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Sample records for anterior circulation aneurysms

  1. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: outcome of aneurysm clipping versus coiling in anterior circulation aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadd, I.H.; Haroon, A.; Ansari, S.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the neurological outcome of microsurgical clipping versus coiling in patients with anterior circulation aneurysm. Study Design: Comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Neurosurgery, Lahore General Hospital, Lahore, from January 2010 to December 2013. Methodology: Patients aged 14 - 60 years, with ruptured cerebral aneurysm of anterior circulation and World Federation of Neurosurgical Society (WFNS) grades 1, 2 and 3 were included. Patients more than 60 years, medically unfit patient and posterior circulation aneurysms and WFNS grades 4 and 5 were excluded. Aneurysm sac obliteration was done in randomized manner with microsurgical clipping or coiling. Postoperatively, the patients were assessed and followed-up upto one year for outcome parameters on the bases of WFNS grade and Modified Ranking Scale (mRS) as favourable (mRS =2 ) and unfavourable (mRS > 2). Results: Among 140 subjects selected for study, 70 were included in group A, i.e. coiling and other 70 were in group B, i.e. clipping. The median age of patients in group A was 52.5 ± 10 years and in group B was 51.00 ± years. Overall, 56 (40%) males, 28 (60%) males in each group; and 84 (60%) females, 42 (60%) in each group were included. The male to female ratio in this study was 1:1.5. In group A, i.e. coiling, 27 (38.6%) patients had no disability (grades 1 and 2), 25 (35.7%) were slightly disabled (grade 3) and 18 (25.7%) had moderate disability (grade 4); whereas in group B, i.e. clipping group 23 (32.9%) patients had no disability (grades 1 and 2), 23 (32.9%) were slightly disabled (grade 3) and 24 (34.3%) had moderate disability (grade 4). At one year follow-up, in group A, favourable outcome was achieved in 56 (80%) of patients compared to 48 (68.6%) in group B; whilst, 14 (20%) patients in group A and 22 (33.1%) in group B showed unfavourable outcome. Although mortality rate was higher in clipping (n=3, 4.3%) as compared to coiling (n=1, 1.4%), but was not statistically

  2. Surgical experience of minipterional craniotomy with 102 ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms.

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    Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Welling, Leonardo C; Preul, Mark C; Sakaya, Gabriel Reis; Neville, Iuri; Spetzler, Robert F; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2016-05-01

    The pterional approach was described in the 1970s and has become the most utilized cranial approach with many variations described, including the minipterional technique. Although described recently as an alternative to the pterional approach for anterior circulation aneurysms, to our knowledge a large series of cases using the minipterional approach in both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has not been described. We present our clinical experience with the minipterional craniotomy in more than 100 ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. The results of 86 consecutive patients with 102 ruptured non-giant, anterior circulation aneurysms treated with early surgery utilizing the minipterional craniotomy were analyzed. Postoperative angiography was carried out in all cases. Outcome results were classified as excellent in 67 (77.9%), and good in seven (8.1%), while 16 (13.9%) patients died. The minipterional technique provides adequate surgical exposure and excellent outcomes for both ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysm clipping. It constitutes a safe and effective alternative to the pterional approach, with equivalent or potentially better aesthetic and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The minipterional craniotomy for anterior circulation aneurysms: initial experience with 72 patients.

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    Caplan, Justin M; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Yang, Wuyang; Colby, Geoffrey P; Coon, Alexander L; Olivi, Alessandro; Tamargo, Rafael J; Huang, Judy

    2014-06-01

    The pterional craniotomy is well established for microsurgical clipping of most anterior circulation aneurysms. The incision and temporalis muscle dissection impacts postoperative recovery and cosmetic outcomes. The minipterional (MPT) craniotomy offers similar microsurgical corridors, with a substantially shorter incision, less muscle dissection, and a smaller craniotomy flap. To report our experience with the MPT craniotomy in select unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. From January 2009 to July 2013, 82 unruptured aneurysms were treated in 72 patients, with 74 MPT craniotomies. Seven patients had multiple aneurysms treated with a single MPT craniotomy. The average patient age was 56 years (range: 24-87). Aneurysms were located along the middle cerebral artery (n = 36), posterior communicating (n = 22), paraophthalmic (n = 22), choroidal (n = 1), and dorsal ICA segments (n = 1). The MPT craniotomy utilized an incision just posterior to the hairline and a single myocutaneous flap. The average aneurysm size was 5.45 mm (range: 1-14). There were no instances of compromised operative corridors requiring craniotomy extension. Three significant early postoperative complications included epidural and subdural hematomas requiring evacuation, and a middle cerebral artery infarction. Average length of hospitalization was 3.96 days (range: 2-20). Two patients required reoperation for wound infections. Average follow-up was 421 days (range: 5-1618). Minimal to no temporalis muscle wasting was noted in 96% of patients. The MPT craniotomy is a worthwhile alternative to the standard pterional craniotomy. There were no instances of suboptimal operative corridors and clip applications when the MPT craniotomy was utilized in the treatment of unruptured middle cerebral artery and supraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysms proximal to the terminal internal carotid artery bifurcation.

  4. Extending the indications of flow diversion to small, unruptured, saccular aneurysms of the anterior circulation.

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    Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M; Yang, Steven; Bovenzi, Cory D; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Hasan, David; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Rosenwasser, Robert; Jabbour, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters are currently indicated for treatment of large and complex intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the indications of flow diversion can be safely extended to unruptured, small, saccular aneurysms (<10 mm) of the anterior circulation. Forty patients treated with the pipeline embolization device (PED) were matched in a 1:4 fashion with 160 patients treated with stent-assisted coiling based on patient age, sex, aneurysm location, and aneurysm size. Procedural complications, angiographic results, and clinical outcomes were analyzed and compared. The rate of periprocedural complications was 5% in the PED group and 3% in the stent-coil group (P=0.7). In multivariable analysis, increasing age was the only predictor of complications. At follow-up, a higher proportion of aneurysms treated with PED (80%) achieved complete obliteration compared with stent-coiled aneurysms (70%) but the difference did not reach statistical significance (P=0.2). In multivariable analysis, increasing aneurysm size and aneurysm location were predictors of nonocclusion. The rate of favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale, 0-2 and modified Rankin Scale, 0-1) was similar in the PED group and the coil group. The PED was associated with similar periprocedural risks, clinical outcomes, and angiographic results compared with stent-assisted coiling. These findings suggest that the indications of PED can be safely extended to small intracranial aneurysms that are amenable to conventional endovascular techniques. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are necessary to determine the optimal treatment that leads to the highest rate of obliteration and best clinical outcomes.

  5. Incidence and risk factors of chronic subdural hematoma after surgical clipping for unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms.

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    Lee, Won Jae; Jo, Kyung-Il; Yeon, Je Young; Hong, Seung-Chyul; Kim, Jong-Soo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare complication of unruptured aneurysm clipping surgery. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and risk factors of postoperative CSDH after surgical clipping for unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. This retrospective study included 518 patients from a single tertiary institute from January 2008 to December 2013. CSDH was defined as subdural hemorrhage which needed surgical treatment. The degree of brain atrophy was estimated using the bicaudate ratio (BCR) index. We used uni- and multivariate analyses to identify risk factors correlated with CSDH. Sixteen (3.1%) patients experienced postoperative CSDH that required burr hole drainage surgery. In univariate analyses, male gender (p<0.001), size of aneurysm (p=0.030), higher BCR index (p=0.004), and the use of antithrombotic medication (p=0.006) were associated with postoperative CSDH. In multivariate analyses using logistic regression test, male gender [odds ratio (OR) 4.037, range 1.287-12.688], high BCR index (OR 5.376, range 1.170-25.000), and the use of antithrombotic medication (OR 4.854, range 1.658-14.085) were associated with postoperative CSDH (p<0.05). Postoperative subdural fluid collection and arachnoid plasty were not showed statistically significant difference in this study. The incidence of CSDH was 3.1% in unruptured anterior circulation aneurysm surgery. This study shows that male gender, degree of brain atrophy, and the use of antithrombotic medication were associated with postoperative CSDH.

  6. Surgical outcome of primary clipping for anterior circulation aneurysms of size 2 centimeters or larger.

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    Furtado, Sunil V; Saikiran, Narayanam A; Thakar, Sumit; Dadlani, Ravi; Mohan, Dilip; Aryan, Saritha; Hegde, Alangar S

    2014-07-01

    Aneurysms of the anterior circulation larger than 2cm have a complex relationship to the anterior skull base, requiring a multi-modality management approach. This retrospective study of 54 patients with such aneurysms who underwent clipping between 2001 and 2012 analyzes clinical and surgical data, aneurysm characteristics and correlates them with respect to the Glasgow outcome score at follow-up and immediate post-operative clinical status. Patients with an outcome score of 5 or 4 were categorized as "good", while those with score 3-1 were "poor". Fisher's exact test and paired T-test (p<0.5) were used to test statistical significance for discrete and continuous variables respectively. 44 (81.4%) patients had a good outcome. Patients with non-ophthalmic/paraclinoid aneurysms had significantly lower incidence of adverse intra-operative events (p=0.035). Patients older than 50 years (p=0.045), with adverse intra-operative events (p=0.015) and post-operative infarction (p<0.001) had a poor outcome compared to those younger than 50 years age and those without adverse intra-operative events or infarctions. The grouped age variable had maximum influence on patient outcome. Location and size of aneurysm did not have an overall impact on surgical outcome. There were 4 mortalities. Primary clipping of proximal non-cavernous aneurysms on the internal carotid artery is associated with adverse intra-operative events. A multi-modality treatment approach in these aneurysms should be individualized, more so in patients older than 50 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Short-term outcome of single stenting technique for unruptured wide-necked tiny aneurysms of the anterior circulation].

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    Lu, Jun; Wang, Daming; Liu, Jiachun; Wang, Lijun; Qi, Peng

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the short-term outcome of single stenting technique for unruptured, wide-necked, tiny aneurysms of the anterior circulation. Eleven unruptured, wide-necked, tiny aneurysms of the anterior circulation were treated by a single stent deployed in the parent artery between January 2008 and July 2013 in Department of Neurosurgery in Beijing Hospital. The maximum diameter of the aneurysms ranged from 2.0 to 3.0 mm, mean (2.4 ± 0.4) mm, and the dome-to-neck ratios were all ≤ 1.2. The locations were clinoid segment of internal carotid artery (n=2), posterior communicating artery origin (n=4), anterior choroidal artery origin (n=2) and middle cerebral artery bifurcation (n=3). All internal carotid aneurysms were located in the medial and/or ventral wall of the internal carotid artery. The rate of aneurysm obliteration and rupture during follow-up was obtained by repeat angiography and clinic or telephone interview respectively. Sole stent placement in the parent artery was intentionally performed for nine aneurysms, while attempt of coiling after stent deployment for the other two aneurysms failed due to unsuccessful microcatherization. Ten stents were successfully deployed, of which one was used to treat two tandem lesions simultaneously. Only one aneurysm became smaller immediately postprocedure. No perioperative complications occurred. Angiographic follow-up after a mean period of (13 ± 6) months (range 8-24 months) revealed that 8 aneurysms did no change in size, 2 became smaller and only one was totally occluded. Asymptomatic in-stent stenosis of the parent artery was found in all 3 shrinking or occluded aneurysms. No aneurysm rupture was observed in the clinical follow-up. For those unruptured, wide-necked, tiny aneurysms arising at branching sites in the anterior circulation, single stenting technique seems to be a safe alternative treatment, while the short-term rate of aneurysm occlusion is low.

  8. Minimally Invasive Thumb-sized Pterional Craniotomy for Surgical Clip Ligation of Unruptured Anterior Circulation Aneurysms

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    Deshaies, Eric M; Villwock, Mark R; Singla, Amit; Toshkezi, Gentian; Padalino, David J

    2015-01-01

    Less invasive surgical approaches for intracranial aneurysm clipping may reduce length of hospital stay, surgical morbidity, treatment cost, and improve patient outcomes. We present our experience with a minimally invasive pterional approach for anterior circulation aneurysms performed in a major tertiary cerebrovascular center and compare the results with an aged matched dataset from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). From August 2008 to December 2012, 22 elective aneurysm clippings on patients ≤55 years of age were performed by the same dual fellowship-trained cerebrovascular/endovascular neurosurgeon. One patient (4.5%) experienced transient post-operative complications. 18 of 22 patients returned for follow-up imaging and there were no recurrences through an average duration of 22 months. A search in the NIS database from 2008 to 2010, also for patients aged ≤55 years of age, yielded 1,341 hospitalizations for surgical clip ligation of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Inpatient length of stay and hospital charges at our institution using the minimally invasive thumb-sized pterional technique were nearly half that of NIS (length of stay: 3.2 vs 5.7 days; hospital charges: $52,779 vs. $101,882). The minimally invasive thumb-sized pterional craniotomy allows good exposure of unruptured small and medium-sized supraclinoid anterior circulation aneurysms. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage from key subarachnoid cisterns and constant bimanual microsurgical techniques avoid the need for retractors which can cause contusions, localized venous infarctions, and post-operative cerebral edema at the retractor sites. Utilizing this set of techniques has afforded our patients with a shorter hospital stay at a lower cost compared to the national average. PMID:26325337

  9. Minimally Invasive Thumb-sized Pterional Craniotomy for Surgical Clip Ligation of Unruptured Anterior Circulation Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshaies, Eric M; Villwock, Mark R; Singla, Amit; Toshkezi, Gentian; Padalino, David J

    2015-08-11

    Less invasive surgical approaches for intracranial aneurysm clipping may reduce length of hospital stay, surgical morbidity, treatment cost, and improve patient outcomes. We present our experience with a minimally invasive pterional approach for anterior circulation aneurysms performed in a major tertiary cerebrovascular center and compare the results with an aged matched dataset from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). From August 2008 to December 2012, 22 elective aneurysm clippings on patients ≤55 years of age were performed by the same dual fellowship-trained cerebrovascular/endovascular neurosurgeon. One patient (4.5%) experienced transient post-operative complications. 18 of 22 patients returned for follow-up imaging and there were no recurrences through an average duration of 22 months. A search in the NIS database from 2008 to 2010, also for patients aged ≤55 years of age, yielded 1,341 hospitalizations for surgical clip ligation of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Inpatient length of stay and hospital charges at our institution using the minimally invasive thumb-sized pterional technique were nearly half that of NIS (length of stay: 3.2 vs 5.7 days; hospital charges: $52,779 vs. $101,882). The minimally invasive thumb-sized pterional craniotomy allows good exposure of unruptured small and medium-sized supraclinoid anterior circulation aneurysms. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage from key subarachnoid cisterns and constant bimanual microsurgical techniques avoid the need for retractors which can cause contusions, localized venous infarctions, and post-operative cerebral edema at the retractor sites. Utilizing this set of techniques has afforded our patients with a shorter hospital stay at a lower cost compared to the national average.

  10. Flow diverter stents for unruptured saccular anterior circulation perforating artery aneurysms: safety, efficacy, and short-term follow-up.

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    Kühn, Anna Luisa; Hou, Samuel Y; Perras, Mary; Brooks, Christopher; Gounis, Matthew J; Wakhloo, Ajay K; Puri, Ajit S

    2015-09-01

    Anterior circulation perforating artery aneurysms including anterior choroidal artery and lenticulostriate artery aneurysms are rare. Injury to these vessels can lead to severe debilitating symptoms. To present a new approach to treatment using flow diversion technology. Patients treated with a Pipeline embolization device (PED) for perforator artery aneurysms at our institution between June 2012 and May 2013 were identified and included in our retrospective analysis. We evaluated patient vascular risk factors; family history of aneurysms; aneurysm characteristics; National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on admission; and angiography follow-up and patient clinical outcome at discharge, 6 months, and 1 year. We included four patients with a mean age of 59.8 years. Two patients had a positive family history of aneurysms. Patient vascular risk factors included smoking, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. All patients presented with a NIHSS and mRS of 0 on admission. Aneurysms were located at the anterior choroidal (n=2) or lenticulostriate artery (n=2) and were treated with a single PED. No periprocedural or postprocedural complications occurred. The patients were discharged with no change in NHISS or mRS score. Six-month and 1-year follow-up angiography showed complete aneurysm occlusion. Mild intimal hyperplasia was seen in 2 cases at 6 months, but was resolved at the 1-year follow-up. No re-treatment was necessary. NIHSS and mRS remained 0 at follow-up time points. Our preliminary results show that flow diversion technology is an effective and safe therapy for complex, hard-to-treat aneurysms in perforating arteries. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are needed to validate our promising results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Optimal Guiding Catheter Length for Endovascular Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms in Anterior Circulation in Era of Flourishing Distal Access System.

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    Jia, Zhen Yu; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Young Eun; Choi, Joon Ho; Hwang, Sun Moon; Lee, Ga Young; Youn, Jin Ho; Lee, Deok Hee

    2017-09-01

    To determine the minimum required guiding catheter length for embolization of various intracranial aneurysms in anterior circulation and to analyze the effect of various patient factors on the required catheter length and potential interaction with its stability. From December 2016 to March 2017, 90 patients with 93 anterior circulation aneurysms were enrolled. Three types of guiding catheters (Envoy, Envoy DA, and Envoy DA XB; Codman Neurovascular, Raynham, MA, USA) were used. We measured the in-the-body length of the catheter and checked the catheter tip location in the carotid artery. We analyzed factors affecting the in-the-body length and stability of the guiding catheter system. The average (±standard deviation) in-the-body length of the catheter was 84.2±5.9 cm. The length was significantly longer in men (89.1±5.6 vs. 82.1±4.6 cm, Pguiding catheter was 84 cm on average for elective anterior-circulation aneurysm embolization. The length increased in men older than 65 years with a more tortuous arch. We could reach a higher position with distal access catheters with little difference in the stability once we reached the target location.

  12. The outcome of a surgical protocol based on ischemia overprotection in large and giant aneurysms of the anterior cerebral circulation.

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    Imai, Hideaki; Watanabe, Katsushige; Miyagishima, Takaaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Kin, Taichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-07-01

    Aiming to define the optimal treatment of large and giant aneurysms (LGAs) in the anterior circulation, we present our surgical protocol and patient outcome. A series of 42 patients with intracavernous LGAs (n = 16), paraclinoid (C2) LGAs (n = 17), and peripheral (middle cerebral artery-MCA or anterior cerebral artery-ACA) LGAs (n = 9) were treated after bypass under motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring. Preoperatively, three categories of ischemic tolerance during internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion were defined on conventional angiography: optimal, suboptimal, and insufficient collaterals. Accordingly, three types of bypass: low flow (LFB), middle flow (MFB) and high flow (HFB) were applied for the cases with optimal, suboptimal, and insufficient collaterals, respectively. Outcome was evaluated by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). All patients had excellent GOS score except one, who suffered a major ischemic stroke immediately after surgery for a paraclinoid lesion. Forty-one patients were followed up for 87.1 ± 40.1 months (range 13-144 months). Intracavernous LGAs were all treated by proximal occlusion with bypass surgery. Of paraclinoid LGA patients, 15 patients had direct clipping under suction decompression and other 2 patients with recurrent aneurysms had ICA (C2) proximal clipping with HFB. MEP monitoring guided for temporary clipping time and clip repositioning, observing significant MEP changes for up to 6 min duration. Of 9 peripheral LGAs patients 7 MCA LGAs had reconstructive clipping (n = 4) or trapping (n = 3) with bypass including LFB in 3 cases, MFB in 1 and HFB in 1. Two ACA LGAs had clipping (n = 1) or trapping (n = 1) with A3-A3 bypass. The applied protocol provided excellent results in intracavernous, paraclinoid, and peripheral thrombosed LGAs of the anterior circulation.

  13. Microsurgical management of posterior circulation aneurysms

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    SHI Xiang-en

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To retrospectively analyze effective methods for surgical management of posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods There were 42 patients with posterior circulation aneurysms [26 cases of basilar aneurysm (27 aneurysms, 16 cases of vertebral aneurysm (17 aneurysms]. There were 15 patients underwent bypass surgery [4 external carotid artery-P2 segment of posterior cerebral artery (ECA-P2, 2 internal carotid artery-P2 segment of posterior cerebral artery (ICA-P2, 2 internal maxillary artery-P2 segment of posterior cerebral artery (IMA-P2, 2 intracranial segment of vertebral artery-extracranial segment of vertebral artery, 5 occipital artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (OA-PICA] and 27 patients underwent simple surgical clipping. Results Activities of daily life of 37 patients recovered to normal (14 patients with aneurysm on the top of basilar artery, 3 with aneurysm on the trunk of basilar artery, 9 with vertebral aneurysm, 5 with posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm, 4 with aneurysm on the junction of P1-P2 segment of posterior cerebral artery, 1 with superior cerebellar artery, and 1 with anterior inferior cerebellar aneurysm. None of them occurred operation-related neurological dysfunction. The recovery rate was 88.09% . Among the other patients, 1 with aneurysm on the top of basilar artery presented severe signs and symptoms of neurological defect and cannot take care of oneself, 2 patients (1 with aneurysm on the top of basilar artery, 1 with aneurysm on the trunk of basilar artery occurred brain stem hemorrhage after operation, and died at perioperative period, 2 with vertebral aneurysm relapsed and was cured after treatment. Conclusion Posterior circulation aneurysm which is not suitable for surgical clipping can be treated with intra? and extra?cranial vessel bypass. It may avoid the risk of surgical clipping of aneurysm.

  14. Microneurosurgical management of anterior choroid artery aneurysms.

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    Lehecka, Martin; Dashti, Reza; Laakso, Aki; van Popta, Jouke S; Romani, Rossana; Navratil, Ondrej; Kivipelto, Leena; Kivisaari, Riku; Foroughi, Mansoor; Kokuzawa, Jouji; Lehto, Hanna; Niemelä, Mika; Rinne, Jaakko; Ronkainen, Antti; Koivisto, Timo; Jääskelainen, Juha E; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2010-05-01

    Anterior choroid artery aneurysms (AChAAs) constitute 2%-5% of all intracranial aneurysms. They are usually small, thin walled with one or several arteries originating at their base, and often associated with multiple aneurysms. In this article, we review the practical microsurgical anatomy, the preoperative imaging, surgical planning, and the microneurosurgical steps in the dissection and the clipping of AChAAs. This review, and the whole series on intracranial aneurysms (IAs), are mainly based on the personal microneurosurgical experience of the senior author (J.H.) in two Finnish centers (Helsinki and Kuopio) that serve, without patient selection, the catchment area in Southern and Eastern Finland. These two centers have treated more than 10,000 patients with IAs since 1951. In the Kuopio Cerebral Aneurysm Database of 3005 patients with 4253 IAs, 831 patients (28%) had altogether 980 internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, of whom 95 patients had 99 (2%) AChAAs. Ruptured AChAAs, found in 39 patients (41%), with median size of 6 mm (range = 2-19 mm), were associated with intracerebral hematoma (ICH) in only 1 (3%) patient. Multiple aneurysms were seen in 58 (61%) patients. The main difficulty in microneurosurgical management of AChAAs is to preserve flow in the anterior choroid artery originating at the base and often attached to the aneurysm dome. This necessitates perfect surgical strategy based on preoperative knowledge of 3 dimensional angioarchitecture and proper orientation during the microsurgical dissection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Totally thrombosed giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm

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    V R Roopesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant anterior communicating artery aneurysmsarerare. Apatient presented with visual dysfunction, gait ataxia and urinary incontinence. MRI showed a giant suprasellar mass.At surgery, the lesion was identified as being an aneurysm arising from the anterior communicating artery.The difficulty in preoperative diagnosis and relevant literature are reviewed.

  16. The energy loss may predict rupture risks of anterior communicating aneurysms: a preliminary result.

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    Hu, Peng; Qian, Yi; Lee, Chong-Joon; Zhang, Hong-Qi; Ling, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms are well documented to have a higher rupture risk compared with aneurysms at other locations. However, the risk predicting factors for these aneurysms still remain unclear due to the complex arteries geometries and flow patterns involved. The authors introduce a comprehensive method to quantitatively illustrate the development of ACoA aneurysms using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. Seven ACoA aneurysms, which included 2 ruptured and 5 unruptured aneurysms, were employed. Patient-specific whole anterior circulation geometries were segmented to simulate the real circumstances in vivo. The energy losses (EL) and flow architectures of these 7 aneurysms were evaluated using an algorithm modality. Overall, the 2 ruptured aneurysms, along with 1 unruptured aneurysm that was defined as highly likely to rupture due to ACoA location and a bleb sitting at the top of the dome, had a significantly larger EL and more complex and unstable flow architecture than the others. Two aneurysms had a negative value of EL indicating that the geometries with aneurysms of the anterior communicating complex (ACC) had a smaller loss of energy than the geometries without aneurysms. Despite a small sample size resulting in a low statistical significance, EL may serve as a development predictor of ACoA aneurysms.

  17. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting with vision loss

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    Dhaval P Shukla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior communicating artery aneurysm rarely presents with symptoms of compression of anterior visual pathways. We report a case of 65 years old man, who had complete loss of vision in right eye and temporal hemianopsia in left eye due to giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

  18. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting with vision loss

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    Shukla, Dhaval P.; Bhat, Dhananjaya I.; Devi, Bhagavatula I.

    2013-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm rarely presents with symptoms of compression of anterior visual pathways. We report a case of 65 years old man, who had complete loss of vision in right eye and temporal hemianopsia in left eye due to giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

  19. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting with vision loss.

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    Shukla, Dhaval P; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Devi, Bhagavatula I

    2013-07-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm rarely presents with symptoms of compression of anterior visual pathways. We report a case of 65 years old man, who had complete loss of vision in right eye and temporal hemianopsia in left eye due to giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

  20. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm related to visual symptoms.

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    Park, Jung Hyun; Park, Sang Keun; Kim, Tae Hong; Shin, Jun Jae; Shin, Hyung Shik; Hwang, Yong Soon

    2009-09-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are sometimes presented with visual symptoms by their rupture or direct compression of the optic nerve. It is because their prevalent sites are anatomically located close to the optic pathway. Anterior communicating artery is especially located in close proximity to optic nerve. Aneurysm arising in this area can produce visual symptoms according to their direction while the size is small. Clinical importance of visual symptoms presented by aneurysmal optic nerve compression is stressed in this study. Retrospective analysis of ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms compressing optic apparatus were carried out. Total 33 cases were enrolled in this study. Optic nerve compression of the aneurysms was confirmed by the surgical fields. In 33 cases among 351 cases of ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms treated surgically, from 1991 to 2000, the dome of aneurysm was compressed in optic pathway. In some cases, aneurysm impacted into the optic nerve that deep hollowness was found when the aneurysm sac was removed during operation. Among 33 cases, 10 cases presented with preoperative visual symptoms, such as visual dimness (5), unilateral visual field defect (2) or unilateral visual loss (3), 20 cases had no visual symptoms. Visual symptoms could not be checked in 3 cases due to the poor mental state. In 6 cases among 20 cases having no visual symptoms, optic nerve was deeply compressed by the dome of aneurysm which was seen in the surgical field. Of 10 patients who had visual symptoms, 8 showed improvement in visual symptoms within 6 months after clipping of aneurysms. In 2 cases, the visual symptoms did not recover. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm can cause visual symptoms by compressing the optic nerve or direct rupture to the optic nerve with focal hematoma formation. We emphasize that cerebral vascular study is highly recommended to detect intracranial aneurysm before its rupture in the case of normal CT findings with

  1. Junctional chiasmatic syndrome due to large anterior communicating artery aneurysm

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    Maruthi Kesani; Pavan Kumar Pelluru; Suchanda Bhattacharjee; Rajesh Alugolu; A K Purohit

    2017-01-01

    Even though aneurysm involving the anterior communicating artery (A Com A) was common in clinical practice, producing compressive symptoms such as visual loss was rare. We report a case, in which patient had gradually progressive visual loss with features of the junctional chiasmatic syndrome, imaging revealed partially thrombosed large A Com A aneurysm. Intraoperatively, aneurysm was found compressing the optic chiasm and right optic nerve, following clipping and decompression of the optic n...

  2. Giant left anterior descending artery aneurysm resulting in sudden death

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    Chan-Hee Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery aneurysm is a rare congenital or vascular inflammation-based anomaly for which the clinical course and optimal timing of treatment remain unclear. Here, we report a case of sudden death caused by a giant coronary artery aneurysm of the left anterior descending artery that presented with chest pain. This case suggests that urgent interventional or surgical repair is needed when a large coronary aneurysm presents with acute ischemic symptoms.

  3. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting as monocular blindness.

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    Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Sampath, Somanna

    2011-10-01

    Anterior communicating artery (AcomA) aneurysm presenting with rapidly progressing monocular visual loss is rare. We present one such case masquerading as retrobulbar optic neuritis, with no improvement following steroid therapy. Monocular blindness was due to compression of the optic nerve by a large AcomA aneurysm, which was detected after rupture.

  4. Double perforation of anterior mitral leaflet aneurysm in a patient with mitral and aortic leaflet aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Double valve aneurysms in a single patient are a rare occurrence and even rare finding is occurrence of double perforation of anterior mitral leaflet aneurysm. We present an adult patient with bicuspid aortic valve, coarctation of aorta and previous endocarditis presenting late with these rare abnormalities.

  5. Junctional chiasmatic syndrome due to large anterior communicating artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruthi Kesani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though aneurysm involving the anterior communicating artery (A Com A was common in clinical practice, producing compressive symptoms such as visual loss was rare. We report a case, in which patient had gradually progressive visual loss with features of the junctional chiasmatic syndrome, imaging revealed partially thrombosed large A Com A aneurysm. Intraoperatively, aneurysm was found compressing the optic chiasm and right optic nerve, following clipping and decompression of the optic nerve and chiasm there was gradually improvement in the vision over 2 weeks postoperatively.

  6. Clinical presentation and treatment of distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokimura, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Takashi; Yamahata, Hitoshi; Yonezawa, Hajime; Yokoyama, Shunichi; Haruzono, Akihiro; Obara, Soichi; Nishimuta, Yosuke; Nagayama, Tetsuya; Hirahara, Kazuho; Kamezawa, Takashi; Sugata, Sei; Arita, Kazunori

    2012-10-01

    Aneurysms located at the distal portion of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are rare, and their clinical features are not fully understood. We report the clinical features and management of nine distal AICA aneurysms in nine patients treated during the past decade at Kagoshima University Hospital and affiliated hospitals. Our series includes seven women and two men. Of their nine aneurysms, eight were ruptured and one was unruptured; six were saccular and three were dissecting aneurysms. The most prevalent location was the meatal loop (n = 5) followed by the postmeatal (n = 3) and premeatal segment (n = 1) of the AICA, suggesting hemodynamic stress as an etiology of these distal AICA aneurysms. Of the nine patients, five presented with angiographic features suggestive of increased hemodynamic stress to the AICA and the common trunk of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, with vertebral artery stenosis, marked laterality, and a primitive hypoglossal artery. We addressed eight aneurysms (eight patients) surgically; one aneurysm in one patient disappeared in the course of 3 months without surgical treatment. Of the eight surgically treated aneurysms, seven were ruptured and one was unruptured, five were clipped via lateral suboccipital craniotomy, two were trapped via lateral suboccipital craniotomy, and one was embolized. Good outcomes were obtained in six of the eight patients who underwent operation (75 %). We consider increased hemodynamic stress attributable to anatomic variations in the AICA and related posterior circulation to be the predominant contributor to the development of distal AICA aneurysms. Direct clipping and trapping yielded favorable outcomes in our series.

  7. A study of the hemodynamics of anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.

    2006-03-01

    In this study, the effects of unequal physiologic flow conditions in the internal carotid arteries on the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics of anterior communicating artery aneurysms were investigated. Patient-specific vascular computational fluid dynamics models of five cerebral aneurysms were constructed from bilateral 3D rotational angiography images. The aneurysmal hemodynamics was analyzed under a range of physiologic flow conditions including the effects of unequal mean flows and phase shifts between the flow waveforms of the left and right internal carotid arteries. A total of five simulations were performed for each patient, and unsteady wall shear stress (WSS) maps were created for each flow condition. Time dependent curves of average WSS magnitude over selected regions on the aneurysms were constructed and used to analyze the influence of the inflow conditions. It was found that mean flow imbalances in the feeding vessels tend to shift the regions of elevated WSS (flow impingement region) towards the dominating inflow jet and to change the magnitude of the WSS peaks. However, the overall qualitative appearance of the WSS distribution and velocity simulations is not substantially affected. In contrast, phase differences tend to increase the temporal complexity of the hemodynamic patterns and to destabilize the intra-aneurysmal flow pattern. However, these effects are less important when the A1 confluence is less symmetric, i.e. dominated by one of the A1 segments. Conditions affecting the flow characteristics in the parent arteries of cerebral aneurysms with more than one avenue of inflow should be incorporated into flow models.

  8. Portal circulation aneurysms: two case reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret, W. L.; Silva, A de.; Elzarka, A.; Schelleman, A.

    2007-01-01

    Venous aneurysms of the superior mesenteric vein and portal vein are an uncommon occurrence and often an incidental finding. They can also be associated with hepatocellular disease and portal hypertension. We present CT and ultrasound findings of these entities. The management of venous aneurysms is generally conservative with serial imaging

  9. [Four cases of direct surgery for anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi, Hidefuku; Inoha, Satoshi; Uno, Jyunji; Ikai, Yoshiaki; Koga, Hiromichi; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Nagaoka, Shintaro

    2007-06-01

    Anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms are very rare. We carried out four direct operations for AICA aneurysms including two distal AICA aneurysms using lateral suboccipital retrosigmoid approaches (LSRA). We successfully performed the clipping by LSRA. but hearing loss occurred except in one of our cases which involved a chronic term operation in in our cases, In a 72 years old female with a ruptured dissecting aneurysm of the AICA anterior pontine segment, we performed the OA-PICA anastomosis first because of its being an AICA-PICA type, and then we continued to carry out the trapping operation of dissecting artery on day 0. She left our hospital cheerfully but hearing loss persisted on the operated side. Four examples of the dissecting aneurysm of AICA anterior pontine segment have been reported, but only our case involved the trapping with revascularization in acute stage. At the moment, there is no clinical or useful classification for distal AICA aneurysm because it is extremely rare. We will now propose a new classification. This classification is divided into two groups, (1) P (pons) -group and (2) C (cerebellum) -group. The P-group consists of pA (AICA anterior pontine segment). pL (lateral branch on the pons to the meatal loop) and pM (medial branch on the pons). C-group consists of m-loop (meatal loop), cL (lateral branch post meatal loop) and cM (medial branch on the cerebellum). From results of case reports (75 distal AICA aneurysms), we found that pA: 5 (6.7%), pL: 2 (2.8%), pM: 0, m-loop: 54 (72%), cL: 8 (11%), cM: 6 (8.3%). The followings factors were also found. (1) Occlusion of the parent artery of P-group without revascularization of peripheral circulation may entail the risk of death. (2) On the other hand, as for the C-group, the parent artery was able to be occluded without severe consequences, but hearing loss and/or cerebellar infarction occurred. We believe that this classification is simple and very useful for therapeutic

  10. Anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms mimicking vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, Aïda Kawkabani; Mosimann, Pascal J; Guichard, Jean-Pierre; Boukobza, Monique; Houdart, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Unruptured anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms are rare but potentially lethal cerebellopontine angle (CPA) lesions that may be misdiagnosed as vestibular schwannomas when they present with vestibulo-cochlear symptoms. We report two cases of unruptured but symptomatic AICA aneurysms initially referred to us as atypical vestibular schwannomas requiring surgery. Two discriminant MR features are described. One patient refused treatment. The other was successfully treated by coil occlusion. Caution is advised before suspecting a CPA mass to be a purely extra-canalicular schwannoma, given its extreme rarity. Deafness and cerebellar ischemia may be prevented if AICA aneurysms are correctly identified preoperatively. In the absence of specific arterial imaging, two MR features may distinguish them from vestibular schwannomas: (1) the absence of internal auditory canal enlargement and (2) the "blurry dot sign," representing blood flow artefacts on pre- and postcontrast studies. Copyright © 2013 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  11. Unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms presenting with seizure: Report of three cases and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Akshay; Menon, Girish R.; Nair, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysms generally present with bleed and epileptogenic aneurysms are rare. Unruptured epilpetogenic anterior communicating artery aneurysms are extremely rare and anecdotal. We present three patients with unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms who presented with seizures and were surgically managed. Seizure might be related to the large size, presence of thrombus, microbleeds and surrounding gliosis. We suggest that large thrombosed anterior communicating artery aneurysms should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with late onset of seizure and having a suprasellar lesion on imaging. Surgical clipping offers a fair chance of seizure freedom in selected patients. PMID:24403964

  12. A case of angiographically occult, distal small anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Hisashi; Sanada, Yasuhiro; Nagatsuka, Kazuhiro; Kato, Amami

    2015-01-01

    Background: A small aneurysm at an unusual location, such as a distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm, may conceal as a computed tomography angiography (CTA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA)-occult aneurysm. Case Description: We herein present the case of a patient suffering from a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with two aneurysms in which the AICA aneurysm was negative by CTA and DSA. CTA demonstrated a right anterior choroidal artery aneurysm, which was revealed to be an unruptured aneurysm after surgical exploration. A small distal AICA aneurysm was detected by 3D rotational angiography (3DRA). The patient fully recovered except for left-side hearing loss four months after the second operation. Conclusion: We recommend a meticulous diagnosis by 3DRA in patients with SAH in which the distribution is not coincident with a typical aneurysmal location. PMID:26110079

  13. Endovascular treatment for ruptured distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Yoon, Seok-Mann; Shim, Jai-Joon; Bae, Hack-Gun; Yoon, Il-Gyu

    2014-03-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented with Hunt and Hess grade (HHG) III subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by a ruptured left distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm. Computed tomography showed a thin SAH on the cerebellopontine angle cistern, and small vermian intracerebral hemorrhage and intraventricular hemorrhage in the fourth ventricle. Digital subtraction angiography revealed the aneurysm on the postmeatal segment of left distal AICA, a branching point of rostrolateral and caudomedial branch of the left distal AICA. Despite thin caliber, tortuous running course and far distal location, the AICA aneurysm was obliterated successfully with endovascular coils without compromising AICA flow. However, the patient developed left side sensorineural hearing loss postoperatively, in spite of definite patency of distal AICA on the final angiogram. She was discharged home without neurologic sequela except hearing loss and tinnitus. Endovascular treatment of distal AICA aneurysm, beyond the meatal loop, is feasible while preserving the AICA flow. However, because the cochlear hair cell is vulnerable to ischemia, unilateral hearing loss can occur, possibly caused by the temporary occlusion of AICA flow by microcatheter during endovascular treatment.

  14. Unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm with co-existing blister aneurysms: case report and review of literature

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    Karthikeyan Y. R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Blister aneurysms are a separate class of vascular malformations with a unique etiopathogenesis and clinical profile, elusive to radiological imaging and complex to manage. Unless identified and managed appropriately they often lead increased morbidity intra and post operatively. They are commonly reported in internal carotid artery. We are reporting a rare case of intraoperatively diagnosed blister aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery, the management options and the importance of constant vigilance in cases where the aneurysm appears unruptured intraoperatively.

  15. Endovascular treatment of unruptured posterior circulation intracranial aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianli Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Endovascular treatment of unruptured posterior circulation intracranial aneurysms (UPCIAs is limited in the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA. The aim of this study is to evaluate the periprocedural morbidity, mortality, and midterm clinical and angiographic follow-ups of endovascular treatment of UPCIAs. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients treated in a 2-year period (89 patients: 10-78 years of age, mean: 45.5 ± 14.3/92 UPCIAs. Fifty-eight aneurysms were found incidentally, 12 in association with mass effect symptoms and 22 with stroke. Results: A clinical improvement or stable outcome was achieved in 84 patients (94.4%. The two cases of permanent morbidity included a patient with paralysis and another patient with hemianopia. One patient died after treatment of a giant fusiform vertebrobasilar aneurysm. In one patient, the aneurysm ruptured during treatment, resulting in death. Another patient suffered a fatal aneurysm rupture 4 days after treatment. Giant size (P = 0.005 and mass effect presentation (P = 0.029 were independent predictors of unfavorable outcomes in UPCIAs. Angiographic follow-up was available in 76 of the 86 surviving patients (88.4% with a mean of 6.8 months (range: 1-36 months. Recanalization in six patients (7.9% at 3 months, 4 months, 4 months, 24 months, and 36 months required retreatment in three patients. In-stent stenosis of >50% was found in three patients. Conclusion: Endovascular therapy is an attractive option for UPCIAs with stable midterm outcome. However, the current endovascular option seems to have a limitation for the treatment of the aneurysm with giant size or mass effect presentation.

  16. Photophobia as the visual manifestation of chiasmal compression by unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Naoshi; Abe, Toshi; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Tabuchi, Kazuo

    2009-04-01

    A 37-year-old woman presented with photophobia without visual loss associated with chiasmal compression by an unruptured anterior communicating artery (AcomA) aneurysm. She had suffered progressive photophobia for one year. Neuroimaging indicated an AcomA aneurysm attached to the chiasm. Photophobia was resolved following clipping of the aneurysm. AcomA aneurysm should be considered in patients who experience photophobia without visual loss.

  17. Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy as the Sole Manifestation of Subarachnoid Haemorrhage from a Ruptured Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kook; Shin, Sun Young; Park, Shin Hae

    2013-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm is the most common form of intracranial aneurysm and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the common presenting feature of anterior communicating artery aneurysms. In general, patients with SAH from anterior communicating artery aneurysm present with neurological deficit. We report an interesting case of a 60-year-old man who presented with acute monocular vision loss accompanied by periorbital pain without any neurological deficit, finally diagnosed with S...

  18. Intrameatal thrombosed anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm mimicking a vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päsler, Dennis; Baldauf, Jörg; Runge, Uwe; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2011-04-01

    Aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are a rare entity. Purely intrameatal aneurysms are even rarer. The authors report an intrameatal thrombosed AICA aneurysm mimicking a vestibular schwannoma that was treated by resection and end-to-end anastomosis. This 22-year-old man presented with acute hearing loss, vertigo, and moderate facial palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an atypical intrameatal lesion with dilation of the internal auditory canal. Microsurgical inspection via a retrosigmoid approach and drilling of the posterior wall of the internal auditory canal revealed a thrombosed AICA aneurysm. The aneurysm was excised, and an end-to-end suture was performed to restore AICA continuity. Intraoperative indocyanine green videoangiography as well as postoperative digital substraction angiography showed a good revascularization. Intrameatal AICA aneurysms may present with symptoms similar to vestibular schwannomas. End-to-end reanastomosis after aneurysm resection is a treatment option when clipping is impossible.

  19. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W. L.; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred

  20. Aneurysm of Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Khursheed Ahmad; Menon, Girish; Nair, Suresh; Abraham, Mathew

    2018-01-01

    Aneurysms arising from anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA-PICA) variant are extremely rare. They usually present with subarachnoid hemorrhage. This is probably the second case report of a large thrombosed AICA-PICA variant aneurysm presenting as a cerebellopontine angle mass lesion with cranial nerve palsy, managed successfully by surgical clipping. PMID:29492120

  1. Evaluation of angiographic delayed vasospasm due to ruptured aneurysm in comparison with cerebral circulation time measured by IA-DSA

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    Okada, Yoshikazu; Shima, Takeshi; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Kanji; Okita, Shinji; Hatayama, Takashi; Yoshida, Akira; Naoe, Yasutaka; Shiga, Naoko (Chugoku Rosai Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1994-05-01

    Delayed vasospasm due to ruptured aneurysm has been basically evaluated by angiographic changes in contrast to clinical features such as delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND). However, the discrepancies between angiographic and clinical findings have been pointed out. In this study, angiographic changes and cerebral circulation time in ruptured aneurysms were simultaneously investigated with IA-DSA. Thirty-two patients, who had ruptured aneurysms at the anterior circle of Willis and neck clippings at the acute stage, were investigated. Carotid angiogram was performed with IA-DSA on the 7-13th day after the attack. Angiographic changes were evaluated by Fischer's classification and circulation time was calculated in the following way. A time-density curve was obtained at the two ROI's: the C3-C4 portion and the rolandic vein. Circulation time was defined by the difference between the time showing peak optical density at the carotid and the venous portion. The control value of this circulation time obtained from 20 cases with non-rupture aneurysm and epilepsy was 3.4 sec (53 year old) on the average. X-ray CT scan examination was performed at the same time and clinical features were observed every day. Angiographically, 3 cases were free from vasospasm, 18 cases were found to present slight to moderate vasospasm, and 11 cases showed severe vasospasm. Circulation time in patients with no spasm was 3.6 seconds, in patients with slight to moderate vasospasm it was 4.3 seconds and in patients with severe vasospasm it was 6.8 seconds. Ten patients showing cerebral infarction on CT scans demonstrated significantly long circulation time, 7.0 seconds on the average. And all patients having severe vasospasm with circulation time more than 6 seconds presented DIND such as hemiparesis. (author).

  2. Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy as the Sole Manifestation of Subarachnoid Haemorrhage from a Ruptured Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kook; Shin, Sun Young; Park, Shin Hae

    2013-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm is the most common form of intracranial aneurysm and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the common presenting feature of anterior communicating artery aneurysms. In general, patients with SAH from anterior communicating artery aneurysm present with neurological deficit. We report an interesting case of a 60-year-old man who presented with acute monocular vision loss accompanied by periorbital pain without any neurological deficit, finally diagnosed with SAH from ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Five months after immediate craniotomy with aneurysm neck clipping, his visual acuity was improved to 20/63 with a pale optic disc appearance. Acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy may be the sole manifestation of SAH from ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Unilateral decrease of visual acuity with periorbital pain, in the absence of other neurological change, may be the initial and isolated sign.

  3. Anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: Segments and results of surgical and endovascular managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xianli; Ge, Huijian; He, Hongwei; Jiang, Chuhan

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms are rare and published clinical experience with these aneurysms is limited. Objective The objective of this article is to report angiographic characteristics and results associated with premeatal, meatal and postmeatal segments, surgical and endovascular therapies. Methods A literature review was performed through PubMed using “anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm” through January 2016. Clinical data, angiograms, management techniques, and patient outcomes were reviewed for 47 collected cases in 30 previous reports. Results Of these aneurysms, 21 (44.7%) were associated with meatal segment, 10 (21.3%) were postmeatal and 16 (34.0%) were premeatal. Patients with meatal aneurysms are more likely to present with subarachnoid hemorrhage and hearing loss and facial palsy (77.8%). Patient outcomes of meatal aneurysms presented with more neuropathies (51.7%) and cerebellar symptoms (14.3%) (p = 0.049). Four cases of meatal aneurysm with preoperative cranial nerve deficits (two VII and two VIII) showed improvement after surgery. Endovascular treatment achieved outcomes similar to surgical treatment (p = 0.327). Conclusions AICA aneurysms have a predilection for meatal segment. Patients with meatal aneurysms are more likely to present with subarachnoid hemorrhage and hearing loss and facial palsy. Patient outcomes of meatal aneurysms presented with more neuropathies and cerebellar symptoms. Endovascular treatment achieved outcomes similar to surgical treatment. PMID:27485045

  4. Enterprise Deployment Through PulseRider To Treat Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Iacopo; Limbucci, Nicola; Nappini, Sergio; Rosi, Andrea; Laiso, Antonio; Mangiafico, Salvatore

    2018-02-01

    PulseRider (Pulsar Vascular, Los Gatos, California, USA) is a new endovascular device designed to treat wide-neck bifurcation intracranial aneurysms. Deployment of a stent through a PulseRider to treat an aneurysm's recurrence has never been described before. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who underwent coiling of an 8-mm anterior communicating artery aneurysm with assistance of a PulseRider neck reconstruction device. The 6-month digital subtraction angiography control showed aneurysm recurrence, so we deployed an Enterprise 2 closed-cell stent (Codman, Miami Lakes, Florida, USA) in the A1-A2 segment passing across the previously implanted PulseRider. Enterprise correctly expanded and allowed for adequate coiling of the aneurysm. An Enterprise stent can be safely opened through a PulseRider in order to treat aneurysm recurrence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of the Endoscopic Endonasal Transclival Approach for Surgical Clipping of Anterior Pontine Anterior-Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmillan, Jose L; Lawton, Michael T; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; El-Sayed, Ivan H; Zhang, Xin; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Gabarros, Andreu; Benet, Arnau

    2016-05-01

    Aneurysms of the anterior pontine segment of the anterior-inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are uncommon. Their treatment is challenging because critical neurovascular structures are adjacent to it and the available surgical corridors are narrow and deep. Although endoscopic endonasal approaches are accepted for treating midline skull base lesions, their role in the treatment vascular lesions remains undefined. The present study is aimed to assess the anatomic feasibility of the endoscopic endonasal transclival (EET) approach for treating anterior pontine AICA aneurysms and compare it with the subtemporal anterior transpetrosal (SAT) approach. Twelve cadaveric specimens were prepared for surgical simulation. The AICAs were exposed using both EET and SAT approaches. Surgical window area and the length of the exposed artery were measured. The distance from the origin of the artery to the clip applied for proximal control was measured. The number of AICA perforators exposed and the anatomic features of each AICA were recorded. The EET approach provided a wider surgical window area compared with the SAT (P AICA perforators were visualized using the EET approach (P AICA, an aneurysm clip could be applied closer to the origin of AICA using EET (0.2 ± 0.42 mm) compared with SAT (6.26 ± 3.4 mm) (P AICA aneurysms using the EET approach is feasible. Compared with SAT, the EET approach provides advantages in surgical window area, ensuring proximal control before aneurysm dissection, visualization of perforating branches, and better proximal control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Circulating neutrophil transcriptome may reveal intracranial aneurysm signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent M Tutino

    Full Text Available Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (IAs are typically asymptomatic and undetected except for incidental discovery on imaging. Blood-based diagnostic biomarkers could lead to improvements in IA management. This exploratory study examined circulating neutrophils to determine whether they carry RNA expression signatures of IAs.Blood samples were collected from patients receiving cerebral angiography. Eleven samples were collected from patients with IAs and 11 from patients without IAs as controls. Samples from the two groups were paired based on demographics and comorbidities. RNA was extracted from isolated neutrophils and subjected to next-generation RNA sequencing to obtain differential expressions for identification of an IA-associated signature. Bioinformatics analyses, including gene set enrichment analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, were used to investigate the biological function of all differentially expressed transcripts.Transcriptome profiling identified 258 differentially expressed transcripts in patients with and without IAs. Expression differences were consistent with peripheral neutrophil activation. An IA-associated RNA expression signature was identified in 82 transcripts (p<0.05, fold-change ≥2. This signature was able to separate patients with and without IAs on hierarchical clustering. Furthermore, in an independent, unpaired, replication cohort of patients with IAs (n = 5 and controls (n = 5, the 82 transcripts separated 9 of 10 patients into their respective groups.Preliminary findings show that RNA expression from circulating neutrophils carries an IA-associated signature. These findings highlight a potential to use predictive biomarkers from peripheral blood samples to identify patients with IAs.

  7. An unusual, duplicate origin of the anterior choroidal artery with aneurysm: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenin, Louis; Chivot, Cyril; Toussaint, Patrick; Deramond, Hervé; Peltier, Johann

    2015-12-01

    Aneurysms of the anterior choroidal artery (AChoA) are rare and often difficult to treat. Variations may be present and must be identified prior to treatment. We report a unique case of a ruptured aneurysm located at the origin of a duplicate branch of the AChoA. A 56-year-old male was admitted to our university hospital for coma. A brain CT scan showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, and CT angiography revealed a duplication of the right AChoA, with an aneurysm located at the branch's origin. We decided to embolize this aneurysm. Four weeks later, our patient was able to transfer to the rehabilitation unit. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first descriptions of an aneurysm located at the origin of a duplicate branch of the AChoA.

  8. Ruptured partially thrombosed anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: two case reports and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Fumiaki; Kawabata, Teppei; Muraoka, Shinsuke; Kojima, Takao; Watanabe, Tadashi; Hatano, Norikazu; Seki, Yukio

    2016-12-01

    Aneurysms arising from the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are very rare. When the parent artery is an AICA-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) variant, occlusion of the artery, even distal to the meatal loop, leads to a significant area of cerebellar infarction. We report two cases of ruptured partially thrombosed distal AICA aneurysms. In both cases, the parent artery was an AICA-PICA variant. The aneurysms were clipped in one case and trapped following occipital artery (OA)-AICA anastomosis in another case. It is important to keep the OA as a donor artery for revascularization in the treatment of the AICA-PICA variant aneurysms, especially when the absence of intra-aneurysmal thrombus is not comfirmed preoperatively.

  9. Resection of left anterior descending coronary artery aneurysm on a beating heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misthos, P; Kokotsakis, J N; Lioulias, A G; Skouteli, E A

    2009-01-01

    We report on the case of a 65-year-old man with unstable angina due to a left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery single aneurysm. On a beating heart, the aneurysm was partially resected and the left internal thoracic artery was grafted in situ as a patch to the LAD opening. The patient remains well and free of symptoms two years after the operation.

  10. Hemodynamic patterns of anterior communicating artery aneurysms: a possible association with rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the different flows present at anterior communicating artery (AcoA) aneurysms and investigate possible associations with rupture. For that purpose, patient-specific computational models of 26 AcoA aneurysms were constructed from 3D rotational angiography images. Bilateral images were acquired in 15 patients who had both A1 segments of the anterior cerebral arteries and models were created by fusing the reconstructed left and right arterial trees. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed under pulsatile flow conditions. Visualizations of the flow velocity pattern were created to classify the aneurysms into the following flow types: A) inflow from both A1 segments, B) flow jet in the parent artery splits into three secondary jets, one enters the aneurysm and the other two are directed to the A2 segments, C) the parent artery jet splits into two secondary jets, one is directed to one of the A2 segments and the other enters the aneurysm before being directed to the other A2 segment, and D) the parent artery jet enters the aneurysm before being directed towards the A2 segments. The maximum wall shear stress in the aneurysm at the systolic peak (MWSS) was calculated. Most aneurysms in group A were unruptured and had the lowest MWSS. Group B had the same number of unruptured and ruptured aneurysms, and a low MWSS. Groups C and D had high rupture ratios, being the average MWSS significantly higher in group C. Finally, it was found that the MWSS was higher for ruptured aneurysms of all flow types.

  11. Ruptured intrameatal aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery accompanying an arteriovenous malformation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Joo; Koh, Jun Seok; Ryu, Chang Woo; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2012-09-01

    The distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms located inside the internal auditory canal are rare. The association of the distal AICA aneurysms and an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) on the same arterial trunk is exceptional. Eight reports of a total of ten cases have been published and all of the reported aneurysms were located in the meatal or postmeatal segment of the AICA. Herein, we report a case of ruptured aneurysm in the intrameatal portion of the AICA accompanying an AVM fed by the same artery. A 55-year-old man suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured intrameatal aneurysm with a small AVM underwent surgical trapping of the meatal loop, resulting in uneventful recovery. Follow-up angiography demonstrated neither aneurysm nor residual AVM nidus. We propose that trapping of the meatal loop could be a safe and feasible alternative to unroofing followed by neck clipping in selected patients with an intrameatal aneurysm of the AICA. We also review here the relevant literature.

  12. Dissecting Aneurysm of Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Initially Presenting with Nonhemorrhagic Symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasame, Jo; Nomura, Motohiro

    2015-08-01

    We report a patient with a probable dissecting aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) initially presenting with a nonhemorrhagic symptom, which resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 61-year-old woman suddenly experienced nausea. Computed tomography (CT) on admission showed a high-density mass with a double lumen in the right cerebellopontine angle without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Five days after the onset, she suddenly lost consciousness. CT demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage. Emergency angiography revealed a probable dissecting aneurysm at the lateral pontomedullary segment of the right AICA. Although the initial symptom is not hemorrhage, an unruptured dissecting aneurysm of the AICA may have a high risk of rupture. Immediate radical treatment to prevent subsequent rupture is necessary for even an unruptured dissecting aneurysm of the AICA. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms and circulating endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, Jean-François; Cezar, Renaud; Kuster, Nils; Lobotesis, Kyriakos; Costalat, Vincent; Machi, Paolo; Bonafe, Alain; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the potential implication of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in complications following endovascular treatment (EVT) of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. CECs characterized as CD146(+)/CD105(+)/CD45(-)/DAPI(+) were considered to originate from an altered endothelial cell layer of the vessel wall. In 15 patients, CECs were characterized and enumerated by the CellTracks(®) System in blood samples from: (1) femoral artery (FA), (2) internal carotid artery (ICA) before (ICA1) and after procedure (ICA2), and (3) a peripheral vein before (PV1) and after EVT (PV2). Ischemic brain events were assessed using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI-MRI) before and 24h after EVT. In ICA1, the median number of single CECs and clusters of 2-5 CECs were higher than in FA, ICA2, PV1 and PV2 samples (P5 cells, sometimes >50μm, were mainly observed in ICA1 and never in PV1, PV2 or PV samples from ten healthy subjects. This distribution of CECs suggested femoral and ICA injury by the devices used, leading to endothelium shearing and desquamation of CECs. All patients discharged on day two (NIHSS score=0), however silent ischemic brain lesions were observed in 9/15 (60%). EVT detaches single and clusters of CECs from wall arteries that may be implicated in silent ischemic brain lesions genesis. Enumeration of CECs associated with DWI-MRI might represent an interesting strategy for monitoring and optimizing endovascular devices, and further limit EVT-related complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF PATIENTS WITH ENDOVASCULAR TREATMENT OF DISSECTING ANEURYSMS OF POSTERIOR CEREBRAL CIRCULATION IN CARTAGENA DE INDIAS

    OpenAIRE

    Rueda-Tamayo Leidy; Almeida-Pérez Rafael; De la Rosa-Manjarrez Ginna; Orozco-Gómez Fernando; Carrasquilla-Meléndez Rubén

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: the intracraneal aneurysms are local and permanent dilations in the artery. Objective: to describe the clinical, imagenologic and effectiveness of endovascular treatment in terms of its independence and mortality in patients with dissecting aneurysms of posterior cerebral circulation in Cartagena. Methods: a descriptive study was carried out with patients 18 years or older with a diagnosis of dissecting aneurysms of posterior cerebral circulation who received ...

  15. Microsurgical efficacy and safety of a right-hemispheric approach for unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Yeon; Jeon, Hong Jun; Ihm, Eun Hyun; Park, Keun Young; Lee, Jae Whan; Huh, Seung Kon

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of a right hemispheric surgical approach in treating unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms. Between January 2005 and June 2012, 305 patients with anterior communicating artery (Acom) aneurysms were treated using the pterional approach. Among them, 113 who underwent microsurgery with an unruptured Acom aneurysm were enrolled in this study. Every patient was evaluated with digital subtraction angiography preoperatively and CT scans were taken several times postoperatively. Surgical outcomes and complications were evaluated at discharge using the Glasgow Outcome Scale and at 6 months after surgery with CT angiography. Enrolled patients included 55 males and 58 females with a mean age of 56.3 years (range: 30-75 years). The mean diameter of the aneurysm was 5.8mm (range: 1.9-24.1). Left A1 dominancy was found in 71 patients (62.8%) whereas right A1 dominancy was found in 20 patients (17.7%), and right pterional craniotomies were performed in 92 patients (81.4%) while left pterional craniotomies were performed in 21 patients (18.6%). Complete clip application was achieved in 94.9% of patients (74 of 78) in right-side approach group but in only 81.3% of patients (13 of 16) in left-side approach group. Despite a left A1 dominancy and approached from the right, more than 90% of the patients had an excellent outcome at discharge (GOS 5) and more than 90% a complete aneurysm clipping at the 6-month follow-up CT angiography although it was not statistically significant. Microsurgical clipping of the unruptured Acom aneurysm through a right-side surgical approach showed favorable postoperative clinical and anatomical outcomes, especially aneurysms smaller than 10mm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: an illustrative case and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Manjila, Sunil; Dashti, Shervin; Tarr, Robert; Megerian, Cliff A

    2009-05-01

    Aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are relatively rare among intracranial aneurysms. They can occur in 1 of 3 regions of the AICA: 1) craniocaudal (high or low riding), 2) mediolateral-premeatal (proximal), and 3) meatal-postmeatal (distal). The management strategies for treatment differ according to the location and configuration of the aneurysm. The existing body of neurosurgical literature contains articles published on aneurysms arising from the AICA near the basilar artery (BA), intracanalicular/meatal aneurysms, and distal AICA. Several therapeutic options exist, encompassing microsurgical and endovascular techniques. The authors describe a case of treatment involving a large BA-AICA aneurysm approached via exposure of the presigmoid dura using a retromastoid suboccipital craniectomy and partial petrosectomy. Treatment of these lesions requires detailed knowledge of the anatomy, and an anatomical overview of the AICA with its arterial loops and significant branches is presented, including a discussion of the internal auditory (labyrinthine) artery, recurrent perforating arteries, subarcuate artery, and cerebellosubarcuate artery. The authors discuss the various surgical approaches (retromastoid, far lateral, subtemporal, and transclival) with appropriate illustrations, citing the advantages and disadvantages in accessing these AICA lesions in relation to these approaches. The complications of these different surgical techniques and possible clinical effects of parent artery occlusion during AICA surgery are highlighted.

  17. Aneurisma da artéria cerebelar ântero-inferior: relato de caso Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Oscar Alarcón Adorno

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Os aneurismas intracranianos do sistema vértebro-basilar representam cerca de 5 a 10% de todos os aneurismas cerebrais. Os aneurismas da artéria cerebelar ântero-inferior (AICA são considerados raros, podendo causar síndrome do ângulo ponto cerebelar, com ou sem hemorragia subaracnóidea. Desde 1948, foram descritos poucos casos na literatura. Apresentamos o caso de uma paciente, de 33 anos, na qual, após investigação de quadro de hemorragia subaracnóidea, diagnosticou-se aneurisma sacular da AICA esquerda. Foi submetida a clipagem do aneurisma, com ótimo resultado pós operatório.The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  18. Resolution of an Anterior-Inferior Cerebellar Artery Feeding Aneurysm with the Treatment of a Transverse-Sigmoid Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Peter; Stevens, Edwin A.; Warner, Judith; Couldwell, William T.

    2007-01-01

    A 27-year-old man developed an unruptured anterior-inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) feeding aneurysm from a transverse-sigmoid dural arteriovenous malformation. The patient, with a known history of left transverse and sigmoid sinus thrombosis, presented with pulse-synchronous tinnitus. Angiography revealed an extensive dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF), with feeders from both the extracranial and intracranial circulations, involving the right transverse sinus, the torcula, and the left transverse/sigmoid sinuses. Multimodal endovascular and open surgical therapy was used to manage the lesion. Before a planned second-stage treatment for the left sigmoid sinus component, the dural AVF improved significantly. During this interval, however, a small flow-related aneurysm developed on the left AICA feeding the petrous dural region. The aneurysm resolved after resection of the involved sigmoid sinus. This is the first reported case of an unruptured feeding-artery aneurysm in an intracranial dural AVF that resolved spontaneously with treatment of the dural AVF. Until more is known about the natural history, the decisions of when and whether to treat an unruptured dural AVF feeding-artery aneurysm must be made on an individual basis. PMID:17973034

  19. Computed Tomographic Angiogram of an Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Causing Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jee Ho; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Bum Tae; Ohn, Young-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D-CT) angiography is a widespread imaging modality for intracranial vascular lesions. However, 3D-CT angiograms of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm associated with acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy have not been previously described. We present 3D-CT angiograms of an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery that caused subarachnoid hemorrhage and vision loss in a 39-year old man. The 3D-CT angiograms were consistent with findings identif...

  20. Prediction of rupture risk in anterior communicating artery aneurysms with a feed-forward artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinjin; Chen, Yongchun; Lan, Li; Lin, Boli; Chen, Weijian; Wang, Meihao; Li, Rui; Yang, Yunjun; Zhao, Bing; Hu, Zilong; Duan, Yuxia

    2018-02-23

    Anterior communicating artery (ACOM) aneurysms are the most common intracranial aneurysms, and predicting their rupture risk is challenging. We aimed to predict this risk using a two-layer feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). 594 ACOM aneurysms, 54 unruptured and 540 ruptured, were reviewed. A two-layer feed-forward ANN was designed for ACOM aneurysm rupture-risk analysis. To improve ANN efficiency, an adaptive synthetic (ADASYN) sampling approach was applied to generate more synthetic data for unruptured aneurysms. Seventeen parameters (13 morphological parameters of ACOM aneurysm measured from these patients' CT angiography (CTA) images, two demographic factors, and hypertension and smoking histories) were adopted as ANN input. Age, vessel size, aneurysm height, perpendicular height, aneurysm neck size, aspect ratio, size ratio, aneurysm angle, vessel angle, aneurysm projection, A1 segment configuration, aneurysm lobulations and hypertension were significantly different between the ruptured and unruptured groups. Areas under the ROC curve for training, validating, testing and overall data sets were 0.953, 0.937, 0.928 and 0.950, respectively. Overall prediction accuracy for raw 594 samples was 94.8 %. This ANN presents good performance and offers a valuable tool for prediction of rupture risk in ACOM aneurysms, which may facilitate management of unruptured ACOM aneurysms. • A feed-forward ANN was designed for the prediction of rupture risk in ACOM aneurysms. • Two demographic parameters, 13 morphological aneurysm parameters, and hypertension/smoking history were acquired. • An ADASYN sampling approach was used to improve ANN quality. • Overall prediction accuracy of 94.8 % for the raw samples was achieved.

  1. Endovascular treatment of acutely ruptured, wide-necked anterior communicating artery aneurysms using the Enterprise stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qing-Hai; Wu, Yong-Fa; Shen, Jie; Hong, Bo; Yang, Peng-Fei; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wen-Yuan; Liu, Jian-Min

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of anterior communicating artery (AcomA) wide-necked aneurysms with the Enterprise stent (Codman, Miami Lakes, FL, USA) has not been commonly described, due to the complexity of the vascular anatomy and the small vessels of the AcomA complex. To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness and safety of Enterprise stent placement in AcomA aneurysms, we performed this retrospective study. Between November 2008 and December 2010, 27 wide-necked AcomA ruptured aneurysms were treated within 72 hours of ictus with the Enterprise stent. Data collected and analyzed were: demographic data, morphologic features of the aneurysm, treatment results and follow-up results. Twenty-nine Enterprise stents were successfully deployed in all 27 aneurysms, including Y-configuration stent deployment in two patients. The initial embolization degrees were Raymond class I in 20 patients, class II in five and class III in the other two. The angiographic follow-up of 21 patients (mean, 8.4 months) showed that all aneurysms remained stable or improved; there was no in-stent stenosis, recurrence or retreatment. The clinical follow-up of 26 patients (mean, 12.6 months) showed that 23 patients displayed no symptoms and no or mild disability; three patients remained with severe or moderately severe disability. The Enterprise stent is feasible and safe for endovascular embolization of wide-necked AcomA ruptured aneurysms. Further follow up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of Enterprise stent placement in AcomA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of an Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm With Microsurgical Trapping and In Situ Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery to Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Bypass: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bryan S; Witek, Alex M; Moore, Nina Z; Bain, Mark D

    2017-12-30

    Anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms are rare lesions whose treatment can involve microsurgical and/or endovascular techniques. Such treatment can be challenging and may carry a significant risk of neurological morbidity. To demonstrate a case involving a complex AICA aneurysm that was treated with a unique microsurgical approach involving trapping the aneurysm and performing in Situ bypass from the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) to the distal AICA. The nuances of AICA aneurysms and revascularization strategies are discussed. The aneurysm and the distal segments of AICA and PICA were exposed with a retrosigmoid and far lateral approach. A side-to-side anastomosis was performed between the adjacent caudal loops of PICA and AICA. The AICA aneurysm was then treated by trapping the aneurysm-bearing segment of the parent vessel between 2 clips. A postoperative angiogram demonstrated a patent PICA-AICA bypass and complete occlusion of the AICA aneurysm. There were no complications, and the patient made an excellent recovery. The combination of parent vessel sacrifice and bypass remains an excellent option for certain difficult-to-treat aneurysms. This case involving PICA-AICA bypass to treat an AICA aneurysm serves as an example of the neurosurgeon's ability to develop unique solutions that take advantage of individual anatomy. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  3. Endovascular management of distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: Report of two cases and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, Alejandro; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Patsalides, Athos; Riina, Howard A.; Rosengart, Axel; Stieg, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), especially those located in the distal portion of the AICA, are rare. There are few reported cases treated with surgery or endovascular embolization. Case Description: We report two cases of fusiform distal AICA aneurysms presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Parent artery occlusion with coils and n-butyl cyanoacrilate (n-BCA) resulted in complete aneurysm occlusion and prevented rebleeding. Both patients presented postprocedure neurological deficits, but have made a good recovery at 4 and 10 months, respectively. Conclusion: Occlusion of the parent artery for the treatment of ruptured fusiform distal AICA aneurysms is effective but has significant neurological risks. PMID:21748047

  4. Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst in the anterior skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Jie Wang, MD, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC, especially in the anterior skull base, is an extremely rare condition. A 5-year-old boy presented with a large space-occupying lesion in the anterior skull base along with a left sided-epistaxis, proptosis and decreased vision. Radical excision of the lesion was performed by an endoscopic transnasal and transethmoidal approach. The patient recovered without any recurrence during a follow-up period of up to 28 months. Here, we review this rare case and discuss the clinical presentation and surgical treatment.

  5. Injuries of the cingulum and fornix after rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm: a diffusion tensor tractography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Heon; Choi, Byung Yeon; Chang, Chul Hoon; Kim, Seong Ho; Jung, Young Jin; Byun, Woo Mok; Jang, Sung Ho

    2012-04-01

    After rupture of an anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm, the anterior cingulum and the fornix can be vulnerable to injury. However, very little is known about this topic. To investigate injuries of the cingulum and fornix in patients with an ACoA aneurysm rupture with diffusion tensor tractography. Eleven consecutive patients with an ACoA aneurysm rupture and 11 age- and sex-matched normal control subjects were recruited. Diffusion tensor imaging was scanned at an average of 54.1 days (range, 29-97 days) after onset of ACoA aneurysm rupture. We found that 6 (54.5%) and 7 (63.6%) of 11 patients revealed no trajectory of the anterior cingulum and the fornical body on diffusion tensor tractography, respectively. In terms of diffusion tensor imaging parameters, we found that the fractional anisotropy value and tract volume of the cingulum and fornix were decreased (P fornix, which showed no difference (P > .05). We found injuries of the cingulum and fornix in patients with an ACoA aneurysm rupture. It is our belief that sustained memory impairment of patients with an ACoA aneurysm rupture might be related to injury of the cingulum and fornix. Therefore, we recommend evaluation of the cingulum and fornix with diffusion tensor tractography for patients with an ACoA aneurysm rupture.

  6. Indocyanine Green Videoangiography for Surgery of a Ruptured Dissecting Aneurysm in the Precommunicating Anterior Cerebral Artery: A Technical Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yasunori; Goto, Masanori; Toda, Hiroki; Nishida, Namiko; Yoshimoto, Naoya; Iwasaki, Koichi

    2017-08-01

    Indocyanine green videoangiography (ICG-VA) is an important intraoperative adjunct for saccular aneurysm surgery, but its efficacy in surgery for dissecting aneurysms has rarely been reported. The authors describe the usefulness of preclipping ICG-VA in a rare case of a ruptured dissecting aneurysm located at the precommunicating (A1) segment of the anterior cerebral artery. A 52-year-old woman, with no history of connective tissue diseases or vascular disorders, presented with sudden headache and convulsion. The CT scan showed that the patient had subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography showed a dissecting aneurysm in the left A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery. Thus, the patient underwent trapping of the dissecting aneurysm. ICG-VA was used as an intraoperative adjunct before and after clipping. The preclipping ICG-VA showed the heterogeneously bright dissecting aneurysm and branching arteries even in the presence of hematoma. Preclipping ICG-VA may enhance the advantage of direct surgery for dissecting aneurysm by allowing visualization of the extent of the dissected vascular wall and the related branching arteries. ICG-VA can be an indispensable adjunct to minimize the compromise from the surgical treatment for intracranial dissecting aneurysms. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  7. Height of aneurysm neck and estimated extent of brain retraction: powerful predictors of olfactory dysfunction after surgery for unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaechan; Son, Wonsoo; Goh, Duck-Ho; Kang, Dong-Hun; Lee, Joomi; Shin, Im Hee

    2016-03-01

    The highest incidence of olfactory dysfunction following a pterional approach and its modifications for an intracranial aneurysm has been reported in cases of anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms. The radiological characteristics of unruptured ACoA aneurysms affecting the extent of retraction of the frontal lobe and olfactory nerve were investigated as risk factors for postoperative olfactory dysfunction. A total of 102 patients who underwent a pterional or superciliary keyhole approach to clip an unruptured ACoA aneurysm from 2006 to 2013 were included in this study. Those patients who complained of permanent olfactory dysfunction after their aneurysm surgery, during a postoperative office visit or a telephone interview, were invited to undergo an olfactory test, the Korean version of the Sniffin' Sticks test. In addition, the angiographic characteristics of ACoA aneurysms, including the maximum diameter, the projecting direction of the aneurysm, and the height of the neck of the aneurysm, were all recorded based on digital subtraction angiography and sagittal brain images reconstructed using CT angiography. Furthermore, the extent of the brain retraction was estimated based on the height of the ACoA aneurysm neck. Eleven patients (10.8%) exhibited objective olfactory dysfunction in the Sniffin' Sticks test, among whom 9 were anosmic and 2 were hyposmic. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that the direction of the ACoA aneurysm, ACoA aneurysm neck height, and estimated extent of brain retraction were statistically significant risk factors for postoperative olfactory dysfunction. Based on a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, an ACoA aneurysm neck height > 9 mm and estimated brain retraction > 12 mm were chosen as the optimal cutoff values for differentiating anosmic/hyposmic from normosmic patients. The values for the area under the ROC curves were 0.939 and 0.961, respectively. In cases of unruptured ACoA aneurysm surgery, the

  8. Risk of aneurysm rupture at intracranial arterial bifurcations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, N.M. van der; Algra, A.; Rinkel, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aneurysms on the posterior circulation, most commonly located at the basilar top, have a higher risk of rupture than aneurysms on the anterior circulation. If hemodynamic shear stress, which has its maximum impact at the distal carina of bifurcations, explains the higher rupture rate of

  9. Surgical Resection of Idiopathic Distal Anterior Choroidal Artery Aneurysm Assisted by Frameless Stereotactic System Guidance: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Feng; Tao, Chuanyuan; Xiong, Shenghua; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic distal anterior choroidal artery (AChoA) aneurysms are particularly rare. Their diagnosis and treatment are difficult because of the particular characteristic of pathological anatomy. Our case mainly presented with intraventricular hemorrhage. His idiopathic aneurysm was located in the trigone of the undilated ventricle. Computed tomographic angiography demonstrated both the precise aneurysm and parent artery even when there was no dilated parent artery for the first time. It is also the first time this tiny aneurysm was resected assisted by frameless stereotactic guidance during operation after absorption of intraventricular blood. Computed tomographic angiography and frameless stereotactic guidance benefit the diagnosis and treatment of this kind of aneurysm. Sacrificing plexual AChoA did not cause any neurologic deficit.

  10. Median Supraorbital Keyhole Approach for Clipping Ruptured Distal Anterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm: Technical Report with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Sahoo, Sushant Kumar

    2018-04-01

    The minimally invasive approach to distal anterior cerebral artery (DACA) aneurysms has not gained much acceptance due to difficulties associated with the conventional frontal paramedian approach. The more proximal basal interhemispheric approach, however, necessitates extensive dissection of soft tissues. We describe a novel minimally invasive median supraorbital keyhole craniotomy with a basal interhemispheric approach for clipping a ruptured DACA aneurysm. A 62-year-old patient presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Computed tomography angiography revealed a DACA aneurysm. The surgical technique involved a keyhole craniotomy made via an eyebrow incision extending between the supraorbital notches, and flush with the anterior cranial fossa. The dura was opened at the anterior part, the falx was cut, an interhemispheric dissection was carried out, adequate proximal control was obtained, and the aneurysm neck was dissected and clipped. A relevant review of the literature was carried out. The patient recovered well, with no residual aneurysm or forehead numbness, with good cosmesis. Compared with the previously described "keyhole unilateral interhemispheric" approaches, our technique has less likelihood of encountering bridging veins; easier cisternal cerebrospinal fluid release, making it feasible even in swollen brain; better proximal vascular control; and trajectory toward the neck rather than dome. The median supraorbital keyhole approach is a minimally invasive technique sufficient for clipping most DACA aneurysms, with easier access, better proximal control, and good cosmesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Serial position learning effects in patients with aneurysms of the anterior communicating artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, Elka; Kostic, Vladimir S; Ziropadja, Ljubomir; Markovic, Milan; Ocic, Gordana

    2002-08-01

    Ruptured and repaired Anterior Communicating Artery (ACoA) aneurysm can result in devastating impairments involving memory, executive function, confabulation, and personality changes. This study tested serial position learning effects (SPEs) in patients following repaired and ruptured ACoA aneurysm, using results on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). Thirty patients with ruptured aneurysms of the ACoA and 31 matched controls were included in the study. The primacy-recency effects were maintained during five learning trials in ACoA group, albeit at an overall lower level than in the controls. There was no difference in primacy-recency relation across five learning trials in ACoA group. On the delayed recall trial the patient group demonstrated neither a primacy, nor a recency phenomenon, reflecting a lack of recall of any parts of the word list. This kind of primacy-recency profile across learning trials in ACoA group has no similarity with SPE results in frontal lesion groups, or with SPE distributions in other amnesic disorders, despite the fact that memory and executive deficits were evident in our ACoA group.

  12. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Janardhanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives: • Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR. • Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA.

  13. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Smith, M Cristy

    2016-01-01

    Summary In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve) endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA) is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR) in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR). Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE) is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA. PMID:27249815

  14. Occipital artery-anterior inferior cerebellar artery bypass with microsurgical trapping for exclusively intra-meatal anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm manifesting as subarachnoid hemorrhage. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Miki; Inoue, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2012-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman presented with an extremely rare exclusively intra-meatal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm manifesting as subarachnoid hemorrhage. The aneurysm was located at a non-branching site of its meatal loop, deeply inside the internal auditory canal. The ipsilateral posterior inferior cerebellar artery was hypoplastic and the affected AICA supplied a wide vascular territory in the right cerebellum. The patient underwent microsurgical trapping of the distal AICA aneurysm in the acute stage. Collateral back flow to the parent artery was poor, so right occipital artery (OA)-AICA anastomosis was performed prior to aneurysm trapping. The postoperative course was uneventful, and magnetic resonance imaging after surgery did not demonstrate any ischemic change. Postoperative angiography showed complete disappearance of the AICA aneurysm and the apparently patent OA-AICA bypass. She did not suffer neurological deficit except for right incomplete hearing disturbance, and postoperative single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated absence of hemodynamic compromise in the cerebellum. OA-AICA anastomosis with aneurysm trapping could be the optimal surgical management of the AICA aneurysm located exclusively inside the internal auditory canal, especially if the parent artery supplies a wide vascular territory.

  15. State-of-art in surgical treatment of dissecting posterior circulation intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Vladimir; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Talari, Sandeep; Kei, Yamashiro; Sano, Hirotoshi; Suyama, Daisuke; Kawase, Tukasa; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Takizawa, Katsumi; Kato, Yoko

    2018-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar (VB) intracranial dissecting aneurysms (IDAs) pose difficult therapeutic issues and are especially among the most difficult to manage surgically. There are, however, some cases where selective aneurysm obliteration by endovascular approach is impossible or is associated with an unacceptable risk of morbidity. This is particularly true when the aneurysm is dissecting, giant, or has a large neck. In such cases, surgical treatment may be the only alternative. Optimal management of these lesions is therefore challenging and treatment decisions have to be made on a case-by-case basis. Ideal treatment should be a complete surgical excision of the lesion; however, this procedure might only be possible after distal and proximal vessel wall occlusion which might not be tolerated by the patient depending on the location of the aneurysm. Therefore, formulation of recommendations concerning the surgical strategy remains still difficult due to inconsistency of surgical outcomes. The literature describing surgical strategy of VB IDAs is varying in quality and content, and many studies deal with only a few patients. In the presented review, the authors summarize the current knowledge on the incidence, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and diagnostic procedures with special emphasis on surgical treatment of IDAs in posterior circulation.

  16. Computed tomographic angiogram of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm causing acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jee Ho; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Bum Tae; Ohn, Young-Hoon

    2011-10-01

    Three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D-CT) angiography is a widespread imaging modality for intracranial vascular lesions. However, 3D-CT angiograms of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm associated with acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy have not been previously described. We present 3D-CT angiograms of an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery that caused subarachnoid hemorrhage and vision loss in a 39-year old man. The 3D-CT angiograms were consistent with findings identified directly during surgery.

  17. Microsurgical clipping in forty patients with unruptured anterior cerebral circulation aneurysms: an investigation into cognitive outcome Clipagem microcirúrgica em 40 pacientes com aneurisma de circulação cerebral anterior não-roto: uma investigação cognitiva

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    Arthur A Pereira-Filho

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It is a consensus that most unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA can be treated with acceptably low morbidity. However, some studies recently reported postoperative cognitive impairment, suggesting that it could be attributable to surgical damage. Our goal is to evaluate cognitive function before and after microsurgical clipping in patients with UIA. METHOD: A consecutive series of 40 patients who underwent microsurgical clipping for UIA were studied. The cognitive assessment (Mini Mental State Examination, MMSE was performed immediately before and at least one month after surgery. Paired Student's "t" test and analysis of variance (ANOVA were used for statistical purposes. RESULTS: The mean MMSE score in the preoperative analysis was 28.12 (SD, 1.34. In the postoperative period the mean MMSE score was 28.40 (SD, 1.46. Paired Student's "t" test was applied to the scores and no significant difference was found (p=0.315. ANOVA did not find independent associations between MMSE scores and age, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, education, aneurysm location, number, laterality or size. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that microsurgical clipping for UIA does not result in major cognitive dysfunction as determined by the MMSEOBJETIVO: É consenso que a maioria dos aneurismas intracranianos não-rotos (AINR podem ser tratados com aceitável taxa de morbidade. Entretanto, alguns estudos reportaram déficits cognitivos no pós-operatório, sugerindo que poderiam ser atribuídos ao dano cirúrgico. O objetivo desse estudo é avaliar a função cognitiva antes e após clipagem microcirúrgica em pacientes com AINR. MÉTODO: Uma série de 40 pacientes com AINR submetidos à clipagem microcirúrgica foi estudada. A avaliação cognitiva (Mini Exame do Estado Mental, MEEM foi realizada antes e após a intervenção cirúrgica. A análise estatística foi realizada com teste "t" de Student e análise de variância (ANOVA. RESULTADOS: A m

  18. [Blister-like Aneurysm Originating from the Anterior Communicating Artery:A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Tomohiro; Saito, Katsuya; Murase, Makoto; Tomita, Hideyuki

    2018-03-01

    Blister-like aneurysms(BLA)are morphologically thin-walled fragile structures that are associated with a high risk of intraoperative rupture. BLAs presumably originate from an arterial dissection and often stem from a non-branching site on the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. We report a rare case of a patient who was successfully treated for a ruptured BLA originating from the anterior communicating artery(Acom). A 60-year-old woman presented with severe headache and loss of consciousness. Computed tomography(CT)showed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH), which was observed to be particularly dense in the interhemispheric fissure around the Acom. CT angiography and three dimensional-digital subtraction angiography(DSA)did not show any aneurysms along the Acom. Follow-up DSA performed on day 13 showed a small aneurysmal dilatation of the Acom, which was surgically treated via interhemispheric approach. Intraoperatively, a BLA observed to be originating from the Acom was wrapped with a piece of temporal fascia using fibrin glue. Postoperatively, this patient showed a good clinical course without re-rupture. Follow-up DSA performed 5 months after the occurrence of the SAH demonstrated disappearance of the BLA originating from the Acom. The findings in this patient strongly suggest that the pathomechanism of BLAs is attributable to an arterial dissection, which can often show morphological changes on short-term angiographic follow-up, and they demonstrate spontaneous repair. Thus, the therapeutic strategy to be utilized for the management of a BLA of the Acom should be carefully considered, because aneurysmal neck clipping or trapping can injure the Acom perforators and cause cognitive deficits. Further studies are needed to establish the optimal treatment strategy for the management of BLAs of the Acom.

  19. Stent assisted coil embolization of wide-necked bilobed anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm with incorporated artery arising from the dome: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Paramveer Singh; Saini, Jitender; Hanumanthapura Ramalingaiah, Arvinda

    2013-09-01

    A technique for stent-assisted coil embolization of a bilobed wide-necked saccular aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) with the AICA arising from the dome of the aneurysm is described. A middle-aged patient was referred for treatment of a bilobed saccular aneurysm identified on a CT angiogram performed for a subarachnoid hemorrhage which occurred 20 days prior to presentation. A diagnostic angiogram showed a bilobed wide-necked saccular aneurysm at the AICA origin with the AICA arising from the dome of the aneurysm and also supplying the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The therapeutic procedure involved trans-aneurysmal cannulation of the AICA with the microcatheter left in situ. Another microcatheter was maneuvered into the larger dome of the aneurysm. A stent was then deployed in the basilar artery, jailing the previous microcatheter in the aneurysm. Helical Guglielmi detachable coils were deployed in the aneurysm resulting in complete occlusion of the aneurysm with preservation of the AICA. It is important to preserve a normal branch arising from the dome of an aneurysm although it is technically demanding and a relative limitation. This case report describes a technique of coiling a bilobed aneurysm with a vital branch arising from the dome, with preservation of the branch and complete occlusion of the aneurysm using two microcatheters and a stent. This expands the repertoire of endovascular treatment of complex aneurysms.

  20. [Mini-orbitozygomatic craniotomy in surgery for supratentorial aneurysms and tumors of the anterior and middle cranial fossae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhindzhikhadze, R S; Dreval', O N; Lazarev, V A; Kambiev, R L

    2016-01-01

    Progress in microneurosurgical techniques, neuroanesthesiology, and intraoperative imaging enables surgery using small incisions and craniotomy, in accordance with the keyhole surgery concept. Supraorbital craniotomy is the most widespread minimally invasive approach. There are a number of supraorbital craniotomy modifications, regarding different soft tissue incisions and the extent of craniotomy. We present the first results of using mini-orbitozygomatic craniotomy for aneurysms of the anterior circle of Willis and space-occupying lesions of the anterior and middle cranial fossae performed through an eyebrow incision. Forty five patients were operated on using mini-orbitozygomatic (MOZ) craniotomy in the period between March 2014 and December 2015. Fifteen supratentorial aneurysms were clipped, and 30 space-occupying lesions were resected. Most patients had unruptured aneurysms (10 patients). Five patients had a history of SAH. The aneurysm localization was as follows: 8 anterior communicating artery aneurysms, 4 aneurysms of the internal carotid artery in the area of the posterior communicating artery orifice, and 3 ophthalmic aneurysms. The Hunt-Hess scale was used to evaluate the patients' condition, and the Fisher scale was used to quantify SAH volume. Surgery was performed 14 days after SAH, on average. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain was the diagnostic method of choice in a group of patients with space-occupying lesions within the anterior and middle cranial fossae. In some cases, patients underwent CT with reconstruction for assessment of the skull base bone structures. The mean age of patients was 58.3 years. All aneurysms were completely excluded from the cerebral blood flow. No serious complications and deaths in a group of aneurysm patients occurred. Complete tumor removal was performed in 28 patients. Two patients having pituitary macroadenomas with supra- and parasellar spread underwent subtotal resection due to adenoma invasion into the cavernous

  1. Optic neuropathy after anterior communicating artery aneurysm clipping: 3 cases and techniques to address a correctable pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzey, Joseph R; Chen, Kevin S; Savastano, Luis; Thompson, B Gregory; Pandey, Aditya S

    2017-08-25

    Brain shifts following microsurgical clip ligation of anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms can lead to mechanical compression of the optic nerve by the clip. Recognition of this condition and early repositioning of clips can lead to reversal of vision loss. The authors identified 3 patients with an afferent pupillary defect following microsurgical clipping of ACoA aneurysms. Different treatment options were used for each patient. All patients underwent reexploration, and the aneurysm clips were repositioned to prevent clip-related compression of the optic nerve. Near-complete restoration of vision was achieved at the last clinic follow-up visit in all 3 patients. Clip ligation of ACoA aneurysms has the potential to cause clip-related compression of the optic nerve. Postoperative visual examination is of utmost importance, and if any changes are discovered, reexploration should be considered as repositioning of the clips may lead to resolution of visual deterioration.

  2. Infra-optic Course of Both Anterior Cerebral Arteries Associated with a Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm and an Aortic Coarctation

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    Ji, Cheol; Ahn, Jae Geun; Cho, Song Mee [Catholic University, St. Paul' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    A ruptured aneurysm at the bifurcation of the left middle cerebral artery with an infra- optic course of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries was found in a 28-year-old woman. Both abnormal anterior cerebral arteries arose from the ipsilateral internal carotid arteries, at the level of the origin of ophthalmic arteries, passed underneath the ipsilateral optic nerves and turned upward at the ventral portion of the optic chiasm. In addition, an aortic coarctation was found with the use of thoracic aortography. An infra-optic course of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries is an extremely rare anomaly. An infra-optic course of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries is frequently associated with cerebral aneurysms and possibly with a coarctation aorta. The clinical features, radiological findings and possible genesis of this anomaly are presented.

  3. Impacts of a Size Ratio on Outcome in Patients with Surgically Treated Unruptured Nondissecting Anterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Hidetoshi; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Takanori; Kinoshita, Yu; Noda, Kosumo; Ota, Nakao; Saito, Norihiro; Takeda, Rihee; Tokuda, Sadahisa; Tanikawa, Rokuya

    2018-03-01

    Anterior cerebral artery aneurysms (ACAs) are characterized by higher rupture rate and small size at rupture. It was shown that the aneurysm/vessel size ratio, and not the absolute size, might predict the risk of rupture in small unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between a size ratio and outcome in patients with unruptured nondissecting ACA aneurysms (UNDAs). A total of 187 consecutive patients with 12 A1 (6.2%), 149 anterior communicating artery (77%), and 33 distal ACA (17%) aneurysms were retrospectively evaluated. The size ratio was defined as (size of aneurysm)/(size of parent artery). Neurologic worsening (NW) was defined as an increase in score of 1 or more on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). The mean age of the patient population was 63 ± 11 years and 132 UNDAs (68%) were seen in women. Complete, partial neck clipping, and aneurysm trapping were archived in 188 (97%), 2 (1.0%), and 4 (2.1%) UNDAs, respectively. An excellent outcome (mRS score 0) at 12 months was archived in 177 (93%) UNDAs overall and 177 (95%) in UNDAs with preoperative mRS score of 0 (n = 186). Postoperative ischemic lesions (odds ratio, 193; 95% confidence interval, 17-2205; P 3.0 (odds ratio, 11; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-105; P = 0.031) were related to 12-month NW on multivariate analysis. The aneurysm size was not related to 12-month NW. The present study showed that the size ratio, and not the absolute size, was related to 12-month NW in surgically treated UNDAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuropsychological rehabilitation in a patient with ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm: 48 month outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia A. Prado Bolognani

    Full Text Available Abstract The neurobehavioral impairments associated with aneurysms of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA are severe amnesia, executive problems and personality changes. Although most patients achieve a favorable neurological outcome, those cognitive deficits usually prevent return to previous activities and levels of social integration. Objectives: To report the outcomes of a neuropsychological and behavioral intervention in a 55 year-old man with very severe memory and executive dysfunctions following ACoA aneurysm rupture. Methods: Neuropsychological intervention focused in functional adjustment in everyday life was used, including individual sessions with the patient, discussion sessions with caregivers and also work with patient at home, aiming generalization of the rehabilitation strategies. Neuropsychological and functional assessments were conducted pre and post intervention. Results: Important improvements were seeing in behavior and daily living performance after treatment. Conclusions: A neuropsychological rehabilitation approach focused on goals based on the family and caregivers necessities is an efficient manner in which to carry out cognitive rehabilitation in severe cases. The importance of a supportive family should be stressed.

  5. Missed Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Vestibular Neuritis-Clues to Prevent Misdiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willms, Jan-Folkard; Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Ernst, Silvia; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-12-01

    We discuss a case with combined vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy mimicking a less urgent peripheral vestibular pattern of acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). With initial magnetic resonance imaging read as normal, the patient was treated for vestibular neuropathy until headaches worsened and a diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage was made. On conventional angiography, a ruptured distal right-sided aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery was diagnosed and coiled. Whereas acute vestibular loss usually points to a benign peripheral cause of AVS, combined neuropathy of the vestibulocochlear and the facial nerve requires immediate neuroimaging focusing on the cerebellopontine angle. Imaging should be assessed jointly by neuroradiologists and the clinicians in charge to take the clinical context into account. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alien Hand Sign and Other Cognitive Deficits following Ruptured Aneurysm of the Anterior Communicating Artery

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    Alan J. Parkin

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a right-handed patient who suffered a ruptured aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA which was clipped successfully. Computerized tomography indicated a low density area in the genu of the corpus callosum and the infero-lateral aspect of the left frontal lobe. On recovery the patient's most notable deficit was the “alien hand sign” whereby the left hand would frequently interfere with the actions of the right hand. Problems in response initiation were also evident. There was significant memory loss and performance was impaired on some tests of frontal lobe function. Discussion centres on the functional locus of the alien hand sign but other aspects of the patient's deficits are also considered.

  7. Successful Endovascular Occlusion of a Ruptured Distal Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm of the Caudal Trunk: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H.-S.; Roh, H.G.; Han, M.H.; Koh, Y.-C.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We report a rare case of a ruptured distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (possibly dissecting) aneurysm of the caudal trunk, successfully treated by endovascular occlusion. A 41-year-old man presented with sudden severe headache and drowsiness. On the day of ictus, conventional angiography was performed to make the above diagnosis, followed by endovascular occlusion of the sac and the parent artery. The patient recovered completely without any neurologic deficit after treatment. Endovascular occlusion could be a safe and effective treatment option in a case of a ruptured distal AICA aneurysm of the caudal trunk. PMID:20566118

  8. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography for visualization of signal Intensity distribution pattern within an unruptured cerebral aneurysm: preliminarily assessment with anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, T.; Ekino, C.; Ohsako, C.

    2004-01-01

    The natural history of unruptured cerebral aneurysm is not known; also unknown is the potential growth and rupture in any individual aneurysm. The authors have developed transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) obtained by a time-of-flight sequence to investigate the interaction between the intra-aneurysmal signal intensity distribution patterns and configuration of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Transluminal color-coded images were reconstructed from volume data of source magnetic resonance angiography by using a parallel volume-rendering algorithm with transluminal imaging technique. By selecting a numerical threshold range from a signal intensity opacity chart of the three-dimensional volume-rendering dataset several areas of signal intensity were depicted, assigned different colors, and visualized transparently through the walls of parent arteries and an aneurysm. Patterns of signal intensity distribution were analyzed with three operated cases of an unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and compared with the actual configurations observed at microneurosurgery. A little difference in marginal features of an aneurysm was observed; however, transluminal color-coded images visualized the complex signal intensity distribution within an aneurysm in conjunction with aneurysmal geometry. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography can thus provide numerical analysis of the interaction between spatial signal intensity distribution patterns and aneurysmal configurations and may offer an alternative and practical method to investigate the patient-specific natural history of individual unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (orig.)

  9. Feasibility of the combination of 3D CTA and 2D CT imaging guidance for clipping microsurgery of anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kojiro; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Hidenori; Arimoto, Hirohiko; Takeuchi, Satoru; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-04-01

    We report the technique of three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (3D CTA)+two-dimensional computed tomographic (2D CT) imaging as an adjunct in early surgery for a ruptured anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm by adopting an anterior interhemispheric approach. These combined imaging modalities provide accurate intraoperative anatomical information. To produce images for an anterior interhemispheric approach, 3D CTA+2D coronal CT images, which are perpendicular to the direction of the surgical approach at three levels (brain surface, genu of the corpus callosum and aneurysm neck), were constructed. We also produced two 3D CTA+2D CT images of the lamina terminalis, with a horizontal 10-degree difference, to clarify the vascular architecture around the aneurysm stereotactically, as well as the dissection point and direction to open the lamina terminalis. Furthermore, we produced a 3D CTA+2D sagittal CT image at the midline, which allowed us to understand the anatomical architecture of the aneurysm, planum sphenoidale and tuberculum sellae. In addition, four different 3D CTA aneurysm images were produced for deciding the clip size preoperatively. The imaging findings in 28 patients with 28 ACoA aneurysms facilitated early clipping. Based on these 3D CTA+2D CT images, we conducted aneurysm surgery, and successfully performed neck clipping via an anterior interhemispheric approach. The combination of 3D CTA and 2D CT images is a feasible and useful method of image guidance for ACoA aneurysm microsurgery.

  10. Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) associated with high-flow lesion: report of two cases and review of literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menovsky, T.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Although aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are rare lesions, their occurrence in combination with high-flow lesions in the same arterial territory is even more striking. Two cases of an AICA aneurysm in combination with a high -flow lesion are

  11. Differences in Morphologic and Hemodynamic Characteristics for "PHASES-Based" Intracranial Aneurysm Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varble, N; Rajabzadeh-Oghaz, H; Wang, J; Siddiqui, A; Meng, H; Mowla, A

    2017-11-01

    Several recent prospective studies have found that unruptured intracranial aneurysms at various anatomic locations have different propensities for future rupture. This study aims to uncover the lack of understanding regarding rupture-prone characteristics, such as morphology and hemodynamic factors, associated with different intracranial aneurysm location. We investigated the characteristics of 311 unruptured aneurysms at our center. Based on the PHASES study, we separated and compared morphologic and hemodynamic characteristics among 3 aneurysm location groups: 1) internal carotid artery; 2) middle cerebral artery; and 3) anterior communicating, posterior communicating, and posterior circulation arteries. A mixed model statistical analysis showed that size ratio, low wall shear stress area, and pressure loss coefficient were different between the intracranial aneurysm location groups. In addition, a pair-wise comparison showed that ICA aneurysms had lower size ratios, lower wall shear stress areas, and lower pressure loss coefficients compared with MCA aneurysms and compared with the group of anterior communicating, posterior communicating, and posterior circulation aneurysms. There were no statistical differences between MCA aneurysms and the group of anterior communicating, posterior communicating, and posterior circulation aneurysms for morphologic or hemodynamic characteristics. ICA aneurysms may be subjected to less rupture-prone morphologic and hemodynamic characteristics compared with other locations, which could explain the decreased rupture propensity of intracranial aneurysms at this location. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. [A Case of Ruptured Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm with Visual Field Defects and Deteriorating to Severe Vision Loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Kazuki; Ikeda, Go; Nakai, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Shiigai, Masanari; Uemura, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Although Terson's syndrome is a well-known cause of vision loss due to intracerebral aneurysm rupture, optic nerve neuropathy can also occur because of other causes. Here, we report such a case, i.e., a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm accompanied by vision loss and visual field disturbances due to a cause other than Terson's syndrome. A 47-year-old man presented with right superior altitudinal hemianopia. Computed tomography (CT) showed subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and three-dimensional CT angiography revealed an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Coil embolization was performed. Right visual acuity degenerated to blindness in the acute stage. MRI performed on day 7 post-admission revealed that the aneurysm had swollen and made contact with the right optic disk. On the basis of the patient's clinical course, we believe that the deterioration in his visual acuity could have been due to ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) resulting from SAH, and the subsequent edema and poor blood perfusion may be attributed to spasm. In cases of visual disturbance associated with SAH, as in our case, it is important to perform MRI to evaluate the damage or risk to the optic nerve as soon as possible. (Received December 26, 2016; Accepted June 9, 2017; Published October 1, 2017).

  13. Aneurysm in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery variant: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saad; Azeem, Abdul; Jiwani, Amyna; Javed, Gohar

    2016-01-01

    There are variations in the anatomy of the vertebrobasilar system amongst which the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (AICA-PICA) variant is thought to have a prevalence of 20-24% (based on retrospective studies). Despite this, aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. We present a case of an AICA-PICA aneurysm and discuss its presentation and management, along with a review of literature. We describe the case of a 35 year old female who presented with signs of meningismus. On the basis of radiological imaging it was initially misdiagnosed as a thrombosed arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The patient was eventually discharged with a plan of interval imaging and interventional radiology (if required). The patient presented again with similar signs and symptoms. Re-evaluation of imaging revealed an aneurysm of the AICA-PICA variant which was managed surgically. Aneurysms of the AICA-PICA variant are rare. The radiological features and surgical management represent a unique clinical entity and are discussed below. The prevalence of the AICA-PICA variant might be high but aneurysms in this vessel are rare. The scant knowledge available on this subject makes it a diagnostic difficulty. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm clipping versus coiling: a comparative study of 50 cases

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    Kumar Pradeep

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (aSAH remains a devastating and often fatal form of stroke. The aneurysm is targeted for obliteration to prevent re-bleeding and to manage the possible complications from the event. Endovascular coiling has emerged as a less invasive alternative to conventional surgical clipping to treat aneurysms.

  15. Epidemiological and imaging features of intracranial aneurysms in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Huan-yu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Nowadays, the epidemiological report and study about the intracranial aneurysms in young adults are very rare, especially in China. This paper aims to investigate the epidemiological and imaging features of intracranial aneurysms in young adults with the age of 16-29 years old. Methods Clinical data of 2119 patients with intracranial aneurysms admitted from January 2010 to October 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results Intracranial aneurysms in young adults (16-29 years old accounted for 1.93% of all intracranial aneurysms (41/2119 treated in the same period, and the gender ratio (male : female was 2.15 : 1. A total of 42 intracranial aneurysms were found in 41 patients, including 35 located in the anterior circulation and 7 in the posterior circulation, of which 13 aneurysms (30.95% in the anterior communicating artery, 6 aneurysms (14.29% each in the middle cerebral artery and the distal of anterior cerebral artery, and 2 aneurysms (4.76% in the posterior communicating artery. There were almost 34 aneurysms (80.95% located in bifurcation of Willis circle and proximal aorta and 8 aneurysms (19.05% in the branches of artery. The diameter of aneurysms were ≤5 mm in 19 aneurysms (45.24%, 6-10mm in 13 (30.95%, 11-24 mm in 3 (7.14% and ≥25mm in 7 (16.67%. Conclusion Young men are much more susceptible to intracranial aneurysms than young women, but the incidence in women increases as they grow old. The anterior communicating artery is the predilection site of intracranial aneurysms in young adults (16-29 years old, and the occurence of giant aneurysms and the aneurysms in the posterior circulation and the distal of anterior cerebral artery is common. The epidemiological and imaging features and gender ratio of intracranial aneurysms in young adults (16-29 years old are similar to those in children and adolesents, but much different from adult patients.

  16. Reflux of Anterior Spinal Artery Predicts Recurrent Posterior Circulation Stroke in Bilateral Vertebral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Kosuke; Handa, Akira; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Lo, Benjamin; Yamagata, Sen

    2015-11-01

    Predictive value of reflux of anterior spinal artery for recurrent posterior circulation ischemia in bilateral vertebral arteries steno-occlusive disease was evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed 55 patients with symptomatic posterior circulation stroke caused by bilateral stenotic (>70%) lesions of the vertebral artery. We investigated any correlation of clinical and angiographic characteristics including collateral flow patterns, with recurrent stroke. Risk factors for poor 3-month functional outcome were also evaluated. Recurrent posterior circulation stroke was observed in 15 (27.3%) patients. Multivariable analysis using Cox proportional hazards model showed anterior spinal artery reflux as a significant risk factor for stroke recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio, 19.3 [95% confidence interval, 5.35-69.9]; Pdisease, anterior spinal artery reflux predicted recurrent posterior circulation stroke and poor functional outcome. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Management of anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: endovascular treatment and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, S H; Kim, D J; Kim, D I; Kim, B M; Chung, T-S; Hong, C K; Jung, J Y

    2011-01-01

    AICA aneurysms are rare and a challenge to treat surgically. We present our experience of the angiographic results and the clinical outcomes for 9 AICA aneurysms treated by EVT. Between 1997 and 2009, EVT was attempted for 9 AICA aneurysms. Six patients presented with SAH, and 3 aneurysms were found incidentally. The location of the aneurysms was the proximal AICA in 7 and the distal AICA in 2. Five aneurysms originated from an AICA-PICA variant. Clinical outcomes and procedural complications were evaluated, and angiography was performed 6, 12, and 24 months after embolization to confirm recanalization of the coiled aneurysm. EVT was technically successful in 7 patients (78%). Surgical trapping was performed in 1 patient after failure of EVT, and another aneurysm occluded spontaneously, along with the parent artery during EVT. In 7 patients, the AICAs had good patency on postoperative angiography. Stent-assisted coiling was performed in 3 patients. Follow-up angiographies were performed in 7 patients and showed no evidence of recanalization or progressive occlusion with further thrombosis except in 1 patient. There was no evidence of aneurysm rupture during the follow-up period, and 8 patients were able to perform all usual activities (mRS score, 0-1). EVT may provide a feasible and safe option as an alternative, though a microsurgical option is initially considered for the management of AICA aneurysms. Further follow-up and more experience are also necessary.

  18. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  19. Brain atrophy and neuropsychological outcome after treatment of ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a voxel-based morphometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendel, Paula; Koskenkorva, Paeivi; Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Koivisto, Timo; Aeikiae, Marja [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurosurgery, Kuopio (Finland); Niskanen, Eini [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Koenoenen, Mervi [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Haenninen, Tuomo [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-11-15

    Cognitive impairment after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is frequently detected. Here, we describe the pattern of cerebral (gray matter) atrophy and its clinical relevance after treatment of aSAH caused by a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. Thirty-seven aSAH patients with ACA aneurysm (17 surgical, 20 endovascular treatment) and a good or moderate clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale V or IV) and 30 controls underwent brain MRI. Voxel-based morphometric analysis was applied to compare the patients and controls. Patients also underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment. The comparisons between controls and either all patients (n=37) or the subgroup of surgically treated patients (n=17) revealed bilateral cortical atrophy in the frontal lobes, mainly in the basal areas. The brainstem, bilateral thalamic and hypothalamic areas, and ipsilateral caudate nucleus were also involved. Small areas of atrophy were detected in temporal lobes. The hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus showed atrophy ipsilateral to the surgical approach. In the subgroup of endovascularly treated patients (n = 15), small areas of atrophy were detected in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex and in the thalamic region. Twenty patients (54%) showed cognitive deficits in neuropsychological assessment. Group analysis after aSAH and treatment of the ruptured ACA aneurysm revealed gray matter atrophy, principally involving the frontobasal cortical areas and hippocampus ipsilateral to the surgical approach. Areas of reduced gray matter were more pronounced after surgical than endovascular treatment. Together with possible focal cortical infarctions and brain retraction deficits in individual patients, this finding may explain the neuropsychological disturbances commonly detected after treatment of ruptured ACA aneurysms. (orig.)

  20. Multiple intracranial aneurysms following radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Gulati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old male presented to the neurosurgical emergency with sudden onset severe headache, nausea, and vomiting. A computed tomography scan showed subarachnoid hemorrhage and a subsequent four vessel angiogram showed six cerebral aneurysms (predominantly fusiform involving both the anterior and posterior circulations, all on the left side. The patient had received 60 Gy external beam radiotherapy for left nasopharyngeal carcinoma 8 years back. The middle cerebral artery aneurysm was clipped, while the internal carotid artery and the two posterior cerebral artery aneurysms were wrapped. The patient was discharged uneventfully and is asymptomatic at follow-up 6 months later. The effects of radiation on cerebral vasculature are well-documented. Radiation-induced vasculopathy generally presents as occlusion/stenosis of cerebral vessels and aneurysms are rare. Only 46 cases of radiation-induced aneurysms have been reported previously. Just seven of these had multiple aneurysms and only one case had as many as six aneurysms.

  1. Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) associated with high-flow lesion: report of two cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menovsky, Tomas; André Grotenhuis, J; Bartels, Ronald H M A

    2002-03-01

    Although aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are rare lesions, their occurrence in combination with high-flow lesions in the same arterial territory is even more striking. Two cases of an AICA aneurysm in combination with a high -flow lesion are described. In one case, a 52-year-old female presented with cerebellar syndrome as the result of a left-sided cerebellar tumor. Angiography revealed a highly vascularized tumor and a broad-based aneurysm at the offspring of the left AICA. In the second case, a 17-year-old female presented with a right-sided cerebellar hemorrhage. Angiography revealed a large peripheral AICA aneurysm and a distal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) fed by the AICA. In the first case, a left lateral suboccipital craniotomy was performed and a highly vascularized tumor was removed. The AICA aneurysm could not be adequately clipped and was subsequently wrapped with muscle and reinforced with fibrin glue. Pathological examination of the tumor revealed a hemangioblastoma. Five years after surgery, the patient experienced a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Subsequent vertebral angiography revealed local enlargement of the known AICA aneurysm just at the superior aspect, but the patient refused further treatment. In the second case, the patient sustained a novel cerebellar rebleed while awaiting surgery. A right-sided lateral retromastoid suboccipital craniotomy was performed and the AICA aneurysm could be successfully clipped. More peripherally, the AVM with two draining veins could be totally removed. Postoperative angiography revealed no residual aneurysm or AVM. Several aspects of these cases are discussed, such as the rare occurrence of AICA aneurysm and the contribution of high-flow lesions to the genesis of the AICA aneurysms. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Merits of Endovascular Coil Surgery for Patients with Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Ho; Yim, Man-Bin

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to report the morbidity, mortality, angiographic results, and merits of elective coiling of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Methods Ninety-six unruptured aneurysms in 92 patients were electively treated with detachable coils. Eighty-one of these aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation, and 15 were located in the posterior circulation. Thirty-six aneurysms were treated in the presence of previously ruptured aneurysms that had already undergone operation. Nine unruptured aneurysms presented with symptoms of mass effect. The remaining 51 aneurysms were incidentally discovered in patients with other cerebral diseases and in individuals undergoing routine health maintenance. Angiographic and clinical outcomes and procedure-related complications were analyzed. Results Eight procedure-related untoward events (8.3%) occurred during surgery or within procedure-related hospitalization, including thromboembolism, sac perforation, and coil migration. Permanent procedural morbidity was 2.2% ; there was no mortality. Complete occlusion was achieved in 73 (76%) aneurysms, neck remnant occlusion in 18 (18.7%) aneurysms, and incomplete occlusion in five (5.2%) aneurysms. Recanalization occurred in 8 (15.4%) of 52 coiled aneurysms that were available for follow-up conventional angiography or magnetic resonance angiography over a mean period of 13.3 months. No ruptures occurred during the follow-up period (12-79 months). Conclusion Endovascular coil surgery for patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms is characterized by low procedural mortality and morbidity and has advantages in patients with poor general health, cerebral infarction, posterior circulation aneurysms, aneurysms of the proximal internal cerebral artery, and unruptured aneurysms associated with ruptured aneurysm. For the management of unruptured aneurysms, endovascular coil surgery is considered an attractive alterative option. PMID:19096631

  3. A Case of Ruptured Peripheral Aneurysm of the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Associated with an Arteriovenous Malformation : A Less Invasive Image-Guided Transcortical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Bang, Jae Seung; Kim, Gook Ki

    2009-01-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and right cerebellar hematoma was referred for evaluation. Cerebral angiography revealed a distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm associated with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Successful obliteration and complete removal of the aneurysm and AVM were obtained using transcortical approach under the guidance of neuronavigation system. The association of a peripheral AICA aneurysm and a cerebellar AVM by the same artery is unique. The reported cases of conventional surgery for this disease complex are not common and their results are variable. Less invasive surgery using image-guided neuronavigation system would be helpful and feasible for a peripheral aneurysm combining an AVM of the posterior fossa in selective cases. PMID:20062576

  4. Reversible Akinetic Mutism after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage in the Territory of the Anterior Cerebral Artery without Permanent Ischaemic Damage to Anterior Cingulate Gyri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Sibille

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on two cases of transient akinetic mutism after massive subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA. In the two cases, vasospasm could not be demonstrated by imaging studies throughout the clinical course. Both patients shared common radiological features: a hydrocephalus due to haemorrhagic contamination of the ventricular system and a mass effect of a subpial hematoma on the borders of the corpus callosum. Patients were also investigated using auditory event-related evoked potentials at acute stage. In contrast to previous observations of akinetic mutism, P300 wave could not be recorded. Both patients had good recovery and we hypothesized that this unexpectedly favourable outcome was due to the absence of permanent structural damage to the ACA territory, with only transient dysfunction due to a reversible mass effect on cingulate gyri.

  5. Chicken primordial germ cells use the anterior vitelline veins to enter the embryonic circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana De Melo Bernardo

    2012-09-01

    During gastrulation, chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs are present in an extraembryonic region of the embryo from where they migrate towards the genital ridges. This is also observed in mammals, but in chicken the vehicle used by the migratory PGCs is the vascular system. We have analysed the migratory pathway of chicken PGCs, focusing on the period of transition from the extraembryonic region to the intraembryonic vascular system. Our findings show that at Hamburger and Hamilton developmental stage HH12–HH14 the majority of PGCs concentrate axially in the sinus terminalis and favour transport axially via the anterior vitelline veins into the embryonic circulation. Moreover, directly blocking the blood flow through the anterior vitelline veins resulted in an accumulation of PGCs in the anterior region and a decreased number of PGCs in the genital ridges. We further confirmed the key role for the anterior vitelline veins in the correct migration of PGCs using an ex ovo culture method that resulted in defective morphogenetic development of the anterior vitelline veins. We propose a novel model for the migratory pathway of chicken PGCs whereby the anterior vitelline veins play a central role at the extraembryonic and embryonic interface. The chicken model of PGC migration through the vasculature may be a powerful tool to study the process of homing (inflammation and metastasis due to the striking similarities in regulatory signaling pathways (SDF1–CXCR4 and the transient role of the vasculature.

  6. [Embolization for aneurismal dilatation associated with ruptured dissecting anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm with preservation of the parent artery: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Noboru; Maruo, Tomoko; Nishiguchi, Mitsuhisa; Takayama, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Yasuhiko; Ogihara, Kotaro; Nakagawa, Minoru; Gotoh, Masaki; Nishiura, Tsukasa

    2006-07-01

    We report a rare case of a ruptured dissecting anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm treated by endosaccular embolization with a Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC). An 85-year-old female presented with headache. Computed tomographic (CT) scan showed subarachnoid hemorrhage and intraventricular hemorrhage in the fourth ventricule. Cerebral angiography and 3D-CT angiography revealed an aneurysmal dilatation at the anterior pontine segment of the right AICA with a diagnosis of arterial dissection. The right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) was absent and the right AICA supplied the territory normally nourished by the right PICA. The aneurismal dilatation was occluded by endosacullar embolization with preservation of the AICA. The distal AICA aneurysm is rare and only seven cases treated with endovascular embolization have been reported. In these, six cases were treated by parent artery occlusion with coil and the subsequent three cases presented with ischemic complications. Only one case was treated by endosaccular embolization with GDC. To our knowledge, this is the second report of the distal AICA aneurysm treated by endosaccular embolization with GDC. Distal AICA aneurysms are briefly discussed while reviewing the literature.

  7. Potential circulating biomarkers for abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion and rupture--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Urbonaviciene, Grazina; Honoré, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    The maximal diameter of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is the dominating indication for repair. However half of the AAAs repaired would never have ruptured if left unrepaired, although small AAAs occasionally rupture. Earlier surgery may be associated with a lower mortality. More precise indic...

  8. Giant Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of the Anterior Cranial Fossa and Paranasal Sinuses Presenting in Pregnancy: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnenny, Luke; Roundy, Neil; Zherebitskiy, Victor; Grafe, Marjorie; Mansoor, Atiya; Dogan, Aclan

    2015-11-01

    Background and Purpose Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) rarely involve the cranium and have seldom been reported in pregnancy. Clinical Presentation We describe a case of a 28-year-old woman who presented at 37 weeks of gestation with 3 months of gradually worsening vision, 10 months of proptosis, and restricted ocular motility on the left. Brain imaging revealed a multicystic enhancing mass measuring 5.9 × 5.3 × 3.7 cm, centered on the cribriform plate on the left, extending into the anterior cranial fossa superiorly as well as the left nasal cavity, maxillary, sphenoid, and frontal sinuses. Her clinical course is described in detail; 3-month postoperative imaging demonstrated no residual mass. Conclusion A literature review revealed five previous cases of ABCs associated with pregnancy. We report a rare case of a giant ABC of fibrous dysplasia involving the paranasal sinuses and anterior cranial fossa. We postulate on the possible influence of pregnancy on the clinical course.

  9. Local intra-arterial thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongwei; Liu Jianmin; Hong Bo; Deng Benqiang; Xu Yi; Ding Suju

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of local intra-arterial thrombolysis (LIT) using urokinase in patients with acute ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation. Methods: Fifty-four patients were treated with LIT using urokinase. The locations of occlusion included 3 of internal carotid artery (ICA), 46 of middle cerebral artery (MCA) and 5 of anterior cerebral artery. Results: Outcome was good in 41 patients (75.9%). Recanalization >50% was obtained in 72.2% of patients and <50% recanalization in 27.8% of patients. Cerebral hemorrhage occurred in 11 patients (20.4%). Four patients died (7.4%). Conclusion: LIT using urokinase can improve the recanalization rate and achieve better functional recovery in patients of acute ischemic stroke

  10. Mechanical thrombectomy for basilar artery thrombosis: a comparison of outcomes with anterior circulation occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, María; Kawiorski, Michal M; Ximénez-Carrillo, Álvaro; Cruz-Culebras, Antonio; García-Pastor, Andrés; Martínez-Sánchez, Patricia; Fernández-Prieto, Andrés; Caniego, José Luis; Méndez, Jose Carlos; Zapata-Wainberg, Gustavo; De Felipe-Mimbrera, Alicia; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Frutos, Remedios; Bárcena-Ruiz, Eduardo; Fandiño, Eduardo; Marín, Begoña; Vivancos, José; Masjuan, Jaime; Gil-Nuñez, Antonio; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Fuentes, Blanca

    2017-12-01

    The benefits of mechanical thrombectomy (MT) in basilar artery occlusions (BAO) have not been explored in recent clinical trials. We compared outcomes and procedural complications of MT in BAO with anterior circulation occlusions. Data from the Madrid Stroke Network multicenter prospective registry were analyzed, including baseline characteristics, procedure times, procedural complications, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and mortality at 3 months. Of 479 patients treated with MT, 52 (11%) had BAO. The onset to reperfusion time lapse was longer in patients with BAO (median (IQR) 385 min (320-540) vs 315 min (240-415), p<0.001), as was the duration of the procedures (100 min (40-130) vs 60 min (39-90), p=0.006). Moreover, the recanalization rate was lower (75% vs 84%, p=0.01). A trend toward more procedural complications was observed in patients with BAO (32% vs 21%, p=0.075). The frequency of SICH was 2% vs 5% (p=0.25). At 3 months, patients with BAO had a lower rate of independence (mRS 0-2) (40% vs 58%, p=0.016) and higher mortality (33% vs 12%, p<0.001). The rate of futile recanalization was 50% in BAO versus 35% in anterior circulation occlusions (p=0.05). Age and duration of the procedure were significant predictors of futile recanalization in BAO. MT is more laborious and shows more procedural complications in BAO than in anterior circulation strokes. The likelihood of futile recanalization is higher in BAO and is associated with greater age and longer procedure duration. A refinement of endovascular procedures for BAO might help optimize the results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Efficacy of Balloon-Guiding Catheter for Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients with Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Yoon, Seok-Mann; Shim, Jai-Joon; Doh, Jae-Won; Bae, Hack-Gun; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of balloon guiding catheter (BGC) during thrombectomy in anterior circulation ischemic stroke. Sixty-two patients with acute anterior circulation ischemic stroke were treated with thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent from 2011 to 2016. Patients were divided into the BGC group (n=24, 39%) and the non-BGC group (n=38, 61%). The number of retrievals, procedure time, thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) grade, presence of distal emboli, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were evaluated. Successful recanalization was more frequent in BGC than in non-BGC (83% vs. 66%, p =0.13). Distal emboli occurred less in BGC than in non-BGC (23.1% vs. 57.1%, p =0.02). Good clinical outcome was more frequent in BGC than in non-BGC (50% vs. 16%, p =0.03). The multivariate analysis showed that use of BGC was the only independent predictor of good clinical outcome (odds ratio, 5.19: 95% confidence interval, 1.07-25.11). More patients in BGC were successfully recanalized in internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion with small retrieval numbers (<3) than those in non-BGC (70% vs. 24%, p =0.005). In successfully recanalized ICA occlusion, distal emboli did not occur in BGC, whereas nine patients had distal emboli in non-BGC (0% vs. 75%, p =0.001) and good clinical outcome was superior in BGC than in non-BGC (55.6% vs. 8.3%, p =0.01). A BGC significantly reduces the number of retrievals and the occurrence of distal emboli, thereby resulting in better clinical outcomes in patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke, particularly with ICA occlusion.

  12. Lateral supraorbital approach to ipsilateral PCA-P1 and ICA-PCoA aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehre, Felix; Jahromi, Behnam Rezai; Elsharkawy, Ahmed; Lehto, Hanna; Shekhtman, Oleg; Andrade-Barazarte, Hugo; Munoz, Francisco; Hijazy, Ferzat; Makhkamov, Makhkam; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysms of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) are rare and often associated with anterior circulation aneurysms. The lateral supraorbital approach allows for a very fast and safe approach to the ipsilateral lesions Circle of Willis. A technical note on the successful clip occlusion of two aneurysms in the anterior and posterior Circle of Willis via this less invasive approach has not been published before. The objective of this technical note is to describe the simultaneous microsurgical clip occlusion of an ipsilateral PCA-P1 and an internal carotid artery - posterior communicating artery (ICA-PCoA) aneurysm via the lateral supraorbital approach. The authors present a technical report of successful clip occlusions of ipsilateral located PCA-P1 and ICA-PCoA aneurysms. A 59-year-old female patient was diagnosed with a PCA-P1 and an ipsilateral ICA-PCoA aneurysm by computed tomography angiography (CTA) after an ischemic stroke secondary to a contralateral ICA dissection. The patient underwent microsurgical clipping after a lateral supraorbital craniotomy. The intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography and the postoperative CTA showed a complete occlusion of both aneurysms; the parent vessels (ICA and PCA) were patent. The patient presents postoperative no new neurologic deficit. The lateral supraorbital approach is suitable for the simultaneous microsurgical treatment of proximal anterior circulation and ipsilateral proximal PCA aneurysms. Compared to endovascular treatment, direct visual control of brainstem perforators is possible.

  13. A comparative study of clinical signs, computed tomography, and electroencephalography after direct operation of ruptured anterior communicating aneurysms, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaoka, Kenichi; Abe, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Yoku; Imai, Tomohiro; Satoh, Masaharu.

    1987-01-01

    Eight cases with ruptured anterior communicating aneurysms, who developed mental signs of mild degree lasting more than two weeks following direct operation, were subjected to our study. The following results were obtained. 1) The mental signs of mild degree in 8 cases consisted of memory and emotional disturbances. The main findings of CT scan was low density area in the subcortical and cortical areas of the frontal lobe. There was no close correlation on CT findings between memory and emotional disturbances. 2) Abnormal density areas were detected on CT scan, but EEG showed no localized abnormalities of slow waves. Abnormal density areas were not clearly shown on CT, but EEG showed localized abnormalities. Background activities on EEG were favorable despite lesions detected on CT. Either local or diffuse abnormalities were observed in EEG background activities while no abnormal mental signs were recognized. 3) In cases with no apparent abnormal findings on CT and with favorable background activities on EEG, EEG showed marked build up during hyperventilation. 4) As indicated by the above data, comparative studies of CT and EEG findings revealed differences in sites of abnormalities and degree of abnormalities. This is considered caused by a possible increase in cerebral blood flow and metabolism at initiation of chronic stage following subarachnoid hemorrhage-resulting in the disappearance of abnormalities on EEG. (author)

  14. Changes of size and shape of small, unruptured intracranial aneurysms in repeated computed tomography angiography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyłkowski, Jarosław; Kunert, Przemysław; Jaworski, Maciej; Rosiak, Grzegorz; Marchel, Andrzej; Rowiński, Olgierd

    2015-07-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) are frequently detected in noninvasive imaging studies such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). If small, UIAs are observed in these modalities in order to detect growth or shape change, but there are many questions about proper protocol of the follow-up. To assess changes of small (< 7 mm) UIAs dome size and shape in repeated CTA studies as predictors of growth and rupture. One hundred and ten UIAs (10 posterior circulation) in 70 patients (55 women) were observed, with a cumulative observation time of 333.32 years. Aneurysms' dome and neck perpendicular dimensions were measured in the first and the last CTA study at least twice with the developed application. Confidence intervals (CI) for measurements and dome shape parameters were calculated. For aneurysms ruptured during follow-up intermediate studies were analyzed. Patients' clinical information was recorded. The aneurysm growth detection algorithm integrated CI and spatial resolution of the CT scanner. Twenty-three aneurysms increased in volume, 10 in height and 14 in dome width. Volume increased in 90% of cases of height and 93% of width increase. Posterior circulation aneurysms grew faster than anterior ones (p < 0.003), but calculated time to significant size increase (eT) did not differ between the groups due to higher CI in the posterior circulation. Analysis of eT with Kaplan-Meier curves showed that 75% of growing aneurysms could be detected in the first 3 years of observation. During the follow-up 3 aneurysms bled, and they grew faster than other growing aneurysms. Two of the bleeding aneurysms formed daughter sacs. Dome volume assessment is superior to single dimension assessment in aneurysm growth detection. Confidence intervals assessment helps to avoid overestimation of growth. Seventy-five percent of growing aneurysms could be detected in the first 3 years of observation. Daughter sac formation and fast

  15. Delayed recovery of adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) caused by elective clipping of anterior communicating artery and left middle cerebral artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jeffrey; Ndoro, Samuel; Okafo, Uchenna; Garrahy, Aoife; Agha, Amar; Rawluk, Danny

    2016-12-16

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) is an extremely rare complication following microsurgical clipping of anterior communicating artery aneurysm (ACoA) and left middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm. It poses a significant challenge to manage due to an absent thirst response and the co-existence of cognitive impairment in our patient. Recovery from adipsic DI has hitherto been reported only once. A 52-year-old man with previous history of clipping of left posterior communicating artery aneurysm 20 years prior underwent microsurgical clipping of ACoA and left MCA aneurysms without any intraoperative complications. Shortly after surgery, he developed clear features of ADI with adipsic severe hypernatraemia and hypotonic polyuria, which was associated with cognitive impairment that was confirmed with biochemical investigations and cognitive assessments. He was treated with DDAVP along with a strict intake of oral fluids at scheduled times to maintain eunatremia. Repeat assessment at six months showed recovery of thirst and a normal water deprivation test. Management of ADI with cognitive impairment is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Recovery from ADI is very rare, and this is only the second report of recovery in this particular clinical setting.

  16. Pseudo-aneurysm of the anterior tibial artery, a rare cause of ankle swelling following a sports injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAteer Eamon

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries are common presenting complaints to the accident and emergency department. Frequently these are diagnosed as musculoskeletal injuries, even when no definitive cause is found. Vascular injuries following trauma are uncommon and are an extremely rare cause of ankle swelling and pain. These injuries may however be limb threatening and are important to diagnose early, in order that appropriate treatment can be delivered. We highlight the steps to diagnosis of these injuries, and methods of managing these injuries. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the potential for this injury in patients with seemingly innocuous trauma from sports injuries, who have significant ankle pain and swelling. Case presentation A young, professional sportsman presented with a swollen, painful ankle after an innocuous hyper-plantar flexion injury whilst playing football, which was initially diagnosed as a ligamentous injury after no bony injury was revealed on X-Ray. He returned 2 days later with a large ulcer at the lateral malleolus and further investigation by duplex ultrasound and transfemoral arteriogram revealed a Pseudo-Aneurysm of the Anterior Tibial Artery. This was initially managed with percutaneous injection of thrombin, and later open surgery to ligate the feeding vessel. The patient recovered fully and was able to return to recreational sport. Conclusion Vascular injuries remain a rare cause of ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries, however it is important to consider these injuries when no definite musculo-skeletal cause is found. Ultrasound duplex and Transfemoral arteriogram are appropriate, sensitive modalities for investigation, and may allow novel treatment to be directed percutaneously. Early diagnosis and intervention are essential for the successful outcome in these patients.

  17. Pseudo-aneurysm of the anterior tibial artery, a rare cause of ankle swelling following a sports injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marron, Conor D; McKay, Damian; Johnston, Ruth; McAteer, Eamon; Stirling, WJ Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Background Ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries are common presenting complaints to the accident and emergency department. Frequently these are diagnosed as musculoskeletal injuries, even when no definitive cause is found. Vascular injuries following trauma are uncommon and are an extremely rare cause of ankle swelling and pain. These injuries may however be limb threatening and are important to diagnose early, in order that appropriate treatment can be delivered. We highlight the steps to diagnosis of these injuries, and methods of managing these injuries. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the potential for this injury in patients with seemingly innocuous trauma from sports injuries, who have significant ankle pain and swelling. Case presentation A young, professional sportsman presented with a swollen, painful ankle after an innocuous hyper-plantar flexion injury whilst playing football, which was initially diagnosed as a ligamentous injury after no bony injury was revealed on X-Ray. He returned 2 days later with a large ulcer at the lateral malleolus and further investigation by duplex ultrasound and transfemoral arteriogram revealed a Pseudo-Aneurysm of the Anterior Tibial Artery. This was initially managed with percutaneous injection of thrombin, and later open surgery to ligate the feeding vessel. The patient recovered fully and was able to return to recreational sport. Conclusion Vascular injuries remain a rare cause of ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries, however it is important to consider these injuries when no definite musculo-skeletal cause is found. Ultrasound duplex and Transfemoral arteriogram are appropriate, sensitive modalities for investigation, and may allow novel treatment to be directed percutaneously. Early diagnosis and intervention are essential for the successful outcome in these patients. PMID:16225679

  18. The ABCD2 score is better for stroke risk prediction after anterior circulation TIA compared to posterior circulation TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjun; Wu, Jimin; Liu, Rongyi; Gao, Feng; Hu, Haitao; Yin, Xinzhen

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) are divided into anterior and posterior circulation types (AC-TIA, PC-TIA, respectively). In the present study, we sought to evaluate the ABCD2 score for predicting stroke in either AC-TIA or PC-TIA. We prospectively studied 369 consecutive patients who presented with TIA between June 2009 and December 2012. The 7 d occurrence of stroke after TIA was recorded and correlated with the ABCD2 score with regards to AC-TIA or PC-TIA. Overall, 273 AC-TIA and 96 PC-TIA patients were recruited. Twenty-one patients with AC-TIA and seven with PC-TIA developed a stroke within the subsequent 7 d (7.7% vs. 7.3%, p = 0.899). The ABCD2 score had a higher predictive value of stroke occurrence in AC-TIA (the AUC was 0.790; 95% CI, 0.677-0.903) than in PC-TIA (the AUC was 0.535; 95% CI, 0.350-0.727) and the z-value of two receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 2.24 (p = 0.025). AC-TIA resulted in a higher incidence of both unilateral weakness and speech disturbance and longer durations of the symptoms. Inversely, PC-TIA was associated with a higher incidence of diabetes mellitus (19.8% vs. 10.6%, p = 0.022). Evaluating each component of scores, age ≥ 60 yr (OR = 7.010, 95% CI 1.599-30.743), unilateral weakness (OR = 3.455, 95% CI 1.131-10.559), and blood pressure (OR = 9.652, 95% CI 2.202-42.308) were associated with stroke in AC-TIA, while in PC-TIA, diabetes mellitus (OR = 9.990, 95% CI 1.895-52.650) was associated with stroke. In our study, the ABCD2 score could predict the short-term risk of stroke after AC-TIA, but might have limitation for PC-TIA.

  19. Giant Coronary Arterial Aneurysm of the Proximal Left Anterior Descending Artery as the Cause of Wide Splitting of the Second Heart Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Akira; Mori, Shumpei; Akita, Tomomi; Yamada, Haruhi; Oki, Tsumugi; Nishii, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Tomoya; Okita, Yutaka; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2017-12-21

    Even in modern clinical cardiology, basic auscultation skill is not obsolete and is still important because it can always provide a clue to an underlying pathophysiology. We demonstrate an unusual mechanism of pathological wide splitting of the second heart sound due to external compression of the pulmonary trunk in a patient with a giant coronary arterial aneurysm of the proximal left anterior descending artery. Echocardiography, when combined with a three-dimensional anatomical analysis with cardiac computed tomography, was useful for elucidating the mechanism of the abnormal heart sounds.

  20. Quantifying cerebrovascular reactivity in anterior and posterior cerebral circulations during voluntary breath holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Christina D; Steinback, Craig D; Chauhan, Uday V; Pfoh, Jamie R; Abrosimova, Maria; Vanden Berg, Emily R; Skow, Rachel J; Davenport, Margie H; Day, Trevor A

    2016-12-01

    What is the central question of this study? We developed and validated a 'stimulus index' (SI; ratio of end-tidal partial pressures of CO 2 and O 2 ) method to quantify cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in anterior and posterior cerebral circulations during breath holding. We aimed to determine whether the magnitude of CVR is correlated with breath-hold duration. What is the main finding and its importance? Using the SI method and transcranial Doppler ultrasound, we found that the magnitude of CVR of the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations is not positively correlated with physiological or psychological break-point during end-inspiratory breath holding. Our study expands the ability to quantify CVR during breath holding and elucidates factors that affect break-point. The central respiratory chemoreflex contributes to blood gas homeostasis, particularly in response to accumulation of brainstem CO 2 . Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) affects chemoreceptor stimulation inversely through CO 2 washout from brainstem tissue. Voluntary breath holding imposes alterations in blood gases, eliciting respiratory chemoreflexes, potentially contributing to breath-hold duration (i.e. break-point). However, the effects of cerebrovascular reactivity on break-point have yet to be determined. We tested the hypothesis that the magnitude of CVR contributes directly to breath-hold duration in 23 healthy human participants. We developed and validated a cerebrovascular stimulus index methodology [SI; ratio of end-tidal partial pressures of CO 2 and O 2 (P ET ,CO2/P ET ,O2)] to quantify CVR by correlating measured and interpolated values of P ET ,CO2 (r = 0.95, P breath hold. The MCAv CVR magnitude was larger than PCAv (P = 0.001; +70%) during breath holding. We then correlated MCAv and PCAv CVR with the physiological (involuntary diaphragmatic contractions) and psychological (end-point) break-point, within individuals. There were significant inverse but modest relationships

  1. Risk Factors Associated With the Presence of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Jisung; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S; Kwon, Sun U

    2015-11-01

    With the increased investigation of cerebral arteries using magnetic resonance angiography in the general population, the detection of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) has increased. Understanding the distribution and factors associated with UIAs might be helpful for understanding the pathomechanism. Subjects who underwent magnetic resonance angiography with a health examination at the Health Screening and Promotion Center were enrolled. The incidence and risk factors of UIAs (age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcohol, and coronary artery disease) were investigated by comparing patients with and without UIAs. These risk factors were also investigated by the UIA location, distal internal carotid artery, anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery (MCA), MCA bifurcation, anterior and posterior communicating artery, and posterior circulation. Among 187 166 subjects who received health examination, 18 954 underwent magnetic resonance angiography. Of them, 367 (1.93%) had UIAs. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P=0.003), women (OR, 2.00; P<0.001), hypertension (OR, 2.21; P<0.001), smoking (OR, 1.66; P=0.001), and coronary artery disease (OR, 0.23; P<0.001) were independently associated with the presence of UIAs. Hypertension was associated with most UIAs, except for those located at sidewalls (anterior cerebral artery and MCA). MCA aneurysms were associated with old age and smoking. Distal internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, and MCA-bifurcation aneurysms were associated with female sex. Anterior communicating artery aneurysms were associated with smoking and alcohol. Posterior circulation UIAs were only associated with hypertension. Coronary artery disease was negatively associated with anterior circulation aneurysms. The risk factors for UIAs differ by their location, compared with the control. Interestingly, the presence of coronary artery disease was protective against the presence of UIAs. © 2015 American Heart

  2. Cranio-orbital approach for complex aneurysmal surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, M O

    2012-02-03

    Certain aneurysms of the anterior circulation continue to offer a technical challenge for safe exposure and clipping. The purpose of this paper was to describe the cranio-orbital approach for surgical clipping of complex aneurysms and to evaluate prospectively the associated complications of this approach. Prospective audit of all patients undergoing cranio-orbital approach for aneurysm surgery from 1997 to 2004 by the senior author. Twenty-five patients, eight male and 17 female, median age of 52 years, range 28-73. All patients had a standard pterional approach supplemented by an orbital osteotomy. In the 7-year period 367 patients underwent treatment for their aneurysms (169 clipped and 198 coiled). Of the 169 patients who were operated on, 29 had a skull base approach, of which 25 were cranio-orbital. The aneurysm location was as follows: 16 middle cerebral artery (MCA), three carotid bifurcation, four anterior communicating artery (ACOMM), one ophthalmic and one basilar. There were no approach-related complications. The cranio-orbital craniotomy can be a useful adjunct in the surgical treatment of giant or complex aneurysms. It offers the following advantages over a standard pterional approach: reduces operative distance; allows easy splitting of the sylvian fissure; and provides a wide arc of exposure with multiple working corridors.

  3. Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Strokes Based on Variant Vascular Anatomy of the Posterior Circulation: Clinical Deficits and Imaging Territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Melissa M; Chen, Stephen R; Diaz-Marchan, Pedro; Schomer, Donald; Kumar, Vinodh A

    2018-04-01

    We report imaging findings of 3 patients with anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarcts who presented with atypical clinical findings of cerebellar strokes. AICA strokes are rare, and diagnosis can be difficult because of the high variability of the posterior circulation vascular anatomy. We describe the embryology and variant anatomy of AICA so that clinicians can understand and recognize the patterns of these infarcts. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Whole brain CT perfusion in acute anterior circulation ischemia: coverage size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmer, B.J. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Postbus 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rijkee, M.; Walderveen, M.A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Niesten, J.M.; Velthuis, B.K. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wermer, M.J.H. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Our aim was to compare infarct core volume on whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) with several limited coverage sizes (i.e., 3, 4, 6, and 8 cm), as currently used in routine clinical practice. In total, 40 acute ischemic stroke patients with non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTP imaging of anterior circulation ischemia were included. Imaging was performed using a 320-multislice CT. Average volumes of infarct core of all simulated partial coverage sizes were calculated. Infarct core volume of each partial brain coverage was compared with infarct core volume of whole brain coverage and expressed using a percentage. To determine the optimal starting position for each simulated CTP coverage, the percentage of infarct coverage was calculated for every possible starting position of the simulated partial coverage in relation to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in Acute Stroke Triage (ASPECTS 1) level. Whole brain CTP coverage further increased the percentage of infarct core volume depicted by 10 % as compared to the 8-cm coverage when the bottom slice was positioned at the ASPECTS 1 level. Optimization of the position of the region of interest (ROI) in 3 cm, 4 cm, and 8 cm improved the percentage of infarct depicted by 4 % for the 8-cm, 7 % for the 4-cm, and 13 % for the 3-cm coverage size. This study shows that whole brain CTP is the optimal coverage for CTP with a substantial improvement in accuracy in quantifying infarct core size. In addition, our results suggest that the optimal position of the ROI in limited coverage depends on the size of the coverage. (orig.)

  5. Techniques and Outcomes of Gore-Tex Clip-Wrapping of Ruptured and Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Moron, Felix; Sun, Hai; Wilson, Christopher; Frock, Ben; Oppenlander, Mark E; Xu, David S; Ghafil, Cameron; Zabramski, Joseph M; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Some aneurysms without a definable neck and associated parent vessel pathology are particularly difficult to treat and may require clipping with circumferential wrapping. We report the largest available contemporary series examining the techniques of Gore-Tex clip-wrapping of ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms and patient outcomes. The presentation, location, and shape of the aneurysm; wrapping technique; outcome at discharge and last follow-up; and any change in the aneurysm at last angiographic follow-up were reviewed retrospectively in 30 patients with Gore-Tex clip-wrapped aneurysms. Gore-Tex clip-wrapping was used in 8 patients with ruptured aneurysms and 22 patients with unruptured aneurysms. Aneurysms included 23 fusiform, 3 blister, and 4 otherwise complex, multilobed, or giant aneurysms. Of the 30 aneurysms, 63% were in the anterior circulation. The overall mean patient age was 52.5 years (range, 17-80 years). Postoperatively, there were no deaths or worsening of neurologic status and no parent vessel stenoses or strokes. The mean Glasgow Outcome Scale score at last follow-up was 4.7. The mean follow-up time was 42.3 months (median, 37.0 months; range, 3-96 months). There were 105.8 patient follow-up years. Aneurysms recurred in 2 patients with Gore-Tex clip-wrapping. No patients developed rehemorrhage. Overall risk of recurrence was 1.9% annually. Gore-Tex has excellent material properties for circumferential wrapping of aneurysms and parent arteries. It is inert and does not cause a tissue reaction or granuloma formation. Gore-Tex clip-wrapping can be used safely for microsurgical management of ruptured and unruptured cerebral aneurysms with acceptable recurrence and rehemorrhage rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intracranial infective aneurysms presenting with haemorrhage: An analysis of angiographic findings, management and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Phadke, Rajendra V.; Kalode, Ravi R.; Kumar, Sunil; Jain, Vijendra K.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: This study is an analysis of angiographic findings in 17 patients with infective aneurysms who presented with intracranial haemorrhage and reviews the management and outcome in the context of the existing literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study of infective aneurysms in 17 patients was carried out. Cranial angiography was performed in all patients. The location, size and outline of aneurysms were analysed. Ten patients were managed conservatively and six patients underwent surgery for the ruptured infective aneurysms and were followed up for a period of 35.8 months and 23 months, respectively. RESULTS: Twenty-two aneurysms were identified (five unruptured) in 17 patients. Twenty aneurysms (90.9%) were distal in location and two (9.1%) proximal. Sixty percent were in the posterior circulation with 55% in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territory, 27.3% in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory and 9.1% in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) territory. Fourteen aneurysms were small (3-5 mm) and eight were medium sized (6-9 mm). 72.7% of aneurysms had irregular outline and 27.3% regular outline. Out of the 10 ruptured aneurysms managed conservatively, eight resolved. One patient died, presumably due to rebleed, and one had infarction due to parent vessel thrombosis. Six aneurysms were surgically managed with good results. Of the five unruptured aneurysms one was surgically managed and the remaining four conservatively managed patients did not bleed during follow-up. CONCLUSION: Patients with ruptured infective aneurysms fared well with medical management and the outcome in this series is better than that reported in literature. Patients on conservative management, however, need closer monitoring with angiographic follow-up. Active management is required with enlarging or persisting aneurysms. Venkatesh, S.K. (2000)

  7. Effect of general anaesthesia on functional outcome in patients with anterior circulation ischaemic stroke having endovascular thrombectomy versus standard care: a meta-analysis of individual patient data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, Bruce C. V.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Goyal, Mayank; Menon, Bijoy K.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Bracard, Serge; White, Philip; Dávalos, Antoni; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; van der Lugt, Aad; Ford, Gary A.; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Kelly, Michael; Bourcier, Romain; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; Bang, Oh Young; Nogueira, Raul G.; Devlin, Thomas G.; van den Berg, Lucie A.; Clarençon, Frédéric; Burns, Paul; Carpenter, Jeffrey; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Yavagal, Dileep R.; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Ducrocq, Xavier; Dixit, Anand; Quesada, Helena; Epstein, Jonathan; Davis, Stephen M.; Jansen, Olav; Rubiera, Marta; Urra, Xabier; Micard, Emilien; Lingsma, Hester F.; Naggara, Olivier; Brown, Scott; Guillemin, Francis; Muir, Keith W.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Jovin, Tudor G.; Hill, Michael D.; Mitchell, Peter J.; Fransen, Puck Ss; Beumer, Debbie; Yoo, Albert J.; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Vos, Jan Albert; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Wermer, Marieke Jh; van Walderveen, Marianne Aa; Staals, Julie; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van Oostayen, Jacques A.; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J.; Boiten, Jelis; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Emmer, Bart J.; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F.; van Dijk, Lukas C.; Kappelle, Jaap; Lo, Rob H.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; de Vries, Joost; de Kort, Paul L. M.; van Rooij, Willem Jan J.; van den Berg, Jan S. P.; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A. A. M.; Aerden, Leo A. M.; Dallinga, René J.; Visser, Marieke C.; Bot, Joseph C. J.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Eshghi, Omid; Schreuder, Tobien H. C. M. L.; Heijboer, Roel J. J.; Keizer, Koos; Tielbeek, Alexander V.; den Hertog, Heleen M.; Gerrits, Dick G.; van den Berg-Vos, Renske M.; Karas, Giorgos B.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Flach, Zwenneke; Marquering, Henk A.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; van den Berg, René; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Brown, Martin M.; Liebig, Thomas; Stijnen, Theo; Andersson, Tommy; Mattle, Heinrich; Wahlgren, Nils; van der Heijden, Esther; Ghannouti, Naziha; Fleitour, Nadine; Hooijenga, Imke; Puppels, Corina; Pellikaan, Wilma; Geerling, Annet; Lindl-Velema, Annemieke; van Vemde, Gina; de Ridder, Ans; Greebe, Paut; de Bont-Stikkelbroeck, José; de Meris, Joke; Janssen, Kirsten; Struijk, Willy; Licher, Silvan; Boodt, Nikki; Ros, Adriaan; Venema, Esmee; Slokkers, Ilse; Ganpat, Raymie-Jayce; Mulder, Maxim; Saiedie, Nawid; Heshmatollah, Alis; Schipperen, Stefanie; Vinken, Stefan; van Boxtel, Tiemen; Koets, Jeroen; Boers, Merel; Santos, Emilie; Borst, Jordi; Jansen, Ivo; Kappelhof, Manon; Lucas, Marit; Geuskens, Ralph; Barros, Renan Sales; Dobbe, Roeland; Csizmadia, Marloes; Hill, M. D.; Goyal, M.; Demchuk, A. M.; Menon, B. K.; Eesa, M.; Ryckborst, K. J.; Wright, M. R.; Kamal, N. R.; Andersen, L.; Randhawa, P. A.; Stewart, T.; Patil, S.; Minhas, P.; Almekhlafi, M.; Mishra, S.; Clement, F.; Sajobi, T.; Shuaib, A.; Montanera, W. J.; Roy, D.; Silver, F. L.; Jovin, T. G.; Frei, D. F.; Sapkota, B.; Rempel, J. L.; Thornton, J.; Williams, D.; Tampieri, D.; Poppe, A. Y.; Dowlatshahi, D.; Wong, J. H.; Mitha, A. P.; Subramaniam, S.; Hull, G.; Lowerison, M. W.; Salluzzi, M.; Maxwell, M.; Lacusta, S.; Drupals, E.; Armitage, K.; Barber, P. A.; Smith, E. E.; Morrish, W. F.; Coutts, S. B.; Derdeyn, C.; Demaerschalk, B.; Yavagal, D.; Martin, R.; Brant, R.; Yu, Y.; Willinsky, R. A.; Weill, A.; Kenney, C.; Aram, H.; Stys, P. K.; Watson, T. W.; Klein, G.; Pearson, D.; Couillard, P.; Trivedi, A.; Singh, D.; Klourfeld, E.; Imoukhuede, O.; Nikneshan, D.; Blayney, S.; Reddy, R.; Choi, P.; Horton, M.; Musuka, T.; Dubuc, V.; Field, T. S.; Desai, J.; Adatia, S.; Alseraya, A.; Nambiar, V.; van Dijk, R.; Newcommon, N. J.; Schwindt, B.; Butcher, K. S.; Jeerakathil, T.; Buck, B.; Khan, K.; Naik, S. S.; Emery, D. J.; Owen, R. J.; Kotylak, T. B.; Ashforth, R. A.; Yeo, T. A.; McNally, D.; Siddiqui, M.; Saqqur, M.; Hussain, D.; Kalashyan, H.; Manosalva, A.; Kate, M.; Gioia, L.; Hasan, S.; Mohammad, A.; Muratoglu, M.; Cullen, A.; Brennan, P.; O'Hare, A.; Looby, S.; Hyland, D.; Duff, S.; McCusker, M.; Hallinan, B.; Lee, S.; McCormack, J.; Moore, A.; O'Connor, M.; Donegan, C.; Brewer, L.; Martin, A.; Murphy, S.; O'Rourke, K.; Smyth, S.; Kelly, P.; Lynch, T.; Daly, T.; O'Brien, P.; O'Driscoll, A.; Martin, M.; Collins, R.; Coughlan, T.; McCabe, D.; O'Neill, D.; Mulroy, M.; Lynch, O.; Walsh, T.; O'Donnell, M.; Galvin, T.; Harbison, J.; McElwaine, P.; Mulpeter, K.; McLoughlin, C.; Reardon, M.; Harkin, E.; Dolan, E.; Watts, M.; Cunningham, N.; Fallon, C.; Gallagher, S.; Cotter, P.; Crowe, M.; Doyle, R.; Noone, I.; Lapierre, M.; Coté, V. A.; Lanthier, S.; Odier, C.; DUROCHER, A.; Raymond, J.; Daneault, N.; Deschaintre, Y.; Jankowitz, B.; Baxendell, L.; Massaro, L.; Jackson-Graves, C.; DeCesare, S.; Porter, P.; Armbruster, K.; Adams, A.; Billigan, J.; Oakley, J.; Ducruet, A.; Jadhav, A.; Giurgiutiu, D.-V.; Aghaebrahim, A.; Reddy, V.; Hammer, M.; Starr, M.; Totoraitis, V.; Wechsler, L.; Streib, S.; Rangaraju, S.; Campbell, D.; Rocha, M.; Gulati, D.; Krings, T.; Kalman, L.; Cayley, A.; Williams, J.; Wiegner, R.; Casaubon, L. K.; Jaigobin, C.; del Campo, J. M.; Elamin, E.; Schaafsma, J. D.; Agid, R.; Farb, R.; ter Brugge, K.; Sapkoda, B. L.; Baxter, B. W.; Barton, K.; Knox, A.; Porter, A.; Sirelkhatim, A.; Devlin, T.; Dellinger, C.; Pitiyanuvath, N.; Patterson, J.; Nichols, J.; Quarfordt, S.; Calvert, J.; Hawk, H.; Fanale, C.; Bitner, A.; Novak, A.; Huddle, D.; Bellon, R.; Loy, D.; Wagner, J.; Chang, I.; Lampe, E.; Spencer, B.; Pratt, R.; Bartt, R.; Shine, S.; Dooley, G.; Nguyen, T.; Whaley, M.; McCarthy, K.; Teitelbaum, J.; Poon, W.; Campbell, N.; Cortes, M.; Lum, C.; Shamloul, R.; Robert, S.; Stotts, G.; Shamy, M.; Steffenhagen, N.; Blacquiere, D.; Hogan, M.; AlHazzaa, M.; Basir, G.; Lesiuk, H.; Iancu, D.; Santos, M.; Choe, H.; Weisman, D. C.; Jonczak, K.; Blue-Schaller, A.; Shah, Q.; MacKenzie, L.; Klein, B.; Kulandaivel, K.; Kozak, O.; Gzesh, D. J.; Harris, L. J.; Khoury, J. S.; Mandzia, J.; Pelz, D.; Crann, S.; Fleming, L.; Hesser, K.; Beauchamp, B.; Amato-Marzialli, B.; Boulton, M.; Lopez-Ojeda, P.; Sharma, M.; Lownie, S.; Chan, R.; Swartz, R.; Howard, P.; Golob, D.; Gladstone, D.; Boyle, K.; Boulos, M.; Hopyan, J.; Yang, V.; da Costa, L.; Holmstedt, C. A.; Turk, A. S.; Navarro, R.; Jauch, E.; Ozark, S.; Turner, R.; Phillips, S.; Shankar, J.; Jarrett, J.; Gubitz, G.; Maloney, W.; Vandorpe, R.; Schmidt, M.; Heidenreich, J.; Hunter, G.; Kelly, M.; Whelan, R.; Peeling, L.; Burns, P. A.; Hunter, A.; Wiggam, I.; Kerr, E.; Watt, M.; Fulton, A.; Gordon, P.; Rennie, I.; Flynn, P.; Smyth, G.; O'Leary, S.; Gentile, N.; Linares, G.; McNelis, P.; Erkmen, K.; Katz, P.; Azizi, A.; Weaver, M.; Jungreis, C.; Faro, S.; Shah, P.; Reimer, H.; Kalugdan, V.; Saposnik, G.; Bharatha, A.; Li, Y.; Kostyrko, P.; Marotta, T.; Montanera, W.; Sarma, D.; Selchen, D.; Spears, J.; Heo, J. H.; Jeong, K.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, B. M.; Kim, Y. D.; Song, D.; Lee, K.-J.; Yoo, J.; Bang, O. Y.; Rho, S.; Lee, J.; Jeon, P.; Kim, K. H.; Cha, J.; Kim, S. J.; Ryoo, S.; Lee, M. J.; Sohn, S.-I.; Kim, C.-H.; Ryu, H.-G.; Hong, J.-H.; Chang, H.-W.; Lee, C.-Y.; Rha, J.; Campbell, Bruce Cv; Churilov, Leonid; Yan, Bernard; Dowling, Richard; Yassi, Nawaf; Oxley, Thomas J.; Wu, Teddy Y.; Silver, Gabriel; McDonald, Amy; McCoy, Rachael; Kleinig, Timothy J.; Scroop, Rebecca; Dewey, Helen M.; Simpson, Marion; Brooks, Mark; Coulton, Bronwyn; Krause, Martin; Harrington, Timothy J.; Steinfort, Brendan; Faulder, Kenneth; Priglinger, Miriam; Day, Susan; Phan, Thanh; Chong, Winston; Holt, Michael; Chandra, Ronil V.; Ma, Henry; Young, Dennis; Wong, Kitty; Wijeratne, Tissa; Tu, Hans; MacKay, Elizabeth; Celestino, Sherisse; Bladin, Christopher F.; Loh, Poh Sien; Gilligan, Amanda; Ross, Zofia; Coote, Skye; Frost, Tanya; Parsons, Mark W.; Miteff, Ferdinand; Levi, Christopher R.; Ang, Timothy; Spratt, Neil; Kaauwai, Lara; Badve, Monica; Rice, Henry; de Villiers, Laetitia; Barber, P. Alan; McGuinness, Ben; Hope, Ayton; Moriarty, Maurice; Bennett, Patricia; Wong, Andrew; Coulthard, Alan; Lee, Andrew; Jannes, Jim; Field, Deborah; Sharma, Gagan; Salinas, Simon; Cowley, Elise; Snow, Barry; Kolbe, John; Stark, Richard; King, John; Macdonnell, Richard; Attia, John; D'Este, Cate; Diener, Hans Christoph; Levy, Elad I.; Bonafé, Alain; Mendes Pereira, Vitor; Jahan, Reza; Albers, Gregory W.; Cognard, Christophe; Cohen, David J.; Hacke, Werner; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; von Kummer, Ruüdiger; Smith, Wade; Turjman, Francis; Hamilton, Scott; Chiacchierini, Richard; Amar, Arun; Sanossian, Nerses; Loh, Yince; Baxter, B.; Reddy, V. K.; Horev, A.; Star, M.; Siddiqui, A.; Hopkins, L. N.; Snyder, K.; Sawyer, R.; Hall, S.; Costalat, V.; Riquelme, C.; Machi, P.; Omer, E.; Arquizan, C.; Mourand, I.; Charif, M.; Ayrignac, X.; Menjot de Champfleur, N.; Leboucq, N.; Gascou, G.; Moynier, M.; du Mesnil de Rochemont, R.; Singer, O.; Berkefeld, J.; Foerch, C.; Lorenz, M.; Pfeilschifer, W.; Hattingen, E.; Wagner, M.; You, S. J.; Lescher, S.; Braun, H.; Dehkharghani, S.; Belagaje, S. R.; Anderson, A.; Lima, A.; Obideen, M.; Haussen, D.; Dharia, R.; Frankel, M.; Patel, V.; Owada, K.; Saad, A.; Amerson, L.; Horn, C.; Doppelheuer, S.; Schindler, K.; Lopes, D. K.; Chen, M.; Moftakhar, R.; Anton, C.; Smreczak, M.; Carpenter, J. S.; Boo, S.; Rai, A.; Roberts, T.; Tarabishy, A.; Gutmann, L.; Brooks, C.; Brick, J.; Domico, J.; Reimann, G.; Hinrichs, K.; Becker, M.; Heiss, E.; Selle, C.; Witteler, A.; Al'Boutros, S.; Danch, M.-J.; Ranft, A.; Rohde, S.; Burg, K.; Weimar, C.; Zegarac, V.; Hartmann, C.; Schlamann, M.; Göricke, S.; Ringlestein, A.; Wanke, I.; Mönninghoff, C.; Dietzold, M.; Budzik, R.; Davis, T.; Eubank, G.; Hicks, W. J.; Pema, P.; Vora, N.; Mejilla, J.; Taylor, M.; Clark, W.; Rontal, A.; Fields, J.; Peterson, B.; Nesbit, G.; Lutsep, H.; Bozorgchami, H.; Priest, R.; Ologuntoye, O.; Barnwell, S.; Dogan, A.; Herrick, K.; Takahasi, C.; Beadell, N.; Brown, B.; Jamieson, S.; Hussain, M. S.; Russman, A.; Hui, F.; Wisco, D.; Uchino, K.; Khawaja, Z.; Katzan, I.; Toth, G.; Cheng Ching, E.; Bain, M.; Man, S.; Farrag, A.; George, P.; John, S.; Shankar, L.; Drofa, A.; Dahlgren, R.; Bauer, A.; Itreat, A.; Taqui, A.; Cerejo, R.; Richmond, A.; Ringleb, P.; Bendszus, M.; Möhlenbruch, M.; Reiff, T.; Amiri, H.; Purrucker, J.; Herweh, C.; Pham, M.; Menn, O.; Ludwig, I.; Acosta, I.; Villar, C.; Morgan, W.; Sombutmai, C.; Hellinger, F.; Allen, E.; Bellew, M.; Gandhi, R.; Bonwit, E.; Aly, J.; Ecker, R. D.; Seder, D.; Morris, J.; Skaletsky, M.; Belden, J.; Baker, C.; Connolly, L. S.; Papanagiotou, P.; Roth, C.; Kastrup, A.; Politi, M.; Brunner, F.; Alexandrou, M.; Merdivan, H.; Ramsey, C.; Given Ii, C.; Renfrow, S.; Deshmukh, V.; Sasadeusz, K.; Vincent, F.; Thiesing, J. T.; Putnam, J.; Bhatt, A.; Kansara, A.; Caceves, D.; Lowenkopf, T.; Yanase, L.; Zurasky, J.; Dancer, S.; Freeman, B.; Scheibe Mirek, T.; Robison, J.; Roll, J.; Clark, D.; Rodriguez, M.; Fitzsimmons, B.-Fm; Zaidat, O.; Lynch, J. R.; Lazzaro, M.; Larson, T.; Padmore, L.; Das, E.; Farrow Schmidt, A.; Hassan, A.; Tekle, W.; Cate, C.; Jansen, O.; Cnyrim, C.; Wodarg, F.; Wiese, C.; Binder, A.; Riedel, C.; Rohr, A.; Lang, N.; Laufs, H.; Krieter, S.; Remonda, L.; Diepers, M.; Añon, J.; Nedeltchev, K.; Kahles, T.; Biethahn, S.; Lindner, M.; Chang, V.; Gächter, C.; Esperon, C.; Guglielmetti, M.; Arenillas Lara, J. F.; Martínez Galdámez, M.; Calleja Sanz, A. I.; Cortijo Garcia, E.; Garcia Bermejo, P.; Perez, S.; Mulero Carrillo, P.; Crespo Vallejo, E.; Ruiz Piñero, M.; Lopez Mesonero, L.; Reyes Muñoz, F. J.; Brekenfeld, C.; Buhk, J.-H.; Kruützelmann, A.; Thomalla, G.; Cheng, B.; Beck, C.; Hoppe, J.; Goebell, E.; Holst, B.; Grzyska, U.; Wortmann, G.; Starkman, S.; Duckwiler, G.; Jahan, R.; Rao, N.; Sheth, S.; Ng, K.; Noorian, A.; Szeder, V.; Nour, M.; McManus, M.; Huang, J.; Tarpley, J.; Tateshima, S.; Gonzalez, N.; Ali, L.; Liebeskind, D.; Hinman, J.; Calderon Arnulphi, M.; Liang, C.; Guzy, J.; Koch, S.; DeSousa, K.; Gordon Perue, G.; Elhammady, M.; Peterson, E.; Pandey, V.; Dharmadhikari, S.; Khandelwal, P.; Malik, A.; Pafford, R.; Gonzalez, P.; Ramdas, K.; Andersen, G.; Damgaard, D.; Von Weitzel Mudersbach, P.; Simonsen, C.; Ruiz de Morales Ayudarte, N.; Poulsen, M.; Sørensen, L.; Karabegovich, S.; Hjørringgaard, M.; Hjort, N.; Harbo, T.; Sørensen, K.; Deshaies, E.; Padalino, D.; Swarnkar, A.; Latorre, J. G.; Elnour, E.; El Zammar, Z.; Villwock, M.; Farid, H.; Balgude, A.; Cross, L.; Hansen, K.; Holtmannspötter, M.; Kondziella, D.; Hoejgaard, J.; Taudorf, S.; Soendergaard, H.; Wagner, A.; Cronquist, M.; Stavngaard, T.; Cortsen, M.; Krarup, L. H.; Hyldal, T.; Haring, H.-P.; Guggenberger, S.; Hamberger, M.; Trenkler, J.; Sonnberger, M.; Nussbaumer, K.; Dominger, C.; Bach, E.; Jagadeesan, B. D.; TAYLOR, R.; Kim, J.; Shea, K.; Tummala, R.; Zacharatos, H.; Sandhu, D.; Ezzeddine, M.; Grande, A.; Hildebrandt, D.; Miller, K.; Scherber, J.; Hendrickson, A.; Jumaa, M.; Zaidi, S.; Hendrickson, T.; Snyder, V.; Killer Oberpfalzer, M.; Mutzenbach, J.; Weymayr, F.; Broussalis, E.; Stadler, K.; Jedlitschka, A.; Malek, A.; Mueller Kronast, N.; Beck, P.; Martin, C.; Summers, D.; Day, J.; Bettinger, I.; Holloway, W.; Olds, K.; Arkin, S.; Akhtar, N.; Boutwell, C.; Crandall, S.; Schwartzman, M.; Weinstein, C.; Brion, B.; Prothmann, S.; Kleine, J.; Kreiser, K.; Boeckh Behrens, T.; Poppert, H.; Wunderlich, S.; Koch, M. L.; Biberacher, V.; Huberle, A.; Gora Stahlberg, G.; Knier, B.; Meindl, T.; Utpadel Fischler, D.; Zech, M.; Kowarik, M.; Seifert, C.; Schwaiger, B.; Puri, A.; Hou, S.; Wakhloo, A.; Moonis, M.; Henniger, N.; Goddeau, R.; Massari, F.; Minaeian, A.; Lozano, J. D.; Ramzan, M.; Stout, C.; Patel, A.; Tunguturi, A.; Onteddu, S.; Carandang, R.; Howk, M.; Ribó, M.; Sanjuan, E.; Rubiera, M.; Pagola, J.; Flores, A.; Muchada, M.; Meler, P.; Huerga, E.; Gelabert, S.; Coscojuela, P.; Tomasello, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Santamarina, E.; Maisterra, O.; Boned, S.; Seró, L.; Rovira, A.; Molina, C. A.; Millán, M.; Muñoz, L.; Pérez de la Ossa, N.; Gomis, M.; Dorado, L.; López-Cancio, E.; Palomeras, E.; Munuera, J.; García Bermejo, P.; Remollo, S.; Castaño, C.; García-Sort, R.; Cuadras, P.; Puyalto, P.; Hernández-Pérez, M.; Jiménez, M.; Martínez-Piñeiro, A.; Lucente, G.; Dávalos, A.; Chamorro, A.; Urra, X.; Obach, V.; Cervera, A.; Amaro, S.; Llull, L.; Codas, J.; Balasa, M.; Navarro, J.; Ariño, H.; Aceituno, A.; Rudilosso, S.; Renu, A.; Macho, J. M.; San Roman, L.; Blasco, J.; López, A.; Macías, N.; Cardona, P.; Quesada, H.; Rubio, F.; Cano, L.; Lara, B.; de Miquel, M. A.; Aja, L.; Serena, J.; Cobo, E.; Lees, Kennedy R.; Arenillas, J.; Roberts, R.; Al-Ajlan, F.; Zimmel, L.; Patel, S.; Martí-Fàbregas, J.; Salvat-Plana, M.; Bracard, S.; Anxionnat, René; Baillot, Pierre-Alexandre; Barbier, Charlotte; Derelle, Anne-Laure; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Richard, Sébastien; Samson, Yves; Sourour, Nader; Baronnet-Chauvet, Flore; Clarencon, Frédéric; Crozier, Sophie; Deltour, Sandrine; Di Maria, Federico; Le Bouc, Raphael; Leger, Anne; Mutlu, Gurkan; Rosso, Charlotte; Szatmary, Zoltan; Yger, Marion; Zavanone, Chiara; Bakchine, Serge; Pierot, Laurent; Caucheteux, Nathalie; Estrade, Laurent; Kadziolka, Krzysztof; Leautaud, Alexandre; Renkes, Céline; Serre, Isabelle; Desal, Hubert; Guillon, Benoît; Boutoleau-Bretonniere, Claire; Daumas-Duport, Benjamin; de Gaalon, Solène; Derkinderen, Pascal; Evain, Sarah; Herisson, Fanny; Laplaud, David-Axel; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Lintia-Gaultier, Alina; Pouclet-Courtemanche, Hélène; Rouaud, Tiphaine; Rouaud Jaffrenou, Violaine; Schunck, Aurélia; Sevin-Allouet, Mathieu; Toulgoat, Frederique; Wiertlewski, Sandrine; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Ronziere, Thomas; Cahagne, Vincent; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Pinel, Jean-François; Raoult, Hélène; Mas, Jean-Louis; Meder, Jean-François; Al Najjar-Carpentier, Amen-Adam; Birchenall, Julia; Bodiguel, Eric; Calvet, David; Domigo, Valérie; Godon-Hardy, Sylvie; Guiraud, Vincent; Lamy, Catherine; Majhadi, Loubna; Morin, Ludovic; Trystram, Denis; Turc, Guillaume; Berge, Jérôme; Sibon, Igor; Menegon, Patrice; Barreau, Xavier; Rouanet, François; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Kazadi, Annabelle; Renou, Pauline; Fleury, Olivier; Pasco-Papon, Anne; Dubas, Frédéric; Caroff, Jildaz; Godard Ducceschi, Sophie; Hamon, Marie-Aurélie; Lecluse, Alderic; Marc, Guillaume; Giroud, Maurice; Ricolfi, Frédéric; Bejot, Yannick; Chavent, Adrien; Gentil, Arnaud; Kazemi, Apolline; Osseby, Guy-Victor; Voguet, Charlotte; Mahagne, Marie-Hélène; Sedat, Jacques; Chau, Yves; Suissa, Laurent; Lachaud, Sylvain; Houdart, Emmanuel; Stapf, Christian; Buffon Porcher, Frédérique; Chabriat, Hugues; Guedin, Pierre; Herve, Dominique; Jouvent, Eric; Mawet, Jérôme; Saint-Maurice, Jean-Pierre; Schneble, Hans-Martin; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Berhoune, Nadia-Nawel; Bouhour, Françoise; Cho, Tae-Hee; Derex, Laurent; Felix, Sandra; Gervais-Bernard, Hélène; Gory, Benjamin; Manera, Luis; Mechtouff, Laura; Ritzenthaler, Thomas; Riva, Roberto; Salaris Silvio, Fabrizio; Tilikete, Caroline; Blanc, Raphael; Obadia, Michaël; Bartolini, Mario Bruno; Gueguen, Antoine; Piotin, Michel; Pistocchi, Silvia; Redjem, Hocine; Drouineau, Jacques; Neau, Jean-Philippe; Godeneche, Gaelle; Lamy, Matthias; Marsac, Emilia; Velasco, Stephane; Clavelou, Pierre; Chabert, Emmanuel; Bourgois, Nathalie; Cornut-Chauvinc, Catherine; Ferrier, Anna; Gabrillargues, Jean; Jean, Betty; Marques, Anna-Raquel; Vitello, Nicolas; Detante, Olivier; Barbieux, Marianne; Boubagra, Kamel; Favre Wiki, Isabelle; Garambois, Katia; Tahon, Florence; Ashok, Vasdev; Coskun, Oguzhan; Rodesch, Georges; Lapergue, Bertrand; Bourdain, Frédéric; Evrard, Serge; Graveleau, Philippe; Decroix, Jean Pierre; Wang, Adrien; Sellal, François; Ahle, Guido; Carelli, Gabriela; Dugay, Marie-Hélène; Gaultier, Claude; Lebedinsky, Ariel Pablo; Lita, Lavinia; Musacchio, Raul Mariano; Renglewicz-Destuynder, Catherine; Tournade, Alain; Vuillemet, Françis; Montoro, Francisco Macian; Mounayer, Charbel; Faugeras, Frederic; Gimenez, Laetitia; Labach, Catherine; Lautrette, Géraldine; Denier, Christian; Saliou, Guillaume; Chassin, Olivier; Dussaule, Claire; Melki, Elsa; Ozanne, Augustin; Puccinelli, Francesco; Sachet, Marina; Sarov, Mariana; Bonneville, Jean-François; Moulin, Thierry; Biondi, Alessandra; de Bustos Medeiros, Elisabeth; Vuillier, Fabrice; Courtheoux, Patrick; Viader, Fausto; Apoil-Brissard, Marion; Bataille, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Laure; Cogez, Julien; Touze, Emmanuel; Leclerc, Xavier; Leys, Didier; Aggour, Mohamed; Aguettaz, Pierre; Bodenant, Marie; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Deplanque, Dominique; Girot, Marie; Henon, Hilde; Kalsoum, Erwah; Lucas, Christian; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Zuniga, Paolo; Arquizan, Caroline; Costalat, Vincent; Machi, Paolo; Mourand, Isabelle; Riquelme, Carlos; Bounolleau, Pierre; Arteaga, Charles; Faivre, Anthony; Bintner, Marc; Tournebize, Patrice; Charlin, Cyril; Darcel, Françoise; Gauthier-Lasalarie, Pascale; Jeremenko, Marcia; Mouton, Servane; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Lamy, Chantal; Hervé, Deramond; Hassan, Hosseini; Gaston, André; Barral, Francis-Guy; Garnier, Pierre; Beaujeux, Rémy; Wolff, Valérie; Herbreteau, Denis; Debiais, Séverine; Murray, Alicia; Ford, Gary; Clifton, Andy; Freeman, Janet; Ford, Ian; Markus, Hugh; Wardlaw, Joanna; Molyneux, Andy; Robinson, Thompson; Lewis, Steff; Norrie, John; Robertson, Fergus; Perry, Richard; Cloud, Geoffrey; Clifton, Andrew; Madigan, Jeremy; Roffe, Christine; Nayak, Sanjeev; Lobotesis, Kyriakos; Smith, Craig; Herwadkar, Amit; Kandasamy, Naga; Goddard, Tony; Bamford, John; Subramanian, Ganesh; Lenthall, Rob; Littleton, Edward; Lamin, Sal; Storey, Kelley; Ghatala, Rita; Banaras, Azra; Aeron-Thomas, John; Hazel, Bath; Maguire, Holly; Veraque, Emelda; Harrison, Louise; Keshvara, Rekha; Cunningham, James

    2018-01-01

    Background General anaesthesia (GA) during endovascular thrombectomy has been associated with worse patient outcomes in observational studies compared with patients treated without GA. We assessed functional outcome in ischaemic stroke patients with large vessel anterior circulation occlusion

  8. Additional Value of Intra-Aneurysmal Hemodynamics in Discriminating Ruptured versus Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, J J; Marquering, H A; van Ooij, P; van den Berg, R; Nederveen, A J; Verbaan, D; Vandertop, W P; Pourquie, M; Rinkel, G J E; vanBavel, E; Majoie, C B L M

    2015-10-01

    Hemodynamics are thought to play an important role in the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. We tested whether hemodynamics, determined from computational fluid dynamics models, have additional value in discriminating ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. Such discriminative power could provide better prediction models for rupture. A cross-sectional study was performed on patients eligible for endovascular treatment, including 55 ruptured and 62 unruptured aneurysms. Association with rupture status was tested for location, aneurysm type, and 4 geometric and 10 hemodynamic parameters. Patient-specific spatiotemporal velocities measured with phase-contrast MR imaging were used as inflow conditions for computational fluid dynamics. To assess the additional value of hemodynamic parameters, we performed 1 univariate and 2 multivariate analyses: 1 traditional model including only location and geometry and 1 advanced model that included patient-specific hemodynamic parameters. In the univariate analysis, high-risk locations (anterior cerebral arteries, posterior communicating artery, and posterior circulation), daughter sacs, unstable inflow jets, impingements at the aneurysm body, and unstable complex flow patterns were significantly present more often in ruptured aneurysms. In both multivariate analyses, only the high-risk location (OR, 3.92; 95% CI, 1.77-8.68) and the presence of daughter sacs (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.25-6.25) remained as significant independent determinants. In this study population of patients eligible for endovascular treatment, we found no independent additional value of aneurysmal hemodynamics in discriminating rupture status, despite high univariate associations. Only traditional parameters (high-risk location and the presence of daughter sacs) were independently associated with ruptured aneurysms. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Microsurgical Clipping of an Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Using a Novel Robotic Visualization Tool in Lieu of the Binocular Operating Microscope: Operative Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Daniel R; Reinard, Kevin A; Ajayi, Olaide O; Delashaw, Johnny B

    2018-01-01

    The binocular operating microscope has been the visualization instrument of choice for microsurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms for many decades. To discuss recent technological advances that have provided novel visualization tools, which may prove to be superior to the binocular operating microscope in many regards. We present an operative video and our operative experience with the BrightMatterTM Servo System (Synaptive Medical, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) during the microsurgical clipping of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. To the best of our knowledge, the use of this device for the microsurgical clipping of an intracranial aneurysm has never been described in the literature. The BrightMatterTM Servo System (Synaptive Medical) is a surgical exoscope which avoids many of the ergonomic constraints of the binocular operating microscope, but is associated with a steep learning curve. The BrightMatterTM Servo System (Synaptive Medical) is a maneuverable surgical exoscope that is positioned with a directional aiming device and a surgeon-controlled foot pedal. While utilizing this device comes with a steep learning curve typical of any new technology, the BrightMatterTM Servo System (Synaptive Medical) has several advantages over the conventional surgical microscope, which include a relatively unobstructed surgical field, provision of high-definition images, and visualization of difficult angles/trajectories. This device can easily be utilized as a visualization tool for a variety of cranial and spinal procedures in lieu of the binocular operating microscope. We anticipate that this technology will soon become an integral part of the neurosurgeon's armamentarium. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  10. CT angiography and CT perfusion improve prediction of infarct volume in patients with anterior circulation stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeters, Tom van; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Horsch, Alexander D.; Niesten, Joris M.; Luitse, Merel J.A.; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, Geert Jan; Kappelle, L.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Majoie, Charles B.L.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vos, Jan Albert [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Schonewille, Wouter J. [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Neurology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Walderveen, Marianne A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Wermer, Marieke J.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands); Duijm, Lucien E.M. [Catharina Hospital, Department of Radiology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Keizer, Koos [Catharina Hospital, Department of Neurology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bot, Joseph C.J. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Visser, Marieke C. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lugt, Aad van der [Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Dippel, Diederik W.J. [Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kesselring, F.O.H.W. [Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Hofmeijer, Jeannette [Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Neurology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Lycklama a Nijeholt, Geert J. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Boiten, Jelis [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Neurology, The Hague (Netherlands); Rooij, Willem Jan van [St. Elisabeth Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Kort, Paul L.M. de [St. Elisabeth Hospital, Department of Neurology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Roos, Yvo B.W.E.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijer, Frederick J.A. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pleiter, C.C. [St. Franciscus Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: Dutch acute stroke study (DUST) investigators

    2016-04-15

    We investigated whether baseline CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP) in acute ischemic stroke could improve prediction of infarct presence and infarct volume on follow-up imaging. We analyzed 906 patients with suspected anterior circulation stroke from the prospective multicenter Dutch acute stroke study (DUST). All patients underwent baseline non-contrast CT, CTA, and CTP and follow-up non-contrast CT/MRI after 3 days. Multivariable regression models were developed including patient characteristics and non-contrast CT, and subsequently, CTA and CTP measures were added. The increase in area under the curve (AUC) and R{sup 2} was assessed to determine the additional value of CTA and CTP. At follow-up, 612 patients (67.5 %) had a detectable infarct on CT/MRI; median infarct volume was 14.8 mL (interquartile range (IQR) 2.8-69.6). Regarding infarct presence, the AUC of 0.82 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.79-0.85) for patient characteristics and non-contrast CT was improved with addition of CTA measures (AUC 0.85 (95 % CI 0.82-0.87); p < 0.001) and was even higher after addition of CTP measures (AUC 0.89 (95 % CI 0.87-0.91); p < 0.001) and combined CTA/CTP measures (AUC 0.89 (95 % CI 0.87-0.91); p < 0.001). For infarct volume, adding combined CTA/CTP measures (R{sup 2} = 0.58) was superior to patient characteristics and non-contrast CT alone (R{sup 2} = 0.44) and to addition of CTA alone (R{sup 2} = 0.55) or CTP alone (R{sup 2} = 0.54; all p < 0.001). In the acute stage, CTA and CTP have additional value over patient characteristics and non-contrast CT for predicting infarct presence and infarct volume on follow-up imaging. These findings could be applied for patient selection in future trials on ischemic stroke treatment. (orig.)

  11. Risk factors between intracranial-extracranial atherosclerosis and anterior-posterior circulation stroke in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Cai, Yefeng; Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingbo

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an important cause of stroke and remains a challenge for stroke prevention. Risk factors involved in atherosclerotic stroke and anterior and posterior circulation strokes (ACS and PCS, respectively) are different. The purpose of this study is to investigate differences in risk factors between intracranial and extracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS and ECAS), ACS and PCS, and ICAS/ECAS with ACS/PCS in a Chinese acute ischaemic stroke population. We analysed 551 ischaemic stroke patients who had been enrolled between August 2005 and July 2008. First, risk factors were compared between non-atherosclerosis, ICAS, ECAS, and combined ICAS and ECAS groups. ICAS and ECAS were assessed with transcranial Doppler and carotid colour Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Second, risk factors were compared between ACS and PCS groups. Stroke lesion was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. Third, risk factors were compared in ICAS/ECAS associated with ACS/PCS. The risk factor for ICAS was high diastolic blood pressure (OR, 1.075; 95% CI, 1.016-1.138; p = 0.013), and the risk factors for ECAS were age (OR, 1.113; 95% CI, 1.046-1.183; p = 0.001) and low density lipoprotein (OR, 1.450; 95% CI, 1.087-1.935; p = 0.012). Hypertension (OR, 1.090; 95% CI, 1.001-1.109; p = 0.027) was associated with PCS. Age (OR, 1.026; 95% CI, 1.011-1.128; p = 0.003), male gender (OR, 2.278; 95% CI, 1.481-3.258; p = 0.003) and age (OR, 1.067; 95% CI, 1.013-1.123; p = 0.014), scores of NIHSS (OR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.012-1.130; p = 0.018) were risk factors for ICAS and ECAS with ACS, respectively. Risk factors are different between ICAS and ECAS, ACS and PCS, and ICAS/ECAS with ACS/PCS. Thus, targeted strategies are needed to consider these differences to prevent, treat and manage these diseases.

  12. Anomalous Origin of the Right Coronary Artery from the Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery in a Patient with Ascending Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Gürkan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of coronary artery anomalies has been reported between 0.6 to 1.3% in angiographic series and 0.3% in autopsy series. An isolated single coronary artery (SCA is even a rarer congenital anomaly occurring in approximately 0.02% of the population. The ectopic origin of the right coronary artery (RCA from the left anterior descending (LAD artery is relatively rare and more benign than other types of anomalous origin of the RCAs. We report a case of an adult male patient with SCA anomaly in which the RCA takes off from the mid LAD. To the best of our knowledge, SCA anomaly coinciding with ascending aortic aneurysm which was treated with Bentall operation has never been described before.

  13. Safety and Tolerability of SonoVue® in Patients with Large Artery Anterior Circulation Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracchini, Claudio; Viaro, Federica; Favaretto, Silvia; Palmieri, Anna; Kulyk, Caterina; Causin, Francesco; Farina, Filippo; Ballotta, Enzo

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are routinely used to improve the visualization of intracranial arteries. Since a higher rate of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has been observed in patients undergoing sonothrombolysis in combination with UCAs, we conducted this study with the aim of assessing safety and tolerability of SonoVue® in patients with acute ischemic stroke due to anterior circulation large artery occlusion (LAO) and eligible to intravenous thrombolysis and/or mechanical thrombectomy. Among 474 patients consecutively admitted to our Stroke Unit with anterior circulation ischemic stroke, SonoVue® was administered during transcranial ultrasound evaluation to 48 patients with suspected LAO for diagnostic confirmation (group I) and to 44 patients with inadequate temporal bone window. Forty-eight stroke patients with LAO diagnosed only by computed tomography (CT) angiography /magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and matched for age, gender, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score with group I represented the control group (group II). Thrombolysis, thrombectomy, or combined treatment were offered to all eligible patients. Brain MR imaging/CT was performed in both groups in case of neurological deterioration or after 1 week to check for ICH. SonoVue® did not cause any serious adverse event; only mild and transient side effects were reported in six cases (6.5%). Among patients in groups I and II, there were 31 (32.3%) secondary cerebral bleedings with no statistically significant difference between the groups, but only 2 (2.1%) were symptomatic. According to our study, SonoVue® can be safely administered to acute ischemic stroke patients with suspected anterior circulation LAO and/or inadequate temporal bone window. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  14. Mechanical Thrombectomy for Minor and Mild Stroke Patients Harboring Large Vessel Occlusion in the Anterior Circulation: A Multicenter Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargazanli, Cyril; Arquizan, Caroline; Gory, Benjamin; Consoli, Arturo; Labreuche, Julien; Redjem, Hocine; Eker, Omer; Decroix, Jean-Pierre; Corlobé, Astrid; Mourand, Isabelle; Gaillard, Nicolas; Ayrignac, Xavier; Charif, Mahmoud; Duhamel, Alain; Labeyrie, Paul-Emile; Riquelme, Carlos; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Gascou, Grégory; Lefèvre, Pierre-Henri; Mantilla-García, Daniel; Cagnazzo, Federico; Coskun, Oguzhan; Mazighi, Mikael; Riva, Roberto; Bourdain, Frédéric; Labauge, Pierre; Rodesch, Georges; Obadia, Michael; Bonafé, Alain; Turjman, Francis; Costalat, Vincent; Piotin, Michel; Blanc, Raphaël; Lapergue, Bertrand

    2017-12-01

    Proximal large vessel occlusion (LVO) is present in up to 30% of minor strokes. The effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy (MT) in the subgroup of minor stroke with LVO in the anterior circulation is still open to debate. Data about MT in this subgroup of patients are sparse, and their optimal management has not yet been defined. The purpose of this multicenter cohort study was to evaluate the effectiveness of MT in patients experiencing acute ischemic stroke (AIS) because of LVO in the anterior circulation, presenting with minor-to-mild stroke symptoms (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of stroke centers having 2 therapeutic approaches (urgent thrombectomy associated with best medical treatment [BMT] versus BMT first and MT if worsening occurs) about management of patients with minor and mild acute ischemic stroke harboring LVO in the anterior circulation. An intention-to-treat analysis was conducted. The primary end point was the rate of excellent outcome defined as the achievement of a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 1 at 3 months. Three hundred one patients were included, 170 with urgent MT associated with BMT, and 131 with BMT alone as first-line treatment. Patients treated with MT were younger, more often received intravenous thrombolysis, and had shorter time to imaging. Twenty-four patients (18.0%) in the medical group had rescue MT because of neurological worsening. Overall, excellent outcome was achieved in 64.5% of patients, with no difference between the 2 groups. Stratified analysis according to key subgroups did not find heterogeneity in the treatment effect size. Minor-to-mild stroke patients with LVO achieved excellent and favorable functional outcomes at 3 months in similar proportions between urgent MT versus delayed MT associated with BMT. There is thus an urgent need for randomized trials to define the effectiveness of MT in this patient subgroup. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. False aneurysm of the interosseous artery and anterior interosseous syndrome - an unusual complication of penetrating injury of the forearm: a case report

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    Garavaglia Guido

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palsies involving the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN comprise less than 1% of all upper extremity nerve palsies. Objectives This case highlights the potential vascular and neurological hazards of minimal penetrating injury of the proximal forearm and emphasizes the phenomenon of delayed presentation of vascular injuries following seemingly obscure penetrating wounds. Case Report We report a case of a 22-year-old male admitted for a minimal penetrating trauma of the proximal forearm that, some days later, developed an anterior interosseous syndrome. A Duplex study performed immediately after the trauma was normal. Further radiologic investigations i.e. a computer-tomographic-angiography (CTA revealed a false aneurysm of the proximal portion of the interosseous artery (IA. Endovascular management was proposed but a spontaneous rupture dictated surgical revision with simple excision. Complete neurological recovery was documented at 4 months postoperatively. Conclusions/Summary After every penetrating injury of the proximal forearm we propose routinely a detailed neurological and vascular status and a CTA if Duplex evaluation is negative.

  16. [Collateral score based on CT perfusion can predict the prognosis of patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke after thrombectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Meixia; Chen, Zhicai; Lou, Min

    2017-07-25

    To evaluate the value of collateral score based on CT perfusion (CTP-CS) in predicting the clinical outcome of patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke after thrombectomy. Clinical data of acute ischemic stroke patients with anterior artery occlusion undergoing endovascular treatment in the Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine during October 2013 and October 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Collateral scores were assessed based on CTP and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images, respectively. And DSA-CS or CTP-CS 3-4 was defined as good collateral vessels. Good clinical outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ≤ 2 at 3 months after stroke. The binary logistic regression model was used to analyze the correlation between the collateral score and clinical outcome, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze the value of DSA-CS and CTP-CS in predicting the clinical outcome. Among 40 patients, 33 (82.5%) acquired recanalization and 16 (40.0%) got good outcome. Compared with poor outcome group, the collateral score (all P collateral vessels were higher in good outcome group (all P collateral vessels were independent factor of good outcome (CTP-CS: OR =48.404, 95% CI :1.373-1706.585, P Collateral scores based on CTP and DSA had good consistency ( κ =0.697, P <0.01), and ROC curve showed that the predictive value of CTP-CS and DSA-CS were comparable (both AUC=0.726, 95% CI :0.559-0.893, P <0.05). CTP-CS can predict the clinical outcome of patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke after thrombectomy.

  17. Aneurismas del complejo arteria cerebral anterior / arteria comunicante anterior: Resultados del tratamiento quirúrgico Aneurysms of the anterior cerebral artery-anterior communicating artery complex: Results of the surgical treatment

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    Justo L González González

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Los aneurismas del complejo arteria cerebral anterior-arteria comunicante anterior figuran entre los más frecuentes de localización intracraneal y, debido a su variabilidad anatómica y características hemodinámicas, constituyen un reto especial para cualquier esfuerzo terapéutico. Con el objetivo de caracterizarlos y evaluar los resultados del tratamiento quirúrgico de estas lesiones, se estudian los pacientes operados en el Servicio de Neurocirugía del Hospital Clinicoquirúrgico «Hermanos Ameijeiras», entre enero de 1983 y agosto de 1998. Se observó que el 71,1 % de la muestra egresó en excelente estado; el 13,44 %, con secuelas mínimas; el 3,48 %, con secuelas graves y que la mortalidad fue del 11,53 %. Se concluye que estos aneurismas son más frecuentes en el sexo masculino, en la cuarta y quinta décadas de la vida (media de 39,9 años y que el tamaño crítico de ruptura se ubica mayoritariamente entre 6 mm y 11 mm. De igual forma se observó que la edad, el tamaño sacular, el vasoespasmo y la ruptura transoperatoria influyen sobre los resultados y que la influencia de estas dos últimas complicaciones es muy fuerte. El infarto cerebral isquémico fue la causa de muerte más frecuente

  18. Case of radiation induced aneurysm of extracranial carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashiro, Takashi; Ikota, Toshio; Yamashita, Kousuke; Kodama, Takao

    1988-08-01

    An unusual case of post-irradiation aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery is presented. A 70-year-old man, complaining of left cervical throbbing mass with focal pain, was admitted on February 8, 1985. It was noted, from his past history, that he had had surgery of the removal of cervical lymphnodes and that unknown dosage of irradiation had been added to the cervical region 30 years before. Left carotid angiography (on admission) demonstrated a giant aneurysm in the cervical portion of internal carotid artery. Right carotid angiography with compression of left carotid artery revealed good cross filling through anterior communicating artery. Computed tomography with contrast media showed a ring like enhanced mass, which was thought to suggest that a large part of the aneurysm was filled with intraluminal thrombosis. During 30 days of evaluation, the aneurysm grew larger and his cervical pain became untolerable. Operation, the resection of the aneurysm and the reconstruction (of circulation) with vein graft, was challenged on March 12. It was so difficult with meticulous work that the ligation of left common carotid artery was performed after all. Seven days after the operation, he suffered from the gastrointestinal bleeding, which was enough to lead him to hypovolemic shock. Thereafter, right hemiparesis and aphasia were brought about. Two months later, he died of pneumonia. On histological examination, it was demonstrated that the aneurysm communicated with the necrotic tissue and that the normal structure of the blood vessel was not observed in the aneurysmal wall and consisted of the collagenous fiber and granulated tissue. The aneurysm was interpreted as a false one.

  19. A case of radiation induced aneurysm of extracranial carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Takashi; Ikota, Toshio; Yamashita, Kousuke; Kodama, Takao

    1988-01-01

    An unusual case of post-irradiation aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery is presented. A 70-year-old man, complaining of left cervical throbbing mass with focal pain, was admitted on February 8, 1985. It was noted, from his past history, that he had had surgery of the removal of cervical lymphnodes and that unknown dosage of irradiation had been added to the cervical region 30 years before. Left carotid angiography (on admission) demonstrated a giant aneurysm in the cervical portion of internal carotid artery. Right carotid angiography with compression of left carotid artery revealed good cross filling through anterior communicating artery. Computed tomography with contrast media showed a ring like enhanced mass, which was thought to suggest that a large part of the aneurysm was filled with intraluminal thrombosis. During 30 days of evaluation, the aneurysm grew larger and his cervical pain became untolerable. Operation, the resection of the aneurysm and the reconstruction (of circulation) with vein graft, was challenged on March 12. It was so difficult with meticulous work that the ligation of left common carotid artery was performed after all. Seven days after the operation, he suffered from the gastrointestinal bleeding, which was enough to lead him to hypovolemic shock. Thereafter, right hemiparesis and aphasia were brought about. Two months later, he died of pneumonia. On histological examination, it was demonstrated that the aneurysm communicated with the necrotic tissue and that the normal structure of the blood vessel was not observed in the aneurysmal wall and consisted of the collagenous fiber and granulated tissue. The aneurysm was interpreted as a false one. (author)

  20. Risk factors for meningitis after craniotomy in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to anterior circulation aneurysms rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Miki; Sato, Kenichi; Endo, Hidenori; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative meningitis is a serious complication occurring after neurosurgical interventions. However, few investigations have focused specifically on the risk factors that predispose patients to meningitis after major craniotomy. This study identified the risk factors for postoperative meningitis after neurovascular surgery, and investigated the relationship between postoperative meningitis and clinical outcome. A total of 148 consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who underwent clipping surgery through a pterional approach within 72 h between January 2007 and September 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. The treatment strategy of our hospital for patients with SAH was based on the findings of digital subtraction angiography in the acute phase. Coil embolization was firstly considered, and clipping through craniotomy if indicated was performed as soon as possible. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered before beginning craniotomy and for at least 3 days after. Hydrocortisone was used to prevent hyponatremia if allowed by the medical condition of the patient. Intrathecal administration of nicardipine hydrochloride was given if required for vasospasm treatment. Meningitis was clinically diagnosed from the blood samplings and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations. Data were collected from the electronic and paper charts. The status of modified Rankin scale (mRS) 0-2 at discharge was defined as favorable outcome. A total of 14 patients (9.5%) had meningitis during this study period. Symptomatic vasospasm was detected in 33 patients (22.3%), and 12 patients (8.1%) had permanent neurological deficits caused by vasospasm. Overall, 109 patients (73.6%) had favorable outcome. The longer duration of drainage placement, presence of CSF leakage, and intrathecal administration of vasodilatory agent showed significantly higher incidence of postoperative meningitis in univariate analysis (p=0.0093, 0.0017, and 0.0090, respectively). The proportion of favorable outcome patients at discharge (mRS 0-2) was significantly lower in patients with postoperative meningitis (35.7%) than in patients without it (77.6%) (p=0.0004). The duration of in-hospital stay was significantly longer in patients with postoperative meningitis (median 58.5, range 28-115 days) than in patients without it (median 38.5, range 19-149 days) (pmeningitis (p=0.0299). Meningitis after surgery is still a serious complication that requires preventative intervention. The clinical outcome of patients with postoperative meningitis after neurovascular surgery is not still satisfactory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolated anterior interosseous nerve deficit due to a false aneurysm of the humeral artery: an unusual complication of penetrating arm injury. Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunet, B; Pallaro, J; Boullet, F; Tournier, C; Fabre, T

    2013-12-01

    Anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) injuries account for only 1% of all the nerve injuries at the upper limb. We report the case of a 22-year-old male who sustained a penetrating injury to the arm. No neurological deficit was found at the initial evaluation. However, 6 weeks later, he had a motor deficit confined to the territory of the AIN with weakness of the flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum longus to the index. He also reported paraesthesia. Tinel's test was positive over the pinpoint wound in the arm, where a painful swelling was felt. Electroneurophysiological testing indicated a deficit of the AIN. Surgical exploration identified a thrombosed false aneurysm of the humeral artery responsible for compression of the median nerve. One month later, the patient had achieved a full recovery. Immediate routine exploration of deep penetrating wounds, although mandatory, may fail to detect any lesions. Close monitoring must be provided subsequently, as gradual nerve compression can result in delayed neurological deficits. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Computed tomographic evaluation due to ruptured intracranial aneurysms in the posterior fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, Takayuki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Ogawa, Akira; Onuma, Takehide; Yoshimoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Jiro.

    1988-12-01

    From April, 1978 through December, 1984, computed tomographic (CT) findings were carefully examined in 34 cases of initial subarachnoid bleeding due to a single ruptured aneurysm in the posterior fossa. All of the patients were hospitalized within 3 days of the onset of symptoms. High-density areas, which indicate the presence of subarachnoid clots, were evaluated in the interhemispheric and Sylvian fissures and the interpeduncular, prepontine, ambient, and quadrigeminal cisterns. The CT data suggest that hematomas in the four cisterns are thicker than those in the supratentorial subarachnoid spaces. Only one patient had an intracerebral hematoma. Hydrocephalus accompanied aneurysms of the posterior fossa more frequently than those of the anterior circulation.

  3. Endovascular embolization of mirror brain aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirakov, S.; Penkov, M.; Sirakov, A.; Todorov, Y.; Ninov, K.; Minkin, K.; Bachvarov, Ch.

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the vertebral artery are rare, constituting 0.5 to 3% of all intracranial aneurysms and less than 20% of those of the posterior brain circulation. Bilateral - mirror aneurysms on vertebral artery are extremely rare and unusual lesions, but are often seen and treated in the setting of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage or stroke in the posterior circulation. The treatment of such aneurysms of the vertebral artery with their specific anatomical location is great challenge to traditional neurosurgery. We present our experience with endovascular approach with this pathology. Key words: Mirror Brain Aneurysm. Endovascular Embolization

  4. Microsurgical one-stage treatment of intracranial mirror aneurysms via bilateral frontolateral approaches

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    Hong-guang WANG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate surgical strategies, clinical effects and complications of microsurgical one-stage treatment of intracranial mirror aneurysms via bilateral frontolateral approaches.  Methods Review clinical data of 18 cases with anterior circulation mirror aneurysms who underwent one-stage clipping via bilateral frontolateral approaches from July 2010 to July 2015 admitted to Department of Neurosurgery in Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. The operative efficacy was evaluated according to postoperative Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS.  Results The 36 aneurysms in 18 patients were successfully clipped via bilateral frontolateral approaches at one-stage, including 18 posterior communicating artery (PCoA mirror aneurysms in 9 cases and 18 middle cerebral artery (MCA mirror aneurysms in 9 cases. GOS score of 5 was discovered in 16 cases, and 4 was discovered in 2 cases after operation. One case underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS due to communicating hydrocephalus, one case got postoperative pulmonary infection and no death occurred. Intracranial CTA at 6 months postoperatively showed aneurysms of 18 patients were clipped completely, the parent artery blood flow was smooth, and no recurrence was found.  Conclusions Microsurgical one-stage clipping via bilateral frontolateral approaches for treating intracranial mirror aneurysms is a sugrical method with small incision, fitting surgical field, high safety, satisfactory effect and good prognosis, which is a new minimally invasive neurosurgical technique. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.08.012

  5. Investigation of small ruptured aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abiko, Masaru; Ikawa, Fusao; Obayashi, Naohiko; Mitsuhara, Takafumi; Nosaka, Ryou; Inagawa, Tetsuji

    2008-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients with ruptured aneurysms smaller than 5 mm in diameter are sometimes encountoied at our hospital. However, the operative indication for unruptured aneurysm is over 5 mm according to the JAPANESE SOCIETY FOR DETECTION OF ASYMPTOMATIC BRAIN DISEASES. We therefore analyzed the characteristics of ruptured aneurysms smaller than 5 mm in diameter. A retrospective review of all SAH patients using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) between April 1999 and March 2004 was conducted. We compared 201 SAH patients with DSA (group A) and 61 with aneurysms smaller than 5 mm (group B). Age, gender, familial history, hypertension, and location of the ruptured aneurysm were examined. In males younger than 40 years old, anterior communicating artery/distal anterior cerebral artery (Acom/DACA) aneurysms were significantly correlated with group B rather than group A. Familial history and hypertension were not found to be characteristic in group B in this study. Small unruptured aneurysms may have a risk of rupture especially in young males with Acom/DACA aneurysms. Further investigations on small aneurysms are needed. (author)

  6. Computer modelling of anterior circulation stroke: Proof of concept in Cerebrovascular Occlusion

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    THANH G PHAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current literature emphasizes the role of the Circle of Willis (CoW in salvaging ischemic brain tissue but not that of leptomeningeal anastomoses (LA. We developed a computational model of the cerebral circulation to 1 evaluate the roles of the CoW and LA in restoring flow to the superficial compartment of the middle cerebral artery territory and 2 estimate the size of the LA required to maintain flow above the critical ischemic threshold (>30% of baseline under simulated occlusion. Methods: Cerebral vasculature was modelled as a network of junctions connected by cylindrical pipes. The experiments included occlusion of successive distal branches of the intracranial arteries while the diameters of LA were varied. Results: The model showed that the region of reduced flow became progressively smaller as the site of occlusion was moved from the large proximal to the smaller distal arteries. There was no improvement in flow in the MCA territory when the diameters of the inter-territorial LA were varied from 0.0625 mm to 0.5 mm while keeping the intra-territorial LA constant. By contrast, the diameter of the inter-territorial LA needed to be greater than 1.0 mm in order to provide adequate (>30% flow to selected arteries in the occluded MCA territory. Conclusions: The CoW and inter-territorial LA together play important supportive roles in intracranial artery occlusion. Computational modelling provides the ability to experimentally investigate the effect of arterial occlusion on CoW and LA function.

  7. Outcome of patients with proximal vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation and DWI-PWI mismatch is time-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundiyanapurath, Sibu; Diatschuk, Sascha; Loebel, Sarah; Pfaff, Johannes; Pham, Mirko; Möhlenbruch, Markus Alfred; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Ringleb, Peter A; Radbruch, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Patients with ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion are assumed to benefit from endovascular therapy (ET) independent of the symptom onset-to-treatment time (OTT) if they present with a mismatch of diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging (DWI-PWI mismatch). We aimed at studying the influence of OTT on clinical outcome in these patients. Retrospective database review in a tertiary care university hospital. All patients presented with proximal vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation and DWI-PWI mismatch. Primary outcome was the influence of OTT on modified Rankin scale (mRS) score three months after treatment, dichotomized in favourable (0-2) and unfavourable outcome (3-6). Secondary outcome was the effect of OTT on the shift of the mRS score. Patients treated within an early time window (mismatch according to the definitions from large trials (DEFUSE 2, DEFUSE 3, SWIFT-PRIME, EXTEND-IA). Outcome of patients with comparable DWI-PWI mismatch is time-dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches for Cerebral Aneurysms: Anatomical, Virtual Reality and Morphometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Notaris, Matteo; Enseñat, Joaquim; Alobid, Isam; San Molina, Joan; Berenguer, Joan; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of the present contribution is to perform a detailed anatomic and virtual reality three-dimensional stereoscopic study in order to test the effectiveness of the extended endoscopic endonasal approaches for selected anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods. The study was divided in two main steps: (1) simulation step, using a dedicated Virtual Reality System (Dextroscope, Volume Interactions); (2) dissection step, in which the feasibility to reach specific vascular territory via the nose was verified in the anatomical laboratory. Results. Good visualization and proximal and distal vascular control of the main midline anterior and posterior circulation territory were achieved during the simulation step as well as in the dissection step (anterior communicating complex, internal carotid, ophthalmic, superior hypophyseal, posterior cerebral and posterior communicating, basilar, superior cerebellar, anterior inferior cerebellar, vertebral, and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries). Conclusion. The present contribution is intended as strictly anatomic study in which we highlighted some specific anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms that can be reached via the nose. For clinical applications of these approaches, some relevant complications, mainly related to the endonasal route, such as proximal and distal vascular control, major arterial bleeding, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak, and olfactory disturbances must be considered. PMID:24575410

  9. Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches for Cerebral Aneurysms: Anatomical, Virtual Reality and Morphometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Di Somma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of the present contribution is to perform a detailed anatomic and virtual reality three-dimensional stereoscopic study in order to test the effectiveness of the extended endoscopic endonasal approaches for selected anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods. The study was divided in two main steps: (1 simulation step, using a dedicated Virtual Reality System (Dextroscope, Volume Interactions; (2 dissection step, in which the feasibility to reach specific vascular territory via the nose was verified in the anatomical laboratory. Results. Good visualization and proximal and distal vascular control of the main midline anterior and posterior circulation territory were achieved during the simulation step as well as in the dissection step (anterior communicating complex, internal carotid, ophthalmic, superior hypophyseal, posterior cerebral and posterior communicating, basilar, superior cerebellar, anterior inferior cerebellar, vertebral, and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries. Conclusion. The present contribution is intended as strictly anatomic study in which we highlighted some specific anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms that can be reached via the nose. For clinical applications of these approaches, some relevant complications, mainly related to the endonasal route, such as proximal and distal vascular control, major arterial bleeding, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak, and olfactory disturbances must be considered.

  10. Postoperative subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hematoma after unruptured aneurysm surgery: age, sex, and aneurysm location as independent risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaechan; Cho, Jae-Hoon; Goh, Duck-Ho; Kang, Dong-Hun; Shin, Im Hee; Hamm, In-Suk

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the incidence and risk factors for the postoperative occurrence of subdural complications, such as a subdural hygroma and resultant chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), following surgical clipping of an unruptured aneurysm. The critical age affecting such occurrences and follow-up results were also examined. The case series included 364 consecutive patients who underwent aneurysm clipping via a pterional or superciliary keyhole approach for an unruptured saccular aneurysm in the anterior cerebral circulation between 2007 and 2013. The subdural hygromas were identified based on CT scans 6-9 weeks after surgery, and the volumes were measured using volumetry studies. Until their complete resolution, all the subdural hygromas were followed using CT scans every 1-2 months. Meanwhile, the CSDHs were classified as nonoperative or operative lesions that were treated by bur-hole drainage. The age and sex of the patients, aneurysm location, history of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and surgical approach (pterional vs superciliary) were all analyzed regarding the postoperative occurrence of a subdural hygroma or CSDH. The follow-up results of the subdural complications were also investigated. Seventy patients (19.2%) developed a subdural hygroma or CSDH. The results of a multivariate analysis showed that advanced age (p = 0.003), male sex (p 60 years, which achieved a 70% sensitivity and 69% specificity with regard to predicting such subdural complications. The female patients ≤ 60 years of age showed a negligible incidence of subdural complications for all aneurysm groups, whereas the male patients > 60 years of age showed the highest incidence of subdural complications at 50%-100%, according to the aneurysm location. The subdural hygromas detected 6-9 weeks postoperatively showed different follow-up results, according to the severity. The subdural hygromas that converted to a CSDH were larger in volume than the subdural hygromas that resolved

  11. Surgical clipping of flow related giant unruptured anterior spinal artery aneurysm secondary to co-arctation of aorta: Management challenges and lessons learnt

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    Jeena Joseph

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: ASAA remains an extremely rare cause of compressive myelopathy. Its association with co-arctation of aorta increases treatment related mortality. Posterolateral approach provides a good exposure of the aneurysm for surgical clipping with minimal retraction of the cord.

  12. [A dissecting aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery was reduced spontaneously during conservative therapy: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamoto, Hirooki; Orii, Maaya; Miyazaki, Hiromichi; Ishiyama, Naomi

    2002-04-01

    We report here a case of a patient with a dissecting aneurysm of the anterior medullary segment of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) which presented with Wallenberg's syndrome. A 32-year-male presented with an unusual case of Wallenberg's syndrome due to a dissecting aneurysm of the PICA manifesting as a sensation of heaviness in the occipital region and vertigo. The occipital symptoms persisted and vertigo and vomiting developed after 6 days. Numbness developed on the left side of the patient's face, and hyperalgesia on the right side of the body. The diagnosis of Wallenberg's syndrome was based on the above findings. MRI revealed infarction of the lateral aspect of the medulla oblongata and MR angiography revealed dilatation in the proximal portion of the left PICA. Digital subtraction angiography revealed that the left vertebral artery was essentially normal, but there was a spindle-shaped dilatation in the proximal portion of the left PICA. We carried out conservative therapy at the patient's request and 3D-CTA revealed that the dissecting aneurysm was markedly reduced in size seven months after the onset. Dissecting aneurysms of the intracranial posterior circulation have been shown to be less uncommon than previously thought. However, those involving the PICA without involvement of the vertebral artery at all are extremely rare. The natural history of the dissecting PICA aneurysm was unknown, and the indication for surgical treatment of such aneurysms remains controversial. Management options are conservative treatment, open surgical treatment including wrapping, trapping, and resection with reconstruction, but almost all of the patients underwent radical treatment to prevent rupture of the aneurysm. However we had no knowledge of the risk of rupture of a PICA dissecting aneurysm presenting with ischemic symptoms. We have reviewed the well-documented 15 cases of dissecting aneurysms of the PICA reported in the literature and we discuss the

  13. Anterior Circulation Steal Syndrome

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    Motahareh Afrakhteh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arteriovenous fistula (AVF can be congenital or acquired. Congenital AVF are less common while acquired fistula are most frequently the result of penetrating trauma or iatrogenic action. Acquired common carotid jugular fistulas are uncommon in the head and neck region, accounting only 4 to 7% of all the traumatic AVFs encountered throughout the body that is not usually detected during the acute injury phase. Objective: For the first time in our center we diagnose and treat a carotid jugular vein fistula due to neck stab wound. Case Description: A 48 years old man with neck stab wound and strangulation was treated as an outpatient in a clinic with suturing the wound. he was stable and discharged without apparent neurologic deficit, after two days he was referred to our center due to left hemiparesis .in our assessment, Brain imaging showed right side hemodynamic infarct, in carotid duplex the flow was bidirectional and low RI, in angiography there was fistula from Right ICA to jugular vein, in left ICA angiography there was reversible flow from Right distal ICA to the fistula. After two times of brachychardia and asystolic cycle the patient was intubated and CPR was done. Cardiac arrest maybe because of cardiac problems dueto carotid jugular fistula. Approach: Due to carotid injury and high flow fistula, the Right ICA jugular fistula was obliterated by Balloon and ICA was also sacrificed. in left ICA Angiography the flow to Right ICA was stopped and MCA  and ACA got flow from left side .the patient was stable and after few days he could be extubated and he was discharged with stable condition. Discussion: Carotid jugular fistula is a rare complication of neck trauma, because its symptoms appear late, with neurologic deficit many times neurologist was suspect to dissection and maybe MRA and CTA report Carotid occlusion but Duplex is an efficient device to differentiated between these two disease. in dissection  there is prestenotic pattern and we can see the Flap flow in pseudolumen but in Carotid jugular fistula there is bidirectional and low resistance flow in proximal ICA. Meanwhile jugular vein have pulsatile flow due to direct carotid arterial flow.we presented a case of carotid-jugular fistula following cervical trauma.we are implicating on the role of carotid duplex for evaluation of cervical trauma. Duplex could efficiently differentiate between the two major  complication of trauma that is cervical arteries dissection and carotid-jugular fistula.

  14. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thin tissues covering the brain. This type of hemorrhagic stroke is called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. A ruptured aneurysm quickly becomes life-threatening and requires prompt medical treatment. Most brain aneurysms, however, don't rupture, create ...

  15. Early single centre experience of flow diverting stents for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Ahmed K; Robertson, Fergus; Wong, Ken; Joshi, Yogish; Haridas, Avinash; Grieve, Joan; Watkins, Laurence D; Kitchen, Neil D; Brew, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    The flow diverting stent (FDS) is a relatively new endovascular therapeutic tool specifically designed to reconstruct the parent artery and divert blood flow along the normal anatomical course and away from the aneurysm neck and dome. Retrospective review of prospectively built clinical and imaging database of patients treated with FDS at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, UK was done. Between 18/03/2008 and 10/11/2011, 80 patients underwent 84 FDS insertion procedures for various indications. Mean duration of clinical follow-up was 11.3 ± 9.3 months and of imaging follow-up was 10.6 ± 9.3 months. Sixty-seven had anterior circulation aneurysms while 17 had posterior circulation aneurysms. Seven (8.3%) patients died (two probably not related, giving a procedure-related mortality of 5.9%), eight had permanent new deficit (9.5%), 20 had transient deficit (23%) and 49 (58%) had no complications. There was a trend towards bad outcome with larger posterior circulation aneurysms. Angiographic follow-up showed 38% cure rate at 6 months and 61% at 12 months. FDS should only be used following multidisciplinary discussion in selected patients. Further data is required regarding long-term safety, efficacy and indications.

  16. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  17. Predictive risk factors for multiple intracranial aneurysms rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jue; Zhao Yuwu; Li Minghua; Lu Haitao

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the risk factors inducing the rupture of multiple intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Between July 2007 and July 2011, a total of 134 patients with 294 aneurysms were admitted to the hospital. Of the 294 aneurysms, 50 were ruptured and 244 were unruptured. Every patient had two or more aneurysms. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis methods were used to analyze the risk factors, including age, gender, site and size, for multiple intracranial aneurysms. Results: The 134 patients were divided into three groups according to patient's age, including <4.5 group, (45-6.5) group and > 65 group. The rupture incidence of aneurysm in the (4.5-65) group was highest in the three groups. The difference was significant (P=0.001). Of 35 patients with anterior communicating arterial aneurysms, 13 (37.1%) were ruptured, accounting for 26% of all ruptured aneurysms, and the rupture rate of anterior communicating arterial aneurysms was significantly higher than that of the aneurysms located at other sites (P= 0.001). Of all 294 aneurysms, 88.1% were <5 mm, 58.2% were <3 mm. Of the ruptured aneurysms, 680-/o were <5 mm. Conclusion: This study indicates that the rupture of multiple intracranial aneurysm is closely related to the patient's age, the size and location of aneurysm. Therefore, patient's age, the size and location of aneurysm should be taken into consideration when to make the therapeutic plan. In multiple intracranial aneurysms, the anterior communicating arterial aneurysm is most prone to bleeding. (authors)

  18. Predictors of the Aspiration Component Success of a Direct Aspiration First Pass Technique (ADAPT) for the Endovascular Treatment of Stroke Reperfusion Strategy in Anterior Circulation Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Raphaël; Redjem, Hocine; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Orng, Eliane; Taylor, Guillaume; Drumez, Elodie; Fahed, Robert; Labreuche, Julien; Mazighi, Mikael; Lapergue, Bertrand; Piotin, Michel

    2017-06-01

    A direct aspiration first pass technique (ADAPT) has been reported to be fast, safe, and effective for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study is to determine the preoperative factors that affect success of the aspiration component of the technique in ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation. We enrolled all 347 consecutive patients with anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke admitted for mechanical thrombectomy at our institution from August 2013 to October 2015 and treated by ADAPT for the endovascular treatment of stroke. Baseline and procedural characteristics, modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction scores, and 3-month modified Rankin Scale were captured and analyzed. Among the 347 patients (occlusion sites: middle cerebral artery=200, 58%; internal carotid artery Siphon=89, 25%; Tandem=58, 17%), aspiration component led to successful reperfusion (modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2b/3 scores) in 55.6% (193/347 patients), stent retrievers were required in 40%, and a total successful final reperfusion rate of 83% (288/347) was achieved. Overall, procedural complications occurred in 13.3% of patients (48/347). Modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 2 at 90 days was reported in 45% (144/323). Only 2 factors positively influenced the success of the aspiration component: an isolated middle cerebral artery occlusion ( P stroke onset to clot contact ( P =0.018). In this large retrospective study, ADAPT was shown to be safe and effective for anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke with a final successful reperfusion achieved in 83%. The site of arterial occlusion and delay of the procedure were predictors for reperfusion. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02523261, NCT02678169, and NCT02466893. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Doustkami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic.

  20. Blink Reflex as a Complementary Test to MRI in Early Detection of Brainstem Infarctions: Comparison of Blink Reflex Abnormalities in Anterior Versus Posterior Circulation Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Basiri

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early detection of vertebro-basilar insufficiency is of paramount importance. Brain MRI was the only method of diagnosis for many years, but in addition to high cost and delay in report, it may not detect all brain stem lesions. In this study Blink reflex (BR was evaluated as a complementary test to MRI. Methods: Fifty-four patients were studied [27 anterior circulation stroke patients (ACSP and 27 posterior circulation stroke patients (PCSP]. MRI was performed within the first week after the onset of stroke. Nineteen age and sex matched healthy people enrolled as controls. BR was performed within the first 24 hours of the onset. Frequency of abnormal blink reflex in ACSP and PCSP was compared with MRI findings. Then abnormal responses in two groups were compared by chi-square test. Results: In both ACSP and PCSP, two patients had normal BR responses, and in 25 patients R1 or R2 components of blink responses were absent or prolonged (92.5%. R1was absent or delayed in 16 PCSP, but it was abnormal in only two ACSP (P < 0.001. Abnormal R2 responses were detected in 22 PCSP and 24 ACSP. Conclusion: BR abnormalities had high correlation with MRI findings in PCSP (92.5% BR can be performed within the first 24 hours of onset of stroke, and its results is available immediately. This test is easy to perform and comfortable for the patient, has low cost, and is available every where. Therefore we introduced BR as a complementary (but not replacing test to MRI in early detection of brainstem infarctions. Comparison of BR responses in ACSP and PCSP showed that abnormalities of R1 responses had high accuracy in differentiation between anterior and posterior circulation strokes. We concluded that BR responses not only can detect brainstem infarctions rapidly and readily in its early stages, but also can differentiate ACSP from PCSP with high accuracy. Keywords: Blink Reflex, Anterior Circulation Stroke, Posterior Circulation Stroke Patients

  1. Aneurysmal wall imaging in a case of cortical superficial siderosis and multiple unruptured aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalo, Bertrand; Pop, Raoul; Zinchenko, Ielyzaveta; Diaconu, Mihaela; Chibbaro, Salvatore; Manisor, Monica; Wolff, Valerie; Beaujeux, Remy

    2016-11-09

    We report a case of interhemispheric and bifrontal cortical superficial siderosis in association with two intracranial aneurysms. The patient had no clinical history suggestive of aneurysm rupture, no feature of amyloid angiopathy or other apparent etiology for cortical siderosis. We performed high resolution brain MRI with dark blood T1 sequences before and after IV contrast injection. An anterior communicating aneurysm showed partial wall enhancement on the posterior wall whereas a left posterior communicating aneurysm did not. In the light of recent reports of the association of wall enhancement with unstable aneurysms, we considered wall enhancement to be a marker of inflammation and remodeling of the aneurysm wall, resulting in chronic hemorrhagic suffusion in the subarachnoid spaces. To our knowledge, this is the first report offering proof for a possible link between apparently unruptured aneurysms and cortical siderosis. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Endovascular treatment for pediatric intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Wu, Zhongxue [Capital Medical University, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, Hebei (China)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to report the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric patients with intracranial aneurysms. From 1998 to 2005, 25 pediatric patients (aged {<=}17 years) with intracranial aneurysm were treated at our institute. Eleven of 25 patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage. In ten patients, the aneurysm was an incidental finding. One patient presented with cranial nerves dysfunction and three with neurological deficits. The locations of the aneurysms were as follows: vertebral artery (VA; n = 9), middle cerebral artery (MCA; n = 5), posterior cerebral artery (PCA; n = 4), basilar artery (BA; n = 2), anterior communicating artery (n = 2), anterior cerebral artery (n = 2), and internal carotid artery (n = 1). Five patients were treated with selective embolization with coils. Sixteen patients were treated with parent vessel occlusion (PVO). Eight PVOs were performed with balloons and eight were performed with coils. One patient with a VA aneurysm was spontaneously thrombosed 4 days after the initial diagnostic angiogram. In three patients treated with stent alone or stent-assisted coiling, one with BA trunk aneurysm died. One aneurismal recurrence occurred and was retreated. At a mean follow-up duration of 23.5 months, 96% of patients had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms occur more commonly in male patients and have a predilection for the VA, PCA, and MCA. PVO is an effective and safe treatment for fusiform aneurysms. Basilar trunk fusiform aneurysms were difficult to treat and were associated with a high mortality rate. (orig.)

  3. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhigang; Li Guoxin; Qu Yuanming; Tang Jun; Liu Zuoqin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To setup an endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm with detachable balloon and micro-coil. Methods: Trans-femoral artery Seldinger's catheterization was used. Balloons and free MDS, GDC micro-coils were pushed into the aneurysm or carrying arteries. Results: No mortality occurred in authors' group. Internal carotid arteries (ICA) were occluded with detachable balloons in 5 aneurysms at sinus segment of ICA and 4 traumatic pseudo-aneurysms. No complications occurred. 9 aneurysms were completely occluded with micro-coils and 2 were partly (95%) occluded. 2 patients got mild paralysis due to vasospasm or mal detaching of MDS coils. Conclusions: Balloon occlusion of ICA for treatment of aneurysm at sinus segment is safe and effective in case of having abundant collateral circulation. Coil occlusion of intracranial aneurysm is a promising method of endovascular treatment. Compared with MDS, GDC coil is safer but expensive. Free coil is not very safe theoretically, but can be used with careful consideration as it is much cheaper

  4. Microsurgical clipping of ophthalmic artery aneurysms: surgical results and visual outcomes with 208 aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamide, Tomoya; Tabani, Halima; Safaee, Michael M; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-01-26

    OBJECTIVE While most paraclinoid aneurysms can be clipped with excellent results, new postoperative visual deficits are a concern. New technology, including flow diverters, has increased the popularity of endovascular therapy. However, endovascular treatment of paraclinoid aneurysms is not without procedural risks, is associated with higher rates of incomplete aneurysm occlusion and recurrence, and may not address optic nerve compression symptoms that surgical debulking can. The increasing endovascular management of paraclinoid aneurysms should be justified by comparisons to surgical benchmarks. The authors, therefore, undertook this study to define patient, visual, and aneurysm outcomes in the most common type of paraclinoid aneurysm: ophthalmic artery (OphA) aneurysms. METHODS Results from microsurgical clipping of 208 OphA aneurysms in 198 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, aneurysm morphology (size, calcification, etc.), clinical characteristics, and patient outcomes were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS Despite 20% of these aneurysms being large or giant in size, complete aneurysm occlusion was accomplished in 91% of 208 cases, with OphA patency preserved in 99.5%. The aneurysm recurrence rate was 3.1% and the retreatment rate was 0%. Good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score 0-2) were observed in 96.2% of patients overall and in all 156 patients with unruptured aneurysms. New visual field defects (hemianopsia or quadrantanopsia) were observed in 8 patients (3.8%), decreased visual acuity in 5 (2.4%), and monocular blindness in 9 (4.3%). Vision improved in 9 (52.9%) of the 17 patients with preoperative visual deficits. CONCLUSIONS The most important risk associated with clipping OphA aneurysms is a new visual deficit. Meticulous microsurgical technique is necessary during anterior clinoidectomy, aneurysm dissection, and clip application to optimize visual outcomes, and aggressive medical management postoperatively might potentially

  5. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  6. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sing, T.M.Y.; Young, N.; O'Rourke, I.C.; Tomlinson, P.

    1994-01-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogens. 11 refs., 2 figs

  7. Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first to use a nonsurgical technique to treat high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. This technique is useful for patients who cannot have surgery because their overall health would make it too ...

  8. Comprehensive Overview of Contemporary Management Strategies for Cerebral Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhas, Amitoz; Nimjee, Shahid M; Agrawal, Abhishek; Zhang, Jonathan; Diaz, Orlando; Zomorodi, Ali R; Smith, Tony; Powers, Ciarán J; Sauvageau, Eric; Klucznik, Richard P; Ferrell, Andrew; Golshani, Kiarash; Stieg, Philip E; Britz, Gavin W

    2015-10-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains an important health issue in the United States. Despite recent improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral aneurysms, the mortality rate following aneurysm rupture. In those patients who survive, up to 50% are left severely disabled. The goal of preventing the hemorrhage or re-hemorrhage can only be achieved by successfully excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. This article is a comprehensive review by contemporary vascular neurosurgeons and interventional neuroradiolgists on the modern management of cerebral aneurysms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between the morphology of A-1 segment of anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between the morphology of A-1 segment of anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery aneurysms. Wenfeng Feng, Long Zhang, Weiguang Li, Guozhong Zhang, Xiaoyan He, Gang Wang, Mingzhou Li, Songtao Qi ...

  10. Non-enhanced MR imaging of cerebral aneurysms: 7 Tesla versus 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H; Dammann, Philipp; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Johst, Sören; Maderwald, Stefan; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Müller, Oliver; Özkan, Neriman; Ladd, Mark E; Forsting, Michael; Schlamann, Marc U; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Sixteen neurosurgical patients (male n = 5, female n = 11) with single or multiple UIA were enrolled in this trial. All patients were accordingly examined at 7 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI utilizing dedicated head coils. The following sequences were obtained: 7 Tesla TOF MRA, 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced MPRAGE. Image analysis was performed by two radiologists with regard to delineation of aneurysm features (dome, neck, parent vessel), presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue-contrast and overall image quality. Interobserver accordance and intermethod comparisons were calculated by kappa coefficient and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. A total of 20 intracranial aneurysms were detected in 16 patients, with two patients showing multiple aneurysms (n = 2, n = 4). Out of 20 intracranial aneurysms, 14 aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 6 aneurysms in the posterior circulation. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging was superior over 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered aneurysm and image quality features (e.g. image quality: mean MPRAGE7T: 5.0; mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T: 4.3). Ratings for 7 Tesla TOF MRA were equal or higher over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA for all assessed features except for artifact delineation (mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T 4.4). Interobserver accordance was good to excellent for most ratings. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging demonstrated its superiority in the detection and assessment of UIA as well as overall imaging features, offering excellent interobserver accordance and highest scores for all ratings. Hence, it may bear the potential to serve as a high-quality diagnostic tool for pretherapeutic assessment and

  11. Non-enhanced MR imaging of cerebral aneurysms: 7 Tesla versus 1.5 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten H Wrede

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF magnetic resonance angiography (MRA in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen neurosurgical patients (male n = 5, female n = 11 with single or multiple UIA were enrolled in this trial. All patients were accordingly examined at 7 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI utilizing dedicated head coils. The following sequences were obtained: 7 Tesla TOF MRA, 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced MPRAGE. Image analysis was performed by two radiologists with regard to delineation of aneurysm features (dome, neck, parent vessel, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue-contrast and overall image quality. Interobserver accordance and intermethod comparisons were calculated by kappa coefficient and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. RESULTS: A total of 20 intracranial aneurysms were detected in 16 patients, with two patients showing multiple aneurysms (n = 2, n = 4. Out of 20 intracranial aneurysms, 14 aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 6 aneurysms in the posterior circulation. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging was superior over 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered aneurysm and image quality features (e.g. image quality: mean MPRAGE7T: 5.0; mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T: 4.3. Ratings for 7 Tesla TOF MRA were equal or higher over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA for all assessed features except for artifact delineation (mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T 4.4. Interobserver accordance was good to excellent for most ratings. CONCLUSION: 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging demonstrated its superiority in the detection and assessment of UIA as well as overall imaging features, offering excellent interobserver accordance and highest scores for all ratings. Hence, it may bear the potential to serve as a

  12. Aspirin Inhibits Degenerative Changes of Aneurysmal Wall in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengjie; Wang, Dehui; Tian, Ye; Wei, Huijie; Zhou, Ziwei; Liu, Li; Wang, Dong; Dong, Jing-Fei; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Jianning

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage still has a high mortality and morbidity despite notable advances in surgical approaches to cerebral aneurysm (CA). We examined the role of aspirin in vascular inflammation and degeneration. CA was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by ligating left common carotid artery and bilateral posterior renal arteries with or without aspirin treatment. The right anterior cerebral artery/olfactory artery (ACA/OA) bifurcations were stripped and assessed morphologically after Verhoeff's Van Gieson staining. Blood sample was obtained to examine circulating CD34(+) CD133(+) endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), platelet aggregation and platelet counts. Macrophages infiltration in aneurysmal wall was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 (MMP-2 and 9), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was examined by RT-PCR. 2 months after CA induction, surgically treated rats manifested aneurysmal degeneration in ACA/OA bifurcations. Aspirin-treated rats exhibited a significant decrease in degradation of internal elastic lamina (IEL), medial layer thinning, CA size and macrophages infiltration with reduced expression of MMP-2 and 9 compared with rats in the CA group. RT-PCR demonstrated that the upregulation of NF-κB, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 after CA induction was reversed by aspirin treatment. Aspirin treatment following CA induction increased circulating EPCs to near control levels and reduced platelet aggregation without changing platelet counts. The evidence suggested that aspirin significantly reduced degeneration of aneurysm walls by inhibiting macrophages-mediated chronic inflammation and mobilizing EPCs.

  13. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Pyo Nyun; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Byoung Ho; Kim, Ki Jung

    1990-01-01

    CT scans were analysed retrospectively in 130 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm to evaluate the relationship of the locations of aneurysms and the patterns of hemorrhage. Hemorrhage corresponded to the site of aneurysmal origin in a general way and in more specific ways to anterior communicating and middle cerebral artery aneurysms when there was parenchymal or cisternal hemorrhage. In anterior communicating artery aneurysm, SAH in the interhemispheric fissure, both sylvian fissures, and basal cistern was usually noted and intracerebral hemorrhage in anteroinferior frontal lobe was sometimes associated. In cases of middle cerebral artery aneurysm, hemorrhage in the ipsilateral sylvian fissure, interhemispheric fissure, and ipsilateral basal cistern was usual. Intracerebral hemorrhage in lateral temporal lobe was sometimes associated. Posterior communicating artery aneurysm demonstrated SAH in the ipsilateral basal cistern or in entire cisternal spaces specifically, so with higher incidence of involvement of the quadrigeminal and superior cerebellar cistern than anterior cerebral or middle cerebral artery aneurysm. We suggest the locations of aneurysm might be predicted with patterns of SAH and / or associated intracerebral hemorrhage with CT

  14. "Microbleeding" from intracranial aneurysms: Local hemosiderin deposition identified during microsurgical treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Eric S; Defillo, Archie; Zelensky, Andrea; Pulivarthi, Swaroopa; Nussbaum, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    During elective surgery for unruptured aneurysms, we have identified a group of patients with hemosiderin staining of the pial surface immediately adjacent to the aneurysm dome suggesting a remote and unrecognized history of microbleeding from the aneurysm. These cases form the basis for this report. Medical records of 421 unruptured cerebral aneurysm patients treated surgically between January 2003 and September 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with a history of prior subarachnoid hemorrhage, craniotomy, or significant closed head injury were excluded from review. Records were reviewed for intraoperative descriptions of hemosiderin deposition in the vicinity of the aneurysm as well as history of headaches, time to presentation, comorbidities, aneurysm characteristics, procedures, and radiologic imaging. Local hemosiderin staining immediately adjacent to the aneurysm was identified intraoperatively in 13 cases. Each of these patients had a history of remote atypical headache prior to presentation. Eight of these patients (62%) had aneurysms described as particularly "thin-walled" at the time of surgery. Aneurysm locations included the internal carotid artery (ICA) (54%), middle cerebral artery (MCA) (23%), anterior communicating artery (ACOMMA) (15%), and the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) (8%). More than half (54%) of these patients had a history of smoking, while 31% had hypertension, and 23% had a history of alcohol abuse. Dyslipidemia and family history of aneurysms were present in 15% and hypercholesterolemia was noted in one patient (8%). We suggest this group of patients had suffered a "microbleed" resulting in local hemosiderin deposition next to the aneurysm. The origins and clinical implications of such microbleeds are unknown and warrant further investigation.

  15. Results of Endovascular Coil Embolization Treatment for Small (≤ 5 mm) Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Siwoo; Gong, Tae-Sik; Lee, Yong-Woo; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kweon, Chang-Young

    2016-09-01

    Researchers and clinicians have been unable to fully elucidate the natural course of and proper treatment for unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) smaller than or equal to 5 mm, particularly with regard to whether close observation or surgery is more appropriate. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of endovascular coil embolization of small (≤ 5 mm) asymptomatic UIAs by analyzing outcomes and complications associated with the procedure. We analyzed data from 150 patients with small asymptomatic UIAs (≤ 5 mm) treated with coil embolization between January 2011 and December 2015. Three-dimensional angiography was used to measure aneurysm size. We evaluated procedure-related morbidity and mortality, immediate post-operative angiographic results, brain computed thomography follow-up results on post-operative day one, and clinical progress. UIAs occurred primarily in the anterior circulation area (142 cases, 94.67%), though eight patients exhibited UIAs of the posterior circulation. Following coil embolization, aneurysms with complete occlusion were observed in 137 cases (91.3%). Partial occlusion occurred in five cases (3.33%), while the procedure had failed in eight cases (5.33%). Procedure-related morbidity and mortality were five cases (3.33%) and zero cases, respectively. The endovascular treatment of small asymptomatic UIAs is associated with good short-term outcomes without permanent neurologic complications as well as low overall complication and morbidity rates. Thus, the procedure should be considered for patients with smaller asymptomatic UIAs.

  16. Giant aneurysms of the carotid system presenting as visual field defect.

    OpenAIRE

    Peiris, J B; Ross Russell, R W

    1980-01-01

    Visual field loss was the presenting symptom in 19 patients with large intracranial aneurysms of the carotid system. Location of the aneurysm was cavernous, carotid-ophthalmic (two), supraclinoid (nine), anterior communicating (six). Other features were pain and a long history of fluctuating visual loss. Cavernous or carotid-ophthalmic aneurysms mostly caused purely uniocular field loss consistent with optic nerve compression. Supraclinoid aneurysms most often caused a lateral chiasmal syndro...

  17. Radiometric analysis of paraclinoid carotid artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Tada, Tsuyoshi; Nagashima, Hisashi; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Goto, Tetsuya; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Kobayashi, Shigeaki

    2002-04-01

    Classification of paraclinoid carotid artery (CA) aneurysms based on their associated branching arteries has been confusing because superior hypophyseal arteries (SHAs) are too fine to appear opacified on cerebral angiograms. The authors performed a retrospective radiometric analysis of surgically treated paraclinoid aneurysms to elucidate their angiographic and anatomical characteristics. A retrospective analysis was made of 85 intradural paraclinoid aneurysms in which the presence or absence of branching arteries had been determined at the time of surgical clipping. The lesions were classified as supraclinoid, clinoid, and infraclinoid aneurysms based on their relation to the anterior clinoid process on lateral angiograms of the CA. The direction of the aneurysms were measured according to angles formed between the medial portion of the horizontal line crossing the aneurysm sac and the center of the aneurysm neck on anteroposterior angiograms. Branching arteries were associated with 68 aneurysms, of which 28 were ophthalmic artery (OphA) lesions (32.9%) and 40 were SHA ones (47.1%); associated branching arteries were absent in 17 aneurysms (20%). Twenty-five aneurysms (29.4%) were located at the supraclinoidal level, 46 (54.1%) at the clinoidal, and 14 (16.5%) at the infraclinoidal. The majority of aneurysms identified at the supraclinoidal level were OphA lesions (44%) or those unassociated with branching arteries (48%), with mean directions of 57 degrees or 67 degrees, respectively. At the clinoidal level, the mean directions of aneurysms were 76 degrees in six lesions unassociated with branching arteries (13%), 43 degrees in 16 OphA lesions (35%), and -11 degrees in 24 SHA ones (52%). All aneurysms at the infraclinoidal level arose at the origin of the SHAs, with a mean direction of -29 degrees, and most of these were embedded in the carotid cave. Aneurysms arising from the SHA can be distinguished from those not located at an arterial division by cerebral

  18. Aneurysm in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/001414.htm Aneurysm in the brain To use the sharing features on this page, ... aneurysm occurs in a blood vessel of the brain, it is called a cerebral, or intracranial, aneurysm. ...

  19. Aneurysm Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Susco Chair of Research North Shore University Hospital, Brain Aneurysm Center Chair of Research The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research Kristen’s Legacy of Love Chair of Research TeamCindy Alcatraz Chair of Research ...

  20. Aneurysms of the superficial venous system: classification and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald G. Bush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Superficial venous aneurysms are rarely described and they may remain indolent or become the source for pulmonary emboli. A system of classification and treatment protocol according to size and location is proposed. Three hundred thirty patients were evaluated for symptomatic venous disease (C2-C6 over a 2-year period. A proposed designation for venous aneurysm is described. Patients fulfilling this criterion are described in reference to site of involvement, histologic findings, and method of treatment. Five percent of patients met the criteria for venous aneurysm. Nine aneurysms of the greater saphenous vein were identified. Three aneurysms were proximal to the subterminal valve and the rest were distal. Six aneurysms of the anterior accessory greater saphenous vein (AAGSV were identified. Three aneurysms of the AAGSV spontaneously thrombosed. Two patients presented with aneurysms of the small saphenous vein. Histology revealed thickened intima, smooth muscle and adventitia. Aneurysm designation relates to diameter of normal and contiguous vein. All superficial venous aneurysms in close proximity to the junction of the femoral or popliteal vein should be ligated. Classification of venous aneurysms should include the AAGSV, which may present with spontaneous thrombosis.

  1. Emergent intracranial balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation: Experience of a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Young Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Jeong, Hae Woong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of angioplasty for recanalization after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study population was selected from 134 patients who underwent endovascular revascularization therapy (ERT) for AIS between October 2011 and May 2014. Of those 134 patients, 39 who underwent balloon angioplasty with or without stent insertion were included in this study. Balloon angioplasty was the primary treatment for nine patients and a rescue method for 30 patients. The revascularization rate at 7 days, procedure-related complications, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were analyzed. The occlusion sites were the middle cerebral artery (n = 26), intracranial internal carotid artery (n = 10), and middle cerebral artery branch (n = 3). Angioplasty achieved successful revascularization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia grade 2b–3) in 76.9% of patients. Computed tomography angiography performed 7 days post-procedure revealed a maintained reperfusion in 82.8% of successful cases. Only two patients had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. At the 3-month follow-up, 18 (48.6%) and 10 (27.0%) patients showed good and poor functional outcomes, respectively (modified Rankin Scale scores, 0–2 and 5–6). Emergent balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement may be safe and effective for achieving successful revascularization in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. It could be a feasible rescue method as well as a primary method for ERT

  2. Novel Interactive Data Visualization: Exploration of the ESCAPE Trial (Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing CT to Recanalization Times) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigdan, Matthew; Hill, Michael D; Jagdev, Abhijeet; Kamal, Noreen

    2018-01-01

    The ESCAPE (Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing CT to Recanalization Times) randomized clinical trial collected a large diverse data set. However, it is difficult to fully understand the effects of the study on certain patient groups and disease progression. We developed and evaluated an interactive visualization of the ESCAPE trial data. We iteratively designed an interactive visualization using Python's Bokeh software library. The design was evaluated through a user study, which quantitatively evaluated its efficiency and accuracy against traditional modified Rankin Scalegraphic. Qualitative feedback was also evaluated. The novel interactive visualization of the ESCAPE data are publicly available at http://escapevisualization.herokuapp.com/. There was no difference in the efficiency and accuracy when comparing the use of the novel with the traditional visualization. However, users preferred the novel visualization because it allowed for greater exploration. Some insights obtained through exploration of the ESCAPE data are presented. Novel interactive visualizations can be applied to acute stroke trial data to allow for greater exploration of the results. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01778335. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Emergent intracranial balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation: Experience of a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Jeong, Hae Woong [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the outcomes of angioplasty for recanalization after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study population was selected from 134 patients who underwent endovascular revascularization therapy (ERT) for AIS between October 2011 and May 2014. Of those 134 patients, 39 who underwent balloon angioplasty with or without stent insertion were included in this study. Balloon angioplasty was the primary treatment for nine patients and a rescue method for 30 patients. The revascularization rate at 7 days, procedure-related complications, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were analyzed. The occlusion sites were the middle cerebral artery (n = 26), intracranial internal carotid artery (n = 10), and middle cerebral artery branch (n = 3). Angioplasty achieved successful revascularization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia grade 2b–3) in 76.9% of patients. Computed tomography angiography performed 7 days post-procedure revealed a maintained reperfusion in 82.8% of successful cases. Only two patients had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. At the 3-month follow-up, 18 (48.6%) and 10 (27.0%) patients showed good and poor functional outcomes, respectively (modified Rankin Scale scores, 0–2 and 5–6). Emergent balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement may be safe and effective for achieving successful revascularization in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. It could be a feasible rescue method as well as a primary method for ERT.

  4. Aneurysms in pediatric age: A challenging and rare disease entity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ligation was allowed only after ensuring that the distal collateral circulation was adequate. Results Eight aneurysms were reconstructed and one carotid aneurysm was ligated. No neurologic events occurred after the carotid ligation. Follow-up ranged between 4 months and 4 years and showed no recurrences or occlusion ...

  5. [Surgical treatment for pseudoaneurysm of the sinus of valsalva ruptured into the right atrium after mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm repair;report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hidekazu; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hosono, Mitsuharu; Bito, Yasuyuki; Nakahira, Atsushi; Suehiro, Yasuo; Kaku, Daisuke; Miyabe, Makoto; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2015-02-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted to our hospital by ambulance after syncope due to complete A-V block. He had received surgical treatment for mycotic aneurysm of the right coronary artery 3 months before, with patch plasty of the right sinus of Valsalva and bypass grafting to the right coronary artery (RCA) as well as the left anterior descending branch. Computed tomography revealed pseudoaneurysm of the right Valsalva sinus of about 8 cm in diameter and a shunt flow to the right atrium. The previous bypass graft to RCA had been occluded due to compression by the aneurysm. As he was in a shock state, emergency operation was performed. Cardiopulmonary bypass was first established, and after the rectal temperature reached to 26 degrees centigrade, the chest was opened. The pseudoaneurysm burst out when the sternum was re-opened. Under circulatory arrest, the ascending aorta was clamped, and then the circulation was resumed. The previous bovine pericardium patch repairing the Valsalva sinus was detached due to infection, and mural thrombus and pus were observed in the aneurysm. At the bottom of the aneurysm, a fistula connected to the right atrium was found. Debridement around the aneurysm was performed as much as possible. The defect of the Valsalva sinus was repaired with a Dacron patch immersed in gentian violet. The postoperative course was uneventful without any recurrence of infection.

  6. Size ratio correlates with intracranial aneurysm rupture status: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Maryam; Smietana, Janel; Hauck, Erik; Hoh, Brian; Hopkins, Nick; Siddiqui, Adnan; Levy, Elad I; Meng, Hui; Mocco, J

    2010-05-01

    The prediction of intracranial aneurysm (IA) rupture risk has generated significant controversy. The findings of the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) that small anterior circulation aneurysms (IAs are small. These discrepancies have led to the search for better aneurysm parameters to predict rupture. We previously reported that size ratio (SR), IA size divided by parent vessel diameter, correlated strongly with IA rupture status (ruptured versus unruptured). These data were all collected retrospectively off 3-dimensional angiographic images. Therefore, we performed a blinded prospective collection and evaluation of SR data from 2-dimensional angiographic images for a consecutive series of patients with ruptured and unruptured IAs. We prospectively enrolled 40 consecutive patients presenting to a single institution with either ruptured IA or for first-time evaluation of an incidental IA. Blinded technologists acquired all measurements from 2-dimensional angiographic images. Aneurysm rupture status, location, IA maximum size, and parent vessel diameter were documented. The SR was calculated by dividing the aneurysm size (mm) by the average parent vessel size (mm). A 2-tailed Mann-Whitney test was performed to assess statistical significance between ruptured and unruptured groups. Fisher exact test was used to compare medical comorbidities between the ruptured and unruptured groups. Significant differences between the 2 groups were subsequently tested with logistic regression. SE and probability values are reported. Forty consecutive patients with 24 unruptured and 16 ruptured aneurysms met the inclusion criteria. No significant differences were found in age, gender, smoking status, or medical comorbidities between ruptured and unruptured groups. The average maximum size of the unruptured IAs (6.18 + or - 0.60 mm) was significantly smaller compared with the ruptured IAs (7.91 + or - 0.47 mm; P=0.03), and the unruptured group had

  7. Radiological analysis of subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik

    1988-01-01

    The CT findings of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysmal rupture were analyzed and compared with cerebral angiography for the purpose of preangiographic prediction of aneurysmal location as well as evaluation of the CT features corresponding to the vasospasm or ischemic neurologic dysfunctions. The results were as follows: 1.Aneurysms could be identified on initial cerebral angiography in 82 out of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and anterior communicating artery aneurysms were most common (42 cases), followed by MCA, posterior communicating artery, ICA, basilar artery in order of frequency. 2.The CT findings of those patients were hemorrhage in subarachnoid space (69%), localized hematoma (47%), ventricular dilatation (31%), enhancing nodule (23%), cisternal enhancement (20%), cerebral infarction (15%), ventricular hemorrhage (14%), and epidural hemorrhage (3%). 3.Localized hematoma was more prevalent in anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture (54%), and less frequently in MCA, posterior communicating artery and ICA aneurysms. 4.Most of aneurysmal sac could be identified as enhancing nodule on CT when the real size were over 1 cm. 5.The size of ruptured aneurysm could be predicted in many patients with ACA and MCA aneurysm according to the CT features such as hemorrhagic patterns, location of hematomas or enhancing nodules. 6.Localized hematoma or blood clots and cerebral infarction are considered to be the CT features corresponding to the angiographic vasospasm

  8. Radiological analysis of subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    The CT findings of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysmal rupture were analyzed and compared with cerebral angiography for the purpose of preangiographic prediction of aneurysmal location as well as evaluation of the CT features corresponding to the vasospasm or ischemic neurologic dysfunctions. The results were as follows: 1.Aneurysms could be identified on initial cerebral angiography in 82 out of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and anterior communicating artery aneurysms were most common (42 cases), followed by MCA, posterior communicating artery, ICA, basilar artery in order of frequency. 2.The CT findings of those patients were hemorrhage in subarachnoid space (69%), localized hematoma (47%), ventricular dilatation (31%), enhancing nodule (23%), cisternal enhancement (20%), cerebral infarction (15%), ventricular hemorrhage (14%), and epidural hemorrhage (3%). 3.Localized hematoma was more prevalent in anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture (54%), and less frequently in MCA, posterior communicating artery and ICA aneurysms. 4.Most of aneurysmal sac could be identified as enhancing nodule on CT when the real size were over 1 cm. 5.The size of ruptured aneurysm could be predicted in many patients with ACA and MCA aneurysm according to the CT features such as hemorrhagic patterns, location of hematomas or enhancing nodules. 6.Localized hematoma or blood clots and cerebral infarction are considered to be the CT features corresponding to the angiographic vasospasm.

  9. Risk factors and outcome in 100 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonilha Leonardo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Clinical and surgical outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH due to ruptured aneurysm were assessed in comparison to pre-operative data and risk factors such as previous medical history, clinical presenting condition, CT findings and site of bleeding. METHODS: We evaluated 100 consecutive patients with aneurysmal SAH. Gender, color, history of hypertension, smoking habit, site and size of aneurysm, admittance and before surgery Hunt Hess scale, need for cerebro-spinal fluid shunt, presence of complications during the surgical procedure, Glasgow Outcome Scale, presence of vasospasm and of rebleeding were assessed and these data matched to outcome. For statistical analysis, we applied the chi-squared test or Fisher's test using the pondered kappa coeficient. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison of continue variables. Tendency of proportion was analyzed through Cochran-Armitage test. Significance level adopted was 5%. RESULTS: Patients studied were mainly white, female, without previous history of hypertension and non-smokers. Upon hospital admittance, grade 2 of Hunt-Hess scale was most frequently observed (34%, while grade 3 of Fisher scale was the most prevalent. Single aneurysms were most frequent at anterior circulation, between 12 and 24 mm. The most frequent Glasgow Outcome Scale observed was 5 (60%. Hunt Hess upon the moment of surgery and presence of complications during surgical procedure showed positive correlation with clinical outcome (p=0.00002 and p=0.001, respectively. Other variables were not significantly correlated to prognosis. Tendency of proportion was observed between Hunt-Hess scale and Fisher scale. CONCLUSION: Among variables such as epidemiological data, previous medical history and presenting conditions of patients with ruptured aneurysms, the Hunt-Hess scale upon the moment of surgery and the presence of surgical adversities are statistically related to degree of disability.

  10. Surgical results in patients with unruptured asymptomatic cerebral aneurysms. Significance of evaluation of neuropsychological function, magnetic resonance images and cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumon, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Hideaki; Igase, Keiji; Nagato, Shigeyuki; Fukumoto, Shinya; Iwata, Shinji; Ohue, Shiro; Ohnishi, Takanori

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated neuropsychological function, magnetic resonance (MR) images and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with unruptured asymptomatic cerebral aneurysms. Among consecutive operations (n=73) on 70 patients since 2000, direct surgery was performed in 53 operations on 50 patients, and intravascular surgery was performed in 20 operations on 20 patients. Surgical results of direct surgery were studied. Direct surgery was selected mainly for patients with small and anterior circulation aneurysms. MR imaging was conducted 1 week after surgery, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) examination and CBF measurement using 133 Xe-SPECT were done before and 1 month after surgery. Abnormal neurological findings were recognized postoperatively in 26% of surgeries. Among them, visual disturbance was permanent in 4% of surgeries, all of which were surgeries for paraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysms. WAIS-R results deteriorated in 26% of surgeries at 1 month and at least in 5% of surgeries at 1 year after surgery. MR images at 1 week after surgery revealed brain damage in 30% of surgeries and subdural fluid collection in 19% of surgeries. Patients with large brain damage or thick subdural fluid collection frequently showed neurological deficits and/or WAISR deterioration. These complications were recognized frequently in patients with ACoA aneurysms. Resting CBF decreased significantly in the area supplied by the anterior cerebral artery and anterior border zone on the operated side postoperatively. The brain damage and subdural fluid collection were observed frequently and caused neurological deficits and neuropsychological dysfunction, although these were usually transient. It may be necessary to evaluate neuropsychological function, MRI and CBF in patients with unruptured asymptomatic cerebral aneurysms to improve surgical results. (author)

  11. Effect of general anaesthesia on functional outcome in patients with anterior circulation ischaemic stroke having endovascular thrombectomy versus standard care: a meta-analysis of individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce C V; van Zwam, Wim H; Goyal, Mayank; Menon, Bijoy K; Dippel, Diederik W J; Demchuk, Andrew M; Bracard, Serge; White, Philip; Dávalos, Antoni; Majoie, Charles B L M; van der Lugt, Aad; Ford, Gary A; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Kelly, Michael; Bourcier, Romain; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Bang, Oh Young; Nogueira, Raul G; Devlin, Thomas G; van den Berg, Lucie A; Clarençon, Frédéric; Burns, Paul; Carpenter, Jeffrey; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Yavagal, Dileep R; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Ducrocq, Xavier; Dixit, Anand; Quesada, Helena; Epstein, Jonathan; Davis, Stephen M; Jansen, Olav; Rubiera, Marta; Urra, Xabier; Micard, Emilien; Lingsma, Hester F; Naggara, Olivier; Brown, Scott; Guillemin, Francis; Muir, Keith W; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Jovin, Tudor G; Hill, Michael D; Mitchell, Peter J

    2018-01-01

    General anaesthesia (GA) during endovascular thrombectomy has been associated with worse patient outcomes in observational studies compared with patients treated without GA. We assessed functional outcome in ischaemic stroke patients with large vessel anterior circulation occlusion undergoing endovascular thrombectomy under GA, versus thrombectomy not under GA (with or without sedation) versus standard care (ie, no thrombectomy), stratified by the use of GA versus standard care. For this meta-analysis, patient-level data were pooled from all patients included in randomised trials in PuMed published between Jan 1, 2010, and May 31, 2017, that compared endovascular thrombectomy predominantly done with stent retrievers with standard care in anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients (HERMES Collaboration). The primary outcome was functional outcome assessed by ordinal analysis of the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 90 days in the GA and non-GA subgroups of patients treated with endovascular therapy versus those patients treated with standard care, adjusted for baseline prognostic variables. To account for between-trial variance we used mixed-effects modelling with a random effect for trials incorporated in all models. Bias was assessed using the Cochrane method. The meta-analysis was prospectively designed, but not registered. Seven trials were identified by our search; of 1764 patients included in these trials, 871 were allocated to endovascular thrombectomy and 893 were assigned standard care. After exclusion of 74 patients (72 did not undergo the procedure and two had missing data on anaesthetic strategy), 236 (30%) of 797 patients who had endovascular procedures were treated under GA. At baseline, patients receiving GA were younger and had a shorter delay between stroke onset and randomisation but they had similar pre-treatment clinical severity compared with patients who did not have GA. Endovascular thrombectomy improved functional outcome at 3 months both in

  12. 24-Hour Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score Assessment in Post-Stroke Spasticity Development in Patients with a First Documented Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volny, Ondrej; Justanova, Maria; Cimflova, Petra; Kasickova, Linda; Svobodova, Ivana; Muzik, Jan; Bares, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Neuroanatomic substrates responsible for development of post-stroke spasticity are still poorly understood. The study is focused on identification of brain regions within the territory of the middle cerebral artery associated with spasticity development. This is a single-center prospective cohort study of first documented anterior circulation ischemic strokes with a neurologic deficit lasting >7 days (from March 2014 to September 2016, all patients are involved in a registry). Ischemic cerebral lesions within the territory of middle cerebral artery were evaluated using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on control 24-hour computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Spasticity was assessed with modified Ashworth scale. Seventy-six patients (mean age 72 years, 45% females; 30% treated with IV tissue plasminogen activator, 6.5% mechanical thrombectomy) fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. Forty-nine (64%) developed early elbow or wrist flexor spasticity defined as modified Ashworth scale >1 (at day 7-10), in 44 (58%) the spasticity remained present at 6 months. There were no differences between the patients who developed spasticity and those who did not when comparing admission stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 5 [interquartile range {IQR} 4-8] versus 6 [IQR 4-10]) and vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease). Nor was there a difference in 24-hour ASPECTS score (9 [IQR 8-10] versus 9 [IQR 7-10]). No differences were found between the groups with and without the early upper limb flexor spasticity of particular regions (M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, lentiform, insula, caudate, internal capsule) and precentral-postcentral gyrus, premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, posterior limb of internal capsule, and thalamus were compared. We did not find any middle cerebral artery territory associated with post-stroke spasticity development by detailed

  13. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Blignaut

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is estimated at 2.3%. Limited literature is available on intracranial aneurysms in HIV-infected patients.Objectives: To describe the radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in HIV-positive adults.Method: In this retrospective analysis of data, 23 HIV-positive patients, of which 15 (65.2%were female, with a total of 41 aneurysms were included. The mean age was 38 years, and their median CD4 count was 305 x 106/L. Inclusion criteria comprised subarachnoid haemorrhage and confirmed intracranial aneurysms on four-vessel angiography.Results: Fifteen (65.2% patients had a single aneurysm, of which 12 (80.0% had a saccular appearance. Seven (46.7% of the single aneurysms had a neck width larger than 50% of the transverse aneurysm sac size. The mean longitudinal diameter of the aneurysm sac was 4.9 mm and the transverse diameter 4.4 mm. More than half of these aneurysms occurred at the anterior communicating artery. The median CD4 count of single-aneurysm patients was 319 x 106 /L. Eight patients (34.8% had multiple aneurysms, with a total of 26 aneurysms (range 2–6 aneurysms per patient, of which 13 (50.0% had a complex appearance. Twenty-four (92.3% of the multiple aneurysms had a neck width larger than 50% of the transverse aneurysm sac size. The mean longitudinal diameter of the aneurysm sac was 4.0 mm and the transverse diameter 3.9 mm. The multiple aneurysms occurred more commonly in the internal carotid artery. These patients had a median CD4 count of 294 x 106/L.Conclusion: HIV-associated intracranial aneurysms occur at a younger age, appear to be saccular and complex in shape, with a wide neck, and might rupture at small sizes.

  14. Ex vivo repair of renal artery aneurysm associated with surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dušan M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Renal artery aneurysms is relatively uncommon with reported incidence ranges from 0.3% to 1%. However, considering all visceral artery aneurysms the percentage of renal artery aneurysms is relatively high between 15-25%. The distal forms of renal artery aneurysms sometimes require "ex vivo" reconstruction and kidney autotransplantation. CASE REPORT A 75-year-old male presented with the right abdominal and back pain. He suffered from a long history of arterial hypertension and chronic renal failure over the last few months (urea blood = 19.8 mmol/l; creatinine = 198 mmol/l. Duplex ultrasonography showed abdominal aortic aneurysm. Subsequent translumbarangiography revealed juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with distal right renal artery aneurysm. The operation was performed under combined thoracic epidural analgesia and general anesthesia using transperitoneal approach. After the laparotomy, the ascending colon was mobilized and reflected medially followed by Kocher maneuver. The result was visualization of the anterior aspect of the right kidney, the collecting system, ureter as well as the right renal vein and artery with large saccular aneurysm located distally. After mobilization of the renal vessels and careful dissection of the ureter, the kidney was explanted. The operation was continued by two surgical teams. The first team performed abdominal aortic aneurysm resection and reconstruction with bifurcated Dacron graft. The second team performed ex vivo reparation of renal artery aneurysm. All time during the explantation, the kidney was perfused by Collins' solution. The saccular right renal artery aneurysm 4 cm in diameter was located at the kidney hilus at the first bifurcation. Three branches originated from the aneurysm. The aneurysm was resected completely. The longest and widest of three branches arising from the aneurysmal sac was end-to-end anastomized with 6 mm PTFE graft. After this intervention, one of

  15. Direct detection of incidental asymptomatic aneurysm by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asari, S.; Sakurai, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Suzuki, K. (Matsuyama Shimin Hospital, Ehime (Japan)); Sadamoto, K.

    1981-02-01

    Incidental asymptomatic aneurysms were found in 9 of 52 patients with intracranial aneurysms from February, 1978 to March, 1980. They had only mild initial symptoms, namely, headache, dysarthria, aphasis, light hemiparesis and others. No patients had severe neurological deficits. In eight of 9 patients with asymptomatic aneurysm, except one case of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma, 9 aneurysms (8 patients) were directly detected by high resolution CT (GE CT/T 8800) and confirmed by angiography. Location of these aneurysms as follows: three at the middle cerebral artery trifurcation, two at the internal carotisposterior communicans junction, one at anterior communication artery, one at the basilar top, one at the basilaris artery-superior cerebelli artery junction and one at the posterior cerebral artery. The smallest aneurysm detected by CT as 5 x 4 x 4 mm in size on angiography. The aneurysm may be suggested by small round or oval defect in the Sylvian fissure or suprasellar cistern, defect of the edge of the so called ''pentagon'' in the plain CT and then if its density is highly and homogeneously increased after contrast-enhanced (CE) scan. As the circle of Willis and other major cerebral arteries can often be demonstrated on CE.CT images, the aneurysm is frequently seen on these cerebral arteries. Limiting factors to direct CT detection of intracranial aneurysms are seemed to be size and location of aneurysm, anatomic location of circle of Willis and motion of patients etc. It may be considered, in our experiences, that the CT is useful in diagnosis of asymptomatic aneurysm and the higher direct CT detection rate to aneurysms, small or medium sized as well as giant aneurysms, will be obtained by devising scanning method, namely, multiprojection scans, multiple overlapping method and improvement of enhanced method.

  16. Endovascular management for intracranial ruptured aneurysms in elderly patients: outcome and technical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mont'alverne, F.; Musacchio, M.; Tolentino, V.; Riquelme, C.; Tournade, A.

    2005-01-01

    The definition of an elderly person is debateable; however, age is a recognised negative prognostic factor for outcome after subarachnoid haemmorrhage, and the age cut-off of 60 years is accepted to define a high risk population. The goal of this article is to access the outcome in this precise population of patients that underwent endovascular treatment (EVT) after aneurysm rupture. Forty-two patients (mean age = 70.24) had 40 aneurysms located at the anterior circulation and nine at the posterior circulation. Thirty-seven (87.9%) patients had Fisher III or IV. Forty-six (93.8%) aneurysms were smaller than 15 mm. Twenty-eight (66.7%) patients were in good neurological state on admission (Hunt and Hess I-III) and 14 (33.3%) in poor state. Satisfactory occlusion rate (total occlusion or neck flow) was achieved in 75% of patients. Follow-up was available in 19 (43.18%) out of the 44 aneurysms treated. Aneurysm recanalization was disclosed in three cases. Satisfactory outcome was achieved on: 60.7% of good grades, 21.4% of poor grades, 43.7% of patients with and 57.6% of patents without comorbidites. Fisher grade (P=0.0346), comorbidities (P=0.525) and risk factors (P=0.515) were not associated with clinical outcome. No age cut-off (65,70 and 75) for favourable outcome could be established, P-values were 0.723, 0.741 and 0.738, respectively. Advancing of age was not associated with an increase number of unfavourable outcome (P=0.125). Poor neurological status on admission was the only variable associated with unfavourable outcome (P=0.02). Mortality and morbidity rate related to the procedure were 4.8% and 9.5% respectively. Age should not be taken alone for precluding treatment in ruptured aneurysms, EVT can be considered as a first therapeutic option for elderly persons, since an overall favourable outcome could be achieved in most cases, mainly in non-comatose patients. (orig.)

  17. Acetazolamide-augmented dynamic BOLD (aczBOLD imaging for assessing cerebrovascular reactivity in chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation: An initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR in chronic steno-occlusive disease using a novel approach that couples BOLD imaging with acetazolamide (ACZ vasoreactivity (aczBOLD, to evaluate dynamic effects of ACZ on BOLD and to establish the relationship between aczBOLD and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC perfusion MRI. Eighteen patients with unilateral chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation underwent a 20-min aczBOLD imaging protocol, with ACZ infusion starting at 5 min of scan initiation. AczBOLD reactivity was calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis to generate CVR maps for subsequent quantitative analyses. Reduced CVR was observed in the diseased vs. the normal hemisphere both by qualitative and quantitative assessment (gray matter (GM: 4.13% ± 1.16% vs. 4.90% ± 0.98%, P = 0.002; white matter (WM: 2.83% ± 1.23% vs. 3.50% ± 0.94%, P = 0.005. In all cases BOLD signal began increasing immediately following ACZ infusion, approaching a plateau at ~8.5 min after infusion, with the tissue volume of reduced augmentation increasing progressively with time, peaking at 2.60 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 0–4.43 min for the GM and 1.80 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 1.40–3.53 min for the WM. In the diseased hemisphere, aczBOLD CVR significantly correlated with baseline DSC time-to-maximum of the residue function (Tmax (P = 0.008 for the WM and normalized cerebral blood flow (P = 0.003 for the GM, and P = 0.001 for the WM. AczBOLD provides a novel, safe, easily implementable approach to CVR measurement in the routine clinical environments. Further studies can establish quantitative thresholds from aczBOLD towards identification of patients at heightened risk of recurrent ischemia and cognitive decline.

  18. Acetazolamide-augmented dynamic BOLD (aczBOLD) imaging for assessing cerebrovascular reactivity in chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation: An initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjie; Dehkharghani, Seena; Nahab, Fadi; Qiu, Deqiang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in chronic steno-occlusive disease using a novel approach that couples BOLD imaging with acetazolamide (ACZ) vasoreactivity (aczBOLD), to evaluate dynamic effects of ACZ on BOLD and to establish the relationship between aczBOLD and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI. Eighteen patients with unilateral chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation underwent a 20-min aczBOLD imaging protocol, with ACZ infusion starting at 5 min of scan initiation. AczBOLD reactivity was calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis to generate CVR maps for subsequent quantitative analyses. Reduced CVR was observed in the diseased vs. the normal hemisphere both by qualitative and quantitative assessment (gray matter (GM): 4.13% ± 1.16% vs. 4.90% ± 0.98%, P  = 0.002; white matter (WM): 2.83% ± 1.23% vs. 3.50% ± 0.94%, P  = 0.005). In all cases BOLD signal began increasing immediately following ACZ infusion, approaching a plateau at ~ 8.5 min after infusion, with the tissue volume of reduced augmentation increasing progressively with time, peaking at 2.60 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 0-4.43 min) for the GM and 1.80 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 1.40-3.53 min) for the WM. In the diseased hemisphere, aczBOLD CVR significantly correlated with baseline DSC time-to-maximum of the residue function (T max ) ( P  = 0.008 for the WM) and normalized cerebral blood flow ( P  = 0.003 for the GM, and P  = 0.001 for the WM). AczBOLD provides a novel, safe, easily implementable approach to CVR measurement in the routine clinical environments. Further studies can establish quantitative thresholds from aczBOLD towards identification of patients at heightened risk of recurrent ischemia and cognitive decline.

  19. CT and angiography evaluation in ruptured intracranial aneurysm clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Sik; Kim, Byung Young; Kim, Hong; Woo, Seong Ku; Zeon, Seok Kil; Park, Sam Kyoon [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-09-15

    CT has been become one of the most important diagnostic method in the evaluation of ruptured intracranial aneurysm with direct detection of subarachnoid, intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage, and identification of complications such as recurrent bleeding, hydrocephalus and infarction secondary to arterial spam. Angiography gives precise information on the location, size of aneurysm and presence of arterial spasm. Authors attempted to predict the location of ruptured aneurysm in the CT by distribution of blood in subarachnoid spaces and brain parenchyme in comparison with angiographic findings, and also predict the prognosis of the patients by relationship between the extent of blood and clinical grade. Authors analysed 40 cases of ruptured intracranial aneurysm confirmed by CT and angiography at Keimyung University Hospital for last 2 year. The results were as follows: 1. The age and sex distribution; the most prevalent age group was 5th to 6th decades (70%), and female patient was slightly more than male patient (57.5% : 42.5%). 2. The location of aneurysms were; posterior communicating artery group 17 cases (42.2%), middle cerebral artery group 10 cases (25.0%), anterior communicating artery group 7 cases (17.5%), basilar artery bifurcation 1 case (2.5%), posterior inferior cerebellar artery 1 cases (2.5%), and multiple aneurysms 4 cases (10%) in order to frequency. 3. Characteristic distribution of intracranial hemorrhage in CT were as follows; 1) In 6 cases (85.7%) of anterior communicating artery aneurysm, interhemispheric fissure hemorrhage was noted. 2) The ipsilateral sylvian fissure hemorrhage was noted in all cases of middle cerebral artery aneurysm (10 cases) and 12 cases (70.6%) of posterior communicating artery aneurysm. 3) Localized hematoma in frontal lobe near interhemispheric fissure (2 cases; 28.6%), septum pellucidum (1 case; 14.3%) and corpus callosm (1 case; 14.3%) were characteristic in anterior communicating artery aneurysm. 4) Comma

  20. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Blignaut

    2014-04-01

    Objectives: To describe the radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in HIV-positive adults. Method: In this retrospective analysis of data, 23 HIV-positive patients, of which 15 (65.2%were female, with a total of 41 aneurysms were included. The mean age was 38 years, and their median CD4 count was 305 x 106/L. Inclusion criteria comprised subarachnoid haemorrhage and confirmed intracranial aneurysms on four-vessel angiography. Results: Fifteen (65.2% patients had a single aneurysm, of which 12 (80.0% had a saccular appearance. Seven (46.7% of the single aneurysms had a neck width larger than 50% of the transverse aneurysm sac size. The mean longitudinal diameter of the aneurysm sac was 4.9 mm and the transverse diameter 4.4 mm. More than half of these aneurysms occurred at the anterior communicating artery. The median CD4 count of single-aneurysm patients was 319 x 106 /L. Eight patients (34.8% had multiple aneurysms, with a total of 26 aneurysms (range 2–6 aneurysms per patient, of which 13 (50.0% had a complex appearance. Twenty-four (92.3% of the multiple aneurysms had a neck width larger than 50% of the transverse aneurysm sac size. The mean longitudinal diameter of the aneurysm sac was 4.0 mm and the transverse diameter 3.9 mm. The multiple aneurysms occurred more commonly in the internal carotid artery. These patients had a median CD4 count of 294 x 106/L. Conclusion: HIV-associated intracranial aneurysms occur at a younger age, appear to be saccular and complex in shape, with a wide neck, and might rupture at small sizes.

  1. Relationship between the morphology of A-1 segment of anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... Department of Neurosurgery, Nanfang Hospital, 1838 Guang zhou Dadao Road, Guangzhou 510515, China. Abstract: Background: The anterior communicating artery (ACoA) is one of the most frequent sites for cerebral aneurysm. The peculiar directions of projection of aneurysms offer great challenges to ...

  2. Diagnosis of ruptured intracranial aneurysm in acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Masataka; Nakagawa, Toshifumi

    1980-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage at an acute stage within one day from the onset to the first CT scan was classified into subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm, subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin and subarachnoid hemorrhage of which angiography could not be carried out, and the first CT findings, the severity, and the prognosis of these subarachnoid hemorrhage were compared and discussed. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm showed various changes according to progress in the severity with time, and intracranial hematoma, intraventricular clots and ventricular dilatation increased according to progress in the severity. Ruptured intracranial aneurysm in middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery could be found easily by CT, but that in internal carotid artery and vertabral basilar artery was difficult to be detected by CT. When cerebral angiography was carried out repeatedly for ruptured intracranial aneurysm of unknown origin, the time of performance must be consifered with attention to angiospasms or hematoma. (Tsunoda, M.)

  3. Safety, efficacy, and cost of surgery for patients with unruptured aneurysms deemed unsuitable for endovascular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifel, Christian; Sacho, Raphael Hillel; Tymianski, Rachel; Radovanovic, Ivan; Tymianski, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Open surgery is a frequent option given to patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) unsuitable for endovascular repair. Since the risk of rupture of UIAs is generally low, we determined whether the risks and costs of surgery in this patient subset are warranted. The safety, efficacy, and costs of minimally invasive surgery by minicraniotomy were evaluated in 102 consecutive patients with anterior circulation UIAs deemed unsuitable for endovascular repair by an interdisciplinary conference of surgeons and neurointerventionalists. Data from 107 UIA patients treated by endovascular means in the same period were used as the standard. Surgical patients comprised a different subset of aneurysms, with more MCA and fewer paraophthalmic aneurysms (54 vs. 6, p < 0.0001 and 4 vs. 60, p < 0.0001, for minicraniotomy and endovascular, respectively). However, surgery incurred shorter anesthesia time (197.7 vs. 149.3 min, p < 0.0001), higher rates of complete aneurysm obliteration (94.57 vs. 66.67 %, p < 0.0001), and lower overall hospital costs ($8,287 CAD vs. $17,732 CAD, p < 0.0001) than the endovascular cohort. There were no treatment-related surgical deaths, but one patient had an mRS of 3 after 6 months due to temporal lobe epilepsy and memory problems. This compared favorably with the endovascular cohort in which two patients died due to treatment (mRS = 6) and one suffered a severe stroke (mRS = 5 at 6 months). For patients counseled to undergo treatment but have UIAs unsuitable for endovascular repair, surgery is safe, effective, and cost-efficient.

  4. Quantifying unruptured giant intracranial aneurysms by measuring diameter and volume--a comparative analysis of 69 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Julius; Maldaner, Nicolai; Bijlenga, Philippe; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Graewe, Alexander; Guhl, Susanne; Nakamura, Makoto; Hohaus, Christian; Kursumovic, Adisa; Schmidt, Nils Ole; Schebesch, Karl-Michael; Wostrack, Maria; Vajkoczy, Peter; Mielke, Dorothee

    2015-03-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IA) are usually quantified according to their largest diameter. However, volumetry has recently been increasingly conducted as well, especially in giant intracranial aneurysms (GIAs). Since so far the true value of GIA volumetry is unknown, we designed a trial to examine correlations between GIA diameter and volume with special focus on clinical implications. Magnetic resonance imaging of 69 unruptured GIAs in 66 patients was retrospectively evaluated. The largest diameter and volume were measured. Also, potential associations to the patients' clinical conditions were examined. Comparing GIA sizes of our patient cohort produced different results depending on whether GIA diameter or volume was measured. Measuring the diameter identified posterior circulation GIAs as the largest ones (39.2 mm, IQR 37.3-48.3), while measuring the volume found GIAs of the MCA to be the largest ones (12.3 cm(3), IQR 7.2-27.8). A correlation of GIA diameter and volume was only found in anterior circulation GIAs, which were predominantly saccular in shape, but not in those of the posterior circulation, of which most were fusiform. Neither GIA diameter nor GIA volume but only GIA location was associated with neurological deficits. Diameter and volume measurements are not interchangeable modes of GIA quantification. Our data suggest that the idea of distinguishing different sizes of GIA may be clinically less relevant than examining their location, shape or mass effect.

  5. Brain Aneurysm Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We realized … Continue Reading View More Research From the Blog Depression Following Aneurysm November 11, 2017 05/29/15 Depression Following a Brain Aneurysm by Stanley J. Berman, PhD Some patients will experience depression following a brain aneurysm. This is certainly ...

  6. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, D

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm results in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a subtype of stroke with an incidence of 9 per 100,000 person-years and a case-fatality around 35%. In order to prevent SAH, patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms can be treated by neurosurgical or

  7. Case report: rupture of popliteal artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altino Ono Moraes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An 83-year-old female patient with a history of prior endovascular treatment to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm presented with intense pain and edema in the left leg, with hyperemia and localized temperature increase. Doppler ultrasonography revealed a voluminous aneurysm of the popliteal artery with a contained rupture, and hematoma involving the popliteal fossa and the medial and anterior surfaces of the knee causing compression of the popliteal vein. Endovascular repair was accomplished with covered stents and the rupture was confirmed. during the procedure The aneurysm was excluded and the signs and symptoms it had caused resolved completely, but during the postoperative period the patient developed sepsis of pulmonary origin and died.

  8. Extended Follow-Up of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms Detected by Presymptomatic Screening in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazabal, Maria V.; Huston, John; Kubly, Vickie; Rossetti, Sandro; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Hogan, Marie C.; Harris, Peter C.; Brown, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients have an increased risk for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). The importance of screening for unruptured IAs (UIAs) depends on their risks for growth and rupture. Design, setting, participants, & measurements ADPKD patients with UIAs found by presymptomatic screening with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) during 1989 to 2009 were followed initially at 6 months and annually, and less frequently after demonstration of stability. Results Forty-five saccular aneurysms were detected in 38 patients from 36 families. Most were small (median diameter 3.5 mm) and in the anterior circulation (84%). Median age at diagnosis was 49 years. During cumulative imaging follow-up of 243 years, one de novo UIA was detected and increased in size from 2 to 4.4 mm over 144 months and two UIAs grew from 4.5 to 5.9 mm and 4.7 to 6.2 mm after 69 and 184 months, respectively. Seven patients did not have imaging follow-up. No change was detected in the remaining 28 patients. During cumulative clinical follow-up of 316 years, no aneurysm ruptured. Five patients died from unrelated causes and two were lost to follow-up after 8 and 120 months. Three patients underwent surgical clipping. Conclusions Most UIAs detected by presymptomatic screening in ADPKD patients are small and in the anterior circulation. Growth and rupture risks are not higher than those of UIAs in the general population. These data support very selective screening for UIAs in ADPKD patients, and widespread screening is not indicated. PMID:21551026

  9. Microsurgery for Aneurysms on the Circle of Willis | de Klerk | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A description of a microsurgical approach for aneurysms on the anterior part of the circle of Willis is given. Certain practical points are stressed. The operative results obtained in 37 consecutive aneurysms operated on in 30 patients are discussed. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 825 (1974).

  10. Surgical treatment of multiple intracranial aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Martelli

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study was conducted on 42 patients with multiple aneurysms surgically treated from 1975 to 1986. Thirty one of them had 2 aneurysms 6 had 3, 3 had 4 and 2 had 5 (62 in the internal carotid, 27 in the middle cerebral artery, 11 in the anterior cerebral and 3 in the basilar artery. All patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage and were classified as follows upon admission: 11, grade I; 12, grade II; 15, grade III, and 4, grade IV, and most of them improved before surgery (29, grade I, 7, grade II, and 6, grade III. In most cases, surgery was delayed and the 42 patients needed 57 craniotomies for clipping the aneurysms. Of the 24 patients with bilateral aneurysms, 15 were operated on both sides (11 are asymptomatic, 1 has hemiparesis, and 3 died later. Of the 9 patients submitted to unilateral craniotomy, 4 died and 5 are alive and well. Of the 18 patients with unilateral aneurysms, 11 are asymptomatic, 2 have hemiparesis, 1 has diplegia and behavioral disorders, and 4 died. Overall mortality was 26.1%, intraoperative mortality was 11.9%, and no mortality occurred among the patients operated over the last 5 years. The management of the these patients is discussed.

  11. Endovascular Treatment of AICA Flow Dependent Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, M.; El Serwi, A.; Alaa Habib, M.; Abou Gamrah, S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Peripheral anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all cerebral aneurysms. To our knowledge 34 flow-related cases including the present study have been reported in the literature. Three patients harbouring four flow dependent aneurysms were referred to our institution. Two patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage, one presented with cerebellar manifestations. They were all treated by endovascular embolization of the aneurysm as well as the parent artery using liquid embolic material. Two cases were embolized using NBCA, Onyx was used in the third case. No bleeding or rebleeding were encountered during the follow-up period which ranged from five to nine months. One patient developed facial palsy, cerebellar symptoms and sensorineural hearing loss. The remaining two cases did not develop any post treatment neurological complications. Endovascular management of flow-dependent AICA aneurysms by parent artery occlusion is feasible and efficient in terms of rebleeding prevention. Post embolization neurological complications are unpredictable. This depends upon the adequacy of collaterals from other cerebellar arteries. PMID:23217640

  12. Twin Middle Cerebral Artery with Aneurysm: A Variant of Early Bifurcation or a Discrete Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sushant; Singh, Sunil; Parihar, Anit

    2017-08-01

    The middle cerebral artery (MCA) usually bifurcates into a superior or frontal and inferior or temporal branch. However, it may have various branching pattern, and there may be additional arteries from the anterior circulation supplying its territory. The majority of them remain asymptomatic. Some cases may have aneurismal dilatation due to turbulent blood flow or the weak arterial wall. The surgical approach in these cases may be challenging due to complex anatomical pattern of MCA. In this report, we have described a distinct pattern of left MCA with an aneurysm which was not clear in computed tomography angiogram and further confirmed on digital subtraction angiography. The different anatomical patterns of MCA and their surgical implications have also been discussed.

  13. Twin middle cerebral artery with aneurysm: A variant of early bifurcation or a discrete entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant Sahoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The middle cerebral artery (MCA usually bifurcates into a superior or frontal and inferior or temporal branch. However, it may have various branching pattern, and there may be additional arteries from the anterior circulation supplying its territory. The majority of them remain asymptomatic. Some cases may have aneurismal dilatation due to turbulent blood flow or the weak arterial wall. The surgical approach in these cases may be challenging due to complex anatomical pattern of MCA. In this report, we have described a distinct pattern of left MCA with an aneurysm which was not clear in computed tomography angiogram and further confirmed on digital subtraction angiography. The different anatomical patterns of MCA and their surgical implications have also been discussed.

  14. Treatment of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms and Cognitive Performance: Preliminary Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bründl, Elisabeth; Böhm, Christina; Lürding, Ralf; Schödel, Petra; Bele, Sylvia; Hochreiter, Andreas; Scheitzach, Judith; Zeman, Florian; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Few studies have addressed the effect of treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) on cognitive function. Neuropsychological assessment after UIA treatment is underreported, and prospective trials have repeatedly been demanded. In 2014, we conducted a prospective controlled study to evaluate the differences in cognitive processing caused by the treatment of anterior circulation UIAs. Thirty patients were enrolled until September 2015. Ten patients received endovascular aneurysm occlusion (EV), 10 patients were treated microsurgically (MS), and 10 patients with surgically treated degenerative lumbar spine disease (LD) served as control. All patients underwent extended standardized neuropsychological assessment before (t 1 ) and 6 weeks after treatment (t 2 ). Tests included verbal, visual, and visuospatial memory, psychomotor functioning, executive functioning, and its subdomains verbal fluency and cognitive flexibility. We statistically evaluated intragroup and intergroup changes. Intragroup comparisons and group-rate analysis showed no significant impairment in overall neuropsychological performance, either postinterventionally or postoperatively. However, the postoperative performance in cognitive processing speed, cognitive flexibility, and executive functioning was significantly worse in the MS group than in the EV (P = 0.038) and LD group (P = 0.02). Compared with the EV group, patients with MS showed significant postoperative impairment in a subtest for auditory-verbal memory (Wechsler Memory Scale, Fourth Edition, Logical Memory II; MS vs. EV P = 0.011). The MS group trended toward posttreatment impairment in subtests for verbal fluency and semantic memory (Regensburg Word Fluency Test; MS vs. EV P = 0.083) and in auditory-verbal memory (Wechsler Memory Scale, Fourth Edition, Logical Memory II; MS vs. LD P = 0.06). Our preliminary data showed no effect of anterior circulation UIA treatment on overall neuropsychological function but impaired

  15. Superdominant Right Coronary Artery with Absence of Left Circumflex and Anomalous Origin of the Left Anterior Descending Coronary from the Right Sinus: An Unheard Coronary Anomaly Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Danillo Peixoto Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery anomalies are congenital changes in their origin, course, and/or structure. Most of them are discovered as incidental findings during coronary angiographic studies or at autopsies. We present herein the case of a 70-year-old man with symptomatic severe aortic valvar stenosis whose preoperative coronary angiogram revealed a so far unreported coronary anomaly circulation pattern.

  16. Fusiform aneurysm on the basilar artery trunk treated with intra-aneurysmal embolization with parent vessel occlusion after complete preoperative occlusion test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Jin; Kim, Min-Soo; Choi, Byung-Yon; Chang, Chul-Hoon

    2013-04-01

    Fusiform aneurysms on the basilar artery (BA) trunk are rare. The microsurgical management of these aneurysms is difficult because of their deep location, dense collection of vital cranial nerves, and perforating arteries to the brain stem. Endovascular treatment is relatively easier and safer compared with microsurgical treatment. Selective occlusion of the aneurysmal sac with preservation of the parent artery is the endovascular treatment of choice. But, some cases, particularly giant or fusiform aneurysms, are unsuitable for selective sac occlusion. Therefore, endovascular coiling of the aneurysm with parent vessel occlusion is an alternative treatment option. In this situation, it is important to determine whether a patient can tolerate parent vessel occlusion without developing neurological deficits. We report a rare case of fusiform aneurysms in the BA trunk. An 18-year-old female suffered a headache for 2 weeks. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance image revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the lower basilar artery trunk. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a 7.1×11.0 mm-sized fusiform aneurysm located between vertebrovasilar junction and the anterior inferior cerebellar arteries. We had good clinical result using endovascular coiling of unruptured fusiform aneurysm on the lower BA trunk with parent vessel occlusion after confirming the tolerance of the patient by balloon test occlusion with induced hypotension and accompanied by neurophysiologic monitoring, transcranial Doppler and single photon emission computed tomography. In this study, we discuss the importance of preoperative meticulous studies for avoidance of delayed neurological deficit in the patient with fusiform aneurysm on lower basilar trunk.

  17. Hepatic artery aneurysms (HAAs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosratini, H.

    2004-01-01

    The hepatic artery aneurysms are rare, especially in interahepatic branches, The frequency consists of 75-80% extrahepatic and 20-25% intrahepatic. Catheterization is achieved usually from common femoral artery, other methods implemented in the case of unsuccessful catheterization from femoral artery, are translumbar and brachial catheterization. The study consist of 565 patients that were referred to the angiography ward, During seven years of assessment, five cases of hepatic artery aneurysm were found; this is a rare condition reported in the English literature. In the literature as well as in this case report the hepatic artery aneurysms are rare. In reported series the extrahepatic artery aneurysms are found more often than in the intrahepatic artery aneurysm but in this case report intrahepatic artery aneurysms are more than extrahepatic one. (author)

  18. Endovascular treatment of unruptured aneurysms of cavernous and ophthalmic segment of internal carotid artery with flow diverter device Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevsek Marko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intra-arterial treatment of aneurysms by redirecting blood flow is a newer method. The redirection is based on a significantly more densely braided wire stent. The stent wall keeps the blood in the lumen of the stent and slows down the turbulent flow in the aneurysms. Stagnation of blood in the aneurysm sac leads to the formation of thrombus and subsequent exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation. The aim of the study was to evaluate flow diverter device Pipeline for broad neck and giant aneurysm treatment.

  19. Low plasma arginine:asymmetric dimethyl arginine ratios predict mortality after intracranial aneurysm rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsø, Jonatan Myrup; Bergström, Anita; Edsen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases, predicts mortality in cardiovascular disease and has been linked to cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this prospective study, we assessed whether circulating ADMA, arginine...

  20. Sex-related differences in patients treated surgically for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Sex-related differences were examined in the clinical course of patients treated surgically for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Retrospective analyses were carried out to evaluate sex-related differences in aneurysm location, aneurysm size, preoperative neurological condition, preoperative computed tomography findings, and outcome among 2577 patients who underwent surgical repair of ruptured aneurysms. The internal carotid artery was most frequently affected in women and the anterior cerebral artery in men. Intracerebral or intraventricular hematoma was more common in men than in women. Some differences may be related to the location of the aneurysm. Sex-related differences were prominent in the 5th decade of life. These findings might be related to the menopause. Sex hormones may be involved in aneurysm formation. (author)

  1. Onyx combined with coiling embolization for endovascular treatment of complex intracranial ruptured aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yongfa; Huang Qinghai; Yang Pengfei; Zhang Lei; Li Qiang; Liu Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapeutic effect of Onyx combined with stent-assisted coiling in embolizing complex intracranial ruptured aneurysms. Methods: Onyx combined with stent-assisted coiling embolization was conducted in two patients with complex intracranial ruptured aneurysms. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The related literature concerning intracranial complex aneurysm treated with Onyx was reviewed. Results: Two intracranial complex aneurysms were embolized with Onyx together with coils. The lesions were located at internal carotid arterial bifurcation (n=1) and at the anterior wall of internal carotid artery (n=1). Complete embolization of the aneurysms was achieved immediately after the procedure while the parent arteries remained patent. Conclusion: For the treatment of complex intracranial ruptured aneurysms Onyx combined with coiling embolization is safe, effective and feasible. This technique can improve the degree of embolization. To make the evaluation of the long-term efficacy further study is needed. (authors)

  2. Stent-assisted coiling of wide-necked aneurysms in the setting of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage: experience in 65 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, Peter S; Dalyai, Richard T; Kung, David; Toporowski, Amy; Chandela, Sid; Hasan, David; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Dumont, Aaron S; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Jabbour, Pascal M

    2012-06-01

    Stent-assisted coiling in the setting of subarachnoid hemorrhage remains controversial. Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding the utility of this procedure and the risks of hemorrhagic and ischemic complications. To assess the utility of stent-assisted coil embolization and pretreatment with antiplatelet agents in the management of ruptured wide-necked aneurysms. A retrospective study of 65 patients with ruptured wide-necked aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coiling. Patients with hydrocephalus or a Hunt and Hess grade ≥ III received a ventriculostomy before endovascular intervention. Patients were treated intraoperatively with 600 mg of clopidogrel and maintained on daily doses of 75 mg of clopidogrel and 81 mg of aspirin. The Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score was recorded at the time of discharge. We identified major bleeding complications secondary to antiplatelet therapy and cases of in-stent thrombosis that required periprocedural thrombolysis. Of the aneurysms, 66.2% arose within the anterior circulation; 69.2% of patients presented with hydrocephalus or a Hunt and Hess grade ≥ III and required a ventriculostomy. A good outcome (GOS of 4 or 5) was achieved in 63.1% of patients, and the overall mortality rate was 16.9%. There were 10 (15.38%) major complications associated with bleeding secondary to antiplatelet therapy (5 patients, 7.7%) or intraoperative in-stent thrombosis (5 patients, 7.7%). Three (4.6%) patients had a fatal hemorrhage. Our findings suggest that stent-assisted coiling and routine treatment with antiplatelet agents is a viable option in the management of ruptured wide-necked aneurysms.

  3. Atherosclerotic femoral artery aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Schroeder, T V

    1996-01-01

    Based on a clinical suspicion of an increase in the proportion of deep femoral aneurysms, we reviewed the case records of patients who underwent reconstructive procedures for femoral aneurysms to investigate if this could be confirmed and explained by selection of patient or modality of diagnosis...

  4. Superior cerebellar artery aneurysms: incidence, clinical presentation and midterm outcome of endovascular treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peluso, Jo P.P.; Rooij, Willem Jan van; Sluzewski, Menno [St. Elisabeth Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Beute, Guus N. [St. Elisabeth Ziekenhuis, Department of Neurosurgery, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence, clinical presentation and midterm clinical and imaging outcome of endovascular treatment of 34 superior cerebellar artery (SCA) aneurysms in 33 patients. Between January 1995 and January 2007, 2,112 aneurysms were treated in our institution, and 36 aneurysms in 35 patients were located on the SCA (incidence 1.7%). Two of three distal SCA aneurysms were excluded. All the remaining 34 SCA aneurysms, of which 22 (65%) were ruptured and 12 (35%) were unruptured, in 33 patients were treated by endovascular techniques. There were 6 men and 27 women ranging from 29-72 years. In 14 patients (42%) multiple aneurysms were present. Initial angiographic occlusion was (near) complete in 32 aneurysms (94%) and incomplete in 2 aneurysms (6%). Complications leading to permanent morbidity or death occurred in two patients (6.1%, 95% CI 0.6 to 20.60%). Outcome at 6 months follow-up in 31 surviving patients was GOS5 in 26 (84%), GOS4 in 4 (13%) and GOS3 in 1 patient (3%). There were no episodes of (re)bleeding during 118 patient-years of follow-up. The 6-month angiographic follow up in 28 SCA aneurysms and extended angiographic follow-up in 19 showed stable occlusion in 27 aneurysms. No additional treatments were performed. SCA aneurysms are rare with an incidence of 1.7% of treated aneurysms at our institution. They are frequently associated with other aneurysms. Endovascular treatment is effective and safe in excluding the aneurysms from the circulation. (orig.)

  5. Acquired Jugular Vein Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopsu, Erkki; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Vento, Seija I.; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Venous malformations of the jugular veins are rare findings. Aneurysms and phlebectasias are the lesions most often reported. We report on an adult patient with an abruptly appearing large tumorous mass on the left side of the neck identified as a jugular vein aneurysm. Upon clinical examination with ultrasound, a lateral neck cyst was primarily suspected. Surgery revealed a saccular aneurysm in intimate connection with the internal jugular vein. Histology showed an organized hematoma inside the aneurysmal sac, which had a focally thinned muscular layer. The terminology and the treatment guidelines of venous dilatation lesions are discussed. For phlebectasias, conservative treatment is usually recommended, whereas for saccular aneurysms, surgical resection is the treatment of choice. While an exact classification based on etiology and pathophysiology is not possible, a more uniform taxonomy would clarify the guidelines for different therapeutic modalities for venous dilatation lesions. PMID:20107571

  6. [Wegener granulomatosis and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an insignificant association?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnet, D; Ginguené, C; Marcos, A; Cahen, R; Mac Gregor, B; Turjman, F; Vallée, B

    2010-08-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is an uncommon systemic necrotizing vasculitis that demonstrates renal and respiratory tropism. While the pathogenesis of WG remains controversial, autoimmune and inflammatory mechanisms are likely to be involved. The nervous system could be affected in up to 54% of cases. Although central nervous system involvement has been reported in 7-11% of cases, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurrence is exceptional. We describe the third reported case of WG-related aneurysmal SAH and then discuss the diagnosis and pathogenesis of WG along with the physiopathology of intracranial aneurysm in light of recent data reported in the literature. A 63-year-old woman with WG was referred to our neurosurgical department for aneurysmal SAH. The vasculitis diagnosis had been established 4 years earlier when she presented with chronic sinusitis, recurrent cystitis, and renal failure. The cerebral angiography revealed an anterior communicating artery dysplastic aneurysm. The neurosurgical management of the aneurysm was scheduled but delayed because the patient was experiencing a vasculitis flare-up. Immunosuppressive therapy and intravenous corticotherapy were given, with the patient's improvement, allowing neurosurgical clipping of the aneurysm. Wegener granulomatosis-related aneurysmal SAH is an exceptional condition in neurovascular pathology. As inflammatory mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of aneurysm, the vasculitis flare-up could account for this SAH. The management of WG could benefit from anti-inflammatory therapy, as could the vasculitis-related SAH. SAH occurrence in patients with systemic vasculitis could indicate a vasculitis flare-up. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical, radiological, and flow-related risk factors for growth of untreated, unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, A Stijntje E; Tiel Groenestege, Andreas T; terBrugge, Karel G; Agid, Ronit; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Wermer, Marieke J H

    2015-01-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms are frequently followed to monitor aneurysm growth. We studied the yield of follow-up imaging and analyzed risk factors for aneurysm growth. We included patients with untreated, unruptured intracranial aneurysms and ≥6 months of follow-up imaging from 2 large prospectively collected databases. We assessed the proportion of patients with aneurysm growth and performed univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses to calculate hazard ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for clinical and radiological risk factors for aneurysm growth. We repeated these analyses for the subset of small ( neck ratio; 2.1 (95% CI, 0.9-4.9) for location in the posterior circulation; and 2.0 (95% CI, 0.8-4.8) for multilobarity. In the subset of aneurysms <7 mm, 37 of 403 (9%) enlarged. In multivariable analysis, hazard ratios for aneurysm growth were 1.1 (95% CI, 0.8-1.5) per each additional mm of initial aneurysm size, 2.2 (95% CI, 1.0-4.8) for smoking, 2.9 (95% CI, 1.0-8.5) for multilobarity, 2.4 (95% CI, 1.0-5.8) for dome/neck ratio, and 2.0 (95% CI, 0.6-7.0) for location in the posterior circulation. Initial aneurysm size, dome/neck ratio, and multilobarity are risk factors for aneurysm growth. Cessation of smoking is pivotal because smoking is a modifiable risk factor for growth of small aneurysms. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Intracranial aneurysms: optimized diagnostic tools call for thorough interdisciplinary treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Oliver M; Schlamann, Marc; Mueller, Daniela; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Forsting, Michael; Sure, Ulrich

    2011-09-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) require deliberately selected treatment strategies as they are incrementally found prior to rupture and deleterious subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Multiple and recurrent aneurysms necessitate both neurointerventionalists and neurosurgeons to optimize aneurysmal occlusion in an interdisciplinary effort. The present study was conducted to condense essential strategies from a single neurovascular centre with regard to the lessons learned. Medical charts of 321 consecutive patients treated for IAs at our centre from September 2008 until December 2010 were retrospectively analysed for clinical presentation of the aneurysms, multiplicity and treatment pathways. In addition, a selective Medline search was performed. A total of 321 patients with 492 aneurysms underwent occlusion of their symptomatic aneurysm: 132 (41.1%) individuals were treated surgically, 189 (58.2%) interventionally; 138 patients presented with a SAH, of these 44.2% were clipped and 55.8% were coiled. Aneurysms of the middle cerebral artery were primarily occluded surgically (88), whereas most of the aneurysms of the internal carotid artery and anterior communicating artery (114) were treated endovascularly. Multiple aneurysms (range 2-5 aneurysms/individual) were diagnosed in 98 patients (30.2%). During the study period 12 patients with recurrent aneurysms were allocated to another treatment modality (previously clip to coil and vice versa). Our data show that successful interdisciplinary occlusion of IAs is based on both neurosurgical and neurointerventional therapy. In particular, multiple and recurrent aneurysms require tailored individual approaches to aneurysmal occlusion. This is achieved by a consequent interdisciplinary pondering of the optimal strategy to occlude IAs in order to prevent SAH.

  9. Practises and controversies in the management of asymptomatic aneurysms: Results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshafai, Nabeel; Falenchuk, Olesya; Cusimano, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Asymptomatic aneurysms that are increasingly discovered on cranial diagnostic imaging are a growing management dilemma. Large-scale studies have shown that in most instances, conservative management is appropriate for the majority of patients with aneurysms less than 7 mm in maximum diameter. It is unclear whether international practise mirrors practise in these large trials. To determine how neurosurgeons around the world manage patients with asymptomatic aneurysms. Electronic survey of 283 clinicians managing patients with aneurysms using a 55-item questionnaire detailing characteristics of their experience, their hospitals and their present and future practises and insights regarding the management of patients with intracerebral aneurysms. The 203 neurosurgeons (72%) who responded had a median of 17 years of practise with aneurysms and managed a median of 25 aneurysms annually. The majority of neurosurgeons endorsed treatment of all asymptomatic aneurysms regardless of size. Only four out of 10 neurosurgeons would manage patients with 4 mm anterior communicating artery or middle cerebral artery aneurysms non-surgically, whereas fewer than 2% would conservatively manage asymptomatic patients with 10 or 16 mm aneurysms. Neurosurgeons were split as to the recommended techniques for asymptomatic aneurysms of 10 or 16 mm with about half of them electing clipping and half coiling for ACoA and nearly three quarters favouring clipping for the MCA aneurysm. Although international differences exist between Europe, North America and the rest of the world, most state that their choice of treatment related to decisions around what option would provide the best neurological outcome and prevention of long-term bleeding. Despite large trials supporting the management of small asymptomatic aneurysms, most neurosurgeons internationally chooses to treat them with surgery or endovascular means. Since clinicians use a number of factors beyond the maximum diameter when

  10. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Nov ... About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis and Symptoms Damage Treatments What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a ...

  11. The management of concomitant renal oncocytoma and giant coronary and bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jonathan; Choong, Andrew; Raja, Shahzad; Amrani, Mohamed; Hellawell, Giles; Hussain, Tahir

    2014-05-01

    We present the rare case of a 66-year-old Caucasian male patient presenting with intermittent left-side abdominal pain. He underwent a kidneys, ureters, and bladder computed tomography scan on which an incidental 45-mm giant aneurysm of the left anterior descending coronary artery was discovered along with 55-mm right-sided and 62-mm left-sided common iliac artery aneurysms and a 100-mm benign renal oncocytoma. He underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting of the left anterior descending, left circumflex and right coronary arteries using internal mammary artery and saphenous vein grafts. He subsequently underwent simultaneous open left nephrectomy and bilateral common iliac aneurysm repair using a bifurcated tube graft. He made a full recovery postoperatively. Giant coronary artery aneurysms are rare. In the pediatric population, they are predominantly secondary to Kawasaki disease. In adults, atheromatous disease is the leading cause. The coexistence of giant coronary artery aneurysms with extracoronary artery aneurysms is extremely unusual. We propose that the identification of giant coronary artery aneurysms necessitates further imaging investigations to identify the presence of extracoronary aneurysms. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such a case in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Morphometric Analysis of Bone Resection in Anterior Petrosectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama; Walther, Jonathan; Theriot, Krystle; Manuel, Morganne; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The anterior petrosectomy is a well-defined skull base approach to lesions such as petroclival meningiomas, posterior circulation aneurysms, petrous apex lesions (chondrosarcomas, cholesteatomas), ventrolateral brainstem lesions, clival chordomas, trigeminal neurinomas, and access to cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VII. Methods and Materials Fourteen anterior petrosectomies on eight cadaveric heads were performed in a skull base dissection laboratory. Predissection and postdissection thin-cut computed tomography scans were obtained to compare the bone resection. A computer program was used (InVivo5, Anatomage, San Jose, California, United States) to measure the bone resection and the improved viewing angle. Results The average bone removed in each plane was as follows: anterior to posterior plane was 10.57 mm ± 2.00 mm, superior to inferior was 9.39 mm ± 1.67 mm, and lateral to medial was 17.46 mm ± 4.64 mm. The average increased angle of view was 13.01 ± 2.35 degrees (Table 1). The average volume was 1786.94 ± 827.40 mm(3). Conclusions Anterior petrosectomy is a useful approach to access the ventrolateral brainstem region. We present a cadaveric study quantitating the volume of bone resection and improvement in the viewing angle. These data provide useful preoperative information on the utility of this skull base approach and the gain in the viewing angle after bony removal.

  13. [False iatrogenic aneurysm complicating septic malunion of the femur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yazidi, A; Lahtaoui, A; Berrada, M S; Amezziane, L; El Yaacoubi, M; El Manouar, M

    2000-09-01

    We report a case of false iatrogenic aneurism of the femoral artery observed after external fixation for septic malunion of the femur subsequent to emergency plate fixation. This false aneurysm ruptured, requiring femoropopliteal arterial repair. In the septic context, the vascular sutures failed making it necessary to ligature the femoral artery. Vascularization was maintained by satisfactory collateral circulation.

  14. Bilateral Iliac Aneurysms in a Child | Kale | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idiopathic arterial aneurysms in childhood are rare and represent a distinct clinical entity. Clinical presentation is by mass effect, ischaemia, growth discrepancy or rupture. Management is complex, and involves exclusion from circulation and placement of vascular grafts. We describe a five-year female child who had ...

  15. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chondroblastoma of the patella with aneurysmal bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Honglue; Yan, Mengning; Yue, Bing; Zeng, Yiming; Wang, You

    2014-01-01

    Chondroblastoma of the patella is rare. Aneurysmal bone cysts, which develop from a prior lesion such as a chondroblastoma, are seldom seen in the patella. The authors report a case of a 36-year-old man who presented with 2 years of right knee pain without calor, erythema, pain on palpation, or abnormal range of motion. Radiological studies suggested aneurysmal bone cyst. The lesion was excised with curettage and the residual cavity filled with autogenous bone graft. Histopathology revealed chondroblastoma associated with a secondary aneurysmal bone cyst. In the follow-up period, the patient demonstrated normal joint activities with no pain. Normal configuration of the patella and bone union were shown on plain radiographs. The authors present a review of the literature of all cases of patellar chondroblastoma with aneurysmal bone cyst. This case is the 14th report of aneurysmal bone cyst arising in a chondroblastoma of the patella. According to the literature, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in the study of these lesions. The pathologic diagnosis is based on the presence of chondroblastoma and aneurysmal bone cyst. Treatment of this lesion includes patellectomy, curettage alone, and curettage with bone grafting. Despite the risk of recurrence of this lesion in the patella, the authors first recommend curettage followed by filling the cavity with bone graft. To protect the anterior tension of the patella intraoperatively, the bone window should be made at the medial edge of the patella to perform the curettage and bone grafting.

  17. Exploring potential association between flow instability and rupture in patients with matched-pairs of ruptured-unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijian; Gu, Lixu; Liu, Hao

    2016-12-28

    Patients with multiple intracranial aneurysms present a great challenge to the neurosurgeon, particularly when presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Misjudgment may result in disastrous postoperative rebleeding from the untreated but true-ruptured lesion. In this study, computational fluid dynamic simulations of two matched-pairs of ruptured-unruptured cerebral aneurysms were performed to investigate the potential association between flow instability and aneurysm rupture. Two pairs of cerebral aneurysms from two patients were located in the middle cerebral artery and the anterior communicating artery respectively. Our results demonstrated highly disturbed states of the blood flows in the ruptured aneurysms of the two patients with multiple aneurysms, which are characterized by remarked velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) fluctuations at late systole. The ruptured aneurysms exhibit obviously temporal intra-cycle WSS fluctuations rather than the unruptured aneurysms of the same patient. Cycle-to-cycle fluctuations are further observed in the ruptured aneurysms when the flow turns to decelerate. The obvious differences observed between matched-pairs of ruptured-unruptured aneurysms imply that flow instability may be a potential source correlating to aneurysm rupture.

  18. Activation of Endocannabinoid System Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation in Human Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestrich, Christopher; Duerr, Georg D; Heinemann, Jan C; Meertz, Anne; Probst, Chris; Roell, Wilhelm; Schiller, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Bindila, Laura; Lutz, Beat; Welz, Armin; Dewald, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Human aortic aneurysms have been associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. Since the endocannabinoid system modulates inflammation and tissue remodeling, we investigated its components in human aortic aneurysms. We obtained anterior aortic wall samples from patients undergoing elective surgery for aortic aneurysm or coronary artery disease as controls. Histological and molecular analysis (RT-qPCR) was performed, and endocannabinoid concentration was determined using LC-MRM. Patient characteristics were comparable between the groups except for a higher incidence of arterial hypertension and diabetes in the control group. mRNA level of cannabinoid receptors was significantly higher in aneurysms than in controls. Concentration of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was significantly higher, while the second endocannabinoid anandamide and its metabolite arachidonic acid and palmitoylethanolamide were significantly lower in aneurysms. Histology revealed persistent infiltration of newly recruited leukocytes and significantly higher mononuclear cell density in adventitia of the aneurysms. Proinflammatory environment in aneurysms was shown by significant upregulation of M-CSF and PPARγ but associated with downregulation of chemokines. We found comparable collagen-stained area between the groups, significantly decreased mRNA level of CTGF, osteopontin-1, and MMP-2, and increased TIMP-4 expression in aneurysms. Our data provides evidence for endocannabinoid system activation in human aortic aneurysms, associated with persistent low-level inflammation and vascular remodeling.

  19. Vascular steal associated with vein of Galen aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, R.I.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Bruce, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Seven patients presented with neonatal arteriovenous malformation and vein of Galen aneurysms. Six had a large degree of vascular steal demonstrated by cerebral angiography and all had significant parenchymal loss on initial CT. Angiographically, the steal affected the ophthalmic artery and branches of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Repeat CT in two patients, one of whom was untreated for 7 months, revealed pronounced atrophy. Patients with neonatal vein of Galen aneurysms present with parenchymal loss on CT which is related to vascular steal and may be progressive. (orig.)

  20. Pulmonary artery aneurysm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Hughes-Stovin's disease,. Behcet's disease), collagen vascular diseases, connective tissue disorders,. (Marfan's syndrome, Ehler's-Danlos. 30. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • October 2004. CASE REPORT. Pulmonary artery aneurysm.

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. ... Smoking . Some inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, can also increase your ...

  2. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into the artery. Then use a dye to define the extent of the aneurysm. Use x-rays ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  3. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the aorta Injury from falls or motor vehicle accidents Syphilis Symptoms Aneurysms develop slowly over many ... rupture) if you do not have surgery to repair it. The treatment depends on the location of ...

  4. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms Presenting with Epistaxis - Our Experience and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Kanwaljeet; Gurjar, Hitesh Kumar; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Manmohan; Chandra, P Sarat; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    Intracranial internal carotid artery aneurysms are an extremely rare cause of spontaneous epistaxis, with a few documented cases. The management of such cases is challenging due to the relative anatomical inaccessibility of the bleeding point. The aim of the present study was to acquaint the readers with this rare type of aneurysm presenting with epistaxis and to report our experience of treating cases of severe epistaxis due to internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms. Data of 4 patients with İCA aneurysms presenting with epistaxis from June 2011 to July 2013 was retrospectively reviewed. The age of patients ranged from 16 to 62 years. Duration of epistaxis ranged from 3 months to 3 years. Two patients had severe epistaxis following transnasal biopsy. Two patients had a history of trauma. Two patients developed hemodynamically instability. All the patients were managed with trapping of the aneurysm. Complete exclusion of aneurysm from circulation was achieved in all the patients. ICA aneurysms can rarely present as life-endangering epistaxis. In patients presenting with a history of craniocerebral trauma, traumatic pseudoaneurysm must be considered as a differential diagnosis. Trapping of the aneurysm is a good option if there is good cross circulation.

  5. Splenic artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcbc-Rj, Rui Antônio Ferreira; Ferreira, Myriam Christina Lopes; Ferreira, Daniel Antônio Lopes; Ferreira, André Gustavo Lopes; Ramos, Flávia Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms - the most common visceral artery aneurysms - are found most often in multiparous women and in patients with portal hypertension. Indications for treatment of splenic artery aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm include specific symptoms, female gender and childbearing age, presence of portal hypertension, planned liver transplantation, a pseudoaneurysm of any size, and an aneurysm with a diameter of more than 2.5cm. Historically, the treatment of splenic artery aneurysm has been surgical ligation of the splenic artery, ligation of the aneurysm, or aneurysmectomy with or without splenectomy, depending on the aneurysm location. There are other percutaneous interventional techniques. The authors present a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in a 51-year-old woman, detected incidentally. RESUMO Aneurismas da artéria esplênica - os aneurismas arteriais viscerais mais comuns - são encontrados mais frequentemente em mulheres multíparas e em pacientes com hipertensão portal. As indicações para o seu tratamento incluem sintomas específicos, sexo feminino e idade fértil, presença de hipertensão portal, paciente em fila de transplante hepático, um pseudoaneurisma de qualquer tamanho, e um aneurisma com um diâmetro superior a 2,5cm. Historicamente, o tratamento do aneurisma da artéria esplênica tem sido a ligadura cirúrgica da artéria esplênica, a ligadura do aneurisma ou a aneurismectomia, com ou sem esplenectomia, dependendo do local do aneurisma. Existem outras técnicas intervencionistas percutâneas. Os autores apresentam o caso de um aneurisma de artéria esplênica em uma mulher de 51 anos de idade, diagnosticado incidentalmente.

  6. Infraoptic course of the anterior cerebral artery: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Myong Hee; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Kwon, O Ki; Koh, Young Cho; Kim, Ho Kyun [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    An infraoptic anterior cerebral artery (ACA) arising at a low bifurcation of the internal carotid artery is a rare anomaly, of which about 33 cases have been reported to date, often in association with cerebral aneurysms. We describe a case involving an infraoptic ACA in which a ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm was also present. Angiography revealed the presence of an abnormal solitary ACA, arising from the intracranial proximal internal carotid artery near the origin of the ophthalmic artery, and a contralateral middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the ACA passed below the ipsilateral optic nerve, anterior to the optic chiasm, to join the normally positioned anterior communicating artery above the optic chiasm.

  7. Primary aneurysmal bone cyst of patella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy N

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O0 f all the aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC occurring in the body, less than 1% are seen in the patella. We report here, a 27-year-old woman with Stage III ABC of patella. Curettage, chemical and thermal cautery of the bed followed by autogenous bone grafting of the defect was done. At two-year follow up, there was a suspicion of lucency in the middle of the patella. However a repeat curettage revealed only fibrous tissue. Now at four years of follow up, the bone graft remained well incorporated. Patient has mild anterior knee pain on stair climbing but regained normal knee function.

  8. Neonatal Intracranial Aneurysm Rupture Treated by Endovascular Management: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Pei Tai

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric intracranial aneurysm rupture is rare, and is traditionally managed by surgical clipping. To the best of our knowledge, endovascular embolization of aneurysms in neonates has not previously been reported in Taiwan. We report a 9-day-old boy with intracranial aneurysms who underwent endovascular embolization, representing the youngest reported case in Taiwan. The 9-day-old boy presented with non-specific symptoms of irritable crying, seizure and respiratory distress. Computed tomography disclosed intraventricular hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage and focal intracranial hemorrhage around the right cerebellum. Subsequent computed tomographic angiography showed two sequential fusiform aneurysms, measuring 3 mm, located in the right side posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA. The patient underwent endovascular embolization because of the high risk of aneurysm re-rupture and the impossibility of surgical clipping due to the fusiform nature of the aneurysms. A postembolization angiogram revealed complete obliteration of the right distal PICA and proximal aneurysm. The distal PICA aneurysm was revascularized from the collateral circulation, but demonstrated a slow and delayed filling pattern. The patient's condition remained stable over the following week, and he was discharged without anticonvulsant therapy. No significant developmental delay was noted at follow-up at when he was 3 months old. This case emphasizes the need for clinical practitioners to consider a diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in neonates with seizure and increased intracranial pressure. Neonatal intracranial aneurysms can be treated safely by endovascular treatment.

  9. Drug eluting stent induced coronary artery aneurysm repair by exclusion. Where are we headed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Krishnan Ganapathy; Akhunji, Zakir

    2009-07-01

    We present a case of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery aneurysm at the site of previous stent placement 3 years previously. The patient presented with recent worsening of angina. Angiography and 64 slice CT angiography confirmed the presence of 6mm aneurysm of LAD at the site of previous stent involving the origin of diagonal, with thrombus proximal and distal to the stent. This patient was successfully managed by taking the posterior wall of the anterior descending artery while suturing the heel of the left internal mammary artery (LIMA)-LAD anastomosis. The idea was to create severe stenosis upstream to prevent distal embolisation from the site of aneurysm. The diagonal was grafted with a saphenous venous graft. Follow-up angiogram at 3 months demonstrated successful exclusion of the aneurysm and unobstructed flow through the grafts.

  10. Topographic anatomy of paraclinoid carotid artery aneurysms: usefulness of MR angiographic source images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, S.; Deguchi, J.; Arai, M.; Tanaka, H.; Kawanishi, M.; Ohta, T.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for showing the topography of paraclinoid carotid artery aneurysms in 27 patients with 30 paraclinoid aneurysms undergoing conventional angiography, three-dimensional time-of-flight MRA and surgery. The anatomy shown on the axial MRA source images was consistent with that found at surgery. The neck of the aneurysm could always be identified on the source images, while it could not be analysed exactly on conventional angiography in 3 cases (10 %). The optic nerves, including those displaced by the aneurysm, were recognised in all patients. The anterior clinoid process was shown as a low-intensity rim or area contiguous with the cortical bone. The source images were of great value in understanding the topography of paraclinoid carotid artery aneurysms. (orig.). With 2 figs

  11. Ruptured intrameatal AICA aneurysms--a report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Wrede, Karsten H; Chen, Zan; Bao, Yuhai; Ling, Feng

    2009-11-01

    Aneurysms of the distal part of the anterior-inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are rare. Most are located in the cerebellopontine angle close to the internal auditory meatus. To our knowledge, only 13 patients with the aneurysm located inside the internal auditory meatus have been reported in the literature. We present two cases of ruptured intrameatal AICA aneurysms that were treated in our center in the past year. The locations and clinical manifestations are discussed and all 13 previously published cases are reviewed. Exposure and decompression of all structures in the internal auditory meatus, careful manipulation of the nerves and vessels, temporary trapping of the aneurysm, and careful dissection of the neck to avoid partial clipping are the essential steps when treating intrameatal AICA aneurysms to reduce the risk of postoperative neurological deficits.

  12. Microneurosurgical Management of Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm: A Contemporary Series from Helsinki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiarawat, Peeraphong; Jahromi, Behnam Rezai; Kozyrev, Danil A; Intarakhao, Patcharin; Teo, Mario K; Choque-Velasquez, Joham; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyze microsurgical techniques and to determine correlations between microsurgical techniques and the radiographic findings in the microneurosurgical treatment of posterior communicating artery aneurysms (PCoAAs). We retrospectively analyzed radiographic findings and videos of surgeries in 64 patients with PCoAAs who underwent microsurgical clipping by the senior author from August 2010 to 2014. From 64 aneurysms, 30 (47%) had acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that necessitated lamina terminalis fenestration (odds ratio [OR], 67.67; P < 0.001) and Liliequist membrane fenestration (OR, 19.62; P < 0.001). The low-lying aneurysms significantly necessitated the coagulation of the dura covering the anterior clinoid process (ACP) (OR, 7.43; P = 0.003) or anterior clinoidectomy (OR, 91.0; P < 0.001). We preferred straight clips in 45 (83%) of 54 posterolateral projecting aneurysms (OR, 45.0; P < 0.001), but preferred curved clips for posteromedial projecting aneurysms (OR, 6.39; P = 0.008). The mean operative time from the brain retraction to the final clipping was 17 minutes and 43 seconds. Postoperative computed tomography angiography revealed complete occlusion of 60 (94%) aneurysms. Three (4.6%) patients with acute SAH suffered postoperative lacunar infarction. For ruptured aneurysms, lamina terminalis and Liliequist membrane fenestration are useful for additional cerebrospinal fluid drainage. For low-lying aneurysms, coagulation of the dura covering the ACP or tailored anterior clinoidectomy might be necessary for exposing the proximal aneurysm neck. Type of clips depends on the direction of projection. The microsurgical clipping of the PCoAAs can achieve good immediate complete occlusion rate with low postoperative stroke rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Endovascular treatment of very small intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskandar, A; Nepper-Rasmussen, J

    2011-01-01

    to large aneurysms (> 3 mm). However the data also suggest that endovascular treatment of very small aneurysms might be associated with an increased risk of procedural ruptures and mortality. At nine-month follow-up results indicate significantly less compaction in the very small aneurysms....... endovascular treatment was attempted in 956 consecutive intracranial aneurysms. Of 956 aneurysms, 111 aneurysms were very small aneurysms with a maximal diameter of 3 mm or less. We conducted a retrospective analysis of angiographic and clinical outcome following coiling of very small aneurysms...... aneurysms and less than 90% aneurysm occlusion in six aneurysms. Complications occurred in the treatment of 15 aneurysms, including eight procedural ruptures, six thromboembolic events and one case of early hemorrhage. Compared with larger aneurysms, treatment of very small aneurysms was associated...

  14. Endovascular Management of Multiple Dysplastic Aneurysms in a Young Man with an Unknown Underlying Cause: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullen, Tyler; Mathkour, Mansour; Lockwood, Joseph; Ott, Leah; Medel, Ricky; Dumont, Aaron S; Amenta, Peter S

    2018-03-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are the leading cause of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and are most commonly associated with the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and anterior communicating artery complex. We describe the presentation and management of a 27-year-old man with concurrent bilateral A1-2 junction aneurysms and fusiform intraorbital ophthalmic artery (OA) aneurysms. A 27-year-old man with no past medical history presented with 3 months of headaches. Imaging showed a large dysplastic left A1-2 junction aneurysm and a smaller saccular right A1-2 junction aneurysm, with potentially adherent domes. Two fusiform aneurysms of the intraorbital segment of the left OA were also identified. The patient underwent coil-assisted pipeline embolization of the left A1-A2 aneurysm, with complete obliteration and reconstitution of the normal parent vessel. The patient underwent coil embolization of the right A1-2 aneurysm 3 weeks later, which was found to have grown significantly at the time of treatment. Three-month follow-up showed spontaneous resolution of the OA aneurysms, persistent obliteration of the left aneurysm, and significant recurrence of the right aneurysm, which was treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. A second recurrence 3 months later was successfully treated with repeat coiling. At the time of this treatment, the patient was also found to have 2 de novo distal middle cerebral artery and ACA dysplastic aneurysms, which were not treated. Follow-up angiography 6 weeks later showed stable complete obliteration of the right A1-2 aneurysm and interval complete resolution of the dysplastic middle cerebral artery aneurysm. The distal ACA aneurysm was observed to have minimally increased in size; however, the parent vessel showed signs of interval partial thrombosis with contrast stasis within the aneurysm. This final aneurysm is being followed with serial imaging. The patient remains neurologically intact with complete resolution of his headaches. We

  15. Giant true celiac artery aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aljabri, Badr

    2009-01-01

    Celiac artery aneurysms are rare and usually asymptomatic. The management of these aneurysms is challenging, especially when they are large and involve the confluence of the trifurcation. We present here a case of a large celiac artery aneurysm involving its branches in a young woman. Preoperative investigations, intraoperative findings, and the operative procedure are also presented and discussed. (author

  16. Distal mycotic aneurysm of the AICA mimicking intracanalicular acoustic neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, Salvatore; Mohr, Gérard; Dufour, Jean-Jacques; Albrecht, Steffan

    2003-11-01

    Among cases of cerebellopontine angle lesions, vascular lesions involving the internal auditory canal are extremely rare. We report a distal fusiform mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) that simulated an acoustic neuroma on presentation. A 60-year-old woman was investigated for recent onset of acute dizziness. Laboratory and radiographic investigations are presented, as well as the surgical management of the patient and pathological examination of the aneurysm. An exceptionally rare case of distal mycotic intracanalicular pseudoaneurysm of the AICA with intraluminal thrombus and fusiform anatomy is described. In our review of the literature (1966-present), only five other intracanalicular AICA-aneurysms were encountered, none of which were infectious in etiology. The possible pathophysiologic mechanisms of distal AICA-aneurysms are discussed along with the currently available literature.

  17. Sole stenting treatment for small wide-necked saccular intracranial aneurysms:a clinical therapeutic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jiyong; Hong Bo; Xu Yi; Huang Qinghai; Yang Pengfei; Zhao Wenyuan; Liu Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility, safety and efficacy of sole stenting technique for the treatment of small wide-necked saccular intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Between February 2001 and November 2009, 36 consecutive patients with small wide-necked saccular intracranial aneurysms (18 males and 18 females, aged 19-75 years,with a mean age of 52.3 years) were treated with stenting technique only. Of 36 patients, the Grade 0 of Hunt and Hess classification was seen in 22,Grade I in 8, Grade II in 5 and Grade III in 1. The aneurysmal diameter ranged from 1.8 mm to 5.0 mm,with a mean diameter of 3.6 mm. The aneurysms were located at the anterior communicating artery (n=1), posterior communicating artery (n=11), intradural paraclinoid internal carotid artery (n=18), basilar artery (n=1), anterior choroidal artery (n=4) or middle cerebral artery (n=1). The clinical manifestations, the angiographic findings and the follow-up observations were analyzed and the results were evaluated by means of the Modified Rankin Scale, magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography. Results: Sole stenting treatment was performed in 36 patients with small wide-necked saccular intracranial aneurysms. A total of 37 stents were successfully delivered and deployed at the targeted location. Immediate post-procedural angiography showed that complete occlusion was obtained in one aneurysm, a sluggish intra-aneurysmal vortex motion in 3 aneurysms and a correction of the angle of the parent vessel in two cases, whereas no change was seen in the remaining 30 aneurysms. Angiographic follow-up was carried out in 22 of the 36 patients (61%) during a mean following-up period of 16 months (ranged from 3 to 59 months). The follow-up angiography showed that the complete occlusion was seen in 11 cases, narrowed aneurysmal neck with shrinkage of the aneurysm in 9 cases, narrowed aneurysmal neck only in 1 case, and shrinkage of the aneurysm only in 1 case.All the patients remained

  18. Is Age a Risk Factor for Poor Outcome of Surgical Treatment of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Hidetoshi; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Kosumo; Ota, Nakao; Miyata, Shiro; Takahashi, Osamu; Tokuda, Sadahisa; Tanikawa, Rokuya

    2016-10-01

    Advanced age is known to be a significant risk factor for the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The impact of age on outcomes of surgically treated patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) is less clear. A total of 663 consecutive patients with 823 surgically treated UIAs were evaluated. UIAs, which need bypass surgery including low-flow or high-flow bypass, were defined as complex aneurysms. Aneurysm size was categorized as small (<15 mm), large (15-24 mm), and giant (≥25 mm). In patients without symptoms, a poor outcome is defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 2-6. In those with mRS score higher than 1 as a result of UIA-related symptoms or other comorbidities, a poor outcome is defined as an increase of 1 or more on the mRS. Outcomes were evaluated at the 6-month and 12-month follow-up examinations. The mean age was 62 ± 12 years and 650 UIAs (78%) were observed in women. Previously treated aneurysm (P = 0.009), posterior circulation aneurysm (P < 0.0001), complex aneurysm (P < 0.0001), a larger size (P = 0.011), and perforator territory infarction (P < 0.0001) were related to poor outcome at 6 months, and posterior circulation aneurysm (P < 0.0001), complex aneurysm (P < 0.0001), a larger size (P = 0.035), and perforator territory infarction (P = 0.013) were related to poor outcome at 12 months. Age was not associated with poor outcome in patients with UIAs who undertook direct surgery. Although risks and benefits of aneurysm treatment in older patients should be carefully considered, surgical treatment of UIAs in the elderly should be considered positively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aneurysmal bone cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangachari P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: Aneurysmal bone cysts have raised intra-cystic pressures which are dynamic and diagnostic in nature. Aneurysmal bone cysts could be diagnosed from other benign cystic lesions of bone by recording their intra-cystic pressures with a spinal manometer. Raised intra-cystic pressures in aneurysmal bone cysts are maintained as long as the periosteum over the cyst is intact even in those with pathological fractures. Even though its pathology is definite its aetio-pathology is not clear Method: Fourteen out of 16 radiologically benign cystic lesions of bone were subjected to intra-cystic pressure recordings with spinal manometer. Other two cysts had displaced unimpacted pathological fractures and so their intra-cystic pressures could not be recorded. All 16 cysts were subjected to histo-pathological examination to confirm their diagnosis and to find out for any pre-existing benign pathology. All the cysts were surgically treated. Results: Fourteen benign cystic lesions of bone were diagnosed as aneurysmal bone cysts preoperatively by recording raised intra-cystic pressures and confirmed by histo-pathology. In addition, histo-pathology revealed pre-existing benign pathology. All cysts were successfully treated surgically. Conclusions: Since, there is appreciable rise in intra-cystic dynamic pressures, the aneurysmal bone cyst is considered to be due to either sudden venous obstruction or arterio-venous shunt. Pre-operative intra-cystic pressure recordings help not only to diagnose aneurysmal bone cysts but also to assess the quantum of blood loss and its replacement during surgery.

  20. Endovascular treatment of unruptured aneurysms of cavernous and ophthalmic segment of internal carotid artery with flow diverter device Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevsek, Marko; Mounayer, Charbel; Seruga, Tomaz

    2016-12-01

    Intra-arterial treatment of aneurysms by redirecting blood flow is a newer method. The redirection is based on a significantly more densely braided wire stent. The stent wall keeps the blood in the lumen of the stent and slows down the turbulent flow in the aneurysms. Stagnation of blood in the aneurysm sac leads to the formation of thrombus and subsequent exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation. The aim of the study was to evaluate flow diverter device Pipeline for broad neck and giant aneurysm treatment. Fifteen patients with discovered aneurysm of the internal carotid artery were treated between November 2010 and February 2014. The majority of aneurysms of the internal carotid artery were located intradural at the ophthalmic part of the artery. The patients were treated using a flow diverter device Pipeline, which was placed over the aneurysm neck. Treatment success was assessed clinically and angiographically using O'Kelly Marotta scale. Control angiography immediately after the release of the stent showed stagnation of the blood flow in the aneurysm sac. In none of the patients procedural and periprocedural complications were observed. 6 months after the procedure, control CT or MR angiography showed in almost all cases exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation and normal blood flow in the treated artery. Neurological status six months after the procedure was normal in all patients. Treatment of aneurysms with flow diverter Pipeline device is a safe and significantly less time consuming method in comparison with standard techniques. This new method is a promising approach in treatment of broad neck aneurysms.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics evaluation of flow reversal treatment of giant basilar tip aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnæs, Martin Sandve; Mardal, Kent-Andre; Bakke, Søren; Sorteberg, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    Therapeutic parent artery flow reversal is a treatment option for giant, partially thrombosed basilar tip aneurysms. The effectiveness of this treatment has been variable and not yet studied by applying computational fluid dynamics. Computed tomography images and blood flow velocities acquired with transcranial Doppler ultrasonography were obtained prior to and after bilateral endovascular vertebral artery occlusion for a giant basilar tip aneurysm. Patient-specific geometries and velocity waveforms were used in computational fluid dynamics simulations in order to determine the velocity and wall shear stress changes induced by treatment. Therapeutic parent artery flow reversal lead to a dramatic increase in aneurysm inflow and wall shear stress (30 to 170 Pa) resulting in an increase in intra-aneurysmal circulation. The enlargement of the circulated area within the aneurysm led to a re-normalization of the wall shear stress and the aneurysm remained stable for more than 8 years thereafter. Therapeutic parent artery flow reversal can lead to unintended, potentially harmful changes in aneurysm inflow which can be quantified and possibly predicted by applying computational fluid dynamics. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Muscle pedicle bone grafting using the anterior one-third of the gluteus medius attached to the greater trochanter for treatment of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage II osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-Jin; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Taek-Rim

    2018-02-24

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of our technique on further collapse of the femoral head in Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) stage II, patient's functional improvements, and analyze the survival rate of the affected hip. Between June 2007 and March 2015, 24 hips diagnosed with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) were treated with our muscle pedicle bone grafting (MPBG) technique using anterior one-third of gluteus medius attached to the greater trochanter. The group was consisted of 15 men and eight women, mean age of 36 years at the time of surgery. Mean follow-up was 6.2 years. Four hips showed regeneration, 11 hips showed no progression, and nine hips showed slight extent of the lesion. But during the follow-up, three hips underwent total hip arthroplasty at the mean follow-up of 5.8 years after the surgery. The survival rate at the last follow-up was approximately 87.5%. Excluding the three failed cases, the mean total Harris hip score was improved from 57.2 to 82.3 points (p < 0.05). We had no case of complications such as limping, numbness, wound infection, heterotopic ossification, nor intra- and post-operative fracture. We showed 87.5% of survival rate by average of 6.2-year follow-up, maximum of 10.1 years. And compared to other reports, our technique showed relatively good results. In the short term, our modified MPBG technique seems to be effective in ARCO stage II ONFH. We, therefore, suggest this technique as one of the promising treatments of choices for patients with ARCO stage II ONFH.

  3. Giant congenital aneurysm of the appendix of the left auricle; an entity potentially lethal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perafan, Sergio; Ascione, Giovanny; Parra, Luis E; Jimenez, Luz S

    2004-01-01

    The case of a 22 years old female patient who at 16 years of age suffered a closed thoracic trauma during a car accident is reported. She underwent surgery under extra corporeal circulation with femoro-femoral cannulation with the diagnosis of rupture of the left atrium. a large aneurysm of the left auricle without evidence of heart trauma, pericardial leakage or hemo pericardium, was found. The surgeon decided not to perform surgery on the aneurysm and to withdraw the extra corporeal circulation, proceeding to suture the patient, who was released with the recommendation of performing additional studies in order to consider the handling of the aneurysm. Six years later she is sent to our institution with the diagnosis of cerebral embolism with left hemiparesis, and a giant partially thrombosed left auricle aneurysm. With a diagnosis of an embolizing partially thrombosed aneurysm of the left auricle she underwent surgery under extracorporeal circulation in order to resect it. The case with the intraoperative findings and the surgical technique are described. Different manifestations and expressions of this potentially lethal rare entity are detailed, concluding that it is imperative to resect surgically the aneurysm once it has been diagnosed

  4. Traumatic Anterior Cerebral Artery Pseudoaneurysmal Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing Lin; Xue, Hao; Qi, Chang Jing; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Dong Hai; Li, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is a rare but emergent condition. We report a case of traumatic anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis and review the published literature. A 49-year-old man sustained severe head trauma. He was diagnosed with multiple skull bone fractures, left subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pneumocephalus, and right frontal hematoma. Subdural hematoma evacuation was done at a local hospital. In the following months, he experienced repeated epistaxis that required nasal packing to stop the bleeding. Digital subtraction angiography showed an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm protruding into the posterior ethmoid sinus. Embolization of the aneurysm was performed with microcoils, and the parent artery was occluded by thrombosis. The patient presented 1 month later with another epistaxis episode. Digital subtraction angiography showed recanalization of the parent artery and recurrence of the aneurysm. The parent artery was occluded for the second time with coils and Onyx embolic agent. Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is rare, and this is the first report of an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm that manifested with epistaxis. Endovascular intervention has become the first choice of treatment for this disease. The high recurrence rate is the main disadvantage of endovascular intervention. Aneurysm trapping with bypass surgery is another treatment option. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment Challenges of a Primary Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Causing Recurrent Ischemic Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Strambo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Extracranial vertebral artery aneurysms are a rare cause of embolic stroke; surgical and endovascular therapy options are debated and long-term complication may occur. Case Report. A 53-year-old man affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 came to our attention for recurrent vertebrobasilar embolic strokes, caused by a primary giant, partially thrombosed, fusiform aneurysm of the left extracranial vertebral artery. The aneurysm was treated by endovascular approach through deposition of Guglielmi Detachable Coils in the proximal segment of the left vertebral artery. Six years later the patient presented stroke recurrence. Cerebral angiography and Color Doppler Ultrasound well characterized the unique hemodynamic condition developed over the years responsible for the new embolic event: the aneurysm had been revascularized from its distal portion by reverse blood flow coming from the patent vertebrobasilar axis. A biphasic Doppler signal in the left vertebral artery revealed a peculiar behavior of the blood flow, alternately directed to the aneurysm and backwards to the basilar artery. Surgical ligation of the distal left vertebral artery and excision of the aneurysm were thus performed. Conclusion. This is the first described case of NF1-associated extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm presenting with recurrent embolic stroke. Complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the blood circulation is advisable to achieve full resolution of the embolic source.

  6. Differential effects of chromosome 9p21 variation on subphenotypes of intracranial aneurysm: site distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Tomoko; Akiyama, Koichi; Cui, Tailin; Tajima, Atsushi; Krischek, Boris; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Hata, Akira; Inoue, Ituro

    2010-08-01

    Recently, a genome-wide association study identified associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 9p21 and risk of harboring intracranial aneurysm (IA). Aneurysm characteristics or subphenotypes of IAs, such as history of subarachnoid hemorrhage, presence of multiple IAs and location of IAs, are clinically important. We investigated whether the association between 9p21 variation and risk of IA varied among these subphenotypes. We conducted a case-control study of 981 cases and 699 controls in Japanese. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging the 9p21 risk locus were genotyped. The OR and 95% CI were estimated using logistic regression analyses. Among the 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs1333040 showed the strongest evidence of association with IA (P=1.5x10(-6); per allele OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.24-1.66). None of the patient characteristics (gender, age, smoking, and hypertension) was a significant confounder or effect modifier of the association. Subgroup analyses of IA subphenotypes showed that among the most common sites of IAs, the association was strongest for IAs of the posterior communicating artery (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.26-2.26) and not significant for IAs in the anterior communicating artery (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.96-1.57). When dichotomizing IA sites, the association was stronger for IAs of the posterior circulation-posterior communicating artery group (OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.32-2.26) vs the anterior circulation group (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.53). Heterogeneity in these ORs was significant (P=0.032). The associations did not vary when stratifying by history of subarachnoid hemorrhage (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.18-1.71 for ruptured IA; OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.00-1.62 for unruptured IA) or by multiplicity of IA (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.21-2.03 for multiple IAs; OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.15-1.61 for single IA). Our results suggest that genetic influence on formation may vary between IA subphenotypes.

  7. The Factors Associated with Outcomes in Surgically Managed Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Lai Chuang; Siregar, Johari Adnan; Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izani; Idris, Zamzuri; Rahman Mohd, Noor Azman A

    2018-02-01

    Ruptured cerebral aneurysm is a life-threatening condition that requires urgent medical attention. In Malaysia, a prospective study by the Umum Sarawak Hospital, Neurosurgical Center, in the year 2000-2002 revealed an average of two cases of intracranial aneurysms per month with an operative mortality of 20% and management mortality of 25%. Failure to diagnose, delay in admission to a neurosurgical centre, and lack of facilities could have led to the poor surgical outcome in these patients. The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that significantly predict the outcome of patients undergoing a surgical clipping of ruptured aneurysm in the local population. A single center retrospective study with a review of medical records was performed involving 105 patients, who were surgically treated for ruptured intracranial aneurysms in the Sultanah Aminah Hospital, in Johor Bahru, from July 2011 to January 2016. Information collected was the patient demographic data, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) prior to surgery, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies Scale (WFNS), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) grading system, and timing between SAH ictus and surgery. A good clinical grade was defined as WFNS grade I-III, whereas, WFNS grades IV and V were considered to be poor grades. The outcomes at discharge and six months post surgery were assessed using the modified Rankin's Scale (mRS). The mRS scores of 0 to 2 were grouped into the "favourable" category and mRS scores of 3 to 6 were grouped into the "unfavourable" category. Only cases of proven ruptured aneurysmal SAH involving anterior circulation that underwent surgical clipping were included in the study. The data collected was analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed and a P -value of < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. A total of 105 patients were included. The group was comprised of 42.9% male and 57.1% female patients

  8. Mirror aneurysms : a reflection on natural history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, Irene; Torner, James; Huston III, John; Rajput, Michele L.; Wiebers, David O.; Jones, Lyell K.; Brown, Robert D.; Groen, Rob

    OBJECT: Investigators conducting the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, sought to evaluate predictors of future hemorrhage in patients who had unruptured mirror aneurysms. These paired aneurysms in bilateral arterial positions

  9. Aphasia following anterior cerebral artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimosaka, Shinichi; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi; Shimizu, Takeo; Morikawa, Atsunori

    1982-01-01

    We have report two cases of aphasia that had infarcts in the distribution of the left or right anterior cerebral artery, as confirmed by computed tomography. Case 1 is a right-handed, 65-year-old man in whom computerized tomographic scanning revealed an infarction of the territory of the left anterior cerebral artery after the clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The standard language test of aphasia (SLTA) revealed non-fluent aphasia with dysarthria, good comprehension, almost normal repetition with good articulation, and a defectiveness in writing. This syndrome was considered an instance of transcortical motor aphasia. Although three years had passed from the onset, his aphasia did not show any improvement. Case 2 is a 37-year-old man who is right-handed but who can use his left hand as well. He was admitted because of subarachnoid hemorrhage from an anterior communicating aneurysm. Because of postoperative spasm, an infarction in the distribution of the right anterior cerebral artery developed. He was totally unable to express himself vocally, but he could use written language quite well to express his ideas and had a good comprehension of spoken language. This clinical picture was considered that of an aphemia. After several weeks, his vocalization returned, but the initial output was still hypophonic. (J.P.N.)

  10. Aphasia following anterior cerebral artery occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimosaka, Shinichi; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi; Shimizu, Takeo; Morikawa, Atsunori (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    We have report two cases of aphasia that had infarcts in the distribution of the left or right anterior cerebral artery, as confirmed by computed tomography. Case 1 is a right-handed, 65-year-old man in whom computerized tomographic scanning revealed an infarction of the territory of the left anterior cerebral artery after the clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The standard language test of aphasia (SLTA) revealed non-fluent aphasia with dysarthria, good comprehension, almost normal repetition with good articulation, and a defectiveness in writing. This syndrome was considered an instance of transcortical motor aphasia. Although three years had passed from the onset, his aphasia did not show any improvement. Case 2 is a 37-year-old man who is right-handed but who can use his left hand as well. He was admitted because of subarachnoid hemorrhage from an anterior communicating aneurysm. Because of postoperative spasm, an infarction in the distribution of the right anterior cerebral artery developed. He was totally unable to express himself vocally, but he could use written language quite well to express his ideas and had a good comprehension of spoken language. This clinical picture was considered that of an aphemia. After several weeks, his vocalization returned, but the initial output was still hypophonic.

  11. Anastomotic femoral aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Schroeder, T V

    1996-01-01

    between the original operation and the repair of the pseudoaneurysms was 9 years (range 1 month to 26 years). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the previously noted trend of an increasing time to aneurysm formation from 3 years before 1975, 5 years between 1976 and 1980, and 6 years between 1981 and 1990....

  12. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M

    1995-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable. No sig...

  13. Brain Aneurysm: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Susco Chair of Research North Shore University Hospital, Brain Aneurysm Center Chair of Research The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research Kristen’s Legacy of Love Chair of Research TeamCindy Alcatraz Chair of Research ...

  14. Unruptured Brain Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Susco Chair of Research North Shore University Hospital, Brain Aneurysm Center Chair of Research The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research Kristen’s Legacy of Love Chair of Research TeamCindy Alcatraz Chair of Research ...

  15. Brain Aneurysm: Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Susco Chair of Research North Shore University Hospital, Brain Aneurysm Center Chair of Research The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research Kristen’s Legacy of Love Chair of Research TeamCindy Alcatraz Chair of Research ...

  16. Ruptured Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-05-04

    May 4, 1974 ... Radiological confirmation of the commonness of the condition found at coeliac angiography,' adds further support for a high autopsy incidence. The unusual preponderance of females with splenic artery aneurysms3.•.• cannot be explained on the basis of aetiology, as they are most often caused by arterio- ...

  17. [Microsurgical anatomy importance of A1-anterior communicating artery complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Sosa, Alejandro; Pérez-Cruz, Julio César; Reyes-Soto, Gervith; Delgado-Hernández, Carlos; Macías-Duvignau, Mario Alberto; Delgado-Reyes, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The anterior cerebral artery originates from the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery lateral to the optic chiasm, then joins with its contralateral counterpart via the anterior communicating artery. A1-anterior communicating artery complex is the most frequent anatomical variants and is the major site of aneurysms between 30 to 37%. Know the anatomy microsurgical, variants anatomical and importance of complex precommunicating segment-artery anterior communicating in surgery neurological of the pathology vascular, mainly aneurysms, in Mexican population. The study was performed in 30 brains injected. Microanatomy was studied (length and diameter) of A1-anterior communicating artery complex and its variants. 60 segments A1, the average length of left side was 11.35 mm and 11.84 mm was right. The average diameter of left was 1.67 mm and the right was 1.64 mm. The average number of perforators on the left side was 7.9 and the right side was 7.5. Anterior communicating artery was found in 29 brains of the optic chiasm, its course depended on the length of the A1 segment. The average length of the segment was 2.84 mm, the average diameter was 1.41 mm and the average number of perforators was 3.27. A1-anterior communicating artery complex variants were found in 18 (60%) and the presence of two blister-like aneurysms. It is necessary to understand the A1-anterior communicating artery complex microanatomy of its variants to have a three-dimensional vision during aneurysm surgery.

  18. Value of 64-slice spiral CT angiography for follow-up of young children with coronary artery aneurysms due to Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yun; Zeng Jinjin; Liu Shichen; Du Zhongdong; Sun Guoqiang; Guo Huiling

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value and feasibility of 64-slice spiral CT in diagnosis of coronary artery aneurysm in the follow-up of young children with previous Kawasaki disease. Methods Twelve boys (mean age 5.1 years) for follow-up (ranged 1.1 to 5.1 years) with known Kawasaki disease and coronary artery aneurysms underwent coronary CT angiography using 64-slice spiral CT. The number, location, shape and size of each coronary artery, aneurysm were recorded and compared with those of echocardiography performed simutaneously. Results: A total of 30 coronary artery aneurysms were identified with mean diameter of (7.5±3.8) mm, and mean maximum length of (12.4±9.1)mm. 10 aneurysms were small in size,7 aneurysms were medium in size and 13 were giant aneurysms. Fourteen aneurysms were saccular, and the remaining 16 were fusiform. Among the aneurysms in left coronary artery, 7 of them were located in the main branch, 9 were located in the proximal segment of the anterior descending branch, 4 were located at the middle segment of the anterior descending branch, and 2 were located in the circumflex branch. Among the aneurysms in right coronary artery, 6 of them were located in the proximal segment, 9 were located in the middle segment, and 4 were located at the distal segment. Nine of the aneurysms involved 2 segments of the coronary arteries, and one involved 3 segments. Six stenotic segments were found. Calcification was found in 5 aneurysms and 3 of them had thrombosis. Echocardiography failed to detect 8 aneurysms of small size and located in the middle or distal segments of the coronary arterys. Conclusion: The 64-slice CT angiography proved valuable for monitoring young children with Kawasaki disease. (authors)

  19. [Coil embolization for incidental aneurysms in patients with chronic renal failure: midterm clinical results of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, T; Katou, T; Murakawa, T; Yamakawa, H; Yoshimura, S; Kaku, Y; Sakai, N

    2000-06-01

    In spite of recent advances in perioperative management, the risk of neurosurgical intervention for patients with chronic renal failure is still considered too high. In this study, coil embolization for incidental aneurysms in such patients is demonstrated in reference to midterm results. A 42-year-old woman with a history of hemodialisis for 7 years presented with subcortical hemorrhage in her right frontal lobe. The magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) demonstrated a distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysm, but it was considered to be unrelated to the hemorrhage. Two and a half months after the hemorrhage the aneurysm was embolized with interlocking detachable coils. Thirty months after embolization, the angiogram revealed the coil compaction and the recanalization of the aneurysm neck. However, 54 months after embolization, the figure of the embolized aneurysm and neck remnant was the same as the previous findings. A 69-year-old woman with a history of hemodialisis for 5 years suddenly experienced left hemiparesis. Computed tomography revealed cerebral infarction in the right frontoparietal white matter. In addition, a left middle cerebral artery aneurysm was unexpectedly found on the MRA. Five months after the onset of the attack, the aneurysm was embolized with a Guglielmi detachable coli. An angiogram obtained 24 months after the embolization showed the aneurysm to be almost completely obliterated. In considering the therapeutic risks and benefits for incidental aneurysms of patients with chronic renal failure, intra-vascular surgery could be recommended as a less invasive treatment.

  20. Versatile fill coils: initial experience as framing coils for oblong aneurysms. A technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Toshiya; Bain, Mark; Hui, Ferdinand K

    2014-01-01

    Coil embolization of oblong aneurysms is difficult because the majority of commercially available coils are manufactured with a helical or spherical tertiary structure. While adopting framing strategies for oblong aneurysms (aspect ratio ≥ 2: 1), traditional coils may be undersized in the long axis but oversized in the short axis, resulting in increased aneurysmal wall stress, risk of re-rupture, and difficulty creating a basket that respects the aneurysmal neck. We review three cases in which versatile filling coils (VFCs) were used as the initial coils for embolization of oblong aneurysms and report coil distribution characteristics and clinical outcomes. Packing density after VFC implantation was assessed using the software AngioSuite-Neuro edition and AngioCalc. a 58-year-old woman experienced a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm (7.5 mm × 3.5 mm). A 3-6 mm × 15 cm VFC was selected as the first coil because the flexibility of its wave-loop structure facilitates framing of an irregularly shaped aneurysm. The loop portions of the structures tend to be pressed to the extremes of the aneurysmal sac by the wave component. The VFC was introduced smoothly into the aneurysmal sac without catheter kickback. We were then able to insert detachable filling coils without any adjunctive technique and achieved complete occlusion. Complete occlusion without severe complications was achieved in all three cases in our study. Average packing density after the first coil was 15.63%. VFC coils may have a specific role in framing oblong aneurysms given their complex loop-wave design, allowing spacing of the coils at the dome and neck while keeping sac stress to a minimum.

  1. Carotid artery sacrifice for unclippable and uncoilable aneurysms: endovascular occlusion vs common carotid artery ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Wolfe, Stacey Quintero; Farhat, Hamad; Ali Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad; Heros, Roberto C

    2010-11-01

    Optimal treatment of intracranial aneurysms involves complete occlusion of the aneurysm with preservation of the parent artery and all of its branches. Attempts to occlude the aneurysm and preserve the parent artery may be associated with a higher level of risk than parent vessel occlusion or trapping. To evaluate our series of patients with large and giant aneurysms who underwent treatment via endovascular coiling with parent artery sacrifice or surgical ligation of the common carotid artery (CCA) and gain insight into the advantages and risks of each of these alternatives. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with aneurysms who underwent carotid sacrifice via endovascular occlusion or surgical CCA ligation during an 8-year period at our institution. Twenty-seven patients with large and giant aneurysms of the internal carotid artery underwent carotid artery sacrifice via endovascular occlusion (n = 15) or CCA ligation (n = 12). Of the patients who underwent endovascular occlusion, 3 developed groin complications, 1 developed a new sixth nerve palsy, 1 died from vasospasm related to subarachnoid hemorrhage, and 1 died secondary to rupture of an associated 3-mm anterior communicating artery aneurysm 5 days postoperatively. Of the patients undergoing CCA ligation, 1 patient developed a partial hypoglossal palsy. Clinical improvement of presenting symptoms was observed in all surviving patients regardless of the method of treatment. Complete aneurysm obliteration was documented in all patients during the initial hospital stay. The mean radiographic long-term follow-up was 14.2 months, which was available in 20 of the 25 surviving patients (80%). Complete obliteration was confirmed at follow-up in all but 2 patients with large cavernous aneurysms; 1 was initially treated with endovascular occlusion and the other with carotid ligation. Parent artery sacrifice is still a viable treatment for some complex aneurysms of the internal carotid artery. CCA ligation is a

  2. Vitamins and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    To summarize the association of vitamins (B6, B12, C, D, and E) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we reviewed clinical studies with a comprehensive literature research and meta-analytic estimates. To identify all clinical studies evaluating the association of vitamins B6/B12/C/D/E and AAA, databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2015, using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). For each case-control study, data regarding vitamin levels in both the AAA and control groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Pooled analyses of the 4 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin B6 levels (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.11; P=0.003) but non-significantly lower vitamin B12 levels (SMD, -0.42; 95% CI, -1.09 to 0.25; P=0.22) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Pooled analyses of the 2 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower levels of circulating vitamins C (SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.23 to -0.19; P=0.007) and E (SMD, -1.76; 95% CI, -2.93 to 0.60; P=0.003) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Another pooled analysis of the 3 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.50 to -0.01; P=0.04) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. In a double-blind controlled trial, 4.0-year treatment with a high-dose folic acid and vitamin B6/B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a rate of AAA repair despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. In another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 5.8-year supplementation with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) had no preventive effect on large AAA among male smokers. In clinical setting, although low circulating vitamins B6/C/D/E (not B12) levels are associated with AAA presence, vitamins B6/B12/E

  3. Aneurysm jig for anastomosis technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, R. M.; Eastcott, H. H.; Mansfield, A. O.; Taylor, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    A new jig is described which enables the technique for abdominal aortic aneurysm to be taught and practiced as it is performed by arterial surgeons at the present time. The aneurysm jig enables a plastic simulated aortic aneurysm to be opened as at operation to allow the inlaying of a Dacron tube sutured into place with continuous sutures. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:3674680

  4. Multiple intracranial aneurysms in polyarteritis nodosa: MRI and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oran, I.; Memis, A.; Parildar, M.; Yunten, N.

    1999-01-01

    In polyarteritis nodosa involvement of the central nervous system is infrequent; small cerebral infarcts are the most common neuroradiological finding. We report a 10-year-old boy with polyarteritis nodosa and intracranial haemorrhage. MRI showed an intracerebral haemorrhage. Angiography revealed two peripheral aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation, previously reported on only two occasions, and multiple microaneurysms in the hepatic, renal, mesenteric and even the lumbar arteries. (orig.)

  5. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Grønbæk, Morten

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined the predictive power of tobacco smoking on aortic aneurysm as opposed to other risk factors in the general population. METHODS: We recorded tobacco smoking and other risk factors at baseline, and assessed hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm in 15,072 individuals...... aneurysm in males and females consuming above 20g tobacco daily was 3.5% and 1.3%, among those >60years with plasma cholesterol >5mmol/L and a systolic blood pressure >140mmHg. CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco smoking is the most important predictor of future aortic aneurysm outcomes in the general population...

  6. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies.

  7. Experimental study on blood flow patterns through the phantoms of the intracranial arterial aneurysms using color Doppler imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Sub; Jeong, Eun Kee; Rhim, Yoon Chul; Kim, Sung Bin; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dae In

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence, growth, thrombosis, and rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms can be directly related to the effect of hemodynamic forces. We developed the phantom flow models and compared with the computer simulation program to analyse the flow pattern and hemodynamics that might be responsible for the intracranial arterial aneurysms. We designed the arterial phantoms of three major sites of intracranial arterial aneurysm ; 1) basilar artery tip, 2) internal carotid artery bifurcation, 3) curved area of internal carotid artery. Flow patterns in the aneurysmal portion of phantoms were evaluated with color Doppler system on the connection with automatic closed type of circulation system. Then, we compared the results with computer simulation. The hemodynamic characteristics of the phantoms were identical with those obtained by computerisation's. Three distinct zones of flow were identified by color Doppler studies on the aneurysm of the curved area of an internal carotid artery : 1) an inflow zone entering the aneurysm at the distal aspect of its orifice, 2) an outflow zone exiting the aneurysm at the proximal aspect of its orifice, 3) a central slow vortex.However, the phantoms of basilar artery tip and artery bifurcation showed a direct inflow stream at the dome of an aneurysm. Flow dynamics in the various phantoms of the aneurysms can be successfully evaluated with color Doppler imaging, and were consistent with those predicted by computer simulations

  8. Language, memory, and verbal fluency changes in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: results of a preoperative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ana Cláudia C; Azevedo-Filho, Hildo R C; Quinino, Saul; Ponte de Souza, Moysés Loyola; Câmara, Divaldo; Leitão, Laécio; Andrade, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    To detect changes in speech, verbal fluency, and memory in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by ruptured aneurysms and to analyze the results before surgical or embolization procedure. During the period May 2007 to November 2009, 193 patients with anterior aneurysmal SAH admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital da Restauração, Recife, Brazil, were tested for speech, verbal fluency, and memory disturbances after the first week of bleeding and compared with a control group with similar demographics. Patients with aneurysmal SAH differed significantly from the control group in language, verbal fluency, and memory functions before clipping or coiling procedures. There were differences in cognitive performance between patients with different aneurysm sites. It was possible to characterize the cognitive impairments of each area affected early on in the preoperative period, confirming the assumptions that the aneurysm site could be a determining factor of cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Surgical indication and problems of patients aged over 70 years with unruptured aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, J; Tanigawara, T; Kubota, T; Chiba, M; Akiyama, Y; Inamura, S

    1999-06-01

    Surgical indication and problems of patients aged over 70 years with unruptured aneurysms were investigated. Clinical features of eighteen cases of unruptured cerebral aneurysms were analyzed. The location of the cerebral aneurysms were in the internal carotid artery in five cases, in the middle cerebral artery in ten cases, in the anterior cerebral artery in 2 cases and in the basilar artery in 1 case. The size of the aneurysms was less than 10 mm in diameter in 17 cases and giant in one case. Treatment of these aneurysms was classified into two groups as follows; the conservative treatment group (four cases) and the surgical treatment group (14 cases). The therapeutic results of the conservative group were good recovery in 2 cases, and death in 2 cases. On the other hand, the results of surgical group were good recovery in 12 cases and fair in 2 cases. Operative complications were recognized in two cases. Consciousness disturbance and left hemiparesis was recognized in one case. Right hemiparesis was recognized in the another case. Postoperative MR imagings or CT scan presented small cerebral infarctions in the corona radiata in both cases. The cause of infarction was thought to be the occlusion of lenticulostriate arteries. From these data, in patients aged over 70 years with unruptured cerebral aneurysms, surgery should be considered not only from the aspect of aneurysmal size and its site, but also from the aspect of cerebral blood flow of the patient.

  10. Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Detected after Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Yoneda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic guidelines of intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA for hyperacute ischemic stroke are very strict. Because of potential higher risk of bleeding complications, the presence of unruptured cerebral aneurysm is a contraindication for systemic thrombolysis with tPA. According to the standard CT criteria, a 66-year-old woman who suddenly developed aphasia and hemiparesis received intravenous tPA within 3 h after ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance angiography during tPA infusion was performed and the presence of a small unruptured cerebral aneurysm was suspected at the anterior communicating artery. Delayed cerebral angiography confirmed an aneurysm with a size of 7 mm. The patient did not experience any adverse complications associated with the aneurysm. Clinical experiences of this kind of accidental off-label thrombolysis may contribute to modify the current rigid tPA guidelines for stroke.

  11. Surgical treatment of innominate artery and aortic aneurysm: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Erdinc; Harling, Leanne; Ashrafian, Hutan; Anagnostakou, Vania; Tassopoulos, Dimitris; Charitos, Christos; Kokotsakis, John; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-06-01

    Innominate artery (IA) aneurysms represent 3% of all arterial aneurysms. Due to the risk of thromboembolic complications and spontaneous rupture, surgical repair is usually recommended on an early elective basis. We present the case of 81-year-old Caucasian male presenting with atypical anterior chest pain secondary to a large innominate artery aneurysm who underwent successful open surgical repair at our institution. In our experience, open correction via median sternotomy with extension into the right neck provides excellent exposure and facilitates rapid reconstruction with good short and long-term outcomes. Minimally invasive and endovascular approaches provide emerging alternatives to open IA aneurysm repair, however further research is required to better define optimal patient selection criteria and determine the long-term outcomes of these novel therapies.

  12. Call-Fleming Syndrome (Reversible Cerebral Artery Vasoconstriction and Aneurysm Associated with Multiple Recreational Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doniel Drazin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse represents a significant health issue. Evidence suggests that recreational drug use has a direct effect on the cerebral vasculature and is of greater concern in those with undiagnosed aneurysms or vascular malformations. The authors report a case of thunderclap headache with a negative head CT and equivocal lumbar puncture after a drug-fueled weekend. The patient underwent diagnostic cerebral angiogram which demonstrated multisegmental, distal areas of focal narrowing of the middle, anterior, posterior, and posterior inferior cerebral artery and an incidental aneurysm. It is often difficult to determine the exact origin of symptoms; thus we were left with a bit of a chicken or the egg debate, trying to decipher which part came first. Either the aneurysm ruptured with associated concomitant vasospasm or it is a case of Call-Fleming syndrome (reversible cerebral artery vasoconstriction with an incidental aneurysm. The authors proposed their management and rationale of this complex case.

  13. Lumbosacral Subdural Hematoma and Concomitant Acute Lower Extremity Monoparesis After Intracranial Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Myeong Jin; Yoo, Chan Jong; Park, Cheol Wan

    2016-11-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs rarely and can cause neurologic deficits. A 52-year-old man was diagnosed with SAH caused by rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was treated by coil embolization on the day of admission. After embolization, the patient's left lower extremity strength had decreased and a spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed subarachnoid hematoma and SDH with severe thecal sac compression at L4-S2. On postbleed day 6, L4-S1 laminectomy was performed, and the strength in all muscle of the left leg improved. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm may cause symptomatic SDH in the lumbosacral spine as well as subarachnoid hematoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We report the clinical and angiographic results of endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Over a three-year period, 80 unruptured aneurysms in 74 patients were electively treated with endovascular management. One aneurysm was diagnosed during investigations for a second ruptured aneurysm, 54 aneurysms were incidentally discovered, 18 aneurysms presented with symptoms of mass effect and seven aneurysms presented with symptoms of brain stem ischemia. Mean size of the 80 unruptured aneurysms was 12.5±8.0 mm (range, 2-39 mm). Thirty-six aneurysms (45%) were small (<10 mm), 38 aneurysms (47.5%) were large (10-25 mm), and six aneurysms (7.5%) were giant (25-39 mm). Forty-eight wide-necked aneurysms (60%) were coiled with the aid of a supporting device. The mortality rate was 1.25%, and the overall morbidity was 1.25%. Of these, one of the patients suffered a stroke, leading to severe disability (1.25%). In one patient, the aneurysm ruptured during treatment, resulting in death. Initial aneurysm occlusion was complete (100%) in 76.25% aneurysms, nearly complete (90%-98%) in 10% aneurysms and incomplete (60%-85%) in 13.75% aneurysms. Follow-up angiography was available in 67 patients with 73 treated aneurysms (91.25%) from one to 36 months (mean 9.3 months); partial reopening occurred in 7.5%, mainly large and giant aneurysms (5.5%). Additional coiling was performed in four aneurysms. There were no complications in additional treatments. At 14.1-month clinical follow-up (range, 2 to 36 months), mRS score was 0 in 78.75% patients, 1 in 10% patients, 2 in 8.75% and 3 in 1.25%. There was no aneurysmal rupture during the follow-up period. Endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms has low procedural mortality and morbidity rates. PMID:22192544

  15. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M

    1995-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable....... No significant differences in survival for patients with dissecting and nondissecting AA were detected. In all, 132 patients (78%) died and 78 (59%) of them died of rupture. Mean time to rupture was 1,300 +/- 8 days. Cumulative 5-year hazard of rupture for the dissecting AA was twice that of the nondissecting (p...... A dissections. The results suggest that type B dissections may have a more favorable course if operated on, but a prospective, randomized study is necessary to confirm this observation. We believe that older patients and those with a small aneurysm may benefit from early, elective operation....

  16. Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Azizzadeh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made in the surgical repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA.  Improvements in perioperative care and surgical techniques have resulted in reductions in complication and mortality rates. Adjunctive use of distal aortic perfusion and cerebrospinal fluid drainage has been especially helpful, reducing the incidence of neurological deficits to 2.4%. Current research is aimed at improving organ preservation. This review focuses on the current diagnosis and management of TAAA.

  17. Gigantic unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm presenting as an incidental murmur.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yagoub, Hatim

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old man referred by his family physician with an asymptomatic cardiac murmur. Trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) suggested an unruptured right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) causing extrinsic compression of the right ventricular outflow tract. This was confirmed with an ECG-gated cardiac CT showing a large right SVA measuring 35×37×42 mm in size. Coronary angiography demonstrated non-obstructive coronary artery disease. Ascending thoracic anterior in the right anterior oblique view delineated the right SVA. The patient underwent aortic valve sparing surgical repair of the aneurysm with an excellent result. Echocardiography confirmed obliteration of the aneurysm and normal aortic valve function postoperatively.

  18. Surgical Repair of Post-Infarct True Posterobasal Ventricular Aneurysm with Mitral Valve Replacement and Coronary Revascularization: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasarathan Charumathi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-infarction ventricular aneurysm is a complication of myocardial infarction. While the involvement of the anterior wall is quite common, posterobasal left ventricular aneurysm is a rare clinical complication in this setting. In this case report, we report a post-infarction posterobasal left ventricular aneurysm combined with ischemic mitral regurgitation due to coronary artery disease, for which we successfully performed triple coronary artery bypass and ventricular geometry restitution via a modified Dor’s procedure with mitral valve replacement through an extracardiac approach.1

  19. A ruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm repaired by combined endovascular and open techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Wang; Sarfati, Mark R; Mueller, Michelle T; Kraiss, Larry W

    2006-11-01

    Aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal arteries (PDA) are rare, accounting for man was transferred to our hospital with a 1-day history of abdominal pain and syncope. On admission, an abdominal and pelvis computerized tomographic (CT) scan identified a large mesenteric hematoma, a 1.9 cm PDA aneurysm, and an occluded celiac axis. Mesenteric angiography revealed no active aneurysm leak and a stenotic superior mesenteric artery (SMA) origin. All hepatic blood flow originated from the stenotic SMA via markedly enlarged PDA collaterals. The patient was brought to the operating room, where absence of the celiac axis was confirmed. An aorto-to-proper hepatic and SMA bypass was performed using a bifurcated polyester graft. The next day, the patient was brought to the angiography suite, where the PDA aneurysm was coiled. Postprocedure CT scans confirmed thrombosis of the aneurysm. Ruptured mesenteric artery aneurysms are a challenging problem for the vascular surgeon. PDA aneurysms are rare and often occur in an unfavorable location. There appears to be an association with anatomic anomalies of the mesenteric circulation. Prompt invasive and noninvasive diagnostic studies aid in the definitive management of this often fatal problem. Combined endovascular and open techniques can be used for successful treatment.

  20. Treatment outcomes of unruptured intracranial aneurysm; experience of 1,231 consecutive aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jihye; Kim, Bum-Soo; Shin, Yong Sam

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review our experience with surgical clipping and endovascular treatment (EVT) of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs), with a special focus on complications. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and radiological data from patients who underwent surgery or EVT. Surgery was performed by one neurosurgeon, and EVT was performed by two neurointerventionists according to one hybrid neurosurgeon's decision. Adverse events included the following: (1) decline of the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score from 1 to 2 and (2) any unexpected neurological deficit or imaging finding affecting the prognosis and/or requiring additional procedures, medication, or prolonged hospital stay. Of the 1231 UIAs in 1124 patients, 625 (50.7 %) aneurysms were treated with surgery, and 606 (49.3 %) aneurysms were treated with EVT. The overall complication rate of UIA treatment was 3.2 %. The rate of adverse events was 2.4 %, and the rates of morbidity and mortality were 0.6 and 0.2 %, respectively. The rates of adverse events, morbidity, and mortality were not significantly different between surgery and EVT. The rate of hospital use for EVT was stationary over the years of the study. Posterior circulation in surgery, large aneurysms (>15 mm) in EVT, and stent- or balloon-assisted procedures in EVT were associated with the occurrence of complications. Poor clinical outcome (mRS of 3-6) was 0.8 % at hospital discharge. Both UIA treatment modalities decided by one hybrid neurosurgeon showed low complication rates and good clinical outcomes in this study. These results may serve as a point of reference for clinical decision-making for patients with UIA.

  1. Epidemiology and contemporary management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is most commonly defined as a maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta in excess of 3 cm in either anterior-posterior or transverse planes or, alternatively, as a focal dilation ≥ 1.5 times the diameter of the normal adjacent arterial segment. Risk factors for the development of AAA include age > 60, tobacco use, male gender, Caucasian race, and family history of AAA. Aneurysm growth and rupture risk appear to be associated with persistent tobacco use, female gender, and chronic pulmonary disease. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and detected incidentally on various imaging studies, including abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomographic angiography. Symptoms associated with AAA may include abdominal or back pain, thromboembolization, atheroembolization, aortic rupture, or development of an arteriovenous or aortoenteric fistula. The Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Efficiently (SAAAVE) Act provides coverage for a one-time screening abdominal ultrasound at age 65 for men who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes and women who have family history of AAA disease. Medical management is recommended for asymptomatic patients with AAAs  5 mm/6 months), or presence of a fusiform aneurysm with maximum diameter of 5.5 cm or greater. Intervention for AAA includes conventional open surgical repair and endovascular aortic stent graft repair.

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Unruptured A1 Segment Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaochuan, Huo; Xiaoyun, Sun; Youxiang, Li; Ning, Guan; Wenshi, Guo; Junsheng, Luo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aneurysms of the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (A1A) are rare and challenging to treat. Less information is available regarding their management by endovascular approach. We evaluated our experience of endovascular treatment in 15 patients with unruptured A1As. We retrospectively reviewed unruptured A1As treated by embolization at our hospital. The clinical data and angiographic results were reviewed. A special technique involving shaping microcatheter tips was used for catheterization. From September 2009 to December 2012, 15 patients presenting with unruptured A1As were identified. All the patients were treated by selective embolization including five patients with balloon-assisted coiling (BAC) or stent-assisted coiling (SAC). These adjunctive techniques were used to catheterize the sac safely or to protect a branch at the neck. According to the location and direction of the aneurysm, “Z-shaped”, “S-Shaped” or “U-Shaped” microcatheter tip shaping was used for microcatheter positioning and stabilization. All patients showed an excellent clinical outcome. A complete aneurysm occlusion was obtained in all the patients. Endovascular treatment of A1As is feasible and associated with good results. Because of their location and close relationship with perforators, endovascular treatment of A1As sometimes requires the use of BAC or SAC. The microcatheter tip shaping technique is very important for coiling. Our results suggest that endovascular treatment is a suitable therapeutic option for unruptured A1As when the aneurysm size is optimal for embolization. PMID:23693042

  3. Cerebral aneurysms – an audit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Abstract. We performed an audit to determine the profile of cerebral aneurysms at the Universitas Hospital Bloem- fontein, the only government hospital with a vascular suite in the Free State and Northern Cape area. Two hun- dred and twenty-three government patients, diagnosed with cerebral aneurysms during the period.

  4. Neurofibromatosis 1 vasculopathy manifesting as a peripheral aneurysm in an adolescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmakis, Shannon G.; Khanna, Geetika; Han, Min; White, Frances

    2014-01-01

    Arterial vasculopathy is a well-recognized but uncommon manifestation of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). It can manifest as stenoses, aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. NF-1 vasculopathy typically involves the aorta, visceral arteries or carotid-vertebral circulation. Aortic and visceral vasculopathy typically presents as stenotic lesions, while aneurysms have been reported primarily in the subclavian/vertebral arteries. Aneurysms of the peripheral/extremity arteries are an extremely rare complication of NF-1 that may present as a mass or spontaneous rupture. We present the case of a teenage boy with an arm mass secondary to an aneurysm. We hope this case will increase recognition of the variable clinical manifestations of NF-1 vasculopathy among radiologists. (orig.)

  5. Neurofibromatosis 1 vasculopathy manifesting as a peripheral aneurysm in an adolescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmakis, Shannon G.; Khanna, Geetika [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Han, Min; White, Frances [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Immunology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Arterial vasculopathy is a well-recognized but uncommon manifestation of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). It can manifest as stenoses, aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. NF-1 vasculopathy typically involves the aorta, visceral arteries or carotid-vertebral circulation. Aortic and visceral vasculopathy typically presents as stenotic lesions, while aneurysms have been reported primarily in the subclavian/vertebral arteries. Aneurysms of the peripheral/extremity arteries are an extremely rare complication of NF-1 that may present as a mass or spontaneous rupture. We present the case of a teenage boy with an arm mass secondary to an aneurysm. We hope this case will increase recognition of the variable clinical manifestations of NF-1 vasculopathy among radiologists. (orig.)

  6. [Hybrid surgical intervention in a patient with an aortic arch aneurysm and coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charchan, E R; Abugov, S A; Puretsky, M V; Kim, S Yu; Skvortsov, A A; Khachatryan, Z R

    2015-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report regarding the use of hybrid technology in surgical treatment of a patient with an aneurysm of the distal portion of the aortic arch and coronary artery disease. The patient underwent a hybrid operation, i.e. debranching of the aortic arch branches, exoprosthetic repair of the ascending aorta, autovenous prosthetic coronary bypass grafting of the branch of the blunt edge of the anterior interventricular artery, stenting of the ascending portion, arch and descending portion of the aorta (stent graft "Medtronic Valiant"). In doing so, we used a non-standard approach to connecting the artificial circulation unit and to choosing the place for establishing proximal anastomoses of autovenous coronary bypass grafts. The early postoperative period was complicated by the development of respiratory insufficiency requiring continuation artificial pulmonary ventilation. The duration of the hospital stay of the patient amounted to 15 days. The check-up multispiral computed tomography showed normal functioning of the reconstruction zones, the stent graft is expanded, with no leak observed. The conclusion was made that hybrid interventions may be considered as an alternative to the classical surgical treatment associated in patients of older age group with a severe course of the postoperative period and high lethality.

  7. Wingspan stent-assisted coiling of intracranial aneurysms with symptomatic parent artery stenosis: Experience in 35 patients with mid-term follow-up results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xu; Liang Guobiao; Li Zhiqing; Wei Xuezhong; Wang Xiaogang; Zhang Haifeng; Feng Sizhe; Lin Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a potential risk of aneurysm rupture after parent artery revascularization because of increased blood flow. The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of Wingspan stent-assisted coil embolization in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with symptomatic parent artery stenosis. Methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients (19 men, 16 women; age range, 48–79 years; mean age, 60.4 years) harboring 35 unruptured wide-necked or fusiform intracranial aneurysms (mean size 6.8 mm; range 2.5–18 mm.) with symptomatic parent artery stenosis (mean degree 71.1%; range 50–92%) were treated with the Wingspan stent-assisted coiling. Twenty-four lesions were located in the anterior circulation and eleven in the posterior circulation. Patients were premedicated with antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin 300 mg and clopidogrel 75 mg for at least 3 days before the procedure. Following pre-dilatation and stent placement, a coiling microcatheter entered the aneurysm through the interstices of the stent, and then coiling was performed. After the procedure, clopidogrel 75 mg daily was recommended for an additional 30 days, and aspirin 100 mg was recommended throughout follow-up. For all patients, clinical follow-up was conducted by clinic visitation, or telephone interview. Angiographic follow-up with DSA was recommended at 6 months and 1 year after the procedure. Angiography follow-up (mean time 10.6 months) was obtained in 31 cases (88.6%). The technical feasibility of the procedure, procedure-related complications, angiographic results, clinical outcome and follow-up angiography were evaluated. Results: In every case, technical success was achieved. The degree of stenosis was reduced from 71.1% to 17.4% after balloon angioplasty and stenting. Immediate angiography demonstrated complete occlusion in 25 cases (71.4%), neck remnant in 7 cases (20.0%), and incomplete occlusion in 3 cases (8.6%). Procedure-related morbidity occurred in two

  8. Clinical value of virtual three-dimensional instrument and cerebral aneurysm models in the interventional preoperative simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Xin; Xie Xiaodong; Wang Chaohua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To establish virtual three-dimensional instrument and cerebral aneurysm models by using three-dimensional moulding software, and to explore the effect of the models in interventional preoperative simulation. Methods: The virtual individual models including cerebral arteries and aneurysms were established by using the three-dimensional moulding software of 3D Studio MAX R3 based on standard virtual cerebral aneurysm models and individual DSA image. The virtual catheter, guide wire, stent and coil were also established. The study of interventional preoperative simulation was run in personal computer, and included 3 clinical cases. Results: The simulation results of the working angle and the moulding angle of the head of catheter and guide wire in 3 cases were identical with that of operation results. The simulation results of the requirement of number and size of coil in 1 case of anterior communicating aneurysm and 1 case of posterior communicating aneurysm were identical with that of operation results. The simulation results of coil for aneurysmal shape in 1 case of giant internal carotid artery aneurysm were more than 2 three-dimensional coils with size of 3 mm x 3 cm from the operation results, and the position of the second coil in aneurysmal neck was adjusted according to the results of real-time simulation. The results of retrospective simulation of operation procedure indicated that the simulation methods for regular and small aneurysms could become a routine simulation means but more simulation experience was needed to build up for the giant aneurysms. Conclusions: The virtual three-dimensional instrument and cerebral aneurysm models established by the general software provided a new study method for neuro-interventional preoperative simulation, and it played an important guidance role in developing neuro-interventional operation. (authors)

  9. Surgical Results of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in the Elderly : Single Center Experience in the Past Ten Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Jin; Park, Eun Suk; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kwun, Byung Duk; Kim, Chang Jin

    2011-01-01

    Objective As medical advances have increased life expectancy, it has become imperative to develop specific treatment strategies for intracranial aneurysms in the elderly. We therefore analyzed the clinical characteristics and outcomes of the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms in patients older than 70 years. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and results of neuroimaging modalities on 54 aneurysms of 48 consecutive patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. (mean±SD age, 72.11±1.96 years; range, 70-78 years) who underwent surgical clipping over 10 years (May 1999 to June 2010). Results Of the 54 aneurysms, 22 were located in the internal carotid artery, 19 in the middle cerebral artery, 12 in the anterior cerebral artery, and 1 in the superior cerebellar artery. Six patients had multiple aneurysms. Aneurysm size ranged from 3 mm to 17 mm (mean±SD, 6.82±3.07 mm). Fifty of the 54 aneurysms (92.6%) were completely clipped. Three-month outcomes were excellent in 50 (92.6%) aneurysms and good and poor in 2 each (3.7%), with 1 death (2.0%). Procedure-related complications occurred in 7 aneurysms (13.0%), with 2 (3.7%) resulting in permanent neurological deficits, including death. No postoperative subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during follow-up. The cumulative rates of stroke- or death-free survival at 5 and 10 years were 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion Surgical clipping of unruptured intracranial aneurysms in elderly group could get it as a favorable outcome in well selected cases. PMID:21887389

  10. Clipping Surgery for Paraclinoid Carotid Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yasunaga; Suzuki, Yota; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Ichinose, Shunsuke; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Paraclinoid carotid aneurysm is widely treated with coil embolization. However, all paraclinoid carotid aneurysms cannot be obliterated by the endovascular approach. Our direct surgical procedure was presented. The clinical data of surgically treated paraclinoid carotid aneurysms were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred ninety paraclinoid carotid aneurysms in 181 patients were directly obliterated at the Shinshu University Hospital and its affiliated hospitals between 1991 and 2013. Direct surgical repair of the paraclinoid carotid aneurysm is still useful, even in the era of endovascular treatment.

  11. Implantation of 3D-Printed Patient-Specific Aneurysm Models into Cadaveric Specimens: A New Training Paradigm to Allow for Improvements in Cerebrovascular Surgery and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnau Benet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of implanting 3D-printed brain aneurysm model in human cadavers and to assess their utility in neurosurgical research, complex case management/planning, and operative training. Methods. Two 3D-printed aneurysm models, basilar apex and middle cerebral artery, were generated and implanted in four cadaveric specimens. The aneurysms were implanted at the same anatomical region as the modeled patient. Pterional and orbitozygomatic approaches were done on each specimen. The aneurysm implant, manipulation capabilities, and surgical clipping were evaluated. Results. The 3D aneurysm models were successfully implanted to the cadaveric specimens’ arterial circulation in all cases. The features of the neck in terms of flexibility and its relationship with other arterial branches allowed for the practice of surgical maneuvering characteristic to aneurysm clipping. Furthermore, the relationship of the aneurysm dome with the surrounding structures allowed for better understanding of the aneurysmal local mass effect. Noticeably, all of these observations were done in a realistic environment provided by our customized embalming model for neurosurgical simulation. Conclusion. 3D aneurysms models implanted in cadaveric specimens may represent an untapped training method for replicating clip technique; for practicing certain approaches to aneurysms specific to a particular patient; and for improving neurosurgical research.

  12. Implantation of 3D-Printed Patient-Specific Aneurysm Models into Cadaveric Specimens: A New Training Paradigm to Allow for Improvements in Cerebrovascular Surgery and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Arnau; Plata-Bello, Julio; Abla, Adib A.; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Saloner, David; Lawton, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of implanting 3D-printed brain aneurysm model in human cadavers and to assess their utility in neurosurgical research, complex case management/planning, and operative training. Methods. Two 3D-printed aneurysm models, basilar apex and middle cerebral artery, were generated and implanted in four cadaveric specimens. The aneurysms were implanted at the same anatomical region as the modeled patient. Pterional and orbitozygomatic approaches were done on each specimen. The aneurysm implant, manipulation capabilities, and surgical clipping were evaluated. Results. The 3D aneurysm models were successfully implanted to the cadaveric specimens' arterial circulation in all cases. The features of the neck in terms of flexibility and its relationship with other arterial branches allowed for the practice of surgical maneuvering characteristic to aneurysm clipping. Furthermore, the relationship of the aneurysm dome with the surrounding structures allowed for better understanding of the aneurysmal local mass effect. Noticeably, all of these observations were done in a realistic environment provided by our customized embalming model for neurosurgical simulation. Conclusion. 3D aneurysms models implanted in cadaveric specimens may represent an untapped training method for replicating clip technique; for practicing certain approaches to aneurysms specific to a particular patient; and for improving neurosurgical research. PMID:26539542

  13. Concomitant unruptured intracranial aneurysms and carotid artery stenosis: an institutional review of patients undergoing carotid revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkon, Matthew J; Hoang, Han; Rockman, Caron; Mussa, Firas; Cayne, Neal S; Riles, Thomas; Jafar, Jafar J; Veith, Frank J; Adelman, Mark A; Maldonado, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of concomitant carotid artery stenosis and unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) has been reported at between 0.5% and 5%. In these patients, treatment strategies must balance the risk of ischemic stroke with the risk of aneurysmal rupture. Several studies have addressed the natural course of UIAs in the setting of carotid revascularization; however, the final recommendations are not uniform. The purpose of this study was to review our institutional experience with concomitant UIAs and carotid artery stenosis. We performed a retrospective review of all patients with carotid artery stenosis who underwent carotid artery endarterectomy (CEA) or carotid artery stenting (CAS) at our institution between 2003 and 2010. Only patients with preoperative imaging demonstrating intracranial circulation were included. Charts were reviewed for patients' demographic and clinical data, duration of follow-up, and aneurysm size and location. Patients were stratified into 2 groups: carotid artery stenosis with unruptured intracranial aneurysm (CS/UIA) and carotid artery stenosis without intracranial aneurysm (CS). Three hundred five patients met the inclusion criteria and had a total of 316 carotid procedures (CAS or CEA) performed. Eleven patients were found to have UIAs (3.61%) prior to carotid revascularization. Male and female prevalence was 2.59% and 5.26% (P = 0.22), respectively. Patients' demographics did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. The average aneurysm size was 3.25 ± 2.13 mm, and the most common location was the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. No patient in the study had aneurysm rupture, and the mean follow-up time was 26.5 months for the CS/UIA group. Concomitant carotid artery stenosis and UIAs is a rare entity. Carotid revascularization does not appear to increase the risk of rupture for small aneurysms (<10 mm) in the midterm. Although not statistically significant, there was a higher incidence of aneurysms found in

  14. Psychological consequences of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm and conservative treatment of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Vammen, Sten; Fasting, H

    2000-01-01

    To describe the potential psychological consequences of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).......To describe the potential psychological consequences of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs)....

  15. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  16. A giant cranial aneurysmal bone cyst associated with fibrous dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Składzieriń, J; Olés, K; Zagólski, O; Moskała, M; Sztuka, M; Strek, P; Wierzchowski, W; Tomik, J

    2008-01-01

    An aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a rare, benign fibro-osseous lesion, considered a vascular phenomenon secondary to fibrous dysplasia or a giant-cell tumour, and occurs mainly in long bones and vertebrae. In this case report a 16-year-old male presented with massive epistaxis. He was admitted with a 3-year history of chronic rhinitis, headaches, right ocular pain and recurrent epistaxis. CT scans showed a predominantly cystic, expansive mass obstructing both nasal cavities, extending to all paranasal sinuses and both orbits, with evidence of anterior cranial fossa skull base destruction. The patient underwent a craniofacial resection of the tumour performed with an external approach and an immediate reconstruction of the dural defect. Histology confirmed the lesion was an ABC associated with fibrous dysplasia. The patient's recovery was complete. A large facial aneurysmal bone cyst can damage the facial skeleton and skull base, and requires excision by a combined external approach.

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  18. Right hepatic artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Astrid Del Pilar Ardila; Loures, Paulo; Calle, Juan Cristóbal Ospina; Cunha, Beatriz; Córdoba, Juan Camilo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an aneurysm of the right hepatic artery and its multidisciplinary management by general surgery, endoscopy and radiology services. Being a case of extremely low incidence, it is important to show its diagnostic and therapeutic approach. RESUMO Relatamos um caso de aneurisma da artéria hepática direita conduzido de forma multidisciplinar pelos Serviços de Cirurgia Geral, Endoscopia e Radiologia. Em se tratando de caso de incidência baixíssima, é importante mostrar o enfoque diagnóstico e terapêutico usado em seu manejo.

  19. SPECT thallium-201 scintigraphy for the detection of left-ventricular aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, K.A.; Alazraki, N.P.; Taylor, A.T.; Datz, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    We have noted that the presence of left ventricular anterior/apical aneurysm on contrast ventriculography or echocardiography correlates well with the finding of failure of convergence of the left ventricular walls toward the apex on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. To assess this observation, we analyzed the SPECT thallium scans of 74 sequential patients who had SPECT thallium scintigraphy and contrast ventriculography and/or echocardiography for evaluation of coronary artery disease. Immediate post-stress and 4-hr redistribution thallium-201 SPECT images, obtained following i.v. administration of 2 mCi of thallium-201, were reconstructed with no attenuation correction using three-dimensional linear and nonlinear filters and displayed in short, vertical-long, and horizontal-long axes. Of the 74 patients, contrast ventriculography and/or echocardiography showed anterior/apical aneurysms in 15 and a posterolateral aneurysm in one. SPECT thallium scans detected 14 of the 16 aneurysms, based on the criterion of failure of convergence of the ventricular walls toward the apex. There were two false-positives. Thus SPECT thallium-201 scintigraphy for the detection of left-ventricular aneurysm in this series had a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 97%, and an accuracy of 96%

  20. Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis following the rupture of an Adamkiewicz aneurysm: Literature review and a case illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todeschi, J; Chibbaro, S; Gubian, A; Pop, R; Proust, F; Cebula, H

    2018-02-09

    The rupture of an isolated spinal aneurysm is an exceptional occurrence. It might be responsible for a spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SSAH) that in rare cases can be complicated by arachnoiditis. Among the former the adhesive type is the most severe leading to the formation of a cyst and/or a syrinx. The literature review was performed via a PubMed search using the following keywords. Adhesive arachnoiditis; spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage; spinal arachnoiditis; spinal arachnoid cyst; arachnoid cyst .Thesearch yielded 24 articles. Given the fact that only a few studies had been reported on the subject, we decided to include all studies regarding adhesive arachnoiditis after SAH leading to a descriptive literature review. Furthermore, a case illustration of a 57 year old man harbouring this type of rare pathology is described. Twenty-four case reports were found regarding spinal adhesive arachnoiditis (SAA) following SSAH. Posterior cerebral circulation bleeding (66.7%) most often occurred followed by spinal (9.1%) and anterior cerebral circulation (9.1%) respectively. The mean time between the haemorrhage and the SAA onset was 10 months. A higher predominance of symptomatic thoracic SAA was found. Including the present case, 80% of patients had a laminectomy, 72% had a micro adhesiolysis, and 56% a shunt placement. Cervical and upper thoracic involvement appeared to have a better outcome. Although most authors suggested surgical treatment, the long-term outcome remains unclear. Early stage diagnosis and management of this rare and disabling pathology may lead to a better outcome. Larger co-operative studies remain essential to obtain a better understanding of such a rare and complex disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Sudden death as a late sequel of Kawasaki disease: postmortem CT demonstration of coronary artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Naoki; Okuda, Takahisa; Shiotani, Seiji; Kohno, Mototsugu; Hayakawa, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Atsuko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku

    2013-02-10

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown etiology that primarily affects the coronary artery (CA) and presents during childhood. The characteristic coronary arterial lesion of KD is an aneurysm. Ischemic heart disease derived from a CA aneurysm is experienced approximately two decades after the onset of acute KD. In recent years, the primary issue of concern has been asymptomatic adults with a CA aneurysm caused by undiagnosed KD. We present a case of sudden death as a late KD sequel in a young adult. A postmortem CT scan revealed a coarse calcification of a left anterior descending CA aneurysm, which was confirmed at the time of autopsy. A postmortem CT scan is useful in cases of sudden death where the detection of a calcified CA aneurysm would suggest to the forensic pathologist that the deceased suffered from a late sequel of KD. The use of screening postmortem CT scans for young people may detect cases of unsuspected CA aneurysms, raising the possibility of untreated KD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Results of Clipping Surgery for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Elderly Patients Aged 90 or Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yota; Watanabe, Atsushi; Wakui, Kenji; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The number of elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is increasing. Although advanced age is one of the recognized risk factors for poor outcome, conservative treatment for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage cannot provide satisfactory outcome in elderly patients. The aim of this study is to assess the outcome in patients aged 90 or older, for whom ruptured aneurysms were treated by clipping. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of non-traumatic SAH patients who were hospitalized at the Chiba Neurosurgical Clinic between 2004 and 2013. Of the 702 patients, 8 patients (1.1 %) were aged 90 or older. Of them, four underwent clipping surgery and the other four died or were managed conservatively. Their preoperative conditions were evaluated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies Grading Scale of SAH, and the Fisher classification was used to assess the bleeding severity. The location of the ruptured aneurysm was determined by three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography or cerebral angiography. The Glasgow Outcome Scale evaluation was assigned at discharge. Four patients (four female, all WFNS grade 1), aged 90 or older, underwent clipping surgery. Fisher classification was three in two patients and four in the other two. Location of the ruptured aneurysm was internal carotid artery in two, anterior communicating artery in one, and posterior inferior cerebellar artery in one patient. Two of these four patients had a favorable outcome. We propose that advanced age alone does not exclude suitable surgical clipping in patients with aneurysmal rupture in the tenth decade of life.

  3. Effects of indocyanine green videoangiography and electrophysiological monitoring on surgery for intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yoshikazu; Kitai, Ryuhei; Awara, Kosuke

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the outcome of 62 consecutive patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm treated by surgical clipping. Thirty-one cases were operated without intraoperative monitoring, 17 cases with indocyanine green videoangiography (ICGA), and 14 cases with electrophysiological monitoring (EPM) in addition to ICGA. Complete obliteration of the aneurysm was confirmed in all 62 cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging of MRI disclosed no ischemic lesions after surgery in any of the cases. Asymptomatic venous infarction was detected by CT study in 2 cases. Cranial nerve palsy occurred in 4 cases but EPM could not detect it. There was no difference among the group without monitoring, the group with ICGA and the group with ICGA and EPM. The mortality and morbidity of all cases was calculated as 0% and 6.5%, respectively. ICGA appeared to be useful in surgery for aneurysms encasing perforators or for repair of problems such as premature rupture. eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) seemed effective in surgery for anterior choroidal artery aneurysms or aneurysms requiring trapping before clipping. However, monitoring would not have been effective without extensive dissection of aneurysms, suggesting that basic microsurgical techniques are crucial for successful surgery. (author)

  4. CT during selective arteriography: anatomical assessment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms before endovascular treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, M.; Kida, S.; Uchiyama, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J.; Sanada, J.; Yoshikawa, J.; Matsui, O.

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the usefulness of helical CT during selective angiography (CT arteriography) in pretreatment assessment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. We studied 47 unruptured aneurysms in 34 prospectively recruited patients for whom endovascular embolisation was initially considered. As pretreatment assessment, we performed rotational digital subtraction angiography (DSA) followed by CT arteriography. The findings on axial source images (axial images) and reconstructed three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) of CT arteriography were compared to those of rotational DSA, with particular attention to the neck of the aneurysm and arterial branches adjacent to it. Information provided by CT arteriography was more useful than that of rotational DSA as regards the neck in 25 (53 %) of 47 cases and as regards branches in 18 (49 %) of 37 aneurysms. On axial images, small arteries such as the anterior choroidal artery were seen in some cases. CT arteriography can provide valuable additional information about unruptured aneurysms, which cannot be obtained by rotational DSA alone. This technique is useful for obtaining anatomical information about aneurysm anatomy and for deciding the therapeutic strategy. (orig.)

  5. Does small aneurysm size predict intraoperative rupture during coiling in ruptured and unruptured aneurysms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Muthusamy, Subramanian; Dowling, Richard; Yan, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    Aneurysm size is a possible risk factor for intraoperative rupture (IOR) during coiling procedures. We aim to determine if aneurysm size 4 mm or smaller predicts IOR. Between January 1997 and August 2010, 689 aneurysms in 595 patients were treated by coiling at a single institution. In all, 41 were excluded from statistical analysis due to missing data leaving 648 aneurysms in 562 patients. Demographic, clinical, and procedural outcomes were collected. We compared the rate of IOR in small aneurysms (≤4 mm) with larger aneurysms (>4 mm). We also compared the rate of IOR in ruptured versus unruptured aneurysms in the above categories. The overall rate of IOR was 4.9%. Aneurysms 4 mm or smaller were more than twice as likely to rupture on table compared to larger aneurysms (8.7% versus 3.9%; P=.022). Of note, ruptured aneurysms were more prone to IOR compared to unruptured aneurysms (7.0% versus 2.2%; P=.005). Aneurysm size 4 mm or smaller was a risk factor in small, ruptured aneurysms only (P=.019). In addition, unruptured aneurysms that were complicated by IOR were associated with higher rates of 30-day mortality (P<.001). Aneurysm size 4 mm or smaller is a risk factor for IOR in ruptured but not unruptured aneurysms. This additional risk factor should be considered when planning the management of small, ruptured aneurysms. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hyperperfusion syndrome after clipping of an unruptured aneurysm by transsylvian approach: A case repot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoichi Iwata

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old man developed symptomatic hyperperfusion syndrome after clipping of an unruptured left anterior choroidal artery aneurysm using a transsylvian approach with temporary internal carotid artery occlusion for 3 min. Although we preserved all adjacent vessels, the patient exhibited right hemiparesis and motor aphasia soon after the operation. Single photon emission computed tomography showed increased perfusion in the left cerebral hemisphere. These symptoms and hyperperfusion gradually resolved and disappeared completely within 2 weeks. Hyperperfusion syndrome should be considered even after uneventful clipping of unruptured aneurysms.

  7. Hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Walter M.; Algra, Ale; van der Sprenkel, Jan Willem Berkelbach; Tulleken, Cornelis A.F.; Rinkel, Gabriël J.E.

    OBJECTIVE: Hypomagnesemia frequently occurs in hospitalized patients, and it is associated with poor outcome. We assessed the frequency and time distribution of hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and its relationship to the severity of SAH, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI),

  8. Endovascular treatment of PICA aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukonoweshuro, W.; Laitt, R.D.; Hughes, D.G. [Radiology Dept., Greater Manchester Neurosciences Unit, Hope Hospital, Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2003-03-01

    Endovascular treatment of aneurysms of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) avoids manipulation of the brainstem or lower cranial nerves and should therefore carry a lower risk of neurological morbidity than surgical clipping. We reviewed our experience of 23 patients with PICA aneurysms treated by endovascular occlusion with Guglielmi detachable coils and documented their long-term outcome on follow-up. We observed a 28 day procedure-related neurological morbidity of 13% (3/23 patients). One patient suffered permanent neurological complications. There were no procedure-related deaths. None of our patients suffered a re-bleed from their treated aneurysms. Our series shows endovascular treatment of ruptured PICA aneurysms to be safe and effective. (orig.)

  9. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  10. Endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms with Guglielmi detachable coils: short- and long-term results of a single-centre series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standhardt, Harald; Boecher-Schwarz, Hans; Gruber, Andreas; Benesch, Thomas; Knosp, Engelbert; Bavinzski, Gerhard

    2008-03-01

    Purpose of the present study is to evaluate the clinical outcome of endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms and to address the question of long-term stability and protection against future subarachnoid hemorrhage. Retrospective analysis of all patients treated in a 12-year period (173 patients: age 26 to 76 yr, mean 52.2+/-10.8/202 aneurysms: size 3 to 50 mm, mean 10.0+/-8.3). The mortality was 0.5%; the overall morbidity was 3.5%. The most frequent complications were thromboembolic events (10.9%). Of these, 3.0% of patients suffered a stroke, leading to severe disability in 1 patient (0.5%). In 1 patient, the aneurysm ruptured during treatment, resulting in relevant neurological disability. Another patient suffered a fatal aneurysm rupture hours after treatment. The occlusion rate depended on aneurysm and neck size. Follow-up angiography revealed a decrease of the occlusion rate over time. This trend was obvious in all size categories and was most pronounced in giant aneurysms. In 3 patients (1.5%) with partially thrombosed giant aneurysms of the posterior circulation, embolization could not prevent later aneurysm rupture. There were no ruptures of any other aneurysms in the follow-up period (3.7+/-3.4 yr). Endovascular treatment is a highly safe procedure with low intervention-related morbidity and mortality. Long-term data for nongiant aneurysms showed good protection against rupture in the observation period. In contrast, the risk of rupture for giant aneurysms of the posterior circulation was as high as expected in observational studies.

  11. Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Andrusaitis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 69-year-old male with poorly controlled hypertension presented with 1 hour of severe low back pain that radiated to his abdomen. The patient was tachycardic and had an initial blood pressure of 70/40. He had a rigid and severely tender abdomen. The patient’s history of hypertension, abnormal vital signs, severity and location of his pain were suspicious for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Therefore, a computed tomography angiogram (CTA was ordered. Significant findings: CTA demonstrated a ruptured 7.4 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with a large left retroperitoneal hematoma. Discussion: True abdominal aortic aneurysm is defined as at least a 3cm dilatation of all three layers of the arterial wall of the abdominal aorta.1 An estimated 15,000 people die per year in the US of this condition.2 Risk factors for AAA include males older than 65, tobacco use, and hypertension.1,3,4 There are also congenital, mechanical, traumatic, inflammatory, and infectious causes of AAA.3 Rupture is often the first manifestation of the disease. The classic triad of abdominal pain, pulsatile mass, and hypotension is seen in only 50% of ruptured AAAs.5 Pain (abdominal, groin, or back is the most common symptom. The most common misdiagnoses of ruptured AAAs are renal colic, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage.6 Bedside ultrasonography is the fastest way to detect this condition and is nearly 100% sensitive.1 One study showed that bedside ultrasounds performed by emergency physicians had a sensitivity of .94 [95% CI = .86-1.0] and specificity of 1 [95% CI = .98-1.0] for detecting AAAs.7 CTA has excellent sensitivity (approximately 100% and yields the added benefit of facilitating surgical planning and management.1 Without surgical treatment, a ruptured AAA is almost uniformly fatal, and 50% of those who undergo surgery do not survive.1 Early resuscitation and coordination with vascular surgery should be

  12. A Case Report of Coronary Arteriovenous Fistulas with an Unruptured Coronary Artery Aneurysm Successfully Treated by Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old female with a history of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome presented at our institution with palpitations and chest pain. Electrocardiography revealed paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia with a heart rate of 188 beats/min. Antiarrhythmic drugs were ineffective, and tachycardia was resolved by electrical cardioversion. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed abnormal vessels around the right coronary artery (RCA and pulmonary artery (PA; in addition, we suspected coronary arteriovenous fistula (CAVF. Coronary angiography and coronary computed tomography revealed dilated fistula vessels, with a 1 cm saccular aneurysm around the RCA, originating from the proximal RCA and left anterior descending artery into the main trunk of PA. Therefore, we confirmed the diagnosis of CAVF with an unruptured aneurysm. We surgically ligated and clipped the fistula vessels and resected the aneurysm. The resected aneurysm measured  cm in size. Pathological examination of the resected aneurysm revealed hypertrophic walls comprising proliferating fibroblasts cells thin elastic fibers. Very few atherosclerotic changes manifested in the aneurysm walls. We report the case of a patient with CAVF and an unruptured coronary artery aneurysm who was successfully treated by surgery.

  13. Flow and wall shear stress characterization following endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersen, Johannes Thomas; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H.; Ku, David N.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Reijnen, Michel M.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is

  14. Aortic aneurysm secondary to umbilical artery catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brill, P.W.; Winchester, P.; Griffith, A.Y.; Kazam, E.; Zirinsky, K.; Levin, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    A 14-month-girl presented with an asymptomatic posterior mediastinal mass. She had a history of prematurity, umbilical artery catheterization, and sepsis. The diagnosis of aortic aneurysm was made by dynamic computed tomography. The aneurysm was successfully resected.

  15. Ocean Circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Andrew F.; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The ocean moderates the Earth's climate due to its vast capacity to store and transport heat; the influence of the large-scale ocean circulation on changes in climate is considered in this chapter. The ocean experiences both buoyancy forcing (through heating/cooling and evaporation/precipitation) and wind forcing. Almost all ocean forcing occurs at the surface, but these changes are communicated throughout the entire depth of the ocean through the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). In ...

  16. Hygroma following endovascular femoral aneurysm exclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wad, Morten; Pedersen, Brian Lindegaard; Lönn, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of aneurysms in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and popliteal segments is a suggested alternative to open surgical repair. Careful selection of patients for endovascular treatment of SFA aneurysms is mandatory.......Endovascular treatment of aneurysms in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and popliteal segments is a suggested alternative to open surgical repair. Careful selection of patients for endovascular treatment of SFA aneurysms is mandatory....

  17. Surveillance intervals for small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bown, Matthew J; Sweeting, Michael J; Brown, Louise C

    2013-01-01

    Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture.......Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture....

  18. Case studies in rare aneurysm localisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinsorge, F.; Berg-Schlosser, V.; Riester, K.P.; Dombrowski, H.

    1987-01-01

    We describe four cases of rare aneurysm localisations, one case of an aneurysm of the hepatic artery, two cases of aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery and its branches and, as an extreme rarity, one case of an aneurysm of the superior gluteal artery (only three known cases up to now). All cases were documented by arteriography/DSA, ultrasonography and computed tomography. We refer to incidence, aetiology, symptomatology, and possible complications as indicated by literature. (orig.) [de

  19. Case studies in rare aneurysm localisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinsorge, F.; Berg-Schlosser, V.; Riester, K.P.; Dombrowski, H.

    1987-07-01

    We describe four cases of rare aneurysm localisations, one case of an aneurysm of the hepatic artery, two cases of aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery and its branches and, as an extreme rarity, one case of an aneurysm of the superior gluteal artery (only three known cases up to now). All cases were documented by arteriography/DSA, ultrasonography and computed tomography. We refer to incidence, aetiology, symptomatology, and possible complications as indicated by literature.

  20. Protective effects of Resveratrol in an experimental model of abdominal aortic aneurysm induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Palmieri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (Rsv is a natural antioxidant polyphenol with vasoprotective properties. We evaluated whether Rsv affects the inflammatory response in an experimental model of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm. Thirty male rats were subjected to aneurysm induction and treated or not with Rsv. Circulating levels of CD62L-monocyte subset, monocyte CD I 43 surface expression, MMP-9 plasma activity and TNFα serum levels were lower in Rsv-treated rats. In conclusion. Rsv acts as an anti-inflammatory compound and could be of great revelance to improve the immune response in AAA patients.

  1. Aspirin and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Bradley A; Rosalind Lai, Pui Man; Frerichs, Kai U; Du, Rose

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence has suggested a potential beneficial effect of aspirin on the risk of aneurysm rupture. This benefit must be weighed against its potential adverse effects as an antiplatelet agent in the setting of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A total of 747 consecutive patients with cerebral aneurysms were reviewed, comparing demographics, aneurysm features, presenting clinical and radiographic grades, vasospasm, and outcome at 1 year between patients with aneurysmal SAH taking aspirin on presentation and those who were not. The rate of hemorrhagic presentation was significantly greater in patients not taking aspirin (40% vs. 28%; P = 0.016). Among 274 patients presenting with aneurysmal SAH, there was no significant difference in presenting clinical (Hunt and Hess) and radiographic (Fisher) grade between patients taking aspirin and those who were not. There was also no significant difference in the rate of subsequent angiographic and delayed cerebral ischemia. Multivariate analysis of outcome at 1 year found only increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.12), Hunt and Hess grade (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.81-5.03), and associated hypertension (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.39-7.81) to be statistically significant risk factors for poor outcome (death or dependence), whereas aspirin use was not associated with poor outcome (OR 1.19, 95% CI 0.35-4.09; P = 0.78). In the present study, patients taking aspirin had a lower rate of hemorrhagic presentation. In addition, taking aspirin did not adversely impact presenting clinical grade or radiographic grade, vasospasm, and outcome in the setting of aneurysmal SAH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  3. Phase contrast MRI in intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, P.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are outpouchings of intracranial arteries that cause brain hemorrhage after rupture. Unruptured aneurysms can be treated but the risk of treatment may outweigh the risk of rupture. Local intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics can contribute substantially to the rupture risk estimation

  4. Effect of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Word Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Ladowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH survivors commonly exhibit impairment on phonemic and semantic fluency tests; however, it is unclear which of the contributing cognitive processes are compromised in aSAH patients. One method of disentangling these processes is to compare initial word production, which is a rapid, semiautomatic, frontal-executive process, and late phase word production, which is dependent on more effortful retrieval and lexical size and requires a more distributed neural network. Methods. Seventy-two individuals with aSAH and twenty-five control subjects were tested on a cognitive battery including the phonemic and semantic fluency task. Demographic and clinical information was also collected. Results. Compared to control subjects, patients with aSAH were treated by clipping and those with multiple aneurysms were impaired across the duration of the phonemic test. Among patients treated by coiling, those with anterior communicating artery aneurysms or a neurological complication (intraventricular hemorrhage, vasospasm, and edema showed worse output only in the last 45 seconds of the phonemic test. Patients performed comparably to control subjects on the semantic test. Conclusions. These results support a “diffuse damage” hypothesis of aSAH, indicated by late phase phonemic fluency impairment. Overall, the phonemic and semantic tests represent a viable, rapid clinical screening tool in the postoperative assessment of patients with aSAH.

  5. Does a craniotomy for treatment of unruptured aneurysm affect cognitive function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahashi, Keita; Morita, Akio; Kimura, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    The surgical procedure used to treat an unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) has controversial effects on cognitive function. From January 2010 through December 2012, we enrolled patients who underwent surgical clipping for a UIA. Patients were tested within one week prior to surgery and again postoperatively (6.8 ± 2.3 days) using a neuropsychological battery comprising the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Trail Making Test (TMT), the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), and Raven's colored progressive matrices (RCPM). Differences between preoperative and postoperative test scores for each examination were analyzed across individuals. In an additional subgroup analysis, patients were grouped according to age (cognitive function. Older patients and those with large aneurysms, anterior communicating aneurysms, and long operations represent the high-risk groups.

  6. Saphenous vein graft true aneurysms: Report of nine cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidović Lazar B.

    2004-01-01

    with regular arterial tension and normal serum lipid level. The pathohistologycal examination showed an intimai fibroelastosis associated with intimai and medial connective tissue proliferation of the aneurysm. The atherosclerotic changes were absent. Four years later this patient has been admitted urgently with ischemia of the left hand, absent distala arterial pulses and with asymptomatic pulsating mass over the supradavicular area. The Duplex ultrasonography and angiography, showed aneurysm of the ASVG, associated with occlusion (embolism of the brachial artery (Figure 3. This aneurysm has been replaced with 6 mm PTFE graft Transbrachial thrombembolectomy has been performed too. The pathohistological examination showed a non atherosclerotic origin of the ASVG aneurysm (Figure 4. Three years after secondary operation the PTFE graft is patent. Echocardiography of the same patient showed mitral valve prolaps, probably caused by connective tissue disorder. CASE 4. A 56-year-old female patient was admitted urgently, due to hemorrhagic shock and giant pulsating swelling over the popliteal space. The Duplex ultrasonography and transfemoral angiography showed ruptured popliteal artery aneurysm. This patient had arterial hypertension and higher lipid level. During the urgent operation using dorsal approach, an aneurysm has been replaced with ASVG. A pathohistological examination showed an atherosclerotic origin of the aneurysm. Ten days postoperatively due to bleeding from the wound, a new urgent surgical procedure was performed. Intraoperatively 1 cm long graft laceration was found, while postoperative bacteriological examination showed an infection caused by Staphylococcus Aureus. The graft has been removed, and new extraanatomic, subcutaneous bypass from the superficial femoral to anterior tibial artery using ASVG was performed. Three years later this patient was admitted urgently with giant pulsating mass and skin necrosis at the knee region, associated with hemorrhagic

  7. Surgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms: six-year experience in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil Tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas intracranianos: experiência de seis anos em Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leodante Batista da Costa Jr

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage accounts for 5 to 10 % of all strokes, with a worldwide incidence of 10.5 / 100000 person/year, varying in individual reports from 1.1 to 96 /100000 person/year. Angiographic and autopsy studies suggest that between 0.5% and 5% of the population have intracranial aneurysms. Approximately 30000 people suffer aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the United States each year, and 60% die or are left permanently disabled. We report our experience in the surgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms in a six year period, in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. We reviewed the hospital files, surgical and out-patient notes of all patients operated on for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms from January 1997 to January 2003. Four hundred and seventy-seven patients were submitted to 525 craniotomies for treatment of 630 intracranial aneurysms. The majority of patients were female (72.1% in the fourth or fifth decade of life. Anterior circulation aneurysms were more common (94.4%. The most common location for the aneurysm was the middle cerebral artery bifurcation. The patients were followed by a period from 1 month to 5 years. The outcome was measured by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS. At discharge, 62.1% of the patients were classified as GOS 5, 13.9% as GOS 4, 8.7% as GOS 3, 1.7% as GOS 2 and 14.8% as GOS 1.A hemorragia subaracnóidea espontânea é responsável por cerca de 5 a 10% de todos os acidentes vasculares cerebrais, com uma incidência mundial de 10,5 / 100000 pessoas/ano, variando em estudos individuais de 1,1 a 96 / 100000 pessoas / ano, de acordo com diferenças étnicas e geográficas. Estudos angiográficos e de necropsia sugerem que a presença de aneurismas intracranianos ocorre em 0,5-5% da população mundial. De acordo com estatísticas norte-americanas, ocorrem cerca de 30000 rupturas de aneurisma cerebral por ano naquele país, com conseqüências desastrosas para grande parte dos pacientes

  8. Endovascular Management of Fusiform Superior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysms: A Series of Three Cases with Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Alurkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal superior cerebellar artery (SCA aneurysms are rare. Fusiform aneurysms of SCA are rarer and more challenging to treat. Parent artery occlusion by endovascular coiling is the treatment option for these cases. Presence of good collateral circulation and paucity of perforators from S1 and S2 segments makes this a feasible option. From 2007 to 2010, we treated three patients (two men and one woman between the ages of 42 to 64 years with distal fusiform SCA aneurysms using endovascular coiling. All the patients presented with symptoms of rupture and were treated in the acute phase. Informed and written high-risk consent was given by all patients prior to the procedure. Successful angiographic and clinical outcome was achieved in all three patients. Endovascular treatment of fusiform SCA aneurysms with coils is a safe and feasible option in the management of this rare entity.

  9. Combined treatment for complex intracranial aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiriac A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Complex aneurysms often cannot be completely excluded by a single approaches. Today successful treatment of these lesions requires a combination between microsurgical and endovascular techniques. Planning of combined treatment require a very good understanding of aneurysm anatomy and a close collaboration between neurosurgeon and neuroendovascular interventionist. Endovascular coiling can usually be used as early treatment for a partially aneurysm occlusion including the ruptured area and followed by definitive clipping. On the other hand microsurgical clipping also can be used as first treatment for complex aneurysm neck reconstruction, allowing successful secondary placement of coils inside the remnant aneurysm sac

  10. Aneurysmal wall enhancement and perianeurysmal edema after endovascular treatment of unruptured cerebral aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, I. Chang [Toronto Western Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Taipei Cathay General Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Willinsky, Robert A.; Agid, Ronit [Toronto Western Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fanning, Noel F. [Cork University Hospital, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Cork (Ireland)

    2014-06-15

    Perianeurysmal edema and aneurysm wall enhancement are previously described phenomenon after coil embolization attributed to inflammatory reaction. We aimed to demonstrate the prevalence and natural course of these phenomena in unruptured aneurysms after endovascular treatment and to identify factors that contributed to their development. We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutively treated unruptured aneurysms between January 2000 and December 2011. The presence and evolution of wall enhancement and perianeurysmal edema on MRI after endovascular treatment were analyzed. Variable factors were compared among aneurysms with and without edema. One hundred thirty-two unruptured aneurysms in 124 patients underwent endovascular treatment. Eighty-five (64.4 %) aneurysms had wall enhancement, and 9 (6.8 %) aneurysms had perianeurysmal brain edema. Wall enhancement tends to persist for years with two patterns identified. Larger aneurysms and brain-embedded aneurysms were significantly associated with wall enhancement. In all edema cases, the aneurysms were embedded within the brain and had wall enhancement. Progressive thickening of wall enhancement was significantly associated with edema. Edema can be symptomatic when in eloquent brain and stabilizes or resolves over the years. Our study demonstrates the prevalence and some appreciation of the natural history of aneurysmal wall enhancement and perianeurysmal brain edema following endovascular treatment of unruptured aneurysms. Aneurysmal wall enhancement is a common phenomenon while perianeurysmal edema is rare. These phenomena are likely related to the presence of inflammatory reaction near the aneurysmal wall. Both phenomena are usually asymptomatic and self-limited, and prophylactic treatment is not recommended. (orig.)

  11. Aneurysmal wall enhancement and perianeurysmal edema after endovascular treatment of unruptured cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, I. Chang; Willinsky, Robert A.; Agid, Ronit; Fanning, Noel F.

    2014-01-01

    Perianeurysmal edema and aneurysm wall enhancement are previously described phenomenon after coil embolization attributed to inflammatory reaction. We aimed to demonstrate the prevalence and natural course of these phenomena in unruptured aneurysms after endovascular treatment and to identify factors that contributed to their development. We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutively treated unruptured aneurysms between January 2000 and December 2011. The presence and evolution of wall enhancement and perianeurysmal edema on MRI after endovascular treatment were analyzed. Variable factors were compared among aneurysms with and without edema. One hundred thirty-two unruptured aneurysms in 124 patients underwent endovascular treatment. Eighty-five (64.4 %) aneurysms had wall enhancement, and 9 (6.8 %) aneurysms had perianeurysmal brain edema. Wall enhancement tends to persist for years with two patterns identified. Larger aneurysms and brain-embedded aneurysms were significantly associated with wall enhancement. In all edema cases, the aneurysms were embedded within the brain and had wall enhancement. Progressive thickening of wall enhancement was significantly associated with edema. Edema can be symptomatic when in eloquent brain and stabilizes or resolves over the years. Our study demonstrates the prevalence and some appreciation of the natural history of aneurysmal wall enhancement and perianeurysmal brain edema following endovascular treatment of unruptured aneurysms. Aneurysmal wall enhancement is a common phenomenon while perianeurysmal edema is rare. These phenomena are likely related to the presence of inflammatory reaction near the aneurysmal wall. Both phenomena are usually asymptomatic and self-limited, and prophylactic treatment is not recommended. (orig.)

  12. Coil embolization of an enlarging fusiform myxomatous cerebral aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Lazarow, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Myxomatous cerebral aneurysms are rare sequelae of cardiac atrial myxoma. These aneurysms are generally fusiform, multiple, and distal. Pathogenesis and evolution of these aneurysms is still debated. There are currently no guidelines on the management of aneurysms secondary to atrial myxoma. We present a case of a 52-year-old man with multiple fusiform aneurysms 3 years after resection of a left atrial myxoma. One of these aneurysms was followed with cerebral angiography and showed substantial interval enlargement. This aneurysm was subsequently embolized. All aneurysms were stable 6 months post-embolization. Keywords: Myxomatous aneurysm, Fusiform, Coil embolization

  13. Fasudil, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, attenuates induction and progression of cerebral aneurysms: experimental study in rats using vascular corrosion casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldawoody, Hany; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Kimura, Naoto; Saito, Atsushi; Nakayama, Toshio; Takahashi, Akira; Tominaga, Teiji

    2010-02-05

    Fasudil (a Rho-kinase inhibitor) has been shown to attenuate abdominal aortic aneurysm development, but any preventive effect against development of cerebral aneurysms is unclear. The effect of fasudil on the development of cerebral aneurysms was investigated in 55 female Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 4 groups: Group 1 (n=10) was the control group without treatment. Groups 2-4 (n=15 each) were subjected to cerebral aneurysm induction procedures plus 1% NaCl in the drinking water. Groups 3 and 4 were also treated with 0.5 or 1.0mg/mL of fasudil in the drinking water, respectively. Vascular corrosion casts of the cerebral arteries were prepared and examined using a scanning electron microscope after 2 months. No significant differences were observed in the degree of induced hypertension between Groups 2, 3 and 4. No aneurysms were found in Group 1. Examination of the left anterior cerebral-olfactory artery junction, which is the most susceptible site for aneurysm development, found significantly fewer aneurysmal lesions in Groups 3 (60%) and 4 (53%) compared to Group 2 (100%) (P<0.02). This study suggests that fasudil attenuated induction of cerebral aneurysms in the rat model. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ruptured gastroepiploic artery aneurysm: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad S. Ashrafi

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroepiploic artery aneurysms are extremely rare, with few reported cases in the literature. The risk of rupture however, is high and thus warrants attention. Presentation of case: Here we present a rare case of a women who presented to the emergency department in shock and was found to have a ruptured gastroepiploic artery aneurysm during surgical exploration. Suture ligation of the aneurysm was completed. Discussion: Although rare, gastroepiploic artery aneurysms have up to a 90% rate of rupture and therefore require intervention. A laparoscopic approach has been described however, in cases where rupture has occurred, urgent laparotomy and control of hemorrhage is needed. Conclusion: We describe a rare case of a ruptured gastroepiploic aneurysm that was successfully managed with urgent laparotomy and aneurysmal resection. Keywords: Gastroepiploic, Aneurysm, Hemorrhage, Case report

  15. Reduced myocardial perfusion reserve in myocardium having coronary artery aneurysm of Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, S. N.; Lee, D. S.; Choi, J. Y.; Kil, H. R.; Jeong, Z. K.; Lee, M. C.; Ko, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis involving the coronary arteries at early childhood and cause coronary artery aneurysms and thrombotic occlusions. These coronary artery aneurysms were usually transformed later into stenotic or obstructive lesions, however, the majority of these aneurysms, even the giant ones, are known to be associated with normal epicardial coronary flow. Flow reserve is difficult to assess in aneurysmal arteries with echo or angiography. We performed this study to question if there are abnormalities in flow reserve in myocardial tissue with normal epicardial arterial flow on angiography in patients with Kawasaki disease, dipyridamole stress and rest Tc-99m-sestamibi SPECT were performed in 37 patients (28 boys, 9 girls, mean age 6.6 years). We compared SPECT findings with coronary angiography (CAG) findings in 21 patients who did both studies after finding abnormality on echocardiaography. On CAG, aneurysms were found in 26 arteries of 16 patients, i.e., 10 left main arteries, 6 left anterior descending arteries (LAD), 2 left circumflex arteries (LCX), and 8 right coronary arteries (RCA). Localized and segmental stenotic lesions were found in 11 arteries in 9 patients (LAD: 4, LCX: 1, RCA: 6). Eight of the 10 patients with aneurysms had no obvious stenosis. On stress-rest SPECT, 16(43%) out of 37 patients showed normal perfusion and the other 21(57%) showed reversible or persistent decrease. Among 11 stenotic artery territories, 3(27%) showed persistent and/or reversible perfusion defects. The other 8 were normal. Among 26 aneurysmal artery territories, 12 artery territories showe perfusion decrease. Three of the 5 patients with normal CAG showed persistent and/or transient perfusion defects. Among 14 artery territories with perfusion decrease in the 16 patients, 3(21%) could be localized to vascular territory having stenosis of supplying coronary arteries, 12(86%) were related to the coronary artery aneurysms. Two were not related to

  16. Agenesis of internal carotid artery associated with congenital anterior hypopituitarism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, W.-J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Porto, L.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Weis, R. [Department of Pediatric Neurology, University of Frankfurt (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    We report a rare case of unilateral agenesis of the internal carotid artery in association with congenital anterior hypopituitarism. The collateral circulation is supplied by a transsellar intercavernous anastomotic vessel connecting the internal carotid arteries. These abnormalities are well depicted on MRI and MRA. The agenesis of the internal carotid artery may explain the pathogenesis of some of congenital anterior hypopituitarism. (orig.)

  17. Agenesis of internal carotid artery associated with congenital anterior hypopituitarism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, W.-J.; Porto, L.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E.; Weis, R.

    2002-01-01

    We report a rare case of unilateral agenesis of the internal carotid artery in association with congenital anterior hypopituitarism. The collateral circulation is supplied by a transsellar intercavernous anastomotic vessel connecting the internal carotid arteries. These abnormalities are well depicted on MRI and MRA. The agenesis of the internal carotid artery may explain the pathogenesis of some of congenital anterior hypopituitarism. (orig.)

  18. Resultados del tratamiento quirúrgico de los aneurismas del complejo cerebral anterior-arteria comunicante anterior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Alemán Rivera

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un estudio de 30 pacientes con aneurismas localizados en el complejo de la arteria cerebral anterior-arteria comunicante anterior (ACoA, operados en el Servicio de Neurocirugía del Hospital Universitario "Arnaldo Milián Castro", durante un período de 7 años. Se analizan variables tales como edad, sexo, estado neurológico preoperatorio, momento quirúrgico, complicaciones y estado al egreso. La mortalidad general fue del 10 %The authors carried out a study in 30 patients with aneurysms located in the anterior communicating artery-anterior cerebral complex (ACA-ACC, that were operated on at the Neurosurgery Service of "Arnaldo Milián Castro" Teaching Hospital, during a period of 7 years. Variables such as age, sex, preoperative neurologic state, surgical moment, complications and status on discharge were analyzed. General mortality was 10 %

  19. Peripheral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M Harold; Davis, Michael J; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Simmons, Grant H; Bender, Shawn B; Padilla, Jaume; Bache, Robert J; Merkus, Daphne; Duncker, Dirk J

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow (BF) increases with increasing exercise intensity in skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscle. In humans during maximal exercise intensities, 85% to 90% of total cardiac output is distributed to skeletal and cardiac muscle. During exercise BF increases modestly and heterogeneously to brain and decreases in gastrointestinal, reproductive, and renal tissues and shows little to no change in skin. If the duration of exercise is sufficient to increase body/core temperature, skin BF is also increased in humans. Because blood pressure changes little during exercise, changes in distribution of BF with incremental exercise result from changes in vascular conductance. These changes in distribution of BF throughout the body contribute to decreases in mixed venous oxygen content, serve to supply adequate oxygen to the active skeletal muscles, and support metabolism of other tissues while maintaining homeostasis. This review discusses the response of the peripheral circulation of humans to acute and chronic dynamic exercise and mechanisms responsible for these responses. This is accomplished in the context of leading the reader on a tour through the peripheral circulation during dynamic exercise. During this tour, we consider what is known about how each vascular bed controls BF during exercise and how these control mechanisms are modified by chronic physical activity/exercise training. The tour ends by comparing responses of the systemic circulation to those of the pulmonary circulation relative to the effects of exercise on the regional distribution of BF and mechanisms responsible for control of resistance/conductance in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  20. Management of Agitation Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Is There a Role for Beta-Blockers?

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Fayaz; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. About 20% of the stroke is hemorrhagic and about 50% of these is due to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A troublesome neuropsychiatric complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage is agitation/aggression. Case Presentation. A 45-year-old man with no prior psychiatric history, sustained subarachnoid hemorrhage. After initial stabilization for 2 days, he underwent craniotomy and clipping of anterior cerebral...

  1. From tissue iron retention to low systemic haemoglobin levels, new pathophysiological biomarkers of human abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Pinna, Roxanna; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Madrigal-Matute, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Iron deposits are observed in tissue of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not completely elucidated. Therefore we explored circulating markers of iron metabolism in AAA patients, and tested if they could serve as biomarkers of AAA. Increased red bloo...

  2. Traumatic radial artery aneurysm at National Orthopaedic Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aneurysms within the period. All the three patients had excision of the aneurysms and reversed cephalic vein interposition graft. The outcomes were satisfactory. Keywords: radial artery aneurysm, vein graft. Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery Vol.

  3. Comparing indocyanine green videoangiography to the gold standard of intraoperative digital subtraction angiography used in aneurysm surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Chad W; Zipfel, Gregory J; Chicoine, Michael R; Derdeyn, Colin P; Rich, Keith M; Moran, Christopher J; Cross, DeWitte T; Dacey, Ralph G

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of aneurysm surgery is complete aneurysm obliteration while sparing associated arteries. Indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography is a new technique that allows for real-time evaluation of blood flow in the aneurysm and vessels. The authors performed a retrospective study to compare the accuracy of ICG videoangiography with intraoperative angiography (IA), and determine if ICG videoangiography can be used without follow-up IA. From June 2007 through September 2009, 155 patients underwent craniotomies for clipping of aneurysms. Operative summaries, angiograms, and operative and ICG videoangiography videos were reviewed. The number, size, and location of aneurysms, the ICG videoangiography and IA findings, and the need for clip adjustment after ICG videoangiography and IA were recorded. Discordance between ICG videoangiography and IA was defined as ICG videoangiography demonstrating aneurysm obliteration and normal vessel flow, but post-IA showing either an aneurysmal remnant and/or vessel occlusion requiring clip adjustment. Thirty-two percent of patients (49 of 155) underwent both ICG videoangiography and IA. The post-ICG videoangiography clip adjustment rate was 4.1% (2 of 49). The overall rate of ICG videoangiography-IA agreement was 75.5% (37 of 49) and the ICG videoangiography-IA discordance rate requiring post-IA clip adjustment was 14.3% (7 of 49). Adjustments were due to 3 aneurysmal remnants and 4 vessel occlusions. These adjustments were attributed to obscuration of the residual aneurysm or the affected vessel from the field of view and the presence of dye in the affected vessel via collateral flow. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend for ICG videoangiography-IA discordance requiring clip adjustment to occur in cases involving the anterior communicating artery complex, with an odds ratio of 3.3 for ICG videoangiography-IA discordance in these cases. These results suggest that care should be taken when considering ICG

  4. [Coronary artery aneurysm with various clinical course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, A; Kaneda, K; Yoshida, Y; Heima, D; Hirao, S; Nagasaka, S; Yokoyama, S; Nishiwaki, N

    2009-12-01

    Case 1: A 77-year-old woman had effort angina pectoris. Coronary angiography (CAG) revealed a coronary artery aneurysm on the left descending artery. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and patch angioplasty for the aneurysm were performed. Case 2 : A 69-year-old woman had effort dyspnea CAG showed dilation of the left main trunk and beaded aneurysms (maximum 6 cm in diameter) behind the ascending aorta with a fistula to the right atrium. We closed the fistula and performed CABG to the circumflex branch. Case 3 : A 78-year-old woman had had general fatigue for 2 weeks. Previous CAG had revealed coronary artery aneurysms and current chest computered tomography revealed pericardial effusion. She was, therefore, diagnosed with the rupture of the coronary artery aneurysm. We closed the coronary artery aneurysm and performed CABG. Case 4: A 55-year-old man had been diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction and had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention 3 years before. CAG revealed a coronary artery aneurysm on the right coronary artery. We resected the aneurysm and interposed with saphenous vein graft. Although coronary artery aneurysm often has no symptoms, in the cases of angina, myocardial infarction, rupture or large aneurysm more than 3 times larger than the normal diameter, surgical repair should be considered.

  5. A case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with an unruptured cerebral aneurysm detected by cerebral computed angiotomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Keiji; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohue, Shiro; Takeda, Sadanori; Kimura, Hideki; Sakaki, Saburo.

    1986-01-01

    One case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with an unruptured cerebral aneurysm detected by cerebral computed angiotomography is reported. A 44-year-old female slipped and hit her head without loss of consciousness, one month ago. Recently she complained of headaches and visited the department of Neurosurgery, Washokai Sadamoto Hospital on May 21, 1985. There were no physical and neurological signs on examination. Plain CT scans showed a crescent-shaped high density area in the left frontal region with a slight mass sign. She was diagnosed as having a possible chronic subdural hematoma and further examination was recommended. Biplane ultrafast overlapping cerebral computed angiotomograms clearly demonstrated a so-called avascular area delineated by enhanced superficial cerebral vessels with contrast medium. Furthermore, a marked high density mass measuring 8 mm x 10 mm x 6 mm in diameters was simultaneously demonstrated around the right anterior clinoid process on the same image, suggesting a cerebral aneurysm. Right carotid angiograms showed a right internal carotid-posterior communicating junction aneurysm. The irrigation of the left chronic subdural hematoma was carried out on May 24 and the neck clipping of the right IC-PC junction aneurysm was done two weeks later. During the operation, there were no findings suggesting a previous subarachnoid hemorrhage from the aneurysm, but a bleb was found on the aneurysm. The post-operative course was uneventful. (J.P.N.)

  6. Circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schievink, W. I.; Karemaker, J. M.; Hageman, L. M.; van der Werf, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in a group of 500 consecutive patients admitted to a neurosurgical center. Subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during stressful events in 42.8% of the patients, during nonstrenuous activities in 34.4%, and during rest or

  7. Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Susco Chair of Research North Shore University Hospital, Brain Aneurysm Center Chair of Research The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research Kristen’s Legacy of Love Chair of Research TeamCindy Alcatraz Chair of Research ...

  8. Functional reserve of the ischemic left ventricle with ventricular aneurysm to afterload stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuiki, Kai; Kobayashi, Tadashi; Hayasaka, Makio

    1985-01-01

    The response of left ventricular function to afterload stress was assessed using DSA for eight patients with old anterior myocardial infarction and ventricular aneurysm including that of the anterior wall. After initial DSA in the basal state, methoxamine was infused intravenously (1 to 2 mg/min). When aortic systolic blood pressure increased by 30 to 50 mmHg, a second DSA was performed for each patient. Left ventricular volumes and ejection fractions were calculated by the area-length method, and regional wall motion was assessed by the visual method according to the AHA classification and the curvature radius of the apical ventricular aneurysm was calculated. Methoxamine induced neither acute heart failure nor angina pectoris in the present series. The heart rates decreased, and there were a significant increase in end-systolic volumes (p ES ). However, ΔESV and ΔR ES did not correlate; ΔR ES was much greater in two patients, who were relatively old. Their aneurysms were circumscribed within the left ventricular anterior wall, their ejection fractions were relatively increased; and their onsets of acute myocardial infarction were relatively recent. (J.P.N.)

  9. The influence of neck thrombus on clinical outcome and aneurysm morphology after endovascular aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M.V. Bastos Gonçalves (Frederico); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); K. Chinsakchai (Khamin); J.W. van Keulen (Jasper); M.T. Voûte (Michiel); H.J.A. Zandvoort (Herman); F.L. Moll (Frans); J.A. van Herwaarden (Joost)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: This study investigated the influence of significant aneurysm neck thrombus in clinical and morphologic outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: The patient population was derived from a prospective EVAR database from two university institutions in The

  10. Circulation economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Stig; Jakobsen, Ove

    2006-01-01

    sustainability. To illustrate the theoretical discussion, the paper gives some practical examples from the reprocessing industry in Norway. Findings - The paper finds, first, effective and efficient use of natural resources is necessary to implement circular value chains. Second, sustainable development...... presupposes a perspective integrating economic, natural and cultural values. Third, to organize the interplay between all stakeholders we introduce an arena for communicative cooperation. Originality/value - The paper concludes that circulation economics presupposes a change in paradigm, from a mechanistic...

  11. Reconstruction of Chest Wall by Cryopreserved Sternal Allograft after Resection of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of Sternum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Sheikhy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old female was referred to our hospital due to deformity and bulging in anterior aspect of chest wall in sternal area. Chest X-ray and CT scan confirmed a large mass with destruction of sternum. Pathologic diagnosis after incisional biopsy was compatible with aneurysmal bone cyst. We resected sternum completely and reconstructed large anterior defect by a cryopreserved sternal allograft. In follow-up of patient there was no unstability of chest wall with good cosmetic result.

  12. Anterior Horn Cell Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Firinciogullari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior horn cells control all voluntary movement. Motor activity, respiratory, speech, and swallowing functions are dependent upon signals from the anterior horn cells. Diseases that damage the anterior horn cells, therefore, have a profound impact. Symptoms of anterior horn cell loss (weakness, falling, choking lead patients to seek medical attention. In this article, anterior horn diseases were reviewed, diagnostic criteria and management were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 269-303

  13. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair.

  14. Primitive experience of three dimensional multi-slice spiral CT angiography for the follow-up of intracranial aneurysm clipping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yunjun; Chen Weijian; Hu Zhangyong; Wu Enfu; Wang Meihao; Zhuge Qichuan; Zhongming; Cheng Jingliang; Ren Cuiping; Zhang Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate multi-slice three-dimensional CT angiography (MS 3D-CTA) for the follow-up of intracranial aneurysm clipping. Methods: MS 3D-CTA of 16 patients with intracranial aneurysm clipping were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were scanned on a 16-slice spiral CT (GE Lightspeed pro). Volume rendering(VR), thin maximum intensity projection(thin MIP) and multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) were employed in image postprocessing in all cases. Results: There were 17 clips in the 16 patients with aneurysm clipping. Six clips were located at the posterior communicating artery, 5 at the anterior communicating artery, 4 at the middle cerebral artery, and the remaining 2 clips were located at the pericallosal artery, in 1 patient. There were no abnormalities found in the aneurysm clipping region in 7 cases by MS 3D- CTA. There were residual aneurysm in 2 cases, parent artery stenosis in 4 cases, and artery spasm in 3 eases. There was no parent artery occlusion and clip displacement in all cases. VR showed excellent 3D spacial relations between the clip and parent artery in 12 cases, and showed good relations in 3 cases. The 1 case with 2 clips in the pericallosal artery showed heavy beam-hardening artifacts. The size and shape of aneurysm clips were clearly depicted by MPR and thin MIP, while 3D spacial relation of aneurysm clip and parent artery were poorly showed. Conclusion: MS 3D-CTA is a safe and efficient method for the follow-up of intracranialaneurysm clipping. Combined VR with MPR or thin MIP can well reveal postoperative changes after aneurysm clipping. (authors)

  15. Use of triple microcatheters for endovascular treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Dae; Rhim, Jong Kook; Kang, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Cho, Won Sang; Han, Moon Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jin Pyeong [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kangwon National University Hospital, Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The dual microcatheter technique is common practice for coil embolization of a wide-necked aneurysm, due to safety and efficacy. However, technical limitations of some complex configurations may necessitate additional microcatheters to bolster coil stability, compact the coil, or for protection. Described herein is a triple microcatheter technique for endovascular management of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Data accruing prospectively between January 2006 and October 2014 on simultaneously executed triple microcatheter coil embolization procedures done in 38 saccular aneurysms were reviewed. Clinical and morphological outcomes were assessed, with emphasis on technical aspects of treatment. The triple microcatheter technique was successfully applied to all 38 saccular aneurysms, involving the posterior communicating artery (n = 13), the middle cerebral artery (n = 10), the basilar tip (n = 7), the anterior cerebral artery (n = 5), and the internal carotid artery (n = 3). Stent protection was added in four patients and balloon remodeling in one. Dual microcatheters (n = 24) were usually deployed to deliver the coil within sacs of aneurysms, with the additional microcatheter used for protection. Otherwise, triple microcatheters were deployed for coil delivery (n = 11) or coils were delivered via a single microcatheter, with dual microcatheters deployed for protection (n = 3). Successful occlusion of aneurysms was achieved in 89.5% of cases, with no procedure-related morbidity or mortality. Stable occlusion was maintained in 72.2% (26/36) of the aneurysms at the final follow-up (mean interval, 30.2 ± 22.7 months). The outcomes of this limited study suggest that the triple microcatheter technique may be an effective and safe therapeutic option for wide-necked aneurysms, using technical strategies tailored to complex angio-anatomic configurations.

  16. Use of triple microcatheters for endovascular treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Dae; Rhim, Jong Kook; Kang, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Cho, Won Sang; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Jeong Jin; Jeon, Jin Pyeong

    2015-01-01

    The dual microcatheter technique is common practice for coil embolization of a wide-necked aneurysm, due to safety and efficacy. However, technical limitations of some complex configurations may necessitate additional microcatheters to bolster coil stability, compact the coil, or for protection. Described herein is a triple microcatheter technique for endovascular management of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Data accruing prospectively between January 2006 and October 2014 on simultaneously executed triple microcatheter coil embolization procedures done in 38 saccular aneurysms were reviewed. Clinical and morphological outcomes were assessed, with emphasis on technical aspects of treatment. The triple microcatheter technique was successfully applied to all 38 saccular aneurysms, involving the posterior communicating artery (n = 13), the middle cerebral artery (n = 10), the basilar tip (n = 7), the anterior cerebral artery (n = 5), and the internal carotid artery (n = 3). Stent protection was added in four patients and balloon remodeling in one. Dual microcatheters (n = 24) were usually deployed to deliver the coil within sacs of aneurysms, with the additional microcatheter used for protection. Otherwise, triple microcatheters were deployed for coil delivery (n = 11) or coils were delivered via a single microcatheter, with dual microcatheters deployed for protection (n = 3). Successful occlusion of aneurysms was achieved in 89.5% of cases, with no procedure-related morbidity or mortality. Stable occlusion was maintained in 72.2% (26/36) of the aneurysms at the final follow-up (mean interval, 30.2 ± 22.7 months). The outcomes of this limited study suggest that the triple microcatheter technique may be an effective and safe therapeutic option for wide-necked aneurysms, using technical strategies tailored to complex angio-anatomic configurations

  17. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms with associated hydronephrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Driscoll, D

    2012-02-03

    An isolated iliac artery aneurysm is where there is aneurysmal dilatation of one or more branches of the iliac system, with no associated dilatation of the aorta. Such aneurysms are rare and comprise 1% of all intra-abdominal aneurysms. The signs and symptoms of such an aneurysm are influenced by its concealed location within the bony pelvis. Awareness of these special characteristics improves the chances of early diagnosis and proper treatment before possible rupture. We present the clinical and radiological features of three such aneurysms. Ultrasound was the first imaging modality to be performed. Ipsilateral hydronephrosis was demonstrated in each case, this lead to imaging the pelvis and the correct diagnosis. We review the clinical and radiological literature and conclude that the pelvis should be imaged in all cases of unexplained hydronephrosis.

  18. Patterns and predictors of in-hospital aneurysmal rebleed: An institutional experience and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Girish

    2007-01-01

    one person rebled while defecating. Nine patients were taken up for emergency exploration immediately after rebleeding. From these, six patients died and three survived, but were severely disabled. The remaining eleven patients who were conservatively treated expired after varying periods of intensive care. Conclusions: Our incidence of rebleeding (2.14% is considerably less than most of the other reported series, probably related to the delayed referral pattern. Probable predisposing factors for rebleed include old age, female sex and an anterior communicating artery location. Known risk factors such as hypertension, poor neurological grade on admission, stressful activity and aneurysm morphology do not appear to be significant in our study. Outcome is extremely poor following the rebleeds, either in immediate surgery or conservative treatment.

  19. Effect of statin therapy on serum activity of proteinases and cytokines in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd; Oberhuber, Alexander; Schelzig, Hubert; Bischoff, Gisela; Marx, Nikolaus; Sunder-Plassmann, Ludger; Orend, Karl H

    2008-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are considered to be key enzymes in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), with elevated levels in diseased aorta and in patient sera. Statins seem to exert an inhibitory effect on MMP activity in the aortic wall. No data exist on the effect of statins on serum activity of MMPs and inflammatory cytokines (interleukins, IL). The serum activities of MMP2 and MMP9, osteoprotegerin (OPG), and IL6 and IL10 in 63 patients undergoing elective infrarenal aneurysm repair were measured on the day before surgery. Levels were correlated to statin therapy and aneurysm diameter. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the activity of circulating levels of MMP2/9, OPG, and IL6/10 in patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysm. IL6 levels in patients with AAA larger than 6 cm were significantly elevated; differences in serum activities of MMP2/9, OPG, and IL10 were not related to AAA diameter. Serum activities of MMP2/9, OPG, and IL6/10 are not correlated to statin therapy; IL6 levels are higher in patients with large aneurysms. Hence the effect of statin therapy in the treatment of aneurysmal disease remains to be elucidated.

  20. Lipolysis of emulsion models of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins is altered in male patients with abdominal aorta aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Hosni

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the lipid metabolism may play a role in the genesis of abdominal aorta aneurysm. The present study examined the intravascular catabolism of chylomicrons, the lipoproteins that carry the dietary lipids absorbed by the intestine in the circulation in patients with abdominal aorta aneurysm. Thirteen male patients (72 ± 5 years with abdominal aorta aneurysm with normal plasma lipid profile and 13 healthy male control subjects (73 ± 5 years participated in the study. The method of chylomicron-like emulsions was used to evaluate this metabolism. The emulsion labeled with 14C-cholesteryl oleate and ³H-triolein was injected intravenously in both groups. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals over 60 min to determine the decay curves. The fractional clearance rate (FCR of the radioactive labels was calculated by compartmental analysis. The FCR of the emulsion with ³H-triolein was smaller in the aortic aneurysm patients than in controls (0.025 ± 0.017 vs 0.039 ± 0.019 min-1; P < 0.05, but the FCR of14C-cholesteryl oleate of both groups did not differ. In conclusion, as indicated by the triglyceride FCR, chylomicron lipolysis is diminished in male patients with aortic aneurysm, whereas the remnant removal which is traced by the cholesteryl oleate FCR is not altered. The results suggest that defects in the chylomicron metabolism may represent a risk factor for development of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  1. Coronary Anomalies: Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Varda, Rajsekhar; Chitimilla, Santosh Kumar; Lalani, Aslam

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery aneurysm is one of the rarest anomalies that we see in our medical practice and they are mostly associated with obstructive lesions due to atherosclerotic changes. Management of these aneurysm patients (conservative or surgical repair) usually depends on obstructive lesions and associated symptoms. We are presenting a case of left main aneurysm measuring around 1 4 × 2 8  mm with other obstructive leisons. It was treated with surgical repair in view of obstructive lesions and ...

  2. Coronary Anomalies: Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsekhar Varda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery aneurysm is one of the rarest anomalies that we see in our medical practice and they are mostly associated with obstructive lesions due to atherosclerotic changes. Management of these aneurysm patients (conservative or surgical repair usually depends on obstructive lesions and associated symptoms. We are presenting a case of left main aneurysm measuring around 14×28 mm with other obstructive leisons. It was treated with surgical repair in view of obstructive lesions and symptoms.

  3. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Seo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is rare. We report a case of mycotic aneurysm that developed in the aortic arch. An 86-year-old man was admitted with fever and general weakness. Blood culture yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged aortic arch, and computed tomography scan revealed an aneurysm in the aortic arch. The patient was treated only with antibiotics and not surgically. The size of the aneurysm increased rapidly, resulting in bronchial obstruction and superimposed pneumonia. The patient died of respiratory failure.

  4. Arteriosclerotic femoral artery aneurysms. A short review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, N; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    classified by Cutler and Darling in 1973 as type 1 and type 2 according to their relationship to the common femoral bifurcation. Case reports of isolated superficial and profunda femoral artery aneurysms have been published, but these are exceedingly rare although isolated aneurysms of the profunda femoris...... occurs in 0-26% of cases. Acute thrombosis occurs in around 15% of cases. Rupture is uncommon and varies between 10% and 14%. Aneurysmal dilatation of the profunda femoris artery is uncommon and occurs in only 1% to 2.6% of all femoral artery aneurysms. Individualized operative approaches are based...

  5. Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms: Evaluation and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, Norman; Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M; Zanaty, Mario; Bell, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of imaging techniques and their increased use in clinical practice have led to a higher detection rate of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The diagnosis of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm is a source of significant stress to the patient because of the concerns for aneurysmal rupture, which is associated with substantial rates of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is important that decisions regarding optimum management are made based on the comparison of the risk of aneurysmal rupture with the risk associated with intervention. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management options for unruptured intracranial aneurysms based on the current evidence in the literature. Furthermore, the authors discuss the genetic abnormalities associated with intracranial aneurysm and current guidelines for screening in patients with a family history of intracranial aneurysms. Since there is significant controversy in the optimum management of small unruptured intracranial aneurysms, we provided a systematic approach to their management based on patient and aneurysm characteristics as well as the risks and benefits of intervention.

  6. Symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Features and surgical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Development of less invasive imaging studies, such as magnetic resonance angiography, has increased the chances that unruptured cerebral aneurysms are found. The rupture risk of 'symptomatic' aneurysms is higher than for 'asymptomatic' aneurysms; so 'symptomatic' aneurysms are more often surgically treated. Many reviews examine 'asymptomatic' unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but few evaluate 'symptomatic' aneurysms. The author has treated many patients with symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms and found that improved cranial nerve signs can be expected if the surgical treatment is performed before the symptoms become irreversible; the critical period is approximately 3 months. It is important to suppress the pulsation of the aneurysms compressing the cranial nerves; both a clipping procedure and endovascular coiling are effective. Cranial nerve signs are more commonly the symptoms of unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but large to giant aneurysms can also be the causes of hemiparesis, hydrocephalus, epilepsy, or even cerebral infarction. This review summarizes the features and surgical outcome of symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (author)

  7. Investigation on the Regional Loss Factor and Its Anisotropy for Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Shahmansouri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An aortic aneurysm is a lethal arterial disease that mainly occurs in the thoracic and abdominal regions of the aorta. Thoracic aortic aneurysms are prevalent in the root/ascending parts of the aorta and can lead to aortic rupture resulting in the sudden death of patients. Understanding the biomechanical and histopathological changes associated with ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAAs, this study investigates the mechanical properties of the aorta during strip-biaxial tensile cycles. The loss factor—defined as the ratio of dissipated energy to the energy absorbed during a tensile cycle—the incremental modulus, and their anisotropy indexes were compared with the media fiber compositions for aneurysmal (n = 26 and control (n = 4 human ascending aortas. The aneurysmal aortas were categorized into the aortas with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV and tricuspid aortic valves (TAV. The strip-biaxial loss factor correlates well with the diameter of the aortas with BAV and TAV (for the axial direction, respectively, R2 = 0.71, p = 0.0022 and R2 = 0.54, p = 0.0096. The loss factor increases significantly with patients’ age in the BAV group (for the axial direction: R2 = 0.45, p = 0.0164. The loss factor is isotropic for all TAV quadrants, whereas it is on average only isotropic in the anterior and outer curvature regions of the BAV group. The results suggest that loss factor may be a useful surrogate measure to describe the histopathology of aneurysmal tissue and to demonstrate the differences between ATAAs with the BAV and TAV.

  8. A failure of preoperative duplex imaging to diagnose a lower extremity venous aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic venous insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Wesley Jones

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We present a case of recurrent bilateral lower extremity venous stasis ulcers in association with a superficial venous aneurysm at the right saphenofemoral junction that was misdiagnosed on preoperative duplex scanning. Methods: A 53-year-old female presented to our clinic with 6-year history of bilateral lower extremity venous stasis ulcers. Her past medical history was significant for refractory venous stasis ulcers of the bilateral lower extremities present for 6 years and morbid obesity. Results: Preoperative venous duplex demonstrated severe venous insufficiency of the superficial and deep systems, but a venous aneurysm was not appreciated. During the high ligation of the right saphenofemoral junction, a 3 × 4 × 5 cm aneurysm was encountered. Repair consisted of aneurysm resection, high ligation of the greater saphenous vein, dissociation of the great saphenous and anterior saphenous veins, and stab phlebectomy of large varicose veins of the thigh and lower leg. The patient recovered uneventfully and experienced complete healing of the venous stasis ulcer in several weeks. Conclusion: Superficial venous aneurysms of the lower extremity are rare and can be often missed on preoperative duplex ultrasound imaging. Large diameter measurements of the proximal greater saphenous vein and obesity increase the risk of misdiagnosing venous aneurysms with duplex imaging; therefore, clinical suspicion must remain high. These aneurysms can be associated with significant symptoms for which repair is indicated.

  9. Surgical repair of complicated coronary arteriovenous fistula and coronary artery aneurysm in an elderly patient after 26 years of conservative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yuki; Shikawa, Akira; Ayusawa, Yoshikazu; Hosoda, Susumu; Muroi, Kennichi; Yagi, Masahiro; Fuji, Shinya; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Fujimori, Kannichi; Shimatani, Yukiko; Shimoyama, Yujin; Uchida, Tatsuro

    2011-01-01

    We describe a rare case of surgical repair of a coronary artery aneurysm with arteriosclerotic changes accompanied by coronary arteriovenous fistula (CAVF) after 26 years of conservative therapy. A 71-year-old woman, diagnosed with CAVF 26 years previously, was admitted to our hospital for general fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. Physical examinations revealed that the CAVF originated from the distal portion of the left circumflex artery (LCX), draining into the coronary sinus (CS); it affected the coronary artery aneurysm with arteriosclerotic changes and was calcified from the left coronary main trunk to the distal portion of the LCX. Treatment without resection of the calcified coronary aneurysm was suggested because of fear of excessive bleeding. The CAVF was closed directly from inside the dilated coronary sinus under cardiopulmonary bypass. The dilated ostium of the left coronary artery was closed using a Xenomedica patch. Coronary artery bypass grafting was performed in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and posterolateral branch (PL) of the LCX using saphenous vein grafts. Postoperatively, the coronary aneurysm was spontaneously thrombosed for low blood flow. The bleeding might have been uncontrolled if the arteriosclerotic and calcified coronary aneurysm had been incised. Therefore, we successfully thrombosed the calcified coronary aneurysm without resection, after reducing the systemic blood flow to the coronary aneurysm and sustaining the coronary blood flow, performed with CABG.

  10. [Ruptured Aneurysm of the Sinus of Valsalva Accompanied with a Bicuspid Aortic Valve in an Elderly Man;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Toshifumi; Tamura, Susumu; Ohzeki, Yasuhiro; Ebine, Kunio

    2017-09-01

    The combination of ruptured aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva and a bicuspid aortic valve is very rare in an elderly person. A 71-year-old man with ruptured aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva and a bicuspid aortic valve had undergone an operation. He was admitted to his other hospital because of heart failure. He was transferred to our hospital to undergo treatment for ruptured aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva. At our hospital, echocardiography findings showed ruptured aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, a ventricular septal defect (VSD), and severe aortic regurgitation with moderate stenosis of the bicuspid aortic valve. An aneurysm originating from the anterior sinus of Valsalva had ruptured into the right ventricular outflow tract. The ruptured aneurysm and VSD were repaired by patch closure through the right ventricular outflow tract. Additionally, the aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva was repaired with direct closure through aortotomy. The insufficient bicuspid aortic valve was replaced with a bioprosthetic valve. After the operation, heart failure improved promptly, and he was making satisfactory progress in his recovery.

  11. Endovascular parent vessel sacrifice in ruptured dissecting vertebral and posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: clinical outcomes and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaelil, Thomas P; Wallace, Adam N; Chatterjee, Arindam N; Zipfel, Gregory J; Dacey, Ralph G; Cross, DeWitte T; Moran, Christopher J; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2016-08-01

    Ruptured intracranial dissecting aneurysms must be secured quickly to prevent re-hemorrhage. Endovascular sacrifice of the diseased segment is a well-established treatment method, however postoperative outcomes of symptomatic stroke and re-hemorrhage rates are not well reported, particularly for the perforator-rich distal vertebral artery or proximal posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We retrospectively reviewed cases of ruptured distal vertebral artery or PICA dissecting aneurysms that underwent endovascular treatment. Diagnosis was based on the presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage on initial CT imaging and of a dissecting aneurysm on catheter angiography. Patients with vertebral artery aneurysms were selected for coil embolization of the diseased arterial segment based on the adequacy of flow to the basilar artery from the contralateral vertebral artery. Patients with PICA aneurysms were generally treated only if they were poor surgical candidates. Outcomes included symptomatic and asymptomatic procedure-related cerebral infarction, recurrent aneurysm rupture, angiographic aneurysm recurrence, and estimated modified Rankin Scale (mRS). During the study period, 12 patients with dissecting aneurysms involving the distal vertebral artery (n=10) or PICA (n=2) were treated with endovascular sacrifice. Two patients suffered an ischemic infarction, one of whom was symptomatic (8.3%). One patient (8.3%) died prior to hospital discharge. No aneurysm recurrence was identified on follow-up imaging. Ten patients (83%) made a good recovery (mRS ≤2). Median clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 41.7 months (range 0-126.4 months) and 14.3 months (range 0.03-88.6 months), respectively. In patients with good collateral circulation, endovascular sacrifice may be the preferred treatment for acutely ruptured dissecting aneurysms involving the distal vertebral artery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  12. Is it safe to sacrifice the superior hypophyseal artery in aneurysm clipping? A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Refaee, Ehab Ahmed; Baldauf, Jörg; Balau, Valentin; Rosenstengel, Christian; Schroeder, Henry

    2013-12-01

    Clipping of paraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysms related to the superior hypophyseal artery (SHA) carries risk of occlusion of this artery when originating distal to the neck of the aneurysm. Sometimes it is inevitable to sacrifice the artery to achieve total aneurysm occlusion. Otherwise a residual aneurysm would remain, which may lead to aneurysm regrowth and subsequent rupture. However, consequences of SHA sacrifice are rarely reported in the literature. In the two presented cases, the SHA was found originating distal to the neck and within the wall of the aneurysm, making the optimal clipping of the aneurysm at the neck unfeasible without trapping of the SHA. Intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography revealed a retrograde blood flow in the SHA distal to the clip in both patients, indicating some collateral circulation. No endocrinologic deficits were encountered after surgery. The vision was not affected in one patient. In the other patient, bilateral visual field defects occurred, which improved partially in the follow-up 2 months after surgery. The consequences of SHA occlusion are difficult to predict. A large variety of anatomical variations of the vascular anatomy exists. Intraoperative ICG angiography may help to estimate collateral blood flow but is not able to predict visual decline. Although final conclusions cannot be drawn from two patients, it seems that in case of multiplicity of superior hypophyseal complex, sacrifice of one even larger branch is safe. However, visual sequelae have to be taken into consideration when a single SHA has to be sacrificed for total aneurysm clipping. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. [Simultaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm and left main trunk lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoshihisa; Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Masuda, Mikio; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Higashi, Shigeki

    2010-10-01

    To patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD) and expanding large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and AAA repair has been recommended. A 68-year-old woman had a CAD and an AAA 71 mm in diameter which was enlarging. Coronary angiography showed severe stenoses in the left main trunk (LMT), the left anterior descending artery and the circumflex artery. On-pump beating CABG and AAA repair with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) were performed simultaneously, because intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) might be needed due to severe stenoses of LMT. Just after EAVR, on-pump beating CABG was performed. The patient was discharged 15 days after the operation. It was suggested that a simultaneous operation of CABG and EVAR might be safe and effective for high risk patients with CAD and AAA.

  14. Abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2010-12-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening. The acceptance rate was 77%, and 95% accept control scans. Furthermore, persons at the highest risk of having an AAA attend screening more frequently. We found that 97% of the interval cases developed from aortas that initially measured 2.5-2.9 cm - i.e. approx. only 5% attenders need re-screening at 5-year intervals. Two large RCTs have given clear indications of operation. Survivors of surgery enjoy the same quality of life as the background population, and only 2-5% of patients refuse an offer of surgery. Early detection seems relevant since the cardiovascular mortality is more than 4 times higher in AAA patients without previous hospital discharge diagnoses due to cardiovascular disease than among similar men without AAA. The absolute risk difference after 5 years was 16%. So, they will benefit from general cardiovascular preventive action as smoking cessation, statins and low-dose aspirin, which could inhibit further AAA progression. All 4 existing RCTs point in the same direction, viz. in favour of screening of men aged 65 and above. We found that screening significantly reduced AAA-related mortality by 67% within the first five years (NNT = 352). Restriction of screening to men with previous cardiovascular or pulmonary hospital discharge diagnoses would request only 27% of the relevant male population study to be invited, but would only have prevented 46.7% of the

  15. Soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.L.; Gielen, J.L.; Delrue, F.; De Schepper, A.M.A. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium); Salgado, R. [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium)

    2004-08-01

    A soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst located in the right gluteus medius of a 21-year-old man is reported. On conventional radiography, the lesion demonstrated a spherically trabeculated mass with a calcific rim. On CT scan, it showed a well-organized peripheral calcification resembling a myositis ossificans. On MRI, it presented as a multilocular, cystic lesion with fluid-fluid levels. The lesion had no solid components except for intralesional septa. Although findings on imaging and histology were identical to those described in classical aneurysmal bone cyst, diagnosis was delayed because of lack of knowledge of this entity and its resemblance to the more familiar post-traumatic heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans). (orig.)

  16. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  17. Non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Sørensen, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Repeat imaging in patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NASAH) remains controversial. We aim to report our experience with NASAH with different hemorrhage patterns, and to investigate the need for further diagnostic workup to determine the underlying cause of hemorrhage. M...... adequate with absence of hematoma and vasospasm. In contrast, a follow-up DSA should be mandatory for confirming or excluding vascular pathology in case of nPMSAH in order to prevent rebleeding....

  18. Perioperative Hemodynamic Monitoring of Common Hepatic Artery for Endovascular Embolization of a Pancreaticoduodenal Arcade Aneurysm with Celiac Stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Eisuke, E-mail: eisuke.shibata1130@gmail.com; Takao, Hidemasa; Amemiya, Shiori; Ohtomo, Kuni [The University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    This report describes perioperative hemodynamic monitoring of the common hepatic artery (CHA) during endovascular treatment of a pancreaticoduodenal arcade aneurysm, in a patient with celiac artery stenosis caused by the median arcuate ligament. Pressure monitoring was performed as a safety measure against critical complications such as liver ischemia. As the aneurysm was located in the anterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (APDA) and the posterior pancreaticoduodenal artery (PPDA) was small in caliber, the patient was considered to be at a high risk of liver ischemia. No significant change in pressure was observed in the CHA on balloon occlusion test in the APDA. Immediately after embolization, the PPDA enlarged and the pressure in the CHA was well maintained. Pressure monitoring appears to improve patient safety during endovascular treatment of visceral aneurysms.

  19. The Siesta Habit is Associated with a Decreased Risk of Rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibin Kang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPrevious studies have examined an association between the siesta habit and hypertension, as well as coronary heart disease. However, the relationship between a siesta and the risk of rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA has not yet been established. We aimed to investigate the effects of a siesta on the risk of rupture of IAs.MethodsWe prospectively enrolled consecutive patients diagnosed with IAs at our hospital between January 2016 and December 2016. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to identify independent risk factors associated with IA rupture.ResultsWe studied 581 consecutive patients with 514 unruptured and 120 ruptured aneurysms. Univariate analysis demonstrated that hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking, location, size, as well as shape and aspect ratio were associated with the risk of rupture of IAs. Multivariate analysis identified hypertension [odds ratio (OR 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.03–2.73], hyperlipidemia (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.08–0.72, current cigarette smoking ≥20 cigarettes/day (d (OR 3.48, 95% CI 1.63–7.47, siesta (siesta time <1 h, OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.24–0.98 and siesta time ≥1 h, OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.19–0.57, location of largest aneurysm on the anterior communicating and internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PCOM (anterior communicating artery OR 16.27, 95% CI 7.40–35.79 and PCOM OR 11.21, 95% CI 5.15–24.43, and size of aneurysm ≥7 mm (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.21–3.97 as independent strong risk factors associated with risk of aneurysm rupture.ConclusionIn the present study, we found that a habitual siesta is a new predictive factor to assess the risk of rupture of an IA. We found the siesta habit may reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture. We also found that hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, location, and size of aneurysm were associated with the risk of rupture of IAs.

  20. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms: Complications in Acutely Ruptured versus Unruptured Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechan, R S; Sprengers, M E; Majoie, C B; Peluso, J P; Sluzewski, M; van Rooij, W J

    2016-03-01

    The use of stents in the setting of SAH is controversial because of concerns about the efficacy and risk of dual antiplatelet therapy. We compare complications of stent-assisted coil embolization in patients with acutely ruptured aneurysms with complications in patients with unruptured aneurysms. Between February 2007 and March 2015, 45 acutely ruptured aneurysms and 47 unruptured aneurysms were treated with stent-assisted coiling. Patients with ruptured aneurysms were not pretreated with antiplatelet medication but received intravenous aspirin during the procedure. Thromboembolic events and early rebleeds were recorded. In ruptured aneurysms, 9 of 45 patients had thromboembolic complications. Four patients remained asymptomatic, 4 developed infarctions, and 1 patient died. The permanent complication rate in ruptured aneurysms was 11% (95% CI, 4%-24%). Five of 45 patients (11%; 95% CI, 4%-24%) had an early rebleed from the treated aneurysm after 3-45 days, and in 4, this rebleed was fatal. In 46 patients with 47 unruptured aneurysms, thromboembolic complications occurred in 2. One patient remained asymptomatic; the other had a thalamus infarction. The complication rate in unruptured aneurysms was 2.2% (1 of 46; 95% CI, 0.01%-12%). No first-time hemorrhages occurred in 46 patients with 47 aneurysms during 6 months of follow-up. The complication rate of stent-assisted coiling with early adverse events in ruptured aneurysms was 10 times higher than that in unruptured aneurysms. Early rebleed accounted for most mortality. In ruptured aneurysms, stent-assisted coil embolization is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and should only be considered when less risky options have been excluded. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Prevention of the Rerupture of Collateral Artery Aneurysms on the Ventricular Wall by Early Surgical Revascularization in Moyamoya Disease: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Fumiaki; Takasu, Syuntaro; Ota, Shinji; Seki, Yukio

    2018-01-01

    Collateral artery aneurysms are a source of intracranial hemorrhage in moyamoya disease. Several reports have shown that surgical revascularization leads to the obliteration of collateral artery aneurysms. However, its effect on the prevention of rebleeding has not been established, and the optimal timing of the operation remains unclear. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of surgical revascularization and to investigate the optimal operation timing in patients with moyamoya disease who have ruptured collateral artery aneurysms on the ventricular wall. Two patients with moyamoya disease who presented with intraventricular hemorrhage caused by rupture of collateral artery aneurysms on the wall of the lateral ventricle are presented here. In both cases, the aneurysms reruptured approximately 1 month after the initial hemorrhage. Both patients successfully underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis combined with indirect bypass in the subacute stage. The aneurysms decreased with the development of collateral circulation through the direct bypasses, and rebleeding did not occur after the surgery. Because ruptured collateral artery aneurysms on the wall of the lateral ventricle in moyamoya disease are prone to rerupture within 1 month, surgical revascularization may be recommended as soon as the patients are stable and able to withstand the operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Shared genetic risk factors of intracranial, abdominal, and thoracic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Femke N G; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Ripke, Stephan; Anderson, Graig; de Andrade, Mariza; Baas, Annette F; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Böttinger, Erwin P; Bown, Matthew J; Broderick, Joseph; Bijlenga, Philippe; Carrell, David S; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; Ebeling, Christian; Eriksson, Johan G; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Friedrich, Christoph M; Gaál, Emília I; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Harrison, Seamus C; Hernesniemi, Juha; Hofman, Albert; Inoue, Ituro; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Jones, Gregory T; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivisaari, Riku; Ko, Nerissa; Koskinen, Seppo; Kubo, Michiaki; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kurki, Mitja I; Laakso, Aki; Lai, Dongbing; Leal, Suzanne M; Lehto, Hanna; LeMaire, Scott A; Low, Siew-Kee; Malinowski, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Mosley, Thomas H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Niemelä, Mika; Pacheco, Jennifer; Peissig, Peggy L; Pera, Joanna; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rij, Andre M; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saratzis, Athanasios; Slowik, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tromp, Gerard; Uitterlinden, André G; Verma, Shefali S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Wang, Gao T; Han, Buhm; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-01-01

    Background--Intracranial aneurysms (IAs), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) all have a familial predisposition. Given that aneurysm types are known to co-occur, we hypothesized that there may be shared genetic risk factors for IAs, AAAs, and TAAs. Methods and

  3. Shared Genetic Risk Factors of Intracranial, Abdominal, and Thoracic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Femke N G; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Ripke, Stephan; Anderson, Graig; de Andrade, Mariza; Baas, Annette F; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Böttinger, Erwin P; Bown, Matthew J; Broderick, Joseph; Bijlenga, Philippe; Carrell, David S; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; Ebeling, Christian; Eriksson, Johan G; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Friedrich, Christoph M; Gaál, Emília I; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Harrison, Seamus C; Hernesniemi, Juha; Hofman, Albert; Inoue, Ituro; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Jones, Gregory T; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivisaari, Riku; Ko, Nerissa; Koskinen, Seppo; Kubo, Michiaki; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kurki, Mitja I; Laakso, Aki; Lai, Dongbing; Leal, Suzanne M; Lehto, Hanna; LeMaire, Scott A; Low, Siew-Kee; Malinowski, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Mosley, Thomas H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Niemelä, Mika; Pacheco, Jennifer; Peissig, Peggy L; Pera, Joanna; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rij, Andre M; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saratzis, Athanasios; Slowik, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tromp, Gerard; Uitterlinden, André G; Verma, Shefali S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Wang, Gao T; Han, Buhm; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracranial aneurysms (IAs), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) all have a familial predisposition. Given that aneurysm types are known to co-occur, we hypothesized that there may be shared genetic risk factors for IAs, AAAs, and TAAs. METHODS AND

  4. Migraine before rupture of intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Gurary, Natalia M; Sakovich, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA.......Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA....

  5. The role of inflammation in cerebral aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Turkmani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (IAs is poorly understood. At present, risk factors for aneurysm rupture are limited to demographics and rudimentary anatomic features of the aneurysm. The first sign of aneurysm destabilization and rupture may be subarachnoid hemorrhage, a potentially devastating brain injury with high morbidity and mortality. An emerging body of literature suggests a complex inflammatory cascade likely promotes aneurysm wall remodeling and progressive ballooning of the arterial wall, ultimately terminating in aneurysm rupture. These events likely begin with hemodynamic, flow-related endothelial injury; the injured endothelium stimulates inflammation, including the recruitment and transmigration of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages. Various proteases are secreted by the inflammatory infiltrate, resulting in degradation of the extracellular matrix and the structural changes unique to IAs. Detailed understanding of these inflammatory processes may result in (1 early identification of patients at high risk for aneurysm rupture, perhaps via arterial wall imaging, and (2 targeted, noninvasive therapies to treat or even prevent cerebral aneurysms.

  6. Natural history of cerebral saccular aneurysms

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and that developmental faults occur quite commonly in the media at the points of arterial junctions. These 'congenital' .... of aneurysm diagnosis were not significant predictors of subsequent rupture. The International Study of ... the diagnosis and surgical management of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, the overall ...

  7. Production of carotid artery aneurysm in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Seo, Dong Man; Yun, Tae Jin

    1997-01-01

    To establish the method of constructing an experimental aneurysm model in porcine carotid artery Fourteen aneurysms were created in the carotid arteries of eight pigs. After paramedian incision under intravenous anesthesia, the common carotid artery and external jugular vein were separated. A portion of the latter was cut to make an aneurysmal sac and this was sutured to the side wall of the common carotid arterial wall (end to side). Within one week, anarteriogram was obtained in all pigs and color Doppler study was performed in four. Digital subtraction arteriograms were serially obtained three images/sec, and these were analyzed to determine the size of the sac and the neck, flow pattern in the aneurysm, and stenosis in the common carotid artery. Arteriographic findings were obtained in ten of 14 aneurysms. Six aneurysms were saccular in shape, and the mean size of the sac and neck was 16 x 10mm and 5.3mm, respectively. Four aneurysms were lobulated, and in these cases, the mean size of the sac and neck was 9 x 3mm and 3.7mm, respectively. The mean size of the proximal common carotid artery was 4.5mm, and at the operation site, mean stenosis was 40%. In 10/14 cases (71%), we successfully established an aneurysm model in the porcine carotid artery, and believe that it is suitable for use in interventional neuroradiology experiments

  8. Submitral Left Ventricular Aneurysm Associated with Thrombus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... She was given drugs for management of heart failure and ... treatment abroad. KEYWORDS: Ethiopia, heart failure, submitral aneurysm, thrombus. INTRODUCTION. Submitral left ventricle aneurysm is a rare cardiovascular disorder worldwide, but ... grade 2 pulmonary edema, and bilateral pleural effusion.

  9. Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoff, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is a devastating disorder with an often poor prognosis. The occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the most important factors determining outcome in

  10. Coiling of ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menovsky, T.; Rooij, W.J.J. van; Sluzewski, M.; Wijnalda, D.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the technical feasibility of treating ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysms with detachable coils and to evaluate the anatomic and clinical results. METHODS: Over a period of 27 months, 12 patients with a ruptured pericallosal artery aneurysm were treated with detachable

  11. Atrial septal aneurysm: MRI and echocardiography correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puvaneswary, M.; Singham, T.; Bastian, B.

    2003-01-01

    A case of a patient with atrial septal aneurysm with findings in echocardiography and MRI is described. MRI was able to differentiate slow flow stagnant blood and permitted a better definition of atrial septal aneurysm when echocardiography finding are inconclusive. Copyright (2003) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm with neurofibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negoro, M.; Terashima, K.; Sugita, K.; Nakaya, T.

    1990-01-01

    An extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with neurofibromatosis is described. The aneurysm was treated by endovascular balloon occlusion of the proximal vertebral artery. The details of the therapeutic management are discussed, and the vascular manifestations of neurofibromatosis are reviewed. (orig.)

  13. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M.; Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture

  14. Ressecção de aneurisma venoso em veia jugular externa direita Resection of right external jugular vein aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pereira Savi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O aneurisma venoso é uma anomalia rara, cujo diagnóstico pode ser realizado a partir de exames físicos e complementares. Sua raridade justifica a necessidade de investigação e de publicações de estudos de caso, objetivo maior deste estudo. Relata-se aqui o caso de uma paciente que apresentava um abaulamento cervical anterior assintomático, progressivo e com seis meses de evolução. A paciente foi submetida à cervicotomia anterior, sob anestesia geral, com ressecção do segmento venoso acometido e ligadura da veia jugular externa. Realizado o estudo, verificou-se que aneurismas venosos podem causar tromboflebite, embolia pulmonar ou rotura. Cirurgia profilática, quando oferece baixo risco, é cuidadosamente recomendada para pacientes com aneurismas abdominais e altamente recomendada para aneurismas do sistema venoso profundo dos membros inferiores. Outros aneurismas venosos devem ser tratados cirurgicamente quando sintomáticos, desfigurantes ou se apresentarem aumento progressivo.Venous aneurysms are a rare abnormality, usually found in physical or complementary exams. We report a case of a 43-year old female with an asymptomatic and progressive enlarging mass in the neck. She had no history of trauma or cervical puncture. Vascular ultrasound showed a right jugular veins aneurysm with 1,81 x 1,62 cm of diameter. She was undergone resection and ligation of right external jugular vein, under general anesthesia. Venous aneurysm can cause thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism or spontaneous rupture. Prophylactic surgery is cautiously recommended for low-risk patients with venous aneurysms of the abdomen and strongly recommended for most patients with lower extremity deep venous aneurysms. Other venous aneurysms should be excised only if they are symptomatic, enlarging, or disfiguring

  15. Computed tomographic diagnosis of pulmonary artery aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeno, Kouji; Kontani, Kazuhiro; Ito, Makoto; Sakurai, Noboru; Sawada, Taisei; Fukeda, Yasuhiko; Takata, Shigeo; Ikeda, Takayuki; Hattori, Nobu.

    1986-01-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysms are rare lesions. Clagett et al reported that one aneurysm of the pulmonary artery may be found in approximately 14,000 necropsies. We have experienced a case of giant pulmonary artery aneurysm confirmed by computed tomography. A 38 year-old man with atrial septal defect admitted to Kanazawa City Hospital. He had been pointed out of a right hilar mass when he was 26 years old. His complaint was bloody sputum and cough. Pulmonary angiography was not useful for the definite diagnosis because of its mural thrombi. Enhanced computed tomography showed a giant pulmonary artery aneurysm with a mural thrombi in its cavity. This shows that enhanced computed tomography is very useful for the diagnosis of a pulmonary artery aneurysm with a mural thrombi in its cavity. (author)

  16. The Relation between Collateral Circulation and 99mTc-MIBI Heart SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Man; Na, Deug Young; Park, Eun Kyung

    1994-01-01

    The coronary collateral vessels have revealed their significance in terms of reduction of infarct size, preservation left ventricular function, and prevention of left ventricular aneurysm in patients with myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study were to evaluated the relation between collateral circulation and 99m Tc-MIBI Heart SPECT in patient with acute myocardial infarction and their clinical significance. The fifty six MI patients with antegrade TIMI perfusion grade 0 and 1 were studied. The patients were classified into two groups; Group I included 30 patients with grade 2, 3 Collateral flow. Group II included 26 patients with grade 0, 1 Collateral flow. Collateral filling were graded from 0 to 3; 0- none, 1- Filling of side branch only, 2- Partial filling of the epicardial segment, 3- Complete filling of epicardial segment. Clinical variables, left ventricular function, 99m Tc-MIBI Heart SPECT were analyzed with angiographic finding. Results were following: 1) Collateral visualization was found to be greater in patient with involvement of right coronary artery (RCA). The collateral development site of infarct related artery was RCA 15 cases, left anterior descending artery (LAD) 10 cases, left circumflex artery (LCX) 5 cases, and the collateral circulation from LAD to RCA was 13 cases (40.6%). 2) There was a tendency to be decreased in peak CK activity with group I . 3) The presence of good collateral channels was more frequently 99m Tc-MIBI reversible perfusion defect (83.4% vs 15.3%, p 99m Tc-MlBI reversible perfusion defect.

  17. PIV-measured versus CFD-predicted flow dynamics in anatomically realistic cerebral aneurysm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Matthew D; Nikolov, Hristo N; Milner, Jaques S; Lownie, Stephen P; Demont, Edwin M; Kalata, Wojciech; Loth, Francis; Holdsworth, David W; Steinman, David A

    2008-04-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of nominally patient-specific cerebral aneurysms is increasingly being used as a research tool to further understand the development, prognosis, and treatment of brain aneurysms. We have previously developed virtual angiography to indirectly validate CFD-predicted gross flow dynamics against the routinely acquired digital subtraction angiograms. Toward a more direct validation, here we compare detailed, CFD-predicted velocity fields against those measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Two anatomically realistic flow-through phantoms, one a giant internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm and the other a basilar artery (BA) tip aneurysm, were constructed of a clear silicone elastomer. The phantoms were placed within a computer-controlled flow loop, programed with representative flow rate waveforms. PIV images were collected on several anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) planes. CFD simulations were then carried out using a well-validated, in-house solver, based on micro-CT reconstructions of the geometries of the flow-through phantoms and inlet/outlet boundary conditions derived from flow rates measured during the PIV experiments. PIV and CFD results from the central AP plane of the ICA aneurysm showed a large stable vortex throughout the cardiac cycle. Complex vortex dynamics, captured by PIV and CFD, persisted throughout the cardiac cycle on the central LAT plane. Velocity vector fields showed good overall agreement. For the BA, aneurysm agreement was more compelling, with both PIV and CFD similarly resolving the dynamics of counter-rotating vortices on both AP and LAT planes. Despite the imposition of periodic flow boundary conditions for the CFD simulations, cycle-to-cycle fluctuations were evident in the BA aneurysm simulations, which agreed well, in terms of both amplitudes and spatial distributions, with cycle-to-cycle fluctuations measured by PIV in the same geometry. The overall good agreement

  18. [Posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms of the anterior tibial artery: a review of the literature and a clinical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stio, F; Ortensi, A; Battisti, G; Felici, A; Marigliani, M; Gallinacci, E; De Vita, M; Finizio, R; Fabrizio, G; Porcelli, C

    1993-02-01

    The authors after a review of the literature report a case of anterior tibial artery false aneurysm in a seventeen year old male, due to traumatic sprained ankle during a basketball match. Surgical techniques used in repairing the lesion as well as microsurgical technique for the direct suture of the artery, which allowed to resolve the problem, are discussed.

  19. Treatment of Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Osamu; Ikawa, Fusao; Hidaka, Toshikazu; Kurokawa, Yasuharu; Yonezawa, Ushio

    2014-01-01

    Summary We evaluated the outcomes of endovascular or surgical treatment of ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs), and investigated the relations between treatment complications and the development and location of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We treated 14 patients (12 men, two women; mean age, 56.2 years) with ruptured VADAs between March 1999 and June 2012 at our hospital. Six and eight patients had Hunt and Hess grades 1-3 and 4-5, respectively. Twelve patients underwent internal endovascular trapping, one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion alone, and one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion in the acute stage and occipital artery (OA)-PICA anastomosis and surgical trapping in the chronic stage. The types of VADA based on their location relative to the ipsilateral PICA were distal, PICA-involved, and non-PICA in nine, two, and three patients, respectively. The types of PICA based on their development and location were bilateral anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)-PICA, ipsilateral AICA-PICA, extradural, and intradural type in one, two, two, and nine patients, respectively. Two patients with high anatomical risk developed medullary infarction, but their midterm outcomes were better than in previous reports. The modified Rankin scale indicated grades 0-2, 3-5, and 6 in eight, three, and three patients, respectively. A good outcome is often obtained in the treatment of ruptured VADA using internal endovascular trapping, except in the PICA-involved type, even with high-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment of the PICA-involved type is controversial. The anatomical location and development of PICA may be predicted by complications with postoperative medullary infarction. PMID:24976093

  20. Spontaneous Rupture of a Superior Gluteal Artery Mycotic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    George, Neal; Abdelghany, Mahmoud; Stark, Owen; Joshi, Medha

    2015-01-01

    Gluteal artery aneurysms are uncommon among all aneurysms and are usually a result of trauma. Streptococcus viridans bacteremia has been described in rare cases of extracranial mycotic aneurysms. Despite a variable clinical presentation, mycotic aneurysms of the superior gluteal artery could be the cause in patients with unexplained sciatica pain. Here we report a very rare case of spontaneous rupture of a superior gluteal artery mycotic aneurysm in a patient with underlying infective endocar...

  1. Retrograde snare-assisted rescue via the anterior communicating artery for lost access during multiple overlapping pipeline embolization device placement: A technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Wonsoo; Kang, Dong-Hun; Kim, Byung Moon; Park, Jaechan; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2018-03-07

    The pipeline embolization device (PED; ev3, Irvine, California, USA) has been used to divert flow away from an aneurysm sac. The risk of complications may increase for flow diversion with giant aneurysms, since these cases may require multiple overlapping PEDs, which makes the technique highly complex. We report a rescue technical strategy for lost access during multiple overlapping PED placement for a giant, fusiform cavernous aneurysm. By using the collateral circulation as an alternative rescue route, intraprocedural loss of distal access may be salvaged. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography of persistent primitive olfactory artery: Incidence and association rate with aneurysm in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Bo Ra; Yeo, Soo Hyun; Chang, Hyuk Won; Kim, Mi Jeong; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Ealmaan; Kim, Mi Kyung; Cho, Ho Chan; Kim, Hye Soon [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Japanese data indicates an incidence of persistent primitive olfactory artery (PPOA) of 0.14%. We studied the incidence of PPOA and associated cerebral vascular variation or anomalies in Korea. We retrospectively reviewed cranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of a total of 9841 patients of our institution. The diagnostic criterion of PPOA is extreme anterioinferior course of the proximal anterior cerebral artery, with a hairpin turn of the lateral projection. We found 29 cases (0.29%) with PPOA. The PPOA location was on the left in 19 cases, bilateral in 3 cases, and on the right in 7 cases. An aneurysm was found at the hairpin turn in 2 patients. There were aneurysms in other sites in 3 cases. There were hypoplasia of anterior cerebral artery in 3 cases, and fenestration of intracranial artery in 1 case. In Korean populations, the incidence of PPOA found in MRA and CTA was twice as high as that shown in the previous Japanese data. Within Korea, left side laterality is more common than right side or bilalterality. Aneurysmal dilatations at the hairpin turning point and aneurysms at other sites were found, and other vascular variations were observed in several cases.

  3. Intracranial Aneurysms Involving Circle of Willis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Vasculitis- A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoti, Amol Madanlal; Taori, Abhijit Kishor; Dhok, Avinash Parashuram; Rawat, Jitesh Subhash; Chandak, Nihar Umakant

    2017-07-01

    Intracranial Arterial Aneurysms (IAAs) are relatively rare in paediatric population and they account for at least 10%-15% of haemorrhagic strokes which occur during the first two decades of life. Here we present a unique and unusual case of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected child who presented with intracranial aneurysms with formation of collaterals and vasculopathy, demonstrating low viral count despite receiving adequate antiretroviral treatment. Intracranial vascular involvement, their complications and its incidence in these patients may become increasingly common as the management of human immunodeficiency virus infection continues to improve and afflicted patients survive for longer periods because of advancement in the antiretroviral treatment. Diagnosing aneurysm of cerebral circulation needs high degree of suspicion and correlation between clinical and radiological findings.

  4. Endovascular treatment of AICA flow dependent aneurysms. A report of three cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, M; El Serwi, A; Alaa Habib, M; Abou Gamrah, S

    2012-12-01

    Peripheral anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all cerebral aneurysms. To our knowledge 34 flow-related cases including the present study have been reported in the literature. Three patients harbouring four flow dependent aneurysms were referred to our institution. Two patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage, one presented with cerebellar manifestations. They were all treated by endovascular embolization of the aneurysm as well as the parent artery using liquid embolic material. Two cases were embolized using NBCA, Onyx was used in the third case. No bleeding or rebleeding were encountered during the follow-up period which ranged from five to nine months. One patient developed facial palsy, cerebellar symptoms and sensorineural hearing loss. The remaining two cases did not develop any post treatment neurological complications. Endovascular management of flow-dependent AICA aneurysms by parent artery occlusion is feasible and efficient in terms of rebleeding prevention. Post embolization neurological complications are unpredictable. This depends upon the adequacy of collaterals from other cerebellar arteries.

  5. [Extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm complicating Klippel-Feil syndrome: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, S; Kojima, T; Morooka, Y; Tanaka, K; Nakagawa, Y; Kuroki, M

    1996-10-01

    The Klippel-Feil syndrome is one of the spinal malformations characterized by fusion of the cervical vertebrae. It is well known that the malformation can cause some neurologic disorders. However, an aneurysm in the vertebral artery associated with the Klippel-Feil syndrome is extremely rare, with only one case having been reported in the literature. We present a 39-year-old female with a sudden onset of disturbed consciousness. Lateral cervical x-ray films showed the Klippel-Feil syndrome and hypermobility between C1 and C2. MRI showed multiple infarctions in the posterior circulation, including bilateral thalami. Right vertebral angiogram identified the extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm as the source of the emboli. The patient gradually recovered with conservative therapy. The aneurysm was thought to be produced by chronic arterial trauma secondary to excessive movement between C1 and C2. We conclude that an extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm is a serious complication in a patient with the Klippel-Feil syndrome.

  6. Aorta Ascending Aneurysm Analysis Using CFD Models towards Possible Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Simão

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD can be seen as complementary tool alongside the visualization capabilities of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR and computed tomography (CT imaging for decision-making. In this research CT images of three cases (i.e., a healthy heart pilot project and two patients with complex aortic disease are used to validate and analyse the corresponding computational results. Three 3D domains of the thoracic aorta were tested under hemodynamic conditions. Under normal conditions, the flow inside the thoracic aorta is more streamlined. In the presence of ascending aortic aneurysm, large areas of blue separation zones (i.e., low velocities are identified, as well as an internal geometry deformation of the aortic wall, respectively. This flow separation is characterized by the reversal of flow and sudden drop of the wall shear stress (WSS in the aorta. Moreover, the aortic aneurysm simulations adversely affect the flow by increasing the pressure drop and flow inefficiency, due to the anatomical configuration of the ascending aorta. Altered hemodynamics led to a vortex formation and locally reversed the flow that eventually induced a low flow velocity and oscillating WSS in the thoracic aorta. Significant changes in the hemodynamic characteristics affect the normal blood circulation with strong turbulence occurrence, damaging the aortic wall, leading ultimately to the need of surgical intervention to avoid fatal events.

  7. [Spine cord descompresion and instrumentation in a case of solid aneurysmal bone cyst in the lumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Martín, A A; Guerrero-Moyano, N; Guerado-Parra, E; Quesada-Rubio, J A

    2010-06-01

    We report a 8-year-old boy with two month history of pain and stiffness in his left lower extremity. On x-ray, MRI and scintigraphy examinations a lytic lesion affecting the body and posterior arc of his third lumbar vertebral become evident. The tumour was excised through a double, anterior and posterior approach; spinal fusion with posterior transpedicular instrumentation was also performed in the same procedure; in order to achieve solid fusion tricortical liofilized graft was also inserted. Histological studies evidenced finding compatible with aneurysmal bone cyst solid variant. Five years after surgery the patient is pain free and no recurrence is evident under diagnostic images tools. For the treatment of aneurysmal bone cyst of the spine we recommend complete excision of the tumour in a combined anterior and posterior one staged procedure, together with hardware instrumentation and bone graft, no recurrence or instability is seen after five years followup.

  8. β-Carotene Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Aortic Aneurysm by Alleviating Macrophage Recruitment in Apoe(-/- Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliappan Gopal

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a common chronic degenerative disease characterized by progressive aortic dilation and rupture. The mechanisms underlying the role of α-tocopherol and β-carotene on AAA have not been comprehensively assessed. We investigated if α-tocopherol and β-carotene supplementation could attenuate AAA, and studied the underlying mechanisms utilized by the antioxidants to alleviate AAA. Four-months-old Apoe(-/- mice were used in the induction of aneurysm by infusion of angiotensin II (Ang II, and were orally administered with α-tocopherol and β-carotene enriched diet for 60 days. Significant increase of LDL, cholesterol, triglycerides and circulating inflammatory cells was observed in the Ang II-treated animals, and gene expression studies showed that ICAM-1, VCAM-1, MCP-1, M-CSF, MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-12 were upregulated in the aorta of aneurysm-induced mice. Extensive plaques, aneurysm and diffusion of inflammatory cells into the tunica intima were also noticed. The size of aorta was significantly (P = 0.0002 increased (2.24±0.20 mm in the aneurysm-induced animals as compared to control mice (1.17±0.06 mm. Interestingly, β-carotene dramatically controlled the diffusion of macrophages into the aortic tunica intima, and circulation. It also dissolved the formation of atheromatous plaque. Further, β-carotene significantly decreased the aortic diameter (1.33±0.12 mm in the aneurysm-induced mice (β-carotene, P = 0.0002. It also downregulated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, MCP-1, M-CSF, MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12, PPAR-α and PPAR-γ following treatment. Hence, dietary supplementation of β-carotene may have a protective function against Ang II-induced AAA by ameliorating macrophage recruitment in Apoe(-/- mice.

  9. Electronic database of arterial aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Luiz Erzinger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:The creation of an electronic database facilitates the storage of information, as well as streamlines the exchange of data, making easier the exchange of knowledge for future research.Objective:To construct an electronic database containing comprehensive and up-to-date clinical and surgical data on the most common arterial aneurysms, to help advance scientific research.Methods:The most important specialist textbooks and articles found in journals and on internet databases were reviewed in order to define the basic structure of the protocol. Data were computerized using the SINPE© system for integrated electronic protocols and tested in a pilot study.Results:The data entered onto the system was first used to create a Master protocol, organized into a structure of top-level directories covering a large proportion of the content on vascular diseases as follows: patient history; physical examination; supplementary tests and examinations; diagnosis; treatment; and clinical course. By selecting items from the Master protocol, Specific protocols were then created for the 22 arterial sites most often involved by aneurysms. The program provides a method for collection of data on patients including clinical characteristics (patient history and physical examination, supplementary tests and examinations, treatments received and follow-up care after treatment. Any information of interest on these patients that is contained in the protocol can then be used to query the database and select data for studies.Conclusions:It proved possible to construct a database of clinical and surgical data on the arterial aneurysms of greatest interest and, by adapting the data to specific software, the database was integrated into the SINPE© system, thereby providing a standardized method for collection of data on these patients and tools for retrieving this information in an organized manner for use in scientific studies.

  10. The effect of endoleak on intra-aneurysmal pressure after EVE for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Sheng; Jing Zaiping; Mei Zhijun; Lu Qingsheng; Zhao Jun; Zhang Suzhen; Zhao Xin; Cai Lili; Tang Jingdong; Xiong Jiang; Liao Mingfang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the intra-aneurysmal pressure curve in the presence of endoleak after endovascular exclusion (EVE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: Infrarenal aortic aneurysms were created with bovine jugular vein segments or patches. Then they were underwent incomplete endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm and formation of endoleaks. The pressures of blood flow outside the graft into the sac were measured. Results: The intrasac pressure was higher than systemic pressure in the presence of endoleak. After sealing the endoleak, pressure decreased significantly, and the pressure cure showed approximately linear. Conclusion: The change of intra-aneurysmal pressure curve reflected the load on aneurysmal wall after EVE, and can also help to determine the endoleak existence

  11. Flow structures in cerebral aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Gambaruto, Alberto M; João, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical properties of blood flow are commonly correlated to a wide range of cardiovascular diseases. In this work means to describe and characterise the flow field in the free-slip and no-slip domains are discussed in the context of cerebral aneurysms, reconstructed from in-vivo medical imaging. The approaches rely on a Taylor series expansion of the velocity field to first order terms that leads to a system of ODEs, the solution to which locally describes the motion of the flow. On perfor...

  12. Aneurysm of the membranous septum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, N.; Haller, D.; Hinterauer, L.; Jenni, R.; Zurich Univ.

    1984-01-01

    Amongst 9000 patients on whom angiocardiograms has been carried out, a membranous septum aneurysm (MSA) was found in 47. In nine patients out of 27 the MSA could be demonstrated by sonography. The most common abnormalities accompanying this lesion were disturbances in rhythm and conduction (in 29 patients), ventricular septal defect in 29 and aortic insufficiency in 14. Complications included bacterial endocarditis in five patients (three with aortic insufficiency and two with sepsis lenta), aortic insufficiency (which was not of rheumatic or bacterial origin in three patients with conduction defects) and thirteen patients with abnormalities of cardiac rhythm with small VSDs. (orig.) [de

  13. Aneurysm of the membranous septum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, N.; Haller, D.; Hinterauer, L.; Jenni, R.

    1984-02-01

    Amongst 9000 patients on whom angiocardiograms has been carried out, a membranous septum aneurysm (MSA) was found in 47. In nine patients out of 27 the MSA could be demonstrated by sonography. The most common abnormalities accompanying this lesion were disturbances in rhythm and conduction (in 29 patients), ventricular septal defect in 29 and aortic insufficiency in 14. Complications included bacterial endocarditis in five patients (three with aortic insufficiency and two with sepsis lenta), aortic insufficiency (which was not of rheumatic or bacterial origin in three patients with conduction defects) and thirteen patients with abnormalities of cardiac rhythm with small VSDs.

  14. Rasmussen's Aneurysm: A Forgotten Entity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, A. N.; Costello, R.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a rare entity which is a complication of a disease process that had almost disappeared from the Western World. With the recent resurgence in reported cases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) in Western communities, it is important to recognize complications and sequelae. A young alcoholic male with confirmed active TB suffered a cardiac arrest following massive haemoptysis. Multidetector computed tomography angiography diagnosed a Rasmussen's aneurysm, confirmed by digital subtraction angiography and then successfully embolized with glue. We outline this rare case and the embolization technique and review previously documented reports

  15. Advances in open microsurgery for cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jason M; Lawton, Michael T

    2014-02-01

    Endovascular techniques introduced strong extrinsic forces that provoked reactive changes in aneurysm surgery. Microsurgery has become less invasive, more appealing to patients, lower risk, and efficacious for complex aneurysms, particularly those unfavorable for or failing endovascular therapy. To review specific advances in open microsurgery for aneurysms. A university-based, single-surgeon practice was examined for the use of minimally invasive craniotomies, surgical management of recurrence after coiling, the use of intracranial-intracranial bypass techniques, and cerebrovascular volume-outcome relationships. The mini-pterional, lateral supraorbital, and orbital-pterional craniotomies are minimally invasive alternatives to standard craniotomies. Mini-pterional and lateral supraorbital craniotomies were used in one-fourth of unruptured patients, increasing from 22% to 28%, whereas 15% of patients underwent orbital-pterional craniotomies and trended upward from 11% to 20%. Seventy-four patients were treated for coil recurrences (2.3% of all aneurysms) with direct clip occlusion (77%), clip occlusion after coil extraction (7%), or parent artery occlusion with bypass (16%). Intracranial-intracranial bypass (in situ bypass, reimplantation, reanastomosis, and intracranial grafts) transformed the management of giant aneurysms and made the surgical treatment of posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms competitive with endovascular therapy. Centralization maximized the volume-outcome relationships observed with clipping. Aneurysm microsurgery has embraced minimalism, tailoring the exposure to the patient's anatomy with the smallest possible craniotomy that provides adequate exposure. The development of intracranial-intracranial bypasses is an important advancement that makes microsurgery a competitive option for complex and recurrent aneurysms. Trends toward centralizing aneurysm surgery in tertiary centers optimize results achievable with open microsurgery.

  16. Lifetime Effects of Small Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishima, Kaoru; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Aihara, Masanori; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2016-11-01

    Recent prospective multicenter studies have shown that the probability of rupture of unruptured aneurysms with maximal diameter <7 mm is rather low. However, the overall risks and long-term impact of unruptured aneurysms on lifetime quality of life are still unknown. A mathematical model of the natural history of intracranial aneurysms was constructed, in which the hypothetical individuals with or without unruptured aneurysm transit between discrete health states. The annual rupture rate of small aneurysms was assumed to be 0.5% in the baseline analysis, followed by the subsequent sensitivity analysis. The analyses were continued until cumulative death rate from subarachnoid hemorrhage or other causes reached 1.0. Age-specific ratios of death of subarachnoid hemorrhage in the individuals harboring unruptured aneurysm, if dying at 60 years old, were 25% in men and 43% in women. These ratios decreased rapidly with higher age. Most (more than 90%) patients with small aneurysms were expected to die of diseases other than subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the baseline analysis (60-year-old individuals), lifetime lost to small aneurysms could be estimated as 3.8% for men and 4.2% for women, but a somewhat larger impact could be identified in the young and/or female individuals compared with in the elderly and/or male individuals. Lifetime effects of small unruptured aneurysms without risk factors increasing the probability of rupture are relatively small, and most patients were expected to die of diseases other than subarachnoid hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  18. Treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms by neurosurgeons in Colombia: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Gutiérrez Paternina, Juan J.; Buendía de Ávila, María E.; Preciado Mesa, Edgar I.; Barrios, Rubén Sabogal; Niño-Hernández, Lucía M.; Jaramillo, Keith Suárez

    2011-01-01

    Background: Trends in management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms among neurosurgeons is very variable and had not been previously described in any Latin American country. This study was conducted to determine the preferences of Colombian neurosurgeons in pharmacologic, surgical, and endovascular management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Methods: A survey-based descriptive study was performed in a sample of members from the Colombian Association of Neurosurgery. Questions about pharmacologic, surgical, and endovascular management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysm were carried out. We calculated the mean and the standard deviation of the results obtained from the continuous variables. The results of the categorical variables are presented as percentages. Results: The preference of medication with poor clinical evidence, such as magnesium sulfate, aspirin, statins, and anti-fibrinolytics was lower than 10%. The use of intravenous nimodipine and systemic glucocorticoids was as high as 31%. The availability of endovascular therapy was 69%. The indication for treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms that required intervention was less than 13.8%. In patients with ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms, coiling was the preferred method for exclusion. Conclusions: Reported compliance of evidence-based clinical guidelines was similar to that described in developed countries, and even better. However, there is little agreement in treating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. For other issues, the conducts reported by Colombian neurosurgeons are in accordance with the current guidelines. PMID:22059120

  19. False iliac artery aneurysm following renal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, N; Sønksen, Jens Otto Reimers; Schroeder, T V

    1999-01-01

    We report a very rare case of a false iliac artery aneurysm following renal transplantation. The patient was a 51-year-old women who presented with a painful 10 x 10 cm pulsating mass in her left iliac fossa. The patient had received a second cadaveric renal transplantation 5 years previously....... The graft never functioned and transplant nephrectomy was performed 2 weeks later. A CT-scanning showed a 10 x 10 cm large aneurysm arising from the left external iliac artery. At operation a large false aneurysm was identified arising from the original transplant anastomotic site. Due to the extent...

  20. Open versus endovascular aneurysm repair trial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinkauf, Craig; George, Elizabeth; Zhou, Wei

    2017-11-01

    The Open versus Endovascular Aneurysm Repair trial is the only randomized controlled trial that is funded by the federal government to evaluate the treatment outcomes of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms. Since the initial publication, multiple post-hoc analyses have become available. This review summarizes these data, focusing on the primary outcome measures (ie, overall survival) and several key secondary outcomes including aneurysm-related death, age consideration, secondary procedures, and endoleaks. Cost-effectiveness of each treatment modality and the limitations of OVER trial also are discussed critically in this review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nuclear medical diagnostic with ventricular aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litter, H.

    1987-01-01

    In the diagnostic of ventricular aneurysms myocardial scintigraphy and above all radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) have special importance. Because of the non-invasive method and the as a result safe and easy use even with stress studies, RNV can provide a very valuable aid with aneurysm patients in early diagnosis, evaluation of the operability and as well as in the prognosis. It must be noted, however, that the differentiation of multivascular diseases and sometimes ventricular aneurysms can be difficult and the inclusion of an angiocardiograph as a radiological invasive examination procedure seems fitting. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Varied CT appearance of aneurysms of the vein of Galen in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirkhoda, A.; Whaley, R.A.; Scatliff, J.H.; North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill; Boone, S.C.; Schnapf, D.

    1981-01-01

    An aneurysm of the vein of Galen can have a varied CT appearance in infancy. The classical picture is a spherical posterior third ventricular mass with the density of circulating blood contiguous with a dilated straigth sinus and with uniform contrast enhancement. With varying degrees of thrombosis of the aneurysm which may occur in late infancy, the mass can change in density and the dilated straigth sinus disappear. With total thrombosis, a precontrast hyperdense rim develops with a low density center. The rim enhances but the low density center does not change with contrast infusion. Our experience in three patients with this spectrum of CT findings will be demonstrated and correlated with clinical findings and angiography. (orig.)

  3. Bilateral giant femoropopliteal artery aneurysms: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perdikides Theodossios P

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Popliteal artery aneurysms are the most common peripheral arterial aneurysms, and are frequently bilateral. Acute limb ischemia, rupture and compression phenomena can complicate these aneurysms when the diameter exceeds 2 cm. Case Presentation We report an 82-year-old male patient with two giant femoropopliteal aneurysms, 10.5 and 8.5 cm diameters, managed in our institution. Both aneurysms were resected and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE femoropopliteal interposition graft was placed successfully. Management and literature review are discussed. Conclusion We believe this is the first report in the medical literature of bilateral giant femoropopliteal aneurysms.

  4. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin, E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Papiewski, Andrzej [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Clinic of Vascular Surgery (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  5. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopiński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  6. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  7. Transesophageal echocardiography in surgical management of pseudoaneurysm of mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa with aneurysms of right sinus of Valsalva and left main coronary artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreedhar S Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa (MAIVF is a rare complication associated with aortic and/or mitral valve surgery complicated by infective endocarditis. We report pseudoaneurysm of MAIVF in a young adult without overt cardiac disease or previous cardiac surgery. The patient had a rare combination of pseudoaneurysm of MAIVF impinging on anterior mitral leaflet causing moderate mitral regurgitation, right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm extending into interventricular septum, and left main coronary artery aneurysm. Transesophageal echocardiography helped in confirming the lesions, delineating the anatomy of all the lesions, and assessing the adequacy of surgical repair.

  8. Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the brain may compress surrounding nerves and brain tissue resulting in nerve paralysis, headache, neck and upper back pain as well as nausea and vomiting. If an aneurysm in the brain ruptures, causing an opening in the wall, the ...

  9. Aneurysm of the vein of Galen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leff, S.L.; Kronfeld, G.; Leonidas, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    We report a case of a vein of Galen aneurysm in a neonate in which MR imaging provided essentially all pertinent diagnostic information prior to surgery. MR findings correlated well with selective cerebral angiography. (orig./MG)

  10. MR angiography after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular occlusion with detachable coils has become an alternative treatment to neurosurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms over the last two decades. Its minimal invasiveness is the most important advantage of this treatment compared to clipping. The disadvantage of occlusion

  11. Training model for cerebral aneurysm clipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tenjin, M.D., Ph.D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clipping of cerebral aneurysms is still an important skill in neurosurgery. We have made a training model for the clipping of cerebral aneurysms. The concepts for the model were 1: training model for beginners, 2: three dimensional manipulation using an operating microscope, 3: the aneurysm model is to be perfused by simulated blood causing premature rupture. The correct relationship between each tissue, and softness of the brain and vessels were characteristics of the model. The skull, brain, arteries, and veins were made using a 3D printer with data from DICOM. The brain and vessels were made from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA. One training course was held and this model was useful for training of cerebral aneurysm surgery for young neurosurgeons.

  12. Brain Aneurysm: Early Detection and Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysms as small as 2 mm. There are advantages and disadvantages of each of these types of ... field empty Connect with Us Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram Pinterest Youtube Mail Donate Now Donate Canada Search ...

  13. Telomere Biology and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Aschacher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ascending aortic aneurysms are mostly asymptomatic and present a great risk of aortic dissection or perforation. Consequently, ascending aortic aneurysms are a source of lethality with increased age. Biological aging results in progressive attrition of telomeres, which are the repetitive DNA sequences at the end of chromosomes. These telomeres play an important role in protection of genomic DNA from end-to-end fusions. Telomere maintenance and telomere attrition-associated senescence of endothelial and smooth muscle cells have been indicated to be part of the pathogenesis of degenerative vascular diseases. This systematic review provides an overview of telomeres, telomere-associated proteins and telomerase to the formation and progression of aneurysms of the thoracic ascending aorta. A better understanding of telomere regulation in the vascular pathology might provide new therapeutic approaches. Measurements of telomere length and telomerase activity could be potential prognostic biomarkers for increased risk of death in elderly patients suffering from an aortic aneurysm.

  14. Dissecting aortic aneurysm in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ounissi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dissecting aortic aneurysm (DAA is a rare pathology that may result in fatal outcome. We report follow up of three cases of DAA patients undergoing maintenance hemo-dialysis who were managed conservatively.

  15. Multiple coronary artery aneurysms in Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jin Woo; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Cha, In Ho; Chung, Kyoo Byung

    1986-01-01

    Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome (Kawasaki disease) is a new disease entity that was first described by Kawasaki in 1967. It occurs predominantly in children less than 5 yrs old and acute febrile illness, which is mucocutaneous involvement associated with swelling of cervical lymph nodes. The coronary artery aneurysms have been revealed 20-30% of patients with Kawasaki disease. The authors report a case of multiple coronary artery aneurysms in Kawasaki disease which was diagnosed by a coronary arteriography.

  16. Potential value of aneurysm sac volume measurements in addition to diameter measurements after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, J.W. van; Prehn, J. van; Prokop, M.; Moll, F.L.; Herwaarden, J.A. van

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE:To investigate the value of aneurysm sac volume measurement in addition to diameter measurements based on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). METHODS:Interrogation of a vascular database identified 56 patients (51 men; median age 77 years, range

  17. Aneurysmal wall enhancement and perianeurysmal edema after endovascular treatment of unruptured cerebral aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Su, I-Chang

    2014-06-01

    Perianeurysmal edema and aneurysm wall enhancement are previously described phenomenon after coil embolization attributed to inflammatory reaction. We aimed to demonstrate the prevalence and natural course of these phenomena in unruptured aneurysms after endovascular treatment and to identify factors that contributed to their development.

  18. Influence of endoleaks on aneurysm volume and hemodynamics after endovascular aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M.B.; Welter, B.; Schmenger, P.; Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Neufang, A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the aneurysm volume and the intra-aneurysmatic pressure and maximal pressure pulse (dp/dtmax) in completely excluded aneurysms and cases with endoleaks. Materials and Methods: In 36 mongrel dogs, experimental autologous aneurysms were treated with stent-grafts. All aortic side branches were ligated in 18 cases (group I) but were preserved in group II (n=18). Aneurysm volumes were calculated from CT scans before and after intervention, and from follow-up CT scans at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months. Finally, for hemodynamic measurements, manometer-tipped catheters were introduced into the excluded aneurysm sac (group I and II), selectively in endoleaks (group II), and intraluminally for aortic reference measurement. Systemic hypertension was induced by volume load and pharmacologic stress. Pressure curves and dp/dt were simultaneously recorded and the ratios of aneurysm pressure to systemic reference pressure calculated. Results: At follow-up, type-II, endoleaks were excluded in all cases of group I by selective angiography. In contrast, endoleaks were evident in all cases of group II. Volumetric analysis of the aneurysms showed a benefit for group I with an improved aneurysm shrinkage: ΔVolume +0.08%, -1.62% and -9.76% at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months follow-up (median, group I), compared to +1.43%, +0.67%, and -4.04% (group II), p [de

  19. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms: Complications in Acutely Ruptured versus Unruptured Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechan, R. S.; Sprengers, M. E.; Majoie, C. B.; Peluso, J. P.; Sluzewski, M.; van Rooij, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of stents in the setting of SAH is controversial because of concerns about the efficacy and risk of dual antiplatelet therapy. We compare complications of stent-assisted coil embolization in patients with acutely ruptured aneurysms with complications in patients with unruptured aneurysms.

  20. Surgical Treatment of Unruptured Intracranial Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysms: Angiographic and Clinical Outcomes in 143 Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Won; Park, Jung Cheol; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kwun, Byung Duk; Kim, Chang Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the outcomes of surgical clipping in patients with unruptured middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms. Methods A retrospective single-center database of 125 consecutive patients with 143 small MCA aneurysms (< 10 mm) who underwent surgical clipping was reviewed from January 2007 to December 2010. Clinical outcomes were assessed based on surgery-related complications and follow-up (mean: 17 months) using the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Angiographic outcomes were evaluated by conventional angiography (N = 96) or computed tomography angiography (N = 29) at postoperative weeks 1 and 6. Results There were no cases of mortality. There were three surgery-related complications (intracranial hemorrhage, meningitis and wound infection, respectively). The hemorrhagic event caused transient neurological deficits. All patients showed good clinical outcomes during follow-up (mRS 0-1). There was angiographic evidence of complete occlusion in 137 aneurysms (95.8%), a small residual neck in three aneurysms (2.2%) and partial for three aneurysms. In the three cases with partial clipping, the decision was made preoperatively to leave the residual sac to maintain distal flow, and muscular wrapping was performed. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that surgical clipping of unruptured small MCA aneurysms yields favorable clinical and angiographic outcomes. Aneurysmal clipping can be safely recommended for patients with small unruptured MCA aneurysms. PMID:23346544

  1. Rupture of an aneurysm of the coronary sinus of Valsalva: diagnosis by helical CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarine, A.; Lions, C.; Beregi, J.P. [Dept. of Vascular Surgery, Hopital Cardiologique, CHRU de Lille (France); Koussa, M. [Dept. of Vascular Radiology, Hopital Cardiologique, CHRU de Lille (France)

    2001-08-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with a 5-day history of upper chest discomfort. On auscultation, there was a systolic murmur in the left parasternal area that radiated to the apex. Electrocardiography showed flat T waves in the anterior precordial leads. Chest X ray revealed mediastinal enlargement. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a dilated proximal ascending aorta with moderate aortic regurgitation. A contrast-enhanced helical CT scan, performed to eliminate an aortic dissection, showed a ruptured left coronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm, confirmed at surgery. This case highlights the fact that helical CT, in patients with suspected aortic dissection, may reveal other pathology that accounts for the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  2. Subacute anterior spinal cord ischemia with lower limb monoplegia: a clinical dilemma and challenging scenario.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waters, Peadar S

    2012-12-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with crescendo right lower limb monoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging depicted anterior spinal artery syndrome with an 8.5 cm Crawford type II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). A staged hybrid procedure was performed, following which she had total exclusion of her TAAA and full resolution of her monoplegia. Clinical presentations of TAAAs can be diverse and require detailed clinical knowledge and lateral thinking to unearth unorthodox presentations. This erratic presentation of a TAAA with anterior spinal artery syndrome outlines particular challenges with management and portrays the need for tailored utilization of contemporary techniques to deal with the growing complexity of TAAAs.

  3. Impact of the moon on cerebral aneurysm rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Marcel A; Dibué, Maxine; Slotty, Philipp; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Several external and internal risk factors for cerebral aneurysm rupture have been identified to date. Recently, it has been reported that moon phases correlate with the incidence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), however, another author found no such association. Therefore, the present study investigates the influence of the lunar cycle on the incidence of aneurysmal rupture, the initial clinical presentation, and the amount of subarachnoid blood. Lunar phase and the particular day of the lunar cycle were correlated to the date of aneurysm rupture, aneurysm location, initial clinical presentation, and amount of subarachnoid blood assessed from CT scans of all patients treated for basal SAH in our department from 2003 to 2010. We found no correlation between incidence of aneurysmal SAH, location of the aneurysm, initial clinical presentation, or amount of subarachnoid blood and the lunar cycle. The moon influences neither the incidence of aneurysmal SAH nor the grade of initial neurological deterioration or amount of subarachnoid blood.

  4. Aneurysm of the splenic artery - a entity controversial | du Toit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case of an asymptomatic, calcified, arteriosclerotic, intact splenic artery aneurysm in a 60-year-old woman is presented. The diagnosis was confirmed by selective coeliac arteriography and the aneurysm was successfully resected with preservation of the spleen.

  5. Multiple large vessel aneurysmal formation in HIV-infected patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-14

    Figure 2a and 2b). As the patient lacked any clinical signs of being acutely ill, the diagnosis of multiple aneurysm formation in HIV infection was favoured rather than that of a multiple mycotic aneurysms. The patient was referred.

  6. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-04

    %. Limited literature is available on intracranial aneurysms in HIV-infected patients. Objectives: To describe the radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in HIV- positive adults. Method: In this retrospective analysis of ...

  7. Intra-Operative Indocyanine Green-Videoangiography (ICG-VA) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Fifteen consecutive patients with anterior circulation aneurysms who underwent craniotomy and clipping of the aneurysms were included in this study. Intraoperative ICG-VA was performed in all cases after exposure of the aneurysm and the branches in the vicinity of the aneurysm or the parent vessel before ...

  8. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction and apical aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Oryshchyn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A case report of apical left ventricular aneurysm in patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction (diagnosis and surgical treatment is presented. We revealed apical aneurysm and mid-ventricular obstruction during echocardiography and specified anatomical characteristics of aneurysm during computer tomography. There was no evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease during coronary angiography. Taking into consideration multiple cerebral infarcts, aneurysm resection and left ventricular plastics was performed. Electronic microscopy of myocardium confirmed the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  9. Rupture of popliteal arterial aneurysm due to salmonella infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Oh, Hyung Woo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Byun, Joo Nam

    2006-01-01

    We report here on a case of popliteal aneurysm and rupture that occurred over a 10-day period and this was all secondary to salmonella infection. Computed tomography (CT) angiography of the extremity that was performed before and after aneurysmal rupture showed the aneurysm's rapid evolution to rupture over a short period of time. We also review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic approach and management of salmonella aneurysms

  10. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caranci, F., E-mail: ferdinandocaranci@libero.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Briganti, F., E-mail: frabriga@unina.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M. [Neuroradiology service, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Service Cardarelli Hospital Naples (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  11. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caranci, F.; Briganti, F.; Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M.; Muto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  12. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Sub; Chung, Young Sun; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of congenital anterior urethral diverticular which have occurred in a 4 year old and one month old boy are presented. Etiology, diagnostic procedures, and its clinical results are briefly reviewed

  13. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thighbone where the kneecap normally rests is too shallow. You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  14. Intracranial aneurysms: risk factors for development and rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinloog, R.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms occur in approximately 3% of the population. The pathogenesis of aneurysms is largely unknown, and is thought to be a complex process in which both genetic and environmental factors are involved. Aneurysms can rupture and give rise to subarachnoid haemorrhage, a devastating

  15. Renovascular hypertension and intrarenal artery aneurysms in a preschool child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, David J.; Barletta, Gina-Marie; Bunchman, Timothy E.; Mowry, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension from renal artery aneurysmal formation is a rare complication of fibromuscular dysplasia. Few data exist to direct the management of intrarenal artery aneurysms in pediatric patients. We report the presentation, diagnosis and management of renovascular hypertension and intrarenal aneurysmal disease in a preschool child. (orig.)

  16. Advances in endovascular aneurysm treatment: are we making a difference?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Jeffrey M.; Ougorets, Igor; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Biondi, Alessandra; Salvaggio, Kimberly A.; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Stieg, Philip E.; Riina, Howard A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advancements in endovascular aneurysm repair, including bioactive and expansile coils and intracranial stents, hold promise for improved aneurysm occlusion rates. We report the immediate and midterm clinical and angiographic outcomes of a consecutive series of patients treated since the advent of these technologies. Clinical and radiological records of 134 patients with 142 aneurysms treated between 2001 and 2004 were retrospectively evaluated by an independent neurologist. Endovascular procedures were analyzed by an independent neuroradiologist blinded to all clinical information. Seventy-two ruptured and 60 un-ruptured saccular aneurysms, nine fusiform and one post-traumatic aneurysm were treated. Matrix coils were used in 53% of saccular aneurysms and HydroCoils in 13% of all aneurysms. Neuroform stents were deployed in 19% of aneurysms. Angiographic total or subtotal occlusion was achieved in 76% of cases and in 96% at last follow-up. Aneurysm recanalization was observed in 14% over a mean follow-up of 12 months, and 18% of aneurysms were retreated. Clinically relevant complications occurred in 6.0%, resulting in procedure-related morbidity of 0.6% and 0.6% mortality at 6 months. No aneurysm bled over a cumulative 1,347 months of observation. Newer embolization technologies can be exploited successfully even in more complex aneurysms with very low morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  17. Renovascular hypertension and intrarenal artery aneurysms in a preschool child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, David J.; Barletta, Gina-Marie; Bunchman, Timothy E. [Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Mowry, Jeanne A. [Oregon Health Sciences University, Pediatric Nephrology, Northwest Permanente, P.C. and Doernbecher Children' s Hospital, Portland, OR (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Renovascular hypertension from renal artery aneurysmal formation is a rare complication of fibromuscular dysplasia. Few data exist to direct the management of intrarenal artery aneurysms in pediatric patients. We report the presentation, diagnosis and management of renovascular hypertension and intrarenal aneurysmal disease in a preschool child. (orig.)

  18. Endovascular Treatment of a Giant Aneurysm of the Maxillary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Stephenson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysms of the maxillary artery are rare and the majority of the literature refers to false aneurysms. We report the first case of what we believe to be a spontaneous true maxillary artery aneurysm and its endovascular management.

  19. Embolization of an Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Image-Guided Direct Puncture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heye, S.; Vaninbroukx, J.; Daenens, K.; Houthoofd, S.; Maleux, G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after percutaneous direct puncture under (cone-beam) computed tomography (CT) guidance. Methods: A retrospective case series of three patients, in whom IIAA not accessible by way of the transarterial route, was reviewed. CT-guided puncture of the IIAA sac was performed in one patient. Two patients underwent puncture of the IIAA under cone-beam CT guidance. Results: Access to the IIAA sac was successful in all three patients. In two of the three patients, the posterior and/or anterior division was first embolized using platinum microcoils. The aneurysm sac was embolized with thrombin in one patient and with a mixture of glue and Lipiodol in two patients. No complications were seen. On follow-up CT, no opacification of the aneurysm sac was seen. The volume of one IIAA remained stable at follow-up, and the remaining two IIAAs decreased in size. Conclusion: Embolization of IIAA after direct percutaneous puncture under cone-beam CT/CT-guidance is feasible and safe and results in good short-term outcome.

  20. Giant coronary artery aneurysm after Takeuchi repair for anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlay, Shannon M; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Dearani, Joseph A; Warnes, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman with an anomalous left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery who had undergone Takeuchi repair at age 7 years presented for evaluation. The Takeuchi procedure creates an aortopulmonary window and an intrapulmonary tunnel that baffles the left coronary artery to the aorta. A mediastinal mass was identified as a giant aneurysm of the left coronary artery resulting in compression of the pulmonary artery and left upper pulmonary vein. The patient underwent open repair with patch closure at the aortic entrance of the left coronary Takeuchi repair and resection and evacuation of the aneurysm. A saphenous vein graft to the left anterior descending artery was performed. Postoperative echocardiography demonstrated normal left ventricular function. This is the first reported case of giant aneurysm formation after Takeuchi repair. The reported complications have included the development of pulmonary artery stenosis at the intrapulmonary baffle, baffle leak, decreased left ventricular function, and mitral regurgitation. In conclusion, late complications of the Takeuchi procedure are common, underscoring the importance of lifelong follow-up at a center with experience in treating coronary anomalies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identifying anterior segment crystals.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, I W; Brooks, A M; Reinehr, D P; Grant, G B; Gillies, W E

    1991-01-01

    A series of 22 patients with crystals in the anterior segment of the eye was examined by specular microscopy. Of 10 patients with hypermature cataract and hyperrefringent bodies in the anterior chamber cholesterol crystals were identified in four patients and in six of the 10 in whom aspirate was obtained cholesterol crystals were demonstrated in three, two of these having shown crystals on specular microscopy. In 10 patients with intracorneal crystalline deposits, cholesterol crystals were f...

  2. Multidisciplinary management of the patients with cerebral aneurysm - Preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Hoyos, Juan Fernando; Celis Mejia, Jorge Ignacio; Yepez Sanchez, Carlos Jaime; Duque Botero, Julieta

    1998-01-01

    A Actually, complex pathologies are treated according to a decision, which is adopted, by a group of specialists from different fields concerned to the same disease. The intention is to have success that is reflected in a low morbimortality and the most complete recovery to permit patients to return their previous life activities. Depending the status of each patient, type of aneurysm and its location, different techniques are performed to exclude them from circulation. Microneurosurgery, aneurysmatic sac embolization with platinum detachable coils and vessel originating aneurysm balloon occlusion The main objective of this work is to demonstrate that both microneurosurgery, classic technique in the cerebral aneurysms management but in continuing development, and endovascular therapy are not excluded, and their effectiveness depends in a strict selection criteria of patients and a comprehensive medical management before, during and after treatment by a multidisciplinary group. Also, to evaluate both techniques based on different indexes, including the ongoing evolution. In this work the preliminary experience of the Neurovascular Group at the Clinica Cardiovascular Santa Maria in Medellin, during the period of time from December 1996 until May 1998.45 patients with 47 aneurysm were treated 55.3% aneurysmatic lesions were treated by endovascular therapy and the remaining (44.7%) by microneurosurgery. 26 patients and same number of aneurysmatic lesions composed the endovascular group, the age range was between 20 and 70 years. 80.0% were women, 20.0% men. 53.8% complained from subarachnoid hemorrhage signs and symptoms. 36.0% were in a Hunt and Hess score scale of III and 84.7% complete success was achieved. 3 patients died, 2 of them were in IV and V Hunt and Hess score scale, respectively. The surgical group composed by 19 patients with 21 lesions and an age range between 31 and 78 years. 64.8% were women and 71,5% had confirmed diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage

  3. Performance of language tasks in patients with ruptured aneurysm of the left hemisphere worses in the post-surgical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia C. Vieira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sub-arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH promotes impairment of upper cortical functions. However, few information is available emphasizing changes in language after aneurismal SAH and aneurysm location influence. Objective To assess the language and verbal fluency performance in aneurismal SAH pre- and post-surgery in patients caused by an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery (AcomA, left middle cerebral artery (L-MCA and left posterior comunicating artery (L-PcomA. Methods Assessment in 79 patients with SAH, on two occasions: pre- and post surgical treatment. They were divided into three groups by the aneurysms’ location. Results Deterioration is detected in the performance of all patients during the post-surgical period; L-MCA aneurysm patients displayed a reduction in verbal naming and fluency; L-PcomA patients deteriorated in the written language and fluency tasks. Conclusion After the surgical procedure the patients decreased in various language tasks and these differences in performance being directly related to the location of the aneurysm.

  4. Extrinsic stretching narrowing and anterior indentation of the rectosigmoid junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, A.; Fataar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-five cases of extrinsic narrowing or anterior indentation of the rectosigmoid junction (RSJ) have been studied. The RSJ lies directly behind the pouch of Douglas which is a favoured site for peritoneal metastasis, abscess and endometriosis. Any space-occupying lesion of sufficient size at this site will indent the anterior aspects of the RSJ. Causes include distension or tumour of the ileum or sigmoid colon, gross ascites (when the patient is erect), and tumours below the pelvic peritonium, such as gynaecological neoplasm and internal iliac artery aneurysm. When a desmoplastic metastasis in the pouch of Douglas infiltrates the outer layers of the RSJ, the fibrosis produces an eccentric shortening on its anterior aspect, which in turn causes a pleating of the mucosa with the folds radiating towards the shortened area. This is also seen with primary pelvic carcinomas directly adherent to the rectum, endometriosis with repeated bleeding and increasing eccentric, submucosal fibrosis, and chronic abscess in the pouch of Douglas. Not all extrinsic narrowing of the RSJ are pathological. One case of anterior indentation followed operation for rectal prolapse. Ten additional cases showed narrowing due to a technical artefact air-distended colon rising into the upper abdomen to cause stretching at the RSJ. As with ascites, this narrowing due to 'high-rise sigmoid' disappeared when the patients became recumbent and the colonic air redistributed. (author)

  5. Late Reopening of Adequately Coiled Intracranial Aneurysms Frequency and Risk Factors in 400 Patients With 440 Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferns, Sandra P.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; van Rooij, Willem Jan; van Zwam, Wim H.; de Kort, Gerard A. P.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Schaafsma, Joanna D.; van den Berg, Rene; Sluzewski, Menno; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.

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