diabetes on metformin and those not. The prevalence of dysglycaemia in acute stroke/TIA in Northland is high. The goal of universal HbA1c screening in stroke is not being met. Māori have stroke younger, and a higher prevalence of diabetes may partially explain this. No association between diabetes and AF was found, nor evidence that metformin may be protective against larger strokes.

  15. Machine learning for outcome prediction of acute ischemic stroke post intra-arterial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Hamed; Dowling, Richard; Yan, Bernard; Mitchell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Accurately predicting stroke outcome from a set of predictive variables may identify high-risk patients and guide treatment approaches, leading to decreased morbidity. Logistic regression models allow for the identification and validation of predictive variables. However, advanced machine learning algorithms offer an alternative, in particular, for large-scale multi-institutional data, with the advantage of easily incorporating newly available data to improve prediction performance. Our aim was to design and compare different machine learning methods, capable of predicting the outcome of endovascular intervention in acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke. We conducted a retrospective study of a prospectively collected database of acute ischaemic stroke treated by endovascular intervention. Using SPSS®, MATLAB®, and Rapidminer®, classical statistics as well as artificial neural network and support vector algorithms were applied to design a supervised machine capable of classifying these predictors into potential good and poor outcomes. These algorithms were trained, validated and tested using randomly divided data. We included 107 consecutive acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients treated by endovascular technique. Sixty-six were male and the mean age of 65.3. All the available demographic, procedural and clinical factors were included into the models. The final confusion matrix of the neural network, demonstrated an overall congruency of ∼ 80% between the target and output classes, with favourable receiving operative characteristics. However, after optimisation, the support vector machine had a relatively better performance, with a root mean squared error of 2.064 (SD: ± 0.408). We showed promising accuracy of outcome prediction, using supervised machine learning algorithms, with potential for incorporation of larger multicenter datasets, likely further improving prediction. Finally, we

  16. Machine learning for outcome prediction of acute ischemic stroke post intra-arterial therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Asadi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Accurately predicting stroke outcome from a set of predictive variables may identify high-risk patients and guide treatment approaches, leading to decreased morbidity. Logistic regression models allow for the identification and validation of predictive variables. However, advanced machine learning algorithms offer an alternative, in particular, for large-scale multi-institutional data, with the advantage of easily incorporating newly available data to improve prediction performance. Our aim was to design and compare different machine learning methods, capable of predicting the outcome of endovascular intervention in acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke. METHOD: We conducted a retrospective study of a prospectively collected database of acute ischaemic stroke treated by endovascular intervention. Using SPSS®, MATLAB®, and Rapidminer®, classical statistics as well as artificial neural network and support vector algorithms were applied to design a supervised machine capable of classifying these predictors into potential good and poor outcomes. These algorithms were trained, validated and tested using randomly divided data. RESULTS: We included 107 consecutive acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients treated by endovascular technique. Sixty-six were male and the mean age of 65.3. All the available demographic, procedural and clinical factors were included into the models. The final confusion matrix of the neural network, demonstrated an overall congruency of ∼ 80% between the target and output classes, with favourable receiving operative characteristics. However, after optimisation, the support vector machine had a relatively better performance, with a root mean squared error of 2.064 (SD: ± 0.408. DISCUSSION: We showed promising accuracy of outcome prediction, using supervised machine learning algorithms, with potential for incorporation of larger multicenter

  17. Effect of body mass index and abdominal girth index on location and etiology of ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-yu HAO

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the influence of body mass index (BMI and abdominal girth index (AGI on the location and etiology of ischemic stroke in order to determine whether they can predict the etiology and pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 185 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 155 cases of normal controls matched in sex, age and past medical history were enrolled in this study. Their height and weight were measured to calculate BMI, and abdominal circumference was measured to calculate AGI. Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP and TOAST classification were carried out. Results BMI of overweight (BMI 24.00-27.90 kg/m2 subgroup (t = 2.060, P = 0.000 and obesity (BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2 subgroup (t = 2.315, P = 0.000 in patients with ischemic stroke was significantly higher than that in control group. AGI of abnomaly (AGI > 1 cm/kg subgroup in patients with ischemic stroke was significantly higher than that in control group (t = 1.021, P = 0.000. Based on OCSP classification, 185 patients with ischemic stroke were classified into 10 (5.41% of total anterior circulation infarct (TACI, 81 (43.78% of partial anterior circulation infarct (PACI, 56 (30.27% of lacunar infarct (LACI and 38 (20.54% of posterior circulation infarct (POCI. Only the PACI ratio among different BMI subgroups had statistical significance (H = 7.041, P = 0.011. PACI ratio in BMI 24.00-27.90 kg/m2 subgroup was significantly higher than that in BMI 1 cm/kg subgroup was significantly higher (χ2 = 11.461, P = 0.001, while SOE ratio was significantly lower ( χ2 = 4.558, P = 0.033 than that in AGI ≤ 1 cm/kg subgroup. Conclusions BMI and AGI can influence the location and etiology of ischemic stroke, which can be used to predict the etiology and pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.11.011

  18. Guidelines for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Egido, J A; Casado, I; Ribó, M; Dávalos, A; Masjuan, J; Caniego, J L; Martínez Vila, E; Díez Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Álvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Díaz-Otero, F; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; Gállego, J; García-Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Molina, C; Morales, A; Nombela, F; Purroy, F; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Simal, P; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2014-03-01

    Update of Acute Ischaemic Stroke Treatment Guidelines of the Spanish Neurological Society based on a critical review of the literature. Recommendations are made based on levels of evidence from published data and studies. Organized systems of care should be implemented to ensure access to the optimal management of all acute stroke patients in stroke units. Standard of care should include treatment of blood pressure (should only be treated if values are over 185/105 mmHg), treatment of hyperglycaemia over 155 mg/dl, and treatment of body temperature with antipyretic drugs if it rises above 37.5 °C. Neurological and systemic complications must be prevented and promptly treated. Decompressive hemicraniectomy should be considered in cases of malignant cerebral oedema. Intravenous thrombolysis with rtPA should be administered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset, except when there are contraindications. Intra-arterial pharmacological thrombolysis can be considered within 6 hours, and mechanical thrombectomy within 8 hours from onset, for anterior circulation strokes, while a wider window of opportunity up to 12-24 hours is feasible for posterior strokes. There is not enough evidence to recommend routine use of the so called neuroprotective drugs. Anticoagulation should be administered to patients with cerebral vein thrombosis. Rehabilitation should be started as early as possible. Treatment of acute ischaemic stroke includes management of patients in stroke units. Systemic thrombolysis should be considered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset. Intra-arterial approaches with a wider window of opportunity can be an option in certain cases. Protective and restorative therapies are being investigated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Seizures, electroencephalographic abnormalities, and outcome of ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentes, Carla; Peralta, Ana Rita; Martins, Hugo; Casimiro, Carlos; Morgado, Carlos; Franco, Ana Catarina; Viana, Pedro; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Geraldes, Ruth; Canhão, Patrícia; Pinho E Melo, Teresa; Paiva, Teresa; Ferro, José M

    2017-12-01

    Seizures and electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities have been associated with unfavorable stroke functional outcome. However, this association may depend on clinical and imaging stroke severity. We set out to analyze whether epileptic seizures and early EEG abnormalities are predictors of stroke outcome after adjustment for age and clinical/imaging infarct severity. A prospective study was made on consecutive and previously independent acute stroke patients with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score ≥ 4 on admission and an acute anterior circulation ischemic lesion on brain imaging. All patients underwent standardized clinical and diagnostic assessment during admission and after discharge, and were followed for 12 months. Video-EEG (<60 min) was performed in the first 72 h. The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score quantified middle cerebral artery infarct size. The outcomes in this study were an unfavorable functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] ≥ 3) and death (mRS = 6) at discharge and 12 months after stroke. Unfavorable outcome at discharge was independently associated with NIHSS score (p = 0.001), EEG background activity slowing (p < 0.001), and asymmetry (p < 0.001). Unfavorable outcome 1 year after stroke was independently associated with age (p = 0.001), NIHSS score (p < 0.001), remote symptomatic seizures (p = 0.046), EEG background activity slowing (p < 0.001), and asymmetry (p < 0.001). Death in the first year after stroke was independently associated with age (p = 0.028), NIHSS score (p = 0.001), acute symptomatic seizures (p = 0.015), and EEG suppression (p = 0.019). Acute symptomatic seizures were independent predictors of vital outcome and remote symptomatic seizures of functional outcome in the first year after stroke. Therefore, their recognition and prevention strategies may be clinically relevant. Early EEG abnormalities were independent predictors and comparable to age and early

  20. Validation of Serial Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score as an Outcome Predictor in Thrombolyzed Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wan-Yee; Tan, Benjamin Y Q; Ngiam, Nicholas J H; Tan, Deborah Y C; Yuan, Christine H; Holmin, Staffan; Andersson, Tommy; Lundström, Erik; Teoh, Hock Luen; Chan, Bernard P L; Rathakrishnan, Rahul; Ting, Eric Y S; Sharma, Vijay K; Yeo, Leonard L L

    2017-10-01

    The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on baseline imaging is an established predictor of functional outcome in anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We studied ASPECTS before intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) and at 24 hours to assess its prognostic value. Data for consecutive anterior circulation AIS patients treated with IVT from 2006 to 2013 were extracted from a prospectively managed registry at our tertiary center. Pre-thrombolysis and 24-hour ASPECTS were evaluated by 2 independent neuroradiologists. Outcome measures included symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH), modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 90 days, and mortality. Unfavorable functional outcome was defined by mRS >1. Dramatic ASPECTS progression (DAP) was defined as deterioration in ASPECTS by 6 points or more. Of 554 AIS patients thrombolyzed during the study period, 400 suffered from anterior circulation infarction. The median age was 65 years (interquartile range (IQR): 59-70) and the median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 18 points (IQR: 12-22). Compared with the pre-IVT ASPECTS (area under the curve [AUC] = .64, 95% confidence interval [CI]: .54-.65, P = .001), ASPECTS on the 24-hour CT scan (AUC = .78, 95% CI: .73-.82, P < .001), and change in ASPECTS (AUC = .69, 95% CI: .64-.74, P < .001) were better predictors of unfavorable functional outcome at 3 months. DAP, noted in 34 (14.4%) patients with good baseline ASPECTS (8-10 points), was significantly associated with unfavorable functional outcome (odds ratio [OR]: 9.91, 95% CI: 3.37-29.19, P ≤ .001), mortality (OR: 21.99, 95% CI: 7.98-60.58, P < .001), and SICH (OR: 8.57, 95% CI: 2.87-25.59, P < .001). Compared with the pre-thrombolysis score, ASPECTS measured at 24 hours as well as serial change in ASPECTS is a better predictor of 3-month functional outcome. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A single-center study on endovascular thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang ZHANG

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficiency and safety of endovascular thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke caused by acute large vessel occulsion. Methods A total of 41 patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by acute large vessel occulsion were treated with endovascular thrombectomy. Time from onset to admission, from admission to femoral artery puncture, from onset to recanalization were recorded. Modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (mTICI was used to assess the recanalization immediately after operation. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was used to evaluate the neurological function at 24 h after operation. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS was used to evaluate clinical prognosis at 90 d after operation. Perioperative procedure-related complications and occurrence rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage within at 90 d after operation were recorded. American Society of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology/Society of Interventional Radiology (ASITN/SIR Collateral Flow Grading System (ACG was used to assess collateral compensation of anterior circulation. BATMAN score was used to assess collateral compensation of posterior circulation. Results Among 41 patients, 12 (29.27% were treated with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis. There were 32 patients (78.05% achieved successful recanalization, including 20 patients (80%, 20/25 in anterior circulation and 12 (12/16 in posterior circulation, and no significant difference was seen between them (adjusted χ2 = 1.424, P = 0.706. At 24 h after operation, 28 patients (68.29% had better neurological function than preoperation (NIHSS decreasing ≥ 4 score, including 18 patients (72%, 18/25 with anterior circulation occlusion and 10 (10/16 with posterior circulation occlusion, and there was no significant difference between them (χ2 = 0.407, P = 0.524. Eleven patients (26.83% died within 90 d after operation, including 4 patients

  2. Migraine as a risk factor for young patients with ischemic stroke: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanoz, Yasin; Gülen Abanoz, Yeşim; Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uludüz, Derya; İnce, Birsen; Yavuz, Burcu; Göksan, Baki

    2017-04-01

    Studies have suggested a possible association of migraine and increased risk of ischemic stroke in young adults, particularly in smokers and in women who use oral contraceptive drugs. We aimed to analyze the association between migraine and ischemic stroke in young population in a hospital-based cohort. We included 202 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of ischemic stroke who were between 15 and 50 years and age- and gender-matched 250 volunteers with no history of stroke. All participants were interviewed using a questionnaire for migraine. Localization of ischemic lesion was classified as anterior and posterior circulation according to neuroimaging findings. The cause of ischemic lesion and all risk factors were recorded. Undetermined etiology was the most frequent (43.1%) and the most common determined cause was cardioembolism (22.3%) in young stroke patients. Frequency of migraine was 30.2% among patients with stroke whereas 16.8% of healthy subjects had migraine (p = 0.001). Migraine with aura was significantly more common among patients with stroke compared to healthy subjects (18.3 vs 4.4%; p = 0.000) whereas the frequency of migraine without aura was similar in both groups (11.9 vs 12.4%). Using logistic regression, migraine with aura was shown to be an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke in young population (p = 0.000) and separate analysis for gender demonstrated that it was only a risk factor for women (p = 0.009) but not for men (p = 0.107). Migraine with aura was found to be more common in ischemic stroke in young patients. It was an independent risk factor in women.

  3. Effects of swallowing training combined with low-frequency electrical stimulation on dysphagia after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-zhong ZHU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of swallowing training combined with low-frequency electrical stimulation on dysphagia after ischemic stroke.  Methods A total of 68 patients with dysphagia after ischemic stroke were divided into control group (N = 34, receiving swallowing training and feeding strategies and combined treatment group (N = 34, receiving swallowing training, feeding strategies and low-frequency electrical stimulation. Video Fluoroscopic Swallowing Study (VFSS and Standardized Swallowing Assessment (SSA were used to evaluate the swallowing function of patients in 2 groups before and after 15 d of treatment. Results According to Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP classification, 34 patients in control group were classified into 12 cases with total anterior circulation infarct (TACI, 8 cases with partial anterior circulation infarct (PACI, 10 cases with posterior circulation infarct (POCI and 4 cases with lacunar infarct (LACI; 34 patients in combined treatment group were classified into 10 cases with TACI, 7 cases with PACI, 11 cases with POCI and 6 cases with LACI. Compared with before treatment, the VFSS score increased (P = 0.003, 0.000, while SSA score decreased (P = 0.003, 0.000 in both groups. Compared with control group, the VFSS score increased (P = 0.004, while SSA score decreased (P = 0.020 in combined treatment group.  Conclusions Swallowing training combined with low-frequency electrical stimulation can significantly improve the swallowing capacity of patients with acute ischemic stroke, and the effect is better than mere swallowing training. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.007

  4. The cerebral circulation and cerebrovascular disease I: Anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankush Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, which is the first in a three-part series that reviews cerebrovascular anatomy, pathogenesis, and stroke, we lay the anatomical foundation for the rest of the series. Beginning with its origin in the branches of the aorta, we start by describing the arterial system. This system is partitioned into two major divisions (anterior and posterior circulations that differ significantly in features and pathogenic potential. The systems, and the major branches that comprise them, are described. Description of the arterial system proceeds to the point of the fulfillment of its function. This function, the exchange of gases and nutrients with the cerebral parenchyma, is the subject of a subsequent section on the microcirculation and blood–brain barrier. Finally, the cerebral venous system, which is composed of cerebral veins and dural venous sinuses, is described. Thus, an anatomical context is supplied for the discussion of cerebrovascular disease pathogenesis provided by our second paper.

  5. Drip, Ship, and On-Demand Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Seok Park

    Full Text Available The "drip and ship" approach can facilitate an early initiation of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT for acute ischemic stroke (AIS at community hospitals. New endovascular treatment modalities, such as stent retrieval, have further improved the rate of safe and successful recanalization. We assessed the clinical outcomes of on-demand endovascular therapy in patients with AIS who were transported to a comprehensive stroke center under the "drip and ship" paradigm.This retrospective study evaluated prospectively registered patients with acute large vessel occlusions in the anterior circulation who underwent endovascular recanalization after IVT at our regional comprehensive stroke center between January 2011 and April 2014. Clinical outcomes and neuroradiological findings were compared between patients who received IVT at the center (direct visit, DV and at a community hospital (drip and ship, DS.Baseline characteristics such as age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, and risk factors for stroke were similar, and most patients underwent endovascular therapy with a Solitaire stent (81.9% vs. 89.3% for DV and DS, respectively, P = 0.55. The average initial NIHSS score was 12.15 ± 4.1 (12.06 vs. 12.39 for DV and DS, respectively, P = 0.719. The proportions of long-term favorable outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score ≤ 2 at 90 days and successful recanalization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia score ≥ 2b were not significantly different (P = 0.828 and 0.158, respectively. The mortality rates and occurrences of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different (P = 0.999 and 0.267, respectively.The "drip and ship" approach with subsequent endovascular therapy is a feasible treatment concept for patients with acute large vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation that could help improve clinical outcomes in patients with AIS.

  6. Stent-assisted mechanical recanalization for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Haowen; Song Bo; Guo Xinbin; Guan Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stent-assisted mechanical recanalization technique in treating acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Stent-assisted mechanical recanalization procedure was carried out in 12 patients with acute ischemic stroke. The lesions were located at the anterior circulation in 10 cases and at posterior circulation in 2 cases. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The technical success rate, the vascular recanalization, the occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, the clinical improvement and mortality were observed and evaluated. Results: The stent was successfully deployed in 11 patients (92%). After the treatment, different degrees of vascular recanalization were obtained in all patients. The complete (TIMI 3), partial (TIMI 2) and minor (TIMI 1) recanalization rate was 58.3% (7/12), 25% (3/12) and 8.3% (1/12), respectively. Postoperative symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in one patient (8.3%). Stroke-related death occurred in one patient (8.3%) and eight patients had their modified Rankin Score ≤ 2. Conclusion: For the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, stent-assisted mechanical recanalization technique is clinically feasible and safe with high vascular recanalization rate although further studies with larger sample to clarify its clinical usefulness are still needed. (authors)

  7. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke Stroke Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  8. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  9. Distribution and natural course of intracranial vessel wall lesions in patients with ischemic stroke or TIA at 7.0 tesla MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, Anja G. van der; Luijten, Peter R.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brundel, Manon; Biessels, Geert Jan [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, Fredy [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies using intracranial vessel wall MRI techniques showed that over 50 % of patients with ischemic stroke or TIA had one or more intracranial vessel wall lesions. In the current study, we assessed the preferential location of these lesions within the intracranial arterial tree and their potential changes over time in these patient groups. Forty-nine patients with ischemic stroke (n = 25) or TIA (n = 24) of the anterior cerebral circulation underwent 7.0 T MRI, including a T{sub 1}-weighted magnetization-preparation inversion recovery turbo-spin-echo (MPIR-TSE) sequence within one week and approximately one month after symptom onset. Intracranial vessel wall lesions were scored for multiple locations within the arterial tree and differences between one-week and one-month images. At baseline, 132 intracranial vessel wall lesions were found in 41 patients (84 %), located primarily in the anterior cerebral circulation (74 %), with a preferential location in the distal internal carotid artery and M1 and M2 segments of the middle cerebral artery. During follow-up, presence or enhancement patterns changed in 14 lesions (17 %). A large burden of intracranial vessel wall lesions was found in both the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation. Most lesions were found to be relatively stable, possibly indicating a more generalized atherosclerotic process. (orig.)

  10. Lesion patterns and etiology of ischemia in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory involvement: a clinical - diffusion weighted - MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumral, E; Kisabay, A; Ataç, C

    2006-04-01

    The topography and mechanism of stroke in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory are delineated before, but the detailed clinical spectrum of lesions involving AICA territory was not studied by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). We reviewed 1350 patients with posterior circulation ischemic stroke in our registry. We included patients if the diagnosis of AICA territory involvement was confirmed, and DWI, and magnetic resonance angiography were obtained in the 3 days of symptoms onset. The potential feeding arteries of the AICA territory were evaluated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a three-dimensional rotating cineoangiographic method. There were 23 consecutive patients with lesion involving AICA territory, six with isolated lesion in the AICA territory, six with posterior inferior cerebellar artery, 11 with multiple posterior circulation infarcts (MPCIs). The clinical feature of isolated AICA infarct was vertigo, tinnitus, dysmetria, ataxia, facial weakness, facial sensory deficits, lateral gaze palsy, and sensory-motor deficits in patients with pontine involvement. Patients with largest lesion extending to the anterior and inferolateral cerebellum showed mixed symptomatology of the lateral medullary (Wallenberg's syndrome) and AICA territory involvement. Patients with MPCIs presented various clinical pictures with consciousness disturbances and diverse clinical signs because of involvement of different anatomical structures. Large-artery atherosclerotic disease in the vertebrobasilar system was the main cause of stroke in 12 (52%) patients, cardioembolism (CE) in one (4%), and coexisting large-artery disease and a source of CE in four (17%). The main cause of stroke was atheromatous vertebrobasilar artery disease either in the distal vertebral or proximal basilar artery. The outcome was usually good except those with multiple lesions. The new MRI techniques and clinical correlations allow better definition of the diverse topographical

  11. Clinical experience of intra-arterial therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke from a single institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, So Young; Lee, Han Bin; Kim, Jong Guk; Oh, Seung Hun; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Sang Heum; Kim, Ok Joon; Kim, Nam Keun

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety between intra-arterial therapy (IAT) and intra-venous and intra-arterial combined therapy (IVIACT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation territory. Forty-one patients treated with IAT using Solitaire were retrospectively reviewed. Nineteen patients were treated with IAT, twenty-two patients were treated with IVIACT, and ten patients of the forty-one patients were managed with multimodal treatment like stent, balloon angioplasty etc. We investigated the rate of recanalization and hemorrhage, NIH stroke scale and 3-month modified Rankin Scale. The overall recanalization rate was 93% and symptomatic ICH occurred in 10% of the patients. There was no difference in hemorrhage, recanalization rate, and early improvement between IAT and IVIACT. Good outcome was more frequently observed in 59% of the patients with IVIACT than 36% of the patients treated with IAT without any significant difference. The patients managed with multimodal treatment did not show any significant hemorrhage outcome. IAT using Solitaire is a useful treatment method without high risk in patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation territory. Also, IVIACT and multimodal treatment might be considered as reasonable therapeutic options in these patients

  12. Clinical experience of intra-arterial therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke from a single institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Young [Dept. Neurology, Seoul National University-Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han Bin; Kim, Jong Guk; Oh, Seung Hun; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Sang Heum; Kim, Ok Joon [CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Keun [Institute for Clinical Research, School of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To compare the efficacy and safety between intra-arterial therapy (IAT) and intra-venous and intra-arterial combined therapy (IVIACT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation territory. Forty-one patients treated with IAT using Solitaire were retrospectively reviewed. Nineteen patients were treated with IAT, twenty-two patients were treated with IVIACT, and ten patients of the forty-one patients were managed with multimodal treatment like stent, balloon angioplasty etc. We investigated the rate of recanalization and hemorrhage, NIH stroke scale and 3-month modified Rankin Scale. The overall recanalization rate was 93% and symptomatic ICH occurred in 10% of the patients. There was no difference in hemorrhage, recanalization rate, and early improvement between IAT and IVIACT. Good outcome was more frequently observed in 59% of the patients with IVIACT than 36% of the patients treated with IAT without any significant difference. The patients managed with multimodal treatment did not show any significant hemorrhage outcome. IAT using Solitaire is a useful treatment method without high risk in patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation territory. Also, IVIACT and multimodal treatment might be considered as reasonable therapeutic options in these patients.

  13. Increased Arterial Diameters in the Posterior Cerebral Circulation in Men with Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A.; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males – females; normal – impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, pFabry disease independent of disease severity. PMID:24475221

  14. Paediatric stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Ischemic Stroke Registry yielded an incidence of 3.3 cases per 100 000 children per year, of ... Neonatal stroke. The newborn period confers the highest risk period for childhood ischaemic stroke. Focal patterns of ischaemic brain injury to the perinatal brain are .... family history of young stroke/ thrombosis.

  15. RISK FACTORS FOR STROKE AND USE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-04-04

    Apr 4, 2003 ... Objective: To review risk factors for stroke and the use of echocardiography in its diagnosis. ... embolism(5,18). Intra-cardiac thrombosis: This occurs in the setting of post myocardial infarction particularly in the anterior cardiac area (19). AC with INR .... of left ventricular thrombi in patients with acute anterior.

  16. Pediatric Stroke: Clinical Findings and Radiological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lanni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on radiological approach in pediatric stroke including both ischemic stroke (Arterial Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis and hemorrhagic stroke. Etiopathology and main clinical findings are examined as well. Magnetic Resonance Imaging could be considered as the first-choice diagnostic exam, offering a complete diagnostic set of information both in the discrimination between ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke and in the identification of underlying causes. In addition, Magnetic Resonance vascular techniques supply further information about cerebral arterial and venous circulation. Computed Tomography, for its limits and radiation exposure, should be used only when Magnetic Resonance is not available and on unstable patients.

  17. Multicenter randomized trial of robot-assisted rehabilitation for chronic stroke: methods and entry characteristics for VA ROBOTICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Albert C; Guarino, Peter; Krebs, Hermano I; Volpe, Bruce T; Bever, Christopher T; Duncan, Pamela W; Ringer, Robert J; Wagner, Todd H; Richards, Lorie G; Bravata, Dawn M; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Wittenberg, George F; Federman, Daniel G; Corn, Barbara H; Maffucci, Alysia D; Peduzzi, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Chronic upper extremity impairment due to stroke has significant medical, psychosocial, and financial consequences, but few studies have examined the effectiveness of rehabilitation therapy during the chronic stroke period. . To test the safety and efficacy of the MIT-Manus robotic device for chronic upper extremity impairment following stroke. . The VA Cooperative Studies Program initiated a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial in November 2006 (VA ROBOTICS). Participants with upper extremity impairment >/=6 months poststroke were randomized to robot-assisted therapy (RT), intensive comparison therapy (ICT), or usual care (UC). RT and ICT consisted of three 1-hour treatment sessions per week for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment upper extremity motor function score at 12 weeks relative to baseline. Secondary outcomes included the Wolf Motor Function Test and the Stroke Impact Scale. . A total of 127 participants were randomized: 49 to RT, 50 to ICT, and 28 to UC. The majority of participants were male (96%), with a mean age of 65 years. The primary stroke type was ischemic (85%), and 58% of strokes occurred in the anterior circulation. Twenty percent of the participants reported a stroke in addition to their index stroke. The average time from the index stroke to enrollment was 56 months (range, 6 months to 24 years). The mean Fugl-Meyer score at entry was 18.9. . VA ROBOTICS demonstrates the feasibility of conducting multicenter clinical trials to rigorously test new rehabilitative devices before their introduction to clinical practice. The results are expected in early 2010.

  18. Development and Assessment of a Computer Algorithm for Stroke Vascular Localization Using Components of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, David P; Tseng, Bertrand P; Goldstein, Larry B

    2016-02-01

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was not intended to be used to determine the stroke's vascular distribution. The aim of this study was to develop, assess the reliability, and validate a computer algorithm based on the NIHSS for this purpose. Two cohorts of patients with ischemic stroke having similar distributions of Oxfordshire localizations (total anterior, partial anterior, lacunar, and posterior circulation) based on neuroimaging were identified. The first cohort (n = 40) was used to develop a computer algorithm for vascular localization using a modified version of the NIHSS (NIHSS-Localization [NIHSS-Loc]) that included the laterality of selected deficits; the second (n = 20) was used to assess the reliability of algorithm-based localizations compared to those of 2 vascular neurologists. The validity of the algorithm-based localizations was assessed in comparison to neuroimaging. Agreement was assessed using the unweighted kappa (κ) statistic. Agreement between the 2 raters using the standard NIHSS was slight to moderate (κ = .36, 95% confidence interval [CI] .10-.61). Inter-rater agreement significantly improved to the substantial to almost perfect range using the NIHSS-Loc (κ = .88, 95% CI .73-1.00). Agreement was perfect when the 2 raters entered the data into the NIHSS-Loc computer algorithm (κ = 1.00, 95% CI 1.00-1.00). Agreement between the algorithm localization and neuroimaging results was fair to moderate (κ = .59, 95% CI .35-.84) and not significantly different from the localizations of either rater using the NIHSS-Loc. A computerized, modified version of the standard NIHSS can be used to reliably and validly assign the vascular distribution of an acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function.

  20. Relationship between serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and modified TOAST classification as well as OCSP subtypes in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-jun CHANG

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the relationship between serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP level and modified TOAST classification as well as OCSP subtypes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Serum hs-CRP was measured in 240 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 120 normal controls. All patients were classified according to modified TOAST classification and OCSP criteria. Serum hs-CRP levels in acute ischemic stroke group were significantly higher than those in normal control group [(13.68 ± 6.92 mg/L vs (3.98 ± 0.76 mg/L; t = 6.922, P = 0.002]. Among modified TOAST subtypes, the highest serum hs-CRP level was in cardioembolism (CE group [(16.82 ± 6.16 mg/L], followed by arterothrombosis (AT group [(15.17 ± 5.68 mg/L], stroke of undetermined etiology (SUD group [(10.06 ± 3.89 mg/L] and small artery disease (SAD group [(9.86 ± 3.75 mg/L, P = 0.027]. Among OCSP subtypes, the highest serum hs-CRP level was in total anterior circulation infarct (TACI group [(17.02 ± 6.98 mg/L], followed by posterior circulation infarct (POCI group [(15.91 ± 7.12 mg/L], partial anterior circulation infarct (PACI group [(12.83 ± 4.95 mg/L] and lacunar infarct (LACI group [(10.61 ± 5.73 mg/L, P = 0.005]. Serum hs-CRP levels are various in different modified TOAST and OCSP subtypes, which may reflect etiological and pathophysiological diversity of acute ischemic stroke, guide clinical treatment and help to predict prognosis. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.10.013

  1. Reperfusion Strategies for Acute Ischaemic Stroke From Past to Present: An Overview Towards Future Perspectives

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    Isabella Canavero

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Timely reperfusion of brain ischaemic tissue is the main therapeutic target for acute stroke. In the last few decades many recanalisation strategies have been studied by randomised controlled trials (RCTs, including intravenous (IV, intra-arterial (IA, and combined approaches. Clinical research is addressed to identify the drug associated with the better reperfusion properties and the lower rate of side-effects. To date, according to current evidence-based guidelines, IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is the only approved treatment for acute ischaemic stroke (AIS within 4.5 hours from onset. Other IV thrombolytics, such as tenecteplase and desmoteplase, have shown promising results in preliminary RCTs and are currently being investigated to produce further evidence. Endovascular catheter-based treatments (including IA administration of thrombolytics or mechanical thrombectomy have quite inferior feasibility, being performed only by stroke-trained interventional neuroradiologists. Until a few months ago, many trials had investigated the safety and efficacy of endovascular techniques compared with IV tPA without consistent results, limiting their application to patients with contraindications or poor response to IV tPA. More recently, the Multicenter Randomized Clinical trial of Endovascular treatment for Acute ischemic stroke in the Netherlands (MR CLEAN, Endovascular treatment for Small Core and Anterior circulation Proximal occlusion with Emphasis on minimizing CT to recanalization times (ESCAPE, and Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits–Intra-arterial (EXTEND-IA trial results have demonstrated the superiority of endovascular procedures associated with standard care in AIS due to proximal arterial occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. These data are going to change the current decision-making process and the care pathway in AIS patients.

  2. Distribution of ischemic infarction and stenosis of intra- and extracranial arteries in young Chinese patients with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Rajeev; Huang, Dongya; An, Hedi; Liu, Rong; Du, Cui; Shen, Nan; Tu, Zhilan; Li, Ying

    2015-11-23

    The distribution of cerebral ischemic infarction and stenosis in ischemic stroke may vary with age-group, race and gender. This study was conducted to understand the risk factors and characteristics of cerebral infarction and stenosis of vessels in young Chinese patients with ischemic stroke. This was a retrospective study, from January 2007 to July 2012, of 123 patients ≤50 years diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke. Patient characteristics were compared according to sex (98 males and 25 females) and age group (51 patients were ≤45 years and 72 patients were 46-50 years). Characteristics of acute ischemic infarction were studied by diffusion weighted imaging. Stenosis of intra- and extracranial arteries was diagnosed by duplex sonography, head magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or cervical MRA. Common risk factors were hypertension (72.4 %), dyslipidemia (55.3 %), smoking (54.4 %) and diabetes (33.3 %). Lacunar Infarction was most common in our patients (41.5 %). Partial anterior circulation infarction was predominant in females (52.0 vs 32.7 %; P = 0.073) and posterior circulation infarction in males (19.8 vs 4 %; P = 0.073). Multiple brain infarctions were found in 38 patients (30.9 %). Small artery atherosclerosis was found in 54 patients (43.9 %), with higher prevalence in patients of the 46-50 years age-group. Intracranial stenosis was more common than extracranial stenosis, and middle cerebral artery stenosis was most prevalent (27.3 %). Stenosis in the anterior circulation was more frequent than in the posterior circulation (P young patients, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia and diabetes were common risk factors. Intracranial stenosis was most common. The middle cerebral artery was highly vulnerable.

  3. [Retrospective analysis of risk factors in 900 patients with ischemic cerebral stroke of wind-phlegm collateral obstruction syndrome and qi deficiency blood stasis syndrome in Wuhan District].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xin; Wang, Kai-xin; Chen, Guo-hua

    2011-11-01

    To analyze the correlation between risk factors and ischemic cerebral stroke of wind-phlegm collateral obstruction syndrome and qi deficiency blood stasis syndrome. Totally 900 patients of the two syndrome types were recruited. Risk factors correlated to ischemic cerebral stroke such as gender, age, time of onset, site of infarction, tongue proper, tongue fur, pulse picture, hypertension, diabetes, past stroke history, hyperlipidemia, hematocrit, smoking, drinking, genetic factor, blood type, complications were analyzed using Chi-square test and non-conditional Logistic regression analysis. Statistical significance existed between the two syndrome types in age (X2 = 8.2392, P = 0.0413), hyperlipidemia (X2 = 4.8386, P = 0.0278), tongue proper (X2 = 7.9470, P = 0.0048), and tongue fur (X2 = 4.3298, P = 0.0375). Statistical significance existed between the two syndrome types in hyperlipidemia, tongue proper, and tongue fur, and their OR value was 0.699 (P = 0.0282), 0.332 (P =0.0071), and 0.667 (P = 0.0382) respectively. The OR value of the past stroke history was 3.226 (P = 0.0314), that of complications 0.203 (P = 0.0705), and that of anterior circulation infarction 0.214 (P = 0.0098). Among different ages groups, the constituent ratio of qi deficiency blood stasis syndrome was obviously higher than that of wind-phlegm collateral obstruction syndrome. Besides, patients of qi deficiency blood stasis syndrome were liable to suffer from hyperlipidemia, anterior circulation infarction, and complications. The age, blood lipid levels, site of infarction, complications are closely correlated with Chinese syndrome types of ischemic cerebral stroke, which can provide objective indices for typing ischemic cerebral stroke.

  4. Basics of acute stroke treatment; Grundzuege der akuten Schlaganfalltherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haass, A. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Acute stroke presents an emergency that requires immediate referral to a specialized hospital, preferably with a stroke unit. Disability and mortality are reduced by 30% in patients treated in stroke units compared to those treated on regular wards, even if a specialized team is present on the ward. Systolic blood pressure may remain high at 200-220 mmHg in the acute phase and should not be lowered too quickly. Further guidelines for basic care include: optimal O{sub 2} delivery, blood sugar levels below 100-150 mg%, and lowering body temperature below 37.5 C using physical means or drugs. Increased intracranial pressure should be treated by raising the upper body of the patient, administration of glycerol, mannitol, and/or sorbitol, artificial respiration, and special monitoring of Tris buffer. Decompressive craniectomy may be considered in cases of ''malignant'' media stroke and expansive cerebellar infarction. Fibrinolysis is the most effective stroke treatment and is twice as effective in the treatment of stroke than myocardial infarction. Fibrinolysis may be initiated within 3 h of a stroke in the anterior circulation. If a penumbra is detectable by ''PWI-DWI mismatch MRI,'' specialized hospitals may perform fibrinolysis up to 6 h after symptom onset. In cases of stroke in the basilar artery, fibrinolysis may be performed even later after symptom onset. Intra-arterial fibrinolysis is performed in these cases using rt-PA or urokinase. Follow-up treatment of stroke patients should not only address post-stroke depression and neuropsychological deficits, but also include patient education about risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmias. (orig.) [German] Jeder akute Schlaganfall ist ein Notfall und muss sofort in einer spezialisierten Klinik, am besten einer Stroke Unit, behandelt werden. Die Stroke-Unit-Behandlung senkt den Behinderungsgrad und die Letalitaet um 30% staerker als die

  5. Correlation of fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and homocysteine with the carotid vulnerable plaque in patients with large artery atherosclerosis stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing LI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the correlation between the serum levels of fibrinogen (FIB, C-reactive protein (CRP and homocysteine (Hcy with the carotid vulnerable plaque in patients with large artery atherosclerosis (LAA stroke. Methods The patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS admitted to the Department of Neurology in The Second Hospital of Lanzhou University from Mar. 2014 to Feb. 2015 were collected continuously, and 273 patients with anterior circulation of LAA stroke were selected based on the TOAST classification. These patients were classified as non-plaque group (n=84, stable plaque group (n=42 and vulnerable plaque group (n=147 according to the carotid ultrasonography examination. Another 182 patients without carotid disease of non-stroke selected simultaneously from our department were regarded as controls. The 19 demographic parameters and hematological indices were compared among the four groups. The logistic regression was used to screen the independent risk factors for carotid vulnerable plaque in LAA stroke patients. The Spearman rank correlation was performed to analyze the correlation between the carotid plaque vulnerability in LAA stroke patients with all the indicators. Results The levels of FIB, CRP and Hcy in the four groups showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that FIB (OR=1.408, 95% CI 1.028-1.927, P=0.033 was the independent risk factor for carotid vulnerable plaque in patients with LAA stroke. The Spearman correlation analysis presented a positive correlation between carotid plaque vulnerability in LAA stroke patients with FIB (r=0.292; P=0.000 and Hcy (r=0.172; P=0.000. Conclusions The serum FIB and Hcy levels may be the meaningful biomarkers to predict the vulnerable carotid plaque in patients with LAA stroke. The serum level of CRP has no obvious correlation with carotid plaque vulnerability in LAA stroke patients. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.08

  6. Mechanical Revascularization for Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Single-Center, Retrospective Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeromel, Miran; Milosevic, Z. V.; Kocijancic, I. J.; Lovric, D.; Svigelj, V.; Zvan, B.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundEndovascular mechanical revascularization (thrombectomy) is an increasingly used method for intracranial large vessel recanalization in acute stroke. The purpose of the study was to analyze the recanalization rate, clinical outcome, and complication rate in our stroke patients treated with mechanical revascularization. A total of 57 patients with large vessel stroke (within 3 h for anterior and 12 h for posterior circulation) were treated with mechanical revascularization at a single center during 24 months. The primary goal of endovascular treatment using different mechanical devices was recanalization of the occluded vessel. Recanalization rate (reported as thrombolysis in cerebral infarction [TICI] score), clinical outcome (reported as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score and modified Rankin scale [mRS] score), as well as periprocedural complications were analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 63.1 ± 12.9 years, with baseline median NIHSS score of 14 (interquartile range, 9.5–19). Successful recanalization (TICI 2b or 3) was achieved in 41 (72 %) patients. Twenty patients (35 %) presented with favorable outcome (mRS ≤2) 30 days after stroke. Overall, significant neurological improvement (≥4 NIHSS point reduction) occurred in 36 (63 %) patients. A clinically significant procedure-related adverse events (vessel disruption, peri/postprocedural intracranial bleeding) defined with decline in NIHSS of ≥4 or death occurred in three (5 %) patients. The study showed a high recanalization rate with improved clinical outcome and a low rate of periprocedural complications in our stroke patients treated with mechanical revascularization. Therefore, we could conclude that endovascular revascularization (primary or in combination with a bridging thrombolysis) was an effective and safe procedure for intracranial large vessel recanalization in acute stroke.

  7. Mechanical thrombectomy with snare in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Mayol, Antonio; Martinez, Eva; Gonzalez-Marcos, Jose R.; Gil-Peralta, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of thrombus extraction using a microsnare in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This was a prospective, observational, cohort study in which consecutive patients with AIS (<6 hours of ischemia for anterior circulation and <24 hours for posterior circulation) who had been previously excluded from intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thrombolysis were included and followed-up for 3 months. Mechanical embolectomy with a microsnare of 2-4 mm was undertaken as the first treatment. Low-dose intraarterial thrombolysis or angioplasty was used if needed. TIMI grade and modified Rankin stroke scale (mRSS) score were used to evaluate vessel recanalization and clinical efficacy, respectively. Nine patients (mean age 55 years, range 17-69 years) were included. Their basal mean NIHSS score was 16 (range 12-24). In seven out of the nine patients (77.8%) the clot was removed, giving a TIMI grade of 3 in four patients and TIMI grade 2 in three patients. Occlusion sites were: middle cerebral artery (four), basilar artery (two) and anterior cerebral artery plus middle cerebral artery (one). The mean time for recanalization from the start of the procedure was 50 min (range 50-75 min). At 3 months, the mRSS score was 0 in two patients and 3-4 in three patients (two patients died). According to our results, the microsnare is a safe procedure for mechanical thrombectomy with a good recanalization rate. Further studies are required to determine the role of the microsnare in the treatment of AIS. (orig.)

  8. Ocean Circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Andrew F.; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The ocean moderates the Earth's climate due to its vast capacity to store and transport heat; the influence of the large-scale ocean circulation on changes in climate is considered in this chapter. The ocean experiences both buoyancy forcing (through heating/cooling and evaporation/precipitation) and wind forcing. Almost all ocean forcing occurs at the surface, but these changes are communicated throughout the entire depth of the ocean through the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). In ...

  9. Endovascular treatment for acute ischaemic stroke with large vessel occlusion: the experience of a regional stroke service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCusker, M.W.; Robinson, S.; Looby, S.; Power, S.; Ti, J.P.; Grech, R.; Galvin, L.; O'Hare, A.; Brennan, P.; O'Kelly, P.; O'Brien, P.; Collins, R.; Dolan, E.; Williams, D.J.; Thornton, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To report the experience of a regional stroke referral service with endovascular treatment for patients with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) and large vessel occlusion. Materials and methods: A prospective review was undertaken of 93 consecutive cases receiving endovascular treatment for AIS over a 42-month period (January 2010 to June 2013). The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), location of large vessel occlusion, details of endovascular procedure, and degree of reperfusion achieved (Thrombolysis In Cerebral Infarction [TICI] score) were recorded. Mortality and functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS]) were measured at 90 days. Results: The mean patient age was 62 years (range 26–87 years). The mean NIHSS at presentation was 16 (range 6–29). All patients had confirmed proximal large-artery occlusion on computed tomography (CT) angiography: 87 in the anterior circulation, six in the posterior circulation. Of the 93 patients treated, 64 (69%) received intravenous thrombolysis. Successful reperfusion (TICI grade 2a to 3) was achieved in 80 (86%) cases. There were 13 (14%) cases of failed vessel recanalisation (TICI grade 0). Good functional outcome (mRS ≤2) was achieved in 51 (55%) cases. The 90-day mortality was 20 (22%) cases. Fifty-seven (61%) cases were transferred from outside centres. There was no significant increase in morbidity or mortality for transferred patients. Conclusion: Successful endovascular recanalisation can result in good functional outcomes for patients with AIS and large vessel occlusion. Our interventional neuroradiology service provides endovascular treatment as part of a regional stroke service without increase in morbidity or mortality for patients transferred from outside institutions. - Highlights: • Acute stoke patients may benefit from transfer to a specialist centre for endovascular treatment. • The authors offer endovascular treatment for suitable patients as part of a regional stroke service.

  10. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge ... Your Technology Guide High Blood Pressure and Stroke Importance of Physical Activity See More Multimedia Las minorías ...

  11. Stroke - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  12. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  13. Comparison of CT and diffusion-weighted MRI in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Shuhei; Yamada, Naoaki; Naritomi, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Non-contrast CT and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) are widely used for assessing patients with acute ischemic stroke including candidates for thrombolytic therapy. Early CT signs, still a gold standard as the diagnostic measure for thrombolysis, are quite subtle and strongly depend on image quality. We evaluated 76 patients (47 male, mean age 71.0 yrs) with ischemic stroke of the anterior cerebral circulation who underwent CT and DWI within 6 hours of onset. The scans were examined separately by two neurologists in a blinded fashion with knowledge of the affected hemisphere. Detection of acute ischemic changes were significantly higher on DWI (72/76, 95%) compared with that on CT (50/76, 66%) (P<0.0001), especially in cases with subcortical lesions (P<0.001). Detection of the lesion with more than 33% of MCA involvement, which should exclude from the thrombolitic therapy, was somewhat higher for DWI (26/26, 100%) compared with CT (22/26, 85%). DWI is more sensitive than CT in the identification of acute ischemic stroke and can visualize major ischemia more easily than CT. Additional studies are required to determine whether these advantages of DWI are clinically relevant in the management of patients with acute stroke. (author)

  14. Early Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhong-Song; Duckwiler, Gary R; Jahan, Reza; Tateshima, Satoshi; Szeder, Viktor; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kim, Doojin; Sharma, Latisha K; Vespa, Paul M; Salamon, Noriko; Villablanca, J Pablo; Viñuela, Fernando; Feng, Lei; Loh, Yince; Liebeskind, David S

    2018-02-27

    The impact of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption can be detected by intraparenchymal hyperdense lesion on the computed tomography (CT) scan after endovascular stroke therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether early BBB disruption predicts intracranial hemorrhage and poor outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with mechanical thrombectomy. We analyzed patients with anterior circulation stroke treated with mechanical thrombectomy and identified BBB disruption on the noncontrast CT images immediately after endovascular treatment. Follow-up CT or magnetic resonance imaging scan was performed at 24 hours to assess intracranial hemorrhage. We dichotomized patients into those with moderate BBB disruption versus those with minor BBB disruption and no BBB disruption. We evaluated the association of moderate BBB disruption after mechanical thrombectomy with intracranial hemorrhage and clinical outcomes. Moderate BBB disruption after mechanical thrombectomy was found in 56 of 210 patients (26.7%). Moderate BBB disruption was independently associated with higher rates of hemorrhagic transformation (OR 25.33; 95% CI 9.93-64.65; P disruption with intracranial hemorrhage remained in patients with successful reperfusion after mechanical thrombectomy. The location of BBB disruption was not associated with intracranial hemorrhage and poor outcome. Moderate BBB disruption is common after mechanical thrombectomy in a quarter of patients with acute ischemic stroke and increases the risk of intracranial hemorrhage and poor outcome. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  15. Agenesis of internal carotid artery associated with congenital anterior hypopituitarism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, W.-J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Porto, L.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Weis, R. [Department of Pediatric Neurology, University of Frankfurt (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    We report a rare case of unilateral agenesis of the internal carotid artery in association with congenital anterior hypopituitarism. The collateral circulation is supplied by a transsellar intercavernous anastomotic vessel connecting the internal carotid arteries. These abnormalities are well depicted on MRI and MRA. The agenesis of the internal carotid artery may explain the pathogenesis of some of congenital anterior hypopituitarism. (orig.)

  16. Agenesis of internal carotid artery associated with congenital anterior hypopituitarism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, W.-J.; Porto, L.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E.; Weis, R.

    2002-01-01

    We report a rare case of unilateral agenesis of the internal carotid artery in association with congenital anterior hypopituitarism. The collateral circulation is supplied by a transsellar intercavernous anastomotic vessel connecting the internal carotid arteries. These abnormalities are well depicted on MRI and MRA. The agenesis of the internal carotid artery may explain the pathogenesis of some of congenital anterior hypopituitarism. (orig.)

  17. Guidelines for the Primary Prevention of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschia, James F.; Bushnell, Cheryl; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Braun, Lynne T.; Bravata, Dawn M.; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Creager, Mark A.; Eckel, Robert H.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Fornage, Myriam; Goldstein, Larry B.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Horvath, Susanna E.; Iadecola, Costantino; Jauch, Edward C.; Moore, Wesley S.; Wilson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of stroke among individuals who have not previously experienced a stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches to atherosclerotic disease of the cervicocephalic circulation, and antithrombotic treatments for preventing thrombotic and thromboembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for genetic and pharmacogenetic testing and for the prevention of stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including sickle cell disease and patent foramen ovale. PMID:25355838

  18. Penumbra Stroke System as an ''add-on'' for the treatment of large vessel occlusive disease following thrombolysis: first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struffert, Tobias; Engelhorn, Tobias; Richter, Gregor; Doerfler, Arnd; Koehrmann, Martin; Nowe, Tim; Schellinger, Peter D.; Schwab, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The Penumbra Stroke System (PSS) was cleared for use in patients with ischemic stroke by the FDA in January 2008. We describe our experience of using this new system in acute large vessel occlusive disease following thrombolysis. Fifteen consecutive patients (mean age 60 years) suffering from acute ischemic stroke were treated with the PSS after intravenous or intra-arterial standard treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (n = 14) or ReoPro (n = 1). All patients presented with TIMI 3 before use of the PSS. Carotid stenting (n = 3) and intracranial balloon angioplasty or stenting (n = 2) were performed if indicated. Neurological evaluation was performed using the NIHSS score and the mRS score. Initial median NIHSS score in 12 patients with occlusions in the anterior circulation was 15; three patients with basilar artery occlusion presented with coma. Median symptom to procedure start time was 151 min. In the anterior circulation, 9 of the 12 target vessels were recanalised successfully (TIMI 2 and 3). The rate of patients with independent clinical outcome (mRS ≤ 2) was 42%. One patient died 5 days after unsuccessful treatment, one after 28 days and one after 85 days owing to heart attack. Basilar artery occlusions could be recanalised in all cases to TIMI 3. The clinical result after 90 days was mRS 4 in two cases and mRS 5 in one case. Symptomatic haemorrhage did not occur. The PSS can safely be used for recanalisation in patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion, who have already received thrombolysis treatment. The recanalisation rate was 80%. Symptomatic haemorrhage did not occur. Randomized trials may demonstrate that endovascular mechanical thrombectomy improves patient outcome. (orig.)

  19. Combination of 24-Hour and 7-Day Relative Neurological Improvement Strongly Predicts 90-Day Functional Outcome of Endovascular Stroke Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jie; Wang, Huaiming; Tu, Mingyi; Zi, Wenjie; Hao, Yonggang; Yang, Dong; Liu, Wenhua; Wan, Yue; Geng, Yu; Lin, Min; Jin, Ping; Xiong, Yunyun; Xu, Gelin; Yin, Qin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2018-01-03

    Early judgment of long-term prognosis is the key to making medical decisions in acute anterior circulation large-vessel occlusion stroke (LVOS) after endovascular treatment (EVT). We aimed to investigate the relationship between the combination of 24-hour and 7-day relative neurological improvement (RNI) and 90-day functional outcome. We selected the target population from a multicenter ischemic stroke registry. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at baseline, 24 hours, and 7 days were collected. RNI was calculated by the following equation: (baseline NIHSS - 24-hour/7-day NIHSS)/baseline NIHSS × 100%. A modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2 at 90 days was defined as a favorable outcome. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between RNI and 90-day outcome. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis was performed to identify the predictive power and cutoff point of RNI for functional outcome. A total of 568 patients were enrolled. Both 24-hour and 7-day RNI were independent predictors of 90-day outcome. The best cutoff points of 24-hour and 7-day RNI were 28% and 42%, respectively. Compared with those with 24-hour RNI of less than 28% and 7-day RNI of less than 42%, patients with 24-hour RNI of 28% or greater and 7-day RNI of 42% or greater had a 39.595-fold (95% confidence interval 22.388-70.026) increased probability of achieving 90-day favorable outcome. The combination of 24-hour and 7-day RNI very strongly predicts 90-day functional outcome in patients with acute anterior circulation LVOS who received EVT, and it can be used as an early accurate surrogate of long-term outcome. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prospective, multicenter, single-arm study of mechanical thrombectomy using Solitaire Flow Restoration in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vitor M; Gralla, Jan; Davalos, Antoni; Bonafé, Alain; Castaño, Carlos; Chapot, René; Liebeskind, David S; Nogueira, Raul G; Arnold, Marcel; Sztajzel, Roman; Liebig, Thomas; Goyal, Mayank; Besselmann, Michael; Moreno, Antonio; Moreno, Alfredo; Schroth, Gerhard

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy using stent retriever devices have been advocated to increase revascularization in intracranial vessel occlusion. We present the results of a large prospective study on the use of the Solitaire Flow Restoration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Solitaire Flow Restoration Thrombectomy for Acute Revascularization was an international, multicenter, prospective, single-arm study of Solitaire Flow Restoration thrombectomy in patients with large vessel anterior circulation strokes treated within 8 hours of symptom onset. Strict criteria for site selection were applied. The primary end point was the revascularization rate (thrombolysis in cerebral infarction ≥2b) of the occluded vessel as determined by an independent core laboratory. The secondary end point was the rate of good functional outcome (defined as 90-day modified Rankin scale, 0-2). A total of 202 patients were enrolled across 14 comprehensive stroke centers in Europe, Canada, and Australia. The median age was 72 years, 60% were female patients. The median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale was 17. Most proximal intracranial occlusion was the internal carotid artery in 18%, and the middle cerebral artery in 82%. Successful revascularization was achieved in 79.2% of patients. Device and procedure-related severe adverse events were found in 7.4%. Favorable neurological outcome was found in 57.9%. The mortality rate was 6.9%. Any intracranial hemorrhagic transformation was found in 18.8% of patients, 1.5% were symptomatic. In this single-arm study, treatment with the Solitaire Flow Restoration device in intracranial anterior circulation occlusions results in high rates of revascularization, low risk of clinically relevant procedural complications, and good clinical outcomes in combination with low mortality at 90 days. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01327989.

  1. Impact of collateral circulation on early outcome and risk of hemorrhagic complications after systemic thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Freimuth; Tomandl, Bernd; Hanken, Katrin; Hildebrandt, Helmut; Kastrup, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    In stroke patients, collateral flow can rapidly be assessed on computed tomography angiography (CTA). In this study, the impact of baseline collaterals on early outcome and risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhages after systemic thrombolysis in patients with proximal arterial occlusions within the anterior circulation were analyzed. Collateralization scores were determined on the CT angiography source images (0 = absent; 1 ≤ 50%, 2 > 50% but collateral filling) of patients with distal intracranial carotid artery and/or M1 segment occlusions treated from 2008 to December 2011. A collateral score of 0 to 1 was designated as poor and 2 to 3 as good collateral vessel status. Outcome variables included in hospital mortality, favorable outcome at discharge (modified Rankin score ≤ 2), and rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage based on the European-Australasian Acute Stroke Study II definition. Among 246 subjects (mean age of 74 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale N at admission 14), 205 patients (83%) had good collaterals, whereas 41 patients (17%) had poor collaterals, respectively. Patients with poor collaterals had significantly higher rates of in-hospital mortality (41% vs. 12%, P collaterals. The grade of collateralization was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (P collaterals have a poor early functional outcome and high rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage after systemic thrombolysis. Since similar findings have also been reported after endovascular therapy, strategies to improve collateral blood flow should be assessed in this patient population. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  2. Peripheral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M Harold; Davis, Michael J; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Simmons, Grant H; Bender, Shawn B; Padilla, Jaume; Bache, Robert J; Merkus, Daphne; Duncker, Dirk J

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow (BF) increases with increasing exercise intensity in skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscle. In humans during maximal exercise intensities, 85% to 90% of total cardiac output is distributed to skeletal and cardiac muscle. During exercise BF increases modestly and heterogeneously to brain and decreases in gastrointestinal, reproductive, and renal tissues and shows little to no change in skin. If the duration of exercise is sufficient to increase body/core temperature, skin BF is also increased in humans. Because blood pressure changes little during exercise, changes in distribution of BF with incremental exercise result from changes in vascular conductance. These changes in distribution of BF throughout the body contribute to decreases in mixed venous oxygen content, serve to supply adequate oxygen to the active skeletal muscles, and support metabolism of other tissues while maintaining homeostasis. This review discusses the response of the peripheral circulation of humans to acute and chronic dynamic exercise and mechanisms responsible for these responses. This is accomplished in the context of leading the reader on a tour through the peripheral circulation during dynamic exercise. During this tour, we consider what is known about how each vascular bed controls BF during exercise and how these control mechanisms are modified by chronic physical activity/exercise training. The tour ends by comparing responses of the systemic circulation to those of the pulmonary circulation relative to the effects of exercise on the regional distribution of BF and mechanisms responsible for control of resistance/conductance in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  3. Clinical implications of eye deviation on admission CT examination of acute ischaemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payabvash, S; Qureshi, I; Qureshi, A I

    2016-12-01

    To determine the frequency and prognostic value of eye deviation detected on the admission computed tomography (CT) of acute ischaemic stroke patients. The clinical and imaging data from the Albumin in Acute Stroke (ALIAS) Trials 1 and 2 were analysed. Two reviewers evaluated all admission CT images for the presence of eye deviation, and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS). The admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and 3-month modified Rankin scale (mRs) scores were ascertained. Disability or death was defined as mRS score >2, at 3-month follow-up. Of 1,223 patients included in the present series, 352 (28.8%) had rightward and 331 (27.1%) had leftward eye deviation on admission CT. Patients with eye deviation on CT had higher admission NIHSS score and larger middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarct volume (based on ASPECTS). The presence of eye deviation on CT was associated with higher rates of haemorrhagic transformation at 24 hours (19.8% versus 13.5%, p=0.004), and higher rates of disability or death at 3-month follow-up (53.1% versus 35.7%, pMediation analysis showed that radiological eye deviation relation with higher rate of disability or death is predominantly due to its association with higher admission NIHSS scores, lower ASPECTS, and to a lesser extent patients' older age. The presence of eye deviation on CT examination of acute ischaemic stroke patients is associated with larger anterior circulation stroke volumes, higher risk of 24-hour haemorrhagic transformation, and 3-month disability or death. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Circulation economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Stig; Jakobsen, Ove

    2006-01-01

    sustainability. To illustrate the theoretical discussion, the paper gives some practical examples from the reprocessing industry in Norway. Findings - The paper finds, first, effective and efficient use of natural resources is necessary to implement circular value chains. Second, sustainable development...... presupposes a perspective integrating economic, natural and cultural values. Third, to organize the interplay between all stakeholders we introduce an arena for communicative cooperation. Originality/value - The paper concludes that circulation economics presupposes a change in paradigm, from a mechanistic...

  5. Anterior Horn Cell Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Firinciogullari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior horn cells control all voluntary movement. Motor activity, respiratory, speech, and swallowing functions are dependent upon signals from the anterior horn cells. Diseases that damage the anterior horn cells, therefore, have a profound impact. Symptoms of anterior horn cell loss (weakness, falling, choking lead patients to seek medical attention. In this article, anterior horn diseases were reviewed, diagnostic criteria and management were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 269-303

  6. Early-onset stroke with moyamoya-like syndrome and extraneurological signs: a first reported paediatric series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law-ye, Bruno; Saliou, Guillaume; Toulgoat, Frederique; Tardieu, Marc; Deiva, Kumaran; Adamsbaum, Catherine; Husson, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya syndrome is characterised by an occlusion of the carotid terminations with the development of collateral vessels. Our objective is to describe a series of infants presenting early-onset moyamoya-like syndrome, which may constitute a distinct entity. From a cohort of children with rare cerebral vascular pathologies, we studied eight infants (28 days-1 year) with early-onset moyamoya-like syndrome demonstrated by angiography. We retrospectively analysed the patterns on MRI and MRA, as well as all other available data. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (IQR: 6-8) with arterial ischaemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory. All of the children experienced severe stroke recurrence within a median time of 11 months (IQR: 10-12), and all showed extraneurological symptoms. The anterior cerebral circulation was involved in all cases and the posterior circulation was involved in six. Two children died and all of the other children suffered permanent neurological deficits. The presence of extraneurological signs in cases of early-onset moyamoya syndrome is suggestive of a newly described systemic vasculopathy with predominantly cerebrovascular expression. Given its rapid progression marked by severe recurrent strokes and poor clinical outcome, early diagnosis could help in the decision to institute aggressive therapy. (orig.)

  7. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  8. Presence of multi-segment clot sign on dynamic CT angiography: a predictive imaging marker of recanalisation and good outcome in acute ischaemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feina; Chen, Zhicai; Gong, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Meixia; Liebeskind, David S; Lou, Min

    2018-03-13

    To investigate the value of multi-segment clot (MSC) sign on dynamic CT angiography (CTA) in predicting recanalisation and outcome after reperfusion therapy in acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) with large artery occlusion (LAO). We retrospectively reviewed data of anterior circulation LAO patients from a prospectively collected database for consecutive AIS patients who underwent perfusion CT (CTP) before treatment. MSC sign was defined as the presence of multiple segments on dynamic CTA derived from CTP data. Good outcome was defined as modified Rankin score 0-3 at 90 days. A total of 181 LAO patients were enrolled. MSC sign was present in 73 (40.3%) patients. When compared with patients without MSC sign, patients with MSC sign had a significantly higher rate of recanalisation (76.7% versus 56.5%, p = 0.005) and good outcome (67.1% versus 51.0%, p = 0.035). Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that MSC sign was an independent predictor for both recanalisation (OR [95% CI] = 2.237 [1.069-4.681]; p = 0.033) and good outcome (OR [95% CI] = 2.715 [1.154-6.388]; p = 0.022) after adjustment. The MSC sign is a good indicator for recanalisation and good outcome after reperfusion therapy in anterior circulation LAO patients. • MSC sign was present in about 40% acute anterior circulation LAO patients. • MSC sign is a predictor for recanalisation after reperfusion treatment. • Patients with MSC sign have a better outcome.

  9. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unique for each person. Although a majority of functional abilities may be restored soon after a stroke, recovery is an ongoing process. Effects of a Stroke Weakness (hemiparesis) or paralysis (hemiplegia) on one side of the body that may affect the whole ...

  10. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of 3 and 10. In those with SCD, ischemic strokes most often occur in children under the age of 15 and adults over the age of 30, while hemorrhagic strokes most often occur in young adults between the ages of 20 and 30. ...

  11. Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Stroke; Acute Stroke; Acute Brain Injury; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhagic Stroke; Transient Ischemic Attack; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Ischemia; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Stroke; Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Cranial

  12. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  13. Doppler Ultrasonographic Parameters for Predicting Cerebral Vascular Reserve in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Han Young; Lee, Hui Joong; Kim, Hye Jung; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik

    2006-01-01

    We investigated Doppler ultrasonographic (US) parameters of patients with acute stroke to predict the cerebral vascular reserve (CVR) measured by SPECT. We reviewed the flow velocity and cross-sectional area of the circular vessel at the common, external, and internal carotid arteries (ICA) and the vertebral arteries (VA) in 109 acute stroke patients who underwent SPECT. Flow volume (FV) of each artery was calculated as the product of the angle-corrected time averaged flow velocity and cross-sectional area of the circular vessel. Total cerebral FV (TCBFV) was determined as the sum of the FVs of the right and left ICA and VA. We compared the Doppler US parameters between 44 cases of preserved and 65 cases of impaired CVR. In the preserved CVR group, ICA FV, anterior circulating FV (ACFV) and TCBFV were higher than in the impaired CVR group (p < 0.05, independent t-test). In the impaired CVR group, the ROC curves showed ACFV and TCBFV were suitable parameters to predict CVR (p < 0.05). Doppler US was helpful for understanding the hemodynamic state of acute stroke. FV measurement by Doppler US was useful for predicting CVR

  14. Acute ischemic stroke associated with nephrotic syndrome: Incidence and significance — Retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Iwaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report 10 cases with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS with nephrotic syndrome (NS, and clarified its incidence and clinical characteristics. The patients having albumin less than 3.0 g/dl and serum cholesterol greater than 250 mg/dl at the same time were retrospectively screened from 11,161 cases of stroke. Furthermore, the patients of AIS showing heavy proteinuria were selected. The 10 cases were diagnosed as AIS with NS. Its incidence was 0.09% of all kinds of stroke and 0.12% of AIS. Their subtypes were 6 large-artery atherosclerosis, 3 small-vessel occlusion, and 1 cardioembolism. We carried out a retrospective cohort study to assess the association between NS and atherosclerosis progression in AIS patients. Seven AIS patients with NS due to diabetic nephropathy (cases; NS group were compared with patients with AIS and diabetes mellitus (DM without NS (control group. Control group subjects were matched in a 2:1 ratio to cases by age, sex, use of medications for DM, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c level. The NS group had high cerebral artery atherosclerosis scores, especially in the anterior circulation. The NS group demonstrated atherosclerosis of the internal carotid and lower extremity arteries, although there were no statistical differences between the two groups. Study subjects had high serum fibrinogen and D-dimer levels, suggesting that AIS patients with NS have a greater degree of hypercoagulability than AIS patients without NS.

  15. The association between collateral status, recanalization and long term outcome in stroke patients treated with stent retrievers - Are there indications not to perform thrombectomy based on CT angiography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmeyer, Hannes; Webering, Nadine; Chapot, Rene; Hadisurya, Jeffrie; Heddier, Markus; Stracke, Paul; Berger, Klaus; Isenmann, Stefan; Weber, Ralph

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the association between baseline pial collateral status on computed tomography angiography (CTA) with recanalization and functional outcome in patients with acute anterior circulation stroke treated with stent retriever thrombectomy. Retrospective analysis of 87 patients from a prospective thrombectomy registry. Collateral status on CTA source images was categorized into good, moderate, and poor with the Tan and Miteff scores by two-blinded readers. Association between CTA collateral status and successful recanalization was investigated with univariate regression analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse the association between collateral score and favourable clinical outcome (mRS 0-2) and death at follow-up. Mean age was 72.5 years and baseline median NIHSS score was 15. Patients with poor collaterals on Tan score had a significant higher mortality compared with moderate or good collaterals during a mean follow-up period of 5.2 months (85.7% vs. 30.6% vs. 25.7%, Pcollateral score could be assessed only in 65 of the 87 patients and the Tan collateral score had a higher interrater reliability. Poor collaterals on CTA were associated with a very high rate of fatal outcome in anterior circulation stroke patients despite a high rate of successful recanalization with stent retrievers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  17. Three-dimensional black-blood contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of intraluminal thrombi in patients with acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho; Hwang, Seung Bae

    2018-03-19

    This study evaluated the utility of three-dimensional (3D), black-blood (BB), contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of intraluminal thrombi in acute stroke patients. Forty-seven patients with acute stroke involving the anterior circulation underwent MRI examination within 6 h of clinical onset. Cerebral angiography was used as the reference standard. In a blinded manner, two neuroradiologists interpreted the following three data sets: (1) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) + 3D BB contrast-enhanced MRI; (2) DWI + susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI); (3) DWI + 3D BB contrast-enhanced MRI + SWI. Of these patients, 47 had clots in the middle cerebral artery and four had clots in the anterior cerebral artery. For both observers, the area under the curve (Az) for data sets 1 and 3, which included 3D BB contrast-enhanced MRI, was significantly greater than it was for data set 2, which did not include 3D BB contrast-enhanced MR imaging (observer 1, 0.988 vs 0.904, p = 0.001; observer 2, 0.988 vs 0.894, p = 0.000). Three-dimensional BB contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of intraluminal thrombi compared to conventional MRI methods in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. • BB contrast-enhanced MRI helps clinicians to assess the intraluminal clot • BB contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of intraluminal thrombi • BB contrast-enhanced MRI for clot detection has a higher sensitivity.

  18. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... a wheelchair accessible or modified van, truck or car can provide the assurance you need to feel ...

  19. Rationale and design of combination of an immune modulator Fingolimod with Alteplase bridging with Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke (FAMTAIS) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Ruiting; Zhang, Meixia; Campbell, Bruce; Lin, Longting; Shi, Fu-Dong; Lou, Min

    2017-10-01

    Rationale In acute ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, although reperfusion within 6 h after stroke onset using combined intravenous alteplase and mechanical thrombectomy (bridging therapy) can improve functional outcome, still approximately 50% patients suffer disability which may result from reperfusion injury. Proof-of-concept clinical trials have indicated that the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator fingolimod may be efficacious in attenuating brain inflammation and improving clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients as a single therapy beyond 4.5 h of disease onset, or in combination with alteplase within 4.5 h of disease onset. Aim To assess whether the treatment of fingolimod combined with bridging therapy in large vessel occlusion acute ischemic stroke patients is effective and safe. Design and sample size estimates Fingolimod with Alteplase bridging with Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke (FAMTAIS) study is a randomized, open-label, multiple central trial. This study includes 98 patients with anterior circulation large vessel occlusion acute ischemic stroke who are eligible for bridging therapy, providing 80% power to reject the null hypothesis that, combined with fingolimod, the bridging therapy has an at least 15% higher penumbra tissue salvage index than receiving bridging therapy alone. Study outcomes The primary outcome is the penumbra tissue salvage index. Key secondary outcomes focus on: infarct growth and extent of clinical improvement from day 1 to day 7, frequency of parenchymal hemorrhage at day 1. Discussion If the hypothesis of FAMTAIS is confirmed, combination of fingolimod with bridging therapy is effective in attenuating reperfusion injury in patients with large vessel occlusion treated with 6 h of stroke onset.

  20. General Anesthesia Versus Conscious Sedation in Acute Stroke Treatment: The Importance of Head Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, H., E-mail: hendrik.janssen@med.uni-muenchen.de [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology (Germany); Buchholz, G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Germany); Killer, M. [Paracelsus Medical University, Neurology/Research Institute of Neurointervention (Austria); Ertl, L.; Brückmann, H. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology (Germany); Lutz, J. [Ingolstadt Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    PurposeWhile today mechanical thrombectomy is an established treatment option for main branch occlusions in anterior circulation stroke, there is still an ongoing debate on the kind of anesthesia to be preferred. Introducing a simple method for head stabilization, we analyzed safety and duration of endovascular recanalization procedures under general anesthesia (GA) and conscious sedation (CS).MethodsWe retrospectively identified 84 consecutive patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy owing to acute anterior circulation stroke. Fifty-three were treated under GA and 31 under CS equipped with a standard cervical collar to reduce head movement. We evaluated recanalization results, in-house time to start recanalization, procedure times, technical and clinical complication rates, and conversion rates from CS to GA.ResultsRecanalization of mTICI ≥2b was achieved in 80 % under CS and in 81 % under GA. Median in-house time to start recanalization for CS was 60 min (IQR 28; 44–72) and 77 min (IQR 23; 68–91) for GA (P = 0.001). Median procedure time under CS was 35 min (IQR 43; 69–25) and 41 min (IQR 43; 66–23) for GA (P = 0.9). No major complications such as ICH occurred in either group, and no conversions from CS to GA were necessary.ConclusionMechanical thrombectomy can be performed faster and safely under CS in combination with simple head immobilization using a standard cervical collar.

  1. General Anesthesia Versus Conscious Sedation in Acute Stroke Treatment: The Importance of Head Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, H.; Buchholz, G.; Killer, M.; Ertl, L.; Brückmann, H.; Lutz, J.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeWhile today mechanical thrombectomy is an established treatment option for main branch occlusions in anterior circulation stroke, there is still an ongoing debate on the kind of anesthesia to be preferred. Introducing a simple method for head stabilization, we analyzed safety and duration of endovascular recanalization procedures under general anesthesia (GA) and conscious sedation (CS).MethodsWe retrospectively identified 84 consecutive patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy owing to acute anterior circulation stroke. Fifty-three were treated under GA and 31 under CS equipped with a standard cervical collar to reduce head movement. We evaluated recanalization results, in-house time to start recanalization, procedure times, technical and clinical complication rates, and conversion rates from CS to GA.ResultsRecanalization of mTICI ≥2b was achieved in 80 % under CS and in 81 % under GA. Median in-house time to start recanalization for CS was 60 min (IQR 28; 44–72) and 77 min (IQR 23; 68–91) for GA (P = 0.001). Median procedure time under CS was 35 min (IQR 43; 69–25) and 41 min (IQR 43; 66–23) for GA (P = 0.9). No major complications such as ICH occurred in either group, and no conversions from CS to GA were necessary.ConclusionMechanical thrombectomy can be performed faster and safely under CS in combination with simple head immobilization using a standard cervical collar.

  2. Time to angiographic reperfusion and clinical outcome after acute ischaemic stroke: an analysis of data from the Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS III) phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Pooja; Yeatts, Sharon D; Mazighi, Mikael; Broderick, Joseph P; Liebeskind, David S; Demchuk, Andrew M; Amarenco, Pierre; Carrozzella, Janice; Spilker, Judith; Foster, Lydia D; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D; Palesch, Yuko Y; Jauch, Edward C; Haley, E Clarke; Vagal, Achala; Tomsick, Thomas A

    2014-06-01

    The IMS III trial did not show a clinical benefit of endovascular treatment compared with intravenous alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator) alone for moderate or severe ischaemic strokes. Late reperfusion of tissue that was no longer salvageable could be one explanation, as suggested by previous exploratory studies that showed an association between time to reperfusion and good clinical outcome. We sought to validate this association in a preplanned analysis of data from the IMS III trial. We used data for patients with complete proximal arterial occlusions in the anterior circulation who received endovascular treatment and achieved angiographic reperfusion (score on Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction scale of grade 2-3) during the endovascular procedure (within 7 h of symptom onset). We used logistic regression to model good clinical outcome (defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2 at 3 months) as a function of the time to reperfusion. We prespecified variables to be considered for adjustment, including age, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, sex, and baseline blood glucose concentration. Of 240 patients who were otherwise eligible for inclusion in our analysis, 182 (76%) achieved angiographic reperfusion. Mean time from symptom onset to reperfusion (ie, procedure end) was 325 min (SD 52). Increased time to reperfusion was associated with a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome (unadjusted relative risk for every 30-min delay 0·85 [95% CI 0·77-0·94]; adjusted relative risk 0·88 [0·80-0·98]). Delays in time to angiographic reperfusion lead to a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome in patients after moderate to severe stroke. Rapid reperfusion could be crucial for the success of future acute endovascular trials. US National Institutes of Health and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinesthetic taping improves walking function in patients with stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeskov, Birgitte; Carver, Line Tornehøj; von Essen-Leise, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is an important cause of severe disability and impaired motor function. Treatment modalities that improve motor function in patients with stroke are needed. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of kinesthetic taping of the anterior thigh and knee on maximal...... walking speed and clinical indices of spasticity in patients with stroke. METHODS: Thirty-two patients (9 women) receiving rehabilitation after stroke (average, 50 days since stroke) who had impaired walking ability were recruited. Primary outcome was maximal walking speed measured by the 10-meter walk...... test. Secondary outcomes were number of steps taken during the test and clinical signs of spasticity measured by the Tardieu Scale. Tests were conducted before and immediately after application of kinesthetic tape to the anterior thigh and knee of the paretic lower limb. RESULTS: After application...

  4. Management of stenosis lesions during the period of endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-xing HAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the management of stenosis lesions during endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 36 acute ischemic stroke patients combined with intracranial/extracranial arterial stenosis were treated with endovascular treatment or bridging treatment. Time from aggravation on admission or in hospital stay to femoral artery puncture, from femoral arterypuncture to recanalization were recorded. Modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (mTICI was usedto assess the recanalization immediately after operation. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS was used to evaluate prognosis at 90 d after operation. Occurrence rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality were recorded. Results Among 36 patients, 13 patients (36.11% underwent intravenous thrombolysis and then endovascular thrombectomy. In all patients, there were 21 (58.33% with intracranial stenosis and 15 (41.67% with extracranial stenosis, 16 (44.44% with anterior circulation stenosis and 20 (55.56% with posterior circulation stenosis. Stent thrombectomy was used in 25 patients (69.44% , while balloon dilatation and/or stent implantation was used in 11 patients (30.56% . For 21 patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, 4 were treated with balloon dilatation only, 9 with Wingspan self-expandable stents and 8 with Apollo balloon-expandable stents. Fifteen patients with extracranial arterial stenosis were treated with balloon dilatation and stent implantation. A total of 33 patients (91.67% achieved recanalization (mTICI 2b-3 grade, 21 patients (58.33% had good outcomes (mRS ≤ 2 score, while symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 2 patients (5.56% and 5 (13.89% died. There were no statistically significant differences in the rate of good prognosis, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality between intracranial and extracranial arterial stenosis, anterior and posterior circulation stenosis (Fisher exact probability: P > 0.05, for

  5. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  6. Solitaire™ with the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke (SWIFT PRIME) trial: protocol for a randomized, controlled, multicenter study comparing the Solitaire revascularization device with IV tPA with IV tPA alone in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Jeffrey L; Goyal, Mayank; Bonafe, Alain; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Levy, Elad I; Pereira, Vitor M; Albers, Gregory W; Cognard, Christophe; Cohen, David J; Hacke, Werner; Jansen, Olav; Jovin, Tudor G; Mattle, Heinrich P; Nogueira, Raul G; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Yavagal, Dileep R; Devlin, Thomas G; Lopes, Demetrius K; Reddy, Vivek; du Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard; Jahan, Reza

    2015-04-01

    Early reperfusion in patients experiencing acute ischemic stroke is critical, especially for patients with large vessel occlusion who have poor prognosis without revascularization. Solitaire™ stent retriever devices have been shown to immediately restore vascular perfusion safely, rapidly, and effectively in acute ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusions. The aim of the study was to demonstrate that, among patients with large vessel, anterior circulation occlusion who have received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, treatment with Solitaire revascularization devices reduces degree of disability 3 months post stroke. The study is a global multicenter, two-arm, prospective, randomized, open, blinded end-point trial comparing functional outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients who are treated with either intravenous tissue plasminogen activator alone or intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in combination with the Solitaire device. Up to 833 patients will be enrolled. Patients who have received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator are randomized to either continue with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator alone or additionally proceed to neurothrombectomy using the Solitaire device within six-hours of symptom onset. The primary end-point is 90-day global disability, assessed with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Secondary outcomes include mortality at 90 days, functional independence (mRS ≤ 2) at 90 days, change in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at 27 h, reperfusion at 27 h, and thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2b/3 flow at the end of the procedure. Statistical analysis will be conducted using simultaneous success criteria on the overall distribution of modified Rankin Scale (Rankin shift) and proportions of subjects achieving functional independence (mRS 0-2). © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Stroke Organization.

  7. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  8. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  9. Genetic Drivers of von Willebrand Factor Levels in an Ischemic Stroke Population and Association With Risk for Recurrent Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Keene, Keith L; Chen, Wei-Min; Dzhivhuho, Godfrey; Rowles, Joe L; Southerland, Andrew M; Furie, Karen L; Rich, Stephen S; Worrall, Bradford B; Sale, Michèle M

    2017-06-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) plays an important role in thrombus formation during cerebrovascular damage. We sought to investigate the potential role of circulating vWF in recurrent cerebrovascular events and identify genetic contributors to variation in vWF level in an ischemic stroke population. We analyzed the effect of circulating vWF on risk of recurrent stroke using survival models in the VISP trial (Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention) and the use of vWF in reclassification over traditional factors. We conducted a genome-wide association study) with imputation, based on 1000 Genomes Project data, for circulating vWF levels and then interrogated loci previously associated with vWF levels. We performed expression quantitative trait locus analysis for vWF across different tissues. Elevated vWF levels were associated with increased risk for recurrent stroke in VISP. Adding vWF to traditional clinical parameters also improved recurrent stroke risk prediction. We identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms significantly associated with circulating vWF at the ABO locus ( P stroke in VISP. In the VISP population, genetic determinants of vWF levels that impact vWF gene expression were identified. These data add to our knowledge of the pathophysiologic and genetic basis for recurrent stroke risk and may have implications for clinical care decision making. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute ischemic stroke: A pilot study in Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical and radiological assessment of effects of normobaric high-flow oxygen therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS. Materials and Methods: Patients with anterior circulation ischemic strokes presenting within 12 h of onset, ineligible for intravenous thrombolysis, an National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score of >4, a mean transit time (MTT lesion larger than diffusion-weighted image (DWI (perfusiondiffusion mismatch, and an evidence of cortical hypoperfusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were included into the trial. Active chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, requirement of >3/L min oxygen delivery to maintain SaO2 > 95%, rapidly improving neurological deficits, pregnancy, contraindications to MRI, or unstable medical conditions were excluded. The experimental group received humidified oxygen at flow rates of 10 L/min for 12 h. The NIHSS, modified Rankin Score (mRS, Barthel Index (BI were measured at 0, 1, 7 day of admission and at 3 months follow-up. MRI with DWI/PWI was performed at admission, 24 h later and at 3 months follow-up. Results: Of 40 patients (mean age = 55.8 years ± 13.2 (range, 26-82, 20 patients were randomized to normobaric oxygen (NBO. The mean NIHSS in NBO and control groups were 14.25 and 12.7 at admission which decreased to 11.6 and 9.5 on the seventh day, and 9.4 and 9.05 at 3 months, respectively. The mean mRS (3.7/3.7 and BI (58.2/53.9 in NBO and control groups improved to 2/2.2 and 73.05/73.8 at the end of 3 months, respectively. Conclusions: NBO did not improve the clinical scores of stroke outcome in Indian patients with AIS.

  11. Know your tools - concordance of different methods for measuring brain volume change after ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [The University of Melbourne, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid [The University of Melbourne, The Florey Institute of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Longitudinal brain volume changes have been investigated in a number of cerebral disorders as a surrogate marker of clinical outcome. In stroke, unique methodological challenges are posed by dynamic structural changes occurring after onset, particularly those relating to the infarct lesion. We aimed to evaluate agreement between different analysis methods for the measurement of post-stroke brain volume change, and to explore technical challenges inherent to these methods. Fifteen patients with anterior circulation stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 1 week of onset and at 1 and 3 months. Whole-brain as well as grey- and white-matter volume were estimated separately using both an intensity-based and a surface watershed-based algorithm. In the case of the intensity-based algorithm, the analysis was also performed with and without exclusion of the infarct lesion. Due to the effects of peri-infarct edema at the baseline scan, longitudinal volume change was measured as percentage change between the 1 and 3-month scans. Intra-class and concordance correlation coefficients were used to assess agreement between the different analysis methods. Reduced major axis regression was used to inspect the nature of bias between measurements. Overall agreement between methods was modest with strong disagreement between some techniques. Measurements were variably impacted by procedures performed to account for infarct lesions. Improvements in volumetric methods and consensus between methodologies employed in different studies are necessary in order to increase the validity of conclusions derived from post-stroke cerebral volumetric studies. Readers should be aware of the potential impact of different methods on study conclusions. (orig.)

  12. Serial Alberta Stroke Program early CT score from baseline to 24 hours in Solitaire Flow Restoration with the Intention for Thrombectomy study: a novel surrogate end point for revascularization in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebeskind, David S; Jahan, Reza; Nogueira, Raul G; Jovin, Tudor G; Lutsep, Helmi L; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2014-03-01

    The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on baseline imaging is an established predictor of acute ischemic stroke outcomes. We analyzed change on serial ASPECTS at baseline and 24-hour imaging in the Solitaire Flow Restoration with the Intention for Thrombectomy (SWIFT) study to determine prognostic value and to identify subgroups with extensive injury after intervention. ASPECTS at baseline and 24 hours was independently scored in all anterior circulation SWIFT cases, blinded to all other trial data. ASPECTS at baseline, at 24 hours, and serial changes were analyzed with univariate and multivariate approaches. One hundred thirty-nine patients (mean age, 67 [SD, 12] years; 52% women; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, 18 [interquartile range, 8-28]) with complete data at both time points were studied. Multivariate analyses showed that higher 24-hour ASPECTS predicted good clinical outcome (day 90 modified Rankin Scale, 0-2; odds ratio, 1.67; PScale outcomes (mean modified Rankin Scale, 4.4 versus 2.7; P<0.001). Twenty-four-hour ASPECTS provides better prognostic information compared with baseline ASPECTS. Predictors of dramatic infarct progression on ASPECTS are hyperglycemia, hypertension, and nonreperfusion. Serial ASPECTS change from baseline to 24 hours predicts clinical outcome, providing an early surrogate end point for thrombectomy trials. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01054560.

  13. Stroke care in Galicia: telemedicine in the early, multidisciplinary treatment of all acute stroke cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castro, Emilio; Vázquez-Lima, Manuel José; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Verde, Luis; Castillo, José

    2018-02-01

    Stroke is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in Spain and in Galicia in particular. Tissue viability after stroke depends on the time taken to restore circulation. The widely dispersed and aging population of this region challenges efforts to provide equal care for patients with time-sensitive emergencies such as stroke. Two regional hospitals (Hospital do Salnés and Hospital do Barbanza) and the reference Hospital Clínico de Santiago launched a telestroke pilot program in 2011 in which patients whose treatment was guided at a distance were discharged with lower levels of stroke severity and mortality. That outcome was probably attributable to more rapid diagnosis. Given those preliminary results and the characteristics of the population, the centrally coordinated Galician Stroke Care Plan was launched in 2016 to provide a telemedicine service that connects all hospitals in the health system of Galicia. This paper summarizes the experience of developing and implementing the program.

  14. Diffusion and perfusion correlates of the {sup 18}F-MISO PET lesion in acute stroke: pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alawneh, Josef A.; Marrapu, S.T.; Jensen-Kondering, Ulf; Morris, Rhiannon S.; Jones, P.S. [University of Cambridge, Stroke Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Moustafa, Ramez R. [University of Cambridge, Stroke Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ain Shams University, Department of Neurology, Cairo (Egypt); Aigbirhio, Franklin I.; Fryer, Tim D.; Carpenter, T.A. [University of Cambridge, Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Warburton, Elizabeth A. [University of Cambridge, Stroke Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Stroke Unit, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Baron, Jean-Claude [University of Cambridge, Stroke Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Universite Paris Descartes, INSERM U894, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Paris (France)

    2014-04-15

    Mapping the ischaemic penumbra in acute stroke is of considerable clinical interest. For this purpose, mapping tissue hypoxia with {sup 18}F-misonidazole (FMISO) PET is attractive, and is straightforward compared to {sup 15}O PET. Given the current emphasis on penumbra imaging using diffusion/perfusion MR or CT perfusion, investigating the relationships between FMISO uptake and abnormalities with these modalities is important. According to a prospective design, three patients (age 54-81 years; admission NIH stroke scale scores 16-22) with an anterior circulation stroke and extensive penumbra on CT- or MR-based perfusion imaging successfully completed FMISO PET, diffusion-weighted imaging and MR angiography 6-26 h after stroke onset, and follow-up FLAIR to map the final infarction. All had persistent proximal occlusion and a poor outcome despite thrombolysis. Significant FMISO trapping was defined voxel-wise relative to ten age-matched controls and mapped onto coregistered maps of the penumbra and irreversibly damaged ischaemic core. FMISO trapping was present in all patients (volume range 18-119 ml) and overlapped mainly with the penumbra but also with the core in each patient. There was a significant (p ≤ 0.001) correlation in the expected direction between FMISO uptake and perfusion, with a sharp FMISO uptake bend around the expected penumbra threshold. FMISO uptake had the expected overlap with the penumbra and relationship with local perfusion. However, consistent with recent animal data, our study suggests FMISO trapping may not be specific to the penumbra. If confirmed in larger samples, this preliminary finding would have potential implications for the clinical application of FMISO PET in acute ischaemic stroke. (orig.)

  15. Diffusion and perfusion correlates of the 18F-MISO PET lesion in acute stroke: pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alawneh, Josef A.; Marrapu, S.T.; Jensen-Kondering, Ulf; Morris, Rhiannon S.; Jones, P.S.; Moustafa, Ramez R.; Aigbirhio, Franklin I.; Fryer, Tim D.; Carpenter, T.A.; Warburton, Elizabeth A.; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Mapping the ischaemic penumbra in acute stroke is of considerable clinical interest. For this purpose, mapping tissue hypoxia with 18 F-misonidazole (FMISO) PET is attractive, and is straightforward compared to 15 O PET. Given the current emphasis on penumbra imaging using diffusion/perfusion MR or CT perfusion, investigating the relationships between FMISO uptake and abnormalities with these modalities is important. According to a prospective design, three patients (age 54-81 years; admission NIH stroke scale scores 16-22) with an anterior circulation stroke and extensive penumbra on CT- or MR-based perfusion imaging successfully completed FMISO PET, diffusion-weighted imaging and MR angiography 6-26 h after stroke onset, and follow-up FLAIR to map the final infarction. All had persistent proximal occlusion and a poor outcome despite thrombolysis. Significant FMISO trapping was defined voxel-wise relative to ten age-matched controls and mapped onto coregistered maps of the penumbra and irreversibly damaged ischaemic core. FMISO trapping was present in all patients (volume range 18-119 ml) and overlapped mainly with the penumbra but also with the core in each patient. There was a significant (p ≤ 0.001) correlation in the expected direction between FMISO uptake and perfusion, with a sharp FMISO uptake bend around the expected penumbra threshold. FMISO uptake had the expected overlap with the penumbra and relationship with local perfusion. However, consistent with recent animal data, our study suggests FMISO trapping may not be specific to the penumbra. If confirmed in larger samples, this preliminary finding would have potential implications for the clinical application of FMISO PET in acute ischaemic stroke. (orig.)

  16. Endovascular therapy for Acute ischemic Stroke Trial (EAST): study protocol for a prospective, multicentre control trial in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhongrong; Huo, Xiaochuan; Gao, Feng; Liao, Xiaoling; Wang, Chunjuan; Peng, Ya; Cao, Yibin; Chen, Shengli; Zhang, Meng; Jiang, Changchun; Peng, Xiaoxiang; Song, Cunfeng; Wei, Liping; Zhu, Qiyi; Guo, Zaiyu; Liu, Li; Lin, Hang; Yang, Hua; Wu, Wei; Liang, Hui; Xu, Anding; Chen, Kangning; Zhao, Xingquan; Pan, Yuesong; Li, Hao; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-06-01

    5 recent trials have shown the benefit of endovascular treatment for acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) due to large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Solitaire thrombectomy in patients with moderate-to-severe stroke in the Chinese population, which has a high prevalence of intracranial atherosclerosis. This multicentre prospective control study will involve 17 stroke centres in China, and plans to recruit 150 patients in the intervention group, and 150 patients in the medical group, in which patients meet enrolment criteria but refuse intervention. Patients with AIS due to large vessel occlusion indicated for treatment with Solitaire stent retriever within 12 hours of symptom onset, and who meet the inclusion and exclusion criteria, will be enrolled in this study. The primary efficacy endpoint is functional independence as defined by a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≤2 at 90 days or by functional improvement as defined by mRS, using shift analysis. The procedural efficacy endpoint is arterial recanalisation of the occluded target vessel measured by a modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (mTICI) score equal or superior to 2b right following the use of the study device. The primary safety endpoint is symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (sICH) within 24±3 hours postprocedure. The protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee at the coordinating centre and by the local Institutional Review Board of each participating centre. NCT02350283.

  17. Stroke awareness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke....

  18. Correlation between urinary incontinence and localization of brain lesion and severity of neurological lesion caused by a stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetra A.

    2012-10-01

    disorders. Urinary incontinence develops more frequently among patients with anterior circulation of the brain and subcortical brain lesion. There is a reliable correlation between severity of neurological lesion and urinary incontinence.

  19. Stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorne, Peter; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2011-05-14

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics. Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obododimma Oha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This poem playfully addresses the slippery nature of linguistic signification, employing humour and sarcasm in presenting a wide range of human experience. It ironical twists -- and "strokes" (read ambiguously as both a giving a punishment and erotic pleasuring -- move from the naming of location through international discourse of capital to the crumbling relationships between nation states. It reading of the signs of language is tied to the unease and fracture in cultural and political experience.

  1. A rare presentation of stroke in young age ( moyamoya disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal F Radwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old hypertensive housewife presented with a sudden onset of left-sided hemiplegia, hemianaesthesia, dysarthria and urinary incontinence. The condition was preceded by recurrent attacks of motor neurological deficits over a 3-year duration. She reported a history of a fall from a height at the age of 10, which was followed by a hearing deficit and a history of two caesarean sections after eclampsia. The blood pressure was 170/100 mmHg. Laboratory investigations revealed hyperglycaemia (fasting glucose 306 mg/dl and normal kidney function tests. The computed tomography scans revealed old multiple bilateral cerebral infarcts with recent intracranial haemorrhage in the right parietal region. The inflammatory markers (ESR and CRP and immune profile (ANA, anti-ds DNA and ANCA were found to be normal. Cerebral angiography revealed a complete occlusion of the intracranial parts of both internal carotid arteries at their supraclinoid segments along with the proximal parts of the anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery, with collaterals from the posterior circulation. Consequently, the diagnosis of moyamoya disease with the collaterals was confirmed. Antihypertensive medications and insulin were administered. Cerebral dehydration measures were undertaken with partial improvement. A superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass operation was performed with some postoperative improvement. One month later, she suffered a new stroke with severe impairment of the level of consciousness; the computed tomography scans revealed a large recent cerebral infarct, her condition deteriorated rapidly and she died shortly thereafter.

  2. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die within minutes. Strokes happen more in some populations and geographic areas. Stroke death declines have stalled in 3 out of every 4 states. Blacks have the highest stroke death rates among all ...

  3. Two Kinds of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... are often a warning sign for future strokes. Stroke Can Affect Anyone Award-winning actress Julie Harris ...

  4. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... the hospital. Thank goodness, she did. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  5. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Sub; Chung, Young Sun; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of congenital anterior urethral diverticular which have occurred in a 4 year old and one month old boy are presented. Etiology, diagnostic procedures, and its clinical results are briefly reviewed

  6. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thighbone where the kneecap normally rests is too shallow. You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  7. Prediction of infarction and reperfusion in stroke by flow- and volume-weighted collateral signal in MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, M; Forkert, N D; Brehmer, L; Thomalla, G; Siemonsen, S; Fiehler, J; Kemmling, A

    2015-02-01

    In proximal anterior circulation occlusive strokes, collateral flow is essential for good outcome. Collateralized vessel intensity in TOF- and contrast-enhanced MRA is variable due to different acquisition methods. Our purpose was to quantify collateral supply by using flow-weighted signal in TOF-MRA and blood volume-weighted signal in contrast-enhanced MRA to determine each predictive contribution to tissue infarction and reperfusion. Consecutively (2009-2013), 44 stroke patients with acute proximal anterior circulation occlusion met the inclusion criteria with TOF- and contrast-enhanced MRA and penumbral imaging. Collateralized vessels in the ischemic hemisphere were assessed by TOF- and contrast-enhanced MRA using 2 methods: 1) visual 3-point collateral scoring, and 2) collateral signal quantification by an arterial atlas-based collateral index. Collateral measures were tested by receiver operating characteristic curve and logistic regression against 2 imaging end points of tissue-outcome: final infarct volume and percentage of penumbra saved. Visual collateral scores on contrast-enhanced MRA but not TOF were significantly higher in patients with good outcome. Visual collateral scoring on contrast-enhanced MRA was the best rater-based discriminator for final infarct volume 50% (area under the curve, 0.67; P = .04). Atlas-based collateral index of contrast-enhanced MRA was the overall best independent discriminator for final infarct volume of collateral index combining the signal of TOF- and contrast-enhanced MRA was the overall best discriminator for effective reperfusion (percentage of penumbra saved >50%; area under the curve, 0.89; P collateral assessment, TOF- and contrast-enhanced MRA both contain predictive signal information for penumbral reperfusion. This could improve risk stratification in further studies. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. Identifying anterior segment crystals.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, I W; Brooks, A M; Reinehr, D P; Grant, G B; Gillies, W E

    1991-01-01

    A series of 22 patients with crystals in the anterior segment of the eye was examined by specular microscopy. Of 10 patients with hypermature cataract and hyperrefringent bodies in the anterior chamber cholesterol crystals were identified in four patients and in six of the 10 in whom aspirate was obtained cholesterol crystals were demonstrated in three, two of these having shown crystals on specular microscopy. In 10 patients with intracorneal crystalline deposits, cholesterol crystals were f...

  9. Understanding Life After Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Hjelmblink, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Stroke is an acute, neurological dysfunction of vascular origin with sudden occurrence and it influences physical, cognitive and psychological functions. Initial treatment aims at eliminating or reducing the brain damage. Soon, however, the influence of the stroke on the entire life of stroke survivors has to be considered. This thesis explores the meaning of life after stroke to 19 elderly stroke survivors during the first year post stroke. Survivors were interviewed twice and the interviews...

  10. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Simple Techniques Can Help Memory after a Stroke Self-Esteem after Stroke Cognitive Challenges After Stroke Depression Trumps ... spasticity), fatigue and more. Let's Talk About Stroke Fact Sheets Our stroke fact sheets cover treatments, recovery, ...

  11. Sexual dimorphism in ischemic stroke: lessons from the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwani, Bharti; McCullough, Louise D

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is emerging as a major health problem for elderly women. Women have lower stroke incidence than men until an advanced age, when the epidemiology of ischemic stroke shifts and incidence rises dramatically in women. Experimental models of rodent stroke have replicated this clinical epidemiology, with exacerbated injury in older compared with young female rodents Many of the detrimental effects of aging on ischemic stroke outcome in females can be replicated by ovariectomy, suggesting that hormones such as estrogen play a neuroprotective role. However, emerging data suggest that the molecular mechanisms leading to ischemic cell death differ in the two sexes, and these effects may be independent of circulating hormone levels. This article highlights recent clinical and experimental literature on sex differences in stroke outcomes and mechanisms. PMID:21612353

  12. Mechanical thrombectomy of acute ischemic stroke with a new intermediate aspiration catheter: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallustio, Fabrizio; Pampana, Enrico; Davoli, Alessandro; Merolla, Stefano; Koch, Giacomo; Alemseged, Fana; Panella, Marta; D'Agostino, Vittoria Carla; Mori, Francesco; Morosetti, Daniele; Konda, Daniel; Fabiano, Sebastiano; Diomedi, Marina; Gandini, Roberto

    2018-02-08

    To report clinical and procedural outcomes of acute ischemic stroke patients after endovascular treatment with the new thromboaspiration catheter AXS Catalyst 6. Patients with anterior and posterior circulation stroke were selected. Successful reperfusion defined as a Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score ≥2 b and 3-month functional independence defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ≤2 were the main efficacy outcomes. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality were the main safety outcomes. 107 patients were suitable for analysis. Mean age was 73.18±12.62 year and median baseline NIHSS was 17 (range: 3-32). The most frequent site of occlusion was the middle cerebral artery (MCA) (60.7%). 76.6% of patients were treated with AXS Catalyst 6 alone without the need for rescue devices or thromboaspiration catheters. Successful reperfusion was achieved in 84.1%, functional independence in 47.6%, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 3.7%, and mortality in 21.4%. Endovascular treatment with AXS Catalyst 6 proved to be safe, technically feasible, and effective. Comparison analyses with other devices for mechanical thrombectomy are needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score applied to CT angiography source images is a strong predictor of futile recanalization in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawiorski, Michal M.; Alonso de Lecinana, Maria; Martinez-Sanchez, Patricia; Fuentes, Blanca; Sanz-Cuesta, Borja E.; Marin, Begona; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Garcia-Pastor, Andres; Diaz-Otero, Fernando; Calleja, Patricia; Lourido, Daniel; Vicente, Agustina; Fandino, Eduardo; Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Reliable predictors of poor clinical outcome despite successful revascularization might help select patients with acute ischemic stroke for thrombectomy. We sought to determine whether baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) applied to CT angiography source images (CTA-SI) is useful in predicting futile recanalization. Data are from the FUN-TPA study registry (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT02164357) including patients with acute ischemic stroke due to proximal arterial occlusion in anterior circulation, undergoing reperfusion therapies. Baseline non-contrast CT and CTA-SI-ASPECTS, time-lapse to image acquisition, occurrence, and timing of recanalization were recorded. Outcome measures were NIHSS at 24 h, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, modified Rankin scale score, and mortality at 90 days. Futile recanalization was defined when successful recanalization was associated with poor functional outcome (death or disability). Included were 110 patients, baseline NIHSS 17 (IQR 12; 20), treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT; 45 %), primary mechanical thrombectomy (MT; 16 %), or combined IVT + MT (39 %). Recanalization rate was 71 %, median delay of 287 min (225; 357). Recanalization was futile in 28 % of cases. In an adjusted model, baseline CTA-SI-ASPECTS was inversely related to the odds of futile recanalization (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7), whereas NCCT-ASPECTS was not (OR 0.8; 95 % CI 0.5-1.2). A score ≤5 in CTA-SI-ASPECTS was the best cut-off to predict futile recanalization (sensitivity 35 %; specificity 97 %; positive predictive value 86 %; negative predictive value 77 %). CTA-SI-ASPECTS strongly predicts futile recanalization and could be a valuable tool for treatment decisions regarding the indication of revascularization therapies. (orig.)

  14. Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score applied to CT angiography source images is a strong predictor of futile recanalization in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawiorski, Michal M.; Alonso de Lecinana, Maria [Hospital Universitario La Paz, IdiPAZ, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, IRYCIS, Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Sanchez, Patricia; Fuentes, Blanca; Sanz-Cuesta, Borja E.; Marin, Begona; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio [Hospital Universitario La Paz, IdiPAZ, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Pastor, Andres; Diaz-Otero, Fernando [Hospital Universitario Gregorio Maranon, IiSGM, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Calleja, Patricia [Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Lourido, Daniel; Vicente, Agustina; Fandino, Eduardo [Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, IRYCIS, Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando [Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Infanta Leonor, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Reliable predictors of poor clinical outcome despite successful revascularization might help select patients with acute ischemic stroke for thrombectomy. We sought to determine whether baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) applied to CT angiography source images (CTA-SI) is useful in predicting futile recanalization. Data are from the FUN-TPA study registry (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT02164357) including patients with acute ischemic stroke due to proximal arterial occlusion in anterior circulation, undergoing reperfusion therapies. Baseline non-contrast CT and CTA-SI-ASPECTS, time-lapse to image acquisition, occurrence, and timing of recanalization were recorded. Outcome measures were NIHSS at 24 h, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, modified Rankin scale score, and mortality at 90 days. Futile recanalization was defined when successful recanalization was associated with poor functional outcome (death or disability). Included were 110 patients, baseline NIHSS 17 (IQR 12; 20), treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT; 45 %), primary mechanical thrombectomy (MT; 16 %), or combined IVT + MT (39 %). Recanalization rate was 71 %, median delay of 287 min (225; 357). Recanalization was futile in 28 % of cases. In an adjusted model, baseline CTA-SI-ASPECTS was inversely related to the odds of futile recanalization (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7), whereas NCCT-ASPECTS was not (OR 0.8; 95 % CI 0.5-1.2). A score ≤5 in CTA-SI-ASPECTS was the best cut-off to predict futile recanalization (sensitivity 35 %; specificity 97 %; positive predictive value 86 %; negative predictive value 77 %). CTA-SI-ASPECTS strongly predicts futile recanalization and could be a valuable tool for treatment decisions regarding the indication of revascularization therapies. (orig.)

  15. The validity and reliability of signs of early infarction on CT in acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dippel, D.W.J.; Du Ry van Beest Holle, M.; Kooten, F. van; Koudstaal, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested that subtle signs of early cerebral infarction on CT are important indicators of outcome and of the effect of thrombolytic treatment in acute ischaemic stroke. We studied these signs prospectively, in 260 patients with an anterior circulation stroke from a European-Australian randomised trial of lubeluzole in acute ischaemic stroke. Interobserver reliability was assessed by means of the χ statistic. The validity of the early signs was assessed by comparing the assessments of the first CT with another CT at 1 week after the onset of stroke, and with stroke outcome at 12 weeks. Each initial CT study was assessed by two of a group of five reviewers, who were blinded to each other's assessments and to the findings on the follow-up CT. The images were assessed twice, once without clinical information and again after disclosure of the side (left or right hemisphere) of the lesion. All reviewers were experienced clinicians with a special interest and training in vascular neurology and CT. The median time between stroke onset and the first CT was 3.2 h; 59 % of the patients were imaged within 3 h and 77 % within 6 h. More than half of the patients (52 %) had a large middle cerebral artery territory (MCA) infarct on follow-up CT. Chance-adjusted interobserver agreement (χ) for any early infarct was 0.27 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.15 to 0.39). Agreement (χ) on the extent of a middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarct and on the indication for treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) was fair: 0.37 and 0.35, respectively. Patients with early signs of an infarct of more than 1/3 of the MCA territory were more likely to have a large MCA infarct on follow-up CT (odds ratio 5.7, 95 % confidence interval 2.8-11.5); the positive and negative predictive value of these signs was 81 % and 57 %, respectively. Chance-adjusted interobserver agreement on early, subtle signs of a large MCA territory infarct on CT by neurologists was thus no

  16. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  17. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  18. Stroke: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when blood flow to your ... cells start dying. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  19. Outcome After Reperfusion Therapies in Patients With Large Baseline Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Stroke Lesions: A THRACE Trial (Mechanical Thrombectomy After Intravenous Alteplase Versus Alteplase Alone After Stroke) Subgroup Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautheron, Vincent; Xie, Yu; Tisserand, Marie; Raoult, Hélène; Soize, Sébastien; Naggara, Olivier; Bourcier, Romain; Richard, Sébastien; Guillemin, Francis; Bracard, Serge; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2018-03-01

    Stroke patients with large diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) volumes are often excluded from reperfusion because of reckoned futility. In those with DWI volume >70 mL, included in the THRACE trial (Mechanical Thrombectomy After Intravenous Alteplase Versus Alteplase Alone After Stroke), we report the associations between baseline parameters and outcome. We examined 304 patients with anterior circulation stroke and pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging. Variables were extracted from the THRACE database, and DWI volumes were measured semiautomatically. Among 53 patients with DWI volume >70 mL, 12 had favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score, ≤2) at 3 months; they had less coronary disease (0/12 versus 12/38; P =0.046) and less history of smoking (1/10 versus 12/31; P =0.013) than patients with modified Rankin Scale score >2. None of the 8 patients >75 years of age reached modified Rankin Scale score ≤2. Favorable outcome occurred in 12 of 37 M1-occluded patients but in 0 of 16 internal carotid-T/L-occluded patients ( P =0.010). Favorable outcome was more frequent (6/13) when DWI lesion was limited to the superficial middle cerebral artery territory than when it extended to the deep middle cerebral artery territory (6/40; P =0.050). Stroke patients with DWI lesion >70 mL may benefit from reperfusion therapy, especially those with isolated M1 occlusion or ischemia restricted to the superficial middle cerebral artery territory. The benefit of treatment seems questionable for patients with carotid occlusion or lesion extending to the deep middle cerebral artery territory. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Adapting the Home After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... after a Stroke Adapting the Home after a Stroke Caregiver Introduction What is Aphasia? Stroke Recovery Guides ...

  1. Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment Using Mechanical Thrombectomy: A Study of 137 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rakeshsingh K; Chafale, Vishal Annaji; Lalla, Rakesh Shyam; Panchal, Keyurkumar Chandrakantbhai; Karapurkar, Anil Pandurang; Khadilkar, Satish Vasant; Ojha, Pawan K; Godge, Yogesh; Singh, Rakesh K; Benny, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) is the most effective treatment in large vessel occlusion (LVO). We have analyzed our initial experience of MT of 137 patients in anterior circulation (AC) and posterior circulation (PC) LVO using Solitaire stent retriever device. Retrospective cohort analysis of 112 AC and 25 PC acute ischemic strokes was done considering various baseline characteristics, risk factors, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) change, revascularization rate, complications, and functional outcome at 3 months using modified Rankin score. Out of 137 patients, occlusion was found in M1 segment (44.5%), carotid T occlusion (37.2%), and basilar artery (18.2%). Atrial fibrillation was important risk factor for Carotid T occlusion. 50.4% patients received intravenous thrombolysis. Baseline mean NIHSS in AC was 15.5 (±4.32), and PC was 19 (±5.5). Tandem lesions were noted in 14.6%. There was significant difference in mean door-to-needle time for AC and PC (220 ± 80.6 and 326 ± 191.8 min, respectively). Mean time to revascularization for AC (39.5 ± 14.1) and PC (42.2 ± 19.4) was similar. Procedural success (modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction ≥2b) observed in AC and PC was 92.9% and 84%, respectively ( P = 0.154). NIHSS at admission between 5 and 15 and immediate postprocedure NIHSS improvement >4 was associated with significant better clinical outcome at 3 months. Overall complication rate was about 15.3% including symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in 8.1% and 6.6% deaths. MT is safe treatment and equally effective for both AC and PC LVO. With careful patient selection, clinical outcome in PC was comparable to AC despite delayed presentation and higher baseline NIHSS.

  2. Anterior Segment Ischemia after Strabismus Surger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Seyhan Göçmen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old male patient was referred to our clinic with complaints of diplopia and esotropia in his right eye that developed after a car accident. The patient had right esotropia in primary position and abduction of the right eye was totally limited. Primary deviation was over 40 prism diopters at near and distance. The patient was diagnosed with sixth nerve palsy and 18 months after trauma, he underwent right medial rectus muscle recession. Ten months after the first operation, full-thickness tendon transposition of the superior and inferior rectus muscles (with Foster suture was performed. On the first postoperative day, slit-lamp examination revealed corneal edema, 3+ cells in the anterior chamber and an irregular pupil. According to these findings, the diagnosis was anterior segment ischemia. Treatment with 0.1/5 mL topical dexamethasone drops (16 times/day, cyclopentolate hydrochloride drops (3 times/day and 20 mg oral fluocortolone (3 times/day was initiated. After 1 week of treatment, corneal edema regressed and the anterior chamber was clean. Topical and systemic steroid treatment was gradually discontinued. At postoperative 1 month, the patient was orthophoric and there were no pathologic symptoms besides the irregular pupil. Anterior segment ischemia is one of the most serious complications of strabismus surgery. Despite the fact that in most cases the only remaining sequel is an irregular pupil, serious circulation deficits could lead to phthisis bulbi. Clinical properties of anterior segment ischemia should be well recognized and in especially risky cases, preventative measures should be taken.

  3. [Origin and development of hemorrhagic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guo-Qing; Huang, Pei-Xin

    2005-01-01

    Research works were done on origin and development of the denomination, the acute stage of etiopathogenisis and pathogenesis, therapeutical priniciple and therapeutical methods in hemorrhagic stroke. Stroke was divided into is chemic and hemorrhagic until the end of the Qing dynasty. In 1997, Terminology of Traditional Chinese Medicine Treatment-Disease Part of National Standard formally included the term hemorrhagic stroke. Before 1950s-1960s, the pathogenesis emphasizes the up-stirring of liver, the adverse-rising of both blood and qi. A proper remedy should to subdue the liver yang, calm down the endopathic wind and clear heat. Since 1970s, it has been considered that the disorder is closely related with the spleen and stomach. The focal pathogenesis was blocked passage of the middle jiao, disorder of qi in ascending and descending and the abnormal flow of qi and blood. Since 1980s, it was claimed that hemorrhagic stroke belongs to blood syndrome of TCM. The vital pathogenesis was accumulation of blood stasis in acute stage of hemorrhagic stroke. The key point of therapeutical method was to promote blood circulation to remove blood stasis. In recent years, the theories of endogenous toxic factor, consumption, yin and yang syndrome, and the therapeutical method of antidote, assisting the vital qi, especially the development of common therapeutical methods were developed, with an abundance of differential diagnosis and treatment in hemorrhagic stroke.

  4. Demographic Characteristics of Strokes Types in Sanliurfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ižnanc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Sanliurfa training and research hospital for diagnosis and treatment of patients with stroke admitted demographic features planned. We aimed to study demographic feature of stroke patient who admitted to Sanliurfa training and research hospital for diagnosis and treatment. Material and Method: 01/10/2011 and 01/9/2012, ischemic and hemorrhagic brain training and research hospital in Sanliurfa vascular disease diagnosis and treatment without any exclusion criteria, patient sequential 454 retrospectively.Results: 366%u2019si 88 were ischemic, hemorrhagic stroke. 54.6% by sex male,% 45.4 were women. Average age: 67.86 di.56.3% radiologically roaming the front circulation infarct brain infarct% found the rear 23.2. Hospital stay duration: 9.27 day.. Hemorrhagic stroke was longer this Sura in the group. Mortality rate 4.6% in all in packaging (21 patients, ischemic in boots in 1.9% (7 patients, hemorrhagic of boots were found at 15.9% (14 patients.Discussion: our study of Sanliurfa province stroke data in terms of the region together, although a portion of their valuable results. In the summer, the ischemic stroke incidence is higher.

  5. Optimal workflow and process-based performance measures for endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke: analysis of the Solitaire FR thrombectomy for acute revascularization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Bijoy K; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Gralla, Jan; Bonafe, Alain; Davalos, Antoni; Chapot, Rene; Goyal, Mayank

    2014-07-01

    We report on workflow and process-based performance measures and their effect on clinical outcome in Solitaire FR Thrombectomy for Acute Revascularization (STAR), a multicenter, prospective, single-arm study of Solitaire FR thrombectomy in large vessel anterior circulation stroke patients. Two hundred two patients were enrolled across 14 centers in Europe, Canada, and Australia. The following time intervals were measured: stroke onset to hospital arrival, hospital arrival to baseline imaging, baseline imaging to groin puncture, groin puncture to first stent deployment, and first stent deployment to reperfusion. Effects of time of day, general anesthesia use, and multimodal imaging on workflow were evaluated. Patient characteristics and workflow processes associated with prolonged interval times and good clinical outcome (90-day modified Rankin score, 0-2) were analyzed. Median times were onset of stroke to hospital arrival, 123 minutes (interquartile range, 163 minutes); hospital arrival to thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) 2b/3 or final digital subtraction angiography, 133 minutes (interquartile range, 99 minutes); and baseline imaging to groin puncture, 86 minutes (interquartile range, 24 minutes). Time from baseline imaging to puncture was prolonged in patients receiving intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (32-minute mean delay) and when magnetic resonance-based imaging at baseline was used (18-minute mean delay). Extracranial carotid disease delayed puncture to first stent deployment time on average by 25 minutes. For each 1-hour increase in stroke onset to final digital subtraction angiography (or TICI 2b/3) time, odds of good clinical outcome decreased by 38%. Interval times in the STAR study reflect current intra-arterial therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Improving workflow metrics can further improve clinical outcome. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01327989. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. The relationship between interventionists' experience and clinical and radiological outcome in intra-arterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A MR CLEAN pretrial survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Debbie; van Boxtel, Tiemen H; Schipperen, Stefanie; van Zwam, Wim H; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert J; Brouwer, Patrick A; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F M; Schonewille, Wouter J; Vos, Jan Albert; van der Lugt, Aad; Roos, Yvo B; Majoie, Charles B; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2017-06-15

    Intra-arterial treatment in acute ischemic stroke is safe and effective as recently shown in several randomized clinical trials. The level of experience of the interventionist performing the IAT procedure has not been studied. The present study investigates effects of interventionists' experience on technical aspects of the procedure and clinical outcome of the patient. In this study of 313 patients with a proximal intracranial arterial anterior circulation occlusion, treated in the Netherlands from 2002 until participation in the Multicenter Randomized Clinical trial of Endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke (MR CLEAN), data were collected retrospectively. The association of the senior interventionists' experience with duration of the procedure, adverse events, recanalization, neurological outcome, and functional outcome at discharge was analyzed. Multiple regression models adjusted for age, sex, stroke severity, carotid terminus occlusion, use of a retrievable stent and onset to door time were used. No association between interventionists' experience and recanalization, neurological outcome, or functional outcome was observed in a strict selection of patients. This strict selection include a start of intra-arterial treatment within 6h, no coagulation disturbances, systolic blood pressureexperience and either serious neurologic adverse events or poor outcomes was observed in this study of treatments by interventionists with experience of experience with procedure times, results and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. anterior hyaloidal fibrovascular proliferation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okonkwo

    It most commonly occurs after phakic vitrectomy and scleral buckling for diabetic traction retinal detachment. It usually manifests with haemorrhage into the vitreous cavity or anterior hyaloid 3 to 12 weeks after vitrectomy and is the result of fibrovascular proliferation from the peripheral retina extending toward the equator of ...

  8. PISA. The effect of paracetamol (acetaminophen and ibuprofen on body temperature in acute stroke: Protocol for a phase II double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial [ISRCTN98608690

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kappelle Jaap

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the first days after stroke, one to two fifths of the patients develop fever or subfebrile temperatures. Body temperature is a strong prognostic factor after stroke. Pharmacological reduction of temperature in patients with acute ischaemic stroke may improve their functional outcome. Previously, we studied the effect of high dose (6 g daily and low dose (3 g daily paracetamol (acetaminophen in a randomised placebo-controlled trial of 75 patients with acute ischemic stroke. In the high-dose paracetamol group, mean body temperature at 12 and 24 hours after start of treatment was 0.4°C lower than in the placebo group. The effect of ibuprofen, another potent antipyretic drug, on body-core temperature in normothermic patients has not been studied. Aim The aim of the present trial is to study the effects of high-dose paracetamol and ibuprofen on body temperature in patients with acute ischaemic stroke, and to study the safety of these treatments. Design Seventy-five (3 × 25 patients with acute ischaemic stroke confined to the anterior circulation will be randomised to treatment with either: 400 mg ibuprofen, 1000 mg acetaminophen, or with placebo 6 times daily during 5 days. Body-temperatures will be measured with a rectal electronic thermometer at the start of treatment and after 24 hours. An infrared tympanic thermometer will be used to monitor body temperature at 2-hour intervals during the first 24 hours and at 12-hour intervals thereafter. The primary outcome measure will be rectal temperature at 24 hours after the start of treatment. The study results will be analysed on an intent-to-treat basis, but an on-treatment analysis will also be performed. No formal interim analysis will be carried out.

  9. Locomotion in Stroke Subjects: Interactions between Unaffected and Affected Sides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloter, Evelyne; Wirz, Markus; Dietz, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensorimotor interactions between unaffected and affected sides of post-stroke subjects during locomotion. In healthy subjects, stimulation of the tibial nerve during the mid-stance phase is followed by electromyography responses not only in the ipsilateral tibialis anterior, but also in the proximal arm…

  10. Significance of periventricular hyperintensity in T2 weighted MRI on memory dysfunction and depression after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokura, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Yamashita, Kazuya; Koide, Hiromi

    1994-01-01

    We studied the effect of periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) in T2 weighted MRI on memory function and post-stroke depression in 159 patients with cerebrovacular disease. Memory function was assessed with Hasegawa's scale, and depressive state was estimated with Zung's self-rating depression scale. Patients showing diffusely distributed PVH had significantly low scores in memory function tests. Localized PVH around the anterior horns of the laterals ventricle was also associated with impaired memory function when the area of PVH was large. The incidence of post-stroke depression was high in patients with large PVH around the anterior horn in comparison with patients with PVH around the posterior horn. The severity of PVH around the posterior horn did not affect memory function and post-stroke depression. These findings suggest that memory dysfunction and post-stroke depression were accelerated by the diffusely or anteriorly distributed PVH. (author)

  11. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microwave circulator design

    CERN Document Server

    Linkhart, Douglas K

    2014-01-01

    Circulator design has advanced significantly since the first edition of this book was published 25 years ago. The objective of this second edition is to present theory, information, and design procedures that will enable microwave engineers and technicians to design and build circulators successfully. This resource contains a discussion of the various units used in the circulator design computations, as well as covers the theory of operation. This book presents numerous applications, giving microwave engineers new ideas about how to solve problems using circulators. Design examples are provided, which demonstrate how to apply the information to real-world design tasks.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100230.htm Anterior cruciate ligament repair - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a ligament in the center of ...

  14. Multidisciplinary management of anterior diastemata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Herkrath, Fernando José; Franco, Eduardo Jacomino

    2007-01-01

    Anterior diastemata may compromise the harmony of a patient's smile. Consideration of etiologic factors, previous gingival conditioning, and individual treatment planning are essential in the proper management of anterior diastemata. An integrated orthodontic-restorative approach may enhance...

  15. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  16. MIGRAINE AND STROKE: VASCULAR COMORBIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata eGuidetti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Several comorbidities are associated to migraine.Recent meta-analyses have consistently demonstrated a relationship between migraine and stroke, which is well-defined for ischaemic stroke and migraine with aura, even stronger in females on oral contraceptives or smokers. However, there seems to be no clear-cut association between stroke in migraineurs and the common vascular risk factors, at least in the young adult population. Migraineurs also run an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, while the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease remains poorly defined.Another aspect is the relationship between migraine and the presence of silent brain lesions. It has been demonstrated that there is an increased frequency of ischaemic lesions in the white matter of migraineurs, especially silent infarcts in the posterior circulation territory in patients with at least 10 attacks per month. Although there is a higher prevalence of patent foramen ovale (PFO in migraineurs, the relationship between migraine and PFO remains controversial and PFO closure is not a recommended procedure to prevent migraine. As an increased frequency of cervical artery dissections has been observed in migrainous patients, it has been hypothesized that migraine may represent a predisposing factor for cervical artery dissection. There still remains the question as to whether migraine should be considered a true vascular disease or if the comorbidity between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may have underlying shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms. Although further studies are required to clarify this issue, current evidence supports a clinical management where MA patients should be screened for other concomitant vascular risk factors and treated accordingly.

  17. Anterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyadhar P. Mali

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the clinical presentation and management of four patients with anterior urethral valves; a rare cause of urethral obstruction in male children. One patient presented antenatally with oligohydramnios, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder thickening suggestive of an infravesical obstruction. Two other patients presented postnatally at 1 and 2 years of age, respectively, with poor stream of urine since birth. The fourth patient presented at 9 years with frequency and dysuria. Diagnosis was established on either micturating cystourethrogram (MCU (in 2 or on cystoscopy (in 2. All patients had cystoscopic ablation of the valves. One patient developed a postablation stricture that was resected with an end-to-end urethroplasty. He had an associated bilateral vesicoureteric junction (VUJ obstruction for which a bilateral ureteric reimplantation was done at the same time. On long-term follow-up, all patients demonstrated a good stream of urine. The renal function is normal. Patients are continent and free of urinary infections. Anterior urethral valves are rare obstructive lesions in male children. The degree of obstruction is variable, and so they may present with mild micturition difficulty or severe obstruction with hydroureteronephrosis and renal impairment. Hence, it is important to evaluate the anterior urethra in any male child with suspected infravesical obstruction. The diagnosis is established by MCU or cystoscopy and the treatment is always surgical, either a transurethral ablation or an open resection. The long-term prognosis is good.

  18. Brain hemorrhage after endovascular reperfusion therapy of ischemic stroke: a threshold-finding whole-brain perfusion CT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renú, Arturo; Laredo, Carlos; Tudela, Raúl; Urra, Xabier; Lopez-Rueda, Antonio; Llull, Laura; Oleaga, Laura; Chamorro, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular reperfusion therapy is increasingly used for acute ischemic stroke treatment. The occurrence of parenchymal hemorrhage is clinically relevant and increases with reperfusion therapies. Herein we aimed to examine the optimal perfusion CT-derived parameters and the impact of the duration of brain ischemia for the prediction of parenchymal hemorrhage after endovascular therapy. A cohort of 146 consecutive patients with anterior circulation occlusions and treated with endovascular reperfusion therapy was analyzed. Recanalization was assessed at the end of reperfusion treatment, and the rate of parenchymal hemorrhage at follow-up neuroimaging. In regression analyses, cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow performed better than Delay Time maps for the prediction of parenchymal hemorrhage. The most informative thresholds (receiver operating curves) for relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow were values lower than 2.5% of normal brain. In binary regression analyses, the volume of regions with reduced relative cerebral blood volume and/or relative cerebral blood flow was significantly associated with an increased risk of parenchymal hemorrhage, as well as delayed vessel recanalization. These results highlight the relevance of the severity and duration of ischemia as drivers of blood-brain barrier disruption in acute ischemic stroke and support the role of perfusion CT for the prediction of parenchymal hemorrhage. PMID:26661254

  19. Circulation pump mounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalicky, A.

    1976-01-01

    The suspension is described of nuclear reactor circulating pumps enabling their dilatation with a minimum reverse force consisting of spacing rods supported with one end in the anchor joints and provided with springs and screw joints engaging the circulating pump shoes. The spacing rods are equipped with side vibration dampers anchored in the shaft side wall and on the body of the circulating pump drive body. The negative reverse force F of the spacing rods is given by the relation F=Q/l.y, where Q is the weight of the circulating pump, l is the spatial distance between the shoe joints and anchor joints, and y is the deflection of the circulating pump vertical axis from the mean equilibrium position. The described suspension is advantageous in that that the reverse force for the deflection from the mean equilibrium position is minimal, dynamic behaviour is better, and construction costs are lower compared to suspension design used so far. (J.B.)

  20. Impact of acute-phase complications and interventions on 6-month survival after stroke. A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Antonio; Lamassa, Maria; Franceschini, Marco; Bovis, Francesca; Cecconi, Lorenzo; Pournajaf, Sanaz; Paravati, Stefano; Biggeri, Annibale; Inzitari, Domenico; Ferro, Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    The outcome of stroke patients is complex and multidimensional. We evaluated the impact of acute-phase variables, including clinical state, complications, resource use and interventions, on 6-month survival after first-ever stroke, taking into account baseline conditions exerting a possible effect on outcome. As part of a National Research Program, we performed a prospective observational study of acute stroke patients in four Italian Regions. Consecutive patients admitted for a period of 3 months to the emergency rooms of participating hospitals were included. A total of 1030 patients were enrolled (median age 76.0 years, 52.1% males). At 6 months, 816 (79.2%) were alive, and 164 (15.9%) deceased. Survival status at the 6-month follow-up was missing for 50 (4.9%). Neurological state in the acute phase was significantly worse in patients deceased at 6 months, who showed also higher frequency of acute-phase complications. Cox regression analysis adjusted for demographics, pre-stroke function, baseline diseases and risk factors, indicated as significant predictors of 6-month death altered consciousness (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.14-2.53), total anterior circulation infarct (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.44-3.15), hyperthermia (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.18-2.45), pneumonia (HR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.18-2.61), heart failure (HR, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.34-6.13) and nasogastric feeding (HR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.53-3.60), while antiplatelet therapy during acute phase (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.39-0.79), and early mobilisation (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.36-0.84) significantly increased 6-month survival. In a prospective observational study, stroke severity and some acute-phase complications, potentially modifiable, significantly increased the risk of 6-month death, independently of baseline variables. Early mobilisation positively affected survival, highlighting the role of early rehabilitation after stroke.

  1. Test Your Stroke Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9-1-1. Which of the following are risk factors for stroke? High blood pressure Heart disease Smoking High cholesterol Diabetes Show Answer All of these are risk factors for stroke. If you smoke - quit. If you have high ...

  2. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a brief ... of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. A ...

  3. Stroke Connection Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Submit A Story Edit Module Show Tags Stroke Rehabilitation Two-Part Series Making the Best Decisions at ... first part of a two-part series on stroke rehab, we offer guidance for the decision-making process ...

  4. Stroke (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your friend. Being around friends can help with healing. Preventing Strokes Some strokes can be prevented in ... Why Does Hair Turn Gray? What Are Wrinkles? Alzheimer Disease Your Brain & Nervous System Why Exercise Is ...

  5. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  6. [Genetics of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, A; Dichgans, M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most widespread causes of mortality und disability worldwide. Around 80 % of strokes are ischemic and different forms of intracranial bleeding account for the remaining cases. Monogenic stroke disorders are rare but the diagnosis may lead to specific therapeutic consequences for the affected patients who are predominantly young. In common sporadic stroke, genetic factors play a role in the form of susceptibility genes. Their discovery may give rise to new therapeutic options in the future.

  7. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M.D., Lori C.; Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research ...

  8. Perawatan Ortodontik Gigitan Terbuka Anterior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuniar Zen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior telah lama dianggap sebagai tantangan bagi ortodontis. Prevalensi gigitan terbuka anterior antara 3,5% hingga 11% terdapat pada berbagai usia dan kelompok etnis, serta ada sekitar 17% pasien ortodonti memiliki gigitan terbuka. Stabilitas hasil perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior sangat sulit, karena adanya kombinasi diskrepansi anteroposterior dengan gigitan terbuka skeletal sehingga dibutuhkan tingkat keterampilan diagnosis dan klinis yang tinggi. Etiologi gigitan terbuka anterior sangat kompleks karena dapat melibatkan skeletal, dental, dan faktor-faktor habitual. Eliminasi faktor etiologi merupakan hal yang penting dalam perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior. Berbagai cara perawatan untuk koreksi gigitan terbuka anterior diantaranya bedah ortognatik dan perawatan ortodontik kamuflase, seperti high-pull headgear, chincup, bite blocks, alatfungsional, pencabutan gigi, multi-loop edgewise archwires dan mini implan. Stabilitas hasil perawatan adalah kriteria yang paling penting dalam menentukan cara perawatan gigitan terbuka anterior. Orthodontic Treatment of Anterior Open Bite. An anterior open bite therapy has long been considered a challenge to orthodontist. The prevalence of anterior openbite range from 3,5 % to 11% among various age and ethnic groups and it has been shown that approximately 17% of orthodontic patients have open bite. Stability of treatment result of anterior open bite with well-maintained results is difficult, because the combination of anteroposteriorly discrepancy with skeletal open bite requires the highest degree of diagnostic and clinical skill. The etiology is complex, potentially involving skeletal, dental and habitual factors. The importance of an anterior open bite therapy is to eliminate the cause of the open bite. Various treatment modalities for the correction of an anterior open bite have been proposed, orthognatic surgery and orthodontic camouflage treatment such as high

  9. Anterior knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLopis, Eva [Hospital de la Ribera, Alzira, Valencia (Spain) and Carretera de Corbera km 1, 46600 Alzira Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: ellopis@hospital-ribera.com; Padron, Mario [Clinica Cemtro, Ventisquero de la Condesa no. 42, 28035 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: mario.padron@clinicacemtro.com

    2007-04-15

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries.

  10. Evaluating anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Engene; Kraft, Michael C

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints account for about 20% to 30% of all primary care office visits; of these visits, discomfort in the knee, shoulder, and back are the most prevalent musculoskeletal symptoms. Having pain or dysfunction in the front part of the knee is a common presentation and reason for a patient to see a health care provider. There are a number of pathophysiological etiologies to anterior knee pain. This article describes some of the common and less common causes, and includes sections on diagnosis and treatment for each condition as well as key points. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC has a role in attention, analysis of sensory information, error recognition, problem solving, detection of novelty, behavior, emotions, social relations, cognitive control, and regulation of visceral functions. This area is active whenever the individual feels some emotions, solves a problem, or analyzes the pros and cons of an action (if it is a right decision. Analogous areas are also found in higher mammals, especially whales, and they contain spindle neurons that enable complex social interactions. Disturbance of ACC activity is found in dementias, schizophrenia, depression, the obsessive-compulsive syndrome, and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  12. Time to Angiographic Reperfusion and Clinical Outcome after Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Interventional Management of Stroke Phase III (IMS III) Trial: A Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Pooja; Yeatts, Sharon D.; Mazighi, Mikael; Broderick, Joseph P.; Liebeskind, David S.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Amarenco, Pierre; Carrozzella, Janice; Spilker, Judith; Foster, Lydia D.; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Jauch, Edward C.; Haley, E. Clarke; Vagal, Achala; Tomsick, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The IMS III Trial did not demonstrate clinical benefit of the endovascular approach compared to IV rt-PA alone for moderate or severe ischemic strokes (NIHSS≥8) enrolled within three hours of stroke onset. Late reperfusion of tissue that is no longer salvageable may be one explanation, as suggested by prior exploratory studies showing an association between time to reperfusion and good clinical outcome. We sought to validate this relationship in the large-scale IMS III trial, and consider its implications for future endovascular trials. METHODS The analysis consisted of the endovascular cohort with proximal arterial occlusions in the anterior circulation that achieved angiographic reperfusion (TICI 2–3) during the endovascular procedure (within 7 hours from the onset of symptoms). Logistic regression was used to model good clinical outcome (90-day modified Rankin 0–2) as a function of the time to reperfusion, and prespecified variables were considered for adjustment. FINDINGS Among 240 proximal vessel occlusions, angiographic reperfusion (TICI 2–3) was achieved in 182 (76%). Mean time to reperfusion was 325 minutes (range 180–418 minutes). Longer time for reperfusion was associated with a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome (RR [95% CI] for every 30 minute delay: unadjusted 0·85 [0·77–0·94]; adjusted 0·88 [0·80–0·98]). INTERPRETATION We confirm that delay in time to angiographic reperfusion leads to a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome. Achieving rapid reperfusion may be critical for the successes of future acute endovascular trials. FUNDING: NIH/NINDS (study sponsor), Genentech Inc. (study drug - intra-arterial t-PA), EKOS Corp. (device), Concentric Inc. (device), Cordis Neurovascular, Inc. (device), and Boehringer Ingelheim (European Investigator Meeting support). PMID:24784550

  13. Sex Disparities in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    between 2003 and 2012 (N=79 617), and the Danish Register of Causes of Death. Information was available on age, sex, marital status, stroke severity, stroke subtype, socioeconomic status, and cardiovascular risk profile. We studied only deaths due to the index stroke, with the assumption that death.......5%) or 1 month (6.9%), respectively. After the age of 60 years, women had more severe strokes than men. Up to ages in the mid-60s, no difference in the risk of death from stroke was seen between the 2 sexes. For people aged >65 years, however, the risk gradually became greater in men than in women...

  14. Collateral blood vessels in acute ischemic stroke: a physiological window to predict future outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor Castelo Branco Rodrigues Alves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Collateral circulation is a physiologic pathway that protects the brain against ischemic injury and can potentially bypass the effect of a blocked artery, thereby influencing ischemic lesion size and growth. Several recent stroke trials have provided information about the role of collaterals in stroke pathophysiology, and collateral perfusion has been recognized to influence arterial recanalization, reperfusion, hemorrhagic transformation, and neurological outcomes after stroke. Our current aim is to summarize the anatomy and physiology of the collateral circulation and to present and discuss a comprehensible review of the related knowledge, particularly the effects of collateral circulation on the time course of ischemic injury and stroke severity, as well as imaging findings and therapeutic implications.

  15. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  16. Registration of acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Cathrine; Mehnert, Frank; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of the registration of patients in stroke-specific registries has seldom been investigated, nor compared with administrative hospital discharge registries. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the registration of patients in a stroke-specific registry...... (The Danish Stroke Registry [DSR]) and a hospital discharge registry (The Danish National Patient Registry [DNRP]). METHODS: Assuming that all patients with stroke were registered in either the DSR, DNRP or both, we first identified a sample of 75 patients registered with stroke in 2009; 25 patients...... in the DSR, 25 patients in the DNRP, and 25 patients registered in both data sources. Using the medical record as a gold standard, we then estimated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of a stroke diagnosis in the DSR and the DNRP. Secondly, we reviewed 160 medical records for all potential stroke...

  17. Sleep and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Padma Srivastav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian variations in conjunction with sleep-related heart rhythm changes and sleepdisordered breathing (SDB are contributing risk factors for stroke. Strong scientificevidence now exists indicating that SDB contributes to systemic hypertension, aprominent risk factor for stroke, and compelling circumstantial evidence is presentsuggesting that SDB raises the risk for development of stroke through other circulatorymechanisms as well. Preliminary evidence indicates that post-stroke patients have ahigher prevalence of SDB, which is likely to compromise their rehabilitation outcomes.Since SDB is modifiable with the application of CPAP and other treatment modalities,there is practical value in investigating patients at risk of stroke or post stroke forpresence of SDB. Successful application of CPAP or BiPAP therapy may improve theoutcome in both instances.Key words : Sleep, Stroke, SDB, CPAP

  18. FLAIR vascular hyperintensities and 4D MR angiograms for the estimation of collateral blood flow in anterior cerebral artery ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Gawlitza

    Full Text Available To assess FLAIR vascular hyperintensities (FVH and dynamic (4D angiograms derived from perfusion raw data as proposed magnetic resonance (MR imaging markers of leptomeningeal collateral circulation in patients with ischemia in the territory of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA.Forty patients from two tertiary care university hospitals were included. Infarct volumes and perfusion deficits were manually measured on DWI images and TTP maps, respectively. FVH and collateral flow on 4D MR angiograms were assessed and graded as previously specified.Forty-one hemispheres were affected. Mean DWI lesion volume was 8.2 (± 13.9; range 0-76.9 ml, mean TTP lesion volume was 24.5 (± 17.2, range 0-76.7 ml. FVH were observed in 26/41 (63.4% hemispheres. Significant correlations were detected between FVH and TTP lesion volume (ρ = 0.4; P<0.01 absolute (ρ = 0.37; P<0.05 and relative mismatch volume (ρ = 0.35; P<0.05. The modified ASITN/SIR score correlated inversely with DWI lesion volume (ρ = -0.58; P<0.01 and positively with relative mismatch (ρ = 0.29; P< 0.05. ANOVA of the ASITN/SIR score revealed significant inter-group differences for DWI (P<0.001 and TTP lesion volumes (P<0.05. No correlation was observed between FVH scores and modified ASITH/SIR scores (ρ = -0.16; P = 0.32.FVH and flow patterns on 4D MR angiograms are markers of perfusion deficits and tissue at risk. As both methods did not show a correlation between each other, they seem to provide complimentary instead of redundant information. Previously shown evidence for the meaning of these specific MR signs in internal carotid and middle cerebral artery stroke seems to be transferrable to ischemic stroke in the ACA territory.

  19. The Impact of Conscious Sedation versus General Anesthesia for Stroke Thrombectomy on the Predictive Value of Collateral Status: A Post Hoc Analysis of the SIESTA Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönenberger, S; Pfaff, J; Uhlmann, L; Klose, C; Nagel, S; Ringleb, P A; Hacke, W; Kieser, M; Bendszus, M; Möhlenbruch, M A; Bösel, J

    2017-08-01

    Radiologic selection criteria to identify patients likely to benefit from endovascular stroke treatment are still controversial. In this post hoc analysis of the recent randomized Sedation versus Intubation for Endovascular Stroke TreAtment (SIESTA) trial, we aimed to investigate the impact of sedation mode (conscious sedation versus general anesthesia) on the predictive value of collateral status. Using imaging data from SIESTA, we assessed collateral status with the collateral score of Tan et al and graded it from absent to good collaterals (0-3). We examined the association of collateral status with 24-hour improvement of the NIHSS score, infarct volume, and mRS at 3 months according to the sedation regimen. In a cohort of 104 patients, the NIHSS score improved significantly in patients with moderate or good collaterals (2-3) compared with patients with no or poor collaterals (0-1) ( P = .011; mean, -5.8 ± 7.6 versus -1.1 ± 10.7). Tan 2-3 was also associated with significantly higher ASPECTS before endovascular stroke treatment (median, 9 versus 7; P collateral status (0.1 versus 2.3), the sedation modes conscious sedation and general anesthesia were not associated with significant differences in the predictive value of collateral status regarding infarction size or functional outcome. The sedation mode, conscious sedation or general anesthesia, did not influence the predictive value of collaterals in patients with large-vessel occlusion anterior circulation stroke undergoing thrombectomy in the SIESTA trial. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  20. [Anterior guidance in complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, J; Trevelo, A

    1990-01-01

    Although the anterior guidance in complete dentures is not really a guide, the arrangement of the anterior maxillary and mandibular prosthetic teeth, defines a propulsive line called the virtual anterior guidance, a part from the cinematic criterias. The influence of this guide on cuspal movement is superior, in all mandibular points, to the influence of the condylar pathway. If this line is not respected, the practitioner may have to do excessive grindings during occlusal adjustments.

  1. Multidisciplinary management of anterior diastemata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Herkrath, Fernando José; Franco, Eduardo Jacomino

    2007-01-01

    Anterior diastemata may compromise the harmony of a patient's smile. Consideration of etiologic factors, previous gingival conditioning, and individual treatment planning are essential in the proper management of anterior diastemata. An integrated orthodontic-restorative approach may enhance...... the aesthetic results when orthodontic therapy itself is not feasible. This article presents integrated orthodonticrestorative solutions of anterior diastemata, associated with the conditioning of the gingival tissue with composite resin, and discusses the most relevant aspects related to their etiology...

  2. Impact of the ASPECT scores and distribution on outcome among patients undergoing thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiotta, Alejandro M; Vargas, Jan; Hawk, Harris; Turner, Raymond; Chaudry, M Imran; Battenhouse, Holly; Turk, Aquilla S

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates whether the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) quantification is associated with outcome following mechanical thrombectomy. To determine whether preintervention non-perfect ASPECT scores involving cortical or subcortical regions and the side of the non-perfect ASPECT score affects outcomes. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of patients with acute ischemic stroke involving the anterior circulation who underwent thrombectomy between May 2008 and August 2012 at a single tertiary care center. The device for mechanical thrombectomy used was the penumbra aspiration system (Penumbra Inc, Alameda, California, USA) and the Solitaire stent retriever (ev3, Irvine, California, USA). A 'blinded' neuroradiologist obtained ASPECTS quantification and noted each region demonstrating early changes. 149 patients (51.7% female, mean age 66.1±15.1 years) were included with an average National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale of 16.2±6.7. Patients with non-perfect ASPECT scores on pretreatment imaging were more likely to have a hemorrhagic conversion (p=0.04) evident on post-procedure CT. However, functional outcomes were the same. Patients with both cortical and basal ganglia non-perfect ASPECT scores were more likely to be in a persistent vegetative state or expire. No differences were identified in outcome among patients with left- versus right-sided infarcts affecting the basal ganglia or cortical regions. These findings support a strategy of selecting candidacy for thrombectomy that does not exclude patients with non-perfect ASPECT scores involving either the basal ganglia or cortical regions. Outcomes were identical among patients with no non-perfect ASPECT scores and those with cortical or subcortical infarcts, despite a higher incidence of hemorrhagic conversion found among those with non-perfect ASPECT scores. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  3. Multicenter experience with the new SOFIA Plus catheter as a primary local aspiration catheter for acute stroke thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlenbruch, M A; Kabbasch, C; Kowoll, A; Broussalis, E; Sonnberger, M; Müller, M; Wiesmann, M; Trenkler, J; Killer-Oberpfalzer, M; Weber, W; Mpotsaris, A; Bendszus, M; Stampfl, S

    2017-12-01

    The direct aspiration first pass technique (ADAPT) has been introduced as a rapid and safe endovascular treatment strategy in patients with ischemic stroke. To determine the technical feasibility, safety, and functional outcome with ADAPT using the new large-bore 6F SOFIA Plus catheter. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from six university hospitals was performed. The following parameters of all acute stroke procedures (June 2015- January 2016) using the SOFIA Plus catheter were analyzed: accessibility of the thrombus with the catheter, recanalization success (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction ≥2b), time to recanalization, procedure-related complications. Furthermore, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at presentation and discharge and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) score at 90 days were recorded. 85 patients were treated using the SOFIA Plus catheter. The occlusion site was the anterior circulation in 94.1%. Median baseline NIHSS score was 18. In 64.7%, ADAPT alone was successful after a median procedure time of 21 min. With additional use of stent retrievers in the remaining cases, the recanalization rate was 96.5%. No catheter-related complications such as dissections were observed. Thrombus migration to a new vascular territory occurred in 4.7% and symptomatic hemorrhage in 4.7%. After 3 months, mRS 0-2 was achieved in 49.4%. Mortality rate was 20%. In the majority of cases, thrombus aspiration using the SOFIA Plus catheter results in successful recanalization after a short procedure time. With additional use of stent retrievers, a high recanalization rate can be achieved (96.5%). The complication rate was in line with those of previous publications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Impact of pretreatment noncontrast CT Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score on clinical outcome after intra-arterial stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Albert J; Zaidat, Osama O; Chaudhry, Zeshan A; Berkhemer, Olvert A; González, R Gilberto; Goyal, Mayank; Demchuk, Andrew M; Menon, Bijoy K; Mualem, Elan; Ueda, Dawn; Buell, Hope; Sit, Siu Po; Bose, Arani

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of intra-arterial treatment remains uncertain. Because most centers performing IAT use noncontrast CT (NCCT) imaging, it is critical to understand the impact of NCCT findings on treatment outcomes. This study aimed to compare functional independence and safety among patients undergoing intra-arterial treatment stratified by the extent of ischemic change on pretreatment NCCT. The study cohort was derived from multicenter trials of the Penumbra System. Inclusion criteria were anterior circulation proximal occlusion, evaluable pretreatment NCCT, and known time to reperfusion. Ischemic change was quantified using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) and stratified into 3 prespecified groups for comparison: 0 to 4 (most ischemic change) versus 5 to 7 versus 8 to 10 (least ischemic change). A total of 249 patients were analyzed: 40 with ASPECTS 0 to 4, 83 with ASPECTS 5 to 7, and 126 with ASPECTS 8 to 10. For ASPECTS 0 to 4, 5 to 7, and 8 to 10, respectively, good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score, 0-2) rates were 5%, 38.6%, and 46% (P<0.0001), and mortality rates were 55%, 28.9%, and 19% (P=0.0001). The only significant pairwise differences were between ASPECTS 0 to 4 and other groups. Symptomatic hemorrhage was more common with lower ASPECTS (P=0.02). Shorter time to reperfusion was significantly associated with better outcomes among patients with ASPECTS 8 to 10 (P=0.01). A similar relationship was seen for ASPECTS 5 to 7 but was not statistically significant. No such relationship was seen for ASPECTS 0 to 4. NCCT seems useful for excluding patients with the greatest burden of ischemic damage from futile intra-arterial treatment, which is unlikely to result in patient functional independence and increases the risk of hemorrhage.

  5. Acute Ischemic Stroke Secondary to Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Sofia; Carneiro, Ângelo; Rodrigues, Tiago; Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Pereira, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma is a malignant infiltrative glial tumor occurring most often over 50 years of age, with diverse clinical presentations. We describe a case of temporal lobe glioblastoma with a rare presentation as an acute ischemic stroke, discussing the imaging and histopathological findings, and reviewing the literature. A 77-year-old woman had sudden onset of left hemiparesis and hemihypoesthesia. The neuroradiological studies revealed an acute ischemic lesion in the right lenticulostriate arteries territory and a right anterior temporal lobe tumor, enhancing heterogeneously after contrast with enhancement of the right middle cerebral artery wall. Histopathological analysis of the resected temporal lesion revealed a glioblastoma multiforme with tumoral infiltration of the vascular wall. Glioblastoma should be considered in the etiology of acute ischemic stroke, where neuroimaging plays an important diagnostic role, enabling a more immediate therapeutic approach, with a consequent impact on survival. PMID:24571837

  6. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  7. Endovascular treatment versus medical care alone for ischaemic stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Filipe Brogueira; Neves, Joana Briosa; Caldeira, Daniel; Ferro, José M; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Costa, João

    2016-04-18

    mortality, without heterogeneity among the results of the studies. All trials were open label. Risk of bias was moderate across studies. The full results of two trials are yet to be published. Moderate to high quality evidence suggests that compared with medical care alone in a selected group of patients endovascular thrombectomy as add-on to intravenous thrombolysis performed within six to eight hours after large vessel ischaemic stroke in the anterior circulation provides beneficial functional outcomes, without increased detrimental effects. PROSPERO CRD42015019340. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Stroke in Commercial Flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Velasco, Rodrigo; Masjuan, Jaime; DeFelipe, Alicia; Corral, Iñigo; Estévez-Fraga, Carlos; Crespo, Leticia; Alonso-Cánovas, Araceli

    2016-04-01

    Stroke on board aircraft has been reported in retrospective case series, mainly focusing on economy class stroke syndrome. Data on the actual incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis of stroke in commercial flights are lacking. A prospective registry was designed to include all consecutive patients referred from an international airport (40 million passengers a year) to our hospital with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and onset of symptoms during a flight or immediately after landing. Forty-four patients (32 ischemic strokes and 12 transient ischemic attacks) were included over a 76-month period (January 2008 to April 2014). The estimated incidence of stroke was 1 stroke in 35 000 flights. Pathogeneses of stroke or transient ischemic attack were atherothrombotic in 16 (36%), economy class stroke syndrome in 8 (18%), cardioembolic in 7 (16%), arterial dissection in 4 (9%), lacunar stroke in 4 (9%), and undetermined in 5 (12%) patients. Carotid stenosis >70% was found in 12 (27%) of the patients. Overall prognosis was good, and thrombolysis was applied in 44% of the cases. The most common reason for not treating patients who had experienced stroke onset midflight was the delay in reaching the hospital. Only 1 patient with symptom onset during the flight prompted a flight diversion. We found a low incidence of stroke in the setting of air travel. Economy class stroke syndrome and arterial dissection were well represented in our sample. However, the main pathogenesis was atherothrombosis with a high proportion of patients with high carotid stenosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Stroke And Substance Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chitsaz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: stroke in recreational substance users can be an indirect complication, like endocarditis and cardio embolism in parenteral drug users. With some drug like cocaine, stroke appear to be the result of a direct effect. In young subjects without other risk factors provide persuasive evidence for causality . OPIATES: Heroine is the most abused opiate drug, which is administered by injection, by snorting or by smoking. Stroke affects heroin users by diverse mechanisms,. Injectors are at risk of infections endocarditis, which carries risk for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Cerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage usually occurs after rupture of a septic (mycotic aneurysm. Heroine users can are also at risk for hemorrhagic stroke secondary to liver failure with deranged clotting and to heroin nephropathy with uremia or malignant hypertension. In some heroin users the drug it self is directly causal due to vasculitis, hypersensitivity and immunologic changes. Embolization of foreign material to brain due to mixed of heroine with quinine can cause cerebral embolism. AMPHETAMINE AND other psychostimulants: In abuser of amphetamine hemorrhagic stroke can occur, oral, intravenous, nasal, and inhalational routes of administration have been reported. Most were chronic user, but in several patients, stroke followed a first exposure. Some of amphetamine induced intracranial hemorrhages are secondary to acute hypertension, some to cerebral vacuities, and some to a combination of two. Decongestants and diet pills: Phenylpropanolamine (PPA, an amphetamine – like drug, in decongestants and diet pills, induce acute hypertension, sever headache, psychiatric symptoms, seizures and hemorrhagic stroke. Ephedrine and pseudo ephedrine are present in decongestants and bronchodilators and induce headache, tachyarrhythmia, hypertensive emergency, and hemorrhagic and occlusive stroke. Ecstasy, 3,4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamin (MDMA with amphetamine like can

  10. Sequential strokes in a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Buddha, Sandeep; Carlton-Jones, Anoma L; Nicholas, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Vasculitis is a rare, but treatable condition that can present to hyperacute stroke units. Thrombolysis does not treat the underlying pathology, and a rapidly evolving clinical picture drives clinical decision often before all the investigation results are available.

  11. Argatroban versus aspirin plus clopidogrel in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke: a pilot, randomised, open-label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-chan LIU

    2015-07-01

    of patients in both groups were performed again after one-week treatment. There was no bleeding events (including intracranial hemorrhage and hemorrhage in other organs or impairment of hepatorenal function (P>0.05. 3. In both groups, OCSP classifications ofpatients were mainly divided into the partial anterior circulation infarction (PACI, lacunar infarction (LACI and posterior circulation infarction (POCI, while TOAST etiological analyses of patients were mainly large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA and small artery occlusion (SAO. In both groups, the neurological defects were improved after treatment, and there was no significant bleeding events during treatment period. There was no significant difference of NIHSS one week after enrollment between PACI subgroups (P>0.05, while better neurological improvement was showed in the POCI subgroup of argatroban group. Conclusions  Argatroban anticoagulant and combination antiplatelet therapy with aspirin plus clopidogrel can effectively improve neurological deficit of patients, reduce recurrence rate and deterioration of the illness in acute phase, and improve patients' daily activities (ADL. Argatroban therapy showed better neurological function improvement in the posterior circulation infarction patients. As a new anticoagulant drug, argatroban is safe in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. For the patients who have infarction involving the posterior circulation, argatroban, as a more aggressive treatment, should be recommended. (The trial registered number: ChiCTRTRC-13003384 DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.02

  12. Ocean circulation using altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minster, Jean-Francois; Brossier, C.; Gennero, M. C.; Mazzega, P.; Remy, F.; Letraon, P. Y.; Blanc, F.

    1991-01-01

    Our group has been very actively involved in promoting satellite altimetry as a unique tool for observing ocean circulation and its variability. TOPEX/POSEIDON is particularly interesting as it is optimized for this purpose. It will probably be the first instrument really capable of observing the seasonal and interannual variability of subtropical and polar gyres and the first to eventually document the corresponding variability of their heat flux transport. The studies of these phenomena require data of the best quality, unbiased extraction of the signal, mixing of these satellite data with in situ measurements, and assimilation of the whole set into a dynamic description of ocean circulation. Our group intends to develop responses to all these requirements. We will concentrate mostly on the circulation of the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans: This will be done in close connection with other groups involved in the study of circulation of the tropical Atlantic Ocean, in the altimetry measurements (in particular, those of the tidal issue), and in the techniques of data assimilation in ocean circulation models.

  13. The role of monocytes in ischemic stroke pathobiology: New avenues to explore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman eElAli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke accounts for the majority of stroke cases and constitutes a major cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. Inflammation has been reported to constitute a major component of ischemic stroke pathobiology. In the acute phase of ischemic stroke, microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, are activated, followed by several infiltration waves of different circulating immune cells into the brain. Among these circulating immune cells, monocytes have been shown to play a particularly important role. Following their infiltration, monocytes differentiate into potent phagocytic cells, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs in the ischemic brain. Initially, the presence of these cells was considered as marker of an exacerbated inflammatory response that contributes to brain damage. However, the recent reports are suggesting a more complex and multiphasic roles of these cells in ischemic stroke pathobiology. Monocytes constitute a heterogeneous group of cells, which comprises two major subsets in rodent and three major subsets in human. In both species, two equivalent subsets exist, the pro-inflammatory subset and the anti-inflammatory subset. Recent data have demonstrated that ischemic stroke differentially regulate monocyte subsets, which directly affect ischemic stroke pathobiology and may have direct implications in ischemic stroke therapies. Here we review the recent findings that addressed the role of different monocyte subsets in ischemic stroke pathobiology, and the implications on therapies.

  14. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  15. Vertebrobasilar Flow Evaluation and Risk of Transient Ischaemic Attack and Stroke study (VERiTAS): rationale and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Rose-Finnell, Linda; Richardson, DeJuran; Ruland, Sean; Pandey, Dilip; Thulborn, Keith R.; Liebeskind, David S.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Kramer, Jeffrey; Silver, Frank L.; Kasner, Scott E.; Caplan, Louis R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Gorelick, Philip B.; Charbel, Fady T.; Jacobs, Tom P.; Xie, Hui; Simkus, Vic; Thulborn, Keith; Flannery, Michael P.; Ganin, Hagai; Grysecwicz, Rebecca; Khaja, Aslam; Pedelty, Laura; Testai, Fernando; Watson, Karriem; Mlinarevich, Nada; Vo, Katie; Foster, Glenn; Ford, Andria; Bradley, Abbie; Alger, Jeffrey; Godinez, Sergio; Saver, Jeffrey; Ali, Latisha; Kim, Doojin; Raychev, Radoslav; Song, Sarah; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Smith, Hannah; Hirsch, Joy; Dashnaw, Stephen; Meyers, Philip; McNeill-Simaan, Edwina; Mikulis, David; Fierstra, Jorn; Hlasny, Eugen; Casaubon, Leanne K.; Vergouwen, Mervyn; Martin del Campo, J. C.; Jaigobin, Cheryl S.; Astorga, Cherissa; Vaughan, Susan; Owens, Laura; Pandey, Dilip K.; Ruland, Sean D.; Kissela, Brett; Turan, Tanya N.; Gobin, Y. Pierre

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over one-third of ischaemic strokes occur in the posterior circulation, and a leading cause is atherosclerotic vertebrobasilar disease. Symptomatic vertebrobasilar disease carries a high annual recurrent stroke risk, averaging 10-15% per year. Endovascular angioplasty and stenting are

  16. An associative Brain-Computer-Interface for acute stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Aliakbaryhosseinabadi, Susan

    2016-01-01

    An efficient innovative Brain-Computer-Interface system that empowers chronic stroke patients to control an artificial activation of their lower limb muscle through task specific motor intent has been tested in the past. In the current study it was applied to acute stroke patients. The system...... (tibialis anterior). This activation is precisely and individually timed such that the sensory signal arising from the stimulation reaches the motor cortex during its maximum activation due to the intention. The output of the motor cortical area representing the dorsiflexor muscles was significantly...

  17. Procedural Predictors of Outcome in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Ansaar T., E-mail: ansaar.rai@gmail.com; Jhadhav, Yahodeep; Domico, Jennifer [West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Interventional Neuroradiology (United States); Hobbs, Gerald R. [West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Department of Community Medicine (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To identify factors impacting outcome in patients undergoing interventions for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing endovascular therapy for AIS secondary during a 30 month period. Outcome was based on modified Rankin score at 3- to 6-month follow-up. Recanalization was defined as Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score 2 to 3. Collaterals were graded based on pial circulation from the anterior cerebral artery either from an ipsilateral injection in cases of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion or contralateral injection for internal carotid artery terminus (ICA) occlusion as follows: no collaterals (grade 0), some collaterals with retrograde opacification of the distal MCA territory (grade 1), and good collaterals with filling of the proximal MCA (M2) branches or retrograde opacification up to the occlusion site (grade 2). Occlusion site was divided into group 1 (ICA), group 2 (MCA with or without contiguous M2 involvement), and group 3 (isolated M2 or M3 branch occlusion). Results: A total of 89 patients were studied. Median age and National Institutes of health stroke scale (NIHSS) score was 71 and 15 years, respectively. Favorable outcome was seen in 49.4% of patients and mortality in 25.8% of patients. Younger age (P = 0.006), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.001), successful recanalization (P < 0.0001), collateral support (P = 0.0008), distal occlusion (P = 0.001), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.01) were associated with a favorable outcome. Factors affecting successful recanalization included younger age (P = 0.01), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.05), collateral support (P = 0.01), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.03). An ICA terminus occlusion (P < 0.0001), lack of collaterals (P = 0.0003), and unsuccessful recanalization (P = 0.005) were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusion: Angiographic findings and preprocedure variables can help

  18. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors among Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Vincent-Onabajo; Taritei Moses

    2016-01-01

    Background. Knowledge of stroke risk factors is expected to reduce the incidence of stroke?whether first-ever or recurrent. This study examined knowledge of stroke risk factors and its determinants among stroke survivors. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of consenting stroke survivors at two physiotherapy facilities in Nigeria was carried out. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained and knowledge of stroke risk factors (defined as the ability to mention at least one correct risk fac...

  19. European Stroke Science Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattle, Heinrich P.; Brainin, Michael; Chamorro, Angel; Diener, Hans Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Leys, Didier; Norrving, Bo; Ward, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The European Stroke Organisation (ESO) held its first European Stroke Science Workshop in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (15-17 December 2011). Stroke experts based in Europe were invited to present and discuss their current research. The scope of the workshop was to review the most recent findings of selected topics in stroke, to exchange ideas, to stimulate new research and to enhance collaboration between European stroke research groups. Seven scientific sessions were held, each starting with a keynote lecture to review the state of the art of the given topic, followed by 4 or 5 short presentations by experts. They were asked to limit their presentations to 10 slides containing only recent information. The meeting was organized by the executive committee of the ESO (Heinrich Mattle, chairman, Michael Brainin, Angel Chamorro, Werner Hacke, Didier Leys) and supported by the European Stroke Conference (Michael Hennerici). In this article we summarize the main contents of this successful workshop. PMID:22836350

  20. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  1. Clinical presentation and diffusion weighted MRI of acute cerebral infarction. The Bergen Stroke Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waje-Andreassen Ulrike

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No large study has compared the yield of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI with clinical examination in order to differentiate lacunar stroke from other stroke subtypes. This differentiation is important for guiding further investigations and treatment. Methods Consecutive patients admitted with cerebral infarction were classified according to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project scale. Based on DWI and CT stroke was classified as lacunar (LI and non-lacunar (NLI. Acute ischemic lesion Results DWI was performed in 419 (69% patients. Among patients with lacunar syndrome (LACS 45 (40.5% had NLI on DWI. All patients with total anterior syndrome (TACS and 144 (88.3% with partial anterior syndrome (PACS had NLI on DWI. Conclusion DWI is important among patients presenting with clinical symptoms suggestive of lacunar syndrome to differentiate between LI and NLI. On the other hand, there is good correspondence between TACS or PACS and NLI on DWI.

  2. Inestabilidad Anterior de Hombro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo David Flint Kuran

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ción La luxación recidivante de hombro es una patología frecuente en pacientes jóvenes, laboralmente activos. Existen numerosas técnicas quirúrgicas para la inestabilidad glenohumeral. La técnica de Bristow, discutida por no ser anatómica y por sus complicaciones, continúa vigente debido al bajo índice de reluxaciones. Los objetivos fueron determinar el índice de recidiva, alteraciones funcionales e índice de consolidación del injerto. Materiales­ y­ Métodos Se evaluaron 24 pacientes del sexo masculino, de entre 19 y 40 años, operados por luxación anterior recidivante de hombro según la técnica de Bristow, entre enero de 2003 y agosto de 2011. Se evaluó la tasa de reluxación, la función articular según el puntaje de Constant y el posicionamiento del injerto con respecto a la superficie articular con tomografía y radiografías para evaluar la consolidación del injerto. Se registraron las complicaciones quirúrgicas. Resultados ­Todos los pacientes eran hombres, con rango de edad de 19 a 40 años. La causa fue traumática en 24 pacientes. Dieciséis pacientes presentaron más de 3 episodios de luxación prequirúrgicos. Según la escala de Constant, 21 obtuvieron entre 96 y 100 puntos, y los restantes, entre 90 y 95 puntos. No hubo nuevos episodios de luxaciones. La tomografía mostró la consolidación en todos los casos. Un paciente tuvo una imagen osteolítica alrededor del tornillo, sin compromiso funcional del hombro. Conclusión La técnica de Bristow para tratar la luxación anterior recidivante de hombro provocó un bajo índice de complicaciones, con resultados funcionales entre excelentes y buenos. No hubo episodios de reluxación y se logró la consolidación del injerto óseo en todos los casos.

  3. Body Mass Index and Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with excess mortality and morbidity, mortality is lower in obese than in normal weight stroke patients (the obesity paradox). Studies now indicate that obesity is not associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke in the years after first stroke. We studied the ...... the association between body mass index (BMI) and stroke patient's risk of having a history of previous stroke (recurrent stroke)....

  4. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  5. Anterior ankle arthrodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gordon L; Sayres, Stephanie C; O’Malley, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common procedure that resolves many conditions of the foot and ankle; however, complications following this procedure are often reported and vary depending on the fixation technique. Various techniques have been described in the attempt to achieve ankle arthrodesis and there is much debate as to the efficiency of each one. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of anterior plating in ankle arthrodesis using customised and Synthes TomoFix plates. We present the outcomes of 28 ankle arthrodeses between 2005 and 2012, specifically examining rate of union, patient-reported outcomes scores, and complications. All 28 patients achieved radiographic union at an average of 36 wk; the majority of patients (92.86%) at or before 16 wk, the exceptions being two patients with Charcot joints who were noted to have bony union at a three year review. Patient-reported outcomes scores significantly increased (P plate offers added compression and provides a rigid fixation for arthrodesis stabilization. PMID:24649408

  6. Demographic Characteristics of Stroke Types in Adıyaman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Altun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to investigate the etiologic, demographic, clinical features, and risk factors of patients who were hospitalized, followed up, and treated due to stroke in our hospital. Materials and Methods: In this study, the hospital records of patients diagnosed as having stroke or cerebrovascular disease (CVD between January 2013 and January 2015 in Adıyaman University Training and Research Hospital, where patients with stroke are frequently admitted or transferred, were retrospectively investigated. Results: In the past two years, 683 patients were followed-up or treated for stroke and CVD in our hospital. Stroke patients constituted 0.06% of all emergency admissions. Of these patients, 87.8% were diagnosed as having ischemic stroke and 8.6% were diagnosed as having hemorrhagic stroke. The sex distribution was almost equal (50.8% were males and 49.2% were females. Based on the results of brain scans performed during admission, radiologically, 498 (81.1% patients showed evidence of anterior system involvement and 116 (18.9% patients showed evidence of posterior system involvement. No focal areas were observed in computed tomography scans in 508 patients. However, diffusion magnetic resonance findings of these 508 patients were pathologic. Most of the patients with stroke were aged above 65 years (74.9%. The most common symptom during admission was unilateral muscle weakness (63.3%, and 58.6% of the patients were brought to the hospital by ambulance. Conclusion: As well as the results of our study being parallel to previous studies, our study also reflects the majority of stroke data in Adıyaman, Turkey, and provides significant results regarding our geographic region

  7. Arctic circulation regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2015-10-13

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. © 2015 The Authors.

  8. Unmasking circulating tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennenhuis, Joost Franciscus

    2017-01-01

    The number of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) that can be isolated from blood of cancer patients is prognostic for the course of the disease. A higher number of CTCs correlates with a worse prognosis. A change from a higher number to a lower number of CTCs indicates a benefit of the current treatment

  9. Immune interventions in stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Qiang; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and immune responses in the brain can shape the clinical presentation and outcome of stroke. Approaches for effective management of acute stroke are sparse and many measures for brain protection fail, but our ability to modulate the immune system and modify the disease progression of multiple sclerosis is increasing. As a result, immune interventions are currently being explored as therapeutic interventions in acute stroke. In this Review, we compare the immunological features of acute stroke with those of multiple sclerosis, identify unique immunological features of stroke, and consider the evidence for immune interventions. In acute stroke, microglia activation and cell death products trigger an inflammatory cascade that damages vessels and the parenchyma within minutes to hours of the ischaemia or haemorrhage. Immune interventions that restrict brain inflammation, vascular permeability and tissue oedema must be administered rapidly to reduce acute immune-mediated destruction and to avoid subsequent immunosuppression. Preliminary results suggest that the use of drugs that modify disease in multiple sclerosis might accomplish these goals in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Further elucidation of the immune mechanisms involved in stroke is likely to lead to successful immune interventions. PMID:26303850

  10. Relational Processing Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Glenda; Halford, Graeme S.; Shum, David; Maujean, Annick; Chappell, Mark; Birney, Damian

    2013-01-01

    The research examined relational processing following stroke. Stroke patients (14 with frontal, 30 with non-frontal lesions) and 41 matched controls completed four relational processing tasks: sentence comprehension, Latin square matrix completion, modified Dimensional Change Card Sorting, and n-back. Each task included items at two or three…

  11. National Stroke Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Event Join a Stroke Challenge Team Comeback Trail Tell Your Story Community Presentations Faces of Stroke Volunteer With Us ... in a video presentation. Watch Video ... to feel the right side of her body. Kathryn’s friends performed the FAST exam and soon ...

  12. Diagnostic neuroimaging in stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarenwattananon, A.; Khandji, A.; Brust, J.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Since the development of cerebral angiography 60 years ago, there has been a proliferation of increasingly sophisticated, expensive, and, fortunately, safe imaging techniques for patients with cerebrovascular disease. In addition, occlusive and hemorrhagic stroke are now recognized as having a wide variety of possible causes. This chapter addresses the different imaging options available for particular kinds of stroke

  13. The Optimal Golf Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchinger, Mikael; Durigen, Susan; Dahl, Johan Rambech

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a preliminary investigation into aspects of the game of golf. A series of models is proposed for the golf stroke, the momentum transfer between club and ball and the flight of the ball.Numerical and asymptotic solutions are presented reproducing many of the features observed...... in the golf stroke of a professional golfer....

  14. Anterior segment indocyanine green angiography in anterior scleritis and episcleritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guex-Crosier, Yan; Durig, Jacques

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the pattern of anterior segment indocyanine green (ICG) angiography in episcleritis and scleritis. Prospective comparative (paired-eye) observational case series. Twenty subjects presenting clinical diseases compatible with episcleritis or scleritis. Anterior segment ICG angiography was performed according to a standard protocol in subjects presenting either episcleritis or scleritis. Photographs of the anterior segment were taken in the early phase (up to 3 minutes after dye injection), intermediate phase (10-12 minutes) and late phase (30-45 minutes). The inflamed zones were compared with the same regions of the controlateral eye. The amount of protein ICG exudation was scored by a masked observer as follows: zero for no exudation, one for slight exudation, two for moderate exudation, and three for severe exudation. Evaluation of dye leakage, which reflects protein exudation, with anterior segment ICG angiography in episcleritis and scleritis. Twenty subjects with a mean age of 43 +/- 15 years (7 male, 13 female) were enrolled in the study. Thirteen subjects had anterior scleritis (7 nodular, 5 diffuse, and 1 scleromalacia perforans), and 7 subjects had episcleritis. Only 1 out of 7 subjects with episcleritis showed a slight ICG leakage (a score of one), whereas all subjects with scleritis had ICG leakage scores of one or more (P = 0.0005, Fisher exact test). ICG angiography of the anterior segment of the eye is a good clinical test to differentiate episcleritis from scleritis.

  15. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  16. Neuro-Otological Aspects of Cerebellar Stroke Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke is a common cause of a vascular vestibular syndrome. Although vertigo ascribed to cerebellar stroke is usually associated with other neurological symptoms or signs, it may mimic acute peripheral vestibulopathy (APV), so called pseudo-APV. The most common pseudo-APV is a cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Recent studies have shown that a normal head impulse result can differentiate acute medial PICA infarction from APV. Therefore, physicians who evaluate stroke patients should be trained to perform and interpret the results of the head impulse test. Cerebellar infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) can produce a unique stroke syndrome in that it is typically accompanied by unilateral hearing loss, which could easily go unnoticed by patients. The low incidence of vertigo associated with infarction involving the superior cerebellar artery distribution may be a useful way of distinguishing it clinically from PICA or AICA cerebellar infarction in patients with acute vertigo and limb ataxia. For the purpose of prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment, it is imperative to recognize the characteristic patterns of the clinical presentation of each cerebellar stroke syndrome. This paper provides a concise review of the key features of cerebellar stroke syndromes from the neuro-otology viewpoint. PMID:19587812

  17. The Danish Stroke Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. STUDY POPULATION: All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated...... at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. MAIN VARIABLES: The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes...... of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients...

  18. Stroke mimic diagnoses presenting to a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ang; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Pereira, Anthony C; Moynihan, Barry J

    2016-10-01

    Stroke services have been centralised in several countries in recent years. Diagnosing acute stroke is challenging and a high proportion of patients admitted to stroke units are diagnosed as a non-stroke condition (stroke mimics). This study aims to describe the stroke mimic patient group, including their impact on stroke services. We analysed routine clinical data from 2,305 consecutive admissions to a stroke unit at St George's Hospital, London. Mimic groupings were derived from 335 individual codes into 17 groupings. From 2,305 admissions, 555 stroke mimic diagnoses were identified (24.2%) and 72% of stroke mimics had at least one stroke risk factor. Common mimic diagnoses were headache, seizure and syncope. Medically unexplained symptoms and decompensation of underlying conditions were also common. Median length of stay was 1 day; a diagnosis of dementia (p=0.028) or needing MRI (p=0.006) was associated with a longer stay. Despite emergency department assessment by specialist clinicians and computed tomography brain, one in four suspected stroke patients admitted to hospital had a non-stroke diagnosis. Stroke mimics represent a heterogeneous patient group with significant impacts on stroke services. Co-location of stroke and acute neurology services may offer advantages where service reorganisation is being considered. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  19. Post-stroke depression among stroke survivors attending two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The burden of stroke worldwide is increasing rapidly. There is paucity of data on post-stroke depression (PSD) among stroke survivors in Uganda, despite the high prevalence of PSD reported elsewhere. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we assessed adult participants with confirmed first stroke with a ...

  20. Perception of stroke among patients with stroke | Ajayi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perception of patients to stroke is variable. The aim of this study was to determine the perception of stroke among stroke patients. The study was carried out between January 2004 - December 2004 on all the patients presenting with features of stroke at the Federal Medical Center Ido, Nigeria. Data were collected by ...

  1. Do brain lesions in stroke affect basic emotions and attachment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinelli, Marina; Panksepp, Jaak; Gestieri, Laura; Maffei, Monica; Agati, Raffaele; Cevolani, Daniela; Pedone, Vincenzo; Northoff, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate basic emotions and attachment in a sample of 86 stroke patients. We included a control group of 115 orthopedic patients (matched for age and cognitive status) without brain lesions to control for unspecific general illness effects of a traumatic recent event on basic emotions and attachment. In order to measure basic emotions and attachment style we applied the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scale (ANPS) and the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ). The stroke patients showed significantly different scores in the SEEKING, SADNESS, and ANGER subscales of the ANPS as well as in the Relationship as Secondary Attachment dimension of the ASQ when compared to the control group. These differences show a pattern influenced by lesion location mainly as concerns basic emotions. Anterior, medial, left, and subcortical patients provide scores significantly lower in ANPS-SEEKING than the control group; ANPS-SADNESS scores in anterior, right, medial, and subcortical patients were significantly higher than those of the control group. ANPS-ANGER scores in posterior, right, and lateral patients were significantly higher than those in the control group; finally, the ANPS-FEAR showed slightly lower scores in posterior patients than in the control group. Minor effects on brain lesions were also individuated in the attachment style. Anterior lesion patients showed a significantly higher average score in the ASQ-Need for Approval subscale than the control group. ASQ-Confidence subscale scores differed significantly in stroke patients with lesions in medial brain regions when compared to control subjects. Scores at ANPS and ASQ subscales appear significantly more correlated in stroke patients than in the control group. Such finding of abnormalities, especially concerning basic emotions in stroke brain-lesioned patients, indicates that the effect of brain lesions may enhance the interrelation between basic emotions and attachment with

  2. Cerebrorenal interaction and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Beyond the original meaning of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as high-risk state for future dialysis, CKD is now known as an established risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Stroke is a major player of cardiovascular disease and has deep two-way relationships with CKD. CKD is an evident risk factor for stroke. Meta-analyses of cohort studies and trials indicate that proteinuria/albuminuria increases the risk of stroke by 71-92%, and reduced glomerular filtration rate increases the risk by 43%. In addition, CKD has a strong relationship with subclinical brain damage including white matter changes, microbleeds, cognitive impairment, and carotid atherosclerosis. CKD is prevalent in acute stroke patients; patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate stroke patients and 39% of total intracerebral hemorrhage patients in our institute. Acute and chronic management of stroke are influenced by CKD. Therapeutic effects of several antithrombotic and thrombolytic agents, including recently-developed novel oral anticoagulants, are affected by renal function. Moreover, reduced glomerular filtration rate is independently associated with increased 1- and 10-year mortalities in the end. Stroke also has deep relationships with end-stage kidney disease. Stroke occurs much more commonly in dialysis patients than general population or CKD patients without need for dialysis. The triggers of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with end-stage kidney disease include special characteristics unique to dialysis, such as drastic hemodynamic change, dialysate and anticoagulants, and vascular calcification. As cohorts of dialysis patients become older, more hypertensive, and more diabetic than before, stroke become more prevalent and more serious events in dialysis clinics. Now, clinicians should have much interest in the association between CKD and cerebrovascular diseases, so-called the cerebro-renal interaction. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  4. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurlo, J.V.; Towers, J.D.; Golla, S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  5. Low-pressure balloon angioplasty with adjuvant pharmacological therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by intracranial arterial occlusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Raul G.; Schwamm, Lee H.; Buonanno, Ferdinando S.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Yoo, Albert J.; Rabinov, James D.; Pryor, Johnny C.; Hirsch, Joshua A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of coronary balloons in the cerebral vasculature is limited due to their poor trackability and increased risk of vessel injury. We report our experience using more compliant elastomer balloons for thrombus resistant to intraarterial (IA) pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis in acute stroke. We retrospectively analyzed 12 consecutive patients with an occluded intracranial artery treated with angioplasty using a low-pressure elastomer balloon. Angiograms were graded according to the Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) and Qureshi grading systems. Outcomes were categorized as independent (modified Rankin scale, mRS, score ≤2), dependent (mRS score 3-5), or dead (mRS score 6). Included in the study were 12 patients (mean age 66±17 years, range 31-88 years; mean baseline National Institutes of Health stroke scale score 17±3, range 12-23). The occlusion sites were: internal carotid artery (ICA) terminus (five patients, including two concomitant cervical ICA occlusions), M1 segment (two patients), and basilar artery (two patients). Pharmacological treatment included intravenous (IV) t-PA only (two patients), IA urokinase only (nine patients), both IV t-PA and IA urokinase (one patient), and IV and/or IA eptifibatide (eight patients). Mean time to treatment was 5.9±3.9 h (anterior circulation) and 11.0±7.2 h (posterior circulation). Overall recanalization rate (TICI grade 2/3) was 91.6%. Procedure-related morbidity occurred in one patient (distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery embolus). There were no symptomatic hemorrhages. Outcomes at 90 days were independent (five patients), dependent (three patients) and dead (four patients, all due to progression of stroke with withdrawal of care). Angioplasty of acutely occluded intracranial arteries with low-pressure elastomer balloons results in high recanalization rates with an acceptable degree of safety. Prior use of thrombolytics may increase the chances of recanalization, and glycoprotein IIb

  6. Effect of anterior cervical osteophyte in poststroke dysphagia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngkook; Park, Geun-Young; Seo, Yu Jung; Im, Sun

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether the concomitant presence of anterior cervical osteophytes can influence the severity and outcome of patients with poststroke dysphagia. Retrospective case-control study. Hospital. A total of 40 participants were identified (N=40). Patients with poststroke dysphagia with anterior cervical osteophytes (n=20) were identified and matched by age, sex, location, and laterality of the stroke lesion to a poststroke dysphagia control group with no anterior cervical osteophytes (n=20). Not applicable. Videofluoroscopic swallowing study, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS), and Penetration-Aspiration Scale results assessed within the first month of stroke were analyzed. The FOIS at 6 months was recorded, and severity of dysphagia was compared between the 2 groups. The case group had larger degrees of postswallow residues in the valleculae and pyriform sinuses (P=.020 and Pdysphagia (OR=15.375; 95% CI, 3.195-infinity). The presence of anterior cervical osteophytes, which may cause mechanical obstruction and interfere with residue clearance at the valleculae and pyriform sinuses and result in more postswallow aspiration, may influence initial severity and outcome of poststroke dysphagia. The presence of anterior cervical osteophytes may be considered an important clinical condition that may affect poststroke dysphagia rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Controlled humidity gas circulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A programmable circulator capable of regulating the humidity of a gas stream over a wide range of humidity is described. An optical dew-point hygrometer is used as a feedback element to control the addition or removal of water vapor. Typical regulation of the gas is to a dew-point temperature of +- 0.2 0 C and to an accuracy limited by the dew-point hygrometer

  8. Ocean circulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblinsky, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Remotely sensed signatures of ocean surface characteristics from active and passive satellite-borne radiometers in conjunction with in situ data were utilized to examine the large scale, low frequency circulation of the world's oceans. Studies of the California Current, the Gulf of California, and the Kuroshio Extension Current in the western North Pacific were reviewed briefly. The importance of satellite oceanographic tools was emphasized.

  9. Fluid circulation control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benard, Henri; Henocque, Jean.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal fluid circulation control device, of the type having a pivoting flap. This device is intended for being fitted in the pipes of hydraulic installation, particularly in a bleed and venting system of a nuclear power station shifting radioactive or contaminated liquids. The characteristic of this device is the cut-out at the top of the flap to allow the air contained in the pipes to flow freely [fr

  10. Third European Stroke Science Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dichgans, Martin; Planas, Anna M.; Biessels, Geert Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367; van der Worp, Bart|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189855010; Sudlow, Cathie; Norrving, B.; Lees, Kennedy; Mattle, Heinrich P.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Eibsee, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, November 19 to 21, 2015: The European Stroke Organization convened >120 stroke experts from 27 countries to discuss latest results and hot topics in clinical, translational, and basic stroke research. Since its inception in 2011, the European Stroke Science

  11. Methylphenidate modulates cerebral post-stroke reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Jean; Pariente, Jérémie; Leger, Anne; Dechaumont-Palacin, Sophie; Gerdelat, Angélique; Guiraud, Vincent; Conchou, Fabrice; Albucher, Jean-François; Marque, Philippe; Franceries, Xavier; Cognard, Christophe; Rascol, Olivier; Chollet, François; Loubinoux, Isabelle

    2006-11-15

    We hypothesized that a single dose of methylphenidate (MP) would modulate cerebral motor activation and behavior in patients having suffered a subcortical stroke. Eight men with a single stroke on the corticospinal tract resulting in a pure motor hemiparesia were included in a randomized, cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were first evaluated 17 days after stroke onset by validated neurological scales, motor tests and fMRI (flexion/extension of the digits) after 20 mg MP or placebo. Seven days later, the patients underwent the same protocol and received the drug they had not taken at the first evaluation. Each patient was his own control. Placebo intake did not change performance. MP compared to placebo elicited a significant improvement in motor performance of the affected hand at the finger tapping test. MP induced: (1) a hyperactivation of the ipsilesional primary sensorimotor cortex including the motor hand and face areas and of the contralesional premotor cortex; (2) a hypoactivation of the ipsilesional anterior cingulum. Hyperactivation in the face motor area correlated positively with the improvement in performance. We demonstrated that the reorganized network may efficiently be targeted by the drug and that the effect of MP might partly rely on an improvement in attention/effort through cingulum modulation.

  12. Dizziness in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness. The treatment of patients with stroke-induced dizziness involves a wide range of medications for the reduction of the degree of dizziness and unsteadiness and for the secondary prevention of stroke. Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of treatment. The paper describes an observation of a patient with poorly controlled hypertension, who developed new-onset acute systemic dizziness. Vestibular neuronitis might be presumed to be a peripheral cause of vestibular disorders, by taking into account the absence of additional obvious neurological symptoms (such as pareses, defective sensation, diplopia, etc. and the nature of nystagmus. However, intention tremor in fingernose and heel-knee tests on the left side, a negative Halmagyi test, and results of Romberg’s test could suggest that stroke was a cause ofdizziness.

  13. Effect of the Mitral Valve's Anterior Leaflet on Axisymmetry of Transmitral Vortex Ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Pahlevan, Niema M; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-10-01

    The shape and formation of transmitral vortex ring are shown to be associated with diastolic function of the left ventricle (LV). Transmitral vortex ring is a flow feature that is observed to be non-axisymmetric in a healthy heart and its inherent asymmetry in the LV assists in efficient ejection of the blood during systole. This study is a first step towards understanding the effects of the mitral valve's anterior leaflet on transmitral flow. We experimentally study a single-leaflet model of the mitral valve to investigate the effect of the anterior leaflet on the axisymmetry of the generated vortex ring based on the three-dimensional data acquired using defocusing digital particle image velocimetry. Vortex rings form downstream of a D-shaped orifice in presence or absence of the anterior leaflet in various physiological stroke ratios. The results of the statistical analysis indicate that the formed vortex ring downstream of a D-shaped orifice is markedly non-axisymmetric, and presence of the anterior leaflet improves the ring's axisymmetry. This study suggests that the improvement of axisymmetry in presence of the anterior leaflet might be due to coupled dynamic interaction between rolling-up of the shear layer at the edges of the D-shaped orifice and the borders of the anterior leaflet. This interaction can reduce the non-uniformity in vorticity generation, which results in more axisymmetric behavior compared to the D-shaped orifice without the anterior leaflet.

  14. Toxic anterior segment syndrome following deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Sevimli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present the case of a 31-year-old patient with toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS that developed after undergoing deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK. She had keratoconus, and despite wearing hard contact lenses for many years in the left eye, her vision had deteriorated; therefore, DALK was performed on this eye. The preoperative visual acuity (VA was finger counting at 3 m. Routine DALK was performed using the "big-bubble" technique. The corneal entry incision was hydrated at the end of the surgery, which was terminated by air injection into the anterior chamber. On postoperative day 1, VA was at the level of hand movements, and the cornea was edematous. Topical high-dose dexamethasone and oral steroids were initiated considering the diagnosis of TASS. Subsequently, the patient's VA increased, and the corneal edema decreased. We believe that the use of re-sterilized cannulas may have been the likely cause of TASS. Although DALK can be performed without interfering with the anterior chamber, one should keep in mind that TASS may occur in response to the solution used to hydrate the incision site and the air injected into the anterior chamber.

  15. Localization of impaired kinesthetic processing post-stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Michael Kenzie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kinesthesia is our sense of limb motion, and allows us to gauge the speed, direction, and amplitude of our movements. Over half of stroke survivors have significant impairments in kinesthesia, which leads to greatly reduced recovery and function in everyday activities. Despite the high reported incidence of kinesthetic deficits after stroke, very little is known about how damage beyond just primary somatosensory areas affects kinesthesia. Stroke provides an ideal model to examine structure-function relationships specific to kinesthetic processing, by comparing lesion location with behavioral impairment. To examine this relationship, we performed voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and statistical region of interest analyses on a large sample of sub-acute stroke subjects (N=142 and compared kinesthetic performance with stroke lesion location. Subjects with first unilateral, ischemic stroke underwent neuroimaging and a comprehensive robotic kinesthetic assessment (~9 days post-stroke. The robotic exoskeleton measured subjects’ ability to perform a kinesthetic mirror-matching task of the upper limbs without vision. The robot moved the stroke-affected arm and subjects’ mirror-matched the movement with the unaffected arm. We found that lesions both within and outside primary somatosensory cortex were associated with significant kinesthetic impairments. Further, sub-components of kinesthesia were associated with different lesion locations. Impairments in speed perception were primarily associated with lesions to the right post-central and supramarginal gyri whereas impairments in amplitude of movement perception were primarily associated with lesions in the right pre-central gyrus, anterior insula, and superior temporal gyrus. Impairments in perception of movement direction were associated with lesions to bilateral post-central and supramarginal gyri, right superior temporal gyrus and parietal operculum. All measures of impairment shared a common

  16. Localization of Impaired Kinesthetic Processing Post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzie, Jeffrey M; Semrau, Jennifer A; Findlater, Sonja E; Yu, Amy Y; Desai, Jamsheed A; Herter, Troy M; Hill, Michael D; Scott, Stephen H; Dukelow, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Kinesthesia is our sense of limb motion, and allows us to gauge the speed, direction, and amplitude of our movements. Over half of stroke survivors have significant impairments in kinesthesia, which leads to greatly reduced recovery and function in everyday activities. Despite the high reported incidence of kinesthetic deficits after stroke, very little is known about how damage beyond just primary somatosensory areas affects kinesthesia. Stroke provides an ideal model to examine structure-function relationships specific to kinesthetic processing, by comparing lesion location with behavioral impairment. To examine this relationship, we performed voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and statistical region of interest analyses on a large sample of sub-acute stroke subjects ( N = 142) and compared kinesthetic performance with stroke lesion location. Subjects with first unilateral, ischemic stroke underwent neuroimaging and a comprehensive robotic kinesthetic assessment (~9 days post-stroke). The robotic exoskeleton measured subjects' ability to perform a kinesthetic mirror-matching task of the upper limbs without vision. The robot moved the stroke-affected arm and subjects' mirror-matched the movement with the unaffected arm. We found that lesions both within and outside primary somatosensory cortex were associated with significant kinesthetic impairments. Further, sub-components of kinesthesia were associated with different lesion locations. Impairments in speed perception were primarily associated with lesions to the right post-central and supramarginal gyri whereas impairments in amplitude of movement perception were primarily associated with lesions in the right pre-central gyrus, anterior insula, and superior temporal gyrus. Impairments in perception of movement direction were associated with lesions to bilateral post-central and supramarginal gyri, right superior temporal gyrus and parietal operculum. All measures of impairment shared a common association with

  17. Which Patent Foramen Ovales Need Closure to Prevent Cryptogenic Strokes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S

    2018-03-01

    Patients with cryptogenic strokes are more likely to have a patent foremen ovale than in the general population. It is speculated that these strokes are due to paradoxical embolism, that is, passage of a venous thrombus across the patent foremen ovale to enter the arterial circulation, resulting in an embolic stroke. Venous thromboembolism is rarely present in these cases of cryptogenic stroke. Thousands of patients with cryptogenic strokes have undergone transcatheter closure of their patent foremen ovale via a variety of devices. The first 3 randomized clinical trials comparing patent foremen ovale closure with medical therapy failed to show a significant advantage of patent foremen ovale closure. Three additional trials reported in 2017 had longer years of follow-up and demonstrated an advantage of patent foremen ovale closure versus medical therapy. Analysis of their data indicated that patent foremen ovale closure in patients with an atrial septal aneurysm in addition to a patent foremen ovale had a very significant decrease in cryptogenic strokes (P patent foremen ovale closure (P = .37). Aneurysms of the atrial septum are easily recognized by echocardiography and are present in approximately one-third of patients with patent foremen ovales. These data suggest that closure of patent foremen ovales in patients with an atrial septal aneurysm is indicated. In patients with a patent foremen ovale without an aneurysm of the atrial septum, patent foremen ovale closure is not indicated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical neurogenetics: stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Natalia S

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of cerebrovascular disease holds promise of novel stroke prevention strategies and therapeutics that are both safe and effective. Apart from a few single-gene disorders associated with cerebral ischemia or intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke is a complex genetic phenotype that requires careful ascertainment and robust association testing for discovery and validation analyses. The recently uncovered shared genetic contribution between clinically manifest stroke syndromes and closely related intermediate cerebrovascular phenotypes offers effective and efficient approaches to complex trait analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cost of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Iversen, Helle K; Ibsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    . The attributable cost of direct net health care costs after the stroke (general practitioner services, hospital services, and medication) and indirect costs (loss of labor market income) were €10,720, €8,205 and €7,377 for patients, and €989, €1,544 and €1.645 for their partners, over and above that of controls......BACKGROUND: To estimate the direct and indirect costs of stroke in patients and their partners. DESCRIPTION: Direct and indirect costs were calculated using records from the Danish National Patient Registry from 93,047 ischemic, 26,012 hemorrhagic and 128,824 unspecified stroke patients...

  20. Determinan Penyakit Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Penyakit stroke merupakan penyebab kematian dan kecacatan kronik yang paling tinggi pada kelompok umur diatas usia 45 tahun terbanyak di Indonesia. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengidentifikasi determinan utama yang berhubungan dengan penyakit stroke pada masyarakat di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa Bogor. Analisis lanjut terhadap 1.912 responden subset baseline data penelitian “Studi Kohort Faktor Risiko Penyakit Tidak Menular” Data dikumpulkan dengan metode wawancara pada penduduk tetap di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa, Kecamatan Bogor Tengah, Bogor tahun 2012. Diagnosis stroke berdasarkan anamnesis dan pemeriksaan dokter spesialis syaraf. Variabel independen meliputi karakteristik sosiodemografi, status kesehatan dan perilaku berisiko. Data dianalisis dengan uji regresi logistik ganda. Penyakit stroke ditemukan pada 49 (2,6% orang. Determinan utama stroke meliputi hipertensi (OR = 4,20; IK 95% = 2,20 – 8,03, penyakit jantung koroner (OR = 2,74; IK 95% = 1,51 – 4,99, diabetes melitus (OR = 2,89; IK 95% = 1,47 – 5,64, dan status ekonomi miskin (OR = 1,83 ; IK 95% = 1,03 – 3,33. Pencegahan penyakit stroke dilakukan dengan peningkatan edukasi (kampanye/penyuluhan melalui pengendalian faktor risiko utama yaitu hipertensi dan pencegahan terjadinya penyakit degeneratif lain yaitu penyakit jantung koroner dan diabetes melitus. Stroke disease is the leading cause of death and chronic disabi lity in most over the age of 45 years in Indonesia. The aim of study was to identify the major determinants of stroke disease in Kebon Kalapa community in Bogor. A deep analyze was conducted in 1.912 respondents based on the subset of baseline data “Risk Factors Cohort Study of Non Communicable Diseases.” Data was collected by interviews on Kebon Kalapa community, Bogor in 2012. Stroke diagnosis was determined by anamnesis and neu-rological examination with specialist. Independent variables were sociodemographic characteristics, health status and risk behavior

  1. The Migraine?Stroke Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and stroke are common neurovascular disorders which share underlying physiological processes. Increased risks of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and subclinical ischemic lesions have been consistently found in migraineurs. Three possible associations are suggested. One is that underlying pathophysiology of migraine can lead to ischemic stroke. Second, common comorbidities between migraine and stroke can be present. Lastly, some syndromes can manifest with both migraine-like head...

  2. Prediction of Clinical Outcome After Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Value of Repeated Noncontrast Computed Tomography, Computed Tomographic Angiography, and Computed Tomographic Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankbaar, Jan W; Horsch, Alexander D; van den Hoven, Andor F; Kappelle, L Jaap; van der Schaaf, Irene C; van Seeters, Tom; Velthuis, Birgitta K

    2017-09-01

    Early prediction of outcome in acute ischemic stroke is important for clinical management. This study aimed to compare the relationship between early follow-up multimodality computed tomographic (CT) imaging and clinical outcome at 90 days in a large multicenter stroke study. From the DUST study (Dutch Acute Stroke Study), patients were selected with (1) anterior circulation occlusion on CT angiography (CTA) and ischemic deficit on CT perfusion (CTP) on admission, and (2) day 3 follow-up noncontrast CT, CTP, and CTA. Follow-up infarct volume on noncontrast CT, poor recanalization on CTA, and poor reperfusion on CTP (mean transit time index ≤75%) were related to unfavorable outcome after 90 days defined as modified Rankin Scale 3 to 6. Four multivariable models were constructed: (1) only baseline variables (model 1), (2) model 1 with addition of infarct volume, (3) model 1 with addition of recanalization, and (4) model 1 with addition of reperfusion. Area under the curves of the receiver operating characteristic curves of the models were compared using the DeLong test. A total of 242 patients were included. Poor recanalization was found in 21%, poor reperfusion in 37%, and unfavorable outcome in 44%. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic curve without follow-up imaging was 0.81, with follow-up noncontrast CT 0.85 ( P =0.02), CTA 0.86 ( P =0.01), and CTP 0.86 ( P =0.01). All 3 follow-up imaging modalities improved outcome prediction compared with no imaging. There was no difference between the imaging models. Follow-up imaging after 3 days improves outcome prediction compared with prediction based on baseline variables alone. CTA recanalization and CTP reperfusion do not outperform noncontrast CT at this time point. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00880113. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Golanó, P.; Clavero, J.A.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly

  4. Circulating microparticles in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookston, Kendall P; Sibbitt, Wilmer L; Chandler, Wayne L; Qualls, Clifford R; Roldan, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine-rich microparticles derived from endothelial cells, platelets and leukocytes have been implicated as surrogate markers of cellular activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Because microparticles have also been associated with many primary neurologic diseases, this study investigated whether cellular-derived microparticles are also implicated in neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE). Plasma microparticles were measured in 51 SLE patients and 22 age- and gender-matched controls. Acute NPSLE was defined as major NPSLE (acute stroke, transient ischemic attack, psychosis, isolated seizures, major cognitive disorder, or acute confusional state) and NPSLE disease activity was measured with the neurologic components of the SLE Disease Activity Index (Neuro-SLEDAI). Neuro-SLEDAI levels varied widely in SLE patients, consistent with variable NPSLE activity. When considering all patients with SLE, there was no difference in total microparticles relative to matched controls, 2158/μL (interquartile range [IQR] 1214-3463) versus 2782/μL (IQR 1586-2990; P = 0.57) nor differences in microparticles derived from either platelets (P = 0.40), monocytes (P = 0.15) or endothelial cells (P = 0.32). However, levels of circulating monocyte-derived microparticles significantly and independently correlated with NPSLE (r = -0.28; P = 0.045), corticosteroid dosage (r = -0.38; P = 0.006) and levels of circulating C5a (r = 0.54; P microparticles. Circulating cell-derived microparticles are reduced in active NPSLE, although the relative contribution of reduced microparticle production, increased consumption or intravascular sequestration, remain uncertain. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Microparticle Shedding from Neural Progenitor Cells and Vascular Compartment Cells Is Increased in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Suades, Rosa; Crespo, Javier; Peña, Esther; Padró, Teresa; Jiménez-Xarrié, Elena; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Badimon, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke has shown to induce platelet and endothelial microparticle shedding, but whether stroke induces microparticle shedding from additional blood and vascular compartment cells is unclear. Neural precursor cells have been shown to replace dying neurons at sites of brain injury; however, if neural precursor cell activation is associated to microparticle shedding, and whether this activation is maintained at long term and associates to stroke type and severity remains unknown. We analyzed neural precursor cells and blood and vascular compartment cells microparticle shedding after an acute ischemic stroke. Forty-four patients were included in the study within the first 48h after the onset of stroke. The cerebral lesion size was evaluated at 3-7 days of the stroke. Circulating microparticles from neural precursor cells and blood and vascular compartment cells (platelets, endothelial cells, erythrocytes, leukocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes and smooth muscle cells) were analyzed by flow cytometry at the onset of stroke and at 7 and 90 days. Forty-four age-matched high cardiovascular risk subjects without documented vascular disease were used as controls. Compared to high cardiovascular risk controls, patients showed higher number of neural precursor cell- and all blood and vascular compartment cell-derived microparticles at the onset of stroke, and after 7 and 90 days. At 90 days, neural precursor cell-derived microparticles decreased and smooth muscle cell-derived microparticles increased compared to levels at the onset of stroke, but only in those patients with the highest stroke-induced cerebral lesions. Stroke increases blood and vascular compartment cell and neural precursor cell microparticle shedding, an effect that is chronically maintained up to 90 days after the ischemic event. These results show that stroke induces a generalized blood and vascular cell activation and the initiation of neuronal cell repair process after stroke. Larger cerebral lesions

  6. Stroke - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain cells can die, causing lasting damage. Risk factors are things that increase your chance of getting ... disease or condition. This article discusses the risk factors for stroke and things you can do to ...

  7. Post-Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... negotiate the provision of reasonable accommodations in the workplace. When can a stroke patient begin rehabilitation? Rehabilitation ... at home gives people the advantage of practicing skills and developing compensatory strategies in the context of ...

  8. A Stroke of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The author reflects on foreign-language learning by his EFL students as well as his own foreign-language learning. He concludes by musing on the possible and fantastical devastation on language-ability wrought by strokes.

  9. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...... with other severe diseases. Cerebral angiography, CT, and EEG were performed in all patients. The patients were followed clinically for 2 to 4 years. Seven patients (9%) developed epilepsy. Of 23 patients with lesions involving the cortex, 6 (26%) developed epilepsy. Of 54 patients in whom the cortex...... was not involved, only 1 (2%) developed epilepsy. Patients with persisting paresis and cortical involvement seem to be at particularly high risk of developing epilepsy, as 50% of such patients (6 of 12) developed the disease....

  10. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. NINDS is conducting a public awareness campaign across the United States to educate people about ...

  11. Increased circulating leukocyte-derived microparticles in ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhangping; Tang, Yanyan; Qin, Chao

    2017-06-01

    Circulating leukocyte-derived microparticles act as proinflammatory mediators that reflect vascular inflammation. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that the quantity of leukocyte-derived microparticles is increased in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, and investigated utility of various phenotypes of leukocyte-derived microparticles as specific biomarkers of vascular inflammation injury. Additionally we focused on identifying leukocyte-derived microparticles that may be correlated with stroke severity in acute ischemic stroke patients. The plasma concentration of leukocyte-derived microparticles obtained by a series of centrifugations of 76 consecutive patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases and 70 age-, sex-, and race-matched healthy controls were determined by flow cytometry. Significantly elevated numbers of leukocyte (CD45+), monocyte (CD14+), lymphocyte (CD4+), granulocyte (CD15+) derived microparticles were found in the plasma samples of patients ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, compared to healthy controls (pcerebrovascular diseases, compared with healthy controls. As proinflammatory mediators, leukocyte-derived microparticles may contribute to vascular inflammatory and the inflammatory process in acute ischemic stroke. Levels of CD14+ microparticles may be a promising biomarker of ischemic severity and outcome of stroke in the clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. World Ocean Circulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R. Allyn

    1992-01-01

    The oceans are an equal partner with the atmosphere in the global climate system. The World Ocean Circulation Experiment is presently being implemented to improve ocean models that are useful for climate prediction both by encouraging more model development but more importantly by providing quality data sets that can be used to force or to validate such models. WOCE is the first oceanographic experiment that plans to generate and to use multiparameter global ocean data sets. In order for WOCE to succeed, oceanographers must establish and learn to use more effective methods of assembling, quality controlling, manipulating and distributing oceanographic data.

  13. The impact of stroke on emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Bronwyn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emotional intelligence (EI is important for personal, social and career success and has been linked to the frontal anterior cingulate, insula and amygdala regions. Aim To ascertain which stroke lesion sites impair emotional intelligence and relation to current frontal assessment measurements. Methods One hundred consecutive, non aphasic, independently functioning patients post stroke were evaluated with the Bar-On emotional intelligence test, "known as the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i" and frontal tests that included the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST and Frontal Systems Behavioral Inventory (FRSBE for correlational validity. The results of a screening, bedside frontal network syndrome test (FNS and NIHSS to document neurological deficit were also recorded. Lesion location was determined by the Cerefy digital, coxial brain atlas. Results After exclusions (n = 8, patients tested (n = 92, mean age 50.1, CI: 52.9, 47.3 years revealed that EQ-i scores were correlated (negatively with all FRSBE T sub-scores (apathy, disinhibition, executive, total, with self-reported scores correlating better than family reported scores. Regression analysis revealed age and FRSBE total scores as the most influential variables. The WCST error percentage T score did not correlate with the EQ-i scores. Based on ANOVA, there were significant differences among the lesion sites with the lowest mean EQ-i scores associated with temporal (71.5 and frontal (87.3 lesions followed by subtentorial (91.7, subcortical gray (92.6 and white (95.2 matter, and the highest scores associated with parieto-occipital lesions (113.1. Conclusions 1 Stroke impairs EI and is associated with apathy, disinhibition and executive functioning. 2 EI is associated with frontal, temporal, subcortical and subtentorial stroke syndromes.

  14. The impact of stroke on emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Michael; Cases, Lourdes Benes; Hoffmann, Bronwyn; Chen, Ren

    2010-10-28

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is important for personal, social and career success and has been linked to the frontal anterior cingulate, insula and amygdala regions. To ascertain which stroke lesion sites impair emotional intelligence and relation to current frontal assessment measurements. One hundred consecutive, non aphasic, independently functioning patients post stroke were evaluated with the Bar-On emotional intelligence test, "known as the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i)" and frontal tests that included the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and Frontal Systems Behavioral Inventory (FRSBE) for correlational validity. The results of a screening, bedside frontal network syndrome test (FNS) and NIHSS to document neurological deficit were also recorded. Lesion location was determined by the Cerefy digital, coxial brain atlas. After exclusions (n = 8), patients tested (n = 92, mean age 50.1, CI: 52.9, 47.3 years) revealed that EQ-i scores were correlated (negatively) with all FRSBE T sub-scores (apathy, disinhibition, executive, total), with self-reported scores correlating better than family reported scores. Regression analysis revealed age and FRSBE total scores as the most influential variables. The WCST error percentage T score did not correlate with the EQ-i scores. Based on ANOVA, there were significant differences among the lesion sites with the lowest mean EQ-i scores associated with temporal (71.5) and frontal (87.3) lesions followed by subtentorial (91.7), subcortical gray (92.6) and white (95.2) matter, and the highest scores associated with parieto-occipital lesions (113.1). 1) Stroke impairs EI and is associated with apathy, disinhibition and executive functioning. 2) EI is associated with frontal, temporal, subcortical and subtentorial stroke syndromes.

  15. Anterior ethmoid anatomy facilitates dacryocystorhinostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, W K; Moore, C A; Linberg, J V

    1990-12-01

    The ethmoid air cell labyrinth lies adjacent to the medial orbital wall, extending even beyond the sutures of the ethmoid bone. Its anatomic relationship to the lacrimal sac fossa is important in lacrimal surgery. We evaluated computed tomographic scans of 190 orbits with normal ethmoid anatomy to define the anatomic relationship of anterior ethmoid air cells to the lacrimal sac fossa. In 93% of the orbits, the cells extended anterior to the posterior lacrimal crest, with 40% entering the frontal process of the maxilla. This anatomic relationship may be used to facilitate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. During a 10-year period (310 cases), one of us routinely entered the anterior ethmoid air cells to initiate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. This technique has helped to avoid lacerations of the nasal mucosa.

  16. Telestroke in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Jacques; Joubert, Lynette B; de Bustos, Elizabeth Medeiros; Ware, Dallas; Jackson, David; Harrison, Terrence; Cadilhac, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a high-frequency disorder placing a significant burden on the health care systems, being the foremost cause of complex chronic disability in adults. Devising systems that can enhance the prevention of stroke recurrence is an important priority and challenge in both the developed and the developing world. The potential for recurrent stroke can be substantially reduced by effective management of vascular risk factors. Telestroke is a tool with potential application to improve risk management of stroke survivors. Lack of acknowledgment of existing practices as well as lack of awareness of potential financial barriers to diffusion of telestroke can lead to limited implementation. Telestroke offers service providers the opportunity to access large numbers of stroke survivors targeting secondary prevention. The ideal 'telestroke model' provides service support, education for the patient and caregiver, as well as integration of specialist and primary care services. Effective use of technological advances, with adequate recognition of the importance of human interaction in the long-term management of a largely elderly population of stroke survivors is challenging but possible. Telestroke should be systems- and not technology-driven. Barriers in the implementation of telestroke have been identified as insufficient planning of IT infrastructure, lack of long-term vision for sustainability, a lack of contextual perspective as well as poor communication across domains. Future telestroke models should provide effective action in an integrated model of care recognizing and involving all existing players and practices. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Autopsy approach to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Seth

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the brain and other relevant tissues are often examined only cursorily when stroke patients come to autopsy. The pathological findings and clinical implications vary according to the type of stroke and its location and cause. Large ischaemic strokes are usually associated with atherosclerosis of extracranial or major intracranial arteries but can be caused by dissection. Most small cerebral infarcts are caused by arteriosclerosis or, in the elderly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, vasculitides and coagulopathies can cause a range of different patterns of ischaemic (and, occasionally, haemorrhagic) stroke. Global brain ischaemia, caused by severe hypotension or raised intracranial pressure, produces damage that is accentuated in certain regions and neuronal populations and may be confused with hypoglycaemic injury. The main cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage is a ruptured berry aneurysm but CAA, arteriovenous malformations and infective aneurysms are occasionally responsible. These can also cause parenchymal brain haemorrhage, although this most often complicates hypertensive small vessel disease. Sometimes the haemorrhage arises from a neoplasm. Performing an adequate autopsy in stroke requires proper preparation, awareness of the likely pathological processes, familiarity with intracranial vascular anatomy, careful gross examination and dissection, and appropriate use of histology. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  18. Post-stroke dyskinesias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakawah MO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Obadah Nakawah, Eugene C Lai Stanely H. Appel Department of Neurology, Houston Methodist Neurological Institute, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Strokes, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, are among the most common causes of secondary movement disorders in elderly patients. Stroke-related (vascular movement disorders, however, are uncommon complications of this relatively common disease. The spectrum of post-stroke movement disorders is broad and includes both hypo- and hyperkinetic syndromes. Post-stroke dyskinesias are involuntary hyperkinetic movements arising from cerebrovascular insults and often present with mixed phenotypes of hyperkinesia which can sometimes be difficult to classify. Nevertheless, identification of the most relevant motor phenotype, whenever possible, allows for a more specific phenomenological categorization of the dyskinesia and thus helps guide its treatment. Fortunately, post-stroke dyskinesias are usually self-limiting and resolve within 6 to 12 months of onset, but a short-term pharmacotherapy might sometimes be required for symptom control. Functional neurosurgical interventions targeting the motor thalamus or globus pallidus interna might be considered for patients with severe, disabling, and persistent dyskinesias (arbitrarily defined as duration longer than 12 months. Keywords: vascular dyskinesia, stroke, movement disorders

  19. Microsurgical management of posterior circulation aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHI Xiang-en

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To retrospectively analyze effective methods for surgical management of posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods There were 42 patients with posterior circulation aneurysms [26 cases of basilar aneurysm (27 aneurysms, 16 cases of vertebral aneurysm (17 aneurysms]. There were 15 patients underwent bypass surgery [4 external carotid artery-P2 segment of posterior cerebral artery (ECA-P2, 2 internal carotid artery-P2 segment of posterior cerebral artery (ICA-P2, 2 internal maxillary artery-P2 segment of posterior cerebral artery (IMA-P2, 2 intracranial segment of vertebral artery-extracranial segment of vertebral artery, 5 occipital artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (OA-PICA] and 27 patients underwent simple surgical clipping. Results Activities of daily life of 37 patients recovered to normal (14 patients with aneurysm on the top of basilar artery, 3 with aneurysm on the trunk of basilar artery, 9 with vertebral aneurysm, 5 with posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm, 4 with aneurysm on the junction of P1-P2 segment of posterior cerebral artery, 1 with superior cerebellar artery, and 1 with anterior inferior cerebellar aneurysm. None of them occurred operation-related neurological dysfunction. The recovery rate was 88.09% . Among the other patients, 1 with aneurysm on the top of basilar artery presented severe signs and symptoms of neurological defect and cannot take care of oneself, 2 patients (1 with aneurysm on the top of basilar artery, 1 with aneurysm on the trunk of basilar artery occurred brain stem hemorrhage after operation, and died at perioperative period, 2 with vertebral aneurysm relapsed and was cured after treatment. Conclusion Posterior circulation aneurysm which is not suitable for surgical clipping can be treated with intra? and extra?cranial vessel bypass. It may avoid the risk of surgical clipping of aneurysm.

  20. Transesophageal Echocardiographically-Confirmed Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis in Association with Posterior Circulation Infarction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Justin A

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary venous thromboembolism has only been identified as a cause of stroke with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations\\/fistulae, pulmonary neoplasia, transplantation or lobectomy, and following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary vein ostia in patients with atrial fibrillation. A 59-year-old man presented with a posterior circulation ischemic stroke. \\'Unheralded\\' pulmonary vein thrombosis was identified on transesophageal echocardiography as the likely etiology. He had no further cerebrovascular events after intensifying antithrombotic therapy. Twenty-eight months after initial presentation, he was diagnosed with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and died 3 months later. This report illustrates the importance of doing transesophageal echocardiography in presumed \\'cardioembolic\\' stroke, and that potential \\'pulmonary venous thromboembolic\\' stroke may occur in patients without traditional risk factors for venous thromboembolism. Consideration should be given to screening such patients for occult malignancy.

  1. Stance limb ground reaction forces in high functioning stroke and healthy subjects during gait initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sheena; McMorland, Angus J C; Stinear, James W

    2015-08-01

    Following stroke, little is known about ground reaction forces during gait initiation. To compare stroke patients' with healthy subjects' anterior, medial, and lateral ground reaction forces generated during gait initiation. Patients with left paresis, right paresis, and age-similar healthy subjects were recruited. During gait initiation the average peak anterior, medial, and lateral ground reaction forces acting on each lower limb were calculated when it was the stance limb. Anterior ground reaction forces acting on the right and left stance limbs of healthy subjects were greater than anterior forces acting on the nonparetic and paretic limbs of stroke patients. Medial ground reaction forces for the nonparetic and paretic limbs of stroke patients and for the right and left stance limbs of healthy subjects were equivalent. While lateral ground reaction forces acting on the nonparetic and paretic limbs were equivalent for left paretic patients, for right paretic patients lateral forces acting on the nonparetic limb were greater compared to the paretic limb and also greater compared to the left limb of healthy subjects. An effect of side-of-lesion was revealed in average peak lateral ground reaction force data. Larger lateral ground reaction forces acting on the left nonparetic stance limb of right paretic patients compared to the right nonparetic stance limb of left paretic patients during gait initiation may be an indication of differing adaptations that depend on the side-of-lesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sporadic Carney complex without PRKAR1A mutation in a young patient with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar de Sousa, Diana; Gouveia, Ana Isabel; Wessling, Ana; Geraldes, Ruth; Canhão, Patrícia

    2015-03-01

    We describe a 29-year-old male, with a previous history of testicular tumor, who presented with a posterior circulation ischemic stroke associated to an atrial myxoma. Dermatologic observation disclosed spotty skin and mucosal pigmentation (lentigines), and a cutaneous myxoma was histopathologically confirmed. Although there was no family history of any of the Carney complex (CNC) features and no mutations in the PRKAR1A gene were found, these findings lead to the diagnosis of CNC. We emphasize the importance of recognizing this entity in young patients with stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  4. Improving public education about stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a common and serious disease. Most studies have shown that basic public knowledge about what a stroke is, symptoms of a stroke, and the proper reaction to a stroke is quite deficient. The fact that a stroke affects cognitive, communicative, and motor functions may partially explain the poor reaction to acute stroke symptoms. Several educational studies, using diverse formats and messaging paradigms, have been shown to positively affect public knowledge of stroke symptoms. Such efforts have often used mass media public education campaigns with an emphasis on recognizing symptoms of an acute stroke. Some have been able to demonstrate an increase in the chance of patients (or by-standers) calling 911 and seeking emergency care. However, many programs were of brief duration, and their long-term benefits are uncertain. Continual educational efforts will be needed to improve stroke knowledge and increase the percentage of patients who seek emergency care. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Circulation of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of man, contemplation of the stars has been a primary impulse in human beings, who proliferated their knowledge of the stars all over the world. Aristotle sees this as the product of primeval and perennial “wonder” which gives rise to what we call science, philosophy, and poetry. Astronomy, astrology, and star art (painting, architecture, literature, and music) go hand in hand through millennia in all cultures of the planet (and all use catasterisms to explain certain phenomena). Some of these developments are independent of each other, i.e., they take place in one culture independently of others. Some, on the other hand, are the product of the “circulation of stars.” There are two ways of looking at this. One seeks out forms, the other concentrates on the passing of specific lore from one area to another through time. The former relies on archetypes (for instance, with catasterism), the latter constitutes a historical process. In this paper I present some of the surprising ways in which the circulation of stars has occurred—from East to West, from East to the Far East, and from West to East, at times simultaneously.

  6. Selection of Patients and Anesthetic Types for Endovascular Treatment in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fubing Ouyang

    Full Text Available and Purpose Recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated consistent effectiveness of endovascular treatment (EVT for acute ischemic stroke, leading to update on stroke management guidelines. We conducted this meta-analysis to assess the efficacy and safety of EVT overall and in subgroups stratified by age, baseline stroke severity, brain imaging feature, and anesthetic type.Published randomized controlled trials comparing EVT and standard medical care alone were evaluated. The measured outcomes were 90-day functional independence (modified Rankin Scale ≤2, all-cause mortality, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage.Nine trials enrolling 2476 patients were included (1338 EVT, 1138 standard medical care alone. For patients with large vessel occlusions confirmed by noninvasive vessel imaging, EVT yielded improved functional outcome (pooled odds ratio [OR], 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64-2.50, lower mortality (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97, and similar symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rate (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.72-1.76 compared with standard medical care. A higher proportion of functional independence was seen in patients with terminus intracranial artery occlusion (±M1 (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.64-6.06, baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score of 8-10 (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.25-3.57 and age ≤70 years (OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.73-5.24. EVT performed under conscious sedation had better functional outcomes (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.47-2.96 without increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or short-term mortality compared with general anesthesia.Vessel-imaging proven large vessel occlusion, a favorable scan, and younger age are useful predictors to identify anterior circulation stroke patients who may benefit from EVT. Conscious sedation is feasible and safe in EVT based on available data. However, firm conclusion on the choice of anesthetic types should be drawn from more appropriate randomized controlled trials.

  7. Hyper-attenuating brain lesions on CT after ischemic stroke and thrombectomy are associated with final brain infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, F B; Castro-Afonso, L H; Nakiri, G S; Monsignore, L M; Fábio, Src; Dos Santos, A C; Pontes-Neto, O M; Abud, D G

    2017-12-01

    Purpose Hyper-attenuating lesions, or contrast staining, on a non-contrast brain computed tomography (NCCT) scan have been investigated as a predictor for hemorrhagic transformation after endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). However, the association of hyper-attenuating lesions and final ischemic areas are poorly investigated in this setting. The aim of the present study was to assess correlations between hyper-attenuating lesions and final brain infarcted areas after thrombectomy for AIS. Methods Data from patients with AIS of the anterior circulation who underwent endovascular treatment were retrospectively assessed. Images of the brain NCCT scans were analyzed in the first hours and late after treatment. The hyper-attenuating areas were compared to the final ischemic areas using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS). Results Seventy-one of the 123 patients (65.13%) treated were included. The association between the hyper-attenuating region in the post-thrombectomy CT scan and final brain ischemic area were sensitivity (58.3% to 96.9%), specificity (42.9% to 95.6%), positive predictive values (71.4% to 97.7%), negative predictive values (53.8% to 79.5%), and accuracy values (68% to 91%). The highest sensitivity values were found for the lentiform (96.9%) and caudate nuclei (80.4%) and for the internal capsule (87.5%), and the lowest values were found for the M1 (58.3%) and M6 (66.7%) cortices. Conclusions Hyper-attenuating lesions on head NCCT scans performed after endovascular treatment of AIS may predict final brain infarcted areas. The prediction appears to be higher in the deep brain regions compared with the cortical regions.

  8. First-line lesional aspiration in acute stroke thrombectomy using a novel intermediate catheter: Initial experiences with the SOFIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbasch, C; Möhlenbruch, M; Stampfl, S; Mpotsaris, A; Behme, D; Liebig, T

    2016-06-01

    Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on endovascular therapy (EVT) of stroke have proven a clinical benefit over conservative treatment or IV-thrombolysis alone. Lesional clot aspiration with a dedicated system can achieve revascularization without an additional retriever (a direct-aspiration first-pass technique, ADAPT), and the SOFIA has been shown to be both safe and efficacious in a multicentric retrospective study. We have evaluated a subset of these data acquired in two major stroke centers with regard to using the SOFIA for first-line lesional aspiration. Thirty patients with large-vessel occlusions treated with first-line lesional aspiration were identified. Procedural data, clot length, reperfusion success (mTICI), procedural timings, complications, and clinical status at admission, discharge and at 90 days were analyzed. The median baseline NIHSS was 16. IV thrombolysis was administered in 15/30 patients. Ninety-three percent of occlusions were in the anterior circulation. TICI ≥ 2b was achieved in 90% of multimodality treatments; lesional aspiration was successful in 67% within a median time of 20 minutes. The highest first-attempt success rate was in MCA occlusions (median time to recanalization 10 minutes). There were no device-related events. Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) occurred in 10%, but never with sole lesional aspiration. Embolization to new territories was recorded in 1/30 (3%). Median discharge NIHSS was 7; 30% were mRS ≤ 2 at discharge and 43% at 90-day follow-up. Lesional aspiration with SOFIA is in line with published data. The SOFIA may be used as a first-line device, aiming at fast recanalization by sole aspiration with good safety and efficacy. If unsuccessful, it converts into part of a stent retriever-based multimodality treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: reducing anterior tibial subluxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Bart; Duerr, Eric R. H.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2016-01-01

    To measure and compare the amount of anterior tibial subluxation (ATS) after anatomic ACL reconstruction for both acute and chronic ACL-deficient patients. Fifty-two patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated after primary, unilateral, anatomic ACL reconstruction. Post-operative true

  10. Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation after a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation After a Stroke Past ... to help them recover successfully. What is post-stroke rehabilitation? Rehab helps stroke survivors relearn skills lost to ...

  11. Pseudoaneurysm of the anterior spinal artery in a patient with Moyamoya: an unusual cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, D M; Woldenberg, R F; Setton, A

    2006-08-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a recognized presentation of Moyamoya disease in adults. Because there are extensive collateral networks and potential complications that develop, a thorough investigation of the intracranial and extracranial circulation is necessary to exclude a treatable cause when these patients present with SAH. We present a case of SAH due to a ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the anterior spinal artery arising from the supreme intercostal artery, which was the sole source of blood supply to the intracranial circulation.

  12. Mini-Stroke vs. Regular Stroke: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is a ministroke different from a regular stroke? Answers from Jerry W. Swanson, M.D. When ... brain, spinal cord or retina, which may cause stroke-like symptoms but does not damage brain cells ...

  13. Carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis on MR angiography: a university hospital-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Okada, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Kaiji [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hidaka, Saitama (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Rarely in the anterior circulation, an anastomosis of the carotid and anterior cerebral arteries occurs when an anomalous branch arises from the ophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery and anastomoses with the A1-A2 junction of the anterior communicating artery. Right-side predominance is known. To our knowledge, the incidence of carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis has not been reported, so we researched cases in our institution records to determine incidence and investigated characteristic features of the condition on magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. To isolate such cases, we retrospectively reviewed cranial MR angiographic images of 3,491 consecutive patients in our institution. We found three cases with carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis (two men, one woman), representing an incidence of 0.086%. The anastomosis was on the right in all three cases. A normal A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was present in two cases but could not be identified in the remaining case on MR angiographic images that included source images. Two of the three patients demonstrated associated arterial variations in their carotid systems. On MR angiography, we observed a 0.086% incidence of carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis in our institution and reaffirmed the right-side predominance of this anomaly. We found a high frequency of other associated arterial variations in the carotid system. (orig.)

  14. Electromyography Exposes Heterogeneity in Muscle Co-Contraction following Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin L. Banks

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Walking after stroke is often described as requiring excessive muscle co-contraction, yet, evidence that co-contraction is a ubiquitous motor control strategy for this population remains inconclusive. Co-contraction, the simultaneous activation of agonist and antagonist muscles, can be assessed with electromyography (EMG but is often described qualitatively. Here, our goal is to determine if co-contraction is associated with gait impairments following stroke. Fifteen individuals with chronic stroke and nine healthy controls walked on an instrumented treadmill at self-selected speed. Surface EMGs were collected from the medial gastrocnemius (MG, soleus (SOL, and tibialis anterior (TA of each leg. EMG envelope amplitudes were assessed in three ways: (1 no normalization, (2 normalization to the maximum value across the gait cycle, or (3 normalization to maximal M-wave. Three co-contraction indices were calculated across each agonist/antagonist muscle pair (MG/TA and SOL/TA to assess the effect of using various metrics to quantify co-contraction. Two factor ANOVAs were used to compare effects of group and normalization for each metric. Co-contraction during the terminal stance (TSt phase of gait is not different between healthy controls and the paretic leg of individuals post-stroke, regardless of the metric used to quantify co-contraction. Interestingly, co-contraction was similar between M-max and non-normalized EMG; however, normalization does not impact the ability to resolve group differences. While a modest correlation is revealed between the amount of TSt co-contraction and walking speed, the relationship is not sufficiently strong to motivate further exploration of a causal link between co-contraction and walking function after stroke. Co-contraction does not appear to be a common strategy employed by individuals after stroke. We recommend exploration of alternative EMG analysis approaches in an effort to learn more about the causal

  15. Fracture of the anterior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skie, M C; Ebraheim, N A; Woldenberg, L; Randall, K

    1995-04-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed 33 cases of fracture involving the anterior colliculus of the medial malleolus to examine clinical results of operative treatment for these fractures. Although this injury appears innocuous, it can be difficult to obtain stable fixation of the fragment intraoperatively, and painful nonunion can result. A simple reduction maneuver and method of tension band fixation are described.

  16. Circulation in the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, E. Peter

    2001-01-01

    Much information on processes and circulation within the Arctic Ocean has emerged from measurements made on icebreaker expeditions during the past decade. This article offers a perspective based on these measurements, summarizing new ideas regarding how water masses are formed and how they circulate. Best understood at present is the circulation of the Atlantic Layer and mid-depth waters, to depths of about 1700 m, which move in cyclonic gyres in the four major basins of the Arctic Ocean. New...

  17. Multidetector computed tomography of the head in acute stroke: predictive value of different patterns of the dense artery sign revealed by maximum intensity projection reformations for location and extent of the infarcted area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadda, Davide; Vannucchi, Letizia; Niccolai, Franco; Neri, Anna T.; Carmignani, Luca; Pacini, Patrizio [Ospedale del Ceppo, U.O. Radiodiagnostica, Pistoia (Italy)

    2005-12-01

    Maximum intensity projections reconstructions from 2.5 mm unenhanced multidetector computed tomography axial slices were obtained from 49 patients within the first 6 h of anterior-circulation cerebral strokes to identify different patterns of the dense artery sign and their prognostic implications for location and extent of the infarcted areas. The dense artery sign was found in 67.3% of cases. Increased density of the whole M1 segment with extension to M2 of the middle cerebral artery was associated with a wider extension of cerebral infarcts in comparison to M1 segment alone or distal M1 and M2. A dense sylvian branch of the middle cerebral artery pattern was associated with a more restricted extension of infarct territory. We found 62.5% of patients without a demonstrable dense artery to have a limited peripheral cortical or capsulonuclear lesion. In patients with a 7-10 points on the Alberta Stroke Early Programme Computed Tomography Score and a dense proximal MCA in the first hours of ictus the mean decrease in the score between baseline and follow-up was 5.09{+-}1.92 points. In conclusion, maximum intensity projections from thin-slice images can be quickly obtained from standard computed tomography datasets using a multidetector scanner and are useful in identifying and correctly localizing the dense artery sign, with prognostic implications for the entity of cerebral damage. (orig.)

  18. Ocean General Circulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  19. Risk Factors and Stroke Characteristic in Patients with Postoperative Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Cao, Wenjie; Cheng, Xin; Fang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Gu, Yuxiang; Leng, Bing; Dong, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombectomy are now the standard therapies for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In-house strokes have often been overlooked even at stroke centers and there is no consensus on how they should be managed. Perioperative stroke happens rather frequently but treatment protocol is lacking, In China, the issue of in-house strokes has not been explored. The aim of this study is to explore the current management of in-house stroke and identify the common risk factors associated with perioperative strokes. Altogether, 51,841 patients were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Shanghai and the records of those who had a neurological consult for stroke were reviewed. Their demographics, clinical characteristics, in-hospital complications and operations, and management plans were prospectively studied. Routine laboratory test results and risk factors of these patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression model. From January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, over 1800 patients had neurological consultations. Among these patients, 37 had an in-house stroke and 20 had more severe stroke during the postoperative period. Compared to in-house stroke patients without a procedure or operation, leukocytosis and elevated fasting glucose levels were more common in perioperative strokes. In multiple logistic regression model, perioperative strokes were more likely related to large vessel occlusion. Patients with perioperative strokes had different risk factors and severity from other in-house strokes. For these patients, obtaining a neurological consultation prior to surgery may be appropriate in order to evaluate the risk of perioperative stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Stroke risk perception among participants of a stroke awareness campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Kraywinkel, Klaus; Heidrich, Jan; Heuschmann, Peter U; Wagner, Markus; Berger, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Subjective risk factor perception is an important component of the motivation to change unhealthy life styles. While prior studies assessed cardiovascular risk factor knowledge, little is known about determinants of the individual perception of stroke risk. Methods Survey by mailed questionnaire among 1483 participants of a prior public stroke campaign in Germany. Participants had been informed about their individual stroke risk based on the Framingham stroke risk score. S...

  1. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: findings from Hip Hop Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2012-01-01

    Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke are linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether "Child-Mediated Stroke Communication" could improve stroke literacy of parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke. Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from 2 public schools in Harlem, New York City, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child's participation in Hip Hop Stroke, a novel Child-Mediated Stroke Communication intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week after the intervention. Fifth and sixth grade students (n=182) were enrolled into Hip Hop Stroke. One hundred two parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both the pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program; before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the 5 cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911) compared with 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) postintervention (P<0.001). The FAST mnemonic was known by 2 (2.7%) of participants before the program versus 29 (41%) after program completion (P<0.001). Knowledge of stroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that school children aged 9 to 12 years may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their parents.

  2. World Stroke Organization Global Stroke Services Guidelines and Action Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Patrice; Furie, Karen L.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Norrving, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Every two seconds, someone across the globe suffers a symptomatic stroke. 'Silent' cerebrovascular disease insidiously contributes to worldwide disability by causing cognitive impairment in the elderly. The risk of cerebrovascular disease is disproportionately higher in low to middle income countries where there may be barriers to stroke care. The last two decades have seen a major transformation in the stroke field with the emergence of evidence-based approaches to stroke prevention,...

  3. The ocean circulation inverse problem

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wunsch, C

    1996-01-01

    .... This book addresses the problem of inferring the state of the ocean circulation, understanding it dynamically, and even forecasting it through a quantitative combination of theory and observation...

  4. Global ocean circulation by altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Carl; Haidvogel, D.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to determine the general circulation of the oceans and many of its climate and biochemical consequences through the optimum use of altimetry data from TOPEX/POSEIDON and related missions. Emphasis is on the global-scale circulation, as opposed to the regional scale, but some more local studies will be carried out. Because of funding limitations, the primary initial focus will be on the time-dependent global-scale circulation rather than the mean; eventually, the mean circulation must be dealt with as well.

  5. Prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among stroke survivors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Eboneé N; Evenson, Kelly R

    2014-01-01

    The risk of stroke is greatest among adults who have experienced a previous stroke, transient ischemic attack, or myocardial infarction. Physical activity may reduce the secondary risk of stroke through mediating effects on blood pressure, vasoconstriction, and circulating lipid concentrations; however, little is known about the prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among stroke survivors in the United States. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we describe self-reported and objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior among adults with a self-reported history of stroke. We also contrast physical activity among stroke survivors with that of adults without stroke (unexposed) to illustrate expected behavior in the absence of disease. Fewer participants with stroke met weekly physical activity guidelines as outlined in the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans when compared with unexposed participants (17.9% vs 25.0%) according to self-reported data. In addition, participants with stroke reported less moderate (46.1% vs 54.7%) and vigorous (9.1% vs 19.6%) leisure activity compared with unexposed participants. As measured by accelerometer, time since diagnosis was inversely associated with physical activity engagement, and participants with stroke recorded more daily hours of sedentary behavior compared with unexposed participants (10.1 hours vs 8.9 hours). Findings from this study provide a basis for future work seeking to measure the impact of physical activity on the secondary prevention of stroke by characterizing the prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among stroke survivors in the United States.

  6. Válvula de uretra anterior Anterior urethral valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Tucci Jr.

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: apresentar os aspectos clínicos, diagnósticos e terapêuticos de pacientes portadores de válvula da uretra anterior. Descrição: em dois neonatos, o diagnóstico presuntivo de patologia obstrutiva do trato urinário foi sugerido pela ultra-sonografia realizada no período pré-natal, confirmando-se o diagnóstico de válvula de uretra anterior pela avaliação pós-natal. Os pacientes foram submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico paliativo, com vesicostomia temporária e, posteriormente, definitivo, pela fulguração endoscópica das válvulas. Ambos evoluíram com função renal normal. Comentários: a válvula da uretra anterior é anomalia rara que deve ser considerada em meninos com quadro radiológico pré-natal sugestivo de obstrução infravesical, secundariamente à hipótese mais comum de válvula da uretra posterior. Ressaltamos a utilização da vesicostomia como derivação urinária temporária nestes casos, prevenindo potenciais complicações pela manipulação da uretra do recém-nascido.Objective: to discuss clinical signs, diagnostic tools and therapeutics of anterior urethral valves, an obstructive anomaly of the urinary system in males. Description: signs of urinary tract obstruction were identified on pre-natal ultrasound in two male fetuses and the diagnosis of anterior urethral valves was made through post-natal evaluation. As an initial treatment, vesicostomy was performed in both patients. Later, the valves were fulgurated using an endoscopic procedure. During the follow-up period both patients presented normal renal function. Comments: anterior urethral valves are a rare form of urethral anomaly that must be ruled out in boys with pre-natal ultrasound indicating infravesical obstruction. Vesicostomy used as an initial treatment rather than transurethral fulguration may prevent potential complications that can occur due to the small size of the neonatal urethra.

  7. Stroke Lesions in a Large Upper Limb Rehabilitation Trial Cohort Rarely Match Lesions in Common Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Matthew A; Wang, Ximing; Liu, Brent; Ding, Li; Lane, Christianne J; Park, Caron; Nelsen, Monica A; Jones, Theresa A; Wolf, Steven L; Winstein, Carolee J; Dromerick, Alexander W

    2017-06-01

    Stroke patients with mild-moderate upper extremity motor impairments and minimal sensory and cognitive deficits provide a useful model to study recovery and improve rehabilitation. Laboratory-based investigators use lesioning techniques for similar goals. To determine whether stroke lesions in an upper extremity rehabilitation trial cohort match lesions from the preclinical stroke recovery models used to drive translational research. Clinical neuroimages from 297 participants enrolled in the Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) study were reviewed. Images were characterized based on lesion type (ischemic or hemorrhagic), volume, vascular territory, depth (cortical gray matter, cortical white matter, subcortical), old strokes, and leukoaraiosis. Lesions were compared with those of preclinical stroke models commonly used to study upper limb recovery. Among the ischemic stroke participants, median infarct volume was 1.8 mL, with most lesions confined to subcortical structures (61%) including the anterior choroidal artery territory (30%) and the pons (23%). Of ICARE participants, stroke patients, but they represent a clinically and scientifically important subgroup. Compared with lesions in general stroke populations and widely studied animal models of recovery, ICARE participants had smaller, more subcortically based strokes. Improved preclinical-clinical translational efforts may require better alignment of lesions between preclinical and human stroke recovery models.

  8. Alterations in upper limb muscle synergy structure in chronic stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, William Z.; Perreault, Eric J.; Yoo, Seng Bum; Beer, Randall F.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in neurologically intact subjects have shown that motor coordination can be described by task-dependent combinations of a few muscle synergies, defined here as a fixed pattern of activation across a set of muscles. Arm function in severely impaired stroke survivors is characterized by stereotypical postural and movement patterns involving the shoulder and elbow. Accordingly, we hypothesized that muscle synergy composition is altered in severely impaired stroke survivors. Using an isometric force matching protocol, we examined the spatial activation patterns of elbow and shoulder muscles in the affected arm of 10 stroke survivors (Fugl-Meyer synergies were identified using non-negative matrix factorization. In both groups, muscle activation patterns could be reconstructed by combinations of a few muscle synergies (typically 4). We did not find abnormal coupling of shoulder and elbow muscles within individual muscle synergies. In stroke survivors, as in controls, two of the synergies were comprised of isolated activation of the elbow flexors and extensors. However, muscle synergies involving proximal muscles exhibited consistent alterations following stroke. Unlike controls, the anterior deltoid was coactivated with medial and posterior deltoids within the shoulder abductor/extensor synergy and the shoulder adductor/flexor synergy in stroke was dominated by activation of pectoralis major, with limited anterior deltoid activation. Recruitment of the altered shoulder muscle synergies was strongly associated with abnormal task performance. Overall, our results suggest that an impaired control of the individual deltoid heads may contribute to poststroke deficits in arm function. PMID:23155178

  9. Postural alignment is altered in people with chronic stroke and related to motor and functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, Geert; Ruesen, Carolien; Gorissen, Monique; Brumby, Victoria; Moran, Rachel; Burnett, Malcolm; Ashburn, Ann

    2014-10-01

    Trunk control is impaired after stroke but little is known about how changes in posture relate to other deficits. We examined spinal postural alignment in people with chronic stroke and explored the relationship between postural alignment and clinical measures. Twenty-one subjects with stroke and 22 age-matched healthy comparison subjects participated in this observational, cross-sectional study. Data collection included measurements of thoracic, lumbar, sacral, and overall postural alignment in the sagittal plane in both sitting and standing. Measurements were made in different postures, including: upright, flexed forward, and extended backward. Clinical outcome measures included the Trunk Impairment Scale and its subscales, Fugl-Meyer Scale, Berg Balance Scale, Barthel Index, and Stroke Impact Scale. Significant deviations in postural alignment for participants with stroke compared with comparison subjects were apparent in sacral alignment (P Scale (r = -0.61) and Berg Balance Scale (r = -0.64). Participants with greater anterior pelvic tilt when flexed forward and more overall inclination when flexed forward and extended backward scored better on the Trunk Impairment Scale, its subscales, and Berg Balance Scale (r = -0.6-0.7). People with chronic stroke have altered postural alignment in standing compared with subjects without neurological deficits. Investigating interventions focusing on increasing anterior and posterior pelvic tilt seem warranted.Video Abstract available. See video (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A76) for more insights from the authors.

  10. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: Findings from Hip Hop Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke is linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether “Child-Mediated Stroke Communication” (CMSC) could improve stroke literacy parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke (HHS). Methods Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from two public schools in Harlem, NYC, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child’s participation in HHS, a novel CMSC intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week following the intervention. Results Fifth and Sixth grade students (n =182) were enrolled into HHS. 102 parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program: before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the five cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911), compared to 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) post-intervention (pstroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that schoolchildren aged 9-12 may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their Parents. PMID:22033995

  11. From stroke unit care to stroke care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1999-01-01

    In some stroke units continuous monitoring of blood pressure, electrocardiogram, body temperature, and oxygen saturation has become an integral part of the management of acute stroke. In addition, regular measurements of blood glucose are performed. Stroke units equipped with such monitoring

  12. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  13. The obesity paradox in stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    . Data include age, gender, civil status, stroke severity, computed tomography, and cardiovascular risk factors. Patients were followed up to 9·8 years (median 2·6 years). We used Cox regression models to compare risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke in the four body mass index groups......BACKGROUND: Although associated with excess mortality and morbidity, obesity is associated with lower mortality after stroke. The association between obesity and risk of recurrent stroke is unclear. AIMS: The study aims to investigate the association in stroke patients between body mass index...... and risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke. METHODS: An administrative Danish quality-control registry designed to collect a predefined dataset on all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark 2000–2010 includes 45 615 acute first-ever stroke patients with information on body mass index in 29 326...

  14. Preventable Pediatric Stroke via Vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Press

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS group studied the risk of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS associated with minor infection and routine childhood vaccinations.

  15. Predictors of Good Outcome After Endovascular Therapy for Vertebrobasilar Occlusion Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouslama, Mehdi; Haussen, Diogo C; Aghaebrahim, Amin; Grossberg, Jonathan A; Walker, Gregory; Rangaraju, Srikant; Horev, Anat; Frankel, Michael R; Nogueira, Raul G; Jovin, Tudor G; Jadhav, Ashutosh P

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular therapy is increasingly used in acute ischemic stroke treatment and is now considered the gold standard approach for selected patient populations. Prior studies have demonstrated that eventual patient outcomes depend on both patient-specific factors and procedural considerations. However, these factors remain unclear for acute basilar artery occlusion stroke. We sought to determine prognostic factors of good outcome in acute posterior circulation large vessel occlusion strokes treated with endovascular therapy. We reviewed our prospectively collected endovascular databases at 2 US tertiary care academic institutions for patients with acute posterior circulation strokes from September 2005 to September 2015 who had 3-month modified Rankin Scale documented. Baseline characteristics, procedural data, and outcomes were evaluated. A good outcome was defined as a 90-day modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 2. The association between clinical and procedural parameters and functional outcome was assessed. A total of 214 patients qualified for the study. Smoking status, creatinine levels, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, anesthesia modality (conscious sedation versus general anesthesia), procedural length, and reperfusion status were significantly associated with good outcomes in the univariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that only smoking (odds ratio=2.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-5.56; P =0.013), low baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (odds ratio=1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.13; P Stroke Scale score, and successful reperfusion status were associated with good outcome in patients with posterior circulation stroke treated with endovascular therapy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. ACUTE STROKE: FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME PREDICTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha; Ramalingam; Vinodkumar; Vasumathi; Valarmathi; Anu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ischemic strokes account for >80% of total stroke events. Biochemical modalities like serum uric acid, ESR, CRP, Serum Fibrinogen will be a low cost and useful way to predict functional outcome after ischemic stroke. The Barthel ADL index it is an ordinal scale helping us to measure performances in ADL-activities in daily living. The present study aims to study the Biochemical parameters Uric Acid, CRP, ESR and Fibrinogen in Ischemic Stroke patients and to assess fu...

  17. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000681.htm Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury - aftercare To use the sharing features ... that connects a bone to another bone. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located inside your knee joint and ...

  19. Personal accounts of stroke experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachters-Kaufmann, CSM

    2000-01-01

    As there appeared to be a need for personal accounts of stroke experiences, a book called "Speaking about Stroke" was written for stroke patients and their caregivers. For the past two years, a questionnaire was sent to the people who had ordered the book, to gain an insight into the characteristics

  20. Questions and Answers about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stroke. High blood pressure increases your risk of stroke four to six times. Heart disease, especially a condition ... leading cause of serious, long-term adult disability. Four million Americans are living with the effects of stroke. The length of time to recover from a ...

  1. Stroke and Episodic Memory Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there…

  2. Antigen-specific immune reactions to ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xabier eUrra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain proteins are detected in the CSF and blood of stroke patients and their concentration is related to the extent of brain damage. Antibodies against brain antigens develop after stroke, suggesting a humoral immune response to the brain injury. Furthermore, induced immune tolerance is beneficial in animal models of cerebral ischemia. The presence of circulating T cells sensitized against brain antigens, and antigen presenting cells (APCs carrying brain antigens in draining lymphoid tissue of stroke patients support the notion that stroke might induce antigen-specific immune responses. After stroke, brain proteins that are normally hidden from the periphery, inflammatory mediators, and danger signals can exit the brain through several efflux routes. They can reach the blood after leaking out of the damaged blood-brain barrier or following the drainage of interstitial fluid to the dural venous sinus, or reach the cervical lymph nodes through the nasal lymphatics following CSF drainage along the arachnoid sheaths of nerves across the nasal submucosa. The route and mode of access of brain antigens to lymphoid tissue could influence the type of response. Central and peripheral tolerance prevents autoimmunity, but the actual mechanisms of tolerance to brain antigens released into the periphery in the presence of inflammation, danger signals, and APCs, are not fully characterized. Stroke does not systematically trigger autoimmunity, but under certain circumstances, such as pronounced systemic inflammation or infection, autoreactive T cells could escape the tolerance controls. Further investigation is needed to elucidate whether antigen-specific immune events could underlie neurological complications impairing stroke outcome.

  3. Stroke prevention: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2012-03-01

    Stroke is a personal, familial, and social disaster. It is the third cause of death worldwide, the first cause of acquired disability, the second cause of dementia, and its cost is astronomic. The burden of stroke is likely to increase given the aging of the population and the growing incidence of many vascular risk factors. Prevention of stroke includes--as for all other diseases--a "mass approach" aiming at decreasing the risk at the society level and an individual approach, aiming at reducing the risk in a given subject. The mass approach is primarily based on the identification and treatment of vascular risk factors and, if possible, in the implementation of protective factors. These measures are the basis of primary prevention but most of them have now been shown to be also effective in secondary prevention. The individual approach combines a vascular risk factor modification and various treatments addressing the specific subtypes of stroke, such as antiplatelet drugs for the prevention of cerebral infarction in large and small artery diseases of the brain, carotid endarterectomy or stenting for tight carotid artery stenosis, and oral anticoagulants for the prevention of cardiac emboli. There is a growing awareness of the huge evidence-to-practice gap that exists in stroke prevention largely due to socio-economic factors. Recent approaches include low cost intervention packages to reduce blood pressure and cheap "polypills" combining in a single tablet aspirin and several drugs to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Polypill intake should however not lead to abandon the healthy life-style measures which remain the mainstay of stroke prevention.

  4. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  5. Sino-Danish Brain Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø; Du, Xiangyun; Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2014-01-01

    China is faced with urgent needs to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable economy based on innovation and knowledge. Brain circulation and research and business investments from the outside are central for this development. Sino-American brain circulation and research...... and investment by overseas researchers and entrepreneurs are well described. In that case, the US is the center of global R&D and S&T. However, the brain circulation and research and investments between a small open Scandinavian economy, such as Denmark, and the huge developing economy of China are not well...... understood. In this case, Denmark is very highly developed, but a satellite in the global R&D and S&T system. With time and the growth of China as a R&D and S&T power house, both Denmark and China will benefit from brain circulation between them. Such brain circulation is likely to play a key role in flows...

  6. Multi-circulation boiler design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, Malcolm [Babcock and Wilcox Canada Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) requires steam, which was historically supplied by once-through steam generators (OTSG). OTSGs are now often replaced by drum boilers for steam generation. Drum boilers have a higher capacity than OTSGs and produce reduced blowdown. However, the volume of contaminants in feedwater is generally significant and ASME criteria require high-quality feedwater. The current study investigates a new design for a multi-circulation boiler that would allow cleaner steam to be generated from lower quality feedwater. In drum boilers, water circulates in one zone. By analyzing circulation fundamentals (notably heat flux and void fraction), the design of multiple circulation zones was envisaged to separate the clean water from the contaminated water. Working with distinct circulation zones would allow the quality of the steam from low quality feedwater to be improved, all the while maintaining the blowdown. The new design would result in a boiler which is easier to clean and would meet ASME criteria.

  7. Ischemic Stroke and Cancer: Stroke Severely Impacts Cancer Patients, While Cancer Increases the Number of Strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Oh Young; Seok, Jin Myoung; Kim, Seon Gyeong; Hong, Ji Man; Kim, Hahn Young; Lee, Jun; Chung, Pil-Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer and ischemic stroke are two of the most common causes of death among the elderly, and associations between them have been reported. However, the main pathomechanisms of stroke in cancer patients are not well known, and can only be established based on accurate knowledge of the characteristics of cancer-related strokes. We review herein recent studies concerning the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of patients with cancer-related stroke. Main Contents This revi...

  8. 38 CFR 3.379 - Anterior poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anterior poliomyelitis. 3... Specific Diseases § 3.379 Anterior poliomyelitis. If the first manifestations of acute anterior poliomyelitis present themselves in a veteran within 35 days of termination of active military service, it is...

  9. Epidermoid cyst in Anterior, Middle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankane Vivek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are benign slow growing more often extra-axial tumors that insinuate between brain structures, we present the clinical, imaging, and pathological findings in 35 years old female patients with atypical epidermoid cysts which was situated anterior, middle & posterior cranial fossa. NCCT head revealed hypodense lesion over right temporal and perisylvian region with extension in prepontine cistern with mass effect & midline shift and MRI findings revealed a non-enhancing heterogeneous signal intensity cystic lesion in right frontal & temporal region extending into prepontine cistern with restricted diffusion. Patient was detoriated in night of same day of admission, emergency Fronto-temporal craniotomy with anterior peterousectomy and subtotal resection was done. The histological examination confirms the epidermoid cyst. The timing of ectodermal tissue sequestration during fetal development may account for the occurrence of atypical epidermoid cysts.

  10. [Anterior chest wall examination reviewed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, A; Santilli, D; Trotta, F

    2002-01-01

    Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondyloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the "activity" of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  11. Chronic Anterior Uveitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Cristóbal; Frick, Mercedes M; LaMattina, Kara; Schlaen, Ariel; Khoury, Marina; Lopez, Matilde María; Hurtado, Erika; Espada, Graciela

    2016-08-01

    To describe the visual prognosis and remission rate of chronic anterior uveitis in pediatric patients. A retrospective case series of children with chronic anterior uveitis treated in the University of Buenos Aires. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was defined according to the International League of Associations for Rheumatology criteria. Uveitis remission was defined according to SUN criteria. There were 35 pediatric patients (61 eyes), mean age of uveitis onset was 7.69 ± 3 years, 60% were females and 74% had bilateral disease, median follow-up was 60 months (range: 12-192 months). JIA was more frequent in females (80.95 vs 21.43; pgood Received 30 August 2015; revised 6 March 2016; accepted 14 March 2016; published online 18 May 2016.

  12. Soluble CXCL16 and long-term outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueland, T; Smedbakken, L M; Hallén, J

    2012-01-01

    CXCL16 is a chemokine involved in atherosclerosis by promoting inflammation, lipid accumulation and matrix degradation. The level of circulating CXCL16 has been proposed as a predictor of long-term mortality in acute coronary syndromes. We studied plasma CXCL16 in acute ischemic stroke and examined...

  13. Anterior cingulotomy for intractable pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Agarwal, MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Conservative therapy is often the first-line treatment for many symptoms of various disease processes, including pain. Nevertheless, if pharmacological or medical management fails for those patients with severe and chronic pain, a surgical strategy may be a reasonable option. First performed for psychiatric disorders, cingulotomy now has been recognized as a viable option for the management of pain. The authors review the literature on anterior cingulotomy for intractable pain to provide guidelines for management and expected outcomes.

  14. Anterior shoulder dislocations in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronen, J G

    1986-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocations, primary and recurrent, are among the most disabling injuries to the shoulder that can plague the athlete. The diagnosis is easily made by the following: the physical appearance of the shoulder; loss of capability by the athlete to internally and externally rotate the shoulder with the elbow at his side; by evaluating the mechanism of injury; and x-rays. Anterior shoulder dislocations should be reduced as soon as possible after diagnosis, to minimise the stretching effect on the neurovascular structures while the humeral head is dislocated. The reduction is not done to allow the athlete to return immediately to sport. Use of a simple traction method in the first 10 to 15 minutes following the injury will result in a successful reduction in the vast majority of dislocations. Reduction of the humeral head can be confirmed by the athlete regaining the capability to internally and externally rotate his shoulder with his elbow at his side. Following reduction, the athlete should begin a treatment regimen which includes a restrengthening programme emphasising the muscles of internal rotation and adduction plus rigid restrictions of activities until the goals of the rehabilitation programme are satisfied. The author's experience with this treatment regimen with athletes at the United States Naval Academy, has shown a decrease of the recurrence rate of primary anterior shoulder dislocations to 25% versus the 80% recurrence rate we have become familiar with from studies done which did not stress specific rehabilitation programmes. The athlete should also be instructed in a self-performed traction method for reduction should a redislocation occur, to minimise the stretching effect on the neurovascular structures and allow relief from discomfort. Surgery for primary and recurrent anterior dislocations should only be considered when the athlete fails to achieve the desired goals after participating in a specific, progressive, adequate

  15. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    OpenAIRE

    F. Trotta; D. Santilli; A. Lo Monaco

    2011-01-01

    Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as er...

  16. Family History in Young Patients With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Dichgans, Martin; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Kolodny, Edwin; Kropp, Peter; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Rothwell, Peter M; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-07-01

    Family history of stroke is an established risk factor for stroke. We evaluated whether family history of stroke predisposed to certain stroke subtypes and whether it differed by sex in young patients with stroke. We used data from the Stroke in Fabry Patients study, a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young patients (aged stroke in whom cardiovascular risk factors and family history of stroke were obtained and detailed stroke subtyping was performed. A family history of stroke was present in 1578 of 4232 transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients (37.3%). Female patients more often had a history of stroke in the maternal lineage (P=0.027) than in the paternal lineage. There was no association with stroke subtype according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment nor with the presence of white matter disease on brain imaging. Patients with dissection less frequently reported a family history of stroke (30.4% versus 36.3%; P=0.018). Patients with a parental history of stroke more commonly had siblings with stroke (3.6% versus 2.6%; P=0.047). Although present in about a third of patients, a family history of stroke is not specifically related to stroke pathogenic subtypes in patients with young stroke. Young women with stroke more often report stroke in the maternal lineage. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. [HE Xingwei's exploration and experience in the pathogenesis and treatment of motor impairment of the trunk after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Hu, Songfeng; He, Fan; Fang, Jinying; Wang, Qiang; He, Xingwei

    2017-02-12

    In the paper, it is introduced professor HE Xingwei 's recognition on the pathogenesis and professor HE 's experience in the treatment of the motor impairment of the trunk after stroke. Professor He believes that the motor impairment of the trunk after stroke is the essential factor affecting the rehabilitation in stroke. The motor impairment of the trunk after stroke results from brain marrow damage and spiritual impairment. Hence, regaining the consciousness and promoting the circulation of the governor vessel are the basic principles of the treatment, named regulating the mind and controlling qi , benefiting qi and warming yang , tonifying the kidney and filling up the essence, and promoting the circulation of the governor vessel. Those four therapeutic methods are equally important. Acupuncture, moxibusiton and herbal medicine are applied in combination in the treatment. Additionally, the psychotherapy and rehabilitation are the accessory therapies.

  18. Morphometric Analysis of Bone Resection in Anterior Petrosectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama; Walther, Jonathan; Theriot, Krystle; Manuel, Morganne; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The anterior petrosectomy is a well-defined skull base approach to lesions such as petroclival meningiomas, posterior circulation aneurysms, petrous apex lesions (chondrosarcomas, cholesteatomas), ventrolateral brainstem lesions, clival chordomas, trigeminal neurinomas, and access to cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VII. Methods and Materials Fourteen anterior petrosectomies on eight cadaveric heads were performed in a skull base dissection laboratory. Predissection and postdissection thin-cut computed tomography scans were obtained to compare the bone resection. A computer program was used (InVivo5, Anatomage, San Jose, California, United States) to measure the bone resection and the improved viewing angle. Results The average bone removed in each plane was as follows: anterior to posterior plane was 10.57 mm ± 2.00 mm, superior to inferior was 9.39 mm ± 1.67 mm, and lateral to medial was 17.46 mm ± 4.64 mm. The average increased angle of view was 13.01 ± 2.35 degrees (Table 1). The average volume was 1786.94 ± 827.40 mm(3). Conclusions Anterior petrosectomy is a useful approach to access the ventrolateral brainstem region. We present a cadaveric study quantitating the volume of bone resection and improvement in the viewing angle. These data provide useful preoperative information on the utility of this skull base approach and the gain in the viewing angle after bony removal.

  19. Ageism in stroke rehabilitation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Eva Joan; Geoghegan, Sheena Elizabeth; O'Neill, Desmond

    2014-05-01

    stroke is predominantly a disease of older people. While age bias has been demonstrated in studies of pharmacological therapeutic interventions in stroke, the extent of discrimination by age in stroke rehabilitation studies is unknown. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature to assess the extent of ageism in stroke rehabilitation studies. all randomised control trials (RCT) on stroke rehabilitation entered in the Cochrane database which reported mean age were included. Patient gender and exclusion criteria were also recorded. of 241 RCT's identified, 182 were eligible for inclusion. The mean age of all patients was 64.3, almost a decade younger than those seen by stroke physicians in daily practice in global terms, and 11-12 years younger than encountered in hospital practice in the British Isles. Almost half (46%) of trials excluded patients with cognitive impairment, almost one-quarter (23%) patients with dysphasia and one-eighth (13%) excluded patients with multiple strokes. we have identified a clear difference in the mean age of those included in stroke rehabilitation studies compared with the international mean age of stroke. In addition, a quarter of trials excluded dysphasic patients which may indicate omission of more severe strokes. This means that the evidence base for stroke rehabilitation is deficient in terms of matching the characteristics of patients encountered in clinical practice, and a more representative sample of older people and those with significant disability must be included in future trials.

  20. Stroke? Localized, otogenic meningitis!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingolfsdottir, Harpa Maria; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted with aphasia, treated for a stroke. Subsequently, it was revealed that the symptoms were caused by complicated otitis media with localized meningitis. This case draws attention to the possible intracranial spread of infection when neurological symptoms occur...

  1. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-01-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG)

  2. Stroke while jogging.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, W. F.; Roussak, J.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging is a form of physical exercise that has stimulated the imagination of the public as shown by recent appearance of its own journal (Jogging Magazine, Editor J. Bryant). We wish to report the unusual complication of an acute stroke sustained during jogging.

  3. Stroke while jogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, W. F.; Roussak, J.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging is a form of physical exercise that has stimulated the imagination of the public as shown by recent appearance of its own journal (Jogging Magazine, Editor J. Bryant). We wish to report the unusual complication of an acute stroke sustained during jogging. Images p229-a Fig. 1 PMID:7448490

  4. Sex differences in stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haast, R.A.M.; Gustafson, D.R.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in stroke are observed across epidemiologic studies, pathophysiology, treatments, and outcomes. These sex differences have profound implications for effective prevention and treatment and are the focus of this review. Epidemiologic studies reveal a clear age-by-sex interaction in

  5. Stroke: Temporal Trends and Association with Atmospheric Variables and Air Pollutants in Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santurtún, Ana; Ruiz, Patricia Bolivar; López-Delgado, Laura; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Riancho, Javier; Zarrabeitia, María T

    2017-07-01

    Stroke, the second cause of death and the most frequent cause of severe disability among adults in developed countries, is related to a large variety of risk factors. This paper assesses the temporal patterns in stroke episodes in a city in Northern Spain during a 12-year period and analyzes the possible effects that atmospheric pollutants and meteorological variables may have on stroke on a daily scale. Our results show that there is an increase in stroke admissions (r = 0.818, p = 0.001) especially in patients over 85 years old. On a weekly scale, the number of hospital admissions due to stroke remains stable from Monday to Friday, whereas it abruptly decreases during the weekends, reaching its minimum values on Sunday (p atmospheric circulation shows a higher frequency of the former in Santander with enhanced negative air pressure anomalies over western Spain; the fact that under these conditions the region studied registers very low values of relative humidity is in line with the aforementioned inverse correlation, which has not been described elsewhere in the literature. This study could be a first step for implementing stroke alert protocols depending on air pollution levels and circulation patterns forecasts.

  6. Thrombolysis in Postoperative Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Nicolas; Hubert, Nikolai Dominik; Backhaus, Roland; Haberl, Roman Ludwig; Hubert, Gordian Jan

    2017-11-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) is beneficial in reducing disability in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. There are numerous contraindications to IVT. One is recent surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety of IVT in patients with postoperative stroke. Data of consecutive IVT patients from the Telemedical Project for Integrative Stroke Care thrombolysis registry (February 2003 to October 2014; n=4848) were retrospectively searched for keywords indicating preceding surgery. Patients were included if surgery was performed within the last 90 days before stroke. The primary outcome was defined as surgical site hemorrhage. Subgroups with major/minor surgery and recent/nonrecent surgery (within 10 days before IVT) were analyzed separately. One hundred thirty-four patients underwent surgical intervention before IVT. Surgery had been performed recently (days 1-10) in 49 (37%) and nonrecently (days 11-90) in 85 patients (63%). In 86 patients (64%), surgery was classified as major, and in 48 (36%) as minor. Nine patients (7%) developed surgical site hemorrhage after IVT, of whom 4 (3%) were serious, but none was fatal. One fatal bleeding occurred remotely from surgical area. Rate of surgical site hemorrhage was significantly higher in recent than in nonrecent surgery (14.3% versus 2.4%, respectively, odds ratio adjusted 10.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-61.27). Difference between patients with major and minor surgeries was less distinct (8.1% and 4.2%, respectively; odds ratio adjusted 4.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-25.04). Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.2%. Intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 9.7% and was asymptomatic in all cases. IVT may be administered safely in postoperative patients as off-label use after appropriate risk-benefit assessment. However, bleeding risk in surgical area should be taken into account particularly in patients who have undergone surgery shortly before stroke onset. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  8. Rehabilitating the Stroke Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Grimmond

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this project was to complete an analysis of monograph and audiovisual items held in the Central Coast Health Service (CCHS Libraries and containing information relevant to the treatment of acute stroke. Acute stroke is treated by multidisciplinary teams of clinicians based at two hospitals within the CCHS. The adequacy of the library collection was measured by subject coverage and age. Methods The methodology used consisted of three main steps: a literature review; design, administration, and analysis of a questionnaire to members of the CCHS Acute Stroke Team; and an analysis of the libraries’ collections. The research project utilised project management methodology and an evidence based librarianship framework. Results The questionnaire revealed that electronic resources were by far the most frequently used by participants, followed in order by print journals, books, interlibrary loan articles, and audiovisual items. Collection analysis demonstrated that the monograph and audiovisual collections were adequate in both scope and currency to support the information needs of Acute Stroke Team members, with the exception of resources to support patient education. Conclusion The researchers developed recommendations for future collection development in the area of acute stroke resources. Conducting this project within the evidence based librarianship framework helped to develop library staff members’ confidence in their ability to make future collection development decisions, informed by the target group’s information needs and preferences. The collection analysis methodology was designed to be replicated, and new specialist groups within the client base of the library will be targeted to repeat the collection analysis process.

  9. Stroke treatment outcomes in hospitals with and without Stroke Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjuan, J; Gállego Culleré, J; Ignacio García, E; Mira Solves, J J; Ollero Ortiz, A; Vidal de Francisco, D; López-Mesonero, L; Bestué, M; Albertí, O; Acebrón, F; Navarro Soler, I M

    2017-10-23

    Organisational capacity in terms of resources and care circuits to shorten response times in new stroke cases is key to obtaining positive outcomes. This study compares therapeutic approaches and treatment outcomes between traditional care centres (with stroke teams and no stroke unit) and centres with stroke units. We conducted a prospective, quasi-experimental study (without randomisation of the units analysed) to draw comparisons between 2 centres with stroke units and 4 centres providing traditional care through the neurology department, analysing a selection of agreed indicators for monitoring quality of stroke care. A total of 225 patients participated in the study. In addition, self-administered questionnaires were used to collect patients' evaluations of the service and healthcare received. Centres with stroke units showed shorter response times after symptom onset, both in the time taken to arrive at the centre and in the time elapsed from patient's arrival at the hospital to diagnostic imaging. Hospitals with stroke units had greater capacity to respond through the application of intravenous thrombolysis than centres delivering traditional neurological care. Centres with stroke units showed a better fit to the reference standards for stroke response time, as calculated in the Quick study, than centres providing traditional care through the neurology department. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Secular trends in ischemic stroke subtypes and stroke risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Hackam, Daniel G; McLeod, A Ian; Spence, J David

    2014-11-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of a stroke improves patient outcomes, and knowledge of the cause of the initial event is crucial to identification of the appropriate therapy to maximally reduce risk of recurrence. Assumptions based on historical frequency of ischemic subtypes may need revision if stroke subtypes are changing as a result of recent changes in therapy, such as increased use of statins. We analyzed secular trends in stroke risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes among patients with transient ischemic attack or minor or moderate stroke referred to an urgent transient ischemic attack clinic from 2002 to 2012. There was a significant decline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure, associated with a significant decline in large artery stroke and small vessel stroke. The proportion of cardioembolic stroke increased from 26% in 2002 to 56% in 2012 (Prisk factors was observed, with a significant decline in stroke/transient ischemic attack caused by large artery atherosclerosis and small vessel disease. As a result, cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack has increased significantly. Our findings suggest that more intensive investigation for cardiac sources of embolism and greater use of anticoagulation may be warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Outcome Determinants of Stroke in a Brazilian Primary Stroke Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo W. Kuster

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke mortality in Brazil is one of the highest among Western countries. Nonetheless, stroke outcome determinants are still poorly known in this country. In this study we evaluate outcome determinants of stroke in a primary stroke center in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods. We evaluated demographic, clinical, and outcome data of patients with ischemic stroke (IS, transient ischemic attack (TIA, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH admitted at “Hospital Paulistano,” São Paulo, Brazil. In-hospital mortality and functional outcome determinants were assessed. Univariate and binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Results. Three hundred forty-one patients were included in the study, 52.2% being male with 66.8±15.7 years. The stroke type distribution was IS: 59.2%, TIA: 29.6%, and ICH: 11.1%. ICH was associated with greater severity and poorer functional outcome. The determinants of poorer functional outcome were higher NIHSS, lower Glasgow score, and lower oxygen saturation level. The most important mortality determinant was the presence of visual symptoms. Conclusions. The stroke mortality and stroke outcome determinants found in the present study do not remarkably differ from studies carried out in developed countries. Stroke prognosis studies are crucial to better understand the high burden of stroke in Brazil.

  12. Mid-cervical flame-shaped pseudo-occlusion: diagnostic performance of mid-cervical flame-shaped extracranial internal carotid artery sign on computed tomographic angiography in hyperacute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakkamakul, Supada; Pitakvej, Nantaporn [King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital the Thai Red Cross Society, Department of Radiology, Bangkok (Thailand); Dumrongpisutikul, Netsiri; Lerdlum, Sukalaya [King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital the Thai Red Cross Society, Department of Radiology, Bangkok (Thailand); Chulalongkorn University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2017-10-15

    Flame-shaped pseudo-occlusion of the extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) is a flow-related phenomenon that creates computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) findings that mimic tandem intracranial-extracranial ICA occlusion or dissection. We aim to determine the diagnostic performance of mid-cervical flame-shaped extracranial ICA sign on CTA in hyperacute ischemic stroke patients. We retrospectively included consecutive anterior circulation ischemic stroke patients presenting within 6 h of symptom onset who underwent 4D brain CTA and arterial-phase neck CTA using a 320-detector CT scanner during August 2012 to July 2015. Two blinded readers independently reviewed arterial-phase neck CTA and characterized the extracranial ICA configurations into mid-cervical flame-shaped, proximal blunt/beak-shaped, and tubular-shaped groups. 4D whole brain CTA was used as a reference standard for intracranial ICA occlusion detection. Diagnostic performance of the mid-cervical flame-shaped extracranial ICA sign and interobserver reliability were calculated. Of the 81 cases, 11 had isolated intracranial ICA occlusion, and 6 had true extracranial ICA occlusion. Mid-cervical flame-shaped extracranial ICA sign was found in 45.5% (5/11) of isolated intracranial ICA occlusions but none in the true extracranial ICA occlusion group. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of the mid-cervical flame-shaped extracranial ICA sign for the detection of isolated intracranial ICA occlusion were 45.5, 100, 100, 92.1, and 92.6%, respectively. Interobserver reliability was 0.90. The mid-cervical flame-shaped extracranial ICA sign may suggest the presence of isolated intracranial ICA occlusion and allow reliable exclusion of tandem extracranial-intracranial ICA occlusion in hyperacute ischemic stroke setting. (orig.)

  13. Understanding Stroke - Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Understanding Stroke Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time Past Issues / ... Julie Harris, and motivational speaker David Layton. Preventing Stroke "Until I had my stroke, I didn't ...

  14. Compensatory stepping responses in individuals with stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Bimal; Mansfield, Avril; Inness, Elizabeth L; McIlroy, William E

    2011-05-01

    Impaired postural control and a high incidence of falls are commonly observed following stroke. Compensatory stepping responses are critical to reactive balance control. We hypothesize that, following a stroke, individuals with unilateral limb dyscontrol will be faced with the unique challenge of controlling such rapid stepping reactions that may eventually be linked to the high rate of falling. The objectives of this exploratory pilot study were to investigate compensatory stepping in individuals poststroke with regard to: (1) choice of initial stepping limb (paretic or non-paretic); (2) step characteristics; and (3) differences in step characteristics when the initial step is taken with the paretic vs. the non-paretic limb. Four subjects following stroke (38-165 days post) and 11 healthy young adults were recruited. Anterior and posterior perturbations were delivered by using a weight drop system. Force plates recorded centre-of-pressure excursion prior to the onset of stepping and step timing. Of the four subjects, three only attempted to step with their non-paretic limb and one stepped with either limb. Time to foot-off was generally slow, whereas step onset time and swing time were comparable to healthy controls. Two of the four subjects executed multistep responses in every trial, and attempts to force stepping with the paretic limb were unsuccessful in three of the four subjects. Despite high clinical balance scores, these individuals with stroke demonstrated impaired compensatory stepping responses, suggesting that current clinical evaluations might not accurately reflect reactive balance control in this population.

  15. Cryostimulation improves recovery from oropharyngeal dysphagia after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo da

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is considered one of the most frequent neurological causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Aim: To determine the effect of cryostimulation on oropharyngeal sensitivity and, subsequently, on the swallowing reaction and premature escape of food in patients with neurogenic dysphagia after stroke. Methods: Clinical and experimental study. The study enrolled 7 adult subjects, 6 men and 1 woman ranging from 28 to 64 years of age, with a diagnosis of stroke and current oropharyngeal dysphagia without any other underlying disease. The selected subjects underwent speech-language pathology evaluation and videofluoroscopic assessment of the dysphagia. The subjects were then treated with cryostimulation consisting of 10 applications to each structure (anterior faucial pillar, posterior oropharyngeal wall, soft palate, and back tongue 3 times a day (for a total of 30 daily applications per structure for 4 consecutive days. The patients were then re-evaluated based on the same criteria. The pre- and post-cryostimulation results of the clinical and videofluoroscopic evaluations were analyzed descriptively and statistically using Student's t-test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Cryostimulation had beneficial effects on oropharyngeal sensitivity in 6 of the 7 subjects. There was also a significant improvement in swallowing and in the premature escape in six subjects. Conclusion: Cryostimulation increased sensitivity and subsequently improved the swallowing reaction and premature escape of food in patients with neurogenic dysphagia after stroke. These effects were evident by both speech-language pathology and videofluoroscopic evaluation.

  16. Dynamics of myelin content decrease in the rat stroke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisel, A.; Khodanovich, M.; Atochin, D.; Mustafina, L.; Yarnykh, V.

    2017-08-01

    The majority of studies were usually focused on neuronal death after brain ischemia; however, stroke affects all cell types including oligodendrocytes that form myelin sheath in the CNS. Our study is focused on the changes of myelin content in the ischemic core and neighbor structures in early terms (1, 3 and 10 days) after stroke. Stroke was modeled with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in 15 male rats that were divided into three groups by time points after operation. Brain sections were histologically stained with Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) for myelin quantification. The significant demyelination was found in the ischemic core, corpus callosum, anterior commissure, whereas myelin content was increased in caudoputamen, internal capsule and piriform cortex compared with the contralateral hemisphere. The motor cortex showed a significant increase of myelin content on the 1st day and a significant decrease on the 3rd and 10th days after MCAo. These results suggest that stroke influences myelination not only in the ischemic core but also in distant structures.

  17. Acute ischemic stroke secondary to glioblastoma. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Sofia; Carneiro, Ângelo; Rodrigues, Tiago; Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Pereira, Cláudia

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma is a malignant infiltrative glial tumor occurring most often over 50 years of age, with diverse clinical presentations. We describe a case of temporal lobe glioblastoma with a rare presentation as an acute ischemic stroke, discussing the imaging and histopathological findings, and reviewing the literature. A 77-year-old woman had sudden onset of left hemiparesis and hemihypoesthesia. The neuroradiological studies revealed an acute ischemic lesion in the right lenticulostriate arteries territory and a right anterior temporal lobe tumor, enhancing heterogeneously after contrast with enhancement of the right middle cerebral artery wall. Histopathological analysis of the resected temporal lesion revealed a glioblastoma multiforme with tumoral infiltration of the vascular wall. Glioblastoma should be considered in the etiology of acute ischemic stroke, where neuroimaging plays an important diagnostic role, enabling a more immediate therapeutic approach, with a consequent impact on survival.

  18. Language Disorders due to Posterior System Strokes - An Ignored Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ÖZTÜRK, Şerefnur; EGE, Fahrettin; EKMEKÇİ, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The anterior system is primarily responsible for the clinical picture in a patient that presents with clinical aphasia. However, recent reports have shown that injuries to posterior structures, the cerebellum in particular, may have a role in language processing. Herein, we will look first at the linguistic role of the cerebellum in light of the literature, then of the thalamus and some described clinical syndromes, and finally, specific syndromes resulting from occipital lobe lesions, all of which are supported by the posterior vascular system. The human brain is such a complex organization that in addition to the thalamus and occipital cortex, we can see the involvement of the cerebellum in high cognitive functions. Posterior system strokes may lead to clinical findings of cognitive deficits, including neurolinguistic components. Determining these defects in stroke patients may precipitate changes in current management strategies. PMID:28360648

  19. Ischemic stroke following abuse of Marijuana in a Nigerian adult male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalekan Oyinloye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug among adolescents and young adults. Despite its widespread use, only a few reports exist on the association of cannabis use and stroke. A 26-year-old Nigerian male, developed right-sided ischemic stroke few hours after smoking three wraps of cannabis. He had smoked cannabis consistently for the past 4 years prior to the development of the stroke. Known stroke etiology and abuse of other illicit drugs were ruled out from history and investigations. Neuroimaging studies of the brain revealed infarcts in basal ganglia secondary to occlusion of blood flow in the left anterior and middle cerebral arteries. The mechanism of stroke in this patient was thought to be a cannabis-induced vasculopathy. Many cases of stroke in the young are increasingly being seen in hospitals in resource scarce countries. There seems to be a predilection for the basal ganglia in ischemic stroke following cannabis abuse. Therefore, cannabis abuse should be considered in young adults with basal ganglia infarcts, after excluding other known etiologies.

  20. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Incident Ischemic Stroke and Its Atherothrombotic and Cardioembolic Subtypes in 3 US Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Hamidreza; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Shi, Peilin; Longstreth, W T; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Siscovick, David; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Willett, Walter C; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-10-01

    The associations of individual long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with incident ischemic stroke and its main subtypes are not well established. We aimed to investigate prospectively the relationship of circulating eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with risk of total ischemic, atherothrombotic, and cardioembolic stroke. We measured circulating phospholipid fatty acids at baseline in 3 separate US cohorts: CHS (Cardiovascular Health Study), NHS (Nurses' Health Study), and HPFS (Health Professionals Follow-Up Study). Ischemic strokes were prospectively adjudicated and classified into atherothrombotic (large- and small-vessel infarctions) or cardioembolic by imaging studies and medical records. Risk according to fatty acid levels was assessed using Cox proportional hazards (CHS) or conditional logistic regression (NHS, HPFS) according to study design. Cohort findings were pooled using fixed-effects meta-analysis. A total of 953 incident ischemic strokes were identified (408 atherothrombotic, 256 cardioembolic, and 289 undetermined subtypes) during median follow-up of 11.2 years (CHS) and 8.3 years (pooled, NHS and HPFS). After multivariable adjustment, lower risk of total ischemic stroke was seen with higher DPA (highest versus lowest quartiles; pooled hazard ratio [HR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-0.92) and DHA (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64-1.00) but not eicosapentaenoic acid (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77-1.19). DHA was associated with lower risk of atherothrombotic stroke (HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.34-0.83) and DPA with lower risk of cardioembolic stroke (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.92). Findings in each individual cohort were consistent with pooled results. In 3 large US cohorts, higher circulating levels of DHA were inversely associated with incident atherothrombotic stroke and DPA with cardioembolic stroke. These novel findings suggest differential pathways of benefit for DHA, DPA, and eicosapentaenoic acid. © 2017

  1. Challenging comparison of stroke scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke scales can be classified as clinicometric scales and functional impairment, handicap scales. All studies describing stroke scales were reviewed by internet searching engines with the final search performed on January 1, 2013. The following string of keywords was entered into search engines; stroke, scale, score and disability. Despite advantages of modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Scandinavian stroke scale comparing to the NIHSS, including their simplification and less inter-rater variability; most of the stroke neurologists around the world continue using the NIHSS. The modified Rankin scale (mRS and Barthel index (BI are widely used functional impairment and disability scales. Distinction between grades of mRS is poorly defined. The Asian stroke disability scale is a simplified functional impairment, handicap scale which is as valid as mRS and BI. At the present time, the NIHSS, mRS and BI are routine stroke scales because physicians have used to work with these scales for more than two decades, although it could not be an acceptable reason. On the other side, results of previous stroke trials, which are the basis of stroke management guidelines are driven using these scales.

  2. Post-stroke urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Z; Birns, J; Bhalla, A

    2013-11-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of the current evidence on post-stroke urinary incontinence. An electronic database search was performed to identify relevant studies and review articles related to Urinary Incontinence (UI) in the stroke population between the years 1966 and 2012. Urinary incontinence following stroke is a common problem affecting more than one-third of acute stroke patients and persisting in up to a quarter at 1 year. It is well established that this condition is a strong marker of stroke severity and is associated with poorer functional outcomes and increased institutionalisation and mortality rates compared with those who remain continent. Despite evidence linking better outcomes to those patients who regain continence, the results of national audits have demonstrated that the management of UI following stroke is suboptimal, with less than two-thirds of stroke units having a documented plan to promote continence. Current evidence supports a thorough assessment to categorise the type and severity of post-stroke urinary incontinence. An individually tailored, structured management strategy to promote continence should be employed. This has been associated with better stroke outcomes and should be the aim of all stroke health professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Gnathostomiasis of the anterior chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barua P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular involvement with Gnathostoma spinigerum occurs years after the initial infection that is acquired by ingestion of poorly cooked, pickled seafood or water contaminated with third stage larvae. Here we report a case of gnathostomiasis of the left eye of a 32-year-old lady hailing from Meghalaya, India. Her vision had deteriorated to hand movement. Slit lamp examination revealed a live, actively motile worm in the anterior chamber, which was extracted by supra temporal limbal incision and visual acuity was restored.

  4. Post-Stroke Depression, Apathy and Alexithymia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriana Horta Rendeiro Correia Pinto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several behavioural changes can occur as a consequence of stroke. A large number of studies have evaluated the frequency and severity of post-stroke depression,  apathy  and  alexithymia  that  result from stroke, however the published data is contradictory.Aims: The aim of this article is to present a literature review of the concepts of depression, apathy  and  alexithymia  and  post-stroke neuroanatomical  findings  that  support these psychopathological observations.Methods: Literature review of selected articles and books deemed relevant by the authors, using Medline/Pubmed database with the combination of the following key-words: “stroke”, “apathy”, “alexithymia”, “depression”,  published  between  1973  and  2013. References of the selected articles and books were also considered.Results  and  Conclusions: After  stroke, many patients are left with variable levels of disability, resulting in a mourning process, and this emotional response is thought to be a normative one to post-stroke problems. It has been understood that the depressive dimension is associated with left frontal lobe functioning  (the  so-called  left  frontal  lobe theory, whereas the apathetic dimension is associated with the basal ganglia. The rate of apathy is lower in patients without previous cerebrovascular  disease;  the  rate  of ‘pure’ apathy (without concomitant depression is twice as frequent as the rate of ‘pure’ depression  (without  concomitant  apathy. Apathetic patients are more frequently and severely depressed and cognitively impaired in comparison to nonapathetic patients. The mechanisms  underlying reduced  emotional  consciousness  and  emotional  blunting following stroke of the MCA are still poorly understood. Apathy and adynamia can be attributed to lesions in the insula and basal ganglia, however reduced emotional awareness can occur as a consequence of changes in

  5. Cell-free DNA as a biomarker in stroke: Current status, problems and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebova, Kristina V; Veiko, Natalya N; Nikonov, Aleksey A; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Kostuyk, Svetlana V

    2018-01-01

    There is currently no proposed stroke biomarker with consistent application in clinical practice. A number of studies have examined cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which circulates in biological fluids during stroke, as a potential biomarker of this disease. The data available suggest that dynamically-determined levels of blood cfDNA may provide new prognostic information for assessment of stroke severity and outcome. However, such an approach has its own difficulties and limitations. This review covers the potential role of cfDNA as a biomarker in stroke, and includes evidence from both animal models and clinical studies, protocols used to analyze cfDNA, and hypotheses on the origin of cfDNA.

  6. Serum cholinesterase activities distinguish between stroke patients and controls and predict 12-month mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Assayag, Einor; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Ofek, Keren

    2010-01-01

    To date there is no diagnostic biomarker for mild stroke, although elevation of inflammatory biomarkers has been reported at early stages. Previous studies implicated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) involvement in stroke, and circulating AChE activity reflects inflammatory response, since acetylcholine...... suppresses inflammation. Therefore, carriers of polymorphisms that modify cholinergic activity should be particularly susceptible to inflammatory damage. Our study sought diagnostic values of AChE and Cholinergic Status (CS, the total capacity for acetylcholine hydrolysis) in suspected stroke patients....... For this purpose, serum cholinesterase activities, butyrylcholinesterase-K genotype and inflammatory biomarkers were determined in 264 ischemic stroke patients and matched controls during the acute phase. AChE activities were lower (P...

  7. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...... searches of reference lists, and discussion with collaborators. DATA EXTRACTION: Individual records were provided for each of 126,634 participants in 36 prospective studies. During 1.3 million person-years of follow-up, 22,076 first-ever fatal or nonfatal vascular disease outcomes or nonvascular deaths...... were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta...

  8. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...... were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta-analysis...... broadly continuous in shape. In the 24 cohort studies, the rates of CHD in the top and bottom thirds of baseline Lp(a) distributions, respectively, were 5.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4-5.9) per 1000 person-years and 4.4 (95% CI, 4.2-4.6) per 1000 person-years. The risk ratio for CHD, adjusted...

  9. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  10. For whom the desert bell tolls: heat stroke or stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bolatkale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat stroke is the most complicated and dangerous amongst heat injuries that can lead to irreversible injury and even death with itself or with creating predisposibility to different diseases. The following case report depicts a patient who presented primarily with impairment of consciousness after walking 45 km in the summer heat to cross the Syria-Turkey border and later syncope. This case report aims to highlight the possibility of higher co-incidence with heat stroke and stroke.

  11. British Association of Stroke Physicians: benchmarking survey of stroke services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Helen; Dennis, Martin; Cohen, David; Rudd, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    the National Service Framework for Older People requires every general hospital which cares for stroke patients to introduce a specialist stroke service by 2004. to describe the organisation and staffing of specialist hospital-based stroke services in the UK. a national postal survey of consultant members of the British Association of Stroke Physicians (BASP) seeking details of the provision of neurovascular clinics, acute stroke units (ASUs), stroke rehabilitation units (SRUs), and the organisation and staffing of these services. the response rate was 91/126 (72%). Fifty-four neurovascular clinics, 40 ASUs and 68 SRUs were identified. Neurovascular clinics used a number of strategies to maintain rapid access and 30 (56%) were run by a single consultant. Only 50% ASUs usually admitted patients within 24 h of stroke. As the number of beds available on ASUs and SRUs did not reflect the total number of stroke in-patients, 21 (53%) ASUs and 45 (79%) SRUs had admission criteria. Training opportunities were limited: 37% ASUs and 82% SRUs had no specialist registrar. The therapy sessions (1 session=half a day) available per bed per week on a SRU were: physiotherapy 0.8; occupational therapy 0.6; speech and language therapy 0.25. significant development is needed to achieve the NSF target for hospital-based stroke services as few Trusts currently have all components in place and even when available not all stroke patients have access to specialist care. Stroke specialists will be required to run these services but training opportunities are currently limited. Stroke unit therapy staffing levels were lower than was available in randomised controlled trials.

  12. Clinical implications of anterior S-T segment depression in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, C.H.; Woodward, W.; Nicod, P.; Corbett, J.R.; Lewis, S.E.; Willerson, J.T.; Rude, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    To assess various factors associated with anterior S-T segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction, 47 consecutive patients with electrocardiographic evidence of a first transmural inferior infarction were studied prospectively with radionuclide ventriculography an average of 7.3 hours (range 2.9 to 15.3) after the onset of symptoms. Thirty-nine patients (Group I) had anterior S-T depression in the initial electrocardiogram and 8 (Group II) did not have such reciprocal changes. There was no difference between the two groups in left ventricular end-diastolic or end-diastolic volume index or left ventricular ejection fraction. Stroke volume index was greater in Group I than in Group II. There were no group differences in left ventricular total or regional wall motion scores. A weak correlation existed between the quantities (mV) or inferior S-T segment elevation and reciprocal S-T depression. No relation between anterior S-T segment depression and the left ventricular end-diastolic volume index could be demonstrated; the extent of left ventricular apical and right ventricular wall motion abnormalities, both frequently associated with inferior infarction, did not correlate with the quantity of anterior S-T depression. These data show that anterior S-T segment depression occurs commonly during the early evolution of transmural inferior infarction, is not generally a marker of functionally significant anterior ischemia and cannot be used to predict left ventricular function in individual patients. Anterior S-T segment depression may be determined by reciprocal mechanisms

  13. Hemichorea after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadullah Saglam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the balance between direct and indirect ways in the basal ganglia causes chorea. The lesions of contralateral basal ganglia, thalamus or the connection of them all together are responsible for this. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Hyperkinetic movement disorders after acute ischemic stroke are reported as rare; however, hemichorea is the most frequent developing disorder of hyperkinetic movement as a result of cerebrovascular disease. In this case report, we presented two case who applied us with choreiform movements in his left half of the body after acute thalamic stroke. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 29-32

  14. [Smoking and stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoichiro

    2011-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for the brain infarction (lacunar and atherothrombotic brain infarction) and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Not only active smoking but also passive smoking and smokeless tobacco products pose a risk. The risk after smoking cessation for 5-10 years is equal to that faced by a non-smoker. Many patients continue smoking even after an attack of stroke; therefore, support measures to enforce nonsmoking are required in this high-risk population. We offer nonsmoking support using the 5A approach, and assess the nonsmoking stage (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance). We also administer medical therapy for smoking cessation when the patients find it difficult to quit smoking on their own accord. Nicotine dependency needs a follow-up like that required for other risk factors in the primary and secondary prevention of the stroke because smoking is a chronic disease that tends to recur.

  15. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  16. [Anterior skull-base schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Miranda, Miguel; De la O Ríos, Elier; Vargas-Valenciano, Emmanuelle; Moreno-Medina, Eva

    Schwannomas are nerve sheath tumours that originate in Schwann cells. They are usually solitary and sporadic and manifest on peripheral, spinal or cranial nerves. Intracranial schwannomas tend to manifest on the eighth cranial nerve, particularly in patients with neurofibromatosis type2. Anterior skull-base schwannomas represent less than 1% of all intracranial schwannomas. They are more frequent in young people and are typically benign. These tumours represent a diagnostic challenge due to their rarity and difficult differential diagnosis, and numerous theories have been postulated concerning their origin and development. In this article, we present the case of a 13-year-old male with a single anterior cranial-base tumour not associated with neurofibromatosis who presented with headache, papilloedema, eye pain and loss of visual acuity. Complete resection of the tumour was performed, which was histopathologically diagnosed as a schwannoma. The patient made a complete clinical recovery with abatement of all symptoms. We conducted a review of the literature and found 66 cases worldwide with this diagnosis. We describe the most relevant epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this kind of tumour and its relation with the recently discovered and similar olfactory schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. The Fate of High-Density Lesions on the Non-contrast CT Obtained Immediately After Intra-arterial Thrombolysis in Ischemic Stroke Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yu Mi; Lee, Deok Hee; Kim, Ho Sung; Ryu, Chang Woo; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon; Suh, Dae Chul

    2006-01-01

    Hyperdense lesions can frequently be observed on the CT obtained immediately after intra-arterial (IA) thrombolysis, and it is sometimes difficult to differentiate contrast extravasation from the hemorrhagic lesions. The purposes of this study are to classify the hyperdense lesions according to their morphologic features and to track the outcome of those lesions. Among the 94 patients who suffered with anterior circulation ischemic stroke and who were treated with IA thrombolysis, 31 patients revealed hyperdense lesions on the CT obtained immediately after the procedure. The lesions were categorized into four types according to their volume, shape, location and density: cortical high density (HD), soft HD, metallic HD and diffuse HD. The follow-up images were obtained 3 5 days later in order to visualize the morphologic changes and hemorrhagic transformation of the lesions. Among the 31 patients with HD lesions, 18 (58%) showed hemorrhagic transformation of their lesion, and six of them were significant. All the cortical HD lesions (n = 4) revealed spontaneous resolution. Seven of the soft HD lesions (n = 13) showed spontaneous resolution, while the rest of the group showed hemorrhagic transformation. Among them the hemorrhage was significant in only two patients (2/6) who did not achieve successful recanalization. All the metallic HD lesions (n = 10) resulted in hemorrhagic transformation; among them, three cases (30%) with a maximum CT value more than 150 HU (Hounsfield unit) subsequently showed significant hemorrhagic transformation on the follow-up CT. There were four diffuse HD lesions, and two of them showed hemorrhagic transformation. The parenchymal hyperdense lesions observed on the CT obtained immediately after IA thrombolysis in ischemic stroke patients exhibited varying features and they were not always hemorrhagic. Most of the soft HD lesions were benign, and although all of the metallic HD lesions were hemorrhagic, some of them were ultimately found

  18. Impairment-oriented training or Bobath therapy for severe arm paresis after stroke: a single-blind, multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, T; Eickhof, C; van Kaick, S; Engel, U; Pinkowski, C; Kalok, S; Pause, M

    2005-10-01

    To study the effects of augmented exercise therapy time for arm rehabilitation as either Bobath therapy or the impairment-oriented training (Arm BASIS training) in stroke patients with arm severe paresis. Single blind, multicentre randomized control trial. Three inpatient neurorehabilitation centres. Sixty-two anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients. Random assignment to three group: (A) no augmented exercise therapy time, (B) augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy and (C) augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training. Fugl-Meyer arm motor score. Secondary measure: Action Research Arm Test (ARA). Ancillary measures: Fugl-Meyer arm sensation and joint motion/pain scores and the Ashworth Scale (elbow flexors). An overall effect of augmented exercise therapy time on Fugl-Meyer scores after four weeks was not corroborated (mean and 95% confidence interval (CI) of change scores: no augmented exercise therapy time (n=20) 8.8, 5.2-12.3; augmented exercise therapy time (n=40) 9.9, 6.8-13.9; p = 0.2657). The group who received the augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training (n=20) had, however, higher gains than the group receiving the augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy (n=20) (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath 7.2, 2.6-11.8; BASIS 12.6, 8.4-16.8; p = 0.0432). Passive joint motion/pain deteriorated less in the group who received BASIS training (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath -3.2, -5.2 to -1.1; BASIS 0.1, -1.8-2.0; p = 0.0090). ARA, Fugl-Meyer arm sensation, and Ashworth Scale scores were not differentially affected. The augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training enhanced selective motor control. Type of training was more relevant for recovery of motor control than therapeutic time spent.

  19. Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    AYBEK, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    In this study detrusor hyperreflexia was investigated by urodynamic study during the acute phase of stroke in patients who became incontinent after a cerebrovascular accident. Urodynamic studies reveal physiopathological findings of incontinence while the acute period of cerebrovascular accident do not cover neurogenic bladder features. In our study it was observed that most of the patients (60%) had normal bladder functions and detrusor hyperreflexia was a rare rindings. This res...

  20. Stroke Management: Nursing Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Esmaeili

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The subacute and long-term assessment and management of patients who have suffered a stroke includes physical therapy and testing to determine the precise etiology of the event so as to prevent recurrence. The acute management differs. Immediate goals include minimizing brain injury, treating medical complications, and moving toward uncovering the pathophysiologic basis of the patient's symptoms. Methods: This is a review paper that report up to date finding with review some...

  1. VOR gain by head impulse video-oculography differentiates acute vestibular neuritis from stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Tehrani, Ali S Saber; Wozniak, Amy; Eibenberger, Karin; Kattah, Jorge C; Guede, Cynthia I; Zee, David S; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-03-01

    Vestibular neuritis is often mimicked by stroke (pseudoneuritis). Vestibular eye movements help discriminate the two conditions. We report vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain measures in neuritis and stroke presenting acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). Prospective cross-sectional study of AVS (acute continuous vertigo/dizziness lasting >24 h) at two academic centers. We measured horizontal head impulse test (HIT) VOR gains in 26 AVS patients using a video HIT device (ICS Impulse). All patients were assessed within 1 week of symptom onset. Diagnoses were confirmed by clinical examinations, brain magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted images, and follow-up. Brainstem and cerebellar strokes were classified by vascular territory-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) or anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA). Diagnoses were vestibular neuritis (n = 16) and posterior fossa stroke (PICA, n = 7; AICA, n = 3). Mean HIT VOR gains (ipsilesional [standard error of the mean], contralesional [standard error of the mean]) were as follows: vestibular neuritis (0.52 [0.04], 0.87 [0.04]); PICA stroke (0.94 [0.04], 0.93 [0.04]); AICA stroke (0.84 [0.10], 0.74 [0.10]). VOR gains were asymmetric in neuritis (unilateral vestibulopathy) and symmetric in PICA stroke (bilaterally normal VOR), whereas gains in AICA stroke were heterogeneous (asymmetric, bilaterally low, or normal). In vestibular neuritis, borderline gains ranged from 0.62 to 0.73. Twenty patients (12 neuritis, six PICA strokes, two AICA strokes) had at least five interpretable HIT trials (for both ears), allowing an appropriate classification based on mean VOR gains per ear. Classifying AVS patients with bilateral VOR mean gains of 0.70 or more as suspected strokes yielded a total diagnostic accuracy of 90%, with stroke sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 92%. Video HIT VOR gains differ between peripheral and central causes of AVS. PICA strokes were readily separated from neuritis using gain measures

  2. Early rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Julie; Godecke, Erin; Johnson, Liam; Langhorne, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Early rehabilitation is recommended in many guidelines, with limited evidence to guide practice. Brain neurobiology suggests that early training, at the right dose, will aid recovery. In this review, we highlight recent trials of early mobilization, aphasia, dysphagia and upper limb treatment in which intervention is commenced within 7 days of stroke and discuss future research directions. Trials in this early time window are few. Although the seminal AVERT trial suggests that a cautious approach is necessary immediately (stroke, early mobility training and mobilization appear well tolerated, with few reasons to delay initiating some rehabilitation within the first week. The results of large clinical trials of early aphasia therapy are on the horizon, and examples of targeted upper limb treatments with better patient selection are emerging. Early rehabilitation trials are complex, particularly those that intervene across acute and rehabilitation care settings, but these trials are important if we are to optimize recovery potential in the critical window for repair. Concerted efforts to standardize 'early' recruitment, appropriately stratify participants and implement longer term follow-up is needed. Trial standards are improving. New recommendations from a recent Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable will help drive new research.

  3. Pre-existing hypertension dominates γδT cell reduction in human ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz G Adamski

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes may play an important role in the evolution of ischemic stroke. Depletion of γδT cells has been found to abrogate ischemia reperfusion injury in murine stroke. However, the role of γδT cells in human ischemic stroke is unknown. We aimed to determine γδT cell counts and γδT cell interleukin 17A (IL-17A production in the clinical setting of ischemic stroke. We also aimed to determine the associations of γδT cell counts with ischemic lesion volume, measures of clinical severity and with major stroke risk factors. Peripheral blood samples from 43 acute ischemic stroke patients and 26 control subjects matched on race and gender were used for flow cytometry and complete blood count analyses. Subsequently, cytokine levels and gene expression were measured in γδT cells. The number of circulating γδT cells was decreased by almost 50% (p = 0.005 in the stroke patients. γδT cell counts did not correlate with lesion volume on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging or with clinical severity in the stroke patients, but γδT cells showed elevated levels of IL-17A (p = 0.048. Decreased γδT cell counts were also associated with older age (p = 0.004, pre-existing hypertension (p = 0.0005 and prevalent coronary artery disease (p = 0.03, with pre-existing hypertension being the most significant predictor of γδT cell counts in a multivariable analysis. γδT cells in human ischemic stroke are reduced in number and show elevated levels of IL-17A. A major reduction in γδT lymphocytes also occurs in hypertension and may contribute to the development of hypertension-mediated stroke and vascular disease.

  4. [Development of Researches on Scalp Acupuncture for Ischemic Stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liang; Wang, Jin-hai; Sun, Run-jie; Zhang, Xing-hua; Yuan, Bo; Du, Xiao-zheng

    2016-02-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the commonly met diseases in clinical practice nowadays. Acupuncture therapy is widly used in the treatment of sequela of ischemic stroke in China and its mechanisms have been extensively studied in recen years. In the present paper, the authors focus on the development of studies on the mechanism of scalp acupuncture therapy in the treatment of ischemic stroke. Results indicate that scalp acupuncture intervention can 1) improve cerebral blood circulation to promote regional energy metabolism, 2) up-regulate expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), etc., possibly promoting proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the focal cerebral cortex and hippocampus, 3) reduce contents of excitatory amino acid and increase level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to lower neurogenic toxicity, and relieve cerebral injury, 4) ease cerebral vascular immunoinflammatory reactions, 5) regulate blood lipid metabolism to resist cerebral free radical damage, and 6) inhibit cerebral cortical apoptosis. However, these results only revealed very limited intrinsic mechanisms of scalp acupuncture in improving ischemic stroke. Further studies using comprehensive techniques of multi-disciplines as molecular biology, electrophysiology, etc. are definitely needed.

  5. Cerebral circulation and metabolism with recovery of chronic poststroke aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Michitaka; Hibino, Hiroaki; Kamimoto, Kaoru; Fukagawa, Kazutoshi

    2004-01-01

    The recruitment of cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism in the particular brain areas responsible for poststroke aphasia are necessary for recovery. This study was undertaken to investigate changes in cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism corresponding to improvement of aphasia. Twenty-nine right-handed chronic aphasic patients with left hemispheric stroke were studied. Aphasia was evaluated as the score of fluency, comprehension, repetition and naming by the Western Aphasia Battery (Japanese version). Concurrent with the evaluation of aphasia, positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed. After several months of speech therapy, PET scans and evaluation of aphasia were reperformed. Both regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen significantly increased in the left upper superior and middle temporal gyri, and in the left upper inferior frontal gyrus in the fair recovery group for comprehension, repetition and naming. In the fair recovery group for fluency, the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen significantly increased in the left upper superior and middle temporal gyri, but regional cerebral blood flow increased insignificantly in these areas. In the lower white matter of the right parietal lobe, both the regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were significantly increased in the fair recovery group for all aphasic features. The recruitment of cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism in the left temporo-parietal area, in the left inferior frontal area, and in the right deep parietal area are essentially responsible for the recovery of aphasia. (author)

  6. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation...... to the risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  7. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.

    2008-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced n...

  8. Problematising risk in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Mary Y; Kessler, Dorothy; Ceci, Christine; Laliberté-Rudman, Debbie; McGrath, Colleen; Sikora, Lindsey; Gardner, Paula

    2016-11-01

    Following stroke, re-engagement in personally valued activities requires some experience of risk. Risk, therefore, must be seen as having positive as well as negative aspects in rehabilitation. Our aim was to identify the dominant understanding of risk in stroke rehabilitation and the assumptions underpinning these understandings, determine how these understandings affect research and practise, and if necessary, propose alternate ways to conceptualise risk in research and practise. Alvesson and Sandberg's method of problematisation was used. We began with a historical overview of stroke rehabilitation, and proceeded through five steps undertaken in an iterative fashion: literature search and selection; data extraction; syntheses across texts; identification of assumptions informing the literature and; generation of alternatives. Discussion of risk in stroke rehabilitation is largely implicit. However, two prominent conceptualisations of risk underpin both knowledge development and clinical practise: the risk to the individual stroke survivor of remaining dependent in activities of daily living and the risk that the health care system will be overwhelmed by the costs of providing stroke rehabilitation. Conceptualisation of risk in stroke rehabilitation, while implicit, drives both research and practise in ways that reinforce a focus on impairment and a generic, decontextualised approach to rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation Much of stroke rehabilitation practise and research seems to centre implicitly on two risks: risk to the patient of remaining dependent in ADL and risk to the health care system of bankruptcy due to the provision of stroke rehabilitation. The implicit focus on ADL dependence limits the ability of clinicians and researchers to address other goals supportive of a good life following stroke. The implicit focus on financial risk to the health care system may limit access to rehabilitation for people who have experienced either milder or

  9. Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Stroke Association’s Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services Rehabilitation, often referred to as rehab, is an important part of stroke recovery. Through rehab, you:  Re-learn basic skills such ...

  10. What You Need to Know about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain. The other kind of stroke, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks ... are very common among African Americans. The best treatment for stroke is prevention. You can reduce your ...

  11. Epidermoid Causing Ischemic Stroke in the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors may rarely cause stroke. We report an epidermoid cyst causing stroke in a pediatric patient. We have also reviewed the literature and pathogenesis of stroke caused by intracranial tumors.

  12. What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Conditions What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke? Brain tissue affected by blockage Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in ... over 55 years old have more chance of stroke, and the risk gets greater as you get ...

  13. Orodental status and medical problems of stroke inpatients undergoing rehabilitation at a rehabilitation hospital in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Omichi, Shiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Many stroke patients may have oral problems and systemic diseases, but clinical information on treatment provided to stroke patients for dental problems during inpatient rehabilitation is rare. The objective of this study was to research stroke inpatients' requirements for dental treatment and the accompanying risks. We included 165 stroke patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation at Morinomiya Hospital during the year 2010 and researched the causes of stroke and the patients' orodental status, underlying diseases, antithrombotic drugs prescribed and special considerations or difficulties in the treatment. Cerebral infarction was the most common causes of stroke. Many patients had hypertension, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and 54.5% had been prescribed antithrombotic drugs. Dentists diagnosed 57.0% patients with untreated dental cavities. Approximately 30% did not use dentures despite having a requirement. In total, 142 patients underwent dental treatment including periodontal treatment, prosthetic treatment and tooth extraction under management of circulation and haemostasis such as monitoring vital signs and surgical splints in cases of the difficult extraction. The current study revealed a high requirement for dental treatment among stroke patients and demonstrated the effectiveness of performing dental treatment during inpatient rehabilitation of these patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Functional outcome in young adult ischemic stroke: impact of lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, J; Strbian, D; Mustanoja, S; Haapaniemi, E; Kaste, M; Tatlisumak, T

    2013-01-01

    To determine the functional outcome in a cohort of young adults with ischemic stroke patients, focusing on components of lipid profile. In our registry including consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke aged 15-49 from 1994 to 2007, we analyzed predictors of 3-month functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale, mRS). Infarct size fell into small, medium, large posterior, or large anterior. Stroke severity was assessed with NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Serum lipids were measured within 72 h after admission. Binary, multinomial ordinal, and Poisson regressions allowed revealing factors associated with size of infarct, stroke severity, and unfavorable outcome or death (mRS, 2-6) or mRS as an ordinal measure. In the 968 patients included (mean age, 41.3 ± 7.6; 62.6% men; 49.5% with mRS 0-1), factors associated with unfavorable outcome after multivariable analysis were increasing age (odds ratio, 1.03 per year; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05), higher NIHSS score (1.23 per point, 1.17-1.29), large anterior (4.37, 2.26-8.42) or posterior (1.73, 1.05-2.85) infarcts, bilateral lesions (2.28, 1.30-3.98), internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) (3.65, 1.41-9.47), and inversely high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels (0.58 per unit increase, 0.38-0.86). Increasing HDL associated with smaller infarct size (0.71, 0.51-0.98). Both higher total and HDL cholesterol associated with lower NIHSS score (0.96, 0.93-0.98 for total cholesterol and 0.82, 0.75-0.88 for HDL) and lower 3-month mRS (0.87, 0.78-0.97 for total cholesterol and 0.65, 0.47-0.90 for HDL). In addition to known prognosticators, ICAD and lower HDL levels were independently associated with adverse clinical outcomes in our young adult stroke cohort. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Kyle [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Leslie, Michael [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, New Haven, CT (United States); Menn, Kirsten; Haims, Andrew [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Anterior hip dislocations are rare orthopedic emergencies resulting from high-energy trauma and have unique imaging characteristics on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings on CT and MRI allow for the prompt recognition and classification of anterior hip dislocations, which guides patient management and reduces complications. The purpose of this article is to review imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations, specifically focusing on CT and MRI. (orig.)

  16. Imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Kyle; Leslie, Michael; Menn, Kirsten; Haims, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Anterior hip dislocations are rare orthopedic emergencies resulting from high-energy trauma and have unique imaging characteristics on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging findings on CT and MRI allow for the prompt recognition and classification of anterior hip dislocations, which guides patient management and reduces complications. The purpose of this article is to review imaging findings of anterior hip dislocations, specifically focusing on CT and MRI. (orig.)

  17. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  18. Burden of stroke in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Keat Wei; Gan, Siew Hua

    2013-08-01

    In Cambodia, stroke is not ranked among the top 10 leading causes of death, but infectious disease are among the top three leading causes of death. This finding could be attributed to a lack of awareness among Cambodians of the signs and symptoms of stroke or to poor reporting, incomplete data, lack of neurologists and neurosurgeons, or low accessibility to the hospitals. The only study of stroke in Cambodia is the Prevalence of Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors in Cambodia survey, which identified several stroke-related risk factors in the population. Tobacco chewing or smoking is the main risk factor for stroke in Cambodia. Traditional therapies, such as oyt pleung (moxibustion) and jup (cupping), are widely practiced for stroke rehabilitation. In Cambodia, there are few neurologists and few important equipment, such as magnetic resonance imaging machines and computed tomography scanners. The Cambodian government should cooperate with the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund to attract foreign expertise and technologies to treat stroke patients. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  19. Infections and Ischemic Stroke Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Grabska, Katarzyna; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Członkowska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background. Infections increase the risk of ischemic stroke (IS) and may worsen IS prognosis. Adverse effects of in-hospital infections on stroke outcome were also reported. We aimed to study the prevalence of pre- and poststroke infections and their impact on IS outcome. Methods. We analysed clinical data of 2066 IS patients to assess the effect of pre-stroke and post-stroke infections on IS severity, as well as short-term (up to 30 days) and long-term (90 days) outcome. The independent i...

  20. Stroke scale score and early prediction of outcome after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Zuberi, F.Z.; Afsar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score as a predictor of functional outcome after ischemic stroke. Subjects and Methods: The study included 50 patients who presented to Civil Hospital, Karachi, during the study period with acute stroke and were evaluated with CT scan of brain. Only those patients were enrolled in the study that had acute ischemic stroke. The enrolled subjects were then evaluated for the neurological impairment using National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The subjects were followed-up and their functional outcome was assessed using Barthel index (BI) on the 7th day of their admission. Results: Of the fifty patients enrolled in the study, 31 (62%) were males and 19 (38%) were females, with age ranging from 45 years to 95 years and a mean age of 59.9 years. Neurological impairment at presentation was assessed by NIHSS. The score ranged between 2 and 28. The functional outcome was evaluated on the 7th day using Barthel index (BI), which ranged from 0 to 80. NIHSS score was found to be a good predictor of functional outcome in patients with ischemic stroke (p<0.001). Other factors like gender, hypertension and heart disease did not affect the functional recovery in such patients. Various factors were found to be significant for early prediction of stroke recovery. The NIHSS score was the strongest predictor of outcome after ischemic stroke. Age at the time of the event was also found to be an important predictor for stroke recovery. Conclusion: The NIHSS score is a good predictor of patient's recovery after stroke. Assessing the patient's neurological impairment at first presentation of ischemic stroke can guide the physician regarding the prognosis and management plan. (author)

  1. Identification of stroke mimics among clinically diagnosed acute strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiyatorn, Lojana; Saksornchai, Pichaya; Tunlayadechanont, Supoch

    2013-09-01

    Stroke is a clinically syndrome of a sudden onset of neurological deficit in a vascular cause. Stroke mimics is the non-vascular disorders with stroke-like clinical symptoms. It is important to distinguish true stroke from mimics since treatment plan may differ To determine the incidence of the stroke mimics and identify their etiologies. All non-contrast head CT of the patients with clinically diagnosed stroke who immediately received imaging upon arrival at the emergency department of the university hospital were retrospectively reviewed in 12-month period between January 1 and December 31, 2008. Medical records, laboratory results, MRI, and 6-month clinical follow-up records were reviewed for final diagnosis. Seven hundred four patients were included in this study, including 363 (51.5%) men and 341 (48.5%) women with range in age from 24 to 108 years. Amongst those, 417 (59.2%) were ischemic stroke, 80 (11.40%) were hemorrhagic stroke, 186 (26.4%) were stroke-mimics, and 21 (3%) were inconclusive. The etiologies among stroke-mimics were metabolic/intoxication (35, 18.8%), sepsis (28, 15.0%), seizure (21, 11.3%), syncope (20, 10.8%), subdural hemorrhage (14, 7.5%), vertigo (11, 6.0%), brain tumor (10, 5.30%), central nervous system infection (5, 2.7%), others (26, 14.0%), and unspecified (16, 8.6%). Incidence rates and etiologies of the stroke mimics were similar to the western reports. However the frequency of each mimic was not.

  2. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 2. Winter circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao

    2014-04-01

    The shallow winter overturning circulation in the Red Sea is studied using a 50 year high-resolution MITgcm (MIT general circulation model) simulation with realistic atmospheric forcing. The overturning circulation for a typical year, represented by 1980, and the climatological mean are analyzed using model output to delineate the three-dimensional structure and to investigate the underlying dynamical mechanisms. The horizontal model circulation in the winter of 1980 is dominated by energetic eddies. The climatological model mean results suggest that the surface inflow intensifies in a western boundary current in the southern Red Sea that switches to an eastern boundary current north of 24N. The overturning is accomplished through a cyclonic recirculation and a cross-basin overturning circulation in the northern Red Sea, with major sinking occurring along a narrow band of width about 20 km along the eastern boundary and weaker upwelling along the western boundary. The northward pressure gradient force, strong vertical mixing, and horizontal mixing near the boundary are the essential dynamical components in the model\\'s winter overturning circulation. The simulated water exchange is not hydraulically controlled in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb; instead, the exchange is limited by bottom and lateral boundary friction and, to a lesser extent, by interfacial friction due to the vertical viscosity at the interface between the inflow and the outflow. Key Points Sinking occurs in a narrow boundary layer along the eastern boundary Surface western boundary current switches into an eastern boundary current Water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is not hydraulically controlled © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Al-Nasser, Mohammad N.; Bahakim, Hassan M.; Kurban, Khadija M.; Zahraa, Jihad N.; Nasir, Ali A.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Khoja, Waleed A.

    2006-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology and clinical features of stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children and ascertain the causes, pathogenesis, and risk factors. The Retrospective Study Group (RSG) included children with stroke who were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology, or admitted to King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period July 1992 to February 2001. The Prospective Study Group (PSG) included those seen between February 2001 and March 2003. During the combined study periods of 10 years and 7 months, 117 children (61 males and 56 females, aged one month-12 years) were evaluated; the majority (89%) of these were Saudis. The calculated annual hospital frequency rate of stroke was 27.1/100,000 of the pediatric (1month-12 years) population The mean age at onset of the initial stroke in the 104 Saudi children was 27.1 months (SD=39.3 months) median and median was 6 months. Ischemic strokes accounted for the majority of cases (76%). Large-vessel infarcts (LVI, 51.9%) were more common than small-vessel lacunar lesions (SVLL, 19.2%). Five patients (4.8%) had combined LVI and SVLL. Intracranial hemorrhage was less common (18.2%), whereas sinovenous thrombosis was diagnosed in 6 (5.8%) patients. A major risk factor was identified in 94 of 104 (89.4%) Saudi children. Significantly more hematologic disorders and coagulopathies were identified in the PSG compared to the RSG (p=0.001), reflecting a better yield following introduction of more comprehensive hematologic and cogulation laboratory tests during the prospective study period. Hematologic disorders were the most common risk factor (46.2%); presumed perinatal ischemic cerebral injury was risk factor in 23 children (22.1) and infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory system in 18 (17.3%). Congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies were the underlying cause in 7 patients (6.7%) and

  4. Equatorial zonal circulations: Historical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastenrath, Stefan

    2007-04-01

    The changing perceptions on zonal circulations in the equatorial belt are traced for (a) stratospheric wind regimes, and (b) vertical-zonal circulation cells in the troposphere. (a) Observations from the Krakatoa eruption 1883 and Berson's 1908 expedition to East Africa, along with later soundings over Batavia (Jakarta) led to the notion of "Krakatoa easterlies" around 30 km (10 mb) and "Berson westerlies" around 20 km (50 mb). Prompted by contrary observations since the late 1950s, this dogma was replaced by the notion of easterlies alternating with westerlies in the equatorial stratosphere at a rhythm of about 26 months. (b) Stimulated by Bjerknes' postulate of a "Walker circulation" along the Pacific Equator, a multitude of such cells have been hypothesized at other longitudes, in part from zonal contrasts of temperature and cloudiness. Essential for the diagnosis of equatorial zonal circulation cells is the continuity following the flow between the centers of ascending and subsiding motion. Evaluation of the recent NCEP-NCAR and ECMWF Reanalysis upper-air datasets reveals equatorial zonal circulation cells over the Pacific all year round, over the Atlantic only in boreal winter, and over the Indian Ocean only in autumn, all being seasons and oceanic longitudes with strong zonal flow in the lower troposphere.

  5. The Invertibility, Explicit Determinants, and Inverses of Circulant and Left Circulant and g-Circulant Matrices Involving Any Continuous Fibonacci and Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulant matrices play an important role in solving delay differential equations. In this paper, circulant type matrices including the circulant and left circulant and g-circulant matrices with any continuous Fibonacci and Lucas numbers are considered. Firstly, the invertibility of the circulant matrix is discussed and the explicit determinant and the inverse matrices by constructing the transformation matrices are presented. Furthermore, the invertibility of the left circulant and g-circulant matrices is also studied. We obtain the explicit determinants and the inverse matrices of the left circulant and g-circulant matrices by utilizing the relationship between left circulant, g-circulant matrices and circulant matrix, respectively.

  6. Impact of collateral circulation status on favorable outcomes in thrombolysis treatment: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wufuer, Alimu; Wubuli, Atikaimu; Mijiti, Peierdun; Zhou, Jun; Tuerxun, Shabier; Cai, Jian; Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiaoning

    2018-01-01

    Collateral circulation affects the prognosis of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) treated by thrombolysis. The present study performed a systematic assessment of the impact of the collateral circulation status on the outcomes of patients receiving thrombolysis treatment. Relevant full-text articles from the Cochrane Library, Ovid, Medline, Embase and PubMed databases published from January 1, 2000 to November 1, 2016 were retrieved. The quality of the studies was assessed and data were extracted by 2 independent investigators. The random-effects model was used to estimate the impact of good vs. poor collateral circulation, as well as baseline characteristics, on the outcome within the series presented as risk ratios. Subgroup analyses explored the potential factors that may interfere with the effects of the collateral circulation status on the outcome. A total of 29 studies comprising 4,053 patients were included in the present meta-analysis. A good collateral circulation status was revealed to have a beneficial effect on favorable functional outcome (modified Rankin scale, 0-3 at 3-6 months; Pcollateral circulation. Good collateral circulation was also associated with a lower rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (Pcollateral circulation was demonstrated to have a favorable prognostic value regarding the outcome for patients with AIS receiving thrombolysis treatment. Assessment of collateral circulation and penumbra area during pre-treatment imaging within an appropriate time-window prior to thrombolytic therapy will therefore improve the identification of AIS patients who may benefit from thrombolysis treatment.

  7. Risk Factors, Vascular Lesion Distribution, Outcome and Recurrence of Strokes Due to Intracranial Atherosclerosis: One Year Data from Hyderabad Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Raghu; Kaul, Subhash; Alladi, Suvarna; Afshan, Jabeen S; Prabha, T Surya; Kohat, Abhijeet; Tandra, Swetha; Rani, Jyotsna Y

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asian countries and probably in India. The aim of this study was to describe the risk factors, distribution of vascular lesions, recurrence and outcome of stroke due to ICAS. A total of 100 consecutive patients of ischemic stroke due to ICAS were enrolled prospectively from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, and followed for 1 year for treatment compliance and recurrence. The details about demographics, risk factors, and vascular lesions were noted. There were 68 males and 32 females. Hypertension (HTN), diabetes, alcohol, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and hyperhomocysteinemia was present in 82%, 52%, 34%, 33%, 28%, and 23%, respectively. The number of arteries involved were middle cerebral artery, 53 (37.3%); posterior cerebral artery, 24 (16.9%); internal cerebral artery, 21 (14.8%); vertebral artery, 18 (12.7%); basilar artery, 6 (4.2%); and anterior cerebral artery, 6 (4.2%). Seventeen (17%) patients had a recurrent stroke during 1 year follow-up. The presence of uncontrolled HTN and diabetes mellitus after discharge were significantly associated with stroke recurrence ( P < 0.05). The use of dual antiplatelet agents and statins was found to have a significant effect in the prevention of recurrent stroke ( P < 0.05). Severe stroke at presentation and presence of hemiparesis were the predictors for unfavorable outcome at 3 months ( P < 0.05). Risk factors, distribution of vascular lesions and high recurrence of stroke due to ICAS in this study is similar to that reported from other Asian countries. Aggressive medical management and risk factor control remains the best strategy for preventing recurrence.

  8. Ischemic Stroke: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clots) (American Stroke Association) Let's Talk about Ischemic Stroke (American Heart Association) Also in Spanish Prevention and Risk Factors Carotid Endarterectomy (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) ...

  9. Persistence of locomotor-related interlimb reflex networks during walking after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehr, E Paul; Loadman, Pamela M

    2012-04-01

    Cutaneous nerve stimulation evokes coordinated and phase-modulated reflex output widely distributed to muscles of all four limbs during walking. Accessibility to this distributed network after stroke offers insight into the pathological changes and suggests utility for therapeutic applications. Here we examined muscles in both the more (MA) and less affected (LA) legs evoked by stimulation at the ankle and wrist during walking in chronic (>6 months post CVA) stroke. Stroke and control participants walked on a treadmill with a harness support system. Reflexes were evoked with trains of electrical stimuli delivered separately to the cutaneous superficial peroneal (SP; at the ankle) and superficial radial (SR; at the wrist) nerves. Background locomotor and reflex EMG were phase-averaged across the gait cycle and analyzed off line. Locomotor background muscle activation patterns were altered bilaterally in stroke, as compared with control. Phase-dependent modulation of interlimb cutaneous reflexes was found in both stroke and control subjects with stimulation of each nerve, but responses were blunted in stroke. Reflex reversal in tibialis anterior (TA) at heel strike with SP nerve stimulation was present in both groups. Notably, SR nerve stimulation produced facilitation during the swing-to-stance transition in the TA and suppression of MG in the MA leg during stance. Interlimb cutaneous inputs may access coordinated reflex pathways in the MA limb during walking after stroke. Importantly activation in these pathways could provoke responses to counter foot drop during swing phase of walking. Additionally, our data support the perspective that there is no "unaffected" side after stroke and that caution should be used when interpreting the LA side as "control" after stroke. The presence of functionally-relevant interlimb cutaneous reflexes in the MA leg presents a substrate that may be strengthened by rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical

  10. 'This stroke was sent…': Stroke-related illness concepts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though there is evidence that stroke incidence is increasing even in low and middle income countries, there is no study of stroke-related illness concepts and HSB in Nigerians. Data from 960 educated Nigerians were analysed. Eight hundred and fifty four respondents (431 aged 20-40 years and 423 aged 41 years or ...

  11. Thromboxane biosynthesis in stroke and post-stroke dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWith 25 to 30 thousand new patients per year and an incidence of 170/100.000, stroke is a major health problem in the Netherlands, as it is in other western countries. It accounts for almost I 0% of the annual death in the Netherlands. Approximately 80% of stroke is of ischemic

  12. Thromboxane biosynthesis in stroke and post-stroke dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWith 25 to 30 thousand new patients per year and an incidence of 170/100.000, stroke is a major health problem in the Netherlands, as it is in other western countries. It accounts for almost I 0% of the annual death in the Netherlands. Approximately 80% of stroke is of ischemic origin,

  13. Improving Stroke Management through Specialized Stroke Units in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rehabilitation of the stroke patient. The establishment of stroke units has been found to improve the survival of patients and significantly reduce disability by rendering holistic care. Early intervention to rapidly restore and maintain blood supply to the ischemic area in the brain, minimize brain damage and hence impairment ...

  14. Acute Hearing Loss Caused by Decreasing Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Arterial Perfusion in a Patient with Vertebral Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Rintaro; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Hayashida, Arisa; Ueno, Yuji; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2017-06-01

    We report a case of bilateral hearing loss caused by decreased vascular flow in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory. A 74-year-old man who experienced right hearing loss 5 months ago presented with bilateral deafness and right cerebellar ataxia; however, no ischemic lesion was detected in the bilateral AICA area. After stroke treatment, hearing loss was improved. One month later, we obtained blood flow improvement in the left AICA territory on single-photon-emission computed tomography and vertebral artery stenosis on magnetic resonance angiography. Therefore, clinicians should recognize that bilateral hearing loss may be related to stroke in the vertebrobasilar artery area. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MRI of anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Mohammad; Smitaman, Edward; Lawrence, David; Moukaddam, Hicham

    2014-07-01

    Anterior knee pain is the most common knee complaint. It may be due to a variety of soft tissue or osseous abnormalities. Knowledge of the radiologic appearance of the abnormalities allows more accurate diagnosis of the cause of the pain including chondral abnormalities, patellar instability and dislocation, femoral trochlear dysplasia, abnormal patellar location, bipartite patella, various tendinopathies, bursal inflammation, traction apophysitis in pediatric and adolescent patients, and miscellaneous diseases including mediopatellar plica syndrome and Hoffa's disease. Radiographs are often obtained to exclude acute osseous abnormalities, such as fractures. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior soft tissue contrast resolution and allows for more accurate evaluation of the underlying etiology and therefore may improve treatment and possible surgical planning.

  16. Fenestrated A1 segment of right anterior cerebral artery associated to duplicated anterior communicating artery

    OpenAIRE

    Sonda, Ildo; Basso, Luciano Silveira

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of fenestrated anterior cerebral artery associated to duplicated anterior communicating artery found duringa routine dissection of the brain in a male human body. Fenestrations of the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery are rare,especially if associated to a duplicated anterior communicating artery. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case in theliterature. We also present a brief review of the surgical importance of this anomaly

  17. Mild toxic anterior segment syndrome mimicking delayed onset toxic anterior segment syndrome after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Na Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS is an acute sterile postoperative anterior segment inflammation that may occur after anterior segment surgery. I report herein a case that developed mild TASS in one eye after bilateral uneventful cataract surgery, which was masked during early postoperative period under steroid eye drop and mimicking delayed onset TASS after switching to weaker steroid eye drop.

  18. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature i...

  19. One Stroke at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollibaugh, Molly

    2012-01-01

    At first glance, a Zentangle creation can seem intricate and complicated. But, when you learn how it is done, you realize how simple it is. Zentangles are patterns, or "tangles," that have been reduced to a simple sequence of elemental strokes. When you learn to focus on each stroke you find yourself capable of things that you may have once…

  20. Totally thrombosed giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Roopesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant anterior communicating artery aneurysmsarerare. Apatient presented with visual dysfunction, gait ataxia and urinary incontinence. MRI showed a giant suprasellar mass.At surgery, the lesion was identified as being an aneurysm arising from the anterior communicating artery.The difficulty in preoperative diagnosis and relevant literature are reviewed.