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Sample records for antagonist modulator contributes

  1. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    . In resistance arteries, the long-lasting contractile effects can only be partly and reversibly relaxed by low-molecular-weight ET(A) antagonists (ERAs). However, the neuropeptide calcitonin-gene-related peptide selectively terminates binding of ET1 to ET(A). We propose that ET1 binds polyvalently to ET......(A) and that ERAs and the physiological antagonist allosterically reduce ET(A) functions. Combining the two-state model and the two-domain model of GPCR function and considering receptor activation beyond agonist binding might lead to better anti-endothelinergic drugs. Future studies could lead to compounds...

  2. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

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    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  3. Ca2+ and Mg2+ modulate conformational dynamics and stability of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Khoa; Dhulipala, Gangadhar; Gonzalez, Walter G; Gerstman, Bernard S; Regmi, Chola; Chapagain, Prem P; Miksovska, Jaroslava

    2015-05-01

    Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM) belongs to the family of neuronal calcium sensors (NCS) that transduce the intracellular changes in Ca(2+) concentration into a variety of responses including gene expression, regulation of Kv channel activity, and calcium homeostasis. Despite the significant sequence and structural similarities with other NCS members, DREAM shows several features unique among NCS such as formation of a tetramer in the apo-state, and interactions with various intracellular biomacromolecules including DNA, presenilin, Kv channels, and calmodulin. Here we use spectroscopic techniques in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to study conformational changes induced by Ca(2+) /Mg(2+) association to DREAM. Our data indicate a minor impact of Ca(2+) association on the overall structure of the N- and C-terminal domains, although Ca(2+) binding decreases the conformational heterogeneity as evident from the decrease in the fluorescence lifetime distribution in the Ca(2+) bound forms of the protein. Time-resolved fluorescence data indicate that Ca(2+) binding triggers a conformational transition that is characterized by more efficient quenching of Trp residue. The unfolding of DREAM occurs through an partially unfolded intermediate that is stabilized by Ca(2+) association to EF-hand 3 and EF-hand 4. The native state is stabilized with respect to the partially unfolded state only in the presence of both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) suggesting that, under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) free DREAM exhibits a high conformational flexibility that may facilitate its physiological functions. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  4. PR130 is a modulator of the Wnt-signaling cascade that counters repression of the antagonist Naked cuticle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, M.P.; Roël, G.; Eichhorn, P.J.A.; Vredeveld, L.C.; Destrée, O.; Bernards, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Wnt-signaling cascade is required for several crucial steps during early embryogenesis, and its activity is modulated by various agonists and antagonists to provide spatiotemporal-specific signaling. Naked cuticle is a Wnt antagonist that itself is induced by Wnt signaling to keep Wnt signaling

  5. The modulation of fragile X behaviors by the muscarinic M4 antagonist, tropicamide.

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    Veeraragavan, Surabi; Bui, Nghiem; Perkins, Jennie R; Yuva-Paylor, Lisa A; Paylor, Richard

    2011-10-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) are G protein-coupled receptors (M1-M5), grouped together into two functional classes, based on their G protein interaction. Although ubiquitously expressed in the CNS, the M4 protein shows highest expression in the neostriatum, cortex, and hippocampus. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies have provided evidence for overactive mAChR signaling in the fragile X knock-out (Fmr1KO) mouse model, and this has been hypothesized to contribute to the phenotypes seen in Fmr1KO mice. To address this hypothesis we used an M4 antagonist, tropicamide, to reduce the activity through the M4 mAChR and investigated the behavioral response in the Fmr1KO animals. Data from the marble-burying assay have shown that tropicamide treatment resulted in a decreased number of marbles buried in the wild-type (WT) and in the knockout (KO) animals. Results from the open field assay indicated that tropicamide increases activity in both the WT and KO mice. In the passive avoidance assay, tropicamide treatment resulted in the improvement of performance in both the WT and the KO animals at the lower doses (2 and 5 mg/kg), and the drug was shown to be important for the acquisition and not the consolidation process. Lastly, we observed that tropicamide causes a significant decrease in the percentage of audiogenic seizures in the Fmr1KO animals. These results suggest that pharmacological antagonism of the M4 receptor modulates select behavioral responses in the Fmr1KO mice.

  6. Coexpressed D1- and D2-Like Dopamine Receptors Antagonistically Modulate Acetylcholine Release in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Allen, Andrew T.; Maher, Kathryn N.; Wani, Khursheed A.; Betts, Katherine E.; Chase, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine acts through two classes of G protein-coupled receptor (D1-like and D2-like) to modulate neuron activity in the brain. While subtypes of D1- and D2-like receptors are coexpressed in many neurons of the mammalian brain, it is unclear how signaling by these coexpressed receptors interacts to modulate the activity of the neuron in which they are expressed. D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors are also coexpressed in the cholinergic ventral-cord motor neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. To begin to understand how coexpressed dopamine receptors interact to modulate neuron activity, we performed a genetic screen in C. elegans and isolated mutants defective in dopamine response. These mutants were also defective in behaviors mediated by endogenous dopamine signaling, including basal slowing and swimming-induced paralysis. We used transgene rescue experiments to show that defects in these dopamine-specific behaviors were caused by abnormal signaling in the cholinergic motor neurons. To investigate the interaction between the D1- and D2-like receptors specifically in these cholinergic motor neurons, we measured the sensitivity of dopamine-signaling mutants and transgenic animals to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. We found that D2 signaling inhibited acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons while D1 signaling stimulated release from these same cells. Thus, coexpressed D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors act antagonistically in vivo to modulate acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons of C. elegans. PMID:21515580

  7. Histamine-2 receptor antagonist famotidine modulates cardiac stem cell characteristics in hypertensive heart disease

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    Sherin Saheera

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiac stem cells (CSCs play a vital role in cardiac homeostasis. A decrease in the efficiency of cardiac stem cells is speculated in various cardiac abnormalities. The maintenance of a healthy stem cell population is essential for the prevention of adverse cardiac remodeling leading to cardiac failure. Famotidine, a histamine-2 receptor antagonist, is currently used to treat ulcers of the stomach and intestines. In repurposing the use of the drug, reduction of cardiac hypertrophy and improvement in cardiac function of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR was reported by our group. Given that stem cells are affected in cardiac pathologies, the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonism on CSC characteristics was investigated. Methods To examine whether famotidine has a positive effect on CSCs, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR treated with the drug were sacrificed; and CSCs isolated from atrial appendages was evaluated. Six-month-old male SHRs were treated with famotidine (30 mg/kg/day for two months. The effect of famotidine treatment on migration, proliferation and survival of CSCs was compared with untreated SHRs and normotensive Wistar rats. Results Functional efficiency of CSCs from SHR was compromised relative to that in Wistar rat. Famotidine increased the migration and proliferation potential, along with retention of stemness of CSCs in treated SHRs. Cellular senescence and oxidative stress were also reduced. The expression of H2R was unaffected by the treatment. Discussion As anticipated, CSCs from SHRs were functionally impaired. Stem cell attributes of famotidine-treated SHRs was comparable to that of Wistar rats. Therefore, in addition to being cardioprotective, the histamine 2 receptor antagonist modulated cardiac stem cells characteristics. Restoration of stem cell efficiency by famotidine is possibly mediated by reduction of oxidative stress as the expression of H2R was unaffected by the treatment. Maintenance of

  8. Improved prognostic classification of breast cancer defined by antagonistic activation patterns of immune response pathway modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Gomez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex; El-Ashry, Dorraya; Schmidt, Marcus; Gehrmann, Mathias; Caldas, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Elucidating the activation pattern of molecular pathways across a given tumour type is a key challenge necessary for understanding the heterogeneity in clinical response and for developing novel more effective therapies. Gene expression signatures of molecular pathway activation derived from perturbation experiments in model systems as well as structural models of molecular interactions ('model signatures') constitute an important resource for estimating corresponding activation levels in tumours. However, relatively few strategies for estimating pathway activity from such model signatures exist and only few studies have used activation patterns of pathways to refine molecular classifications of cancer. Here we propose a novel network-based method for estimating pathway activation in tumours from model signatures. We find that although the pathway networks inferred from cancer expression data are highly consistent with the prior information contained in the model signatures, that they also exhibit a highly modular structure and that estimation of pathway activity is dependent on this modular structure. We apply our methodology to a panel of 438 estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and 785 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers to infer activation patterns of important cancer related molecular pathways. We show that in ER negative basal and HER2+ breast cancer, gene expression modules reflecting T-cell helper-1 (Th1) and T-cell helper-2 (Th2) mediated immune responses play antagonistic roles as major risk factors for distant metastasis. Using Boolean interaction Cox-regression models to identify non-linear pathway combinations associated with clinical outcome, we show that simultaneous high activation of Th1 and low activation of a TGF-beta pathway module defines a subtype of particularly good prognosis and that this classification provides a better prognostic model than those based on the individual pathways. In ER+ breast cancer, we find that

  9. Modulation of Cytokine and Cytokine Receptor/Antagonist by Treatment with Doxycycline and Tetracycline in Patients with Dengue Fever

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    J. E. Z. Castro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus infection can lead to dengue fever (DF or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Disease severity has been linked to an increase in various cytokine levels. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of doxycycline and tetracycline to modulate serum levels of IL-6, IL-1B, and TNF and cytokine receptor/receptor antagonist TNF-R1 and IL-1RA in patients with DF or DHF. Hospitalized patients were randomized to receive standard supportive care or supportive care combined with doxycycline or tetracycline therapy. Serum cytokine and cytokine receptor/antagonist levels were determined at the onset of therapy and after 3 and 7 days. Cytokine and cytokine receptor/antagonist levels were substantially elevated at day 0. IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF remained at or above day 0 levels throughout the study period in untreated patients. Treatment with tetracycline or doxycycline resulted in a significant decline in cytokine levels. Similarly, IL-1RA and TNF-R1 serum concentrations were elevated at baseline and showed a moderate increase among untreated patients. Both drugs resulted in a significant rise in IL-1Ra levels by day 3 in patients. In contrast, treatment did not affect a similar result for TNF-R1. When compared to the control group, however, a significant rise post-treatment was seen upon intragroup analysis. Further analysis demonstrated that doxycycline was significantly more effective at modulating cytokine and cytokine receptor/antagonist levels than tetracycline.

  10. Modulation of cytokine and cytokine receptor/antagonist by treatment with doxycycline and tetracycline in patients with dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J E Z; Vado-Solis, I; Perez-Osorio, C; Fredeking, T M

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus infection can lead to dengue fever (DF) or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Disease severity has been linked to an increase in various cytokine levels. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of doxycycline and tetracycline to modulate serum levels of IL-6, IL-1B, and TNF and cytokine receptor/receptor antagonist TNF-R1 and IL-1RA in patients with DF or DHF. Hospitalized patients were randomized to receive standard supportive care or supportive care combined with doxycycline or tetracycline therapy. Serum cytokine and cytokine receptor/antagonist levels were determined at the onset of therapy and after 3 and 7 days. Cytokine and cytokine receptor/antagonist levels were substantially elevated at day 0. IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF remained at or above day 0 levels throughout the study period in untreated patients. Treatment with tetracycline or doxycycline resulted in a significant decline in cytokine levels. Similarly, IL-1RA and TNF-R1 serum concentrations were elevated at baseline and showed a moderate increase among untreated patients. Both drugs resulted in a significant rise in IL-1Ra levels by day 3 in patients. In contrast, treatment did not affect a similar result for TNF-R1. When compared to the control group, however, a significant rise post-treatment was seen upon intragroup analysis. Further analysis demonstrated that doxycycline was significantly more effective at modulating cytokine and cytokine receptor/antagonist levels than tetracycline.

  11. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist modulates the early phase of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in mice.

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    Antonino Sgroi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytokine administration is a potential therapy for acute liver failure by reducing inflammatory responses and favour hepatocyte regeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra during liver regeneration and to study the effect of a recombinant human IL-1ra on liver regeneration. METHODS: We performed 70%-hepatectomy in wild type (WT mice, IL-1ra knock-out (KO mice and in WT mice treated by anakinra. We analyzed liver regeneration at regular intervals by measuring the blood levels of cytokines, the hepatocyte proliferation by bromodeoxyuridin (BrdU incorporation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and Cyclin D1 expression. The effect of anakinra on hepatocyte proliferation was also tested in vitro using human hepatocytes. RESULTS: At 24h and at 48 h after hepatectomy, IL-1ra KO mice had significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β and MCP-1 and a reduced and delayed hepatocyte proliferation measured by BrdU incorporation, PCNA and Cyclin D1 protein levels, when compared to WT mice. IGFBP-1 and C/EBPβ expression was significantly decreased in IL-1ra KO compared to WT mice. WT mice treated with anakinra showed significantly decreased levels of IL-6 and significantly higher hepatocyte proliferation at 24h compared to untreated WT mice. In vitro, primary human hepatocytes treated with anakinra showed significantly higher proliferation at 24h compared to hepatocytes without treatment. CONCLUSION: IL1ra modulates the early phase of liver regeneration by decreasing the inflammatory stress and accelerating the entry of hepatocytes in proliferation. IL1ra might be a therapeutic target to improve hepatocyte proliferation.

  12. Antagonists of the TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel modulate airway smooth muscle tone and intracellular calcium.

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    Danielsson, Jennifer; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Bernstein, Kyra; Barajas, Matthew B; Zhang, Yi; Kumar, Satish; Sharma, Pawan K; Gallos, George; Emala, Charles W

    2015-09-01

    Perioperative bronchospasm refractory to β agonists continues to challenge anesthesiologists and intensivists. The TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel modulates airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. The authors hypothesized that TMEM16A antagonists would relax ASM contraction by modulating membrane potential and calcium flux. Human ASM, guinea pig tracheal rings, or mouse peripheral airways were contracted with acetylcholine or leukotriene D4 and then treated with the TMEM16A antagonists: benzbromarone, T16Ainh-A01, N-((4-methoxy)-2-naphthyl)-5-nitroanthranilic acid, or B25. In separate studies, guinea pig tracheal rings were contracted with acetylcholine and then exposed to increasing concentrations of isoproterenol (0.01 nM to 10 μM) ± benzbromarone. Plasma membrane potential and intracellular calcium concentrations were measured in human ASM cells. Benzbromarone was the most potent TMEM16A antagonist tested for relaxing an acetylcholine -induced contraction in guinea pig tracheal rings (n = 6). Further studies were carried out to investigate the clinical utility of benzbromarone. In human ASM, benzbromarone relaxed either an acetylcholine- or a leukotriene D4-induced contraction (n = 8). Benzbromarone was also effective in relaxing peripheral airways (n = 9) and potentiating relaxation by β agonists (n = 5 to 10). In cellular mechanistic studies, benzbromarone hyperpolarized human ASM cells (n = 9 to 12) and attenuated intracellular calcium flux from both the plasma membrane and the sarcoplasmic reticulum (n = 6 to 12). TMEM16A antagonists work synergistically with β agonists and through a novel pathway of interrupting ion flux at both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum to acutely relax human ASM.

  13. Glutamate receptor antagonists and growth factors modulate dentate granule cell neurogenesis in organotypic, rat hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Blaabjerg, Morten; Montero, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Generation of dentate granule cells and its modulation by glutamate receptor antagonists, growth factors and pilocarpine-induced seizure-like activity was investigated in rat hippocampal slice cultures derived from 1-week-old rats and grown for 2 weeks. Focussing on the dentate granule cell layer...... the number of TUC-4-positive cells, just as combining pilocarpine with the neurogenesis-stimulating compounds, prevented or reduced the increase of TUC-4-positive cells. None of the treatments were found to induce dentate granule cell death within the observed period. Labeling of dividing cells by adding 5...

  14. Glutamate receptor antagonist infusions into the basolateral and medial amygdala reveal differential contributions to olfactory vs. context fear conditioning and expression

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, David L.; Paschall, Gayla Y.; Davis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala's involvement in fear acquisition and expression to visual and auditory stimuli is well known. The involvement of the basolateral and other amygdala areas in fear acquisition and expression to stimuli of other modalities is less certain. We evaluated the contribution of the basolateral and medial amygdala to olfactory and to context fear and fear conditioning by infusing into these areas the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5, the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX, or v...

  15. Attachment Capability of Antagonistic Yeast Rhodotorula glutinis to Botrytis cinerea Contributes to Biocontrol Efficacy.

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    Li, Boqiang; Peng, Huaimin; Tian, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    Rhodotorula glutinis as an antagonism show good biocontrol performance against various post-harvest diseases in fruits. In the present study, strong attachment capability of R. glutinis to spores and hyphae of Botrytis cinerea was observed. Further analysis showed that certain protein components on the yeast cell surface played critical role during the interaction between R. glutinis and B. cinerea. The components mainly distributed at the poles of yeast cells and might contain glycosylation modification, as tunicamycin treated yeast cells lost attachment capability to B. cinerea. To investigate contributions of attachment capability of R. glutinis to its biocontrol efficacy, yeast cells were mutagenized with 3% methane-sulfonic acid ethyl ester (EMS), and a mutant CE4 with stable non-attaching phenotype was obtained. No significant difference was found on colony, cell morphology, reproductive ability, and capsule formation between the mutant and wild-type. However, there was a distinct difference in India ink positive staining patterns between the two strains. Moreover, wild-type strain of R. glutinis showed better performance on inhibiting spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea than CE4 strain when yeast cells and B. cinerea were co-cultured in vitro. In biocontrol assay, both wild-type and CE4 strains showed significant biocontrol efficacy against gray mold caused by B. cinerea in apple fruit, whereas, control effect of CE4 strain was lower than that of wild-type. Our findings provided new evidences that attachment capability of R. glutinis to B. cinerea contributed to its biocontrol efficacy.

  16. Pharmacological modulation of the short-lasting effects of antagonistic direct current-stimulation over the human motor cortex

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    Leila eChaieb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Combined administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS with either pergolide (PGL or D-cycloserine (D-CYC can prolong the excitability-diminishing effects of cathodal, or the excitability enhancing effect of anodal stimulation for up to 24hrs poststimulation. However, it remains unclear whether the potentiation of the observed aftereffects is dominated by the polarity and duration of the stimulation, or the dual application of combined stimulation and drug administration. The present study looks at whether the aftereffects of oral administration of PGL (a D1/D2 agonist or D-CYC (a partial NMDA receptor agonist, in conjunction with the short duration antagonistic application of tDCS (either 5 min cathodal followed immediately by 5 min anodal or vice versa, that alone only induces short lasting aftereffects, can modulate cortical excitability in healthy human subjects, as revealed by a single-pulse MEP (motor-evoked-potential paradigm. Results indicate that the antagonistic application of DC currents induces short-term neuroplastic aftereffects that are dependent upon the polarity of the second application of short-duration tDCS. The application of D-cycloserine resulted in a reversal of this trend and so consequently a marked inhibition of cortical excitability with the cathodal-anodal stimulation order was observed. The administration of pergolide showed no significant aftereffects in either case. These results emphasise that the aftereffects of tDCS are dependent upon the stimulation orientation, and mirror the findings of other studies reporting the neuroplasticity inducing aftereffects of tDCS, and their prolongation when combined with the administration of CNS active drugs.

  17. Insulin Stimulates S100B Secretion and These Proteins Antagonistically Modulate Brain Glucose Metabolism.

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    Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; de Souza, Daniela F; Biasibetti, Regina; Bobermin, Larissa D; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Brain metabolism is highly dependent on glucose, which is derived from the blood circulation and metabolized by the astrocytes and other neural cells via several pathways. Glucose uptake in the brain does not involve insulin-dependent glucose transporters; however, this hormone affects the glucose influx to the brain. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of S100B (an astrocyte-derived protein) have been associated with alterations in glucose metabolism; however, there is no evidence whether insulin modulates glucose metabolism and S100B secretion. Herein, we investigated the effect of S100B on glucose metabolism, measuring D-(3)H-glucose incorporation in two preparations, C6 glioma cells and acute hippocampal slices, and we also investigated the effect of insulin on S100B secretion. Our results showed that: (a) S100B at physiological levels decreases glucose uptake, through the multiligand receptor RAGE and mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling, and (b) insulin stimulated S100B secretion via PI3K signaling. Our findings indicate the existence of insulin-S100B modulation of glucose utilization in the brain tissue, and may improve our understanding of glucose metabolism in several conditions such as ketosis, streptozotocin-induced dementia and pharmacological exposure to antipsychotics, situations that lead to changes in insulin signaling and extracellular levels of S100B.

  18. Modulation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis by pegylated hyaluronidase and dopamine receptor antagonist in mice.

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    Evgenii Germanovich Skurikhin

    Full Text Available Hyaluronidases are groups of enzymes that degrade hyaluronic acid (HA. To stop enzymatic hydrolysis we modified testicular hyaluronidase (HYAL by activated polyethylene oxide with the help of electron-beam synthesis. As a result we received pegylated hyaluronidase (pegHYAL. Spiperone is a selective D2 dopamine receptor antagonist. It was demonstrated on the model of a single bleomycin damage of alveolar epithelium that during the inflammatory phase monotherapy by pegHYAL or spiperone reduced the populations of hematopoietic stem /progenitor cells in the lung parenchyma. PegHYAL also reduced the levels of transforming growth factor (TGF-β, interleukin (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in the serum and lungs, while spiperone reduced the level of the serum IL-1β. Polytherapy by spiperone and pegHYAL caused the increase of the quantity of hematopoietic stem/ progenitor cells in the lungs. Such an influx of blood cell precursors was observed on the background of considerable fall level of TGF-β and the increase level of TNF-α in the serum and lungs. These results show pegHYAL reduced the bleomycin-induced fibrosis reaction (production and accumulation of collagen in the lung parenchyma. This effect was observed at a single and repetitive bleomycin damage of alveolar epithelium, the antifibrotic activity of pegHYAL surpassing the activity of testicular HYAL. The antifibrotic effect of pegHYAL is enhanced by an additional instillation of spiperone. Therapy by pegHYAL causes the flow of CD31‒ CD34‒ CD45‒ CD44+ CD73+ CD90+ CD106+-cells into the fibrous lungs. These cells are incapable of differentiating into fibroblast cells. Spiperone instillation separately or together with pegHYAL reduced the MSC-like cells considerably. These data enable us to assume, that pegHYAL is a new and promising instrument both for preventive and therapy of toxic pneumofibrosis. The blockage of D2 dopamine receptors with the following change of hyaluronan

  19. 14-3-3 Binding and Sumoylation Concur to the Down-Modulation of β-catenin Antagonist chibby 1 in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

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    Manuela Mancini

    Full Text Available The down-modulation of the β-catenin antagonist Chibby 1 (CBY1 associated with the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML contributes to the aberrant activation of β-catenin, particularly in leukemic stem cells (LSC resistant to tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitors. It is, at least partly, driven by transcriptional events and gene promoter hyper-methylation. Here we demonstrate that it also arises from reduced protein stability upon binding to 14-3-3σ adapter protein. CBY1/14-3-3σ interaction in BCR-ABL1+ cells is mediated by the fusion protein TK and AKT phosphorylation of CBY1 at critical serine 20, and encompasses the 14-3-3σ binding modes I and II involved in the binding with client proteins. Moreover, it is impaired by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK phosphorylation of 14-3-3σ at serine 186, which promotes dissociation of client proteins. The ubiquitin proteasome system UPS participates in reducing stability of CBY1 bound with 14-3-3σ through enhanced SUMOylation. Our results open new routes towards the research on molecular pathways promoting the proliferative advantage of leukemic hematopoiesis over the normal counterpart.

  20. Targeting CXCR4 by a selective peptide antagonist modulates tumor microenvironment and microglia reactivity in a human glioblastoma model.

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    Mercurio, Laura; Ajmone-Cat, Maria Antonietta; Cecchetti, Serena; Ricci, Alessandro; Bozzuto, Giuseppina; Molinari, Agnese; Manni, Isabella; Pollo, Bianca; Scala, Stefania; Carpinelli, Giulia; Minghetti, Luisa

    2016-03-25

    The CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway regulates tumor cell proliferation, metastasis, angiogenesis and the tumor-microenvironment cross-talk in several solid tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and fatal brain cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of peptide R, a new specific CXCR4 antagonist that we recently developed by a ligand-based approach, in an in vitro and in vivo model of GBM. The well-characterized CXCR4 antagonist Plerixafor was also included in the study. The effects of peptide R on CXCR4 expression, cell survival and migration were assessed on the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG exposed to CXCL12, by immunofluorescence and western blotting, MTT assay, flow cytometry and transwell chamber migration assay. Peptide R was then tested in vivo, by using U87MG intracranial xenografts in CD1 nude mice. Peptide R was administered for 23 days since cell implantation and tumor volume was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 4.7 T. Glioma associated microglia/macrophage (GAMs) polarization (anti-tumor M1 versus pro-tumor M2 phenotypes) and expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD31 were assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. We found that peptide R impairs the metabolic activity and cell proliferation of human U87MG cells and stably reduces CXCR4 expression and cell migration in response to CXCL12 in vitro. In the orthotopic U87MG model, peptide R reduced tumor cellularity, promoted M1 features of GAMs and astrogliosis, and hindered intra-tumor vasculature. Our findings suggest that targeting CXCR4 by peptide R might represent a novel therapeutic approach against GBM, and contribute to the rationale to further explore in more complex pre-clinical settings the therapeutic potential of peptide R, alone or in combination with standard therapies of GBM.

  1. Quantitative Electroencephalography Within Sleep/Wake States Differentiates GABAA Modulators Eszopiclone and Zolpidem From Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonists in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Steven V; Gotter, Anthony L; Tye, Spencer J; Garson, Susan L; Savitz, Alan T; Uslaner, Jason M; Brunner, Joseph I; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; McDonald, Terrence P; Hodgson, Robert; Yao, Lihang; Bowlby, Mark R; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J; Hargreaves, Richard; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J

    2013-01-01

    Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) induce sleep by blocking orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptor-mediated activities responsible for regulating wakefulness. DORAs represent a potential alternative mechanism to the current standard of care that includes the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-positive allosteric modulators, eszopiclone and zolpidem. This work uses an innovative method to analyze electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral frequencies within sleep/wake states to differentiate the effects of GABAA modulators from DORA-22, an analog of the DORA MK-6096, in Sprague–Dawley rats. The effects of low, intermediate, and high doses of eszopiclone, zolpidem, and DORA-22 were examined after first defining each compound's ability to promote sleep during active-phase dosing. The EEG spectral frequency power within specific sleep stages was calculated in 1-Hz intervals from 1 to 100 Hz within each sleep/wake state for the first 4 h after the dose. Eszopiclone and zolpidem produced marked, dose-responsive disruptions in sleep stage-specific EEG spectral profiles compared with vehicle treatment. In marked contrast, DORA-22 exhibited marginal changes in the spectral profile, observed only during rapid eye movement sleep, and only at the highest dose tested. Moreover, while eszopiclone- and zolpidem-induced changes were evident in the inactive period, the EEG spectral responses to DORA-22 were absent during this phase. These results suggest that DORA-22 differs from eszopiclone and zolpidem whereby DORA-22 promotes somnolence without altering the neuronal network EEG activity observed during normal sleep. PMID:23722242

  2. Mathematics Anxiety and Statistics Anxiety. Shared but Also Unshared Components and Antagonistic Contributions to Performance in Statistics

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    Manuela Paechter

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In many social science majors, e.g., psychology, students report high levels of statistics anxiety. However, these majors are often chosen by students who are less prone to mathematics and who might have experienced difficulties and unpleasant feelings in their mathematics courses at school. The present study investigates whether statistics anxiety is a genuine form of anxiety that impairs students' achievements or whether learners mainly transfer previous experiences in mathematics and their anxiety in mathematics to statistics. The relationship between mathematics anxiety and statistics anxiety, their relationship to learning behaviors and to performance in a statistics examination were investigated in a sample of 225 undergraduate psychology students (164 women, 61 men. Data were recorded at three points in time: At the beginning of term students' mathematics anxiety, general proneness to anxiety, school grades, and demographic data were assessed; 2 weeks before the end of term, they completed questionnaires on statistics anxiety and their learning behaviors. At the end of term, examination scores were recorded. Mathematics anxiety and statistics anxiety correlated highly but the comparison of different structural equation models showed that they had genuine and even antagonistic contributions to learning behaviors and performance in the examination. Surprisingly, mathematics anxiety was positively related to performance. It might be that students realized over the course of their first term that knowledge and skills in higher secondary education mathematics are not sufficient to be successful in statistics. Part of mathematics anxiety may then have strengthened positive extrinsic effort motivation by the intention to avoid failure and may have led to higher effort for the exam preparation. However, via statistics anxiety mathematics anxiety also had a negative contribution to performance. Statistics anxiety led to higher procrastination in

  3. Mathematics Anxiety and Statistics Anxiety. Shared but Also Unshared Components and Antagonistic Contributions to Performance in Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paechter, Manuela; Macher, Daniel; Martskvishvili, Khatuna; Wimmer, Sigrid; Papousek, Ilona

    2017-01-01

    In many social science majors, e.g., psychology, students report high levels of statistics anxiety. However, these majors are often chosen by students who are less prone to mathematics and who might have experienced difficulties and unpleasant feelings in their mathematics courses at school. The present study investigates whether statistics anxiety is a genuine form of anxiety that impairs students' achievements or whether learners mainly transfer previous experiences in mathematics and their anxiety in mathematics to statistics. The relationship between mathematics anxiety and statistics anxiety, their relationship to learning behaviors and to performance in a statistics examination were investigated in a sample of 225 undergraduate psychology students (164 women, 61 men). Data were recorded at three points in time: At the beginning of term students' mathematics anxiety, general proneness to anxiety, school grades, and demographic data were assessed; 2 weeks before the end of term, they completed questionnaires on statistics anxiety and their learning behaviors. At the end of term, examination scores were recorded. Mathematics anxiety and statistics anxiety correlated highly but the comparison of different structural equation models showed that they had genuine and even antagonistic contributions to learning behaviors and performance in the examination. Surprisingly, mathematics anxiety was positively related to performance. It might be that students realized over the course of their first term that knowledge and skills in higher secondary education mathematics are not sufficient to be successful in statistics. Part of mathematics anxiety may then have strengthened positive extrinsic effort motivation by the intention to avoid failure and may have led to higher effort for the exam preparation. However, via statistics anxiety mathematics anxiety also had a negative contribution to performance. Statistics anxiety led to higher procrastination in the structural

  4. Mathematics Anxiety and Statistics Anxiety. Shared but Also Unshared Components and Antagonistic Contributions to Performance in Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paechter, Manuela; Macher, Daniel; Martskvishvili, Khatuna; Wimmer, Sigrid; Papousek, Ilona

    2017-01-01

    In many social science majors, e.g., psychology, students report high levels of statistics anxiety. However, these majors are often chosen by students who are less prone to mathematics and who might have experienced difficulties and unpleasant feelings in their mathematics courses at school. The present study investigates whether statistics anxiety is a genuine form of anxiety that impairs students' achievements or whether learners mainly transfer previous experiences in mathematics and their anxiety in mathematics to statistics. The relationship between mathematics anxiety and statistics anxiety, their relationship to learning behaviors and to performance in a statistics examination were investigated in a sample of 225 undergraduate psychology students (164 women, 61 men). Data were recorded at three points in time: At the beginning of term students' mathematics anxiety, general proneness to anxiety, school grades, and demographic data were assessed; 2 weeks before the end of term, they completed questionnaires on statistics anxiety and their learning behaviors. At the end of term, examination scores were recorded. Mathematics anxiety and statistics anxiety correlated highly but the comparison of different structural equation models showed that they had genuine and even antagonistic contributions to learning behaviors and performance in the examination. Surprisingly, mathematics anxiety was positively related to performance. It might be that students realized over the course of their first term that knowledge and skills in higher secondary education mathematics are not sufficient to be successful in statistics. Part of mathematics anxiety may then have strengthened positive extrinsic effort motivation by the intention to avoid failure and may have led to higher effort for the exam preparation. However, via statistics anxiety mathematics anxiety also had a negative contribution to performance. Statistics anxiety led to higher procrastination in the structural

  5. CONTRIBUTION OF A LINEAR PROGRAMMING VBA MODULE TO STUDENTS PEFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUČÍRKOVÁ Lenka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of freeware modules as a teaching support of Operations Research methods at the Department of Systems Engineering, Czech university of Life Sciences (CULS Prague. In particular, we concentrated on a linear programming module and measured the impact on student performance. The motivation for this evaluation is based on a current development of a new module that focuses on Traveling Salesman Problem. First, we explain the current situation both worldwide and in the Czech Republic and the CULS Prague. Subsequently, we describe the content of students’ exams and statistical methods applied to the evaluation. Finally, we analyze and generalize the obtained results. The students exams have show a positive impact of the modules. Further, our analysis has proven that this impact is statistically significant. The findings motivate us to made new modules for other methods.

  6. A Gly/Ala switch contributes to high affinity binding of benzoxazinone-based non-peptide oxytocin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawtin, Stuart R; Ha, Sookhee N; Pettibone, Douglas J; Wheatley, Mark

    2005-01-17

    Non-peptide antagonists of the oxytocin receptor (OTR) have been developed to prevent pre-term labour. The benzoxazinone-based antagonists L-371,257 and L-372,662 display pronounced species-dependent pharmacology with respect to selectivity for the OTR over the V(1a) vasopressin receptor. Examination of receptor sequences from different species identified Ala(318) in helix 7 of the human OTR as a candidate discriminator required for high affinity binding. The mutant receptor [A318G]OTR was engineered and characterised using ligands representing many different chemical classes. Of all the ligands investigated, only the benzoxazinone-based antagonists had decreased affinity for [A318G]OTR. Molecular modelling revealed that Ala(318) provides a direct hydrophobic contact with a methoxy group of L-371,257 and L-372,662.

  7. Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Reveals Calcium Binding Properties and Allosteric Regulation of Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Jing; Craig, Theodore A; Kumar, Rajiv; Gross, Michael L

    2017-07-18

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) is an EF-hand Ca 2+ -binding protein that also binds to a specific DNA sequence, downstream regulatory elements (DRE), and thereby regulates transcription in a calcium-dependent fashion. DREAM binds to DRE in the absence of Ca 2+ but detaches from DRE under Ca 2+ stimulation, allowing gene expression. The Ca 2+ binding properties of DREAM and the consequences of the binding on protein structure are key to understanding the function of DREAM. Here we describe the application of hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the Ca 2+ binding properties and the subsequent conformational changes of full-length DREAM. We demonstrate that all EF-hands undergo large conformation changes upon calcium binding even though the EF-1 hand is not capable of binding to Ca 2+ . Moreover, EF-2 is a lower-affinity site compared to EF-3 and -4 hands. Comparison of HDX profiles between wild-type DREAM and two EF-1 mutated constructs illustrates that the conformational changes in the EF-1 hand are induced by long-range structural interactions. HDX analyses also reveal a conformational change in an N-terminal leucine-charged residue-rich domain (LCD) remote from Ca 2+ -binding EF-hands. This LCD domain is responsible for the direct interaction between DREAM and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and regulates the recruitment of the co-activator, CREB-binding protein. These long-range interactions strongly suggest how conformational changes transmit the Ca 2+ signal to CREB-mediated gene transcription.

  8. Discovery, synthesis, selectivity modulation and DMPK characterization of 5-azaspiro[2.4]heptanes as potent orexin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Luigi Piero; Artusi, Roberto; Bovino, Clara; Buzzi, Benedetta; Canciani, Luca; Caselli, Gianfranco; Colace, Fabrizio; Garofalo, Paolo; Giambuzzi, Silvia; Larger, Patrice; Letari, Ornella; Mandelli, Stefano; Perugini, Lorenzo; Pucci, Sabrina; Salvi, Matteo; Toro, PierLuigi

    2013-05-01

    Starting from a orexin 1 receptor selective antagonist 4,4-disubstituted piperidine series a novel potent 5-azaspiro[2.4]heptane dual orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptor antagonist class has been discovered. SAR and Pharmacokinetic optimization of this series is herein disclosed. Lead compound 15 exhibits potent activity against orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors along with low cytochrome P450 inhibition potential, good brain penetration and oral bioavailability in rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation of in vivo immunoglobulin production by endogenous histamine and H1R and H2R agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Trivendra; Shahid, Mohammad; Khan, Haris M; Negi, Mahendra Pal Singh; Siddiqui, Mashiatullah; Khan, Rahat A

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to delineate the immunomodulatory role of histamine receptors (H1R and H2R) and their antibody generation in a rabbit model. Six groups containing 18 rabbits each received either vehicle (sterile distilled water, 1 ml/kg x b.i.d), histamine (100 μg/kg x b.i.d.), H1R agonist (HTMT, 10 μg/kg x b.i.d.), H2R agonist (amthamine, 10 μg/kg x b.i.d.), H1R antagonist (pheniramine, 10 mg/kg x b.i.d.) or H2R antagonist (ranitidine, 10 mg/kg x b.i.d.). All animals were subsequently immunized with an intravenous injection of sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Estimations of total serum immunoglobulins (Igs), immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were performed by ELISA and hemagglutination assay (HA) at days 0 (pre-immunization), 7, 14, 21, 28 and 58 (post-immunization). Both the ELISA and the HA showed similar production of Igs, IgM and IgG but the results were found comparatively more significant by ELISA as opposed to HA. Results showed that histamine could influence a detectable antibody response to SRBC early (i.e., at day 7), which lasted until day 58. Immunomodulatory processes showed suppression of an Ig generation in the H1R-antagonist group with enhancement in the H2R-antagonist group. The H1R-agonist group showed an increased Ig production in comparison to the H2R-agonist group. The IgM production was inhibited in the H1R-antagonist group as compared to the H2R-antagonist group, and it was also suppressed in H1R-agonist group as compared to H2R-agonist group. IgG production was inhibited in the H1R-antagonist group as opposed to the H2R-antagonist group. In contrast, the H1R-agonist group increased IgG production as compared to the H2R-agonist group. All the results were found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). In conclusion, histamine and its receptor (H1R and H2R) agonists enhance antibody production by triggering the histamine receptors (H1R and H2R), and both the H1R antagonist and the H2R antagonist

  10. Dual orexin receptor antagonists show distinct effects on locomotor performance, ethanol interaction and sleep architecture relative to gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres D. Ramirez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs are a potential treatment for insomnia that function by blocking both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. The objective of the current study was to further confirm the impact of therapeutic mechanisms targeting insomnia on locomotor coordination and ethanol interaction using DORAs and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA-A receptor modulators of distinct chemical structure and pharmacologic properties in the context of sleep-promoting potential. The current study compared rat motor co-ordination after administration of DORAs, DORA-12 and almorexant, and GABA-A receptor modulators, zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam, alone or each in combination with ethanol. Motor performance was assessed by measuring time spent walking on a rotarod apparatus. Zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam (0.3–30 mg/kg administered orally [PO] impaired rotarod performance in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, all three GABA-A receptor modulators potentiated ethanol- (0.25–1.25 g/kg induced impairment on the rotarod. By contrast, neither DORA-12 (10–100 mg/kg, PO nor almorexant (30–300 mg/kg, PO impaired motor performance alone or in combination with ethanol. In addition, distinct differences in sleep architecture were observed between ethanol, GABA-A receptor modulators (zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam and DORA-12 in electroencephalogram studies in rats. These findings provide further evidence that orexin receptor antagonists have an improved motor side-effect profile compared with currently available sleep-promoting agents based on preclinical data and strengthen the rationale for further evaluation of these agents in clinical development.

  11. Modulation of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors by strategically functionalized agonists and antagonists immobilized on gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Jayasekara, P. Suresh; Phan, Khai; Tosh, Dilip K.; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Moss, Steven M.; Zhang, Guofeng; Barchi, Joseph J.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) allow the tuning of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties by active or passive targeting of drugs for cancer and other diseases. We have functionalized gold nanoparticles by tethering specific ligands, agonists and antagonists, of adenosine receptors (ARs) to the gold surface as models for cell surface interactions with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The AuNP conjugates with chain-extended AR ligands alone (PEGylated nucleosides and nonnucleosides, an...

  12. Isobolographic Analysis of Drug Combinations With Intrathecal BRL52537 (κ-Opioid Agonist), Pregabalin (Calcium Channel Modulator), AF 353 (P2X3 Receptor Antagonist), and A804598 (P2X7 Receptor Antagonist) in Neuropathic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Hwan; Kim, Yeo Ok; Han, Jung Hyun; Kim, Yong-Chul; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2017-08-01

    Neuropathic pain should be treated with drug combinations exhibiting multiple analgesic mechanisms of action because the mechanism of neuropathic pain involves multiple physiological causes and is mediated by multiple pathways. In this study, we defined the pharmacological interaction of BRL52537 (κ-opioid agonist), pregabalin (calcium channel modulator), AF 353 (P2X3 receptor antagonist), and A804598 (P2X7 receptor antagonist). Animal models of neuropathic pain were established by spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and responses to the mechanical stimulation using von Frey filaments were measured. Drugs were administered by intrathecal route and were examined for antiallodynic effects, and drug interactions were evaluated using isobolographic analysis. The mRNA expression levels of pain-related receptors in each spinal cord or dorsal root ganglion of naïve, SNL, and drug-treated SNL rats were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Intrathecal BRL52537, pregabalin, AF 353, and A804598 produced antiallodynic effects in SNL rats. In the drug combination studies, intrathecal coadministration of BRL52537 with pregabalin or A804598 exhibited synergistic interactions, and other drugs combinations showed additivity. The rank order of potency was observed as follows: BRL52537 + pregabalin > BRL52537 + A804598 > pregabalin + AF 353 > A804598 + pregabalin > BRL52537 + AF 353 > AF 353 + A804598. Real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that alterations of P2X3 receptor and calcium channel mRNA expression levels were observed, while P2X7 receptor and κ-opioid receptor expression levels were not altered. These results demonstrated that intrathecal combination of BRL52537, pregabalin, AF 353, and A804598 synergistically or additively attenuated allodynia evoked by SNL, which suggests the possibility to improve the efficacy of single-drug administration.

  13. Modulation of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors by strategically functionalized agonists and antagonists immobilized on gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekara, P Suresh; Phan, Khai; Tosh, Dilip K; Kumar, T Santhosh; Moss, Steven M; Zhang, Guofeng; Barchi, Joseph J; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) allow the tuning of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties by active or passive targeting of drugs for cancer and other diseases. We have functionalized gold nanoparticles by tethering specific ligands, agonists and antagonists, of adenosine receptors (ARs) to the gold surface as models for cell surface interactions with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The AuNP conjugates with chain-extended AR ligands alone (PEGylated nucleosides and nonnucleosides, anchored to the Au via thioctic acid) were found to be insoluble in water due to hydrophobic entities in the ligand. Therefore, we added a second, biologically inactive pendant moiety to increase the water solubility, consisting of a PEGylated chain terminating in a carboxylic or phosphate group. The purity and stability of the immobilized biologically active ligand were examined by ultrafiltration and HPLC. Pharmacological receptor binding studies on these GPCR ligand-derivatized AuNPs (2-5 nm in diameter), performed using membranes of mammalian cells stably expressing human A1, A2A, and A3ARs, showed that the desired selectivity was retained with K(i) values (nanomolar) of A3AR agonist 21b and A2AAR antagonists 24 and 26a of 14 (A3), 34 (A2A), and 69 (A2A), respectively. The corresponding monomers displayed K i values of 37, 61, and 1,420 nM, respectively. In conclusion, we have synthesized stable, water-soluble AuNP derivatives of tethered A3 and A2AAR ligands that retain the biological properties of their monomeric ligands and are intended for therapeutic and imaging applications. This is the first prototypical application to gold carriers of small molecule (nonpeptide) GPCR ligands, which are under investigation for treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  14. Contribution of tumor endothelial cells to drug resistance: anti-angiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors act as p-glycoprotein antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani, MariaRosa; Decio, Alessandra; Giavazzi, Raffaella; Ghilardi, Carmen

    2017-05-01

    Tumor endothelial cells (TEC) differ from the normal counterpart, in both gene expression and functionality. TEC may acquire drug resistance, a characteristic that is maintained in vitro. There is evidence that TEC are more resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs, substrates of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. TEC express p-glycoprotein (encoded by ABCB1), while no difference in other ABC transporters was revealed compared to normal endothelia. A class of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), used as angiostatic compounds, interferes with the ATPase activity of p-glycoprotein, thus impairing its functionality. The exposure of ovarian adenocarcinoma TEC to the TKIs sunitinib or sorafenib was found to abrogate resistance (proliferation and motility) to doxorubicin and paclitaxel in vitro, increasing intracellular drug accumulation. A similar effect has been reported by the p-glycoprotein inhibitor verapamil. No beneficial effect was observed in combination with cytotoxic drugs that are not p-glycoprotein substrates. The current paper reviews the mechanisms of TEC chemoresistance and shows the role of p-glycoprotein in mediating such resistance. Inhibition of p-glycoprotein by anti-angiogenic TKI might contribute to the beneficial effect of these small molecules, when combined with chemotherapy, in counteracting acquired drug resistance.

  15. Gene-to-gene interactions regulate endogenous pain modulation in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls—antagonistic effects between opioid and serotonin-related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Jeanette; Löfgren, Monika; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Gerdle, Björn; Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Bjersing, Jan; Martin, Ingvar; Ernberg, Malin; Schalling, Martin; Kosek, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain is associated with dysfunctional endogenous pain modulation, involving both central opioid and serotonergic (5-HT) signaling. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and reduced exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). In this study, we assessed the effects of 3 functional genetic polymorphisms on EIH in 130 patients with FM and 132 healthy controls. Subjects were genotyped regarding the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene (rs1799971), the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene (5-HTTLPR/rs25531), and the serotonin-1a receptor (5-HT1a) gene (rs6296). The patients with FM had increased pain sensitivity and reduced EIH compared with healthy controls. None of the polymorphisms had an effect on EIH on their own. We found significant gene-to-gene interactions between OPRM1 x 5-HTT and OPRM1 x 5-HT1a regarding activation of EIH, with no statistically significant difference between groups. Better EIH was found in individuals with genetically inferred strong endogenous opioid signaling (OPRM1 G) in combination with weak 5-HT tone (5-HTT low/5-HT1a G), compared with strong 5-HT tone (5-HTT high/5-HT1a CC). Based on the proposed mechanisms of these genetic variants, the findings indicate antagonistic interactions between opioid and serotonergic mechanisms during EIH. Moreover, despite different baseline pain level, similar results were detected in FM and controls, not supporting an altered interaction between opioid and 5-HT mechanisms as the basis for dysfunction of EIH in patients with FM. In summary, our results suggest that, by genetic association, the mu-opioid receptor interacts with 2 major serotonergic structures involved in 5-HT reuptake and release, to modulate EIH. PMID:28282362

  16. Gene-to-gene interactions regulate endogenous pain modulation in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls-antagonistic effects between opioid and serotonin-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Jeanette; Löfgren, Monika; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Gerdle, Björn; Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Bjersing, Jan; Martin, Ingvar; Ernberg, Malin; Schalling, Martin; Kosek, Eva

    2017-07-01

    Chronic pain is associated with dysfunctional endogenous pain modulation, involving both central opioid and serotonergic (5-HT) signaling. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and reduced exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). In this study, we assessed the effects of 3 functional genetic polymorphisms on EIH in 130 patients with FM and 132 healthy controls. Subjects were genotyped regarding the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene (rs1799971), the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene (5-HTTLPR/rs25531), and the serotonin-1a receptor (5-HT1a) gene (rs6296). The patients with FM had increased pain sensitivity and reduced EIH compared with healthy controls. None of the polymorphisms had an effect on EIH on their own. We found significant gene-to-gene interactions between OPRM1 x 5-HTT and OPRM1 x 5-HT1a regarding activation of EIH, with no statistically significant difference between groups. Better EIH was found in individuals with genetically inferred strong endogenous opioid signaling (OPRM1 G) in combination with weak 5-HT tone (5-HTT low/5-HT1a G), compared with strong 5-HT tone (5-HTT high/5-HT1a CC). Based on the proposed mechanisms of these genetic variants, the findings indicate antagonistic interactions between opioid and serotonergic mechanisms during EIH. Moreover, despite different baseline pain level, similar results were detected in FM and controls, not supporting an altered interaction between opioid and 5-HT mechanisms as the basis for dysfunction of EIH in patients with FM. In summary, our results suggest that, by genetic association, the mu-opioid receptor interacts with 2 major serotonergic structures involved in 5-HT reuptake and release, to modulate EIH.

  17. A Novel Nuclear Trafficking Module Regulates the Nucleocytoplasmic Localization of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist, P Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksayan, Sibil; Wiltzer, Linda; Rowe, Caitlin L.; Blondel, Danielle; Jans, David A.; Moseley, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    Regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins is central to cellular function and dysfunction during processes such as viral infection. Active protein trafficking into and out of the nucleus is dependent on the presence within cargo proteins of intrinsic specific modular signals for nuclear import (nuclear localization signals, NLSs) and export (nuclear export signals, NESs). Rabies virus (RabV) phospho (P) protein, which is largely responsible for antagonising the host anti-viral response, is expressed as five isoforms (P1–P5). The subcellular trafficking of these isoforms is thought to depend on a balance between the activities of a dominant N-terminal NES (N-NES) and a distinct C-terminal NLS (C-NLS). Specifically, the N-NES-containing isoforms P1 and P2 are cytoplasmic, whereas the shorter P3–P5 isoforms, which lack the N-NES, are believed to be nuclear through the activity of the C-NLS. Here, we show for the first time that RabV P contains an additional strong NLS in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), which, intriguingly, overlaps with the N-NES. This arrangement represents a novel nuclear trafficking module where the N-NLS is inactive in P1 but becomes activated in P3, concomitant with truncation of the N-NES, to become the principal targeting signal conferring nuclear accumulation. Understanding this unique switch arrangement of overlapping, co-regulated NES/NLS sequences is vital to delineating the critical role of RabV P protein in viral infection. PMID:22700958

  18. Estrogen signaling modulates allergic inflammation and contributes to sex differences in asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander eKeselman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease that afflicts approximately 300 million people worldwide. It is characterized by airway constriction that leads to wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. The most common treatments are corticosteroids and β2-adrenergic receptor antagonists, which target inflammation and airway smooth muscle constriction, respectively. The incidence and severity of asthma is greater in women than in men, and women are more prone to develop corticosteroid-resistant or hard-to-treat asthma. Puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, menopause, and oral contraceptives are known to contribute to disease outcome in women, potentially suggesting a role for estrogen and other hormones impacting allergic inflammation. Currently, the mechanisms underlying these sex differences are poorly understood, although the effect of sex hormones, such as estrogen, on allergic inflammation is gaining interest. Asthma presents as a heterogeneous disease. In typical Th2-type allergic asthma, interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 predominate, driving IgE production and recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Chronic Th2-inflammation in the lung results in structural changes and activation of multiple immune cell types, leading to a deterioration of lung function over time. Most immune cells express estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ, or the membrane-bound G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor to varying degrees and can respond to the hormone. Together these receptors have demonstrated the capacity to regulate a spectrum of immune functions, including adhesion, migration, survival, wound healing, and antibody and cytokine production. This review will cover the current understanding of estrogen signaling in allergic inflammation and discuss how this signaling may contribute to sex differences in asthma and allergy.

  19. GABAB antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Hansen, J J; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1994-01-01

    chromatographic techniques. The absolute stereochemistry of (-)-(R)-phaclofen was established by X-ray crystallographic analysis. (-)-(R)-Phaclofen was shown to inhibit the binding of [3H]-(R)-baclofen to GABAB receptor sites on rat cerebellar membranes (IC50 = 76 +/- 13 microM), whereas (+)-(S......)-baclofen and the antagonist (-)-(R)-phaclofen suggests that these ligands interact with the GABAB receptor sites in a similar manner. Thus, it may be concluded that the different pharmacological effects of these compounds essentially result from the different spatial and proteolytic properties of their acid groups....

  20. The Contribution of Non-catalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules to the Activity of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Lucy I.; Labourel, Aurore; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable industrial substrate. Copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to the degradation of lignocellulose and increase the efficiency of biofuel production. LPMOs can contain non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), but their role in the activity of these enzymes is poorly understood. Here we explored the importance of CBMs in LPMO function. The family 2a CBMs of two monooxygenases, CfLPMO10 and TbLPMO10 from Cellulomonas fimi and Thermobispora bispora, respectively, were deleted and/or replaced with CBMs from other proteins. The data showed that the CBMs could potentiate and, surprisingly, inhibit LPMO activity, and that these effects were both enzyme-specific and substrate-specific. Removing the natural CBM or introducing CtCBM3a, from the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome scaffoldin CipA, almost abolished the catalytic activity of the LPMOs against the cellulosic substrates. The deleterious effect of CBM removal likely reflects the importance of prolonged presentation of the enzyme on the surface of the substrate for efficient catalytic activity, as only LPMOs appended to CBMs bound tightly to cellulose. The negative impact of CtCBM3a is in sharp contrast with the capacity of this binding module to potentiate the activity of a range of glycoside hydrolases including cellulases. The deletion of the endogenous CBM from CfLPMO10 or the introduction of a family 10 CBM from Cellvibrio japonicus LPMO10B into TbLPMO10 influenced the quantity of non-oxidized products generated, demonstrating that CBMs can modulate the mode of action of LPMOs. This study demonstrates that engineered LPMO-CBM hybrids can display enhanced industrially relevant oxygenations. PMID:26801613

  1. Modulation of gut microbiota contributes to curcumin-mediated attenuation of hepatic steatosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenhuan; Wang, Hongdong; Zhang, Pengzi; Gao, Caixia; Tao, Junxian; Ge, Zhijuan; Zhu, Dalong; Bi, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Structural disruption of gut microbiota contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and modulating the gut microbiota represents a novel strategy for NAFLD prevention. Although previous studies have demonstrated that curcumin alleviates hepatic steatosis, its effect on the gut microbiota modulation has not been investigated. Next generation sequencing and multivariate analysis were utilized to evaluate the structural changes of gut microbiota in a NAFLD rat model induced by high fat-diet (HFD) feeding. We found that curcumin attenuated hepatic ectopic fat deposition, improved intestinal barrier integrity, and alleviated metabolic endotoxemia in HFD-fed rats. More importantly, curcumin dramatically shifted the overall structure of the HFD-disrupted gut microbiota toward that of lean rats fed a normal diet and altered the gut microbial composition. The abundances of 110 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were altered by curcumin. Seventy-six altered OTUs were significantly correlated with one or more hepatic steatosis associated parameters and designated 'functionally relevant phylotypes'. Thirty-six of the 47 functionally relevant OTUs that were positively correlated with hepatic steatosis associated parameters were reduced by curcumin. These results indicate that curcumin alleviates hepatic steatosis in part through stain-specific impacts on hepatic steatosis associated phylotypes of gut microbiota in rats. Compounds with antimicrobial activities should be further investigated as novel adjunctive therapies for NAFLD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rhizosphere Microbiome Modulators: Contributions of Nitrogen Fixing Bacteria towards Sustainable Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igiehon, Nicholas Ozede; Babalola, Olubukola Oluranti

    2018-03-23

    Rhizosphere microbiome which has been shown to enhance plant growth and yield are modulated or influenced by a few environmental factors such as soil type, plant cultivar, climate change and anthropogenic activities. In particular, anthropogenic activity, such as the use of nitrogen-based chemical fertilizers, is associated with environmental destruction and this calls for a more ecofriendly strategy to increase nitrogen levels in agricultural land. This feat is attainable by harnessing nitrogen-fixing endophytic and free-living rhizobacteria. Rhizobium , Pseudomonas , Azospirillum and Bacillus , have been found to have positive impacts on crops by enhancing both above and belowground biomass and could therefore play positive roles in achieving sustainable agriculture outcomes. Thus, it is necessary to study this rhizosphere microbiome with more sophisticated culture-independent techniques such as next generation sequencing (NGS) with the prospect of discovering novel bacteria with plant growth promoting traits. This review is therefore aimed at discussing factors that can modulate rhizosphere microbiome with focus on the contributions of nitrogen fixing bacteria towards sustainable agricultural development and the techniques that can be used for their study.

  3. Japanese contribution to the design of primary module of shielding blanket in ITER-FEAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Toshimasa; Hatano, Toshihisa; Miki, Nobuharu; Hiroki, Seiji; Enoeda, Mikio; Ohmori, Junji; Akiba, Masato [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Sato, Shinichi [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Japanese contributions to the design activity on the shielding blanket module consisting of the separable first wall and the shield block for ITER-FEAT are compiled. Temperature and stress distributions in the first wall and the shield block are analyzed and evaluated with 2-D and 3-D models for steady state and also for transient condition according to plasma ramp-up and ramp-down. While temperatures and stresses in the first wall satisfy their allowable values, those in a front part of the shield block exceed the allowable guideline. Based on this result, design improvements are suggested. Coolant flow and pressure distributions along the complicated coolant channel in the shield block are preliminary analyzed. Though heat removal is satisfactory in all coolant channels, back flows due to choking in coolant collectors are found. Design improvements to avoid the choking are suggested. Electromagnetic forces acting on blanket modules are analyzed with detailed 3-D models of solid elements for different disruption scenarios. The maximum moment around radial axis is 1.36 MNm on module no.5 under fast upward VDE, and the maximum moment around vertical axis is 1.47 MNm on module no.1 under fast downward VDE. The supporting beam of the first wall with welded attachment to the shield block is designed. Required welding thickness and support conditions to withstand electromagnetic forces are estimated. Strength of the shield block at the region mating the flexible cartridge is also estimated. Though the shield block surface attached by the flexible cartridge shows sufficient strength, the internal thread mating the Inconel bolt would need more length. In addition, water-to-water leak detection system in case main supply/return manifolds are located within the vacuum vessel is designed. By using Kr as the tracer material, the possibility of water-to-water leak detection and the concept of the detection system are shown. The design of the shielding blanket of ITER-FEAT has

  4. Higher-order power harmonics of pulsed electrical stimulation modulates corticospinal contribution of peripheral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiun-Fan; Bikson, Marom; Chou, Li-Wei; Shan, Chunlei; Khadka, Niranjan; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-03-03

    It is well established that electrical-stimulation frequency is crucial to determining the scale of induced neuromodulation, particularly when attempting to modulate corticospinal excitability. However, the modulatory effects of stimulation frequency are not only determined by its absolute value but also by other parameters such as power at harmonics. The stimulus pulse shape further influences parameters such as excitation threshold and fiber selectivity. The explicit role of the power in these harmonics in determining the outcome of stimulation has not previously been analyzed. In this study, we adopted an animal model of peripheral electrical stimulation that includes an amplitude-adapted pulse train which induces force enhancements with a corticospinal contribution. We report that the electrical-stimulation-induced force enhancements were correlated with the amplitude of stimulation power harmonics during the amplitude-adapted pulse train. In an exploratory analysis, different levels of correlation were observed between force enhancement and power harmonics of 20-80 Hz (r = 0.4247, p = 0.0243), 100-180 Hz (r = 0.5894, p = 0.0001), 200-280 Hz (r = 0.7002, p harmonics. This is a pilot, but important first demonstration that power at high order harmonics in the frequency spectrum of electrical stimulation pulses may contribute to neuromodulation, thus warrant explicit attention in therapy design and analysis.

  5. Resolving the contribution of the uncoupled phycobilisomes to cyanobacterial pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Alonso M; Snellenburg, Joris J; Gwizdala, Michal; Kirilovsky, Diana; van Grondelle, Rienk; van Stokkum, Ivo H M

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry is extensively used to characterize photosynthetic organisms on the slow time-scale (1-1000 s). The saturation pulse method allows determination of the quantum yields of maximal (F(M)) and minimal fluorescence (F(0)), parameters related to the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus. Also, when the sample undergoes a certain light treatment during the measurement, the fluorescence quantum yields of the unquenched and the quenched states can be determined. In the case of cyanobacteria, however, the recorded fluorescence does not exclusively stem from the chlorophyll a in photosystem II (PSII). The phycobilins, the pigments of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting complexes, the phycobilisomes (PB), also contribute to the PAM signal, and therefore, F(0) and F(M) are no longer related to PSII only. We present a functional model that takes into account the presence of several fluorescent species whose concentrations can be resolved provided their fluorescence quantum yields are known. Data analysis of PAM measurements on in vivo cells of our model organism Synechocystis PCC6803 is discussed. Three different components are found necessary to fit the data: uncoupled PB (PB(free)), PB-PSII complexes, and free PSI. The free PSII contribution was negligible. The PB(free) contribution substantially increased in the mutants that lack the core terminal emitter subunits allophycocyanin D or allophycocyanin F. A positive correlation was found between the amount of PB(free) and the rate constants describing the binding of the activated orange carotenoid protein to PB, responsible for non-photochemical quenching.

  6. Interactions between allosteric modulators and 4-DAMP and other antagonists at muscarinic receptors: potential significance of the distance between the N and Carboxyl C atoms in the molecules of antagonists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lysíková, Michaela; Havlas, Zdeněk; Tuček, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2001), s. 383-394 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0214; GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulation * 4-DAMP Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.638, year: 2001

  7. Modulation of intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stabilization due to vision, task instruction, and perturbation bandwidth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drunen, P.; Koumans, Y.; van der Helm, F.C.T.; van Dieen, J.H.; Happee, R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess how reflexes and intrinsic properties contribute to low-back stabilization and modulate with conditions. Upper body sway was evoked by anterior–posterior platform translations, while subjects were seated with a restrained pelvis and free upper body. Kinematic

  8. Cytokine modulation by stress hormones and antagonist specific hormonal inhibition in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) head kidney primary cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansari, Ali Reza; Parra, David; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Tort, Lluís

    2017-09-01

    A tight interaction between endocrine and immune systems takes place mainly due to the key role of head kidney in both hormone and cytokine secretion, particularly under stress situations in which the physiological response promotes the synthesis and release of stress hormones which may lead into immunomodulation as side effect. Although such interaction has been previously investigated, this study evaluated for the first time the effect of stress-associated hormones together with their receptor antagonists on the expression of cytokine genes in head kidney primary cell culture (HKPCC) of the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the seawater gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata). The results showed a striking difference when comparing the response obtained in trout and seabream. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) decreased the expression of immune-related genes in sea bream but not in rainbow trout and this cortisol effect was reverted by the antagonist mifepristone but not spironolactone. On the other hand, while adrenaline reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) in rainbow trout, the opposite effect was observed in sea bream showing an increased expression (IL-1β, IL-6). Interestingly, this effect was reverted by antagonist propranolol but not phentolamine. Overall, our results confirm the regional interaction between endocrine and cytokine messengers and a clear difference in the sensitivity to the hormonal stimuli between the two species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  10. S179D prolactin: antagonistic agony!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ameae M

    2007-09-30

    The aims of this review are three-fold: first, to collate what is known about the production and activities of phosphorylated prolactin (PRL), the latter largely, but not exclusively, as illustrated through the use of the molecular mimic, S179D PRL; second, to apply this and related knowledge to produce an updated model of prolactin-receptor interactions that may apply to other members of this cytokine super-family; and third, to promote a shift in the current paradigm for the development of clinically important growth antagonists. This third aim explains the title since, based on results with S179D PRL, it is proposed that agents which signal to antagonistic ends may be better therapeutics than pure antagonists-hence antagonistic agony. Since S179D PRL is not a pure antagonist, we have proposed the term selective prolactin receptor modulator (SPeRM) for this and like molecules.

  11. Non-Selective Cannabinoid Receptor Antagonists, Hinokiresinols Reduce Infiltration of Microglia/Macrophages into Ischemic Brain Lesions in Rat via Modulating 2-Arachidonolyglycerol-Induced Migration and Mitochondrial Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M A Anthony Jalin

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that therapeutic strategies to modulate the post-ischemic inflammatory responses are promising approaches to improve stroke outcome. Although the endocannabinoid system has been emerged as an endogenous therapeutic target to regulate inflammation after stroke insult, the downstream mechanisms and their potentials for therapeutic intervention remain controversial. Here we identified trans- and cis-hinokiresinols as novel non-selective antagonists for two G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid receptor type 1 and type 2. The Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing and Boyden chamber migration assays using primary microglial cultures revealed that both hinokiresinols significantly inhibited an endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol-induced migration. Hinokiresinols modulated 2-arachidonoylglycerol-induced mitochondrial bioenergetics in microglia as evidenced by inhibition of ATP turnover and reduction in respiratory capacity, thereby resulting in impaired migration activity. In rats subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (1.5-h followed by 24-h reperfusion, post-ischemic treatment with hinokiresinols (2 and 7-h after the onset of ischemia, 10 mg/kg significantly reduced cerebral infarct and infiltration of ED1-positive microglial/macrophage cells into cerebral ischemic lesions in vivo. Co-administration of exogenous 2-AG (1 mg/kg, i.v., single dose at 2 h after starting MCAO abolished the protective effect of trans-hinokiresionol. These results suggest that hinokiresinols may serve as stroke treatment by targeting the endocannabinoid system. Alteration of mitochondrial bioenergetics and consequent inhibition of inflammatory cells migration may be a novel mechanism underlying anti-ischemic effects conferred by cannabinoid receptor antagonists.

  12. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, S. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has been incompletely elucidated, but vasospasm probably is a contributing factor. Experimental studies have suggested that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse

  13. Glutamate Receptor Antagonist Infusions into the Basolateral and Medial Amygdala Reveal Differential Contributions to Olfactory vs. Context Fear Conditioning and Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David L.; Paschall, Gayla Y.; Davis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala's involvement in fear acquisition and expression to visual and auditory stimuli is well known. The involvement of the basolateral and other amygdala areas in fear acquisition and expression to stimuli of other modalities is less certain. We evaluated the contribution of the basolateral and medial amygdala to olfactory and…

  14. Neurochemical and electrical modulation of the Locus coeruleus: contribution to CO2 drive to breathe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora eDe Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Locus coeruleus (LC is a dorsal pontine region, situated bilaterally on the floor of the fourth ventricle. It is considered to be the major source of noradrenergic innervation in the brain. These neurons are highly sensitive to CO2 / pH, and chemical lesions of LC neurons largely attenuate the hypercapnic ventilatory response in unanesthetized adult rats. Developmental dysfunctions in these neurons are linked to pathological conditions such as Rett and sudden infant death syndromes, which can impair the control of the cardio-respiratory system. LC is densely innervated by fibers that contain glutamate, serotonin and ATP, and these neurotransmitters strongly affect LC activity, including central chemoreflexes. Aside from neurochemical modulation, LC neurons are also strongly electrically coupled, specifically through gap junctions, which play a role in the CO2 ventilatory response. This article reviews the available data on the role of chemical and electrical neuromodulation of the LC in the control of ventilation.

  15. Mast Cell Infiltration in Human Brain Metastases Modulates the Microenvironment and Contributes to the Metastatic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Roy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic brain tumors continue to be a clinical problem, despite new therapeutic advances in cancer treatment. Brain metastases (BMs are among the most common mass lesions in the brain that are resistant to chemotherapies, have a very poor prognosis, and currently lack any efficient diagnostic tests. Predictions estimate that about 40% of lung and breast cancer patients will develop BM. Despite this, very little is known about the immunological and genetic aberrations that drive tumorigenesis in BM. In this study, we demonstrate the infiltration of mast cells (MCs in a large cohort of human BM samples with different tissues of origin for primary cancer. We applied patient-derived BM cell models to the study of BM cell–MC interactions. BM cells when cocultured with MCs demonstrate enhanced growth and self-renewal capacity. Gene set enrichment analyses indicate increased expression of signal transduction and transmembrane proteins related genes in the cocultured BM cells. MCs exert their effect by release of mediators such as IL-8, IL-10, matrix metalloprotease 2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, thereby permitting metastasis. In conclusion, we provide evidence for a role of MCs in BM. Our findings indicate MCs’ capability of modulating gene expression in BM cells and suggest that MCs can serve as a new target for drug development against metastases in the brain.

  16. SK2 channel modulation contributes to compartment-specific dendritic plasticity in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Gen; Piochon, Claire; Adelman, John P.; Hansel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (SK channels) modulate excitability and curtail excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in neuronal dendrites. Here, we demonstrate long-lasting plasticity of intrinsic excitability (IE) in dendrites that results from changes in the gain of this regulatory mechanism. Using dendritic patch-clamp recordings from rat cerebellar Purkinje cells, we find that somatic depolarization or parallel fiber (PF) burst stimulation induce long-term amplification of synaptic responses to climbing fiber (CF) or PF stimulation, and enhance the amplitude of passively propagated sodium spikes. Dendritic plasticity is mimicked and occluded by the SK channel blocker apamin, and is absent in Purkinje cells from SK2 null mice. Triple-patch recordings from two dendritic sites and the soma, and confocal calcium imaging studies show that local stimulation limits dendritic plasticity to the activated compartment of the dendrite. This plasticity mechanism allows Purkinje cells to adjust the SK2-mediated control of dendritic excitability in an activity-dependent manner. PMID:22794265

  17. Does the Host Contribute to Modulation of Mycotoxin Production by Fruit Pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dilip; Barad, Shiri; Sionov, Edward; Keller, Nancy P; Prusky, Dov B

    2017-09-12

    Storage of freshly harvested fruit is a key factor in modulating their supply for several months after harvest; however, their quality can be reduced by pathogen attack. Fruit pathogens may infect their host through damaged surfaces, such as mechanical injuries occurring during growing, harvesting, and packing, leading to increased colonization as the fruit ripens. Of particular concern are fungal pathogens that not only macerate the host tissue but also secrete significant amounts of mycotoxins. Many studies have described the importance of physiological factors, including stage of fruit development, biochemical factors (ripening, C and N content), and environmental factors (humidity, temperature, water deficit) on the occurrence of mycotoxins. However, those factors usually show a correlative effect on fungal growth and mycotoxin accumulation. Recent reports have suggested that host factors can induce fungal metabolism, leading to the synthesis and accumulation of mycotoxins. This review describes the new vision of host-factor impact on the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthetic gene clusters underlying the complex regulation of mycotoxin accumulation in ripening fruit.

  18. Dietary Modulation of Gut Microbiota Contributes to Alleviation of Both Genetic and Simple Obesity in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhong Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Research in context: Poorly managed diet and genetic mutations are the two primary driving forces behind the devastating epidemic of obesity-related diseases. Lack of understanding of the molecular chain of causation between the driving forces and the disease endpoints retards progress in prevention and treatment of the diseases. We found that children genetically obese with Prader–Willi syndrome shared a similar dysbiosis in their gut microbiota with those having diet-related obesity. A diet rich in non-digestible but fermentable carbohydrates significantly promoted beneficial groups of bacteria and reduced toxin-producers, which contributes to the alleviation of metabolic deteriorations in obesity regardless of the primary driving forces.

  19. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Kesic

    Full Text Available Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with increased respiratory morbidities and susceptibility to infections. Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known. The greater Mexico City area was the primary site for the spring 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, which also coincided with high levels of environmental ozone. Proteolytic cleavage of the viral membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA is essential for influenza virus infectivity. Recent studies suggest that HA cleavage might be cell-associated and facilitated by the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2, whose activities are regulated by antiproteases, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI. Based on these observations, we sought to determine how acute exposure to ozone may modulate cellular protease/antiprotease expression and function, and to define their roles in a viral infection. We utilized our in vitro model of differentiated human nasal epithelial cells (NECs to determine the effects of ozone on influenza cleavage, entry, and replication. We show that ozone exposure disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance within the airway liquid. We also determined that functional forms of HAT, TMPRSS2, and SLPI are secreted from human airway epithelium, and acute exposure to ozone inversely alters their expression levels. We also show that addition of antioxidants significantly reduces virus replication through the induction of SLPI. In addition, we determined that ozone-induced cleavage of the viral HA protein is not cell-associated and that secreted endogenous proteases are sufficient to activate HA leading to a significant increase in viral replication. Our data indicate that pre-exposure to ozone disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance found in the human airway, leading to increased influenza susceptibility.

  20. p53 activation contributes to patulin-induced nephrotoxicity via modulation of reactive oxygen species generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huan; Yin, Shutao; Song, Xinhua; Zhang, Enxiang; Fan, Lihong; Hu, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Patulin is a major mycotoxin found in fungal contaminated fruits and their derivative products. Previous studies showed that patulin was able to induce increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress was suggested to play a pivotal role in patulin-induced multiple toxic signaling. The objective of the present study was to investigate the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. Our study demonstrated that higher levels of ROS generation and DNA damage were induced in wild-type p53 cell lines than that found in either knockdown or knockout p53 cell lines in response to patulin exposure, suggesting p53 activation contributed to patulin-induced ROS generation. Mechanistically, we revealed that the pro-oxidant role of p53 in response to patulin was attributed to its ability to suppress catalase activity through up-regulation of PIG3. Moreover, these in vitro findings were further validated in the p53 wild-type/knockout mouse model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report addressing the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. The findings of the present study provided novel insights into understanding mechanisms behind oxidative stress in response to patulin exposure. PMID:27071452

  1. Biochemical and histological contributions to textural changes in watermelon fruit modulated by grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soteriou, Georgios A; Siomos, Anastasios S; Gerasopoulos, Dimitrios; Rouphael, Youssef; Georgiadou, Soteria; Kyriacou, Marios C

    2017-12-15

    Increased watermelon fruit flesh firmness is systematically incurred with grafting on Cucurbita hybrid rootstocks (heterografting). Possible differences in mesocarp cell wall constitution and histology between heterografted, homeografted (self-grafted) and non-grafted watermelon were examined, as well as their contributions to fruit texture. Firmness correlated positively (r=0.78, p<0.001) with cell density (cellsmm -2 ) which was higher in heterografts (5.83) than homeografts (4.64) and non-grafted controls (4.69). Mean cell size was smallest in heterografts and correlated negatively (r=-0.75, p<0.001) with firmness. Cell wall material, particularly the water-insoluble pectin fractions associated with firmness, were highest in heterografts. No associations with firmness were found for cell wall neutral sugars and membrane permeability. Higher parenchymatic cell density with higher content of alcohol insoluble residue and more abundant water-insoluble pectin fractions underscore enhanced firmness in heterografts. Possible implication of osmolytes in rootstock-mediated cell pressure regulation warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Contribution of Carbon and Water in Modulating Wood Formation in Black Spruce Saplings1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Annie; Balducci, Lorena; Rossi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Nonstructural carbohydrates (NSCs) play a crucial role in xylem formation and represent, with water, the main constraint to plant growth. We assessed the relationships between xylogenesis and NSCs in order to (1) verify the variance explained by NSCs and (2) determine the influence of intrinsic (tissue supplying carbon) and extrinsic (water availability and temperature) factors. During 2 years, wood formation was monitored in saplings of black spruce (Picea mariana) subjected to a dry period of about 1 month in June and exposed to different temperature treatments in a greenhouse. In parallel, NSC concentrations were determined by extracting the sugar compounds from two tissues (cambium and inner xylem), both potentially supplying carbon for wood formation. A mixed-effect model was used to assess and quantify the potential relationships. Total xylem cells, illustrating meristematic activity, were modeled as a function of water, sucrose, and d-pinitol (conditional r2 of 0.79). Water availability was ranked as the most important factor explaining total xylem cell production, while the contribution of carbon was lower. Cambium stopped dividing under water deficit, probably to limit the number of cells remaining in differentiation without an adequate amount of water. By contrast, carbon factors were ranked as most important in explaining the variation in living cells (conditional r2 of 0.49), highlighting the functional needs during xylem development, followed by the tissue supplying the NSCs (cambium) and water availability. This study precisely demonstrates the role of carbon and water in structural growth expressed as meristematic activity and tissue formation. PMID:26850274

  3. The Contribution of Carbon and Water in Modulating Wood Formation in Black Spruce Saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Annie; Huang, Jian-Guo; Balducci, Lorena; Beaulieu, Marilène; Rossi, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Nonstructural carbohydrates (NSCs) play a crucial role in xylem formation and represent, with water, the main constraint to plant growth. We assessed the relationships between xylogenesis and NSCs in order to (1) verify the variance explained by NSCs and (2) determine the influence of intrinsic (tissue supplying carbon) and extrinsic (water availability and temperature) factors. During 2 years, wood formation was monitored in saplings of black spruce (Picea mariana) subjected to a dry period of about 1 month in June and exposed to different temperature treatments in a greenhouse. In parallel, NSC concentrations were determined by extracting the sugar compounds from two tissues (cambium and inner xylem), both potentially supplying carbon for wood formation. A mixed-effect model was used to assess and quantify the potential relationships. Total xylem cells, illustrating meristematic activity, were modeled as a function of water, sucrose, and d-pinitol (conditional r(2) of 0.79). Water availability was ranked as the most important factor explaining total xylem cell production, while the contribution of carbon was lower. Cambium stopped dividing under water deficit, probably to limit the number of cells remaining in differentiation without an adequate amount of water. By contrast, carbon factors were ranked as most important in explaining the variation in living cells (conditional r(2) of 0.49), highlighting the functional needs during xylem development, followed by the tissue supplying the NSCs (cambium) and water availability. This study precisely demonstrates the role of carbon and water in structural growth expressed as meristematic activity and tissue formation. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. β-(1→3-D-glucan modulates DNA binding of nuclear factors κB, AT and IL-6 leading to an anti-inflammatory shift of the IL-1β/IL-1 receptor antagonist ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koritke Petra

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-1→3-D-glucans represent a pathogen-associated molecular pattern and are able to modify biological responses. Employing a comprehensive methodological approach, the aim of our in vitro study was to elucidate novel molecular and cellular mechanisms of human peripheral blood immune cells mediated by a fungal β-1→3-D-glucan, i.e. glucan phosphate, in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS or toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1. Results Despite an activation of nuclear factor (NFκB, NFinterleukin(IL-6 and NFAT similar to LPS or TSST-1, we observed no significant production of IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α or interferon γ induced by glucan phosphate. Glucan phosphate-treated leukocytes induced a substantial amount of IL-8 (peak at 18 h: 5000 pg/ml, likely due to binding of NFκB to a consensus site in the IL-8 promoter. An increase in IL-1receptor antagonist(RA production (peak at 24 h: 12000 pg/ml by glucan phosphate-treated cells positively correlated with IL-8 levels. Glucan phosphate induced significant binding to a known NFIL-6 site and a new NFAT site within the IL-1RA promoter, which was confirmed by inhibition experiments. When applied in combination with either LPS or TSST-1 at the same time points, we detected that glucan phosphate elevated the LPS- and the TSST-1-induced DNA binding of NFκB, NFIL-6 and NFAT, leading to a synergistic increase of IL-1RA. Further, glucan phosphate modulated the TSST-1-induced inflammatory response via reduction of IL-1β and IL-6. As a consequence, glucan phosphate shifted the TSST-1-induced IL-1β/IL-1RA ratio towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Subsequently, glucan phosphate decreased the TSST-1-induced, IL-1-dependent production of IL-2. Conclusion Thus, β-1→3-D-glucans may induce beneficial effects in the presence of pro-inflammatory responses, downstream of receptor binding and signaling by switching a pro- to an anti-inflammatory IL-1RA-mediated reaction

  5. What Can "Social Practice" Theory and "Socio-Cultural" Theory Contribute to Our Understanding of the Processes of Module Design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, Carole

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the data obtained from an online survey of academic staff who are involved in module design and who are employed within one university. The survey was used as a baselining tool to explore the nature of current module design practice within the survey sample. Do academics consistently employ the pragmatic approaches…

  6. Modulating weak interactions for molecular recognition: a dynamic combinatorial analysis for assessing the contribution of electrostatics to the stability of CH-π bonds in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Moreno, Ester; Gómez, Ana M; Bastida, Agatha; Corzana, Francisco; Jiménez-Oses, Gonzalo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2015-03-27

    Electrostatic and charge-transfer contributions to CH-π complexes can be modulated by attaching electron-withdrawing substituents to the carbon atom. While clearly stabilizing in the gas phase, the outcome of this chemical modification in water is more difficult to predict. Herein we provide a definitive and quantitative answer to this question employing a simple strategy based on dynamic combinatorial chemistry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Hippocampal α7 nicotinic ACh receptors contribute to modulation of depression-like behaviour in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineur, Yann S; Mose, Tenna N; Blakeman, Sam; Picciotto, Marina R

    2017-03-06

    Clinical studies have identified links between cholinergic signalling and depression in human subjects. Increased cholinergic signalling in hippocampus also increases behaviours related to anxiety and depression in mice, which can be reversed by ACh receptor antagonists. As the α7 subunit of the nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) is highly expressed in hippocampus, we determined whether blocking α7 nAChRs could reverse the effects of increased ACh signalling in anxiety- and depression-related behaviours in mice. Administration of the α7 nAChR agonist GTS-21 had no effect in tail suspension or forced swim tests. Conversely, the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) induced significant antidepressant-like effects in male mice in these paradigms, consistent with previous studies, but this was not observed in female mice. MLA also decreased physostigmine-induced c-fos immunoreactivity (a marker of neuronal activity) in hippocampus. Local knockdown of α7 nAChRs in hippocampus had no effect on its own but decreased a subset of depression-like phenotypes induced by physostigmine in male mice. Few effects of α7 nAChR knockdown were observed in depression-like behaviors in female mice, possibly due to a limited response to physostigmine. There was no significant effect of hippocampal α7 nAChR knockdown on anxiety-like phenotypes in male mice. However, a modest increase in anxiety-like behavior was observed in female mice infused with a scrambled control vector in response to physostigmine administration, that was not seen after a7 nAChR knockdown in the hippocampus. These results suggest that ACh signalling through α7 nAChRs in the hippocampus contributes to regulation of a subset of depression-like behaviours when ACh is increased, as can occur under stressful conditions. These studies also provide evidence for sex differences that may be relevant for treatments of mood disorders based on cholinergic signalling. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 increases depression-like behavior in mice without affecting locomotor ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Ethan H.; Scibelli, Angela C.; Finn, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Progesterone withdrawal has been proposed as an underlying factor in premenstrual syndrome and postpartum depression. Progesterone withdrawal induces forced swim test (FST) immobility in mice, a depression-like behavior, but the contribution of specific receptors to this effect is unclear. The role of progesterone’s GABAA receptor-modulating metabolite allopregnanolone in depression- and anxiety-related behaviors has been extensively documented, but little attention has been paid to the role of progesterone receptors. We administered the classic progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone (RU-38486) and the specific progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 to mice that had been primed with progesterone for five days, and found that both compounds induced FST immobility reliably, robustly, and in a dose-dependent fashion. Although CDB-4124 increased FST immobility, it did not suppress initial activity in a locomotor test. These findings suggest that decreased progesterone receptor activity contributes to depression-like behavior in mice, consistent with the hypothesis that progesterone withdrawal may contribute to the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. PMID:21163582

  9. Naloxone : actions of an antagonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Eveline Louise Arianna van

    2009-01-01

    The opioid antagonist naloxone has a special place in pharmacology – it has no intrinsic action of its own, but it is able to save lives in the case of life threatening side-effects caused by other drugs. Naloxone is an antagonist for all opioid receptors, but most specifically for the μ-opioid

  10. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E; Zarnke, Allison L; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B; Nickisch, Klaus J; Long, Henry W; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2018-01-12

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  11. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E.; Zarnke, Allison L.; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G.; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B.; Nickisch, Klaus J.; Long, Henry W.; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2018-01-01

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  12. Separating the contributions of olivocochlear and middle ear muscle reflexes in modulation of distortion product otoacoustic emission levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Nikolaus E; Harrison, Robert V; James, Adrian L

    2014-01-01

    Mediated by the medial olivocochlear system (MOCS), distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) levels are reduced by presentation of contralateral acoustic stimuli. Such acoustic signals can also evoke a middle ear muscle reflex (MEMR) that also attenuates recorded DPOAE levels. Our aim is to clearly differentiate these two inhibitory mechanisms and to analyze each separately, perhaps allowing the development of novel tests of hearing function. DPOAE were recorded in real time from chinchillas with normal auditory brainstem response thresholds and middle ear function. Amplitude reduction and its onset latency caused by contralateral presentation of intermittent narrow-band noise (NBN) were measured. Stapedius and tensor tympani muscle tendons were divided without disturbing the ossicular chain, and DPOAE testing was repeated. Peak reduction of (2f1 - f2) DPOAE levels occurred when the center frequency of contralateral NBN approximated the primary tone f2, indicating an f2-frequency-specific response. For a 4.5-kHz centered NBN, DPOAE (f2 = 4.4 kHz) inhibition was 0.1 dB (p Low-frequency NBN (center frequency: 0.5 kHz) reduced otoacoustic emission levels (0.1 dB, p low-frequency response was abolished by division of the middle ear muscle tendons, clearly indicating MEMR involvement. Following middle ear muscle tendon division, DPOAE inhibition by contralateral stimuli approximating the primary tone f2 persists, whereas responses evoked by lower contralateral frequencies are abolished. This distinguishes the different roles of the MOCS (f2 frequency specific) and MEMR (low frequency only) in contralateral modulation of DPOAE. This analysis helps clarify the pathways involved in an objective test that might have clinical benefit in the testing of neonates.

  13. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists: pharmacological opportunities, clinical experience, and translational prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2009-03-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid) signaling system is involved in a variety of (patho)physiological processes, primarily by virtue of natural, arachidonic acid-derived lipids (endocannabinoids) that activate G protein-coupled CB1 and CB2 receptors. A hyperactive endocannabinoid system appears to contribute to the etiology of several disease states that constitute significant global threats to human health. Consequently, mounting interest surrounds the design and profiling of receptor-targeted CB antagonists as pharmacotherapeutics that attenuate endocannabinoid transmission for salutary gain. Experimental and clinical evidence supports the therapeutic potential of CB1 receptor antagonists to treat overweight/obesity, obesity-related cardiometabolic disorders, and substance abuse. Laboratory data suggest that CB2 receptor antagonists might be effective immunomodulatory and, perhaps, anti-inflammatory drugs. One CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, has emerged as the first-in-class drug approved outside the United States for weight control. Select follow-on agents (taranabant, otenabant, surinabant, rosonabant, SLV-319, AVE1625, V24343) have also been studied in the clinic. However, rimonabant's market withdrawal in the European Union and suspension of rimonabant's, taranabant's, and otenabant's ongoing development programs have highlighted some adverse clinical side effects (especially nausea and psychiatric disturbances) of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists. Novel CB1 receptor ligands that are peripherally directed and/or exhibit neutral antagonism (the latter not affecting constitutive CB1 receptor signaling) may optimize the benefits of CB1 receptor antagonists while minimizing any risk. Indeed, CB1 receptor-neutral antagonists appear from preclinical data to offer efficacy comparable to or better than that of prototype CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, with less propensity to induce nausea. Continued

  14. Pyk2 modulates hippocampal excitatory synapses and contributes to cognitive deficits in a Huntington’s disease model

    KAUST Repository

    Giralt, Albert

    2017-05-30

    The structure and function of spines and excitatory synapses are under the dynamic control of multiple signalling networks. Although tyrosine phosphorylation is involved, its regulation and importance are not well understood. Here we study the role of Pyk2, a non-receptor calcium-dependent protein-tyrosine kinase highly expressed in the hippocampus. Hippocampal-related learning and CA1 long-term potentiation are severely impaired in Pyk2-deficient mice and are associated with alterations in NMDA receptors, PSD-95 and dendritic spines. In cultured hippocampal neurons, Pyk2 has autophosphorylation-dependent and -independent roles in determining PSD-95 enrichment and spines density. Pyk2 levels are decreased in the hippocampus of individuals with Huntington and in the R6/1 mouse model of the disease. Normalizing Pyk2 levels in the hippocampus of R6/1 mice rescues memory deficits, spines pathology and PSD-95 localization. Our results reveal a role for Pyk2 in spine structure and synaptic function, and suggest that its deficit contributes to Huntington’s disease cognitive impairments.

  15. Contribution of PPARγ in modulation of acrolein-induced inflammatory signaling in gp91phox knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefipour, Zivar; Chug, Neha; Marek, Katarzyna; Nesbary, Alicia; Mathew, Joseph; Ranganna, Kasturi; Newaz, Mohammad A

    2017-08-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are major contributors to acrolein toxicity. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the contribution of PPARγ ligand GW1929 to the attenuation of oxidative stress in acrolein-induced insult. Male gp91 phox knock-out (KO) mice were treated with acrolein (0.5 mg·(kg body mass) -1 by intraperitoneal injection for 7 days) with or without GW1929 (GW; 0.5 mg·(kg body mass) -1 ·day -1 , orally, for 10 days). The livers were processed for further analyses. Acrolein significantly increased 8-isoprostane and reduced PPARγ activity (P acrolein-treated WT mice, and was reduced by GW1929 (by 65%). KO mice exhibited higher xanthine oxidase (XO). Acrolein increased XO and COX in WT mice and XO in KO mice. GW1929 significantly reduced COX in WT and KO mice and reduced XO in KO mice. Acrolein significantly reduced the total antioxidant status in WT and KO mice (P acrolein-treated WT mice. GW1929 reduced NF-κB levels (by 51%) in KO mice. Acrolein increased CD36 in KO mice (by 43%), which was blunted with GW1929. Data confirms that the generation of free radicals by acrolein is mainly through NAD(P)H, but other oxygenates play a role too. GW1929 may alleviate the toxicity of acrolein by attenuating NF-κB, COX, and CD36.

  16. Studies on antagonistic marine streptomycetes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, D.; Nair, S.

    Sixty nine strains of Streptomyces sp. isolated from the sediments of Andaman and Nicobar islands (Bay of Bengal) were screened for their antagonistic property against a number of test cultures (Vibrio sp., Klebsiella sp., Escherichia coli, Shigella...

  17. Arabidopsis NITRILASE 1 Contributes to the Regulation of Root Growth and Development through Modulation of Auxin Biosynthesis in Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Thomas; Janowitz, Tim; Sánchez-Parra, Beatriz; Alonso, Marta-Marina Pérez; Trompetter, Inga; Piotrowski, Markus; Pollmann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Nitrilases consist of a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of organic cyanides. They are found ubiquitously distributed in the plant kingdom. Plant nitrilases are mainly involved in the detoxification of ß-cyanoalanine, a side-product of ethylene biosynthesis. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana a second group of Brassicaceae -specific nitrilases (NIT1-3) has been found. This so-called NIT1-subfamily has been associated with the conversion of indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) into the major plant growth hormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). However, apart of reported functions in defense responses to pathogens and in responses to sulfur depletion, conclusive insight into the general physiological function of the NIT-subfamily nitrilases remains elusive. In this report, we test both the contribution of the indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx) pathway to general auxin biosynthesis and the influence of altered nitrilase expression on plant development. Apart of a comprehensive transcriptomics approach to explore the role of the IAOx route in auxin formation, we took a genetic approach to disclose the function of NITRILASE 1 (NIT1) of A. thaliana . We show that NIT1 over-expression (NIT1ox) results in seedlings with shorter primary roots, and an increased number of lateral roots. In addition, NIT1ox plants exhibit drastic changes of both free IAA and IAN levels, which are suggested to be the reason for the observed phenotype. On the other hand, NIT2 RNAi knockdown lines, capable of suppressing the expression of all members of the NIT1-subfamily, were generated and characterized to substantiate the above-mentioned findings. Our results demonstrate for the first time that Arabidopsis NIT1 has profound effects on root morphogenesis in early seedling development.

  18. A novel 5HT3 antagonist 4i (N-(3-chloro-2-methylphenyl)quinoxalin-2-carboxamide) prevents diabetes-induced depressive phenotypes in mice: Modulation of serotonergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepali; Thangaraj, Devadoss; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh

    2016-01-15

    Despite the presence of a multitudinous pharmacotherapy, diabetes-induced depressive disorder remains undertreated. Evidence suggests that brain serotonergic deficits are associated with depressive-like behavior in diabetes and that 5HT3 receptor (5HT3R) antagonists have serotonergic facilitatory effects. This study examined the effects of a novel 5HT3R antagonist, 4i (N-(3-chloro-2-methylphenyl)quinoxalin-2-carboxamide), in diabetes-induced depressive phenotypes. Experimentally, (1) to evaluate the effects of 4i, mice with 8-weeks of diabetes (induced by streptozotocin, 200mg/kg, i.p.) were treated with vehicle, 4i (0.5 and 1mg/kg/day, i.p.), fluoxetine (10mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 4-weeks and subjected to neurobehavioral assays, followed by biochemical estimation of serotonin levels in midbrain, prefrontal-cortex and cerebellum. (2) To evaluate the role of 5HT3R in the postulated effect of 4i, diabetic mice were given 4i (1mg/kg/day, i.p.) after 1h of 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (mCPBG, a 5HT3R agonist, 10mg/kg/day, i.p.) treatment and subjected to the same protocol. The results showed that diabetic mice exhibited a significant behavioral deficit, including depression-like behavior in forced swim test, anxiety-like in open field test and sociability deficits in social interaction test, along with a significant decrease in serotonin level in these brain regions. 4i (1mg/kg), similar to fluoxetine, prevented these behavioral abnormalities and normalized brain serotonin levels. 4i (0.5mg/kg) ameliorated only diabetes-induced depressive-like behavior and serotonin deficits, but not anxiety-like effects. mCPBG blunted 4i-mediated behavioral response and increase in brain serotonin levels. Altogether, this study suggests that 4i prevents diabetes-induced depressive phenotypes in mice, which may involve antagonism of 5HT3Rs and increase in serotonin levels in discrete brain regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxytocin antagonist disrupts hypotension-evoked renin secretion and other responses in conscious rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, W.; Sjöquist, M.; Skøtt, O.

    2001-01-01

    antagonist did not alter the hypotension induced by hydralazine or diazoxide, but it did markedly blunt the induced increase in PRA. The OT receptor antagonist also blunted the hypotension-evoked increase in heart rate and plasma vasopressin levels, suggesting that the antagonist may have generally disrupted...... afferent signaling of hypotension. Thus hypotension-evoked OT secretion may contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis by enhancing baroreceptor signals that stimulate increases in renin secretion, vasopressin secretion, and heart rate during arterial hypotension in rats....

  20. Fcγ and Complement Receptors and Complement Proteins in Neutrophil Activation in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Contribution to Pathogenesis and Progression and Modulation by Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Balbina Paoliello-Paschoalato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a highly disabling disease that affects all structures of the joint and significantly impacts on morbidity and mortality in RA patients. RA is characterized by persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane lining the joint associated with infiltration of immune cells. Eighty to 90% of the leukocytes infiltrating the synovia are neutrophils. The specific role that neutrophils play in the onset of RA is not clear, but recent studies have evidenced that they have an important participation in joint damage and disease progression through the release of proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS, cytokines, and neutrophil extracellular traps, in particular during frustrated phagocytosis of immune complexes (ICs. In addition, the local and systemic activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of RA and other IC-mediated diseases. This review discusses (i the participation of Fcγ and complement receptors in mediating the effector functions of neutrophils in RA; (ii the contribution of the complement system and ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms to joint damage in RA; and (iii the use of plant extracts, dietary compounds, and isolated natural compounds in the treatment of RA, focusing on modulation of the effector functions of neutrophils and the complement system activity and/or activation.

  1. Inhibitory effect of a histamine 4 receptor antagonist on CCL17 and CCL22 production by monocyte-derived Langerhans cells in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Kyohei; Matsushita, Sho; Tsuchida, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Koichiro

    2016-09-01

    We examined the inhibitory effect of a histamine 4 receptor (H4R) antagonist (JNJ7777120) on CCL17 and CCL22 chemokine production by human monocyte-derived Langerhans cells (MoLC) in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy controls (HC). We confirmed the significantly higher production of both CCL17 and CCL22 in the MoLC of AD patients compared with HC. The H4R antagonist significantly inhibited the production of both CCL17 and CCL22 in the MoLC of AD patients. With regard to TLR2-signaled enhancement, peptidoglycan (PGN)-enhanced production of CCL17 and CCL22 by MoLC was inhibited by the H4R. Immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was induced by PGN and that this enhancement was attenuated by the application of the H4R antagonist. These data indicate that H4 signaling modulates the production of T-helper 2 chemokine in MoLC and contributes to chronic inflammation in AD patients. Our data suggest a possible novel therapeutic approach using a H4R antagonist in the treatment of patients with AD. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  2. Glutamates 78 and 122 in the active site of saccharopine dehydrogenase contribute to reactant binding and modulate the basicity of the acid-base catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanayake, Devi K; Andi, Babak; Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2010-07-02

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase catalyzes the NAD-dependent oxidative deamination of saccharopine to give l-lysine and alpha-ketoglutarate. There are a number of conserved hydrophilic, ionizable residues in the active site, all of which must be important to the overall reaction. In an attempt to determine the contribution to binding and rate enhancement of each of the residues in the active site, mutations at each residue are being made, and double mutants are being made to estimate the interrelationship between residues. Here, we report the effects of mutations of active site glutamate residues, Glu(78) and Glu(122), on reactant binding and catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate E78Q, E122Q, E78Q/E122Q, E78A, E122A, and E78A/E122A mutant enzymes. Mutation of these residues increases the positive charge of the active site and is expected to affect the pK(a) values of the catalytic groups. Each mutant enzyme was completely characterized with respect to its kinetic and chemical mechanism. The kinetic mechanism remains the same as that of wild type enzymes for all of the mutant enzymes, with the exception of E78A, which exhibits binding of alpha-ketoglutarate to E and E.NADH. Large changes in V/K(Lys), but not V, suggest that Glu(78) and Glu(122) contribute binding energy for lysine. Shifts of more than a pH unit to higher and lower pH of the pK(a) values observed in the V/K(Lys) pH-rate profile of the mutant enzymes suggests that the presence of Glu(78) and Glu(122) modulates the basicity of the catalytic groups.

  3. Resistance-nodulation-division efflux pump acrAB is modulated by florfenicol and contributes to drug resistance in the fish pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Rodrigo; Oliver, Cristian; Valdivia, Sharin; Valenzuela, Karla; Haro, Ronie E; Sánchez, Patricio; Olavarría, Víctor H; Valenzuela, Paulina; Avendaño-Herrera, Rubén; Romero, Alex; Cárcamo, Juan G; Figueroa, Jaime E; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-06-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is a fastidious intracellular pathogen responsible for high mortality rates in farmed salmonids, with serious economic consequences for the Chilean aquaculture industry. Oxytetracycline and florfenicol are the most frequently used antibiotics against P. salmonis, but routine use could contribute to drug resistance. This study identified differentiated florfenicol susceptibilities in two P. salmonis strains, LF-89 and AUSTRAL-005. The less susceptible isolate, AUSTRAL-005, also showed a high ethidium bromide efflux rate, indicating a higher activity of general efflux pump genes than LF-89. The P. salmonis genome presented resistance nodulation division (RND) family members, a family containing typical multidrug resistance-related efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, efflux pump acrAB genes were overexpressed in AUSTRAL-005 following exposure to the tolerated maximal concentration of florfenicol, in contrast to LF-89. These results indicate that tolerated maximum concentrations of florfenicol can modulate RND gene expression and increase efflux pump activity. We propose that the acrAB efflux pump is essential for P. salmonis survival at critical florfenicol concentrations and for the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  5. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  6. Growth of cultured human glioma tumour cells can be regulated with histamine and histamine antagonists.

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Ven, L. T.; Prinsen, I. M.; Jansen, G. H.; Roholl, P. J.; Defferrari, R.; Slater, R.; Den Otter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 50% survival time for low grade astrocytomas is 50 months and for high grade astrocytomas it is 13 months, underlining the need for new therapies. Several reports show that in vivo histamine antagonists cause retardation of tumour growth in some animal models and prolonged survival in cancer patients. Therefore we have tested the growth modulating effects of histamine and histamine antagonists on human glioma cultures. Twelve freshly excised human gliomas were cultured and tested for thei...

  7. Endothelin receptor antagonists influence cardiovascular morphology in uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokov, A V; Amann, K; Wessels, S; Münter, K; Wagner, J; Ritz, E

    1999-02-01

    In is generally held that renal failure results in blood pressure (BP)-independent structural changes of the myocardium and the vasculature. The contribution, if any, of endothelin (ET) to these changes has been unknown. We morphometrically studied random samples of the left ventricle myocardium and small intramyocardial arteries in subtotally (5/6) nephrectomized (SNx) male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with either the selective ETA receptor antagonist BMS182874 (30 mg/kg/day) or the nonselective ETA/ETB receptor antagonist Ro46-2005 (30 mg/kg/day) in comparison with either sham-operated rats, untreated SNx, or SNx rats treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor trandolapril (0.1 mg/kg/day). Eight weeks later, systolic BP was lower in trandolapril-treated SNx compared with untreated SNx animals. No decrease in BP was seen following either ET receptor antagonist at the dose used. A significantly increased volume density of the myocardial interstitium was found in untreated SNx rats as compared with sham-operated controls. Such interstitial expansion was prevented by trandolapril and either ET receptor antagonist. SNx caused a substantial increase in the wall thickness of small intramyocardial arteries. The increase was prevented by trandolapril or BMS182874 treatment. The arteriolar wall:lumen ratio was significantly lower in all treated groups when compared with untreated SNx. In contrast, only trandolapril, but not the ET receptor antagonists, attenuated thickening of the aortic media in SNx animals. The ETA-selective and ETA/ETB-nonselective receptor antagonists appear to prevent development of myocardial fibrosis and structural changes of small intramyocardial arteries in experimental chronic renal failure. This effect is independent of systemic BP.

  8. Smac mimetics as IAP antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-03-01

    As the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins are expressed at high levels in human cancers, they represent promising targets for therapeutic intervention. Small-molecule inhibitors of IAP proteins mimicking the endogenous IAP antagonist Smac, called Smac mimetics, neutralize IAP proteins and thereby promote the induction of cell death. Smac mimetics have been shown in preclinical models of human cancer to directly trigger cancer cell death or to sensitize for cancer cell death induced by a variety of cytotoxic stimuli. Smac mimetics are currently undergoing clinical evaluation in phase I/II trials, demonstrating that therapeutic targeting of IAP proteins has reached the clinical stage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Memory Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive

  10. Synthetic peptide antagonists of glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unson, C.G.; Andreu, D.; Gurzenda, E.M.; Merrifield, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Several glucagon analogs were synthesized in an effort to find derivatives that would bind with high affinity to the glucagon receptor of rat liver membranes but would not activate membrane-bound adenylate cyclase and, therefore, would serve as antagonists of the hormone. Measurements on a series of glucagon/secretin hybrids indicated that replacement of Asp 9 in glucagon by Glu 9 , found in secretin, was the important sequence difference in the N terminus of the two hormones. Further deletion of His 1 and introduction of a C-terminal amide resulted in des-His 1 -[Glu 9 ]glucagon amide, which had a 40% binding affinity relative to that of native glucagon but caused no detectable adenylate cyclase activation in the rat liver membrane. This antagonist completely inhibited the effect of a concentration of glucagon that alone gave a full agonist response. It had an inhibition index of 12. The pA 2 was 7.2. An attempt was made to relate conformation with receptor binding. The peptides were synthesized by solid-phase methods and purified to homogeneity by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on C 18 -silica columns

  11. Antiallergic effects of H1-receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, F M; Naclerio, R M

    2000-01-01

    The primary mechanism of antihistamine action in the treatment of allergic diseases is believed to be competitive antagonism of histamine binding to cellular receptors (specifically, the H1-receptors), which are present on nerve endings, smooth muscles, and glandular cells. This notion is supported by the fact that structurally unrelated drugs antagonize the H1-receptor and provide clinical benefit. However, H1-receptor antagonism may not be their sole mechanism of action in treating allergic rhinitis. On the basis of in vitro and animal experiments, drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists have long been recognized to have additional pharmacological properties. Most first-generation H1-antihistamines have anticholinergic, sedative, local anaesthetic, and anti-5-HT effects, which might favourably affect the symptoms of the allergic response but also contribute to side-effects. These additional properties are not uniformly distributed among drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists. Azatadine, for example, inhibits in vitro IgE-mediated histamine and leukotriene (LT) release from mast cells and basophils. In human challenge models, terfenadine, azatadine, and loratadine reduce IgE-mediated histamine release. Cetirizine reduces eosinophilic infiltration at the site of antigen challenge in the skin, but not the nose. In a nasal antigen challenge model, cetirizine pretreatment did not affect the levels of histamine and prostaglandin D2 recovered in postchallenge lavages, whereas the levels of albumin, N-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) esterase activity, and LTs were reduced. Terfenadine, cetirizine, and loratadine blocked allergen-induced hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In view of the complexity of the pathophysiology of allergy, a number of H1 antagonists with additional properties are currently under development for allergic diseases. Mizolastine, a new H1-receptor antagonist, has been shown to have additional actions that should help reduce the

  12. Twisted gastrulation, a BMP antagonist, exacerbates podocyte injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Yamada

    Full Text Available Podocyte injury is the first step in the progression of glomerulosclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp7 in podocyte injury and the existence of native Bmp signaling in podocytes. Local activity of Bmp7 is controlled by cell-type specific Bmp antagonists, which inhibit the binding of Bmp7 to its receptors. Here we show that the product of Twisted gastrulation (Twsg1, a Bmp antagonist, is the central negative regulator of Bmp function in podocytes and that Twsg1 null mice are resistant to podocyte injury. Twsg1 was the most abundant Bmp antagonist in murine cultured podocytes. The administration of Bmp induced podocyte differentiation through Smad signaling, whereas the simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. The administration of Bmp also inhibited podocyte proliferation, whereas simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. Twsg1 was expressed in the glomerular parietal cells (PECs and distal nephron of the healthy kidney, and additionally in damaged glomerular cells in a murine model of podocyte injury. Twsg1 null mice exhibited milder hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia, and milder histological changes while maintaining the expression of podocyte markers during podocyte injury model. Taken together, our results show that Twsg1 plays a critical role in the modulation of protective action of Bmp7 on podocytes, and that inhibition of Twsg1 is a promising means of development of novel treatment for podocyte injury.

  13. Tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists. A patent review (2006 - 2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamura, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Tachykinins are endogenous peptide neurotransmitters, acting through the NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptors, at central and peripheral level. At peripheral level, they are involved in contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of water and ion from epithelia, as well as modulation of visceral pain sensitivity. Tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists have the potential to be useful in the treatment of various gastrointestinal, genitourinary and CNS diseases. In this review, an overview of the patenting activity in the last 5 years is provided. Patents from different companies and research groups are discussed for their novelty and evaluated in relation to proposed indications and clinical studies. Relevant biological data are also presented. Patents claiming new therapeutic indications are included in a dedicated section. Although there is still no tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist approved for use in human therapy, research in the field is still proposing new compounds and possible uses. A number of candidates are being evaluated in Phase II clinical studies, in indications ranging from gastrointestinal disorders to inflammatory diseases. The results of these studies will indicate the role of tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists in human therapy.

  14. Correlated EMG Oscillations between Antagonists during Cocontraction in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Yasuhide; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Shinohara, Minoru

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the modulation of common low-frequency oscillations in pools of motor units across antagonistic muscles because of the difference in the activation level of pools of spinal motor neurons and the presence of neuromuscular fatigue during intended cocontraction. Ten healthy young men (21.8 ± 1.5 yr) performed intended steady cocontractions of elbow flexors and extensors at maximal and a submaximal (10% of maximal EMG) effort. The submaximal cocontraction was repeated after sustained maximal contraction of elbow flexors. Surface EMG was recorded from the biceps brachii and triceps brachii muscles. Correlated EMG oscillations between the antagonistic muscles were quantified by the cross-correlation function (CCF) using rectified EMG for the EMG for the 3- to 15-Hz bands. The positive CCF peak in rectified EMG EMG, a negative CCF peak (i.e., out-of-phase oscillations) during submaximal cocontraction was smaller compared with maximal cocontraction but increased after the sustained contraction. Across subjects, the degree of reduction in maximal EMG amplitude after the sustained contraction was correlated with the amount of change in the CCF peak in EMG oscillations between antagonistic muscles occur during intended cocontraction, and 2) the magnitude of these correlated oscillations increases with the activation level of pools of spinal motor neurons and neuromuscular fatigue.

  15. New antagonist agents of neuropeptide y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Aldana

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the CNS, NPY has been implicated in obesity and feeding, endocrine function and metabolism. Potent and selective rNPY antagonists will be able to probe the merits of this approach for the treatment of obesity. We report the synthesis and preliminary evaluation of some hydrazide derivatives as antagonists of rNPY.

  16. Endothelin@25 – new agonists, antagonists, inhibitors and emerging research frontiers: IUPHAR Review 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, J J; Davenport, A P

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of endothelin (ET)-1 in 1988, the main components of the signalling pathway have become established, comprising three structurally similar endogenous 21-amino acid peptides, ET-1, ET-2 and ET-3, that activate two GPCRs, ETA and ETB. Our aim in this review is to highlight the recent progress in ET research. The ET-like domain peptide, corresponding to prepro-ET-193–166, has been proposed to be co-synthesized and released with ET-1, to modulate the actions of the peptide. ET-1 remains the most potent vasoconstrictor in the human cardiovascular system with a particularly long-lasting action. To date, the major therapeutic strategy to block the unwanted actions of ET in disease, principally in pulmonary arterial hypertension, has been to use antagonists that are selective for the ETA receptor (ambrisentan) or that block both receptor subtypes (bosentan). Macitentan represents the next generation of antagonists, being more potent than bosentan, with longer receptor occupancy and it is converted to an active metabolite; properties contributing to greater pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic efficacy. A second strategy is now being more widely tested in clinical trials and uses combined inhibitors of ET-converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase such as SLV306 (daglutril). A third strategy based on activating the ETB receptor, has led to the renaissance of the modified peptide agonist IRL1620 as a clinical candidate in delivering anti-tumour drugs and as a pharmacological tool to investigate experimental pathophysiological conditions. Finally, we discuss biased signalling, epigenetic regulation and targeting with monoclonal antibodies as prospective new areas for ET research. PMID:25131455

  17. [Extracorporeal life support in calcium antagonist intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, M W; Grewal, S; Meeder, H J; van Thiel, R J; den Uil, C A

    2017-01-01

    Intoxication with calcium antagonists is associated with poor outcome. Even mild calcium antagonist overdose may be fatal. A 51-year-old woman and a 51-year-old man came to the Accident and Emergency Department in severe shock after they had taken a calcium antagonist overdose. After extensive medicinal therapy had failed, they both needed extracorporeal life support (ECLS) as a bridge to recovery. In severe calcium antagonist overdose, the combination of vasoplegia and cardiac failure leads to refractory shock. ECLS temporarily supports the circulation and maintains organ perfusion. In this way ECLS functions as a bridge to recovery and may possibly save lives. Timely consultation with and referral to an ECLS centre is recommended in patients with calcium antagonist overdose.

  18. Histamine H4 receptor antagonists are superior to traditional antihistamines in the attenuation of experimental pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Paul J; Williams, Kacy N; Desai, Pragnya J; Karlsson, Lars; McQueen, Daniel; Thurmond, Robin L

    2007-01-01

    Histamine is a potent mediator of itch in humans, yet histamine H(1) receptor antagonists have been shown to be of limited use in the treatment of certain chronic pruritic diseases. The histamine H(4) receptor is a recently described histamine receptor, expressed on hematopoietic cells, linked to the pathology of allergy and asthma. The contribution of the novel histamine H(4) receptor to histaminergic and allergic pruritus was investigated. Histamine and a selective histamine H(4) receptor agonist caused scratching responses in mice, which were almost completely attenuated in histamine H(4) receptor knockout mice or by pretreatment with the selective histamine H(4) receptor antagonist, JNJ 7777120. Pruritus induced by allergic mechanisms was also potently inhibited with histamine H(4) receptor antagonist treatment or in histamine H(4) receptor knockout mice. In all cases, the inhibitory effect of histamine H(4) receptor antagonist was greater than those observed with histamine H(1) receptor antagonists. The histamine H(4) receptor-mediated pruritus was shown to be independent of mast cells or other hematopoietic cells and may result from actions on peripheral neurons. These results demonstrate that the histamine H(4) receptor is involved in pruritic responses in mice to a greater extent than the histamine H(1) receptor. Histamine H(4) receptor antagonists may have therapeutic utility for treating chronic pruritic diseases in humans where histamine H(1) receptor antagonists are not effective.

  19. Effects of intra-infralimbic prefrontal cortex injections of cannabidiol in the modulation of emotional behaviors in rats: contribution of 5HT₁A receptors and stressful experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, A L Z; Vila-Verde, C; Fogaça, M V; Guimarães, F S

    2015-06-01

    The infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) regions of the prefrontal cortex are involved in behavioral responses observed during defensive reactions. Intra-PL or IL injections of cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotomimetic cannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant, result in opposite behavioral effects in the contextual fear conditioning (CFC) paradigm. The intra-PL effects of CBD are mediated by 5HT1A receptors and depend on previous stressful experiences but the mechanisms and effects of intra-IL CBD injected are unknown. To this aim the present work verified the effects of intra-IL administration of CBD on two animal models of anxiety, the elevated plus maze (EPM) and CFC. We also investigated if these effects were mediated by 5HT1A receptors and depended on previous stressful experience. Male Wistar rats received bilateral microinjections of vehicle, WAY100635 (5HT1A receptor antagonist, 0.37 nmol) and/or CBD (15, 30 or 60 nmol) before being submitted to the behavioral tests. Intra-IL CBD induced anxiolytic and anxiogenic in the EPM and CFC, respectively. To verify if these effects are influenced by the previous stressful experience (footshocks) in the CFC model, we tested the animals in the EPM 24h after a 2-h restraint period. The anxiolytic-like effect of CBD in the EPM disappeared when the animals were previously stressed. Both responses, i.e., anxiolytic and anxiogenic, were prevented by WAY100635, indicating that they involve local 5HT1A-mediated neurotransmission. Together these results indicate that CBD effects in the IL depend on the nature of the animal model, being influenced by previous stressful experiences and mediated by facilitation of 5HT1A receptors-mediated neurotransmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) blockers as medicines: beyond obesity and cardiometabolic disorders to substance abuse/drug addiction with CB1R neutral antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, David R

    2012-03-01

    Addiction to chemical substances with abuse potential presents medical needs largely unsolved by extant therapeutic strategies. Signal transmission through the cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) in the central nervous system (CNS) modulates neurotransmitters/neuronal pathways contributing to the rewarding properties and hedonic effects of certain nondrug stimuli (e.g., food) and many prototypical addictive drugs, promoting excessive intake and its pathological consequences. Typical CB1R antagonists/inverse agonists reduce the rewarding effects and normalize behavioral phenotypes associated with food and abused drugs, but carry an unacceptable adverse-event profile that may reflect, at least partly, their intrinsic ability to alter basal homeostatic CB1R signaling in the CNS and elicit a negative efficacy response. Alternatively, peripherally biased CB1R inverse agonists with limited CNS permeability and putative CB1R neutral antagonists expressing modest (if any) inverse-agonist efficacy are garnering attention for treating obesity and related cardiometabolic complications with a potentially enhanced benefit-to-risk profile. This mini-review calls attention to the proposition that CB1R neutral antagonists offer attractive opportunities for pharmacotherapeutic exploitation in the substance abuse/drug addiction space, whereas the restricted CNS accessibility of peripherally biased CB1R inverse agonists circumscribes their therapeutic utility for this indication. The unique preclinical pharmacology, efficacy profiles, and reduced adverse-event risk of CB1R neutral antagonists make them worthy of translational study for their potential therapeutic application beyond obesity/cardiometabolic disease to include substance-abuse/drug-addiction disorders.

  1. Opioid antagonists for alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, Susanne; Hackl-Herrwerth, Andrea; Leucht, Stefan; Vecchi, Simona; Srisurapanont, Manit; Soyka, Michael

    2010-12-08

    Alcohol dependence belongs to the globally leading health risk factors. Therapeutic success of psychosocial programs for relapse prevention is moderate and could be increased by an adjuvant treatment with the opioid antagonists naltrexone and nalmefene. To determine the effectiveness and tolerability of opioid antagonists in the treatment of alcohol dependence. We searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group (CDAG) Specialized Register, PubMed, EMBASE and CINAHL in January 2010 and inquired manufacturers and researchers for unpublished trials. All double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compare the effects of naltrexone or nalmefene with placebo or active control on drinking-related outcomes. Two authors independently extracted outcome data. Trial quality was assessed by one author and cross-checked by a second author. Based on a total of 50 RCTs with 7793 patients, naltrexone reduced the risk of heavy drinking to 83% of the risk in the placebo group RR 0.83 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.90) and decreased drinking days by about 4%, MD -3.89 (95% CI -5.75 to -2.04). Significant effects were also demonstrated for the secondary outcomes of the review including heavy drinking days, MD - 3.25 (95% CI -5.51 to -0.99), consumed amount of alcohol, MD - 10.83 (95% CI -19.69 to -1.97) and gamma-glutamyltransferase, MD - 10.37 (95% CI -18.99 to -1.75), while effects on return to any drinking, RR 0.96 (95 CI 0.92 to 1.00) missed statistical significance. Side effects of naltrexone were mainly gastrointestinal problems (e.g. nausea: RD 0.10; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.13) and sedative effects (e.g. daytime sleepiness: RD 0.09; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.14). Based on a limited study sample, effects of injectable naltrexone and nalmefene missed statistical significance. Effects of industry-sponsored studies, RR 0.90 (95% CI 0.78 to 1.05) did not significantly differ from those of non-profit funded trials, RR 0.84 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.91) and the linear regression test did not indicate publication

  2. PXR antagonists and implication in drug metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sridhar; Dou, Wei; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Adopted orphan nuclear receptor (NR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), plays a central role in the regulation of xeno- and endobiotic metabolism. Since the discovery of the functional role of PXR in 1998, there is evolving evidence for the role of PXR agonists in abrogating metabolic pathophysiology (e.g., cholestasis, hypercholesterolemia, and inflammation). However, more recently, it is clear that PXR is also an important mediator of adverse xeno- (e.g., enhances acetaminophen toxicity) and endobiotic (e.g., hepatic steatosis) metabolic phenotypes. Moreover, in cancer therapeutics, PXR activation can induce drug resistance, and there is growing evidence for tissue-specific enhancement of the malignant phenotype. Thus, in these instances, there may be a role for PXR antagonists. However, as opposed to the discovery efforts for PXR agonists, there are only a few antagonists described. The mode of action of these antagonists (e.g., sulforaphane) remains less clear. Our laboratory efforts have focused on this question. Since the original discovery of azoles analogs as PXR antagonists, we have preliminarily defined an important PXR antagonist pharmacophore and developed less-toxic PXR antagonists. In this review, we describe our published and unpublished findings on recent structure-function studies involving the azole chemical scaffold. Further work in the future is needed to fully define potent, more-selective PXR antagonists that may be useful in clinical application. PMID:23330542

  3. Assessing the contribution of thrombospondin-4 induction and ATF6α activation to endoplasmic reticulum expansion and phenotypic modulation in bladder outlet obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Katarzyna K.; Ekman, Mari; Rippe, Catarina; Grossi, Mario; Nilsson, Bengt-Olof; Albinsson, Sebastian; Uvelius, Bengt; Swärd, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic modulation of smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of disease. The associated expansion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) volume remains unexplained. Thrombospondin-4 was recently found to promote ATF6α activation leading to ER expansion. Using bladder outlet obstruction as a paradigm for phenotypic modulation, we tested if thrombospondin-4 is induced in association with ATF6α activation and ER expansion. Thrombospondin-4 was induced and ATF6α was activated after outlet obstruction in rodents. Increased abundance of spliced of Xbp1, another ER-stress sensor, and induction of Atf4 and Creb3l2 was also seen. Downstream of ATF6α, Calr, Manf, Sdf2l1 and Pdi increased as did ER size, whereas contractile markers were reduced. Overexpression of ATF6α, but not of thrombospondin-4, increased Calr, Manf, Sdf2l1 and Pdi and caused ER expansion, but the contractile markers were inert. Knockout of thrombospondin-4 neither affected bladder growth nor expression of ATF6α target genes, and repression of contractile markers was the same, even if ATF6α activation was curtailed. Increases of Xbp1s, Atf4 and Creb3l2 were similar. Our findings demonstrate reciprocal regulation of the unfolded protein response, including ATF6α activation and ER expansion, and reduced contractile differentiation in bladder outlet obstruction occurring independently of thrombospondin-4, which however is a sensitive indicator of obstruction. PMID:27581066

  4. Pharmacological properties of S1RA, a new sigma-1 receptor antagonist that inhibits neuropathic pain and activity-induced spinal sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, L; Zamanillo, D; Nadal, X; Sánchez-Arroyos, R; Rivera-Arconada, I; Dordal, A; Montero, A; Muro, A; Bura, A; Segalés, C; Laloya, M; Hernández, E; Portillo-Salido, E; Escriche, M; Codony, X; Encina, G; Burgueño, J; Merlos, M; Baeyens, J M; Giraldo, J; López-García, J A; Maldonado, R; Plata-Salamán, C R; Vela, J M

    2012-08-01

    The sigma-1 (σ(1) ) receptor is a ligand-regulated molecular chaperone that has been involved in pain, but there is limited understanding of the actions associated with its pharmacological modulation. Indeed, the selectivity and pharmacological properties of σ(1) receptor ligands used as pharmacological tools are unclear and the demonstration that σ(1) receptor antagonists have efficacy in reversing central sensitization-related pain sensitivity is still missing. The pharmacological properties of a novel σ(1) receptor antagonist (S1RA) were first characterized. S1RA was then used to investigate the effect of pharmacological antagonism of σ(1) receptors on in vivo nociception in sensitizing conditions and on in vitro spinal cord sensitization in mice. Drug levels and autoradiographic, ex vivo binding for σ(1) receptor occupancy were measured to substantiate behavioural data. Formalin-induced nociception (both phases), capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and sciatic nerve injury-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were dose-dependently inhibited by systemic administration of S1RA. Occupancy of σ(1) receptors in the CNS was significantly correlated with the antinociceptive effects. No pharmacodynamic tolerance to the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effect developed following repeated administration of S1RA to nerve-injured mice. As a mechanistic correlate, electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that pharmacological antagonism of σ(1) receptors attenuated the wind-up responses in spinal cords sensitized by repetitive nociceptive stimulation. These findings contribute to evidence identifying the σ(1) receptor as a modulator of activity-induced spinal sensitization and pain hypersensitivity, and suggest σ(1) receptor antagonists as potential novel treatments for neuropathic pain. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Frequent epigenetic inactivation of Wnt antagonist genes in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Toyota, M; Caraway, H; Gabrielson, E; Ohmura, T; Fujikane, T; Nishikawa, N; Sogabe, Y; Nojima, M; Sonoda, T; Mori, M; Hirata, K; Imai, K; Shinomura, Y; Baylin, S B; Tokino, T

    2008-01-01

    Although mutation of APC or CTNNB1 (β-catenin) is rare in breast cancer, activation of Wnt signalling is nonetheless thought to play an important role in breast tumorigenesis, and epigenetic silencing of Wnt antagonist genes, including the secreted frizzled-related protein (SFRP) and Dickkopf (DKK) families, has been observed in various tumours. In breast cancer, frequent methylation and silencing of SFRP1 was recently documented; however, altered expression of other Wnt antagonist genes is largely unknown. In the present study, we found frequent methylation of SFRP family genes in breast cancer cell lines (SFRP1, 7 out of 11, 64%; SFRP2, 11 out of 11, 100%; SFRP5, 10 out of 11, 91%) and primary breast tumours (SFRP1, 31 out of 78, 40%; SFRP2, 60 out of 78, 77%; SFRP5, 55 out of 78, 71%). We also observed methylation of DKK1, although less frequently, in cell lines (3 out of 11, 27%) and primary tumours (15 out of 78, 19%). Breast cancer cell lines express various Wnt ligands, and overexpression of SFRPs inhibited cancer cell growth. In addition, overexpression of a β-catenin mutant and depletion of SFRP1 using small interfering RNA synergistically upregulated transcriptional activity of T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer factor. Our results confirm the frequent methylation and silencing of Wnt antagonist genes in breast cancer, and suggest that their loss of function contributes to activation of Wnt signalling in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:18283316

  6. Potential contribution of phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells and related inflammation in the development of experimental obstructive pulmonary vasculopathy in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Otsuki

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells (SMCs and related inflammation are associated with the progression of experimental occlusive pulmonary vascular disease (PVD. Occlusive PVD was induced by combined exposure to a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor Sugen 5416 and hypobaric hypoxia for 3 weeks in rats, which were then returned to ambient air. Hemodynamic, morphometric, and immunohistochemical studies, as well as gene expression analyses, were performed at 3, 5, 8, and 13 weeks after the initial treatment (n = 78. Experimental animals developed pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy, and exhibited a progressive increase in indices of PVD, including cellular intimal thickening and intimal fibrosis. Cellular intimal lesions comprised α smooth muscle actin (α SMA+, SM1+, SM2+/-, vimentin+ immature SMCs that were covered by endothelial monolayers, while fibrous intimal lesions typically included α SMA+, SM1+, SM2+, vimentin+/- mature SMCs. Plexiform lesions comprised α SMA+, vimentin+, SM1-, SM2- myofibroblasts covered by endothelial monolayers. Immature SMC-rich intimal and plexiform lesions were proliferative and were infiltrated by macrophages, while fibrous intimal lesions were characterized by lower proliferative abilities and were infiltrated by few macrophages. Compared with controls, the number of perivascular macrophages was already higher at 3 weeks and progressively increased during the experimental period; gene expression of pulmonary hypertension-related inflammatory molecules, including IL6, MCP1, MMP9, cathepsin-S, and RANTES, was persistently or progressively up-regulated in lungs of experimental animals. We concluded that phenotypically modulated SMCs and related inflammation are potentially associated with the progression of experimental obstructive PVD.

  7. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    to the local temporal pattern of GABA impact, enabling phasic or tonic inhibition. Specific GABAAR antagonists are essential tools for physiological and pharmacological elucidation of the different type of GABAAR inhibition. However, distinct selectivity among the receptor subtypes (populations) has been shown...... antagonists and describes the development of potent antagonists from partial agonists originally derived from the potent GABAAR agonist muscimol. In this process, several heterocyclic aromatic systems have been used in combination with structural models in order to map the orthosteric binding site...... and to reveal structural details to be used for obtaining potency and subtype selectivity. The challenges connected to functional characterization of orthosteric GABAAR partial agonists and antagonists, especially with regard to GABAAR stoichiometry and alternative binding sites are discussed. GABAAR...

  8. Antagonist wear by polished zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkamp, Oliver; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Reich, Sven

    The aim of this in vivo study was to measure antagonist wear caused by polished monolithic posterior zirconia crowns over a 24-month period using the intraoral digital impression (IDI) technique. Thirteen zirconia crowns were placed in nine patients. The crowns and adjacent teeth were captured using an intraoral scanner (Lava C.O.S.). The corresponding antagonist teeth and the respective neighboring teeth were also scanned. Scanning was performed immediately after the restoration (baseline) as well as 12 and 24 months after crown placement. Geomagic Qualify software was used to superimpose the follow-up data sets onto the corresponding baseline data set, identify wear sites, and measure maximum vertical height loss in each individual wear site. Overall antagonist wear was then determined as the mean of wear rates measured in all of the individual antagonist units. In addition, wear rates in enamel and ceramic antagonists were analyzed as part of the scope of this study. The maximum mean wear with standard deviation (SD) in the overall sample with a total of nine patients, 13 antagonist units, and 98 evaluable wear sites was 86 ± 23 µm at 12 months, and 103 ± 39 µm at 24 months. The maximum mean wear in the enamel antagonist subgroup was 87 ± 41 µm at 12 months, and 115 ± 71 µm at 24 months; and in the ceramic antagonist subgroup 107 ± 22 µm at 12 months, and 120 ± 27 µm at 24 months. The wear rates determined in this study are comparable to those of existing studies. The IDI technique of wear analysis can be carried out in a practical manner and produces useful results.

  9. Structural refinement and prediction of potential CCR2 antagonists through validated multi-QSAR modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sk Abdul; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Baidya, Sandip Kumar; Gayen, Shovanlal; Jha, Tarun

    2018-01-03

    Chemokines trigger numerous inflammatory responses and modulate the immune system. The interaction between monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) may be the cause of atherosclerosis, obesity, and insulin resistance. However, CCR2 is also implicated in other inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, and neuropathic pain. Therefore, there is a paramount importance of designing potent and selective CCR2 antagonists despite a number of drug candidates failed in clinical trials. In this article, 83 CCR2 antagonists by Jhonson and Jhonson Pharmaceuticals have been considered for robust validated multi-QSAR modeling studies to get an idea about the structural and pharmacophoric requirements for designing more potent CCR2 antagonists. All these QSAR models were validated and statistically reliable. Observations resulted from different modeling studies correlated and validated results of other ones. Finally, depending on these QSAR observations, some new molecules were proposed that may exhibit higher activity against CCR2.

  10. Pseudomonas orientalis F9: A Potent Antagonist against Phytopathogens with Phytotoxic Effect in the Apple Flower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Zengerer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In light of public concerns over the use of pesticides and antibiotics in plant protection and the subsequent selection for spread of resistant bacteria in the environment, it is inevitable to broaden our knowledge about viable alternatives, such as natural antagonists and their mode of action. The genus Pseudomonas is known for its metabolic versatility and genetic plasticity, encompassing pathogens as well as antagonists. We characterized strain Pseudomonas orientalis F9, an isolate from apple flowers in a Swiss orchard, and determined its antagonistic activity against several phytopathogenic bacteria, in particular Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. P. orientalis F9 displayed antagonistic activity against a broad suite of phytopathogenic bacteria in the in vitro tests. The promising results from this analysis led to an ex vivo assay with E. amylovora CFBP1430Rif and P. orientalis F9 infected detached apple flowers. F9 diminished the fire blight pathogen in the flowers but also revealed phytotoxic traits. The experimental results were discussed in light of the complete genome sequence of F9, which revealed the strain to carry phenazine genes. Phenazines are known to contribute to antagonistic activity of bacterial strains against soil pathogens. When tested in the cress assay with Pythium ultimum as pathogen, F9 showed results comparable to the known antagonist P. protegens CHA0.

  11. Pseudomonas orientalis F9: A Potent Antagonist against Phytopathogens with Phytotoxic Effect in the Apple Flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengerer, Veronika; Schmid, Michael; Bieri, Marco; Müller, Denise C; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N P; Ahrens, Christian H; Pelludat, Cosima

    2018-01-01

    In light of public concerns over the use of pesticides and antibiotics in plant protection and the subsequent selection for spread of resistant bacteria in the environment, it is inevitable to broaden our knowledge about viable alternatives, such as natural antagonists and their mode of action. The genus Pseudomonas is known for its metabolic versatility and genetic plasticity, encompassing pathogens as well as antagonists. We characterized strain Pseudomonas orientalis F9, an isolate from apple flowers in a Swiss orchard, and determined its antagonistic activity against several phytopathogenic bacteria, in particular Erwinia amylovora , the causal agent of fire blight. P. orientalis F9 displayed antagonistic activity against a broad suite of phytopathogenic bacteria in the in vitro tests. The promising results from this analysis led to an ex vivo assay with E. amylovora CFBP1430 Rif and P. orientalis F9 infected detached apple flowers. F9 diminished the fire blight pathogen in the flowers but also revealed phytotoxic traits. The experimental results were discussed in light of the complete genome sequence of F9, which revealed the strain to carry phenazine genes. Phenazines are known to contribute to antagonistic activity of bacterial strains against soil pathogens. When tested in the cress assay with Pythium ultimum as pathogen, F9 showed results comparable to the known antagonist P. protegens CHA0.

  12. Lack of Osteoradionecrosis of the Mandible After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Likely Contributions of Both Dental Care and Improved Dose Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-David, Merav A.; Diamante, Maximiliano; Radawski, Jeffrey D.; Vineberg, Karen A.; Stroup, Cynthia; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel R.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence and dosimetric and clinical predictors of mandibular osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in patients with head and neck cancer who underwent a pretherapy dental evaluation and prophylactic treatment according to a uniform policy and were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2005, all patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with parotid gland-sparing IMRT in prospective studies underwent a dental examination and prophylactic treatment according to a uniform policy that included extractions of high-risk, periodontally involved, and nonrestorable teeth in parts of the mandible expected to receive high radiation doses, fluoride supplements, and the placement of guards aiming to reduce electron backscatter off metal teeth restorations. The IMRT plans included dose constraints for the maximal mandibular doses and reduced mean parotid gland and noninvolved oral cavity doses. A retrospective analysis of Grade 2 or worse (clinical) ORN was performed. Results: A total of 176 patients had a minimal follow-up of 6 months. Of these, 31 (17%) had undergone teeth extractions before RT and 13 (7%) after RT. Of the 176 patients, 75% and 50% had received ≥65 Gy and ≥70 Gy to ≥1% of the mandibular volume, respectively. Falloff across the mandible characterized the dose distributions: the average gradient (in the axial plane containing the maximal mandibular dose) was 11 Gy (range, 1-27 Gy; median, 8 Gy). At a median follow-up of 34 months, no cases of ORN had developed (95% confidence interval, 0-2%). Conclusion: The use of a strict prophylactic dental care policy and IMRT resulted in no case of clinical ORN. In addition to the dosimetric advantages offered by IMRT, meticulous dental prophylactic care is likely an essential factor in reducing ORN risk

  13. The contribution of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in modulating 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38)-induced gastrointestinal toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Melanie N; Miles, Kristini K; Kessler, Fay K; Nielsen, Judith N; Tian, Xianbin; Ritter, Joseph K; Smith, Philip C

    2007-01-01

    Life-threatening diarrhea afflicts a considerable percentage of patients treated with irinotecan, an anticancer agent with effects elicited through its active metabolite 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). The primary detoxification pathway for SN-38 is glucuronidation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role that intestinal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) have from hepatic UGTs in modulating this diarrhea. To investigate this, Gunn rats devoid of UGT1A activity were injected with recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing UGT1A1, 1A6, and 1A7, resulting in reconstituted hepatic UGT expression comparable to a heterozygote. Hepatic microsome studies indicated that 4 to 7 days after adenoviral injection, transfected Gunn rats (j/jAV) had SN-38 glucuronide (SN-38G) formation rates three times higher than control heterozygote rats (j+AV). The adenovirus did not impart any glucuronidating capacity to the intestine in j/jAV rats, whereas j+AV rats possessed intestinal UGT function. After the administration of 20 mg/kg/day irinotecan i.p. to j/jAV rats 4 days after adenovirus injection, diarrhea ensued before the fourth irinotecan dose. j+AV rats were spared the diarrhea, and the toxicity was mild compared with the j/jAV rats, as measured by diarrhea scores, weight loss, and histological assessments of the cecum and colon. The pharmacokinetics of irinotecan, SN-38, and SN-38G indicate that the systemic exposure of SN-38 and SN-38G was higher and lower, respectively, in j/jAV rats. Despite this, the biliary excretion of irinotecan and metabolites was similar. Because intestinal UGTs are the main discriminating factor between j/jAV and j+AV rats, their presence seems to be critical for the gastrointestinal protection observed in j+AV rats.

  14. Aberrant Meiotic Modulation Partially Contributes to the Lower Germination Rate of Pollen Grains in Maize (Zea mays L.) Under Low Nitrogen Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongyan; Wu, Huamao; Pan, Xiaoying; Jin, Weiwei; Li, Xuexian

    2017-02-01

    Pollen germination is an essential step towards successful pollination during maize reproduction. How low niutrogen (N) affects pollen germination remains an interesting biological question to be addressed. We found that only low N resulted in a significantly lower germination rate of pollen grains after 4 weeks of low N, phosphorus or potassium treatment in maize production. Importantly, cytological analysis showed 7-fold more micronuclei in male meiocytes under the low N treatment than in the control, indicating that the lower germination rate of pollen grains was partially due to numerous chromosome loss events resulting from preceding meiosis. The appearance of 10 bivalents in the control and low N cells at diakinesis suggested that chromosome pairing and recombination in meiosis I was not affected by low N. Further gene expression analysis revealed dramatic down-regulation of Nuclear Division Cycle 80 (Ndc80) and Regulator of Chromosome Condensation 1 (Rcc1-1) expression and up-regulation of Cell Division Cycle 20 (Cdc20-1) expression, although no significant difference in the expression level of kinetochore foundation proteins Centromeric Histone H3 (Cenh3) and Centromere Protein C (Cenpc) and cohesion regulators Recombination 8 (Rec8) and Shugoshin (Sgo1) was observed. Aberrant modulation of three key meiotic regulators presumably resulted in a high likelihood of erroneous chromosome segregation, as testified by pronounced lagging chromosomes at anaphase I or cell cycle disruption at meiosis II. Thus, we proposed a cytogenetic mechanism whereby low N affects male meiosis and causes a higher chromosome loss frequency and eventually a lower germination rate of pollen grains in a staple crop plant. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The Arabidopsis UDP-glycosyltransferases UGT79B2 and UGT79B3, contribute to cold, salt and drought stress tolerance via modulating anthocyanin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Li, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Feng-Ju; Zhang, Gui-Zhi; Jiang, Xiao-Yi; Yu, Hui-Min; Hou, Bing-Kai

    2017-01-01

    The plant family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) are the biggest GT family in plants, which are responsible for transferring sugar moieties onto a variety of small molecules, and control many metabolic processes; however, their physiological significance in planta is largely unknown. Here, we revealed that two Arabidopsis glycosyltransferase genes, UGT79B2 and UGT79B3, could be strongly induced by various abiotic stresses, including cold, salt and drought stresses. Overexpression of UGT79B2/B3 significantly enhanced plant tolerance to low temperatures as well as drought and salt stresses, whereas the ugt79b2/b3 double mutants generated by RNAi (RNA interference) and CRISPR-Cas9 strategies were more susceptible to adverse conditions. Interestingly, the expression of UGT79B2 and UGT79B3 is directly controlled by CBF1 (CRT/DRE-binding factor 1, also named DREB1B) in response to low temperatures. Furthermore, we identified the enzyme activities of UGT79B2/B3 in adding UDP-rhamnose to cyanidin and cyanidin 3-O-glucoside. Ectopic expression of UGT79B2/B3 significantly increased the anthocyanin accumulation, and enhanced the antioxidant activity in coping with abiotic stresses, whereas the ugt79b2/b3 double mutants showed reduced anthocyanin levels. When overexpressing UGT79B2/B3 in tt18 (transparent testa 18), a mutant that cannot synthesize anthocyanins, both genes fail to improve plant adaptation to stress. Taken together, we demonstrate that UGT79B2 and UGT79B3, identified as anthocyanin rhamnosyltransferases, are regulated by CBF1 and confer abiotic stress tolerance via modulating anthocyanin accumulation. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. CXCR4 Antagonists: A Screening Strategy for Identification of Functionally Selective Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, C; Benicchi, T; Otrocka, M; Mori, E; Pilli, E; Ferruzzi, P; Valensin, S; Diamanti, D; Fecke, W; Varrone, M; Porcari, V

    2014-07-01

    The CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a widely expressed G protein-coupled receptor implicated in several diseases. In cancer, an increased number of surface CXCR4 receptors, in parallel with aberrant signaling, have been reported to influence several aspects of malignancy progression. CXCR4 activation by the specific ligand C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) induces several intracellular signaling pathways that have been selectively related to malignancy depending on the tissue or cell type. We developed a panel of CXCR4 screening assays investigating Gα(i)-mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate modulation, β-arrestin recruitment, and receptor internalization. All of the assays were set up in recombinant cells and were used to test four reported CXCR4 antagonists. Consequently, a set of hit compounds, deriving from a screening campaign of a 30,000-small-molecule internal library, was profiled with the different assays. We identified several compounds showing a pathway-selective activity: antagonists on a Gα(i)-dependent pathway; antagonists on both the β-arrestin and Gα(i)-dependent pathways, some of which induce receptor internalization; and compounds with an antagonist behavior in all of the readouts. The identified biased antagonists induce different functional states on CXCR4 and preferentially affect specific downstream responses from the activated receptor, thus providing an improved therapeutic profile for correction of CXCR4 abnormal signaling. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  17. Orexin 1 receptor antagonists in compulsive behavior and anxiety: possible therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo Pich, Emilio; Melotto, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen years after the discovery of hypocretin/orexin a large body of evidence has been collected supporting its critical role in the modulation of several regulatory physiological functions. While reduced levels of hypocretin/orexin were initially associated with narcolepsy, increased levels have been linked in recent years to pathological states of hypervigilance and, in particular, to insomnia. The filing to FDA of the dual-activity orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) suvorexant for the indication of insomnia further corroborates the robustness of such evidences. However, as excessive vigilance is also typical of anxiety and panic episodes, as well as of abstinence and craving in substance misuse disorders. In this review we briefly discuss the evidence supporting the development of hypocretin/orexin receptor 1 (OX1) antagonists for these indications. Experiments using the OX1 antagonist SB-334867 and mutant mice have involved the OX1 receptor in mediating the compulsive reinstatement of drug seeking for ethanol, nicotine, cocaine, cannabinoids and morphine. More recently, data have been generated with the novel selective OX1 antagonists GSK1059865 and ACT-335827 on behavioral and cardiovascular response to stressors and panic-inducing agents in animals. Concluding, while waiting for pharmacologic data to become available in humans, risks and benefits for the development of an OX1 receptor antagonist for Binge Eating and Anxiety Disorders are discussed.

  18. Orexin 1 receptor antagonists in compulsive behaviour and anxiety: possible therapeutic use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio eMerlo-Pich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen years after the discovery of hypocretin/orexin a large body of evidence has been collected supporting its critical role in the modulation of several regulatory physiological functions. While reduced levels of hypocretin/orexin were early on associated with narcolepsy, increased levels have been linked in recent years to pathological states of hypervigilance and, in particular, to insomnia. The filing to FDA of the dual-activity orexin receptor antagonist (DORA suvorexant for the indication of insomnia further corroborates the robustness of such evidences. However, as excessive vigilance is also typical of anxiety and panic episodes, as well as of abstinence and craving in substance misuse disorders, in this review we briefly discuss the evidence supporting the development of hypocretin/orexin receptor 1 (OX1 antagonists for these indications. Experiments using the OX1 antagonist SB-334867 and mutant mice have involved the OX1 receptor in mediating the compulsive reinstatement of drug seeking for ethanol, nicotine, cocaine, cannabinoids and morphine. More recently, data have been generated with the novel selective OX1 antagonists GSK1059865 and ACT-335827 on behavioural and cardiovascular response to stressors and panic-inducing agents in animals. Concluding, while waiting for pharmacologic data to become available in humans, risks and benefits for the development of an OX1 receptor antagonist for Binge Eating and Anxiety Disorders are discussed.

  19. Discovery of Novel Proline-Based Neuropeptide FF Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy; Decker, Ann M; Langston, Tiffany L; Mathews, Kelly M; Siemian, Justin N; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L; Runyon, Scott P; Zhang, Yanan

    2017-10-18

    The neuropeptide FF (NPFF) system has been implicated in a number of physiological processes including modulating the pharmacological activity of opioid analgesics and several other classes of drugs of abuse. In this study, we report the discovery of a novel proline scaffold with antagonistic activity at the NPFF receptors through a high throughput screening campaign using a functional calcium mobilization assay. Focused structure-activity relationship studies on the initial hit 1 have resulted in several analogs with calcium mobilization potencies in the submicromolar range and modest selectivity for the NPFF1 receptor. Affinities and potencies of these compounds were confirmed in radioligand binding and functional cAMP assays. Two compounds, 16 and 33, had good solubility and blood-brain barrier permeability that fall within the range of CNS permeant candidates without the liability of being a P-glycoprotein substrate. Finally, both compounds reversed fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia in rats when administered intraperitoneally. Together, these results point to the potential of these proline analogs as promising NPFF receptor antagonists.

  20. A reinforcing circuit action of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor modulators on cerebellar granule cell inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi Santhakumar

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors (GABARs are the targets of a wide variety of modulatory drugs which enhance chloride flux through GABAR ion channels. Certain GABAR modulators appear to acutely enhance the function of δ subunit-containing GABAR subtypes responsible for tonic forms of inhibition. Here we identify a reinforcing circuit mechanism by which these drugs, in addition to directly enhancing GABAR function, also increase GABA release. Electrophysiological recordings in cerebellar slices from rats homozygous for the ethanol-hypersensitive (α6100Q allele show that modulators and agonists selective for δ-containing GABARs such as THDOC, ethanol and THIP (gaboxadol increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs in granule cells. Ethanol fails to augment granule cell sIPSC frequency in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating that circuit mechanisms involving granule cell output contribute to ethanol-enhancement of synaptic inhibition. Additionally, GABAR antagonists decrease ethanol-induced enhancement of Golgi cell firing. Consistent with a role for glutamatergic inputs, THIP-induced increases in Golgi cell firing are abolished by glutamate receptor antagonists. Moreover, THIP enhances the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in Golgi cells. Analyses of knockout mice indicate that δ subunit-containing GABARs are required for enhancing GABA release in the presence of ethanol and THIP. The limited expression of the GABAR δ subunit protein within the cerebellar cortex suggests that an indirect, circuit mechanism is responsible for stimulating Golgi cell GABA release by drugs selective for extrasynaptic isoforms of GABARs. Such circuit effects reinforce direct actions of these positive modulators on tonic GABAergic inhibition and are likely to contribute to the potent effect of these compounds as nervous system depressants.

  1. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists and Parkinson's disease: state of the art and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simola, N; Morelli, M; Pinna, A

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptors present in the central nervous system have been implicated in the modulation of motor functions. Accordingly, adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists currently constitute an attractive non-dopaminergic option for use in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). The highly enriched distributions of adenosine A(2A) receptors in striatopallidal neurons, and their ability to form functional heteromeric complexes with dopamine D(2) and metabotropic glutamate mGlu5 receptors, render A(2A) receptor antagonists of particular interest in the modulation of motor behavior, whilst at the same time displaying a low predisposition to inducing non-motor side effects. Furthermore, adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists appear to exert a marked efficacy on PD tremor and in reducing the progress of underlying neurodegeneration and maladaptive neuroplasticity that complicates standard dopamine replacement treatments in PD. Finally, recent evidence has illustrated an improvement of cognitive function as well as enhancement of attention in rodents following administration of A(2A) receptor antagonists. This article is aimed at examining preclinical studies describing these findings as well as reports from clinical trials, in order to provide a comprehensive review of the evidence suggesting that this class of drugs may represent an advance in the treatment of PD.

  2. Coronary dilation with nitrocompounds and calcium antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, S; Rafflenbeul, W; Lichtlen, P R

    1990-01-01

    The vasodilatory effects of nitrocompounds and calcium antagonists on epicardial coronary arteries represent substantial antianginal mechanisms in the presence of coronary vasospasm or eccentric coronary stenoses. With high doses of nitrocompounds, angiographically normal coronary segments can be dilated by an average of approx. 30%, some coronary stenoses even by up to 100%, usually without severe reduction of blood pressure. With calcium antagonists, a similar extent of dilation of normal coronary arteries and eccentric stenoses can be obtained. Our own group demonstrated an average dilation of normal coronary arteries of about 20% after intravenous administration of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists; however, the average systolic blood pressure dropped below 100 mmHg after these compounds. Hence, although in isolated human coronary arteries high concentrations of calcium antagonists were shown to induce a considerably greater vasodilation than nitrocompounds, the early drop in blood pressure prohibits a higher dosage of calcium antagonists in vivo. In the presence of coronary artery disease, particularly when associated with coronary vasospasm, a combination of the two groups of compounds might be recommendable, since an addition of the effects of coronary vasomotor tone is likely. Furthermore, the antianginal effects of a reduction of preload and afterload are complementary.

  3. Mir-513a-3p contributes to the controlling of cellular migration processes in the A549 lung tumor cells by modulating integrin β-8 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Marina Bonfogo; Lima, Kelvin Furtado; da Silva, Andrea Renata; Dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Moraes, Karen C M

    2017-12-04

    Lung tumors are a frequent type of cancer in humans and a leading cause of death, and the late diagnostic contributes to high mortality rates. New therapeutic strategies are needed, and the heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) [ang-(1-7)] demonstrated the ability to control cancer growth rates and migration in vitro and in vivo. However, the possible use of the heptapeptide in clinical trials demands deeper analyses to elucidate molecular mechanisms of its effect in the target cells. In this study, we investigated relevant elements that control pro-inflammatory environment and cellular migration, focusing in the post-transcription mechanism using lung tumor cell line. In our cellular model, the microRNA-513a-3p was identified as a novel element targeting ITG-β8, thereby controlling the protein level and its molecular function in the controlling of migration and pro-inflammatory environment. These findings provide useful information for future studies, using miR-513a-3p as an innovative molecular tool to control lung tumor cell migration, which will support more effective clinical treatment of the patients with the widely used chemotherapeutic agents, increasing survival rates.

  4. Molecular determinants of non-competitive antagonist binding to the mouse GPRC6A receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faure, Helene; Gorojankina, Tatiana; Rice, Nadejda

    2009-01-01

    ) in HEK293 cells. The calcilytic Calhex 231 did not modulate this response. A three-dimensional model of the GPRC6A seven transmembrane domains (TMs) was constructed. It was used to identify seven residues strictly conserved within the CaSR and GPRC6A allosteric binding pockets, and previously...... of Calindol antagonist activity but was without effect on NPS2143 inhibitory response. In summary, these data suggest that Calindol is primarily anchored through an H-bond to E816(7.39) in TM7 and highlight important local differences at the level of the CaSR and GPRC6A allosteric binding pockets. We have...... identified the first antagonists of GPRC6A that could represent new tools to analyze GPRC6A functions and serve as chemical leads for the development of more specific modulators....

  5. Overexpression of HO-1 Contributes to Sepsis-Induced Immunosuppression by Modulating the Th1/Th2 Balance and Regulatory T-Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seong-Jin; Kim, So-Jin; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2017-05-15

    Countervailing anti-inflammatory response and immunosuppression can cause death in late sepsis. Depletion and dysfunction of T cells are critical for developing sepsis-induced immunosuppression. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has a regulatory effect on differentiation and function of T cells and anti-inflammatory properties. We therefore investigated the immunosuppressive role of HO-1 in sepsis with a focus on its effects on helper T-cell (Th) differentiation and regulatory T cells (Treg). Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Mice were intraperitoneally injected with zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP; 25 mg/kg), an HO-1 inhibitor, or hemin (20 mg/kg), an HO-1 inducer, at 24 and 36 hours post-CLP. Splenocytes were isolated 48 hours post-CLP. Mice were intranasally infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4 days post-CLP as a secondary pneumonia infection model. ZnPP improved survival and bacterial clearance, whereas hemin had the opposite effect in septic mice. CLP induced lymphocyte apoptosis and a proinflammatory Th1 to anti-inflammatory Th2 shift, which was attenuated by ZnPP. ZnPP attenuated the CLP-induced Treg population and protein expression of inhibitory costimulatory molecules. Furthermore, ZnPP improved survival in the secondary pneumonia infection model. Our findings suggest that HO-1 overexpression contributes to sepsis-induced immunosuppression during late phase sepsis by promoting Th2 polarization and Treg function. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The role of opioid antagonist efficacy and constitutive opioid receptor activity in the opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Navani, Dipesh M.; Sirohi, Sunil; Madia, Priyanka A.; Yoburn, Byron C.

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of efficacy, opioid antagonists are classified as inverse opioid agonists (e.g. naltrexone) or neutral opioid antagonists (e.g. 6β-naltrexol). This study examined the interaction between naltrexone and 6β-naltrexol in the precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome in morphine dependent mice. Furthermore, the possible contribution of constitutive opioid receptor activity to precipitated withdrawal was evaluated using increasing levels of morphine dependence. In the first experiment, ...

  7. Interleukin-1 antagonists for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diabetes is a currently incurable, epidemically growing global health concern. Contemporary symptomatic treatment targets acute and chronic metabolic consequences of relative or absolute insulin deficiency. Intensive multifactorial therapy is required to attenuate morbidity and mort......INTRODUCTION: Diabetes is a currently incurable, epidemically growing global health concern. Contemporary symptomatic treatment targets acute and chronic metabolic consequences of relative or absolute insulin deficiency. Intensive multifactorial therapy is required to attenuate morbidity...... and mortality from late micro- and macrovascular complications, and despite current best clinical practice diabetes is still associated with shortened lifespan. There is an unmet need for interventions targeting pathogenetic mechanisms in diabetes, and the market for such therapies is huge. AREAS COVERED......: Diabetes occurs when insulin secretion fails to meet tissue needs as a consequence of reduced functional beta-cell mass or reduced insulin sensitivity. Chronic inflammation contributes to beta-cell failure and insulin resistance. Molecular details are accumulating on the underlying cellular and molecular...

  8. Implementation of a fluorescence-based screening assay identifies histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit as subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Dawit, Sara

    2010-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate a slow, Ca(2+)-permeable component of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity, neuronal development, and several neurological diseases. We describe...... a fluorescence-based assay that measures NMDA receptor-mediated changes in intracellular calcium in a BHK-21 cell line stably expressing NMDA receptor NR2D with NR1 under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter (Tet-On). The assay selectively identifies allosteric modulators by using supramaximal...... concentrations of glutamate and glycine to minimize detection of competitive antagonists. The assay is validated by successfully identifying known noncompetitive, but not competitive NMDA receptor antagonists among 1800 screened compounds from two small focused libraries, including the commercially available...

  9. cAMP-responsive element modulator α (CREMα) trans-represses the transmembrane glycoprotein CD8 and contributes to the generation of CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Christian M; Rauen, Thomas; Crispin, Jose C; Koga, Tomohiro; Ioannidis, Christina; Zajdel, Melissa; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2013-11-01

    T cell receptor-αβ(+) CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) "double-negative" T cells are expanded in the peripheral blood of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. In both disorders, double-negative T cells infiltrate tissues, induce immunoglobulin production, and secrete proinflammatory cytokines. Double-negative T cells derive from CD8(+) T cells through down-regulation of CD8 surface co-receptors. However, the molecular mechanisms orchestrating this process remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the transcription factor cAMP-responsive element modulator α (CREMα), which is expressed at increased levels in T cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients, contributes to transcriptional silencing of CD8A and CD8B. We provide the first evidence that CREMα trans-represses a regulatory element 5' of the CD8B gene. Therefore, CREMα represents a promising candidate in the search for biomarkers and treatment options in diseases in which double-negative T cells contribute to the pathogenesis.

  10. Radiation therapy technology innovations applied to the treatment of head and neck patients: - Clinical results of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), - Contribution of Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) in the management of head and neck patients treated with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff-Cailleaud, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Numerous and exciting technological innovations were recently developed in radiotherapy. We aimed to assess benefits in two specific fields. 1) Clinical results of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) applied to the treatment of Head and Neck (H and N) patients. The first study was a long-term mono-centric prospective registration of all H and N patients treated with IMRT in our institution. Locoregional control was excellent and toxicities limited. Recurrences were in-field. Dosimetric recommendations (parotids mean dose) were established. The second study assessed the impact of IMRT on health-related quality of life for H and N patients through a multicentric matched-pair comparison with conventional radiotherapy. Outstanding benefits were observed particularly in the fields of salivary dysfunction and oral discomfort. 2) Contribution of Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) in the management of H and N patients treated with IMRT. The first study was a monitoring of delivered dose, using 3D dose recalculation from Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT (CBCT), as a quality assurance measure of a panel of H and N IMRT patients aligned with IGRT. Dosimetric consequences of anatomical changes were assessed. Contribution of color-coded MVCBCT dose-difference maps was studied. The aim of the second study was to quantify the inherent relative mobility between anatomic regions of the H and N area and to assess the dosimetric impact of several different matching procedures. Recommendations for the use of CBCT images in a daily practice were established. (author) [fr

  11. Cross-reactivity of acid-sensing ion channel and Na+–H+ exchanger antagonists with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Torres, Julio; Ślimak, Marta A; Auer, Sebastian; Ibañez-Tallon, Inés

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed throughout the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems, where they contribute to neuronal excitability and synaptic communication. It has been reported that nAChRs are modulated by BK channels and that BK channels, in turn, are inhibited by acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). Here we investigate the possible functional interaction between these channels in medial habenula (MHb) neurones. We report that selective antagonists of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and ASIC1a channels, paxilline and psalmotoxin 1, respectively, did not induce detectable changes in nicotine-evoked currents. In contrast, the non-selective ASIC and Na+–H+ exchanger (NHE1) antagonists, amiloride and its analogues, suppressed nicotine-evoked responses in MHb neurones of wild-type and ASIC2 null mice, excluding a possible involvement of ASIC2 in the nAChR inhibition by amiloride. Zoniporide, a more selective inhibitor of NHE1, reversibly inhibited α3β4-, α7- and α4-containing (*) nAChRs in Xenopus oocytes and in brain slices, as well as in PS120 cells deficient in NHE1 and virally transduced with nAChRs, suggesting a generalized effect of zoniporide in most neuronal nAChR subtypes. Independently from nAChR antagonism, zoniporide profoundly blocked synaptic transmission onto MHb neurones without affecting glutamatergic and GABA receptors. Taken together, these results indicate that amiloride and zoniporide, which are clinically used to treat hypertension and cardiovascular disease, have an inhibitory effect on neuronal nAChRs when used experimentally at high doses. The possible cross-reactivity of these compounds with nAChRs in vivo will require further investigation. PMID:21911609

  12. IL-27 structural analysis demonstrates similarities with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and leads to the identification of antagonistic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Francois; Basset, Laetitia; Froger, Josy; Dinguirard, Nathalie; Chevalier, Sylvie; Gascan, Hugues

    2010-11-09

    IL-27, consisting of the subunits IL-27p28 and Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3), is a heterodimeric cytokine belonging to the IL-6/IL-12 family of cytokines. IL-27p28 is a four-helical cytokine requiring association with the soluble receptor EBI3 to be efficiently secreted and functionally active. Computational and biological analyses of the IL-27 binding site 1 to its receptor revealed important structural proximities with the ciliary neurotrophic factor group of cytokines and highlighted the contribution of p28 Trp(97), as well as of EBI3 Phe(97), Asp(210), and Glu(159), as key residues in the interactions between both cytokine subunits. WSX-1 (IL-27R) and gp130 compose the IL-27 receptor-signaling complex, recruiting the STAT-1 and STAT-3 pathways. A study of IL-27 binding site 3 showed that Trp(197) was crucial for the cytokine's interaction with gp130, but that the mutated cytokine still recognized IL-27R on the cell surface. IL-27 exerts both pro- and anti-inflammatory functions, promoting proliferation and differentiation of Th1 and inhibiting Th17 differentiation. Our results led us to develop mutated forms of human and mouse IL-27 with antagonistic activities. Using an in vivo mouse model of concanavalin A-induced Th1-cell-mediated hepatitis, we showed that the murine IL-27 antagonist W195A decreased liver inflammation by downregulating the synthesis of CXCR3 ligands and several acute phase proteins. Together, these data suggest that IL-27 antagonism could be of interest in down-modulating acute IL-27-driven Th1-cell-mediated immune response.

  13. CRTH2 antagonists in asthma: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dave Singh, Arjun Ravi, Thomas Southworth Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, The Medicines Evaluation Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2 binds to prostaglandin D2. CRTH2 is expressed on various cell types including eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils. CRTH2 and prostaglandin D2 are involved in allergic inflammation and eosinophil activation. Orally administered CRTH2 antagonists are in clinical development for the treatment of asthma. The biology and clinical trial data indicate that CRTH2 antagonists should be targeted toward eosinophilic asthma. This article reviews the clinical evidence for CRTH2 involvement in asthma pathophysiology and clinical trials of CRTH2 antagonists in asthma. CRTH2 antagonists could provide a practical alternative to biological treatments for patients with severe asthma. Future perspectives for this class of drug are considered, including the selection of the subgroup of patients most likely to show a meaningful treatment response. Keywords: CRTH2, clinical trial, eosinophilic asthma, prostaglandin D2

  14. Carbon adaptation influence the antagonistic ability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influences of carbon adaptation on antagonistic activities of three Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains V4, V7 and V10 against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis were determined in this study. Results from this study showed that the P. aeruginosa strains and their adapted strains significantly inhibited the growth of mycelium ...

  15. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has not been elucidated yet, but may be related to vasospasm. Experimental studies have indicated that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse vasospasm and have

  16. Antagonistic properties of microogranisms associated with cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antagonistic properties of indigenous microflora from cassava starch, flour and grated cassava were investigated using the conventional streak, novel ring and well diffusion methods. Antagonism was measured by zone of inhibition between the fungal plug and bacterial streak/ring. Bacillus species were more effective ...

  17. Opioid antagonists for pharmacological treatment of gambling disorder: Are they relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Spiers, Andrew; Caillet, Pascal; Bruneau, Mélanie; Challet-Bouju, Gaëlle; Grall-Bronnec, Marie

    2017-07-18

    Background: To date, no drugs have been approved for gambling disorder. Numerous publications have described the value of opioid antagonists. Indeed, the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathway has been suggested as the underlying cause of reward-seeking behaviour, and it is modulated by the opioid system. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the relevance of opioid antagonists for treating GD. Method A systematic literature review was conducted. A search of the PubMed electronic database, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Systematic Review Database without any limits was performed. Results: There is little information concerning the effects of opioid antagonists on GD. The total search with "nalmefene and gambling" without any limits revealed only 11 articles. The search with "naltrexone and gambling" without any limits generated 47 articles. Nevertheless, the best available data support the use of opioid antagonists, particularly in individuals with a history of alcohol use disorder or strong gambling urges. Conclusion: Future trials are still needed. Indeed, opioid antagonists effectiveness has been investigated in only a limited number of patients, clinical trials do not reflect the heterogeneity of GD and there is little knowledge of the predictive factors of response to treatments. Moreover, differential affinity to nalmefene for kappa receptors may be associated with a particular effect in a yet to be defined addiction phenotype. Head to head comparisons between naltrexone and nalmefene would be helpful in combining with other medication or psychotherapy. The identification of subgroups of patients that are more likely to benefit from opioid antagonists should be a goal. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Discovery of a Manduca sexta Allatotropin Antagonist from a Manduca sexta Allatotropin Receptor Homology Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Peng Kai

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Insect G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs have important roles in modulating biology, physiology and behavior. They have been identified as candidate targets for next-generation insecticides, yet these targets have been relatively poorly exploited for insect control. In this study, we present a pipeline of novel Manduca sexta allatotropin (Manse-AT antagonist discovery with homology modeling, docking, molecular dynamics simulation and structure-activity relationship. A series of truncated and alanine-replacement analogs of Manse-AT were assayed for the stimulation of juvenile hormone biosynthesis. The minimum sequence required to retain potent biological activity is the C-terminal amidated octapeptide Manse-AT (6–13. We identified three residues essential for bioactivity (Thr4, Arg6 and Phe8 by assaying alanine-replacement analogs of Manse-AT (6–13. Alanine replacement of other residues resulted in reduced potency but bioactivity was retained. The 3D structure of the receptor (Manse-ATR was built and the binding pocket was identified. The binding affinities of all the analogs were estimated by calculating the free energy of binding. The calculated binding affinities corresponded to the biological activities of the analogs, which supporting our localization of the binding pocket. Then, based on the docking and molecular dynamics studies of Manse-AT (10–13, we described it can act as a potent Manse-AT antagonist. The antagonistic effect on JH biosynthesis of Manse-AT (10–13 validated our hypothesis. The IC50 value of antagonist Manse-AT (10–13 is 0.9 nM. The structure-activity relationship of antagonist Manse-AT (10–13 was also studied for the further purpose of investigating theoretically the structure factors influencing activity. These data will be useful for the design of new Manse-AT agonist and antagonist as potential pest control agents.

  19. Discovery of a Manduca sexta Allatotropin Antagonist from a Manduca sexta Allatotropin Receptor Homology Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Zhen-Peng; Zhu, Jing-Jing; Deng, Xi-Le; Yang, Xin-Ling; Chen, Shan-Shan

    2018-04-03

    Insect G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in modulating biology, physiology and behavior. They have been identified as candidate targets for next-generation insecticides, yet these targets have been relatively poorly exploited for insect control. In this study, we present a pipeline of novel Manduca sexta allatotropin (Manse-AT) antagonist discovery with homology modeling, docking, molecular dynamics simulation and structure-activity relationship. A series of truncated and alanine-replacement analogs of Manse-AT were assayed for the stimulation of juvenile hormone biosynthesis. The minimum sequence required to retain potent biological activity is the C -terminal amidated octapeptide Manse-AT (6-13). We identified three residues essential for bioactivity (Thr⁴, Arg6 and Phe⁸) by assaying alanine-replacement analogs of Manse-AT (6-13). Alanine replacement of other residues resulted in reduced potency but bioactivity was retained. The 3D structure of the receptor (Manse-ATR) was built and the binding pocket was identified. The binding affinities of all the analogs were estimated by calculating the free energy of binding. The calculated binding affinities corresponded to the biological activities of the analogs, which supporting our localization of the binding pocket. Then, based on the docking and molecular dynamics studies of Manse-AT (10-13), we described it can act as a potent Manse-AT antagonist. The antagonistic effect on JH biosynthesis of Manse-AT (10-13) validated our hypothesis. The IC 50 value of antagonist Manse-AT (10-13) is 0.9 nM. The structure-activity relationship of antagonist Manse-AT (10-13) was also studied for the further purpose of investigating theoretically the structure factors influencing activity. These data will be useful for the design of new Manse-AT agonist and antagonist as potential pest control agents.

  20. Recent progress in the development of small-molecule glucagon receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Matthew F; Lee, Esther C Y

    2015-10-01

    The endocrine hormone glucagon stimulates hepatic glucose output via its action at the glucagon receptor (GCGr) in the liver. In the diabetic state, dysregulation of glucagon secretion contributes to abnormally elevated hepatic glucose output. The inhibition of glucagon-induced hepatic glucose output via antagonism of the GCGr using small-molecule ligands is a promising mechanism for improving glycemic control in the diabetic state. Clinical data evaluating the therapeutic potential of small-molecule GCGr antagonists is currently emerging. Recently disclosed clinical data demonstrates the potential efficacy and possible therapeutic limitations of small-molecule GCGr antagonists. Recent pre-clinical work on the development of GCGr antagonists is also summarized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antagonist-Elicited Cannabis Withdrawal in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, David A.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; McMahon, Robert P.; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40–120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0–8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  2. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  3. XPS-and-DFT analyses of the Pb 4f — Zn 3s and Pb 5d — O 2s overlapped ambiguity contributions to the final electronic structure of bulk and thin-film Pb-modulated zincite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zatsepin, D.A. [M.N. Miheev Institute of Metal Physics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Boukhvalov, D.W., E-mail: danil@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Theoretical Physics and Applied Mathematics Department, Ural Federal University,Mira Street 19, 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, N.V. [Institute of Electrophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kurmaev, E.Z. [M.N. Miheev Institute of Metal Physics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Zatsepin, A.F. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Cui, L. [Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Shur, V. Ya.; Esin, A.A. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 51 Lenin Ave, 620000 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Two modes of ZnO:Pb in the bulk and surface morphologies were established: the high- and low-interaction. • It was shown the ambiguity contribution of Pb 4f − Zn 3s and Pb 5d − O 2s states into final electronic structure. • The main type of defects is PbO-like with some PbO{sub 2}-like contributions. • An applied wurzite-like structural model well agrees with experimental data obtained for zincite. - Abstract: The electronic structures of zincite Pb-modulated bulk and thin-films were studied via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) techniques. Both XPS data and DFT-calculations allowed the derivation of two different Pb-embedding scenarios into the ZnO-hosts. These included the high-interaction mode of Pb-impurity with initial zinc-oxygen host-lattice for the bulk morphology, accompanied with low Pb-metal losses; and the low-interaction mode for thin-films, where there was intake of Pb-impurities into the hollows of the surface. Despite dissimilar mechanisms of Pb-impurity accumulation and distribution in the bulk and thin-films zincite host-matrices, the strong Pb 4f — Zn 3s and Pb 5d — O 2s overlapped ambiguity contribution to the appropriate core-level structure and valence bands was established by XPS analysis and reproduced with the help of DFT-calculations. It was shown that the microscopic structure of the embedded lead-impurity played a crucial role in the Pb ion-beam stimulated synthesis of secondary lead-oxygen phases via large-area defect fabrication, and the difference among zincite and wurzite polymorphs played almost no role in this case.

  4. Combining elements from two antagonists of formyl peptide receptor 2 generates more potent peptidomimetic antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Holdfeldt, Andre; Nielsen, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Structural optimization of a peptidomimetic antagonist of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) was explored by an approach involving combination of elements from the two most potent FPR2 antagonists described: a Rhodamine B-conjugated 10-residue gelsonin-derived peptide (i.e., PBP10, Rh......B-QRLFQVKGRR-OH) and the palmitoylated α-peptide/β-peptoid hybrid Pam-(Lys-βNspe)6-NH2. This generated an array of hybrid compounds from which a new subclass of receptor-selective antagonists was identified. The most potent representatives displayed activity in the low nanomolar range. The resulting stable and potent FPR2-selective...... antagonists (i.e., RhB-(Lys-βNphe)n-NH2; n = 4–6) are expected to become valuable tools in further elucidation of the physiological role of FPR2 in health and disease....

  5. Central histaminergic transmission modulates the ethanol induced anxiolysis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Lokesh; Jain, Nishant S

    2016-10-15

    histaminergic transmission functions to negatively modulate the acute ethanol-induced anxiolysis probably via stimulation of postsynaptic H1 receptor and histamine might contribute to the anxiolytic action of ethanol via H2 receptor activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Central Reinforcing Properties of Ethanol Are Mediated by Endogenous Opioid Systems: Effects of Mu and Kappa Opioid Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. Spear

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous opioid systems are implicated in the reinforcing effects of ethanol and may play a substantial role in modulating the central reinforcing effects of ethanol early in ontogeny. This possibility was explored in the present study through the use of an olfactory conditioning paradigm with centrally administered ethanol serving as an unconditioned stimulus (US. In Experiment 1, newborn rat pups were treated with either a selective mu antagonist CTOP or kappa selective antagonist nor-BNI prior to olfactory conditioning. Experiment 2 tested the effectiveness of an alternative, shorter-duration kappa opioid antagonist GNTI in altering ethanol reinforcement. Experiment 3 investigated whether the effectiveness of pharmacological blockade of opioid receptors was due to the disruption of learning per se using an olfactory aversive conditioning paradigm with intraoral quinine serving as a US. Central administration of either mu or kappa opioid antagonists prior to conditioning disrupted the reinforcing effects of ethanol in newborn rats. The kappa opioid antagonist GNTI was as effective as nor-BNI. These effects of opioid antagonists on ethanol reinforcement are unlikely to be due to a disruption of all types of conditioning, since CTOP did not affect aversive reinforcement to intraoral infusions of quinine. The present results support the hypothesis that in newborn rats, the reinforcing properties of ethanol are mediated by the endogenous activity at mu and kappa opioid receptors.

  7. Similarities and differences between calcium antagonists: pharmacological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.; Pfaffendorf, M.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of three different calcium antagonist groups: Most important calcium antagonists used to treat cardiovascular disease belong to one of three main groups, phenylalkylamines, dihydropyridines and benzothiazepines. The best known drug in each group is verapamil, nifedipine and

  8. Protective effects of calcium antagonists in different organs and tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of calcium antagonists in ischemic disorders of various tissues is attributed to vasodilator and antivasoconstrictor activities. A direct, energy-conserving, antiischemic effect of certain calcium antagonists has been claimed repeatedly by basic scientists. The clinical

  9. Stimulation of Glia Reveals Modulation of Mammalian Spinal Motor Networks by Adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, David; Miles, Gareth B

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that glia can release modulators to influence the excitability of neighbouring neurons, the importance of gliotransmission for the operation of neural networks and in shaping behaviour remains controversial. Here we characterise the contribution of glia to the modulation of the mammalian spinal central pattern generator for locomotion, the output of which is directly relatable to a defined behaviour. Glia were stimulated by specific activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), an endogenous G-protein coupled receptor preferentially expressed by spinal glia during ongoing activity of the spinal central pattern generator for locomotion. Selective activation of PAR1 by the agonist TFLLR resulted in a reversible reduction in the frequency of locomotor-related bursting recorded from ventral roots of spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal mice. In the presence of the gliotoxins methionine sulfoximine or fluoroacetate, TFLLR had no effect, confirming the specificity of PAR1 activation to glia. The modulation of burst frequency upon PAR1 activation was blocked by the non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline and by the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, but not by the A2A-receptor antagonist SCH5826, indicating production of extracellular adenosine upon glial stimulation, followed by A1-receptor mediated inhibition of neuronal activity. Modulation of network output following glial stimulation was also blocked by the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, indicating glial release of ATP and its subsequent degradation to adenosine rather than direct release of adenosine. Glial stimulation had no effect on rhythmic activity recorded following blockade of inhibitory transmission, suggesting that glial cell-derived adenosine acts via inhibitory circuit components to modulate locomotor-related output. Finally, the modulation of network output by endogenous adenosine was found to scale with the

  10. Stimulation of Glia Reveals Modulation of Mammalian Spinal Motor Networks by Adenosine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Acton

    Full Text Available Despite considerable evidence that glia can release modulators to influence the excitability of neighbouring neurons, the importance of gliotransmission for the operation of neural networks and in shaping behaviour remains controversial. Here we characterise the contribution of glia to the modulation of the mammalian spinal central pattern generator for locomotion, the output of which is directly relatable to a defined behaviour. Glia were stimulated by specific activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1, an endogenous G-protein coupled receptor preferentially expressed by spinal glia during ongoing activity of the spinal central pattern generator for locomotion. Selective activation of PAR1 by the agonist TFLLR resulted in a reversible reduction in the frequency of locomotor-related bursting recorded from ventral roots of spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal mice. In the presence of the gliotoxins methionine sulfoximine or fluoroacetate, TFLLR had no effect, confirming the specificity of PAR1 activation to glia. The modulation of burst frequency upon PAR1 activation was blocked by the non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline and by the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, but not by the A2A-receptor antagonist SCH5826, indicating production of extracellular adenosine upon glial stimulation, followed by A1-receptor mediated inhibition of neuronal activity. Modulation of network output following glial stimulation was also blocked by the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, indicating glial release of ATP and its subsequent degradation to adenosine rather than direct release of adenosine. Glial stimulation had no effect on rhythmic activity recorded following blockade of inhibitory transmission, suggesting that glial cell-derived adenosine acts via inhibitory circuit components to modulate locomotor-related output. Finally, the modulation of network output by endogenous adenosine was found to

  11. AM-251 and rimonabant act as direct antagonists at mu-opioid receptors: implications for opioid/cannabinoid interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, Kathryn A; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Zimmerman, Sarah M; Fantegrossi, William E; Prather, Paul L

    2012-10-01

    Mu-opioid and CB1-cannabinoid agonists produce analgesia; however, adverse effects limit use of drugs in both classes. Additive or synergistic effects resulting from concurrent administration of low doses of mu- and CB1-agonists may produce analgesia with fewer side effects. Synergism potentially results from interaction between mu-opioid receptors (MORs) and CB1 receptors (CB1Rs). AM-251 and rimonabant are CB1R antagonist/inverse agonists employed to validate opioid-cannabinoid interactions, presumed to act selectively at CB1Rs. Therefore, the potential for direct action of these antagonists at MORs is rarely considered. This study determined if AM-251 and/or rimonabant directly bind and modulate the function of MORs. Surprisingly, AM-251 and rimonabant, but not a third CB1R inverse agonist AM-281, bind with mid-nanomolar affinity to human MORs with a rank order of affinity (K(i)) of AM-251 (251 nM) > rimonabant (652 nM) > AM281 (2135 nM). AM-251 and rimonabant, but not AM-281, also competitively antagonize morphine induced G-protein activation in CHO-hMOR cell homogenates (K(b) = 719 or 1310 nM, respectively). AM-251 and rimonabant block morphine inhibition of cAMP production, while only AM-251 elicits cAMP rebound in CHO-hMOR cells chronically exposed to morphine. AM-251 and rimonabant (10 mg/kg) attenuate morphine analgesia, whereas the same dose of AM-281 produces little effect. Therefore, in addition to high CB1R affinity, AM-251 and rimonabant bind to MORs with mid-nanomolar affinity and at higher doses may affect morphine analgesia via direct antagonism at MORs. Such CB1-independent of these antagonists effects may contribute to reported inconsistencies when CB1/MOR interactions are examined via pharmacological methods in CB1-knockout versus wild-type mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Attenuation of antagonist-induced impairment of dopamine receptors by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, M.I.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether chronic,long-term postnatal challenge of rat pups per se, with specific dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, would modify the ontogeny of the respective receptor types. Since the neuropeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) attenuates the effect of haloperidol on dopamine D2 receptors in adult rats it was of interest to determine whether PLG would modulate antagonists-induced alterations in the ontogeny of striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Half of the rats were treated daily for 32 days from birth with SCH-23390, a selective dopamine D1 antagonist; or spiroperidol, a selective dopamine D2 antagonists; or both SCH-23390 and spiroperidol; or saline. The other half of the litters were treated with PLG, in combination with the other treatments. Animals were decapitated at 5, 8, and 12 weeks from birth for neurochemical analysis of the striatum. Chronic SCH-23390 treatment produced a 70-80% decrease in the binding of [ 3 H] SCH-23390 to striatal homogenates. The alteration at 5 weeks was associated with a 78% decrease in the Bmax for [ 3 H] SCH-23390 binding, and no change in the K D . Similarly, at 5, 8, and 12 weeks, chronic spiroperidol treatment reduced the binding of [ 3 H] spiroperidol to striatal homogenates by 70-80%

  13. Study of the n-methyl-d-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough, J.H.; Shih, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A study of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs. PHARMACOL BIOCHEM BEHAV. 51(2/3) 249-253, 1995. Drugs that act at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex have the ability to terminate nerve agent-induced seizures and modulate the neuropathologic consequences of agent exposure. Drugs with mixed anticholinergic and anti-NMDA properties potentially provide an ideal class of compounds for development as anticonvulsant treatments for nerve agent casualties. The present experiment evaluated the potential NMDA antagonist activity of 11 anticholinergic drugs by determining whether pretreatment with the compound was capable of protecting mice from the lethal effects of NMDA. The following anticholinergic drugs antagonized NMDA lethality and are ranked according to their potency: mecamylamine > procyclidine = benactyzine > biperiden > tribexyphenidyl. The anticholinergics atropine, aprophen, azaprophen, benztropine, 3-quinudidinyl benzilate (QNB), and scopolamine failed to show NMDA antagonist properties. In addition, and unexpectedly, diazepam, ethanol, and pentobarbital were also shown to be capable of antagonizing NMDA lethality over a certain range of doses. The advantages and limitations of using antagonism of NMDA lethality in mice as a bioassay for determining the NMDA antagonist properties of drugs are also discussed.

  14. Interaction between Cannabinoid Type 1 and Type 2 Receptors in the Modulation of Subventricular Zone and Dentate Gyrus Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui S. Rodrigues

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain occurs mainly in two neurogenic niches, the subventricular zone (SVZ and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG. Cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptors (CB1R and CB2R have been shown to differently modulate neurogenesis. However, low attention has been given to the interaction between CB1R and CB2R in modulating postnatal neurogenesis (proliferation, neuronal differentiation and maturation. We focused on a putative crosstalk between CB1R and CB2R to modulate neurogenesis and cultured SVZ and DG stem/progenitor cells from early postnatal (P1-3 Sprague-Dawley rats. Data showed that the non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 promotes DG cell proliferation (measured by BrdU staining, an effect blocked by either CB1R or CB2R selective antagonists. Experiments with selective agonists showed that facilitation of DG cell proliferation requires co-activation of both CB1R and CB2R. Cell proliferation in the SVZ was not affected by the non-selective receptor agonist, but it was enhanced by CB1R selective activation. However, either CB1R or CB2R selective antagonists abolished the effect of the CB1R agonist in SVZ cell proliferation. Neuronal differentiation (measured by immunocytochemistry against neuronal markers of different stages and calcium imaging was facilitated by WIN55,212-2 at both SVZ and DG. This effect was mimicked by either CB1R or CB2R selective agonists and blocked by either CB1R or CB2R selective antagonists, cross-antagonism being evident. In summary, our findings indicate a tight interaction between CB1R and CB2R to modulate neurogenesis in the two major neurogenic niches, thus contributing to further unraveling the mechanisms behind the action of endocannabinoids in the brain.

  15. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D; Schiffmann, Serge N; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-07-07

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain.

  16. Emerging therapies for atopic dermatitis: TRPV1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonchak, Jonathan G; Swerlick, Robert A

    2018-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are important mediators of somatosensory signaling throughout the body. Our understanding of the contribution of TRPs to a multitude of cutaneous physiologic processes has grown substantially in the past decade. TRP cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), one of the better-understood members of this large family of ion channels, affects multiple pathways involved in pruritus. Further, TRPV1 appears to play a role in maintaining skin barrier function. Together, these properties make TRPV1 a ripe target for new therapies in atopic dermatitis. Neurokinin antagonists may affect similar pathways and have been studied to this effect. Early trials data suggest that these therapies are safe, but assessment of their efficacy in atopic dermatitis is pending as we await publication of phase II and III clinical trials data. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. MEMORY MODULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evidence from both animal and human research indicates that emotionally significant experiences activate hormonal and brain systems that regulate the consolidation of newly acquired memories. These effects are integrated through noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala which regulates memory consolidation via interactions with many other brain regions involved in consolidating memories of recent experiences. Modulatory systems not only influence neurobiological processes underlying the consolidation of new information, but also affect other mnemonic processes, including memory extinction, memory recall and working memory. In contrast to their enhancing effects on consolidation, adrenal stress hormones impair memory retrieval and working memory. Such effects, as with memory consolidation, require noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala and interactions with other brain regions. PMID:22122145

  18. Antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kölliker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In species across taxa, offspring have means to influence parental investment (PI. PI thus evolves as an interacting phenotype and indirect genetic effects may strongly affect the co-evolutionary dynamics of offspring and parental behaviors. Evolutionary theory focused on explaining how exaggerated offspring solicitation can be understood as resolution of parent-offspring conflict, but the evolutionary origin and diversification of different forms of family interactions remains unclear.In contrast to previous theory that largely uses a static approach to predict how "offspring individuals" and "parental individuals" should interact given conflict over PI, we present a dynamic theoretical framework of antagonistic selection on the PI individuals obtain/take as offspring and the PI they provide as parents to maximize individual lifetime reproductive success; we analyze a deterministic and a stochastic version of this dynamic framework. We show that a zone for equivalent co-adaptation outcomes exists in which stable levels of PI can evolve and be maintained despite fast strategy transitions and ongoing co-evolutionary dynamics. Under antagonistic co-adaptation, cost-free solicitation can evolve as an adaptation to emerging preferences in parents.We show that antagonistic selection across the offspring and parental life-stage of individuals favors co-adapted offspring and parental behavior within a zone of equivalent outcomes. This antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation does not require solicitation to be costly, allows for rapid divergence and evolutionary novelty and potentially explains the origin and diversification of the observed provisioning forms in family life.

  19. Antagonist potential of Trichoderma indigenous isolates for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Antagonist potential of Trichoderma indigenous isolates for biological control of Phytophthora palmivora the causative agent of black pod disease on cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) in Côte d'Ivoire. J. Mpika1,4*, I. B. Kébé1, A. E. Issali2, F.K. N'Guessan1, S. Druzhinina3, ...

  20. Medicinal Chemistry of Competitive Kainate Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1−5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure−activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  1. The sexually antagonistic genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Innocenti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available When selective pressures differ between males and females, the genes experiencing these conflicting evolutionary forces are said to be sexually antagonistic. Although the phenotypic effect of these genes has been documented in both wild and laboratory populations, their identity, number, and location remains unknown. Here, by combining data on sex-specific fitness and genome-wide transcript abundance in a quantitative genetic framework, we identified a group of candidate genes experiencing sexually antagonistic selection in the adult, which correspond to 8% of Drosophila melanogaster genes. As predicted, the X chromosome is enriched for these genes, but surprisingly they represent only a small proportion of the total number of sex-biased transcripts, indicating that the latter is a poor predictor of sexual antagonism. Furthermore, the majority of genes whose expression profiles showed a significant relationship with either male or female adult fitness are also sexually antagonistic. These results provide a first insight into the genetic basis of intralocus sexual conflict and indicate that genetic variation for fitness is dominated and maintained by sexual antagonism, potentially neutralizing any indirect genetic benefits of sexual selection.

  2. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) [ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor

  3. NMDA Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Ates-Alagoz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a psychiatric disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Individuals battling this disorder commonly experience high rates of relapse, persistent residual symptoms, functional impairment, and diminished well-being. Medications have important utility in stabilizing moods and daily functions of many individuals. However, only one third of patients had considerable improvement with a standard antidepressant after 2 months and all patients had to deal with numerous side effects. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor family has received special attention because of its critical role in psychiatric disorders. Direct targeting of the NMDA receptor could result in more rapid antidepressant effects. Antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists have been demonstrated in different animal models. MK-801 (a use-dependent channel blocker, and CGP 37849 (an NMDA receptor antagonist have shown antidepressant properties in preclinical studies, either alone or combined with traditional antidepressants. A recent development is use of ketamine clinically for refractory depression. The purpose of this review is to examine and analyze current literature on the role of NMDA receptor antagonists for treatment of depression and whether this is a feasible route in drug discovery.

  4. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  5. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis by Shade Relies on Specific Subsets of Antagonistic Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Cifuentes-Esquivel, Nicolas; Halliday, Karen J; Martinez-García, Jaime F; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Carotenoids are photosynthetic pigments essential for the protection against excess light. During deetiolation, their production is regulated by a dynamic repression-activation module formed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) and LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5). These transcription factors directly and oppositely control the expression of the gene encoding PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY), the first and main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. Antagonistic modules also regulate the responses of deetiolated plants to vegetation proximity and shade (i.e. to the perception of far-red light-enriched light filtered through or reflected from neighboring plants). These responses, aimed to adapt to eventual shading from plant competitors, include a reduced accumulation of carotenoids. Here, we show that PIF1 and related photolabile PIFs (but not photostable PIF7) promote the shade-triggered decrease in carotenoid accumulation. While HY5 does not appear to be required for this process, other known PIF antagonists were found to modulate the expression of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PSY gene and the biosynthesis of carotenoids early after exposure to shade. In particular, PHYTOCHROME-RAPIDLY REGULATED1, a transcriptional cofactor that prevents the binding of true transcription factors to their target promoters, was found to interact with PIF1 and hence directly induce PSY expression. By contrast, a change in the levels of the transcriptional cofactor LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR RED1, which also binds to PIF1 and other PIFs to regulate shade-related elongation responses, did not impact PSY expression or carotenoid accumulation. Our data suggest that the fine-regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in response to shade relies on specific modules of antagonistic transcriptional factors and cofactors. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Inhibition of tolerance to spinal morphine antinociception by low doses of opioid receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaull, Benjamin; Trang, Tuan; Sutak, Maaja; Jhamandas, Khem

    2007-04-10

    Ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists inhibit development of chronic spinal morphine tolerance. As this phenomenon mechanistically resembles acute tolerance, the present study examined actions of opioid receptor antagonists on acute spinal morphine tolerance. In adult rats, administration of three intrathecal injections of morphine (15 microg) at 90 min intervals produced a significant decline of the antinociceptive effect and loss of agonist potency in both the tail-flick and paw-pressure tests. These reduced responses, indicative of acute tolerance, were blocked by co-injection of morphine (15 microg) with naltrexone (NTX, 0.05 ng), D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTAP, 0.001 ng), naltrindole (0.06 ng), or nor-binaltorphimine (0.1 ng). Repeated injections of CTAP, naltrindole, or nor-binaltorphimine without morphine elicited a delayed weak antinociceptive response which was blocked by a high dose of naltrexone (2 microg). In another set of experiments, administration of low dose spinal (0.05 ng) or systemic (0.01 microg/kg) morphine produced a sustained thermal hyperalgesia. This response was blocked by opioid receptor antagonists at doses inhibiting development of acute morphine tolerance. Lastly, an acute spinal injection of morphine (15 microg) with naltrexone (0.05 ng) produced a sustained analgesic response; this was antagonized by adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (3 microg). The results show that ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists block acute tolerance to morphine. This effect may result from blockade of opioid excitatory effects that produce a latent hyperalgesia that then contributes to induction of tolerance. The sustained antinociception produced by combination of morphine with an opioid receptor antagonist shows dependency on the adenosine receptor activity.

  7. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  8. Investigation of orexin-2 selective receptor antagonists: Structural modifications resulting in dual orexin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skudlarek, Jason W; DiMarco, Christina N; Babaoglu, Kerim; Roecker, Anthony J; Bruno, Joseph G; Pausch, Mark A; O'Brien, Julie A; Cabalu, Tamara D; Stevens, Joanne; Brunner, Joseph; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Wuelfing, W Peter; Garson, Susan L; Fox, Steven V; Savitz, Alan T; Harrell, Charles M; Gotter, Anthony L; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J

    2017-03-15

    In an ongoing effort to explore the use of orexin receptor antagonists for the treatment of insomnia, dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) were structurally modified, resulting in compounds selective for the OX 2 R subtype and culminating in the discovery of 23, a highly potent, OX 2 R-selective molecule that exhibited a promising in vivo profile. Further structural modification led to an unexpected restoration of OX 1 R antagonism. Herein, these changes are discussed and a rationale for selectivity based on computational modeling is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduction of periodontal pathogens adhesion by antagonistic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoogmoed, C G; Geertsema-Doornbusch, G I; Teughels, W; Quirynen, M; Busscher, H J; Van der Mei, H C

    2008-02-01

    Periodontitis results from a shift in the subgingival microflora into a more pathogenic direction with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans considered as periodontopathogens. In many cases, treatment procures only a temporary shift towards a less pathogenic microflora. An alternative treatment could be the deliberate colonization of pockets with antagonistic microorganisms to control the adhesion of periodontopathogens. The aim of this study was to identify bacterial strains that reduce adhesion of periodontopathogens to surfaces. Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus crista, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Haemophilus parainfluenzae were evaluated as potential antagonists against P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, P. intermedia ATCC 49046, and A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718 as periodontopathogens. Adhesion of periodontopathogens to the bottom plate of a parallel plate flow chamber was studied in the absence (control) and the presence of pre-adhering antagonistic strains up to a surface coverage of 5%. The largest reduction caused by antagonistic strains was observed for P. gingivalis. All antagonistic strains except S. crista ATCC 49999 inhibited the adhesion of P. gingivalis by at least 1.6 cells per adhering antagonist, with the largest significant reduction observed for A. naeslundii ATCC 51655 (3.8 cells per adhering antagonist). Adhering antagonists had a minimal effect on the adhesion of A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718. Intermediate but significant reductions were perceived for P. intermedia, most notably caused by S. mitis BMS. The adhesion of P. gingivalis was inhibited best by antagonistic strains, while S. mitis BMS appeared to be the most successful antagonist.

  10. Effects of cannabinoid and glutamate receptor antagonists and their interactions on learning and memory in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Somayeh; Komaki, Alireza; Shahidi, Siamak; Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Mirazi, Naser; Salehi, Iraj

    2015-04-01

    Despite previous findings on the effects of cannabinoid and glutamatergic systems on learning and memory, the effects of the combined stimulation or the simultaneous inactivation of these two systems on learning and memory have not been studied. In addition, it is not clear whether the effects of the cannabinoid system on learning and memory occur through the modulation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Hence, in this study, we examined the effects of the simultaneous inactivation of the cannabinoid and glutamatergic systems on learning and memory using a passive avoidance (PA) test in rats. On the test day, AM251, which is a CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist; MK-801, which is a glutamate receptor antagonist; or both substances were injected intraperitoneally into male Wistar rats 30min before placing the animal in a shuttle box. A learning test (acquisition) was then performed, and a retrieval test was performed the following day. Learning and memory in the PA test were significantly different among the groups. The CB1 receptor antagonist improved the scores on the PA acquisition and retention tests. However, the glutamatergic receptor antagonist decreased the acquisition and retrieval scores on the PA task. The CB1 receptor antagonist partly decreased the glutamatergic receptor antagonist effects on PA learning and memory. These results indicated that the acute administration of a CB1 antagonist improved cognitive performance on a PA task in normal rats and that a glutamate-related mechanism may underlie the antagonism of cannabinoid by AM251 in learning and memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals different neural substrates for the effects of orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gozzi

    Full Text Available Orexins are neuro-modulatory peptides involved in the control of diverse physiological functions through interaction with two receptors, orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R. Recent evidence in pre-clinical models points toward a putative dichotomic role of the two receptors, with OX2R predominantly involved in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle and arousal, and the OX1R being more specifically involved in reward processing and motivated behaviour. However, the specific neural substrates underlying these distinct processes in the rat brain remain to be elucidated. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in the rat to map the modulatory effect of selective OXR blockade on the functional response produced by D-amphetamine, a psychostimulant and arousing drug that stimulates orexigenic activity. OXR blockade was produced by GSK1059865 and JNJ1037049, two novel OX1R and OX2R antagonists with unprecedented selectivity at the counter receptor type. Both drugs inhibited the functional response to D-amphetamine albeit with distinct neuroanatomical patterns: GSK1059865 focally modulated functional responses in striatal terminals, whereas JNJ1037049 induced a widespread pattern of attenuation characterised by a prominent cortical involvement. At the same doses tested in the fMRI study, JNJ1037049 exhibited robust hypnotic properties, while GSK1059865 failed to display significant sleep-promoting effects, but significantly reduced drug-seeking behaviour in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. Collectively, these findings highlight an essential contribution of the OX2R in modulating cortical activity and arousal, an effect that is consistent with the robust hypnotic effect exhibited by JNJ1037049. The subcortical and striatal pattern observed with GSK1059865 represent a possible neurofunctional correlate for the modulatory role of OX1R in controlling reward-processing and goal-oriented behaviours in the rat.

  12. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Different Neural Substrates for the Effects of Orexin-1 and Orexin-2 Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzi, Alessandro; Turrini, Giuliano; Piccoli, Laura; Massagrande, Mario; Amantini, David; Antolini, Marinella; Martinelli, Prisca; Cesari, Nicola; Montanari, Dino; Tessari, Michela; Corsi, Mauro; Bifone, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    Orexins are neuro-modulatory peptides involved in the control of diverse physiological functions through interaction with two receptors, orexin-1 (OX1R) and orexin-2 (OX2R). Recent evidence in pre-clinical models points toward a putative dichotomic role of the two receptors, with OX2R predominantly involved in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle and arousal, and the OX1R being more specifically involved in reward processing and motivated behaviour. However, the specific neural substrates underlying these distinct processes in the rat brain remain to be elucidated. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the rat to map the modulatory effect of selective OXR blockade on the functional response produced by D-amphetamine, a psychostimulant and arousing drug that stimulates orexigenic activity. OXR blockade was produced by GSK1059865 and JNJ1037049, two novel OX1R and OX2R antagonists with unprecedented selectivity at the counter receptor type. Both drugs inhibited the functional response to D-amphetamine albeit with distinct neuroanatomical patterns: GSK1059865 focally modulated functional responses in striatal terminals, whereas JNJ1037049 induced a widespread pattern of attenuation characterised by a prominent cortical involvement. At the same doses tested in the fMRI study, JNJ1037049 exhibited robust hypnotic properties, while GSK1059865 failed to display significant sleep-promoting effects, but significantly reduced drug-seeking behaviour in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. Collectively, these findings highlight an essential contribution of the OX2R in modulating cortical activity and arousal, an effect that is consistent with the robust hypnotic effect exhibited by JNJ1037049. The subcortical and striatal pattern observed with GSK1059865 represent a possible neurofunctional correlate for the modulatory role of OX1R in controlling reward-processing and goal-oriented behaviours in the rat. PMID:21307957

  13. DNA Methylation Modulates Nociceptive Sensitization after Incision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Sun

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling DNA accessibility and gene expression. Blockade of DNA methylation can significantly affect pain behaviors implicated in neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the role of DNA methylation with regard to postoperative pain has not yet been explored. In this study we sought to investigate the role of DNA methylation in modulating incisional pain and identify possible targets under DNA methylation and contributing to incisional pain. DNA methyltranferase (DNMT inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine significantly reduced incision-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal sensitivity. Aza-2'-deoxycytidine also reduced hindpaw swelling after incision, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. Global DNA methylation and DNMT3b expression were increased in skin after incision, but none of DNMT1, DNMT3a or DNMT3b was altered in spinal cord or DRG. The expression of proopiomelanocortin Pomc encoding β-endorphin and Oprm1 encoding the mu-opioid receptor were upregulated peripherally after incision; moreover, Oprm1 expression was further increased under DNMT inhibitor treatment. Finally, local peripheral injection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone significantly exacerbated incision-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These results suggest that DNA methylation is functionally relevant to incisional nociceptive sensitization, and that mu-opioid receptor signaling might be one methylation regulated pathway controlling sensitization after incision.

  14. Cholinergic modulation, visual function and Alzheimer's dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, L; Sannita, W G

    1997-12-01

    Electrophysiological evidence at a cellular level and in vivo macroelectrode recordings converge in indicating a degree of specificity of acetylcholine action in vision. Acetylcholine (ACh) function is also thought to play a significant role in memory, learning and other cognitive processes. In this respect, ACh action is suggested to serve in both sensory and cognitive processes. The pharmacological blocking of brain muscarinic transmission has been proposed as a model of geriatric memory impairment and Alzheimer's dementia. Visual electrophysiological testing is deemed of diagnostic specificity for this disease. ACh brain neurotransmission, however, mostly contributes to the modulation of nonspecific aspects of cognition, such as arousal or attention. Alzheimer's dementia results from complex neuron alterations [which also affect muscarinic receptors among other (sub)cellular structures] rather than simply reflecting ACh impoverishment. A substantial loss of retinal ganglion cells is documented in patients with Alzheimer's disease and is consistent with electrophysiological observations. However, it is unclear to what extent the dysfunction of the visual system observable in Alzheimer's dementia is qualitatively different from that occurring spontaneously during aging. The dissimilarities between the effect of acute muscarinic blocking (e.g. by scopolamine) and dementia outnumber the similarities. Accordingly, the conventional ACh agonist-antagonist model of dementia now appears questionable, and replacement treatment with compounds enhancing ACh function proved disappointing. It is suggested that (nonspecific) ACh action becomes function-specific, as determined by the architecture of local brain circuits in which it is involved.

  15. Investigating Aging-Related Changes in the Coordination of Agonist and Antagonist Muscles Using Fuzzy Entropy and Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging alters muscular coordination patterns. This study aimed to investigate aging-related changes in the coordination of agonist and antagonist muscles from two aspects, the activities of individual muscles and the inter-muscular coupling. Eighteen young subjects and 10 elderly subjects were recruited to modulate the agonist muscle activity to track a target during voluntary isometric elbow flexion and extension. Normalized muscle activation and fuzzy entropy (FuzzyEn were applied to depict the activities of biceps and triceps. Mutual information (MI was utilized to measure the inter-muscular coupling between biceps and triceps. The agonist activation decreased and the antagonist activation increased significantly during elbow flexion and extension with aging. FuzzyEn values of agonist electromyogram (EMG were similar between the two age groups. FuzzyEn values of antagonist EMG increased significantly with aging during elbow extension. MI decreased significantly with aging during elbow extension. These results indicated increased antagonist co-activation and decreased inter-muscular coupling with aging during elbow extension, which might result from the reduced reciprocal inhibition and the recruitment of additional cortical-spinal pathways connected to biceps. Based on FuzzyEn and MI, this study provided a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying the aging-related changes in the coordination of agonist and antagonist muscles.

  16. Adenosine receptor antagonist and augmented vasodilation during hypoxic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Darren P; Madery, Brandon D; Pike, Tasha L; Eisenach, John H; Dietz, Niki M; Joyner, Michael J; Wilkins, Brad W

    2009-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adenosine contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilation during hypoxic exercise. In separate protocols, subjects performed incremental rhythmic forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n = 8), subjects received an intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist). In protocol 2 (n = 10), subjects received intra-arterial phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) and combined phentolamine and aminophylline administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml x min(-1).100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from forearm blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (DeltaFVC; change from normoxic baseline) during hypoxic exercise with saline was 172 +/- 29 and 314 +/- 34 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20%, respectively). Aminophylline administration did not affect DeltaFVC during hypoxic exercise at 10% (190 +/- 29 ml x min(-1)x100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.4) or 20% (287 +/- 48 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.3). In protocol 2, DeltaFVC due to hypoxic exercise with phentolamine infusion was 313 +/- 30 and 453 +/- 41 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20% respectively). DeltaFVC was similar at 10% (352 +/- 39 ml min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.8) and 20% (528 +/- 45 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.2) hypoxic exercise with combined phentolamine and aminophylline. In contrast, DeltaFVC to exogenous adenosine was reduced by aminophylline administration in both protocols (P < 0.05 for both). These observations suggest that adenosine receptor activation is not obligatory for the augmented hyperemia during hypoxic exercise in humans.

  17. Diphenyl Purine Derivatives as Peripherally Selective Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulp, Alan; Bortoff, Katherine; Zhang, Yanan; Seltzman, Herbert; Mathews, James; Snyder, Rodney; Fennell, Tim; Maitra, Rangan

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists are potentially useful for the treatment of several diseases. However, clinical development of several CB1 antagonists was halted due to central nervous system (CNS)-related side effects including depression and suicidal ideation in some users. Recently, studies have indicated that selective regulation of CB1 receptors in the periphery is a viable strategy for treating several important disorders. Past efforts to develop peripherally selective antagonists of CB1 have largely targeted rimonabant, an inverse agonist of CB1. Reported here are our efforts toward developing a peripherally selective CB1 antagonist based on the otenabant scaffold. Even though otenabant penetrates the CNS, it is unique among CB1 antagonists that have been clinically tested because it has properties that are normally associated with peripherally selective compounds. Our efforts have resulted in an orally absorbed compound that is a potent and selective CB1 antagonist with limited penetration into the CNS. PMID:23098108

  18. Hypocretin antagonists in insomnia treatment and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Chad; Cao, Michelle; Guilleminault, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep through stabilization of sleep promoting GABAergic and wake promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. Hypocretin also influences other physiologic processes such as metabolism, appetite, learning and memory, reward and addiction, and ventilatory drive. The discovery of hypocretin and its effect upon the sleep-wake cycle has led to the development of a new class of pharmacologic agents that antagonize the physiologic effects of hypocretin (i.e. hypocretin antagonists). Further investigation of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side-effect profile of currently available hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, confusional arousals, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle while also influencing non-sleep physiologic processes may create an entirely different but equally concerning side-effect profile such as transient loss of muscle tone (i.e. cataplexy) and a dampened respiratory drive. In this review, we will discuss the discovery of hypocretin and its receptors, hypocretin and the sleep-wake cycle, hypocretin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia, and other implicated functions of the hypocretin system.

  19. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Camperio Ciani

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness, accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  20. Sexually Antagonistic Selection in Human Male Homosexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling ‘Darwinian paradox’. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait. PMID:18560521

  1. Improvement of chronic hepatic encephalopathy in dogs by the benzodiazepine-receptor partial inverse agonist sarmazenil, but not by the antagonist flumazenil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, H. P.; Legemate, D. A.; van den Brom, W.; Rothuizen, J.

    1998-01-01

    Therapeutic modulation of the increased GABAergic tone in chronic hepatic encephalopathy (HE) by the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) antagonist flumazenil (F) has led to conflicting results in humans and animal models for HE. The BR inverse agonist sarmazenil (S) has only been used in animal models of

  2. Tomato histone H2B monoubiquitination enzymes SlHUB1 and SlHUB2 contribute to disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea through modulating the balance between SA- and JA/ET-mediated signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafen; Li, Dayong; Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Li, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Zhigang; Song, Fengming

    2015-10-21

    -silenced plants after infection of B. cinerea. VIGS-based functional analyses demonstrate that both SlHUB1 and SlHUB2 contribute to resistance against B. cinerea most likely through modulating the balance between the SA- and JA/ET-mediated signaling pathways.

  3. The Attractiveness of Opposites: Agonists and Antagonists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Tony

    2015-02-02

    ABSTRACT Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, of which constipation is the most common aspect, is a major limiting factor in the use of opioids for pain management. The availability of an oral, long-acting formulation of oxycodone and naloxone represents a highly significant development in pain management. The combination of an opioid analgesic with an opioid antagonist offers reliable pain control with a significant reduction in the burden of opioid-induced constipation. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 3, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd, and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http:\\/\\/www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  4. Calcium antagonists and the diabetic hypertensive patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Rossing, P

    1993-01-01

    reduces albuminuria, delays the progression of nephropathy, and postpones renal insufficiency in diabetic nephropathy. Calcium antagonists and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors induce an acute increase in the glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and renal sodium excretion......Roughly 40% of all diabetic patients, whether insulin dependent or not, develop persistent albuminuria (over 300 mg/24 hr), a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate, and elevated blood pressure, ie, diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is the single most important cause of end stage renal...... disease in the Western world, and accounts for over a quarter of all end stage renal disease. It also is a major cause of the increased morbidity and mortality seen in diabetic patients; for example, the cost of end stage renal care in the United States currently exceeds +1.8 billion per year for diabetic...

  5. Assay method for organic calcium antagonist drugs and a kit for such an assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S. H.; Gould, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring the level of organic calcium antagonist drug in a body fluid comprises preparing a mixture of a radioactive calcium antagonist drug, a body fluid containing a calcium antagonist drug and a calcium antagonist receptor material, measuring the radioactivity of the radioactive calcium antagonist drug bound to said calcium antagonist receptor material and deriving the concentration of the calcium antagonist drug in the body fluid from a standard curve indicating the concentration of calcium antagonist drug versus inhibition of binding of said radioactive calcium antagonist drug to said receptor sites caused by the calcium antagonist drug in said body fluid. A kit for measuring the level of an organic calcium drug comprises a receptacle containing a radioactive calcium antagonist drug, a calcium antagonist receptor material and a standard amount of a nonradioactive calcium antagonist drug

  6. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  7. Selective estrogen receptor modulators: tissue specificity and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinkovich S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Martinkovich,* Darshan Shah,* Sonia Lobo Planey, John A ArnottDepartment of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, Scranton, PA, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs are a diverse group of ­nonsteroidal compounds that function as agonists or antagonists for estrogen receptors (ERs in a target gene-specific and tissue-specific fashion. SERM specificity involves tissue-specific expression of ER subtypes, differential expression of co-regulatory proteins in various tissues, and varying ER conformational changes induced by ligand binding. To date, the major clinical applications of SERMs are their use in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, the prevention of osteoporosis, and the maintenance of beneficial serum lipid profiles in postmenopausal women. However, SERMs have also been found to promote adverse effects, including thromboembolic events and, in some cases, carcinogenesis, that have proven to be obstacles in their clinical utility. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of SERM tissue specificity and highlight the therapeutic application of well-known and emergent SERMs.Keywords: selective estrogen receptor modulators, SERMs, estrogen receptors

  8. Developmental Bisphenol A Exposure Modulates Immune-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joella Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA, used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, has a widespread exposure to humans. BPA is of concern for developmental exposure resulting in immunomodulation and disease development due to its ability to cross the placental barrier and presence in breast milk. BPA can use various mechanisms to modulate the immune system and affect diseases, including agonistic and antagonistic effects on many receptors (e.g., estrogen receptors, epigenetic modifications, acting on cell signaling pathways and, likely, the gut microbiome. Immune cell populations and function from the innate and adaptive immune system are altered by developmental BPA exposure, including decreased T regulatory (Treg cells and upregulated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Developmental BPA exposure can also contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, allergy, asthma and mammary cancer disease by altering immune function. Multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus may also be exacerbated by BPA, although more research is needed. Additionally, BPA analogs, such as bisphenol S (BPS, have been increasing in use, and currently, little is known about their immune effects. Therefore, more studies should be conducted to determine if developmental exposure BPA and its analogs modulate immune responses and lead to immune-related diseases.

  9. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology, nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance, physiological (pH, temperature and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate, soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are

  10. Modulational instability of nematic phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... T Mithun K Porsezian. Contributed Papers Volume 82 Issue 2 February 2014 pp 307-312 ... Abstract. We numerically observe the effect of homogeneous magnetic field on the modulationally stable case of polar phase in = 2 spinor Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs). Also we investigate the modulational ...

  11. REVIEWING AND IDENTIFYING AMINO ACIDS OF HUMAN, MURINE, CANINE AND EQUINE TLR4 / MD-2 RECEPTOR COMPLEXES CONFERRING ENDOTOXIC INNATE IMMUNITY ACTIVATION BY LPS/LIPID A, OR ANTAGONISTIC EFFECTS BY ERITORAN, IN CONTRAST TO SPECIES-DEPENDENT MODULATION BY LIPID IVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Scior

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There is literature evidence gathered throughout the last two decades reflecting unexpected species differences concerning the immune response to lipid IVa which provides the opportunity to gain more detailed insight by the molecular modeling approach described in this study. Lipid IVa is a tetra-acylated precursor of lipid A in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid A of the prototypic E. coli-type is a hexa-acylated structure that acts as an agonist in all tested mammalian species by innate immunorecognition via the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2 receptor complex. In contrast, lipid IVa is proinflammatory in mouse cells (agonism but it remains inactive to human macrophages and even antagonizes the action of potent agonists like E. coli-type lipid A. This particular ambivalent activity profile of lipid IVa has been confirmed in other mammalian species: in equine cells Lipid IVa also acts in a weak agonistic manner, whereas being inactive and antagonizing the lipid A-induced activation of canine TLR4/MD-2. Intriguingly, the respective TLR4 amino acid sequences of the latter species are more identical to the human (67%, 68% than to the murine (62%, 58% ortholog. In order to address the unpaired activity-sequence dualism for human, murine, canine and equine species regarding the activity of lipid IVa as compared to LPS and lipid A and, we review the literature and computationally pinpoint the differential biological effects of lipid IVa versus LPS and lipid A to specific amino acid residues. In contrast to lipid IVa the structurally related synthetic compound Eritoran (E5564 acts consistently in an antagonistic manner in these mammalian species and serves as a reference ligand for molecular modeling in this study. The combined evaluation of data sets provided by prior studies and in silico homology mapping of differential residues of TLR4/MD-2 complexes lends detailed insight

  12. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    Effectiveness Directorate, Biosciences and Protection Division, Warfighter Fatigue Countermeasures Branch. 35. Golden, C.J. (1978). Stroop Color and Word Test: A...0080 TITLE: Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Thomas Neylan...31August2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH

  13. Using waste of Tofu production improved antagonistic activities of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs. Hoa

    2012-10-04

    Oct 4, 2012 ... screened for their antagonistic activity against 10 races of Xoo causing rice bacterial blight disease. Three actinomycete strains ... antagonistic activity of VN10-A-44 against the Xoo pathogen and to make use of tofu waste for large- ..... vitamins and some essential amino acids which are very important for ...

  14. Thrombin-receptor antagonist vorapaxar in acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoci, Pierluigi; Huang, Zhen; Held, Claes

    2012-01-01

    Vorapaxar is a new oral protease-activated-receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist that inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation.......Vorapaxar is a new oral protease-activated-receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist that inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation....

  15. Evaluation of antagonistic fungi against charcoal rot of sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro, sensitivity of Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid determined through inhibition zone technique to various antagonistic fungi viz., Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma harzianum and Penicillium capsulatum amended into PDA medium. All the antagonists reduced the colony ...

  16. Calcium antagonists for ischemic stroke: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, J.; Limburg, M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke is a common disease, and many trials with calcium antagonists as possible neuroprotective agents have been conducted. The aim of this review is to determine whether calcium antagonists reduce the risk of death or dependency after acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: Acute

  17. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  18. Interaction between Antagonist of Cannabinoid Receptor and Antagonist of Adrenergic Receptor on Anxiety in Male Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Komaki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anxiety is among the most common and treatable mental disorders. Adrenergic and cannabinoid systems have an important role in the neurobiology of anxiety. The elevated plus-maze (EPM has broadly been used to investigate anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds. The present study investigated the effects of intraperitoneal (IP injection of cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist (AM251 in the presence of alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist (Prazosin on rat behavior in the EPM. Methods: In this study, the data were obtained from male Wistar rat, which weighing 200- 250 g. Animal behavior in EPM were videotaped and saved in computer for 10 min after IP injection of saline, AM251 (0.3 mg/kg, Prazosin (0.3 mg/kg and AM251 + Prazosin, subsequently scored for conventional indices of anxiety. During the test period, the number of open and closed arms entries, the percentage of entries into the open arms of the EPM, and the spent time in open and closed arms were recorded. Diazepam was considered as a positive control drug with anxiolytic effect (0.3, 0.6, 1.2 mg/kg. Results: Diazepam increased the number of open arm entries and the percentage of spent time on the open arms. IP injection of AM251 before EPM trial decreased open arms exploration and open arm entry. Whereas, Prazosin increased open arms exploration and open arm entry. This study showed that both substances in simultaneous injection have conflicting effects on the responses of each of these two compounds in a single injection. Discussion: Injection of CB1 receptor antagonist may have an anxiogenic profile in rat, whereas adrenergic antagonist has an anxiolytic effect. Further investigations are essential for better understanding of anxiolytic and anxiogenic properties and neurobiological mechanisms of action and probable interactions of the two systems.

  19. Synergism between dexketoprofen and meloxicam in an orofacial formalin test was not modified by opioid antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Claudia; Zegpi, Carlos; Noriega, Viviana; Prieto, Juan C; Miranda, Hugo F

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used drugs for the management of acute and chronic pain. The role of the opioid system in the synergism between NSAIDs is not well characterized. Mice were injected with a 5% formalin solution (20 μl) into the upper right lip to perform an orofacial formalin test. The isobolographic method was used to determine the interaction between dexketoprofen, which is the (S)-(+) enantiomer of ketoprofen, and meloxicam co-administration. Additionally, the non-selective, opioid antagonist naltrexone, the selective δ opioid receptor (DOP) antagonist naltrindole and the selective κ opioid receptor (KOP) antagonist norbinaltorphimine were used to assess the opioid effects on this interaction. Intraperitoneal administration of dexketoprofen or meloxicam induced dose-dependent antinociception with different phase I and phase II potencies in the orofacial formalin test. Meloxicam displayed similar potencies (ED(50)) in phase I (7.20 mg/kg) and phase II (8.60 mg/kg). Dexketoprofen was more potent in phase I (19.96 mg/kg) than in phase II (50.90 mg/kg). The interactions between dexketoprofen and meloxicam were synergistic in both phases. This was determined based on the fixed ratios (1:1) of their ED(50) values, which were determined by isobolographic analysis. Furthermore, this antinociceptive activity does not seem to be modulated by opioid receptor blockers because they did not induce changes in the nature of this interaction. This finding may be relevant with regards to NSAID multi-modal analgesia where an opioid antagonist must be used.

  20. Cross-reactivity of acid-sensing ion channel and Na⁺-H⁺ exchanger antagonists with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Torres, Julio; Ślimak, Marta A; Auer, Sebastian; Ibañez-Tallon, Inés

    2011-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed throughout the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems, where they contribute to neuronal excitability and synaptic communication. It has been reported that nAChRs are modulated by BK channels and that BK channels, in turn, are inhibited by acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). Here we investigate the possible functional interaction between these channels in medial habenula (MHb) neurones. We report that selective antagonists of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and ASIC1a channels, paxilline and psalmotoxin 1, respectively, did not induce detectable changes in nicotine-evoked currents. In contrast, the non-selective ASIC and Na(+)-H(+) exchanger (NHE1) antagonists, amiloride and its analogues, suppressed nicotine-evoked responses in MHb neurones of wild-type and ASIC2 null mice, excluding a possible involvement of ASIC2 in the nAChR inhibition by amiloride. Zoniporide, a more selective inhibitor of NHE1, reversibly inhibited α3β4-, α7- and α4-containing (*) nAChRs in Xenopus oocytes and in brain slices, as well as in PS120 cells deficient in NHE1 and virally transduced with nAChRs, suggesting a generalized effect of zoniporide in most neuronal nAChR subtypes. Independently from nAChR antagonism, zoniporide profoundly blocked synaptic transmission onto MHb neurones without affecting glutamatergic and GABA receptors. Taken together, these results indicate that amiloride and zoniporide, which are clinically used to treat hypertension and cardiovascular disease, have an inhibitory effect on neuronal nAChRs when used experimentally at high doses. The possible cross-reactivity of these compounds with nAChRs in vivo will require further investigation.

  1. Selective A2A receptor antagonist prevents microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and protects retinal ganglion cells from high intraocular pressure-induced transient ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Maria H; Boia, Raquel; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-03-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness worldwide, characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. Reactive microglial cells have been recognized as a neuropathologic feature, contributing to local inflammation and retinal neurodegeneration. In a recent in vitro work (organotypic cultures), we demonstrated that blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) prevents the neuroinflammatory response and affords protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) against exposure to elevated hydrostatic pressure (EHP), to mimic elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), the main risk factor for glaucoma development. Herein, we investigated whether a selective A2AR antagonist (SCH 58261) could modulate retinal microglia reactivity and their inflammatory response. Furthermore, we took advantage of the high IOP-induced transient ischemia (ischemia-reperfusion, I-R) animal model to evaluate the protective role of A2AR blockade in the control of retinal neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Primary microglial cell cultures were challenged either with lipopolysaccharide or with EHP, in the presence or absence of A2AR antagonist SCH 58261 (50 nM). In addition, I-R injury was induced in adult Wistar rats after intravitreal administration of SCH 58261 (100 nM, 5 μL). Our results showed that SCH 58261 attenuated microglia reactivity and the increased expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, intravitreal administration of SCH 58261 prevented I-R-induced cell death and RGC loss, by controlling microglial-mediated neuroinflammatory response. These results prompt the proposal that A2AR blockade may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by microglia reactivity and RGC death, such as glaucoma and ischemic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Progesterone receptor modulators in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    WIEHLE, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer has been treated successfully with selective estrogen receptor antagonists (SERMs) such as tamoxifen, receptor-depleting agents such as fulvestrant, and aromatase inhibitors such as anastrozole. Selective progesterone receptor modulators (SPRMs or PRMs) have not been studied as much and are currently under investigation for inhibition of mammary carcinogenesis in animal models and breast cancer prevention trials in women. They might follow tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors in t...

  3. Functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at the 5-HT3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, B; Wetzel, C H; Pestel, E; Zieglgänsberger, W; Holsboer, F; Rupprecht, R

    1996-08-23

    The atypical neuroleptic clozapine is thought to exert its psychopharmacological actions through a variety of neurotransmitter receptors. It binds preferentially to D4 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, little is known on it's interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor. Using a cell line stably expressing the 5-HT3 receptor, whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis revealed functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at low nanomolar concentrations in view of a binding affinity in the upper nanomolar range. Because the concentration of clozapine required for an interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor can be achieved with therapeutical doses, functional antagonistic properties at this ligand-gated ion channel may contribute to its unique psychopharmacological profile.

  4. Host modulation by therapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugumari Elavarasu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease susceptible group present advanced periodontal breakdown even though they achieve a high standard of oral hygiene. Various destructive enzymes and inflammatory mediators are involved in destruction. These are elevated in case of periodontal destruction. Host modulation aims at bringing these enzymes and mediators to normal level. Doxycycline, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, bisphosphonates, nitrous oxide (NO synthase inhibitors, recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11, omega-3 fatty acid, mouse anti-human interleukin-6 receptor antibody (MRA, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitors, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kb inhibitors, osteoprotegerin, and tumor necrosis factor antagonist (TNF-α are some of the therapeutic agents that have host modulation properties.

  5. Current position of 5HT3 antagonists and the additional value of NK1 antagonists; a new class of antiemetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Wit (Ronald)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe advent of the 5HT3 receptor antagonists (5HT3 antagonists) in the 1990s and the combination with dexamethasone has resulted in acute emesis protection in 70% of patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Despite complete protection in the acute phase, however, 40% of patients

  6. Adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors in mouse prefrontal cortex modulate acetylcholine release and behavioral arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dort, Christa J; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2009-01-21

    During prolonged intervals of wakefulness, brain adenosine levels rise within the basal forebrain and cortex. The view that adenosine promotes sleep is supported by the corollary that N-methylated xanthines such as caffeine increase brain and behavioral arousal by blocking adenosine receptors. The four subtypes of adenosine receptors are distributed heterogeneously throughout the brain, yet the neurotransmitter systems and brain regions through which adenosine receptor blockade causes arousal are incompletely understood. This study tested the hypothesis that adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex contribute to the regulation of behavioral and cortical arousal. Dependent measures included acetylcholine (ACh) release in the prefrontal cortex, cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power, and time to waking after anesthesia. Sleep and wakefulness were also quantified after microinjecting an adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist into the prefrontal cortex. The results showed that adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex modulate cortical ACh release, behavioral arousal, EEG delta power, and sleep. Additional dual microdialysis studies revealed that ACh release in the pontine reticular formation is significantly altered by dialysis delivery of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists to the prefrontal cortex. These data, and early brain transection studies demonstrating that the forebrain is not needed for sleep cycle generation, suggest that the prefrontal cortex modulates EEG and behavioral arousal via descending input to the pontine brainstem. The results provide novel evidence that adenosine A(1) receptors within the prefrontal cortex comprise part of a descending system that inhibits wakefulness.

  7. Anaphylactic shock: catecholamine actions in the responses to opioid antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, S

    1988-01-01

    The pathophysiological consequences of endorphin release in anaphylactic shock were investigated through pharmacological studies using opiate antagonists (naloxone, naltrexone, natrexone methyl bromide) as well as agonists (morphine, beta-endorphin). These studies suggest that induction of anaphylaxis provokes the release of endogenous opioids, possibly from the hypothalamus, which contribute to the shock process by stimulating opiate receptors in the CNS. The mechanism of pathophysiologic action of endorphin in anaphylaxis involves, at least in part, inhibition of the central component of the sympatho-adrenalmedullary system. This results in reduced effectiveness of the sympathetic system to physiologically reverse the circulatory effects of the toxic mediators of anaphylaxis. Naloxone, by blocking endorphin action at CNS opiate receptors located at autonomic regulatory centers (e.g. hypothalamus), reverses the sympatho-inhibitory effect of the endorphin peptides. This results in increased central sympathetic outflow to peripheral sympathetic neuroeffector mechanisms; it affords improved sympathetic compensatory responses and increases survival. TRH and DT gamma E physiologically oppose the action of endorphins upon the autonomic system. They stimulate central sympathetic mechanisms through their own receptor systems and increase outflow to peripheral sympathetic effectors. This also results in improved circulatory function and survival.

  8. Micro1-opioid antagonist naloxonazine alters ethanol discrimination and consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Molina; Holloway, Frank

    2003-02-01

    The endogenous opioid system is implicated in excessive ethanol-drinking behavior. However, the role of individual opioid receptor subtypes in the mechanism underlying excessive ethanol-drinking behavior is not yet well understood. Therefore, we investigated the ability of a selective micro1-opioid antagonist, naloxonazine, to modulate ethanol-drinking behavior and ethanol discrimination in a rat model with the use of ethanol self-administration and drug discrimination paradigms. The effects of naloxonazine (0.001-10 mg/kg) on ethanol intake were examined in Sprague-Dawley rats under conditions of limited access to 10% (wt./vol.) ethanol and ad libitum access to food and water. Pretreatment with high doses of naloxonazine (1-10 mg/kg) significantly reduced ethanol consumption. When the effects of naloxonazine on food intake in free-feeding male rats were examined, naloxonazine (1.8-10 mg/kg) significantly suppressed 24-h food intake. Another group of rats was trained to discriminate ethanol (1.25 g/kg, i.p.) from saline on a fixed-ratio schedule (FR 10), and ethanol dose-response tests were conducted once rats had acquired ethanol-saline discrimination. Injections were given 15 min before ethanol dose-response tests were conducted, and after characterization of the ethanol dose-response curve, the effects of naloxonazine on ethanol discrimination were assessed by administering naloxonazine (0.001-10 mg/kg, i.p.) 15 min before ethanol administration. Treatment with naloxonazine (0.001-1.8 mg/kg, i.p.) before the ED(100) dose of ethanol partially antagonized the discriminative stimulus of ethanol without having any effect on the response rate. The results support the suggestion of involvement of micro1-opioid receptors in the discriminative effects of ethanol and ethanol-drinking behavior.

  9. Antagonist Functional Selectivity: 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Antagonists Differentially Regulate 5-HT2A Receptor Protein Level In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Prem N.; Kroeze, Wesley K.; Farrell, Martilias S.

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of the 5-HT2A receptor is implicated in both the etiology and treatment of schizophrenia. Although the essential role of 5-HT2A receptors in atypical antipsychotic drug actions is widely accepted, the contribution of 5-HT2A down-regulation to their efficacy is not known. We hypothesized that down-regulation of cortical 5-HT2A receptors contributes to the therapeutic action of atypical antipsychotic drugs. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the effect of chronically administered antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, and haloperidol) and several 5-HT2A antagonists [ketanserin, altanserin, α-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl)]-4-piperidinemethanol (M100907), α-phenyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinemethano (M11939), 4-[(2Z)-3-{[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy]amino}-3-(2-fluorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-ylidene]cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-one (SR46349B), and pimavanserin], on the phencyclidine (PCP)-induced hyperlocomotor response and cortical 5-HT2A receptor levels in C57BL/6J mice. Clozapine and olanzapine, but not haloperidol, induced receptor down-regulation and attenuated PCP-induced locomotor responses. Of the selective 5-HT2A antagonists tested, only ketanserin caused significant receptor protein down-regulation, whereas SR46349B up-regulated 5-HT2A receptors and potentiated PCP-hyperlocomotion; the other 5-HT2A receptor antagonists were without effect. The significance of these findings with respect to atypical antipsychotic drug action is discussed. PMID:21737536

  10. Local cholinergic interneurons modulate GABAergic inhibition in the chicken optic tectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Stefan; Luksch, Harald

    2014-03-01

    The chicken optic tectum (TeO) and its mammalian counterpart, the superior colliculus, are important sensory integration centers. Multimodal information is represented in a topographic map, which plays a role in spatial attention and orientation movements. The TeO is organised in 15 layers with clear input and output regions, and further interconnected with the isthmic nuclei (NI), which modulate the response in a winner-takes-all fashion. While many studies have analysed tectal cell types and their modulation from the isthmic system physiologically, little is known about local network activity and its modulation in the tectum. We have recently shown with voltage-sensitive dye imaging that electrical stimulation of the retinorecipient layers results in a stereotypic response, which is under inhibitory control [S. Weigel & H. Luksch (2012) J. Neurophysiol., 107, 640-648]. Here, we analysed the contribution of acetylcholine (ACh) and the NI to evoked tectal responses using a pharmacological approach in a midbrain slice preparation. Application of the nicotinic ACh receptor (AChR) antagonist curarine increased the tectal response in amplitude, duration and lateral extent. This effect was similar but less pronounced when γ-aminobutyric acid(A) receptors were blocked, indicating interaction of inhibitory and cholinergic neurons. The muscarinic AChR antagonist atropine did not change the response pattern. Removal of the NI, which are thought to be the major source of cholinergic input to the TeO, reduced the response only slightly and did not result in a disinhibition. Based on the data presented here and the neuroanatomical literature of the avian TeO, we propose a model of the underlying local circuitry. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Contributions: SAGE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Contributions: SAGE. Space Alternating Generalized Expectation (SAGE) Maximization algorithm provides an iterative approach to parameter estimation when direct maximization of the likelihood function may be infeasible. Complexity is less in those applications ...

  12. Various Contributions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Various Contributions. Developed an Off –Diagonal MIMO Canceller to mitigate Upstream Crosstalk in VDSL. Developed a low complexity, Expectation Maximization based iterative Crosstalk cancellation. Developed an optimal way of computational complexity ...

  13. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks – the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  14. Antagonistic Neural Networks Underlying Differentiated Leadership Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eleftherios Boyatzis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950’s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task oriented and socio-emotional oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks -- the Task Positive Network (TPN and the Default Mode Network (DMN. Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  15. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Richard E; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks - the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  16. Modulation masking produced by second-order modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füllgrabe, Christian; Moore, Brian C.J.; Demany, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that an auditory nonlinearity converts second-order sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM) (i.e., modulation of SAM depth) into a first-order SAM component, which contributes to the perception of second-order SAM. However, conversion may also occur in other ways......-carrier modulation frequency, phase relationship between the probe and masker modulator, and probe modulation depth. In experiment 1, the carrier was a 5-kHz sinusoid presented either alone or within a notched-noise masker in order to restrict off-frequency listening. In experiment 2, the carrier was a white noise....... The data obtained in both carrier conditions are consistent with the existence of a modulation distortion component. However, the phase yielding poorest detection performance varied across experimental conditions between 0° and 180°, confirming that, in addition to nonlinear mechanisms, cochlear filtering...

  17. Superoxide anions in paraventricular nucleus modulate adipose afferent reflex and sympathetic activity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ding

    Full Text Available Adipose afferent reflex (AAR is a sympatho-excitatory reflex induced by chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT. Ionotropic glutamate receptors including NMDA receptors (NMDAR and non-NMDA receptors (non-NMDAR in paraventricular nucleus (PVN mediate the AAR. Enhanced AAR contributes to sympathetic activation and hypertension in obesity rats. This study was designed to investigate the role and mechanism of superoxide anions in PVN in modulating the AAR.Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP were recorded in anesthetized rats. AAR was evaluated by the RSNA and MAP responses to injections of capsaicin into four sites of right inguinal WAT (8.0 nmol in 8.0 µl for each site. Microinjection of polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD, the superoxide anion scavenger tempol or the NAD(PH oxidase inhibitor apocynin into the PVN decreased the baseline RSNA and MAP, and attenuated the AAR. Unilateral WAT injection of capsaicin increased superoxide anions in bilateral PVN, which was prevented by the WAT denervation. WAT injection of capsaicin increased superoxide anion level and NAD(PH oxidase activity in the PVN, which was abolished by the PVN pretreatment with the combined NMDAR antagonist AP5 and non-NMDAR antagonist CNQX. Microinjection of the NMDAR agonist NMDA or the non-NMDAR agonist AMPA increased superoxide anion level and NAD(PH oxidase activity in the PVN.NAD(PH oxidase-derived superoxide anions in the PVN contributes to the tonic modulation of AAR. Activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the PVN is involved in the AAR-induced production of superoxide anions in the PVN.

  18. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  19. Possible site of action of CGRP antagonists in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists olcegepant and telcagepant are very potent drugs. Both are effective in migraine but in doses much higher than would be predicted from receptor binding and other in vitro results. This could perhaps suggest an effect of CGRP antagoni......The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists olcegepant and telcagepant are very potent drugs. Both are effective in migraine but in doses much higher than would be predicted from receptor binding and other in vitro results. This could perhaps suggest an effect of CGRP...... antagonists behind the blood-brain barrier (BBB), i.e. in the central nervous system (CNS)....

  20. Local Administration of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Improves Diabetic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, David P; Bramos, Athanasios; Xu, Xingtian; Shi, Songtao; Wong, Alex K

    2018-03-16

    Impaired healing of the skin is a notable cause of patient morbidity and mortality. In diabetic individuals, dysregulated inflammation contributes to delayed wound healing. Specific immunomodulatory agents may have a role in the treatment of diabetic wounds. One of these molecules is interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Anakinra; Amgen Corp.). Although interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Anakinra; Amgen Corp.) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease, little is known about the local use this drug in cutaneous wound healing. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine the effect of locally administered interleukin-1 receptor antagonist on delayed wound healing, specifically, in a diabetic mouse model. Two 6-mm full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsa of diabetic (db/db) mice and stented. One-hour postwounding, wound margins were subcutaneously injected with either (1) low-dose interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in a gelatin-transglutaminase gel vehicle or (2) the gel vehicle only. Wounds were imaged on days 0, 7, 14, and 21 postwounding, and wound area was determined. Wound biopsies were collected on day 21 and immunohistochemically stained for neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. Wounds treated with interleukin-1 receptor antagonist had significantly smaller wound area than nontreated wounds on day 7 and day 14 postwounding. Treated wounds also showed significantly less neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. These findings support the hypothesis that interleukin-1 receptor antagonist may have an important role in cutaneous wound healing, possibly by promoting successful resolution of acute inflammation and hence accelerating wound closure. Thereby, administration of IL-1Ra may be useful in the treatment of nonhealing wounds.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives

  1. Kisspeptin signaling in the amygdala modulates reproductive hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comninos, Alexander N; Anastasovska, Jelena; Sahuri-Arisoylu, Meliz; Li, Xiaofeng; Li, Shengyun; Hu, Minghan; Jayasena, Channa N; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Matthews, Paul M; O'Byrne, Kevin T; Bell, Jimmy D; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2016-05-01

    Kisspeptin (encoded by KISS1) is a crucial activator of reproductive function. The role of kisspeptin has been studied extensively within the hypothalamus but little is known about its significance in other areas of the brain. KISS1 and its cognate receptor are expressed in the amygdala, a key limbic brain structure with inhibitory projections to hypothalamic centers involved in gonadotropin secretion. We therefore hypothesized that kisspeptin has effects on neuronal activation and reproductive pathways beyond the hypothalamus and particularly within the amygdala. To test this, we mapped brain neuronal activity (using manganese-enhanced MRI) associated with peripheral kisspeptin administration in rodents. We also investigated functional relevance by measuring the gonadotropin response to direct intra-medial amygdala (MeA) administration of kisspeptin and kisspeptin antagonist. Peripheral kisspeptin administration resulted in a marked decrease in signal intensity in the amygdala compared to vehicle alone. This was associated with an increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. In addition, intra-MeA administration of kisspeptin resulted in increased LH secretion, while blocking endogenous kisspeptin signaling within the amygdala by administering intra-MeA kisspeptin antagonist decreased both LH secretion and LH pulse frequency. We provide evidence for the first time that neuronal activity within the amygdala is decreased by peripheral kisspeptin administration and that kisspeptin signaling within the amygdala contributes to the modulation of gonadotropin release and pulsatility. Our data suggest that kisspeptin is a 'master regulator' of reproductive physiology, integrating limbic circuits with the regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons and reproductive hormone secretion.

  2. Practical recommendations for calcium channel antagonist poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, S J; de Lange, D W; Donker, D W; Meulenbelt, J

    2016-02-01

    Calcium channel antagonists (CCAs) are widely used for different cardiovascular disorders. At therapeutic doses, CCAs have a favourable side effect profile. However, in overdose, CCAs can cause serious complications, such as severe hypotension and bradycardia. Patients in whom a moderate to severe intoxication is anticipated should be observed in a monitored setting for at least 12 hours if an immediate-release formulation is ingested, and at least 24 hours when a sustained-release formulation (or amlodipine) is involved, even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial treatment is aimed at gastrointestinal decontamination and general supportive care, i.e., fluid resuscitation and correction of metabolic acidosis and electrolyte disturbances. In moderate to severe CCA poisoning, a combined medical strategy might be indispensable, such as administration of vasopressors, intravenous calcium and hyperinsulinaemia/euglycaemia therapy. Especially hyperinsulinaemia/euglycaemia therapy is an important first-line treatment in CCA-overdosed patients in whom a large ingestion is suspected. High-dose insulin, in combination with glucose, seems to be most effective when used early in the intoxication phase, even when the patient shows hardly any haemodynamic instability. Intravenous lipid emulsion therapy should only be considered in patients with life-threatening cardiovascular toxicity, such as refractory shock, which is unresponsive to conventional therapies. When supportive and specific pharmacological measures fail to adequately reverse refractory conditions in CCA overdose, the use of extracorporeal life support should be considered. The efficacy of these pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions generally advocated in CCA poisoning needs further in-depth mechanistic foundation, in order to improve individualised treatment of CCA-overdosed patients.

  3. Characterization and design of antagonistic shape memory alloy actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, T; Brailovski, V; Terriault, P

    2012-01-01

    Antagonistic shape memory actuators use opposing shape memory alloy (SMA) elements to create devices capable of producing differential motion paths and two-way mechanical work in a very efficient manner. There is no requirement for additional bias elements to ‘re-arm’ the actuators and allow repetitive actuation. The work generation potential of antagonistic shape memory actuators is determined by specific SMA element characteristics and their assembly conditions. In this study, the selected SMA wires are assembled in antagonistic configuration and characterized using a dedicated test bench to evaluate their stress–strain characteristics as a function of the number of cycles. Using these functional characteristics, a so-called ‘working envelope’ is built to assist in the design of such an actuator. Finally, the test bench is used to simulate a real application of an antagonistic actuator (case study). (paper)

  4. A SELECTIVE ANTAGONIST OF MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR EPLERENONE IN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Gegenava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of aldosterone in pathophysiological processes is considered. The effects of the selective antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor eplerenone are analyzed. The advantages of eplerenone compared with spironolactone are discussed.

  5. Development of KGF Antagonist as a Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugimoto, Yasuro

    2003-01-01

    .... We were able to show some potential intracellular KGFR target small molecules whereas extracellular target synthetic peptide antagonist was not able to do during this period We also added a new...

  6. Recent Development of Non-Peptide GnRH Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Ling Tukun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone, also referred to as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone with the sequence (pGlu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-Gly-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2 plays an important role in regulating the reproductive system. It stimulates differential release of the gonadotropins FSH and LH from pituitary tissue. To date, treatment of hormone-dependent diseases targeting the GnRH receptor, including peptide GnRH agonist and antagonists are now available on the market. The inherited issues associate with peptide agonists and antagonists have however, led to significant interest in developing orally active, small molecule, non-peptide antagonists. In this review, we will summarize all developed small molecule GnRH antagonists along with the most recent clinical data and therapeutic applications.

  7. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  8. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15 1-0252 TITLE: Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...14 Jul 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Center for Substance Abuse Research Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University 3500 N, Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19140 AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  9. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists as induction therapy after heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Gustafsson, Finn; Gluud, Christian

    2008-01-01

    About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras.......About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras....

  10. Kinetic properties of 'dual' orexin receptor antagonists at OX1R and OX2R orexin receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Elizabeth Callander

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orexin receptor antagonists represent attractive targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of insomnia. Both efficacy and safety are crucial in clinical settings and thorough investigations of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can predict contributing factors such as duration of action and undesirable effects. To this end, we studied the interactions between various ‘dual’ orexin receptor antagonists and the orexin receptors, OX1R and OX2R, over time using saturation and competition radioligand binding with [3H]-BBAC ((S-N-([1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl-1-(2-((1-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylthioacetylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide. In addition, the kinetics of these compounds were investigated in cells expressing human, mouse and rat OX1R and OX2R using FLIPR® assays for calcium accumulation. We demonstrate that almorexant reaches equilibrium very slowly at OX2R, whereas SB-649868, suvorexant and filorexant may take hours to reach steady state at both orexin receptors. By contrast, compounds such as BBAC or the selective OX2R antagonist IPSU ((2-((1H-Indol-3-ylmethyl-9-(4-methoxypyrimidin-2-yl-2,9-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-1-one bind rapidly and reach equilibrium very quickly in both binding and / or functional assays. Overall, the dual antagonists tested here tend to be rather unselective under non-equilibrium conditions and reach equilibrium very slowly. Once equilibrium is reached, each ligand demonstrates a selectivity profile that is however, distinct from the non-equilibrium condition. The slow kinetics of the dual antagonists tested suggest that in vitro receptor occupancy may be longer lasting than would be predicted. This raises questions as to whether pharmacokinetic studies measuring plasma or brain levels of these antagonists are accurate reflections of receptor occupancy in vivo.

  11. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-antagonists of natural origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Preeti; Singh, Ishwari Narayan; Mondal, Sambhu Charan; Singh, Lubhan; Garg, Vipin Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Presently herbal medicines are being used by about 80% of the world population for primary health care as they stood the test of time for their safety, efficacy, cultural acceptability and lesser side effects. The discovery of platelet activating factor antagonists (PAF antagonists) during these decades are going on with different framework, but the researchers led their efficiency in studying in vitro test models. Since it is assumed that PAF play a central role in etiology of many diseases in humans such as asthma, neuronal damage, migraine, cardiac diseases, inflammatory, headache etc. Present days instinctively occurring PAF antagonist exists as a specific grade of therapeutic agents for the humans against these and different diseases either laid hold of immunological or non-immunological types. Ginkgolide, cedrol and many other natural PAF antagonists such as andrographolide, α-bulnesene, cinchonine, piperine, kadsurenone, different Piper species' natural products and marine origin plants extracts or even crude drugs having PAF antagonist properties are being used currently against different inflammatory pathologies. This review is an attempt to summarize the data on PAF and action of natural PAF antagonists on it, which were evaluated by in vivo and in vitro assays. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 impairs reconsolidation of pavlovian fear memory in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratano, Patrizia; Everitt, Barry J; Milton, Amy L

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated the requirement for signaling at CB1 receptors in the reconsolidation of a previously consolidated auditory fear memory, by infusing the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, or the FAAH inhibitor URB597, directly into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in conjunction with memory reactivation. AM251 disrupted memory restabilization, but only when administered after reactivation. URB597 produced a small, transient enhancement of memory restabilization when administered after reactivation. The amnestic effect of AM251 was rescued by coadministration of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline at reactivation, indicating that the disruption of reconsolidation was mediated by altered GABAergic transmission in the BLA. These data show that the endocannabinoid system in the BLA is an important modulator of fear memory reconsolidation and that its effects on memory are mediated by an interaction with the GABAergic system. Thus, targeting the endocannabinoid system may have therapeutic potential to reduce the impact of maladaptive memories in neuropsychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder.

  13. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Cornell); (Scripps); (NIDA); (Columbia); (UCSD); (Receptos)

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  14. Effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate NR2B subunit antagonist ifenprodil on precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, E C; König, H-G; Prehn, J H M; Kirby, B P

    2014-06-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, one of the ionotropic glutamate receptor, plays important physiological and pathological roles in learning and memory, neuronal development, acute and chronic neurological diseases, and neurogenesis. This work examines the contribution of the NR2B NMDA receptor subunit to adult neurogenesis/cell proliferation under physiological conditions and following an excitotoxic insult. We have previously shown in vitro that a discrete NMDA-induced, excitotoxic injury to the hippocampus results in an increase in neurogenesis within the dentate gyrus. Here we have characterized adult neurogenesis or proliferation, using BrdU, in an in vivo model of excitotoxic injury to the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus. We demonstrate a peak in neural stem cell proliferation/neurogenesis between 6 and 9 days after the excitotoxic insult. Treatment with ifenprodil, an NR2B subunit-specific NMDA receptor antagonist, without prior injury induction, also increased the number of BrdU-positive cells within the DG and posterior periventricle, indicating that ifenprodil itself could modulate the rate of proliferation. Interestingly, though, the increased level of cell proliferation did not change significantly when ifenprodil was administered following an excitotoxic insult. In conclusion, our results suggest and add to the growing evidence that NR2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors play a role in neural stem cell proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. alpha2-Adrenoceptor antagonists reverse the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist suppression of head-twitch behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K; Mizowaki, M; Thongpraditchote, S; Murakami, Y; Watanabe, H

    1997-03-01

    The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, as well as 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, reportedly suppress 5-HT2 receptor-mediated head-twitch behavior. We investigated the effect of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists on the suppressive action of 5-HT2 receptor antagonists in mice pretreated with the noradrenaline toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA). In normal mice, idazoxan (0.08-0.2 mg/kg, IP) or yohimbine (0.2-2.0 mg/kg, IP), both alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, had no effect on the head-twitch response caused by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT; 16 mg/kg, IP), but idazoxan significantly enhanced the response at 0.5 mg/kg. On the other hand, these alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, at doses that had no effect on the basal number of head-twitches (idazoxan 0.2 mg/kg and yohimbine 0.5 mg/kg), significantly attenuated not only the suppressive effect of clonidine (0.01 mg/kg, IP) on head-twitch response but also that of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin (0.03 mg/kg, IP). Moreover, idazoxan (0.2 mg/kg) also significantly reversed the inhibition by 0.01 mg/kg (IP) ketanserin, a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist. Pretreatment with 6-OHDA plus nomifensine but not with p-CPA significantly attenuated the effect of idazoxan (0.2-0.5 mg/kg) on the ritanserin inhibition of the head-twitch response. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, dose-dependently suppressed the response, and the effect of prazosin (1.25 mg/kg) was significantly attenuated by 0.5 mg/kg idazoxan. These results indicate that endogenous noradrenaline is involved in the apparent antagonistic interaction between selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists in the head-twitch response, and suggest that noradrenaline stimulation of alpha1-adrenoceptors may be involved in this apparent antagonism.

  16. Ultra-low dose cannabinoid antagonist AM251 enhances cannabinoid anticonvulsant effects in the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Shervin; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Bahremand, Arash; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2007-11-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that cannabinoid compounds are anticonvulsant since they have inhibitory effects at micromolar doses, which are mediated by activated receptors coupling to Gi/o proteins. Surprisingly, both the analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of opioids are enhanced by ultra-low doses (nanomolar to picomolar) of the opioid antagonist naltrexone and as opioid and cannabinoid systems interact, it has been shown that ultra-low dose naltrexone also enhances cannabinoid-induced antinociception. However, regarding the seizure modulating properties of both classes of receptors this study investigated whether ultra-low dose cannabinoid antagonist AM251 influences cannabinoid anticonvulsant effects. The clonic seizure threshold (CST) was tested in separate groups of male NMRI mice following injection of vehicle, the cannabinoid selective agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA) and ultra-low doses of the cannabinoid CB1 antagonist AM251 and a combination of ACEA and AM251 doses in a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Systemic administration of ultra-low doses of AM251 (10 fg/kg-100 ng/kg) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of ACEA at 0.5 and 1 mg/kg. Moreover, inhibition of cannabinoid induced excitatory signaling by AM251 (100 pg/kg) unmasked a strong anticonvulsant effect for very low doses of ACEA (100 ng/kg-100 microg/kg), suggesting that a presumed inhibitory component of cannabinoid receptor signaling can exert strong seizure-protective effects even at very low levels of cannabinoid receptor activation. A similar potentiation by AM251 (100 pg/kg and 1 ng/kg) of anticonvulsant effects of non-effective dose of ACEA (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) was also observed in the generalized tonic-clonic model of seizure. The present data suggest that ultra-low doses of cannabinoid receptor antagonists may provide a potent strategy to modulate seizure susceptibility, especially in conjunction with very low doses of

  17. Vitamin K antagonist use and mortality in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskamp, Pauline W M; Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Verhaar, Marianne C; Dekker, Friedo W; Ocak, Gurbey

    2018-01-01

    The risk-benefit ratio of vitamin K antagonists for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in patients with end-stage renal disease treated with dialysis is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between vitamin K antagonist use and mortality for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in a cohort of end-stage renal disease patients receiving dialysis treatment. We prospectively followed 1718 incident dialysis patients. Hazard ratios were calculated for all-cause and cause-specific (stroke, bleeding, cardiovascular and other) mortality associated with vitamin K antagonist use. Vitamin K antagonist use as compared with no vitamin K antagonist use was associated with a 1.2-fold [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0-1.5] increased all-cause mortality risk, a 1.5-fold (95% CI 0.6-4.0) increased stroke mortality risk, a 1.3-fold (95% CI 0.4-4.2) increased bleeding mortality risk, a 1.2-fold (95% CI 0.9-1.8) increased cardiovascular mortality risk and a 1.2-fold (95% CI 0.8-1.6) increased other mortality risk after adjustment. Within patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≤1, vitamin K antagonist use was associated with a 2.8-fold (95% CI 1.0-7.8) increased all-cause mortality risk as compared with no vitamin K antagonist use, while vitamin K antagonist use within patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 was not associated with an increased mortality risk after adjustment. Vitamin K antagonist use was not associated with a protective effect on mortality in the different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in dialysis patients. The lack of knowledge on the indication for vitamin K antagonist use could lead to confounding by indication. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  18. The Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist Almorexant Promotes Sleep Without Impairment of Performance in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Morairty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypocretin receptor (HcrtR antagonist almorexant (ALM has potent hypnotic actions but little is known about neurocognitive performance in the presence of ALM. HcrtR antagonists are hypothesized to induce sleep by disfacilitation of wake-promoting systems whereas GABAA receptor modulators such as zolpidem (ZOL induce sleep through general inhibition of neural activity. To test the hypothesis that less functional impairment results from HcrtR antagonist-induced sleep, we evaluated the performance of rats in the Morris Water Maze in the presence of ALM vs. ZOL. Performance in spatial reference memory (SRM and spatial working memory (SWM tasks were assessed during the dark period after equipotent sleep-promoting doses (100 mg/kg, po following undisturbed and sleep deprivation (SD conditions. ALM-treated rats were indistinguishable from vehicle (VEH-treated rats for all SRM performance measures (distance travelled, latency to enter, time within, and number of entries into, the target quadrant after both the undisturbed and 6 h SD conditions. In contrast, rats administered ZOL showed impairments in all parameters measured compared to VEH or ALM in the undisturbed conditions. Following SD, ZOL-treated rats also showed impairments in all measures. ALM-treated rats were similar to VEH-treated rats for all SWM measures (velocity, time to locate the platform and success rate at finding the platform within 60 s after both the undisturbed and SD conditions. In contrast, ZOL-treated rats showed impairments in velocity and in the time to locate the platform. Importantly, ZOL rats only completed the task 23-50% of the time while ALM and VEH rats completed the task 79-100% of the time. Thus, following equipotent sleep-promoting doses, ZOL impaired rats in both memory tasks while ALM rats performed at levels comparable to VEH rats. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that less impairment results from HcrtR antagonism than from GABAA

  19. Signaling pathway underlying the octopaminergic modulation of myogenic contraction in the cricket lateral oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamashiro, Hirotake; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-12-01

    Octopamine (OA), a biogenic monoamine, is a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in invertebrates. Here, we report the effect of OA on the spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRCs) of the lateral oviduct of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and the possible signaling pathway involved. Application of OA increased both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of OA was inhibited by subsequent application of the OA receptor antagonist epinastine, indicating that the action of OA is mediated by OA receptor. To investigate the predominant signaling pathway underlying the action of OA, we first examined a possible involvement of the cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Application of the membrane-permeable cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP had little effect on SRCs and the effect of OA was not influenced by subsequent application of the PKA inhibitor H89, indicating that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is not the predominant pathway in the action of OA. Next, we examined a possible involvement of the second messenger inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in the action of OA. The effect of OA on SRCs was inhibited by subsequent application of the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, indicating that the PLC pathway is involved in the action of OA. The OA-induced increase in the frequency of SRCs was inhibited by pretreatment of the cell with the ryanodine receptor antagonist tetracaine but was not significantly affected by the IP3 receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). On the other hand, the OA-induced increase in the amplitude of SRCs was inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with 2-APB but was not significantly affected by tetracaine. Taken together, these results suggest that the OA-induced excitatory effect on SRCs is mediated by the PLC signaling pathway: Ca2+ release from IP3 receptors may contribute to the modulation of the amplitude of SRCs, whereas Ca2+ release from ryanodine

  20. Early Illustrations of Geste Antagoniste in Cervical and Generalized Dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Broussolle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Geste antagoniste, or sensory trick, is a voluntary maneuver that temporarily reduces the severity of dystonic postures or movements. We present a historical review of early reports and illustrations of geste antagoniste.Results: In 1894, Brissaud described this phenomenon in Paris in patients with torticollis. He noted that a violent muscular contraction could be reversed by a minor voluntary action. He considered the improvement obtained by what he called “simple mannerisms, childish behaviour or fake pathological movements” was proof of the psychogenic origin of what he named mental torticollis. This concept was supported by photographical illustrations of the patients. The term geste antagoniste was used by Brissaud’s pupils, Meige and Feindel, in their 1902 monograph on movement disorders. Other reports and illustrations of this sign were published in Europe between 1894 and 1906. Although not mentioned explicitly, geste antagoniste was also illustrated in a case report of generalized dystonia in Oppenheim’s 1911 seminal description of dystonia musculorum deformans in Berlin.Discussion: Brissaud-Meige’s misinterpretation of the geste antagoniste unfortunately anchored the psychogenic origin of dystonia for decades. In New York, Herz brought dystonia back into the realm of organic neurology in 1944. Thereafter, it was given prominence by other authors, notably Fahn and Marsden in the 1970–1980s. Nowadays, neurologists routinely investigate for geste antagoniste when a dystonic syndrome is suspected, because it provides a further argument in favor of dystonia. The term alleviating maneuver was proposed in 2014 to replace sensory trick or geste antagoniste. This major sign is now part of the motor phenomenology of the 2013 Movement Disorder Society’s classification of dystonia.

  1. Antagonistic Donor Density Effect Conserved in Multiple Enterococcal Conjugative Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan; O'Brien, Sofie; Frank, Kristi L.; Dunny, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterococcus faecalis, a common causative agent of hospital-acquired infections, is resistant to many known antibiotics. Its ability to acquire and transfer resistance genes and virulence determinants through conjugative plasmids poses a serious concern for public health. In some cases, induction of transfer of E. faecalis plasmids results from peptide pheromones produced by plasmid-free recipient cells, which are sensed by the plasmid-bearing donor cells. These plasmids generally encode an inhibitory peptide that competes with the pheromone and suppresses self-induction of donors. We recently demonstrated that the inhibitor peptide encoded on plasmid pCF10 is part of a unique quorum-sensing system in which it functions as a “self-sensing signal,” reducing the response to the pheromone in a density-dependent fashion. Based on the similarities between regulatory features controlling conjugation in pAD1 and pAM373 and those controlling conjugation in pCF10, we hypothesized that these plasmids are likely to exhibit similar quorum-sensing behaviors. Experimental findings indicate that for both pAD1 and pAM373, high donor densities indeed resulted in decreased induction of the conjugation operon and reduced conjugation frequencies. This effect was restored by the addition of exogenous inhibitor, confirming that the inhibitor serves as an indicator for donor density. Donor density also affects cross-species conjugative plasmid transfer. Based on our experimental results, we propose models for induction and shutdown of the conjugation operon in pAD1 and pAM373. IMPORTANCE Enterococcus faecalis is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Its ability to transfer antibiotic resistance and virulence determinants by sharing its genetic material with other bacteria through direct cell-cell contact via conjugation poses a serious threat. Two antagonistic signaling peptides control the transfer of plasmids pAD1 and pAM373: a peptide pheromone produced by

  2. Targeting inhibitor of apoptosis proteins in combination with ErbB antagonists in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Fiona M; Owens, Thomas W; Tanianis-Hughes, Jolanta; Clarke, Robert B; Brennan, Keith; Bundred, Nigel J; Streuli, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAPs) proteins are a family of proteins that can block apoptosis in normal cells and have been suggested to cause resistance to apoptosis in cancer. Overexpression of oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases is common in breast cancer; in particular 20% of all cases show elevated Her2. Despite clinical success with the use of targeted therapies, such as Trastuzumab, only up to 35% of Her2-positive patients initially respond. We reasoned that IAP-mediated apoptosis resistance might contribute to this insensitivity to receptor tyrosine kinase therapy, in particular ErbB antagonists. Here we examine the levels of IAPs in breast cancer and evaluate whether targeting IAPs can enhance apoptosis in response to growth factor receptor antagonists and TRAIL. IAP levels were examined in a breast cancer cell line panel and in patient samples. IAPs were inhibited using siRNA or cell permeable mimetics of endogenous inhibitors. Cells were then exposed to TRAIL, Trastuzumab, Lapatinib, or Gefitinib for 48 hours. Examining nuclear morphology and staining for cleaved caspase 3 was used to score apoptosis. Proliferation was examined by Ki67 staining. Four members of the IAP family, Survivin, XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2, were all expressed to varying extents in breast cancer cell lines or tumours. MDAMB468, BT474 and BT20 cells all expressed XIAP to varying extents. Depleting the cells of XIAP overcame the intrinsic resistance of BT20 and MDAMB468 cells to TRAIL. Moreover, siRNA-based depletion of XIAP or use of a Smac mimetic to target multiple IAPs increased apoptosis in response to the ErbB antagonists, Trastuzumab, Lapatinib or Gefitinib in Her2-overexpressing BT474 cells, or Gefitinib in EGFR-overexpressing MDAMB468 cells. The novel findings of this study are that multiple IAPs are concomitantly expressed in breast cancers, and that, in combination with clinically relevant Her2 treatments, IAP antagonists promote apoptosis and reduce the cell turnover index of

  3. Identification of pyrazolopyrimidine arylsulfonamides as CC-chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Afjal H; Champigny, Aurelie C; Graves, Rebecca H; Hodgson, Simon T; Percy, Jonathan M; Procopiou, Panayiotis A

    2017-10-15

    A novel 4-aminoindazole sulfonamide hit (13) was identified as a human CCR4 antagonists from testing a focussed library of compounds in the primary GTPγS assay. Replacing the indazole core with a pyrazolopyrimidine, and introduction of a methoxy group adjacent to the sulfonamide substituent, resulted in the identification of pyrazolopyrimidine 37a, which exhibited good binding affinity in the GTPγS assay (pIC 50 =7.2), low lipophilicity (clogP=2.2, chromlogD 7.4 =2.4), high LE (0.41), high solubility (CLND solubility ≥581µM), and an excellent PK profile in both the rat (F=62%) and the dog (F=100%). Further SAR investigation of the pyrazolopyrimidine suggested that substitution at N1 is tolerated, providing a suitable vector to modulate the properties, and increase the potency in a lead optimisation campaign. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A starch-binding domain identified in α-amylase (AmyP) represents a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules that contribute to enzymatic hydrolysis of soluble starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Yunyun; Chen, Maojiao; Wang, Ying; Xiao, Yazhong; Gao, Yi

    2014-04-02

    A novel starch-binding domain (SBD) that represents a new carbohydrate-binding module family (CBM69) was identified in the α-amylase (AmyP) of the recently established alpha-amylase subfamily GH13_37. The SBD and its homologues come mostly from marine bacteria, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that they are closely related to the CBM20 and CBM48 families. The SBD exhibited a binding preference toward raw rice starch, but the truncated mutant (AmyPΔSBD) still retained similar substrate preference. Kinetic analyses revealed that the SBD plays an important role in soluble starch hydrolysis because different catalytic efficiencies have been observed in AmyP and the AmyPΔSBD. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Module descriptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon; Klausen, Bodil; Kjær Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The Module Descriptor including a Teacher’s Guide explains and describes how to work innovatively and co-creatively with wicked problems and young people. The descriptor shows how interested educators and lecturers in Europe can copy the lessons of the Erasmus+ project HIP when teaching their own...

  6. Huntington's disease: a randomized, controlled trial using the NMDA-antagonist amantadine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen Metman, L; Morris, M J; Farmer, C; Gillespie, M; Mosby, K; Wuu, J; Chase, T N

    2002-09-10

    To examine the acute effects of the NMDA receptor antagonist amantadine on motor and cognitive function in Huntington's disease (HD). Chorea in HD and in the levodopa-induced dyskinesias of PD may be clinically indistinguishable. In PD, hyperphosphorylation of NMDA receptors expressed on striatal medium spiny neurons contributes to peak-dose dyskinesias, and drugs that block these receptors can diminish chorea severity. Because these spiny neurons are the primary target of the neurodegenerative process in HD, sensitization of NMDA receptors on residual striatal neurons might also participate in the generation of motor dysfunction in HD. To evaluate this possibility, 24 patients with HD entered a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of amantadine with two 2-week arms. Chorea scores were lower with amantadine (usually 400 mg/d) than placebo, with a median reduction in extremity chorea at rest of 36% (p = 0.04) for all 22 evaluable patients and of 56% in the 10 individuals with the highest plasma drug levels. Improvement correlated with plasma amantadine concentrations (p = 0.01) but not CAG repeat length. Parkinsonian rating scores did not worsen and there was no consistent change in cognitive measures. Adverse event profile was benign. Results suggest that NMDA receptor supersensitivity may contribute to the clinical expression of choreiform dyskinesias in HD and that selective antagonists at that site can safely confer palliative benefit.

  7. Antagonistic spindle motors and MAPs regulate metaphase spindle length and chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Fu, Chuanhai; Tran, Phong T

    2013-12-02

    Metaphase describes a phase of mitosis where chromosomes are attached and oriented on the bipolar spindle for subsequent segregation at anaphase. In diverse cell types, the metaphase spindle is maintained at characteristic constant length [1-3]. Metaphase spindle length is proposed to be regulated by a balance of pushing and pulling forces generated by distinct sets of spindle microtubules (MTs) and their interactions with motors and MT-associated proteins (MAPs). Spindle length is further proposed to be important for chromosome segregation fidelity, as cells with shorter- or longer-than-normal metaphase spindles, generated through deletion or inhibition of individual mitotic motors or MAPs, showed chromosome segregation defects. To test the force-balance model of spindle length control and its effect on chromosome segregation, we applied fast microfluidic temperature control with live-cell imaging to monitor the effect of deleting or switching off different combinations of antagonistic force contributors in the fission yeast metaphase spindle. We show that the spindle midzone proteins kinesin-5 cut7p and MT bundler ase1p contribute to outward-pushing forces and that the spindle kinetochore proteins kinesin-8 klp5/6p and dam1p contribute to inward-pulling forces. Removing these proteins individually led to aberrant metaphase spindle length and chromosome segregation defects. Removing these proteins in antagonistic combination rescued the defective spindle length and in some combinations also partially rescued chromosome segregation defects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tic Modulation Using Sensory Tricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca W. Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A sensory trick, or geste antagoniste, is defined as a physical gesture (such as a touch on a particular body part that mitigates the production of an involuntary movement. This phenomenon is most commonly described as a feature of dystonia. Here we present a case of successful modulation of tics using sensory tricks.Case Report:: A case report and video are presented. The case and video demonstrate a 19-year-old male who successfully controlled his tics with various sensory tricks.Discussion: It is underappreciated by movement disorder physicians that sensory tricks can play a role in tics. Introducing this concept to patients could potentially help in tic control. In addition, understanding the pathophysiological underpinnings of sensory tricks could help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of tics.

  9. TRPA1 antagonists as potential analgesic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E L; Meotti, F C; Calixto, J B

    2012-02-01

    The necessity of safe and effective treatments for chronic pain has intensified the search for new analgesic drugs. In the last few years, members of a closely-related family of ion channels, called transient receptor potential (TRP) have been identified in different cell types and their functions in physiological and pathological conditions have been characterized. The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), originally called ANKTM1 (ankyrin-like with transmembrane domains protein 1), is a molecule that has been conserved in different species during evolution; TRPA1 is a cation channel that functions as a cellular sensor, detecting mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli, being a component of neuronal, epithelial, blood and smooth muscle tissues. In mammals, TRPA1 is largely expressed in primary sensory neurons that mediate somatosensory processes and nociceptive transmission. Recent studies have described the role of TRPA1 in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. However, its participation in cold sensation has not been agreed in different studies. In this review, we focus on data that support the relevance of the activation and blockade of TRPA1 in pain transmission, as well as the mechanisms underlying its activation and modulation by exogenous and endogenous stimuli. We also discuss recent advances in the search for new analgesic medicines targeting the TRPA1 channel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. First Irish birth following IVF therapy using antagonist protocol.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mocanu, E V

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: During in vitro fertilization (IVF), the prevention of a premature LH surge was traditionally achieved using a gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a), and more recently, a GnRH antagonist. AIMS: We report a case of a 37 year old treated using the GnRH antagonist in a second completed cycle of IVF. METHODS: IVF was performed for primary infertility of 5-year duration due to frozen pelvis secondary to endometriosis. RESULTS: Following controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, oocyte recovery and fertilization, cleavage and transfer of two zygotes, a pregnancy established. A twin gestation was diagnosed at 7-weeks scan and pregnancy ended with the delivery of twin girls by emergency caesarean section. CONCLUSION: This is a first report of a delivery following IVF using the antagonist protocol in Ireland. Such therapy is patient friendly and its use should be introduced on a larger scale in clinical practice.

  11. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists as immunomodulators: new therapeutic views?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    of proliferation and angiogenesis. Specific histamine receptors have been identified on the surface of bone marrow cells, immune competent cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and also on malignant cells. This has prompted research in regulation by specific histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Results...... from such studies are currently accumulating and suggest that the histamine-2 receptor antagonists have potential beneficial effects in the treatment of certain malignant, autoimmune and skin diseases, either alone or in combination with other drugs. The beneficial effect of histamine-2 receptor...... antagonists as adjuvant single drugs to reduce trauma-, blood transfusion- and sepsis-induced immunosuppression has led to research in combined treatment regimens in major surgery, particularly, of patients operated on for malignant diseases....

  12. GnRH antagonist versus long agonist protocols in IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambalk, C B; Banga, F R; Huirne, J A

    2017-01-01

    was not the only variable between the compared study arms. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: The aim of the current study was to compare GnRH antagonist protocols versus standard long agonist protocols in couples undergoing IVF or ICSI, while accounting for various patient populations and treatment schedules. SEARCH......BACKGROUND: Most reviews of IVF ovarian stimulation protocols have insufficiently accounted for various patient populations, such as ovulatory women, women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or women with poor ovarian response, and have included studies in which the agonist or antagonist...... METHODS: The Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Review Group specialized register of controlled trials and Pubmed and Embase databases were searched from inception until June 2016. Eligible trials were those that compared GnRH antagonist protocols and standard long GnRH agonist protocols...

  13. ANTAGONISTIC BACTERIA AGAINST SCHIZOPHYLLUM COMMUNE FR. IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTARJO DIKIN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophyllum commune Fr., is one of the important fungi, causes brown germ and seed rot of oil palm. Biodiversity of antagonistic bacteria from oil palm plantations in Peninsular Malaysia is expected to support in development of biopesticide. Isolation with liquid assay and screening antagonistic bacteria using dual culture assay were carried out in the bioexploration. A total of 265 bacterial isolates from plant parts of oil palm screened 52 antagonistic bacterial isolates against 5. commune. Bacterial isolates were identified by using Biolog* Identification System i.e. Bacillus macroccanus, B. thermoglucosidasius, Burkholderia cepacia, B. gladioli, B. multivorans, B pyrrocinia, B. spinosa, Corynebacterium agropyri, C. misitidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Microbacterium testaceum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. citronellolis, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, Serratia ficaria, Serratia sp., S. marcescens, Staphylococcus sciuri, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia.

  14. Histamine H4 receptor antagonists: the new antihistamines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping; Thurmond, Robin L; Ling, Ping; Karlsson, Lars

    2004-11-01

    Antihistamines (histamine H1 receptor antagonists) are a mainstay treatment for atopic allergy, yet they are only partially effective in relieving the symptoms of the disease. They also have very limited value for the treatment of asthma, despite the well-characterized bronchoconstrictory effects of histamine. The recent discovery of a fourth histamine receptor (H4), and the realization that it is exclusively expressed on hematopoietic cell types that are most implicated in the development and symptomatology of allergy and asthma, suggests that pharmacological targeting of the H4 receptor, either alone or in combination with H1 receptor antagonists, may prove useful for treating both allergy and asthma. Here we review the known biology associated with the H4 receptor, as well the effects of a highly selective H1 receptor antagonist.

  15. Clinical Development of Histamine H4Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmond, Robin L; Venable, Jennifer; Savall, Brad; La, David; Snook, Sandra; Dunford, Paul J; Edwards, James P

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the histamine H 4 receptor (H 4 R) provided a new avenue for the exploration of the physiological role of histamine, as well as providing a new drug target for the development of novel antihistamines. The first step in this process was the identification of selective antagonists to help unravel the pharmacology of the H 4 R relative to other histamine receptors. The discovery of the selective H 4 R antagonist JNJ 7777120 was vital for showing a role for the H 4 R in inflammation and pruritus. While this compound has been very successful as a tool for understanding the function of the receptor, it has drawbacks, including a short in vivo half-life and hypoadrenocorticism toxicity in rats and dogs, that prevented advancing it into clinical studies. Further research let to the discovery of JNJ 39758979, which, similar to JNJ 7777120, was a potent and selective H 4 R antagonist and showed anti-inflammatory and anti-pruritic activity preclinically. JNJ 39758979 advanced into human clinical studies and showed efficacy in reducing experimental pruritus and in patients with atopic dermatitis. However, development of this compound was terminated due to the occurrence of drug-induced agranulocytosis. This was overcome by developing another H 4 R antagonist with a different chemical structure, toreforant, that does not appear to have this side effect. Toreforant has been tested in clinical studies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, or psoriasis. In conclusions there have been many H 4 R antagonists reported in the literature, but only a few have been studied in humans underscoring the difficulty in finding ligands with all of the properties necessary for testing in the clinic. Nevertheless, the clinical data to date suggests that H 4 R antagonists can be beneficial in treating atopic dermatitis and pruritus.

  16. Discovery of Tertiary Sulfonamides as Potent Liver X Receptor Antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuercher, William J.; Buckholz†, Richard G.; Campobasso, Nino; Collins, Jon L.; Galardi, Cristin M.; Gampe, Robert T.; Hyatt, Stephen M.; Merrihew, Susan L.; Moore, John T.; Oplinger, Jeffrey A.; Reid, Paul R.; Spearing, Paul K.; Stanley, Thomas B.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Willson, Timothy M. (GSKNC)

    2010-08-12

    Tertiary sulfonamides were identified in a HTS as dual liver X receptor (LXR, NR1H2, and NR1H3) ligands, and the binding affinity of the series was increased through iterative analogue synthesis. A ligand-bound cocrystal structure was determined which elucidated key interactions for high binding affinity. Further characterization of the tertiary sulfonamide series led to the identification of high affinity LXR antagonists. GSK2033 (17) is the first potent cell-active LXR antagonist described to date. 17 may be a useful chemical probe to explore the cell biology of this orphan nuclear receptor.

  17. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Vaag, Allan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expression of interleukin-1-receptor antagonist is reduced in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and high glucose concentrations induce the production of interleukin-1beta in human pancreatic beta cells, leading to impaired insulin secretion, decreased cell...... proliferation, and apoptosis. METHODS: In this double-blind, parallel-group trial involving 70 patients with type 2 diabetes, we randomly assigned 34 patients to receive 100 mg of anakinra (a recombinant human interleukin-1-receptor antagonist) subcutaneously once daily for 13 weeks and 36 patients to receive...

  18. Identification of telmisartan as a unique angiotensin II receptor antagonist with selective PPARgamma-modulating activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benson, S. C.; Pershadsingh, H. A.; Ho, C. I.; Chittiboyina, A.; Desai, P.; Pravenec, Michal; Qi, N.; Wang, J.; Avery, M. A.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2004), s. 993-1002 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/01/0278; GA MŠk LN00A079 Grant - others:NIH(US) 2R42AR44767-02A2; NIH(US) HL63709; NIH(US) TW01236 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : receptors * insulin resistance * losartan Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.342, year: 2004

  19. Slow Receptor Dissociation Kinetics Differentiate Macitentan from Other Endothelin Receptor Antagonists in Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Sasse, Thomas; Clozel, Martine; Nayler, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists can influence their pharmacological activity in vivo, we used human PASMC to characterize inhibitory potency and receptor inhibition kinetics of macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan using calcium release and inositol-1-phosphate (IP1) assays. In calcium release assays macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan were highly potent ERAs with Kb values of 0.14 nM, 0.12 nM and 1.1 nM, respectively. Macitentan, but not ambrisentan and bosentan, displayed slow apparent receptor association kinetics as evidenced by increased antagonistic potency upon prolongation of antagonist pre-incubation times. In compound washout experiments, macitentan displayed a significantly lower receptor dissociation rate and longer receptor occupancy half-life (ROt1/2) compared to bosentan and ambrisentan (ROt1/2∶17 minutes versus 70 seconds and 40 seconds, respectively). Because of its lower dissociation rate macitentan behaved as an insurmountable antagonist in calcium release and IP1 assays, and unlike bosentan and ambrisentan it blocked endothelin receptor activation across a wide range of endothelin-1 (ET-1) concentrations. However, prolongation of the ET-1 stimulation time beyond ROt1/2 rendered macitentan a surmountable antagonist, revealing its competitive binding mode. Bosentan and ambrisentan behaved as surmountable antagonists irrespective of the assay duration and they lacked inhibitory activity at high ET-1 concentrations. Thus, macitentan is a competitive ERA with

  20. Slow receptor dissociation kinetics differentiate macitentan from other endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Gatfield

    Full Text Available Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs, bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists can influence their pharmacological activity in vivo, we used human PASMC to characterize inhibitory potency and receptor inhibition kinetics of macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan using calcium release and inositol-1-phosphate (IP(1 assays. In calcium release assays macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan were highly potent ERAs with K(b values of 0.14 nM, 0.12 nM and 1.1 nM, respectively. Macitentan, but not ambrisentan and bosentan, displayed slow apparent receptor association kinetics as evidenced by increased antagonistic potency upon prolongation of antagonist pre-incubation times. In compound washout experiments, macitentan displayed a significantly lower receptor dissociation rate and longer receptor occupancy half-life (ROt(1/2 compared to bosentan and ambrisentan (ROt(1/2:17 minutes versus 70 seconds and 40 seconds, respectively. Because of its lower dissociation rate macitentan behaved as an insurmountable antagonist in calcium release and IP(1 assays, and unlike bosentan and ambrisentan it blocked endothelin receptor activation across a wide range of endothelin-1 (ET-1 concentrations. However, prolongation of the ET-1 stimulation time beyond ROt(1/2 rendered macitentan a surmountable antagonist, revealing its competitive binding mode. Bosentan and ambrisentan behaved as surmountable antagonists irrespective of the assay duration and they lacked inhibitory activity at high ET-1 concentrations. Thus, macitentan is a competitive

  1. Relationship of resting brain hyperconnectivity and schizophrenia-like symptoms produced by the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driesen, N R; McCarthy, G; Bhagwagar, Z; Bloch, M; Calhoun, V; D'Souza, D C; Gueorguieva, R; He, G; Ramachandran, R; Suckow, R F; Anticevic, A; Morgan, P T; Krystal, J H

    2013-11-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDA-R) antagonists produce schizophrenia-like positive and negative symptoms in healthy human subjects. Preclinical research suggests that NMDA-R antagonists interfere with the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons and alter the brain oscillations. These changes have been hypothesized to contribute to psychosis. In this investigation, we evaluated the hypothesis that the NMDA-R antagonist ketamine produces alterations in cortical functional connectivity during rest that are related to symptoms. We administered ketamine to a primary sample of 22 subjects and to an additional, partially overlapping, sample of 12 subjects. Symptoms before and after the experimental session were rated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). In the primary sample, functional connectivity was measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging almost immediately after infusion began. In the additional sample, this assessment was repeated after 45 min of continuous ketamine infusion. Global, enhanced functional connectivity was observed at both timepoints, and this hyperconnectivity was related to symptoms in a region-specific manner. This study supports the hypothesis that pathological increases in resting brain functional connectivity contribute to the emergence of positive and negative symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

  2. NMDA antagonists exert distinct effects in experimental organophosphate or carbamate poisoning in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekundy, Andrzej; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Zielinska, Elzbieta; Turski, Waldemar A.

    2007-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors produce seizures and lethality in mammals. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists encourage the investigation of their effects in AChE inhibitor-induced poisonings. In the present study, the effects of dizocilpine (MK-801, 1 mg/kg) or 3-((RS)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10 mg/kg), alone or combined with muscarinic antagonist atropine (1.8 mg/kg), on convulsant and lethal properties of an OP pesticide dichlorvos or a carbamate drug physostigmine, were studied in mice. Both dichlorvos and physostigmine induced dose-dependent seizure activity and lethality. Atropine did not prevent the occurrence of convulsions but decreased the lethal effects of both dichlorvos and physostigmine. MK-801 or CPP blocked or attenuated, respectively, dichlorvos-induced convulsions. Contrariwise, NMDA antagonists had no effect in physostigmine-induced seizures or lethality produced by dichlorvos or physostigmine. Concurrent pretreatment with atropine and either MK-801 or CPP blocked or alleviated seizures produced by dichlorvos, but not by physostigmine. Both MK-801 and CPP co-administered with atropine enhanced its antilethal effects in both dichlorvos and physostigmine poisoning. In both saline- and AChE inhibitor-treated mice, no interaction of the investigated antidotes with brain cholinesterase was found. The data indicate that both muscarinic ACh and NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms contribute to the acute toxicity of AChE inhibitors, and NMDA receptors seem critical to OP-induced seizures

  3. Displacement of cortisol from human heart by acute administration of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javaid; Andrew, Ruth; Cruden, Nicholas L; Kenyon, Christopher J; Hughes, Katherine A; Newby, David E; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Walker, Brian R

    2014-03-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists have beneficial effects in patients with heart failure and myocardial infarction, often attributed to blocking aldosterone action in the myocardium. However, binding of aldosterone to MR requires local activity of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2), which inactivates cortisol to cortisone and thereby prevents receptor occupancy by cortisol. In vivo activity of 11β-HSD2 and potential occupancy of MR by cortisol in human heart have not been quantified. This study aimed to measure in vivo activity of 11β-HSD2 and to establish whether cortisol binds MR in human heart. Nine patients without heart failure undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography were infused to steady state with the stable isotope tracers 9,11,12,12-[(2)H]4-cortisol and 1,2-[(2)H]2-cortisone to quantify cortisol and cortisone production. Samples were obtained from the femoral artery and coronary sinus before and for 40 minutes after bolus iv administration of an MR antagonist, potassium canrenoate. Coronary sinus blood flow was measured by venography and Doppler flow wire. There was no detectable production of cortisol or cortisone across the myocardium. After potassium canrenoate administration, plasma aldosterone concentrations increased substantially but aldosterone was not detectably released from the myocardium. In contrast, plasma cortisol concentrations did not change in the systemic circulation but tissue-bound cortisol was released transiently from the myocardium after potassium canrenoate administration. Human cardiac 11β-HSD2 activity appears too low to inactivate cortisol to cortisone. Cortisol is displaced acutely from the myocardium by MR antagonists and may contribute to adverse MR activation in human heart.

  4. Indications for the use of parenteral H2-receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J C; Walker, J P

    1984-11-19

    Development of acute mucosal ulceration is a complex series of catabolic interactions. Hospitalized patients with duodenal or gastric ulcer, pathologic gastric hypersecretory states (such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome), gastric outlet obstruction, esophagitis, severe gastritis or duodenitis, sepsis, trauma (particularly head injury or burns), and some patients receiving high-dose corticosteroids are at risk of developing acute stress ulcers. Treatment should be initiated as soon as the patient is identified as being at risk, because measures designed to prevent bleeding or perforation are more effective than those designed to stop bleeding once it supervenes and the cascade of multiple organ failure commences. The presence of acid will trigger the onset of this condition; however, ulceration will not occur if the intraluminal pH can be maintained above 5 by periodic antacid treatment or by H2-receptor blockade. The dosing regimen of antacid or of H2-receptor antagonist should not be fixed, but should be sufficient to keep the gastric pH higher than 5. Antagonists administered via a nasogastric tube are the first line of defense, but 30 to 50 percent of the most ill patients will also be treated parenterally with H2-receptor antagonists. Parenteral H2-receptor blockade therapy is indicated in these patients when the risk of acute or continued ulceration of esophageal, gastric, or duodenal mucosa is high and the oral administration of medication is either not possible or the response to such therapy is unreliable. Parenteral H2-receptor antagonists are rarely administered alone.

  5. Bronchoprotection with a leukotriene receptor antagonist in asthmatic preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Nielsen, K G

    2000-01-01

    We hypothesized that a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) could provide bronchoprotection against the cold, dry air-induced response in asthmatic preschool children. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we examined the effect of the specific LTRA montelukast at 5...

  6. Manumycin from a new Streptomyces strain shows antagonistic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manumycin from a new Streptomyces strain shows antagonistic effect against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)/vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) strains from Korean Hospitals. Yun Hee Choi, Seung Sik Cho, Jaya Ram Simkhada, Chi Nam Seong, Hyo Jeong Lee, Hong Seop Moon, Jin Cheol Yoo ...

  7. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Inany, Hesham G; Youssef, Mohamed A; Ayeleke, Reuben Olugbenga; Brown, Julie; Lam, Wai Sun; Broekmans, Frank J

    2016-04-29

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-oestrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists directly and rapidly inhibit gonadotrophin release within several hours through competitive binding to pituitary GnRH receptors. This property allows their use at any time during the follicular phase. Several different regimens have been described including multiple-dose fixed (0.25 mg daily from day six to seven of stimulation), multiple-dose flexible (0.25 mg daily when leading follicle is 14 to 15 mm), and single-dose (single administration of 3 mg on day 7 to 8 of stimulation) protocols, with or without the addition of an oral contraceptive pill. Further, women receiving antagonists have been shown to have a lower incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Assuming comparable clinical outcomes for the antagonist and agonist protocols, these benefits would justify a change from the standard long agonist protocol to antagonist regimens. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001, and previously updated in 2006 and 2011. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists compared with the standard long protocol of GnRH agonists for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted conception cycles. We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register (searched from inception to May 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, inception to 28 April 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (1966 to 28 April 2015), EMBASE (1980 to 28 April 2015), PsycINFO (1806 to 28 April 2015), CINAHL (to 28 April 2015) and trial registers to 28 April 2015, and handsearched bibliographies of relevant publications and reviews, and abstracts of major scientific meetings, for

  8. Diversity, distribution, and antagonistic activities of rhizobacteria of Panax notoginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Yan Fan

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: The results suggest that diverse bacteria exist in the P. notoginseng rhizosphere soil, with differences in community in the same field, and antagonistic isolates may be good potential biological control agent for the notoginseng root-rot diseases caused by F. oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Panax herbarum.

  9. Antagonistic effect of brevicin on Gram positive and Gram negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Senthil Kumar

    phylogenetic tree was constructed, based on evolutionary distances that were calculated by following the distance matrix method, using the Phylip package. Preparation and analysis of crude extract of protein (CEP) for their antagonistic activity against food borne pathogens. 24 h old MRS broth culture was prepared and ...

  10. Neuroprotection by NMDA receptor antagonists in a variety of neuropathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, G C

    2001-09-01

    Because of adverse reactions, early efforts to introduce high affinity competitive or use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists into patients suffering from stroke, head trauma or epilepsy met with failure. Later it was discovered that both low affinity use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists and compounds with selective affinity for the NR2B receptor subunit met the criteria for safe administration into patients. Furthermore, these low affinity antagonists exhibit significant mechanistic differences from their higher affinity counterparts. Success of the latter is attested to the ability of the following low affinity compounds to be marketed: 1) Cough suppressant-dextromethorphan (available for decades); 2) Parkinson's disease--amantadine, memantine and budipine; 3) Dementia--memantine; and 4) Epilepsy--felbamate. Moreover, Phase III clinical trials are ongoing with remacemide for epilepsy and Huntington's disease and head trauma for HU-211. A host of compounds are or were under evaluation for the possible treatment of stroke, head trauma, hyperalgesia and various neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the fact that other drugs with associated NMDA receptor mechanisms have reached clinical status, this review focuses only on those competitive and use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists that reached clinical trails. The ensuing discussions link the in vivo pharmacological investigations that led to the success/mistakes/ failures for eventual testing of promising compounds in the clinic.

  11. Epiminocyclohepta[b]indole analogs as 5-HT6 antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henderson, Alan J; Guzzo, Peter R; Ghosh, Animesh

    2012-01-01

    A new series of epiminocyclohepta[b]indoles with potent 5-HT(6) antagonist activity were discovered and optimized using in vitro protocols. One compound from this series was progressed to advanced pharmacokinetic (PK) studies followed by 5-HT(6) receptor occupancy studies. The compound was found ...

  12. Sympatho-inhibitory properties of various AT1 receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balt, Jippe C.; Mathy, Marie-Jeanne; Pfaffendorf, Martin; van Zwieten, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that angiotensin II (Ang II) can facilitate the effects of sympathetic neurotransmission. In the present study, using various experimental models, we investigated the inhibitory effects of several Ang II subtype 1 receptor (AT1) antagonists on this Ang II-induced facilitation. We

  13. Management of hyperkalaemia consequent to mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonist therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roscioni, Sara S.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.

    2012-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists (MRAs) reduce blood pressure and albuminuria in patients treated with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II-receptor blockers. The use of MRAs, however, is limited by the occurrence of hyperkalaemia, which frequently occurs in patients

  14. Calcium antagonists: a ready prescription for treating infectious diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin B; Eisenstein, Edward M; Krahl, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of new and medically resistant pathogenic microbes continues to escalate toward worldwide public health, wild habitat, and commercial crop and livestock catastrophes. Attempts at solving this problem with sophisticated modern biotechnologies, such as smart vaccines and microbicidal and microbistatic drugs that precisely target parasitic bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, remain promising without major clinical and industrial successes. However, discovery of a more immediate, broad spectrum prophylaxis beyond conventional epidemiological approaches might take no longer than the time required to fill a prescription at your neighborhood pharmacy. Findings from a growing body of research suggest calcium antagonists, long approved and marketed for various human cardiovascular and neurological indications, may produce safe, efficacious antimicrobial effects. As a general category of drugs, calcium antagonists include compounds that disrupt passage of Ca(2+) molecules across cell membranes and walls, sequestration and mobilization of free intracellular Ca(2+), and downstream binding proteins and sensors of Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory pathways important for proper cell function. Administration of calcium antagonists alone at current therapeutically relevant doses and schedules, or with synergistic compounds and additional antimicrobial medications, figures to enhance host immunoprotection by directly altering pathogen infection sequences, life cycles, homeostasis, antibiotic tolerances, and numerous other infective, survival, and reproductive processes. Short of being miracle drugs, calcium antagonists are welcome old drugs with new tricks capable of controlling some of the most virulent and pervasive global infectious diseases of plants, animals, and humans, including Chagas' disease, malaria, and tuberculosis.

  15. Role of muscarinic receptor antagonists in urgency and nocturia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2005-01-01

    The overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is defined as urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are the most established form of treatment for OAB, but until recently their effectiveness was only confirmed for symptoms

  16. How Hybrid Organizations Turn Antagonistic Assets into Complementarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockerts, Kai

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on people excluded from traditional markets as employees, producers, or consumers on the grounds that they lack the appropriate skills. It describes the processes through which these perceived liabilities can be overcome by so-called hybrid organizations. Hybrids pursue expli...... for complementarities, and by creating demands for antagonistic assets, or by using partnerships....

  17. Effects of calcium antagonists on hypertension and diastolic function ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcium antagonists are known to decrease blood pressure acutely and chronically in hypertensive patients with hypertensive heart disease, and also to improve their systolic function. However, disorders of diastolic function may occur early in hypertensive heart disease. The improvement of diastolic function by nifedipine ...

  18. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng; Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A.; Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang; Mais, Dale E.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K i = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  19. Contrasting effects of intralocus sexual conflict on sexually antagonistic coevolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennell, Tanya M; de Haas, Freek J H; Morrow, Edward H; van Doorn, G Sander

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary conflict between the sexes can induce arms races in which males evolve traits that are detrimental to the fitness of their female partners, and vice versa. This interlocus sexual conflict (IRSC) has been proposed as a cause of perpetual intersexual antagonistic coevolution with

  20. Effect of Three Calmodulin Antagonists on Subpopulations of CD44 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus,. International Pharmaceutical ... cancer stem cells. It is not known, however, whether targeting CD44 can alter the fate of cancer stem cells themselves. In this study, the effect of the calmodulin antagonists (N-(10-.

  1. Effects of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists on male sexual function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marleen M.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Michel, Martin C.

    2006-01-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptor antagonists such as alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin and terazosin are first-line agents for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but are only second-line agents (doxazosin and terazosin only) for the treatment of

  2. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor ...

  3. Evaluation of antagonistic fungi against charcoal rot of sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Results showed reduction in disease incidence of charcoal rot on sunflower cultivar G-66 with antagonist, A. flavus (100%) followed by A. niger (64.86%) P. capsulatum (63.79%) and T. viride (31.89%) over control. Decrease in disease incidence over control was 100% where seed was treated with combination of A. niger ...

  4. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  5. NK-1 receptor antagonists as anti-cancer drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The substance P (SP)/neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor system plays an important role in cancer. SP promotes the proliferation of tumour cells, angiogenesis and the migration of tumour cells. We review the involvement of SP, the NK-1 receptor and NK-1 receptor antagonists in cancer. Tumour cells overexpress NK-1 receptors, ...

  6. About the use of antagonistic bacteria and fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Tilcher, R.; Schmidt, C.; Lorenz, D.; Wolf, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms isolated from the phylloplane of vine and cereal plants inhibiting different phytopathogenic fungi were tested as biological control agents against Plasmopara viticola (downy mildew of grapevine). Based on screening in vitro against Phytophthora infestans, P. parasitica, Pythium ultimum, Botrytis cinerea 62 bacterial isolates were selected for tests with Plasmopara viticola.. Antifungal bacterial strains were assayed for antagonistic activity towards the grapevine dieback fungu...

  7. Antagonistic bioactivity of endophytic strains isolated from Salvia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibiotic-producing potential of endophytic populations from medical plant of Salvia miltiorrhiza was examined. A total of 63 isolates was screened against five fungal and three bacterial species for the production of antimicrobial compounds. It showed that more isolates was antagonistic to fungi than to bacteria.

  8. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antagonists and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Lyeth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Despite more than 30 years of research, no pharmacological agents have been identified that improve neurological function following TBI. However, several lines of research described in this review provide support for further development of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. Following TBI, neurons and astrocytes experience a rapid and sometimes enduring increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. These fluxes in [Ca2+]i drive not only apoptotic and necrotic cell death, but also can lead to long-term cell dysfunction in surviving cells. In a limited number of in vitro experiments, both L-type and N-type VGCC antagonists successfully reduced calcium loads as well as neuronal and astrocytic cell death following mechanical injury. In rodent models of TBI, administration of VGCC antagonists reduced cell death and improved cognitive function. It is clear that there is a critical need to find effective therapeutics and rational drug delivery strategies for the management and treatment of TBI, and we believe that further investigation of VGCC antagonists should be pursued before ruling out the possibility of successful translation to the clinic.

  9. Antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas and its impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  10. Vasopressin receptor antagonists: pharmacological tools and potential therapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefkerk, J. O.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    The present survey deals with the development and applications of non-peptidergic vasopressin receptor antagonists. The existence of at least three vasopressin receptors (V(1), V(2) and V(3) respectively) is firmly established. V(1)-receptors play a relevant role in the regulation of vascular tone,

  11. Screening and Mechanism of Trapping Ligand Antagonist Peptide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to develop peptide H9 as an efficient antagonist of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) chemokine receptor US28. Methods: US28 gene was amplified from HCMV, and a stable expression system was constructed using NIH/3T3 cells. Interaction between peptide H9 and receptor ...

  12. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A. [Cell Systems Division, Invitrogen, Madison, WI (United States); Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Mais, Dale E. [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); MPI Research, Mattawan, MI (United States); Wang, Ming-Wei, E-mail: wangmw@mail.shcnc.ac.cn [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  13. Antagonistic activity of selected strains of Bacillus thuringiensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work was to determine, in vitro, the antagonistic effectiveness of 60 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis against damping-off and root and stem rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani. The strains were obtained from the International Collection of Entomopathogenic Bacillus at the FCB-UANL. During the in vitro dual ...

  14. The Effect of Antagonist Muscle Sensory Input on Force Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Onushko

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand how stretch-related sensory feedback from an antagonist muscle affects agonist muscle output at different contraction levels in healthy adults. Ten young (25.3 ± 2.4 years, healthy subjects performed constant isometric knee flexion contractions (agonist at 6 torque levels: 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of their maximal voluntary contraction. For half of the trials, subjects received patellar tendon taps (antagonist sensory feedback during the contraction. We compared error in targeted knee flexion torque and hamstring muscle activity, with and without patellar tendon tapping, across the 6 torque levels. At lower torque levels (5%, 10%, and 15%, subjects produced greater knee torque error following tendon tapping compared with the same torque levels without tendon tapping. In contrast, we did not find any difference in torque output at higher target levels (20%, 30%, and 40% between trials with and without tendon tapping. We also observed a load-dependent increase in the magnitude of agonist muscle activity after tendon taps, with no associated load-dependent increase in agonist and antagonist co-activation, or reflex inhibition from the antagonist tapping. The findings suggest that at relatively low muscle activity there is a deficiency in the ability to correct motor output after sensory disturbances, and cortical centers (versus sub-cortical are likely involved.

  15. Isolation of Fusarium fujikuroi antagonistic bacteria and cloning of its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... effects of volatile metabolites produced by antagonistic P. fluorescens found in the isolates inhibited growth of F. fujikuroi in vitro. ... secondary metabolites play critical roles in many aspects of bacterium-host interactions. ... Nocardia, Sorangium, Brevibacterium, and Burkholderia. (Mavrodi et al., 2006; ...

  16. β-Adrenergic receptor antagonists inhibit vasculogenesis of embryonic stem cells by downregulation of nitric oxide generation and interference with VEGF signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifpanah, Fatemeh; Saliu, Fatjon; Bekhite, Mohamed M; Wartenberg, Maria; Sauer, Heinrich

    2014-11-01

    The β-adrenoceptor antagonist Propranolol has been successfully used to treat infantile hemangioma. However, its mechanism of action is so far unknown. The hypothesis of this research was that β-adrenoceptor antagonists may interfere with endothelial cell differentiation of stem cells. Specifically, the effects of the non-specific β-adrenergic receptor (β-adrenoceptor) antagonist Propranolol, the β1-adrenoceptor-specific antagonist Atenolol and the β2-adrenoceptor-specific antagonist ICI118,551 on vasculogenesis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were investigated. All three β-blockers dose-dependently downregulated formation of capillary structures in ES cell-derived embryoid bodies and decreased the expression of the vascular cell markers CD31 and VE-cadherin. Furthermore, β-blockers downregulated the expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF165), VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) and phospho VEGF-R2, as well as neuropilin 1 (NRP1) and plexin-B1 which are essential modulators of embryonic angiogenesis with additional roles in vessel remodelling and arteriogenesis. Under conditions of β-adrenoceptor inhibition, the endogenous generation of nitric oxide (NO) as well as the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was decreased in embryoid bodies, whereas an increase in NO generation was observed with the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP). Consequently, vasculogenesis of ES cells was restored upon treatment of differentiating ES cells with β-adrenoceptor antagonists in the presence of NO donor. In summary, our data suggest that β-blockers impair vasculogenesis of ES cells by interfering with NO generation which could be the explanation for their anti-angiogenic effects in infantile hemangioma.

  17. String Stretching, Frequency Modulation, and Banjo Clang

    OpenAIRE

    Politzer, David

    2014-01-01

    The banjo’s floating bridge, string break angle, and flexible drumhead all contribute to substantial audio range frequency modulation. From the world of electronic music synthesis, it is known that modulating higher frequency sounds with lower acoustic frequencies leads to metallic and bell-like tone. The mechanics of the banjo does just that quite naturally, modulating fundamentals and harmonics with the motion of the bridge. In technical terms, with a floating bridge, string stretching is f...

  18. A protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist protects against podocyte injury in a mouse model of nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Guan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The kidney expresses protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1. PAR-1 is known as a thrombin receptor, but its role in kidney injury is not well understood. In this study, we examined the contribution of PAR-1 to kidney glomerular injury and the effects of its inhibition on development of nephropathy. Mice were divided into 3 groups: control, doxorubicin + vehicle (15 mg/kg doxorubicin and saline and doxorubicin + Q94 (doxorubicin at 15 mg/kg and the PAR-1 antagonist Q94 at 5 mg/kg/d groups. Where indicated, doxorubicin was administered intravenously and PAR-1 antagonist or saline vehicle by subcutaneous osmotic mini-pump. PAR-1 expression was increased in glomeruli of mice treated with doxorubicin. Q94 treatment significantly suppressed the increased albuminuria in these nephropathic mice. Pathological analysis showed that Q94 treatment significantly attenuated periodic acid–Schiff and desmin staining, indicators of podocyte injury, and also decreased glomerular levels of podocin and nephrin. Furthermore, thrombin increased intracellular calcium levels in podocytes. This increase was suppressed by Q94 and Rox4560, a transient receptor potential cation channel (TRPC3/6 antagonist. In addition, both Q94 and Rox4560 suppressed the doxorubicin-induced increase in activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3 in podocytes. These data suggested that PAR-1 contributes to development of podocyte and glomerular injury and that PAR-1 antagonists have therapeutic potential. Keywords: Protease-activated receptor-1, Podocyte, Transient receptor potential cation channel, Kidney injury

  19. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  20. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Jun; Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan; Fan, Xiaotang; Xu, Haiwei; Bai, Yun

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP swe /PS1 ΔE9 mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP swe /PS1 ΔE9 transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  1. Metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists but not NMDA antagonists affect conditioned taste aversion acquisition in the parabrachial nucleus of rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valeš, Karel; Zach, P.; Bielavská, Edita

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 169, č. 1 (2006), s. 50-57 ISSN 0014-4819 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0517 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : learning * microdialysis * glutamate antagonists Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.959, year: 2006

  2. Synergism of ochratoxin B and calcium-channel antagonist verapamil caused mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatopadhyay, Pronobesh; Tariang, Banlumlang; Agnihotri, Amit; Veer, Vijay

    2014-09-01

    We examined the mechanism by which the ochratoxin B induced interaction with calcium-channel antagonist verapamil and mitochondrial dysfunction of the rat trachea in vitro experiment. The tracheas were cut into 2-3 mm wide rings and suspended in a tissue bath. Isometric tension was continuously measured with an isometric force transducer connected to a computer-based data acquisition system. Verapamil (1 × 10(-6) M) produced a concentration-dependent contraction response in rat's tracheal rings pre-contracted by acetylcholine. Incubation of rat's tracheal rings with the ochratoxin B significantly potentiated the contraction responses of verapamil. Verapamil and OTB accelerate the overloading of Ca(2+) in tracheal smooth muscle contributes the tissue toxicity as shown in electron microscopy and mitochondrial enzymes, through a mechanism that could involve perturbations of Ca(2+) homeostasis. These results proved that ochratoxin B is a potential vasoconstrictor mycotoxin with the presence of calcium-channel antagonist. In conclusion, disturbance of Ca(2+) homeostasis caused by OTA and plays a significant role in produces toxicity through mitochondrial enzyme inhibition.

  3. Antagonist of GH-releasing hormone receptors alleviates experimental ocular inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yong Jie; Chan, Sun On; Chong, Kelvin Kam Lung; Li, Benjamin Fuk Loi; Ng, Tsz Kin; Yip, Yolanda Wong Ying; Chen, Haoyu; Zhang, Mingzhi; Block, Norman L; Cheung, Herman S; Schally, Andrew V; Pang, Chi Pui

    2014-12-23

    Disruptions in immunity and occurrence of inflammation cause many eye diseases. The growth hormone-releasing hormone-growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 (GHRH-GH-IGF1) axis exerts regulatory effects on the immune system. Its involvement in ocular inflammation remains to be investigated. Here we studied this signaling in endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) generated by LPS. The increase in GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) protein levels was parallel to the increase in mRNA levels of pituitary-specific transcription factor-1, GHRH-R splice variant 1, GHRH, and GH following LPS insult. Elevation of GHRH-R and GH receptor was localized on the epithelium of the iris and ciliary body, and GHRH-R was confined to the infiltrating macrophages and leukocytes in aqueous humor but not to those in stroma. Treatment with GHRH-R antagonist decreased LPS-stimulated surges of GH and IGF1 in aqueous humor and alleviated inflammation by reducing the infiltration of macrophages and leukocytes and the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Our results indicate that inflammation in the iris and ciliary body involves the activation of GHRH signaling, which affects the recruitment of immune cells and the production of proinflammatory mediators that contribute to EIU pathogenesis. Moreover, the results suggest that GHRH-R antagonists are potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of acute ocular inflammation.

  4. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs: the tide continues to come in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blann A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Andrew Blann University of Birmingham Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, Birmingham, UKThrombosis is the major common endpoint in most human diseases. In the coronary circulation, occlusive thrombi and/or the rupture of atherosclerotic plaque causes myocardial infarction, and in the cerebral circulation thrombosis, causes ischemic stroke. In the venous circulation, venous thromboembolism (VTE, manifesting clinically as pulmonary embolus and deep vein thrombosis (DVT, is a frequent complication among inpatients, and contributes to longer hospital stays with increased morbidity and mortality. Until perhaps 5 years ago, heparinoids (unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin [LMWH], and fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs: warfarin, acenocoumarol, phenocoumarol were the only options for the prevention of thrombotic stroke in atrial fibrillation, and of VTE in general. Although effective, these traditional drugs have several practical, management, and clinical disadvantages, a fact that our colleagues in industry have not been slow to recognize and address by developing improved drugs, now collectively known as nonvitamin K antagonist oral anti coagulants (NOACs. These agents are steadily replacing the heparinoids and VKAs in both inpatient and outpatient prevention and treatment of thrombosis.

  5. Pushing the threshold: how NMDAR antagonists induce homeostasis through protein synthesis to remedy depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.; Workman, Emily R.; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Niere, Farr

    2016-01-01

    Healthy neurons have an optimal operating range, coded globally by the frequency of action potentials or locally by calcium. The maintenance of this range is governed by homeostatic plasticity. Here, we discuss how new approaches to treat depression alter synaptic activity. These approaches induce the neuron to recruit homeostatic mechanisms to relieve depression. Homeostasis generally implies that the direction of activity necessary to restore the neuron’s critical operating range is opposite in direction to its current activity pattern. Unconventional antidepressant therapies deep brain stimulation and NMDAR antagonists alter the neuron’s “depressed” state by pushing the neuron’s current activity in the same direction but to the extreme edge. These therapies rally the intrinsic drive of neurons in the opposite direction, thereby allowing the cell to return to baseline activity, form new synapses, and restore proper communication. In this review, we discuss seminal studies on protein synthesis dependent homeostatic plasticity and their contribution to our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of NMDAR antagonists as rapid antidepressants. Rapid antidepressant efficacy is likely to require a cascade of mRNA translational regulation. Emerging evidence suggests that changes in synaptic strength or intrinsic excitability converge on the same protein synthesis pathways, relieving depressive symptoms. Thus, we address the question: Are there multiple homeostatic mechanisms that induce the neuron and neuronal circuits to self-correct to regulate mood in vivo? Targeting alternative ways to induce homeostatic protein synthesis may provide, faster, safer, and longer lasting antidepressants. PMID:27125595

  6. Mechanisms linking depression co-morbid with obesity: An approach for serotonergic type 3 receptor antagonist as novel therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan

    2015-10-01

    Despite of the enormous research, therapeutic treatment for depression has always been a serious issue. Even though depression and obesity are individual abnormal health conditions, each act as a triggering factor for the other. Obese individuals are twice prone to develop depression than that of non-obese persons. The exact mechanism how obesity increases the risk for depression still remains an area of interest for research in neuropsychopharmacology. Depression and obesity share some common pathological pathways such as hyperactivity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, dysregulation of oxidant/antioxidant system balance, higher level of inflammatory cytokines, leptin resistance, altered plasma glucose, insulin resistance, reduced neuronal brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and decreased serotonergic neurotransmission in various regions of brain. The antidepressant-like effect of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists through allosteric modulation of serotonergic pathways is well evident from several research investigations belonging to our and some in other laboratories. Furthermore, serotonin regulates diet intake, leptin, corticosterone, inflammatory mechanisms, altered plasma glucose, insulin resistance and BDNF concentration in brain. The present review deals with various biological mechanisms involved in depression co-morbid with obesity and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists by modulation of serotonergic system as a therapeutic target for such co-morbid disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Orexin receptor antagonists differ from standard sleep drugs by promoting sleep at doses that do not disrupt cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslaner, Jason M; Tye, Spencer J; Eddins, Donnie M; Wang, Xiaohai; Fox, Steven V; Savitz, Alan T; Binns, Jacquelyn; Cannon, Christopher E; Garson, Susan L; Yao, Lihang; Hodgson, Robert; Stevens, Joanne; Bowlby, Mark R; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Brunner, Joseph; Mcdonald, Terrence P; Gotter, Anthony L; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J

    2013-04-03

    Current treatments for insomnia, such as zolpidem (Ambien) and eszopiclone (Lunesta), are γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA)-positive allosteric modulators that carry a number of side effects including the potential to disrupt cognition. In an effort to develop better tolerated medicines, we have identified dual orexin 1 and 2 receptor antagonists (DORAs), which promote sleep in preclinical animal models and humans. We compare the effects of orally administered eszopiclone, zolpidem, and diazepam to the dual orexin receptor antagonist DORA-22 on sleep and the novel object recognition test in rat, and on sleep and two cognition tests (delayed match to sample and serial choice reaction time) in the rhesus monkey. Each compound's minimal dose that promoted sleep versus the minimal dose that exerted deficits in these cognitive tests was determined, and a therapeutic margin was established. We found that DORA-22 has a wider therapeutic margin for sleep versus cognitive impairment in rat and rhesus monkey compared to the other compounds tested. These data were further supported with the demonstration of a wider therapeutic margin for DORA-22 compared to the other compounds on sleep versus the expression of hippocampal activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc), an immediate-early gene product involved in synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that DORAs might provide an effective treatment for insomnia with a greater therapeutic margin for sleep versus cognitive disturbances compared to the GABAA-positive allosteric modulators currently in use.

  8. Antagonistic Enzymes in a Biocatalytic pH Feedback System Program Autonomous DNA Hydrogel Life Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Laura; Heuser, Thomas; Steinschulte, Alexander; Walther, Andreas

    2017-08-09

    Enzymes regulate complex functions and active behavior in natural systems and have shown increasing prospect for developing self-regulating soft matter systems. Striving for advanced autonomous hydrogel materials with fully programmable, self-regulated life cycles, we combine two enzymes with an antagonistic pH-modulating effect in a feedback-controlled biocatalytic reaction network (BRN) and couple it to pH-responsive DNA hydrogels to realize hydrogel systems with distinct preprogrammable lag times and lifetimes in closed systems. The BRN enables precise and orthogonal internal temporal control of the "ON" and "OFF" switching times of the temporary gel state by modulation of programmable, nonlinear pH changes. The time scales are tunable by variation of the enzyme concentrations and additional buffer substances. The resulting material system operates in full autonomy after injection of the chemical fuels driving the BRN. The concept may open new applications inherent to DNA hydrogels, for instance, autonomous shape memory behavior for soft robotics. We further foresee general applicability to achieve autonomous life cycles in other pH switchable systems.

  9. CB1 - cannabinoid receptor antagonist effects on cortisol in cannabis-dependent men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Robert S; Baumann, Michael H; Gorelick, David A; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; Schroeder, Jennifer R; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, but the effect of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor antagonism following chronic CB1 receptor stimulation in humans is unknown. To evaluate effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant on the HPA axis in cannabis-dependent individuals. Fourteen daily cannabis smokers received increasingly frequent 20 mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) doses (60-120 mg/day) over 8 days to standardize cannabis tolerance. Concurrent with the last THC dose, double-blind placebo or rimonabant (20 or 40 mg) was administered. Cannabinoid, rimonabant, and cortisol plasma concentrations were measured 1.5 hours prior to rimonabant administration and 2.0, 5.5, and 12.5 hours post-dose. Ten participants completed before premature study termination due to rimonabant's withdrawal from development. Five participants received 20 mg, three received 40 mg, and two placebo. There was a significant positive association between rimonabant concentration and change in cortisol concentration from baseline (r = .53, p 40 mg might elicit cortisol changes, confirming a role for CB1 receptors in modulating the HPA axis in humans.

  10. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS: DATA OF EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE AND RECOM-MENDATIONS ON PRACTICAL USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The classification of calcium antagonists is presented. There were considered the results of large randomized trials, which were devoted to study of influence of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists on the risk of cardiovascular complications. The place of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists in modern recommendations on treatment of arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease is defined. The clinical importance of differences between various presentations of dihy-dropyridine calcium antagonists is stressed.

  11. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS: DATA OF EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE AND RECOM-MENDATIONS ON PRACTICAL USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The classification of calcium antagonists is presented. There were considered the results of large randomized trials, which were devoted to study of influence of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists on the risk of cardiovascular complications. The place of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists in modern recommendations on treatment of arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease is defined. The clinical importance of differences between various presentations of dihy-dropyridine calcium antagonists is stressed.

  12. Nice module. Apollon Solar present their new line of solar modules; Nettes Modul. Apollon Solar stellt Linie fuer neuartige Modultechnologie vor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podewils, C.

    2008-06-15

    Solar modules, TGV engines and perfume Zerstaeuber seem to have nothing in common. The new solar module developed by French producer Apollon Solar makes use of both technologies in the construction process. The contribution presents the 'Nice' module which has many new features. (orig.)

  13. Endocannabinoids in the brainstem modulate dural trigeminovascular nociceptive traffic via CB1 and "triptan" receptors: implications in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Simon; Holland, Philip R; Lasalandra, Michele P; Goadsby, Peter J

    2013-09-11

    Activation and sensitization of trigeminovascular nociceptive pathways is believed to contribute to the neural substrate of the severe and throbbing nature of pain in migraine. Endocannabinoids, as well as being physiologically analgesic, are known to inhibit dural trigeminovascular nociceptive responses. They are also involved in the descending modulation of cutaneous-evoked C-fiber spinal nociceptive responses from the brainstem. The purpose of this study was to determine whether endocannabinoids are involved in the descending modulation of dural and/or cutaneous facial trigeminovascular nociceptive responses, from the brainstem ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). CB1 receptor activation in the vlPAG attenuated dural-evoked Aδ-fiber neurons (maximally by 19%) and basal spontaneous activity (maximally by 33%) in the rat trigeminocervical complex, but there was no effect on cutaneous facial receptive field responses. This inhibitory vlPAG-mediated modulation was inhibited by specific CB1 receptor antagonism, given via the vlPAG, and with a 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, given either locally in the vlPAG or systemically. These findings demonstrate for the first time that brainstem endocannabinoids provide descending modulation of both basal trigeminovascular neuronal tone and Aδ-fiber dural-nociceptive responses, which differs from the way the brainstem modulates spinal nociceptive transmission. Furthermore, our data demonstrate a novel interaction between serotonergic and endocannabinoid systems in the processing of somatosensory nociceptive information, suggesting that some of the therapeutic action of triptans may be via endocannabinoid containing neurons in the vlPAG.

  14. Developmental changes in central O2 chemoreflex in Rana catesbeiana: the role of noradrenergic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Stéphanie; Allard, Mathieu; Roussin, Stéphanie; Kinkead, Richard

    2007-09-01

    The in vitro brainstem preparation from Rana catesbeiana shows a functional central O(2) chemoreflex. Acute brainstem exposure to hypoxic superfusate elicits lung burst frequency responses that change over the course of development. Based on studies suggesting that brainstem noradrenergic neurons are involved in this reflex, we tested the following two hypotheses in vitro: (1) activation of adrenoceptors is necessary for the expression of the fictive lung ventilation response to hypoxia, and (2) changes in fast, Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmission (GABA/glycine) contribute to developmental changes in noradrenergic modulation. Experiments were performed on preparations from pre-metamorphics tadpoles (TK stages V-XIII) and adult bullfrogs. Acute exposure to hypoxic superfusate (98% N(2), 2% CO(2)) increased fictive lung ventilation frequency in the pre-metamorphic group, whereas a decrease was observed in adults. Buccal burst frequency was unchanged by hypoxia. Noradrenaline (NA; 5 micromol l(-1)) bath application mimicked both fictive breathing responses and application of the alpha(1)-antagonist prazosine (0.5 micromol l(-1)) blocked the lung burst response to hypoxia in both groups. Blocking GABA(A)/glycine receptors with a bicuculine/strychnine mixture (1.25 micromol l(-1)/1.5 micromol l(-1), respectively) or activation of GABA(B) pre-synaptic autoreceptors with baclofen (0.5 micromol l(-1)) prevented the lung burst response to hypoxia and to the alpha(1)-agonist phenylephrine (25 micromol l(-1)) in both stage groups. We conclude that NA modulation contributes to the central O(2) chemoreflex in bullfrog, which acts via GABA/glycine pathways. These data suggest that maturation of GABA/glycine neurotransmission contributes to the developmental changes in this chemoreflex.

  15. Opioid antagonists with minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M

    2017-05-29

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of long-term substitution treatment. To assess the effects of opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal. Comparators were placebo as well as more established approaches to detoxification, such as tapered doses of methadone, adrenergic agonists, buprenorphine and symptomatic medications. We updated our searches of the following databases to December 2016: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Science. We also searched two trials registers and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant studies. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials along with prospective controlled cohort studies comparing opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation versus other approaches or different opioid antagonist regimens for withdrawal in opioid-dependent participants. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Ten studies (6 randomised controlled trials and 4 prospective cohort studies, involving 955 participants) met the inclusion criteria for the review. We considered 7 of the 10 studies to be at high risk of bias in at least one of the domains we assessed.Nine studies compared an opioid antagonist-adrenergic agonist combination versus a treatment regimen based primarily on an alpha 2 -adrenergic agonist (clonidine or lofexidine). Other comparisons (placebo, tapered doses of methadone, buprenorphine) made by included studies were too diverse for any meaningful analysis. This review therefore focuses on the nine studies comparing an opioid antagonist (naltrexone or naloxone) plus clonidine or lofexidine versus treatment primarily based on clonidine or lofexidine.Five studies took place in an inpatient setting, two studies were in outpatients with day care, two used day care only for the first day of opioid antagonist administration, and one study described the setting as outpatient

  16. Reproductive system behavior following exposure of sustained delivery of npy antagonist in ovariectomized (ovx) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Zelma; Wilson, Gerri; Golanov, Olga; Tucci, Michelle; McGuire, Robert; Benghuzzi, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    Several investigations have documented that sustained delivery of estrogen can modulate or sustain normal female reproductive functions. However, the literature is lacking scientific evidence regarding the mechanism of estrogen and neuropeptide Y antagonist (NPY) effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The objective of this study was to explore the role of sustained delivery of estrogen and its effects on reproductive unction compared to an antagonist such as NPY. A total of twenty adult female rats (OVX, n=15; intact control, n=5) were divided into five groups (intact control, OVX, sham, OVX + estrogen, and OVX + NPY). Animals in two groups were surgically implanted with a TCP delivery device loaded with estrogen or NPY. Vaginal smears and body weights (BW) were evaluated at baseline and at two weeks post implantation. At the end of two weeks, all animals were euthanized and vital and reproductive organs were retrieved for histopathological evaluation. The results revealed differences in BW between intact control and OVX animals. Furthermore, there was statistical difference (P<0.05) in BW between OVX and OVX + NPY animals. Vaginal smear evaluation revealed that estrogen exposure induced estrus cyclic activities as compared to OVX and sham animals. The animals exposed to sustained delivery of NPY triggered moderate cyclic activities compared to intact control animals. There were no significant differences (P<0.5) in vital organ wet weights among and between animals in all groups. Overall this study proved the capability of TCP to release estrogen and NPY at sustained levels, which resulted inpathophysiological changes in female reproductive organs.

  17. Identification and characterization of a selective allosteric antagonist of human P2X4 receptor channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ase, Ariel R; Honson, Nicolette S; Zaghdane, Helmi; Pfeifer, Tom A; Séguéla, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    P2X4 is an ATP-gated nonselective cation channel highly permeable to calcium. There is increasing evidence that this homomeric purinoceptor, which is expressed in several neuronal and immune cell types, is involved in chronic pain and inflammation. The current paucity of unambiguous pharmacological tools available to interrogate or modulate P2X4 function led us to pursue the search for selective antagonists. In the high-throughput screen of a compound library, we identified the phenylurea BX430 (1-(2,6-dibromo-4-isopropyl-phenyl)-3-(3-pyridyl)urea, molecular weight = 413), with antagonist properties on human P2X4-mediated calcium uptake. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed direct inhibition of P2X4 currents by extracellular BX430, with submicromolar potency (IC50 = 0.54 µM). BX430 is highly selective, having virtually no functional impact on all other P2X subtypes, namely, P2X1-P2X3, P2X5, and P2X7, at 10-100 times its IC50. Unexpected species differences were noticed, as BX430 is a potent antagonist of zebrafish P2X4 but has no effect on rat and mouse P2X4 orthologs. The concentration-response curve for ATP on human P2X4 in the presence of BX430 shows an insurmountable blockade, indicating a noncompetitive allosteric mechanism of action. Using a fluorescent dye uptake assay, we observed that BX430 also effectively suppresses ATP-evoked and ivermectin-potentiated membrane permeabilization induced by P2X4 pore dilation. Finally, in single-cell calcium imaging, we validated its selective inhibitory effects on native P2X4 channels at the surface of human THP-1 cells that were differentiated into macrophages. In summary, this ligand provides a novel molecular probe to assess the specific role of P2X4 in inflammatory and neuropathic conditions, where ATP signaling has been shown to be dysfunctional. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Lack of Association between an Interleukin-I Receptor Antagonist Gene Polymorphism and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A. Danis

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-MHC linked genes may contribute to genetic predisposition to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. The possibility that cytokine genes may be involved was raised by the observation of increased frequency in expression of an uncommon allele of an interleukin-I receptor antagonist gene polymorphism and SLE in a recent U.K. study. We have not been able to show any significant differences in expression of this allele in SLE patients as a whole or in any patient subgroups. Our results actually show a slight decrease in the expression of this allele in SLE patients compared with healthy controls and in SLE patients with malar rash compared with SLE patients without malar rash.

  19. Tactical Approaches to Interconverting GPCR Agonists and Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosa, Peter I; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

    2016-02-11

    There are many reported examples of small structural modifications to GPCR-targeted ligands leading to major changes in their functional activity, converting agonists into antagonists or vice versa. These shifts in functional activity are often accompanied by negligible changes in binding affinity. The current perspective focuses on outlining and analyzing various approaches that have been used to interconvert GPCR agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists in order to achieve the intended functional activity at a GPCR of therapeutic interest. An improved understanding of specific structural modifications that are likely to alter the functional activity of a GPCR ligand may be of use to researchers designing GPCR-targeted drugs and/or probe compounds, specifically in cases where a particular ligand exhibits good potency but not the preferred functional activity at the GPCR of choice.

  20. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  1. In-silico guided discovery of novel CCR9 antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Cross, Jason B.; Romero, Jan; Heifetz, Alexander; Humphries, Eric; Hall, Katie; Wu, Yuchuan; Stucka, Sabrina; Zhang, Jing; Chandonnet, Haoqun; Lippa, Blaise; Ryan, M. Dominic; Baber, J. Christian

    2018-03-01

    Antagonism of CCR9 is a promising mechanism for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. There is limited experimental data on CCR9 and its ligands, complicating efforts to identify new small molecule antagonists. We present here results of a successful virtual screening and rational hit-to-lead campaign that led to the discovery and initial optimization of novel CCR9 antagonists. This work uses a novel data fusion strategy to integrate the output of multiple computational tools, such as 2D similarity search, shape similarity, pharmacophore searching, and molecular docking, as well as the identification and incorporation of privileged chemokine fragments. The application of various ranking strategies, which combined consensus and parallel selection methods to achieve a balance of enrichment and novelty, resulted in 198 virtual screening hits in total, with an overall hit rate of 18%. Several hits were developed into early leads through targeted synthesis and purchase of analogs.

  2. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Vaag, Allan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expression of interleukin-1-receptor antagonist is reduced in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and high glucose concentrations induce the production of interleukin-1beta in human pancreatic beta cells, leading to impaired insulin secretion, decreased cell...... proliferation, and apoptosis. METHODS: In this double-blind, parallel-group trial involving 70 patients with type 2 diabetes, we randomly assigned 34 patients to receive 100 mg of anakinra (a recombinant human interleukin-1-receptor antagonist) subcutaneously once daily for 13 weeks and 36 patients to receive......, and the body-mass index were similar in the two study groups. Symptomatic hypoglycemia was not observed, and there were no apparent drug-related serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: The blockade of interleukin-1 with anakinra improved glycemia and beta-cell secretory function and reduced markers of systemic...

  3. Non-imidazole histamine NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Recently a series of H3-antagonists related to Imoproxifan was realised (I); in these products the oxime substructure of the lead was constrained in NO-donor furoxan systems and in the corresponding furazan derivatives. In this paper, a new series of compounds derived from I by substituting the imidazole ring with the ethoxycarbonylpiperazino moiety present in the non-imidazole H3-ligand A-923 is described. For all the products synthesis and preliminary pharmacological characterisation, as well as their hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, are reported. The imidazole ring replacement generally results in a decreased H3-antagonist activity with respect to the analogues of series I and, in some cases, induces relaxing effects on the electrically contracted guinea-pig ileum, probably due to increased affinity for other receptor systems.

  4. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Kane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Urotensin-II (UII, which binds to its receptor UT, plays an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland and CNS. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in ACAT-1 activity leading to SMC proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII, as well as inflammation, high blood pressure and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  5. Construction, purification, and characterization of a chimeric TH1 antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier-González Luís

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TH1 immune response antagonism is a desirable approach to mitigate some autoimmune and inflammatory reactions during the course of several diseases where IL-2 and IFN-γ are two central players. Therefore, the neutralization of both cytokines could provide beneficial effects in patients suffering from autoimmune or inflammatory illnesses. Results A chimeric antagonist that can antagonize the action of TH1 immunity mediators, IFN-γ and IL-2, was designed, engineered, expressed in E. coli, purified and evaluated for its in vitro biological activities. The TH1 antagonist molecule consists of the extracellular region for the human IFNγ receptor chain 1 fused by a four-aminoacid linker peptide to human 60 N-terminal aminoacid residues of IL-2. The corresponding gene fragments were isolated by RT-PCR and cloned in the pTPV-1 vector. E. coli (W3110 strain was transformed with this vector. The chimeric protein was expressed at high level as inclusion bodies. The protein was partially purified by pelleting and washing. It was then solubilized with strong denaturant and finally refolded by gel filtration. In vitro biological activity of chimera was demonstrated by inhibition of IFN-γ-dependent HLA-DR expression in Colo 205 cells, inhibition of IFN-γ antiproliferative effect on HEp-2 cells, and by a bidirectional effect in assays for IL-2 T-cell dependent proliferation: agonism in the absence versus inhibition in the presence of IL-2. Conclusion TH1 antagonist is a chimeric protein that inhibits the in vitro biological activities of human IFN-γ, and is a partial agonist/antagonist of human IL-2. With these attributes, the chimera has the potential to offer a new opportunity for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  6. State Estimation For An Agonistic-Antagonistic Muscle System

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thang; Warner, Holly; La, Hung; Mohammadi, Hanieh; Simon, Dan; Richter, Hanz

    2017-01-01

    Research on assistive technology, rehabilitation, and prosthesis requires the understanding of human machine interaction, in which human muscular properties play a pivotal role. This paper studies a nonlinear agonistic-antagonistic muscle system based on the Hill muscle model. To investigate the characteristics of the muscle model, the problem of estimating the state variables and activation signals of the dual muscle system is considered. In this work, parameter uncertainty and unknown input...

  7. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists as immunomodulators: new therapeutic views?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    Considerable evidence has emerged to suggest that histamine participates in the regulation of the inflammatory response, immune reaction, coagulation cascade, and cardiovascular function. Furthermore, histamine may play a major role in the growth of normal and malignant tissue as a regulator...... antagonists as adjuvant single drugs to reduce trauma-, blood transfusion- and sepsis-induced immunosuppression has led to research in combined treatment regimens in major surgery, particularly, of patients operated on for malignant diseases....

  8. Chitinolytic Enterobacter agglomerans Antagonistic to Fungal Plant Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Chernin, L.; Ismailov, Z.; Haran, S.; Chet, I.

    1995-01-01

    Three Enterobacter agglomerans strains which produce and excrete proteins with chitinolytic activity were found while screening soil-borne bacteria antagonistic to fungal plant pathogens. The chitinolytic activity was induced when the strains were grown in the presence of colloidal chitin as the sole carbon source. It was quantitated by using assays with chromogenic p-nitrophenyl analogs of disaccharide, trisaccharide, and tetrasaccharide derivatives of N-acetylglucosamine. A set of three flu...

  9. ANTIHYPERTENSIVE TREATMENT IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS

    OpenAIRE

    Y. A. Karpov; V. V. Buza

    2006-01-01

    The proofs of necessity of active arterial hypertension (AH) treatment in elderly patients are given. Peculiarities of pathogenesis of AH in elderly patients, connected predominantly with loss of big arteries elasticity and reasoning widely spread of isolated systolic AH in these patients, are discussed. Advantages of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists (DPCA) for AH treatment in elderly patients are proved, safety of treatment with DPCA is discussed. Data of clinical studies is analyzed. Ana...

  10. Renoprotective effects of calcium antagonists on kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mochammad Sja'bani, Mochammad Sja'bani

    2015-01-01

    There has been a growing number of evidence that calcium antagonists provide a salutary effects in preserving kidneys against acute renal ischemia in patients at increasing risk. Their beneficial effects on cellular and mitochondrial calcium may explain the effects on renal hemodynamics and metabolics. It seems, that they do not directly vasodilate kidney vessels but alter the response towards vasoconstrictor agents. This effect may mediate diuretic and natriuretic effect of calcium antagonis...

  11. Capturing the angel in "angel dust": twenty years of translational neuroscience studies of NMDA receptor antagonists in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Bita; Krystal, John H

    2012-09-01

    Here, we describe our collaborative efforts to use N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists as a translational tool to advance our understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and identify potential new targets for treatment of schizophrenia. We began these efforts in the late 1980s with a keen sense that, in both human and animal studies, we needed to move beyond the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia; if the dopamine hypothesis were correct, the existing dopamine antagonists should have cured the disease but they have not. We used NMDA receptor antagonists, not to produce schizophrenia, but as a tool to provide insights into effects of disturbances in glutamate synaptic function in schizophrenia. Our work has provided insights into potential mechanisms that may contribute to disrupted cortical function in schizophrenia and has helped identify potential treatment targets for the disorder. The translational nature of this study made the clinical testing of the first of these targets feasible. Advances in systems neuroscience approaches in animals and humans make new types of translational research possible; however, our concern is that the current obstacles facing translational research funding and academia-industry collaborations threaten the future progress in this field.

  12. Deoxycholic acid conjugates are muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Chen, Ying; Zimniak, Piotr; Cheng, Kunrong

    2002-08-01

    In the course of examining the actions of major human bile acids on cholinergic receptors, we discovered that conjugates of lithocholic acid are partial muscarinic agonists. In the present communication, we report that conjugates of deoxycholic acid (DC) act as cholinergic muscarinic receptor antagonists. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing rat M3-muscarinic receptors were used to test bile acids for inhibition of radioligand [N- (3)H-methylscopolamine ((3)H-NMS)] binding; alteration of inositol phosphate (IP) formation; mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation and cell toxicity. We observed approximately 18.8, 30.3 and 37.1% inhibition of (3)H-NMS binding with DC and its glycine (DCG) and taurine (DCT) conjugates, respectively (all 100 micromol/l, p exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase release from CHO-M3 cells. We observed the following rank order of potency (IC(50) micromol/l) for inhibition of (3)H-NMS by muscarinic antagonists and bile acids: NMS (0.0004) > 4-DAMP (0.009) > atropine (0.012) > DCT (170) > DCG (250). None of the bile acids tested were hydrolyzed by recombinant cholinesterase. At concentrations achieved in human bile, DC derivatives are natural muscarinic antagonists. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Glutamate receptor antagonists with the potential for migraine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Anna; Rustichelli, Cecilia; Baraldi, Carlo

    2017-12-01

    Preclinical, clinical, and other (e.g., genetic) evidence support the concept that migraine susceptibility may at least partially result from a glutamatergic system disorder. Therefore, the receptors of the glutamatergic system are considered relatively new targets for investigational drugs to treat migraine. Investigational and established glutamate receptor antagonists (GluRAs) have been shown to possess antinociceptive properties in preclinical models of trigeminovascular nociception and have been evaluated in clinical trials. This review focuses on preclinical and clinical studies of GluRAs for the treatment of migraine. Areas covered: A PubMed database search (from 1987 to December 2016) and a review of published studies on GluRAs in migraine were conducted. Expert opinion: All published clinical trials of investigational GluRAs have been unsuccessful in establishing benefit for acute migraine treatment. Clinical trial results contrast with the preclinical data, suggesting that glutamate (Glu) does not play a decisive role after the attack has already been triggered. These antagonists may instead be useful for migraine prophylaxis. Improving patient care requires further investigating and critically analyzing the role of Glu in migraine, designing experimental models to study more receptors and their corresponding antagonists, and identifying biomarkers to facilitate trials designed to target specific subgroups of migraine patients.

  14. Non-genetic inheritance and the patterns of antagonistic coevolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostowy Rafal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antagonistic species interactions can lead to coevolutionary genotype or phenotype frequency oscillations, with important implications for ecological and evolutionary processes. However, direct empirical evidence of such oscillations is rare. The rarity of observations is generally attributed to inherent difficulties of ecological and evolutionary long-term studies, to weak or absent interaction between species, or to the absence of negative frequency-dependence. Results Here, we show that another factor – non-genetic inheritance, mediated for example by epigenetic mechanisms – can completely eliminate oscillations in the presence of such negative frequency dependence, even if only a small fraction of offspring are affected. We analytically derive the threshold value of this fraction at which the dynamics change from oscillatory to stable, and investigate how selection, mutation and generation times differences between the two species affect the threshold value. These results strongly suggest that the lack of phenotype frequency oscillations should not be attributed to the lack of strong interactions between antagonistic species. Conclusions Given increasing evidence of non-genetic effects on the outcomes of antagonistic species interactions, we suggest that these effects should be incorporated into ecological and evolutionary models of interacting species.

  15. Histamine H1 antagonists and clinical characteristics of febrile seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolaly MA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed A ZolalyDepartment of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures.Methods: The current descriptive study was carried out from April 2009 to February 2011 in 250 infants and children who visited the Madinah Maternity and Children's Hospital as a result of febrile convulsions. They were divided into two groups according to administration of antihistamines at the onset of fever.Results: Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamines. The time from fever detection to seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than in the nonantihistamine group. No significant difference was found in time from fever detection to seizure onset or seizure duration between patients who received a first-generation antihistamine and those who received a second-generation antihistamine.Conclusion: Due to their central nervous system effects, H1 antagonists should not be administered to patients with febrile seizures and epilepsy. Caution should be exercised regarding the use of histamine H1 antagonists in young infants, because these drugs could potentially disturb the anticonvulsive central histaminergic system.Keywords: antihistamine, nonantihistamine, histamine H1 antagonist, febrile seizures

  16. [Necrotic leg ulcer revealing vasculitis induced by vitamin K antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabli, H; Hocar, O; Akhdari, N; Amal, S; Hakkou, M; Hamdaoui, A

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists are widely used in thromboembolic diseases. Hemorrhagic complications related to drug overdose represent their main side effect. We report a rare side effect, a severe and unexpected type of skin vasculitis - necrotic leg ulcer - induced by vitamin K antagonist. A 63-year-old female with a history of diabetes developed hyperalgesic necrotic ulcerations on the lower limbs one month after starting an acenocoumarol-based treatment for ischemic heart disease. Histological examination revealed lymphocytic vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis. Etiological explorations searching for vasculitis were negative. In the absence of a precise etiology, drug-induced ulcer was suspected. Low molecular weight heparin was prescribed to replace acenocoumarol. The lesions slowly resolved with topical treatment. The chronological criteria and the negativity of etiological explorations allowed the diagnosis of vitamin K antagonist-induced necrotic skin ulcer. Clinicians should be aware of this rare complication induced by oral anticoagulants because of its practical therapeutic implications. This is the first case of necrotic leg ulcer induced by acenocoumarol corresponding histologically to necrotising lymphocytic vasculitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. DREAM/Calsenilin/KChIP3 Modulates Strategy Selection and Estradiol-Dependent Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunur, Tumay; Stelly, Claire E.; Schrader, Laura Ann

    2013-01-01

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM)/calsenilin(C)/K+ channel interacting protein 3 (KChIP3) is a multifunctional Ca[superscript 2+]-binding protein highly expressed in the hippocampus that inhibits hippocampus-sensitive memory and synaptic plasticity in male mice. Initial studies in our lab suggested opposing effects of…

  18. Influence of specific and non-specific endothelin receptor antagonists on renal morphology in rats with surgical renal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokov, A; Amann, K; Wagner, J; Gehlen, F; Münter, K; Ritz, E

    1996-03-01

    Studies in experimental models of chronic renal failure suggest an important role for the endothelin system in the development of renal scarring. Endothelin receptor (ETR) anatagonists interfere with progression, but it has not been resolved (i) whether this is true for all models of renal damage, (ii) to what extent the effect is modulated by systemic blood pressure and (iii) whether the effect is similar for ETAR and ETA/ETBR antagonists. 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy (SNX) by surgical ablation in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Comparison of ACE inhibitor Trandolapril (0.1 mg/kg/day), ETAR antagonist BMS 182874 (30 mg/kg/day) and ETAR/ETBR antagonist Ro 46-2005 (30 mg/kg/day) by gavage. Duration of the experiment eight weeks. Systolic blood pressure by tail plethysmography. Perfusion fixation of kidneys and morphometric analysis ET-1 and ETA/ETBR by quantitative PCR. SNX caused a significant (P < 0.01) increase of systolic blood pressure (170 +/- 8.6 mmHg) compared to sham operated controls (131 +/- 5.3 mmHg). Blood pressure was significantly (P < 0.001) lower with Trandolapril (128 +/- 5.3 mmHg), but not with BMS 182874 (153 +/- 5.9 mmHg) or Ro 46-2005 (167 +/- 7.6 mmHg). Compared to sham operated rats (0.03 +/- 0.01) glomerulosclerosis index (GSI) was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in the untreated SNX group (0.9 +/- 0.15). Significantly lower GSI was found in Trandolapril treated (0.29 +/- 0.04), BMS 182874 treated (0.36 +/- 0.05), and Ro 46-2005 treated animals (0.45 +/- 0.11). The effect of BMS 182874 was accompanied by lower tubulointerstitial damage index. Mean glomerular volume was dramatically increased (P < 0.001) in SNX rats as compared to sham operated animals. This glomerular enlargement was partially prevented by Trandolapril (P < 0.05), but not by either ETR antagonist. ET-1 mRNA tended to be higher in SNX irrespective of treatment, while ETAR and ETBR mRNA were significantly lower. Both specific (ETAR) and non-specific (ETA/ETBR) endothelin antagonists

  19. Stress-induced changes of hippocampal NMDA receptors: modulation by duloxetine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Calabrese

    Full Text Available It is now well established that the glutamatergic system contributes to the pathophysiology of depression. Exposure to stress, a major precipitating factor for depression, enhances glutamate release that can contribute to structural abnormalities observed in the brain of depressed subjects. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that NMDA antagonists, like ketamine, exert an antidepressant effect at preclinical and clinical levels. On these bases, the purpose of our study was to investigate whether chronic mild stress is associated with specific alterations of the NMDA receptor complex, in adult rats, and to establish whether concomitant antidepressant treatment could normalize such deficits. We found that chronic stress increases the expression of the obligatory GluN1 subunit, as well as of the accessory subunits GluN2A and GluN2B at transcriptional and translational levels, particularly in the ventral hippocampus. Concomitant treatment with the antidepressant duloxetine was able to normalize the increase of glutamatergic receptor subunit expression, and correct the changes in receptor phosphorylation produced by stress exposure. Our data suggest that prolonged stress, a condition that has etiologic relevance for depression, may enhance glutamate activity through post-synaptic mechanisms, by regulating NMDA receptors, and that antidepressants may in part normalize such changes. Our results provide support to the notion that antidepressants may exert their activity in the long-term also via modulation of the glutamatergic synapse.

  20. Allosteric modulation of G-protein coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, Tracy A

    2004-01-01

    are believed to activate (agonists) or inhibit (competitive antagonists) receptor signalling by binding the receptor at the same site as the endogenous agonist, the orthosteric site. In contrast, allosteric ligands modulate receptor function by binding to different regions in the receptor, allosteric sites....... In recent years, combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screening have helped identify several allosteric GPCR modulators with novel structures, several of which already have become valuable pharmacological tools and may be candidates for clinical testing in the near future. This mini review outlines...... the current status and perspectives of allosteric modulation of GPCR function with emphasis on the pharmacology of endogenous and synthesised modulators, their receptor interactions and the therapeutic prospects of allosteric ligands compared to orthosteric ligands....

  1. Abiotic conditions affect floral antagonists and mutualists of Impatiens capensis (Balsaminaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper Gorden, Nicole L; Adler, Lynn S

    2013-04-01

    While the effect of abiotic factors on leaf herbivory is well known, the relative importance of abiotic conditions influencing both mutualists and antagonists is less well understood. Species interactions could enhance or reduce the direct effects of abiotic factors, depending on how mutualists and antagonists respond to abiotic conditions. We manipulated soil nutrients and shade in a factorial design and measured soil moisture in the annual Impatiens capensis. We then measured interactions with mutualists (two pollinating species) and antagonists (herbivores, florivores, nectar thieves, and flower bud gallers), as well as plant growth, floral rewards, and plant reproduction. Fertilizer increased plant growth, floral attractiveness, mutualist and antagonist interactions, and plant reproduction. Shade had no effects, and soil moisture was negatively associated with plant growth and reproduction. All effects were additive. Mutualist and antagonist floral interactions both increased on fertilized plants, but antagonists increased at a greater rate, leading to a larger ratio of antagonist to mutualist interactions on fertilized plants. Despite having more antagonists, fertilized plants still had significantly higher reproduction, suggesting higher tolerance to antagonists. Abiotic effects can have consistent effects on antagonists and mutualists, and on both floral and leaf antagonists. However, tolerance to antagonisms increased in favorable conditions. Thus, the direct positive effects of favorable abiotic conditions on plants outweighed negative indirect effects via increased antagonisms, which may lead to selection to grow in high-nutrient microsites in spite of increased herbivory.

  2. Orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor antagonists reduce ethanol self-administration in high-drinking rodent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Ivy Anderson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To examine the role of orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor activity on ethanol self-administration, compounds that differentially target orexin (OX receptor subtypes were assessed in various self-administration paradigms using high-drinking rodent models. Effects of the OX1 antagonist SB334867, the OX2 antagonist LSN2424100, and the mixed OX1/2 antagonist almorexant (ACT-078573 on home cage ethanol consumption were tested in ethanol-preferring (P rats using a 2-bottle choice procedure. In separate experiments, effects of SB334867, LSN2424100, and almorexant on operant ethanol self-administration were assessed in P rats maintained on a progressive ratio operant schedule of reinforcement. In a third series of experiments, SB334867, LSN2424100, and almorexant were administered to ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J mice to examine effects of OX receptor blockade on ethanol intake in a binge-like drinking (drinking-in-the-dark model. In P rats with chronic home cage free-choice ethanol access, SB334867 and almorexant significantly reduced ethanol intake, but almorexant also reduced water intake, suggesting nonspecific effects on consummatory behavior. In the progressive ratio operant experiments, LSN2424100 and almorexant reduced breakpoints and ethanol consumption in P rats, whereas the almorexant inactive enantiomer and SB334867 did not significantly affect the motivation to consume ethanol. As expected, vehicle-injected mice exhibited binge-like drinking patterns in the drinking-in-the-dark model. All three OX antagonists reduced both ethanol intake and resulting blood ethanol concentrations relative to vehicle-injected controls, but SB334867 and LSN2424100 also reduced sucrose consumption in a different cohort of mice, suggesting nonspecific effects. Collectively, these results contribute to a growing body of evidence indicating that OX1 and OX2 receptor activity influences ethanol self-administration, although the effects may not be selective for ethanol

  3. Ghrelin modulates lateral amygdala neuronal firing and blocks acquisition for conditioned taste aversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lige Song

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is an orexigenic brain-gut hormone promoting feeding and regulating energy metabolism in human and rodents. An increasing number of studies have reported that ghrelin and its identified receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a, produces remarkably wide and complex functions and biological effects on specific populations of neurons in central nervous system. In this study, we sought to explore the in vivo effects of acute ghrelin exposure on lateral amygdala (LA neurons at the physiological and behavioral levels. In vivo extracellular single-unit recordings showed that ghrelin with the concentration of several nanomolars (nM stimulated spontaneous firing of the LA neurons, an effect that was dose-dependent and could be blocked by co-application of a GHS-R1a antagonist D-Lys3-GHRP-6. We also found that D-Lys3-GHRP-6 inhibited spontaneous firing of the LA neurons in a dose-dependent manner, revealing that tonic GHS-R1a activity contributes to orchestrate the basal activity of the LA neurons. Behaviorally, we found that microinfusion of ghrelin (12 ng into LA before training interfered with the acquisition of conditioned taste aversion (CTA as tested at 24 h after conditioning. Pre-treatment with either purified IgG against GHS-R1a or GHS-R1a antagonist blocked ghrelin's effect on CTA memory acquisition. Ghrelin (12 ng had no effect on CTA memory consolidation or the expression of acquired CTA memory; neither did it affect the total liquid consumption of tested rats. Altogether, our data indicated that ghrelin locally infused into LA blocks acquisition of CTA and its modulation effects on neuronal firing may be involved in this process.

  4. Antioxidants L-carnitine and D-methionine modulate neuronal activity through GABAergic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Calvin; Gopal, Kamakshi V; Moore, Ernest J; Gross, Guenter W

    2014-07-01

    Antioxidants are well known for their neuroprotective properties against reactive oxygen species in cortical neurons and auditory cells. We recently identified L-carnitine and D-methionine to be among agents that provide such protection. Here, we investigated their neuronal modulatory actions. We used cultured neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays to assess the effects of L-carnitine and D-methionine on network function. Spike production and burst properties of neuronal networks were used as parameters to monitor pharmacological responses. L-Carnitine and D-methionine reduced spike activity with 100% efficacy with EC50 values of 0.22 (± 0.01) mM and 1.06 (± 0.05) mM, respectively. In the presence of 1.0-40 μM of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, the sigmoidal concentration-response curves of both compounds exhibited stepwise shifts, without a change in efficacy. Under a maximal bicuculline concentration of 40 μM, the EC50 increased to 3.57 (± 0.26) mM for L-carnitine and to 10.52 (± 0.97) mM for D-methionine, more than a tenfold increase. The agonist-antagonist interactions with bicuculline were estimated by Lineweaver-Burk plot analyses to be competitive, corroborated by the computed dissociation constants of bicuculline. For both compounds, the effects on the network burst pattern, activity reversibility, and bicuculline antagonism resembled that elicited by the GABAA agonist muscimol. We showed that the antioxidants L-carnitine and D-methionine modulate cortical electrical spike activity primarily through GABAA receptor activation. Our findings suggest the involvement of GABAergic mechanisms that perhaps contribute to the protective actions of these compounds.

  5. Fast Convolution Module (Fast Convolution Module)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bierens, L

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the design and realisation of a real-time range azimuth compression module, the so-called 'Fast Convolution Module', based on the fast convolution algorithm developed at TNO-FEL...

  6. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists in the VTA and RMTg have opposite effects on morphine-induced locomotion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, Stephan; Dhillon, Ekamjeet S; Sharma, Natasha; Ludwig, Jessica

    2017-04-14

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) each contribute to opiate reward and each receive inputs from the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, the two principle brainstem cholinergic cell groups. We compared the contributions of VTA or RMTg muscarinic cholinergic receptors to locomotion induced by morphine infusions into the same sites. VTA co-infusion of atropine completely blocked VTA morphine-induced locomotion providing additional support for the important role of VTA muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the stimulant effects of opiates. By contrast, RMTg co-infusion of atropine increased RMTg morphine-induced locomotion. Furthermore, RMTg co-infusion of the M3-selective antagonist 4-DAMP, but not the M4-selective antagonist Tropicamide, strongly increased RMTg morphine-induced locomotion. RMTg infusions of 4-DAMP, but not of Tropicamide, by themselves strongly increased drug-free locomotion. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the RMTg thus also contribute to the stimulant effects of morphine, but in a way opposite to those in VTA. We suggest that the net effect of endogenous cholinergic input to the RMTg on drug-free and on RMTg morphine-induced locomotion is inhibitory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Recovery of stress-impaired social behavior by an antagonist of the CRF binding protein, CRF6-33,in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Mailton; Stein, Dirson J; Albrechet-Souza, Lucas; Miczek, Klaus A; de Almeida, Rosa Maria M

    2018-01-09

    Social stress is recognized to promote the development of neuropsychiatric and mood disorders. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is an important neuropeptide activated by social stress, and it contributes to neural and behavioral adaptations, as indicated by impaired social interactions and anhedonic effects. Few studies have focused on the role of the CRF binding protein (CRFBP), a component of the CRF system, and its activity in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST), a limbic structure connecting amygdala and hypothalamus. In this study, animals' preference for sweet solutions was examined as an index of stress-induced anhedonic responses in Wistar rats subjected to four brief intermittent episodes of social defeat. Next, social approach was assessed after local infusions of the CRFBP antagonist, CRF fragment 6-33 (CRF 6-33 ) into the BNST. The experience of brief episodes of social defeat impaired social approach behaviors in male rats. However, intra-BNST CRF 6-33 infusions restored social approach in stressed animals to the levels of non-stressed rats. CRF 6-33 acted selectively on social interaction and did not alter general exploration in nether stressed nor non-stressed rats. These findings suggest that BNST CRFBP is involved in the modulation of anxiety-like responses induced by social stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of 7-day repeated treatment with the 5-HT2A inverse agonist/antagonist pimavanserin on methamphetamine vs. food choice in male rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical drug vs. food choice is an emerging group of drug self-administration procedures that have shown predictive validity to clinical drug addiction. Emerging data suggest that serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors modulate mesolimbic dopamine function, such that 5-HT2A antagonists blunt the abuse-related neurochemical effects of monoamine transporter substrates, such as amphetamine or methamphetamine. Whether subchronic 5-HT2A antagonist treatment attenuates methamphetamine reinforcement in any preclinical drug self-administration procedure is unknown. The study aim was therefore to determine 7-day treatment effects with the 5-HT2A inverse agonist/antagonist pimavanserin on methamphetamine vs. food choice in monkeys. Behavior was maintained under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1g pellets, fixed-ratio 100 schedule) and intravenous methamphetamine injections (0-0.32 mg/kg/injection, fixed-ratio 10 schedule) in male rhesus monkeys (n=3). Methamphetamine choice dose-effect functions were determined daily before and during 7-day repeated pimavanserin (1.0-10mg/kg/day, intramuscular) treatment periods. Under control conditions, increasing methamphetamine doses resulted in a corresponding increase in methamphetamine vs. food choice. Repeated pimavanserin administration failed to attenuate methamphetamine choice and produce a reciprocal increase in food choice in any monkey up to doses (3.2-10mg/kg) that suppressed rates of operant responding primarily during components where behavior was maintained by food pellets. Repeated 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist/antagonist treatment did not attenuate methamphetamine reinforcement under a concurrent schedule of intravenous methamphetamine and food presentation in nonhuman primates. Overall, these results do not support the therapeutic potential of 5-HT2A inverse agonists/antagonists as candidate medications for methamphetamine addiction. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights

  9. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Nunes-Correia, Isabel [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Flow Cytometry Unit, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Santos, Armanda E., E-mail: aesantos@ci.uc.pt [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Custódio, José B.A. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  10. Predictions of in vivo prolactin levels from in vitro k I values of d 2 receptor antagonists using an agonist-antagonist interaction model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersson, K.J.; Vermeulen, A.M.J.; Friberg, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin elevation is a side effect of all currently available D2 receptor antagonists used in the treatment of schizophrenia. Prolactin elevation is the result of a direct antagonistic D2 effect blocking the tonic inhibition of prolactin release by dopamine. The aims of this work were to assess

  11. Cerebral activations related to ballistic, stepwise interrupted and gradually modulated movements in Parkinson patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien M Toxopeus

    Full Text Available Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD experience impaired initiation and inhibition of movements such as difficulty to start/stop walking. At single-joint level this is accompanied by reduced inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. While normal basal ganglia (BG contributions to motor control include selecting appropriate muscles by inhibiting others, it is unclear how PD-related changes in BG function cause impaired movement initiation and inhibition at single-joint level. To further elucidate these changes we studied 4 right-hand movement tasks with fMRI, by dissociating activations related to abrupt movement initiation, inhibition and gradual movement modulation. Initiation and inhibition were inferred from ballistic and stepwise interrupted movement, respectively, while smooth wrist circumduction enabled the assessment of gradually modulated movement. Task-related activations were compared between PD patients (N = 12 and healthy subjects (N = 18. In healthy subjects, movement initiation was characterized by antero-ventral striatum, substantia nigra (SN and premotor activations while inhibition was dominated by subthalamic nucleus (STN and pallidal activations, in line with the known role of these areas in simple movement. Gradual movement mainly involved antero-dorsal putamen and pallidum. Compared to healthy subjects, patients showed reduced striatal/SN and increased pallidal activation for initiation, whereas for inhibition STN activation was reduced and striatal-thalamo-cortical activation increased. For gradual movement patients showed reduced pallidal and increased thalamo-cortical activation. We conclude that PD-related changes during movement initiation fit the (rather static model of alterations in direct and indirect BG pathways. Reduced STN activation and regional cortical increased activation in PD during inhibition and gradual movement modulation are better explained by a dynamic model that also takes into account

  12. Thin film silicon modules: contributions to low cost industrial production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, A. [Universite de Neuchatel, Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the research work done during the two-year period 2003-04 at the Thin-Film Solar Cell Laboratory of the Institute of Microtechnology (IMT) at the University of Neuchatel in Switzerland. The transition from fundamental research work to concrete industrialisation issues, and changes within the research staff are discussed. The main results of the work done are presented, including basic techniques for the production of p-i-n solar cells on glass, new technologies for the deposition of n-i-p cells on low-cost flexible substrates and the optimisation of zinc oxide deposition methods. The key role played by substrate chemistry and roughness in the nucleation and growth of micro-crystalline silicon layers is looked at and diagnostic tools for the analysis of micro-crystalline solar cells are discussed.

  13. The Roles of the Wnt-Antagonists Axin and Lrp4 during Embryogenesis of the Red Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prühs, Romy; Beermann, Anke; Schröder, Reinhard

    2017-10-15

    In both vertebrates and invertebrates, the Wnt-signaling pathway is essential for numerous processes in embryogenesis and during adult life. Wnt activity is fine-tuned at various levels by the interplay of a number of Wnt-agonists (Wnt ligands, Frizzled-receptors, Lrp5/6 coreceptors) and Wnt-antagonists (among them Axin, Secreted frizzled and Lrp4) to define anterior-posterior polarity of the early embryo and specify cell fate in organogenesis. So far, the functional analysis of Wnt-pathway components in insects has concentrated on the roles of Wnt-agonists and on the Wnt-antagonist Axin. We depict here additional features of the Wnt-antagonist Axin in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum . We show that Tc-axin is dynamically expressed throughout embryogenesis and confirm its essential role in head development. In addition, we describe an as yet undetected, more extreme Tc-axin RNAi-phenotype, the ectopic formation of posterior abdominal segments in reverse polarity and a second hindgut at the anterior. For the first time, we describe here that an lrp4 ortholog is involved in axis formation in an insect. The Tribolium Lrp4 ortholog is ubiquitously expressed throughout embryogenesis. Its downregulation via maternal RNAi results in the reduction of head structures but not in axis polarity reversal. Furthermore, segmentation is impaired and larvae develop with a severe gap-phenotype. We conclude that, as in vertebrates, Tc-lrp4 functions as a Wnt-inhibitor in Tribolium during various stages of embryogenesis. We discuss the role of both components as negative modulators of Wnt signaling in respect to axis formation and segmentation in Tribolium .

  14. Progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 increases depression-like behavior in mice without affecting locomotor ability

    OpenAIRE

    Beckley, Ethan H.; Scibelli, Angela C.; Finn, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Progesterone withdrawal has been proposed as an underlying factor in premenstrual syndrome and postpartum depression. Progesterone withdrawal induces forced swim test (FST) immobility in mice, a depression-like behavior, but the contribution of specific receptors to this effect is unclear. The role of progesterone’s GABAA receptor-modulating metabolite allopregnanolone in depression- and anxiety-related behaviors has been extensively documented, but little attention has been paid to the role ...

  15. Sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive" of the sex chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Rice

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic conflict is perplexing because it causes the fitness of a species to decline rather than improve. Many diverse forms of genomic conflict have been identified, but this extant tally may be incomplete. Here, we show that the unusual characteristics of the sex chromosomes can, in principle, lead to a previously unappreciated form of sexual genomic conflict. The phenomenon occurs because there is selection in the heterogametic sex for sex-linked mutations that harm the sex of offspring that does not carry them, whenever there is competition among siblings. This harmful phenotype can be expressed as an antagonistic green-beard effect that is mediated by epigenetic parental effects, parental investment, and/or interactions among siblings. We call this form of genomic conflict sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive", because it is functionally equivalent to meiotic drive, except that it operates during the zygotic and postzygotic stages of the life cycle rather than the meiotic and gametic stages. A combination of mathematical modeling and a survey of empirical studies is used to show that sexually antagonistic zygotic drive is feasible, likely to be widespread in nature, and that it can promote a genetic "arms race" between the homo- and heteromorphic sex chromosomes. This new category of genomic conflict has the potential to strongly influence other fundamental evolutionary processes, such as speciation and the degeneration of the Y and W sex chromosomes. It also fosters a new genetic hypothesis for the evolution of enigmatic fitness-reducing traits like the high frequency of spontaneous abortion, sterility, and homosexuality observed in humans.

  16. Central actions of a novel and selective dopamine antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Receptors for the neurotransmitter dopamine traditionally have been divided into two subgroups: the D 1 class, which is linked to the stimulation of adenylate cyclase-activity, and the D 2 class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D 2 class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D 2 dopamine receptor that mediates the physiological and behavioral actions of dopamine in the intact animal. However, the benzazepine SCH23390 is a dopamine antagonist which has potent behavioral actions while displaying apparent neurochemical selectivity for the D 1 class of dopamine receptors. The purpose of this dissertation was to (1) confirm and characterize this selectivity, and (2) test certain hypothesis related to possible modes of action of SCH233390. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase by SCH23390 occurred via an action at the dopamine receptor only. A radiolabeled analog of SCH23390 displayed the receptor binding properties of a specific high-affinity ligand, and regional receptor densities were highly correlated with dopamine levels. The subcellular distribution of [ 3 H]-SCH23390 binding did not correspond completely with that of dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase. The neurochemical potency of SCH23390 as a D 1 receptor antagonist was preserved following parental administration. A variety of dopamine agonists and antagonists displayed a high correlation between their abilities to compete for [ 3 H]-SCH23390 binding in vitro and to act at an adenylate cyclase-linked receptor. Finally, the relative affinities of dopamine and SCH23390 for both D 1 receptors and [ 3 H]-SCH23390 binding sites were comparable. It is concluded that the behavioral effects of SCH23390 are mediated by actions at D 1 dopamine receptors only, and that the physiological importance of this class of receptors should be reevaluated

  17. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  18. Membrane Formation in Liquids by Adding an Antagonistic Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Sadakane

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic salts are composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ions. In a binary mixture, such as water and organic solvent, these ion pairs preferentially dissolve to those phases, respectively, and there is a coupling between the charge density and the composition. The heterogeneous distribution of ions forms a large electric double layer at the interface between these solvents. This reduces the interfacial tension between water and organic solvent, and stabilizes an ordered structure, such as a membrane. These phenomena have been extensively studied from both theoretical and experimental point of view. In addition, the numerical simulations can reproduce such ordered structures.

  19. Synthesis of carbon-11 labelled calcium channel antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holschbach, M.; Roden, W.; Hamkens, W. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin)

    1991-04-01

    A useful synthetic approach to carbon-11 labelled 1,4-dihydropyridines is described. Carbon-11 labelled calcium channel antagonists {sup 11}C-Nifedipine, {sup 11}C-Nisoldipine, {sup 11}C-nitrendipine and {sup 11}C-CF{sub 3}-Nifedipine were synthesized by a modified Hantzsch method using protected carboxy functions. Deprotection of the carboxylic acids by alkaline hydrolysis followed by conversion into the corresponding potassium salts and subsequent methylation with {sup 11}CH{sub 3}I produced the labelled compounds in very good chemical and radiochemical yields (94%). (author).

  20. The opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in the treatment of trichotillomania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N

    2014-01-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is characterized by repetitive hair pulling resulting in hair loss. Data on the pharmacological treatment of TTM are limited. This study examined the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, in adults with TTM who had urges to pull their hair. Fifty-one individuals with TTM were...... randomized to naltrexone or placebo in an 8-week, double-blind trial. Subjects were assessed with measures of TTM severity and selected cognitive tasks. Naltrexone failed to demonstrate significantly greater reductions in hair pulling compared to placebo. Cognitive flexibility, however, significantly...

  1. Pharmacoepidemiological assessment of drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Christensen, R. D.; Wang, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    PurposeWe present a database of prescription drugs and international normalized ratio (INR) data and the applied methodology for its use to assess drug-drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). We use the putative interaction between VKAs and tramadol as a case study. MethodsWe used...... definitions, and other drugs. ResultsWe identified 513 VKA users with at least 1 INR measurement 4.0 and concomitant tramadol and VKA exposure during the observation period. The overall IRR was 1.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53-2.10), with a stronger association among users of phenprocoumon compared...

  2. ANTIHYPERTENSIVE TREATMENT IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Karpov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The proofs of necessity of active arterial hypertension (AH treatment in elderly patients are given. Peculiarities of pathogenesis of AH in elderly patients, connected predominantly with loss of big arteries elasticity and reasoning widely spread of isolated systolic AH in these patients, are discussed. Advantages of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists (DPCA for AH treatment in elderly patients are proved, safety of treatment with DPCA is discussed. Data of clinical studies is analyzed. Analysis of target levels of blood pressure for antihypertensive treatment in elderly hypertensive patients is made. As a conclusion DPCA are the medicines of choice for AH treatment in elderly patients.

  3. Membrane formation in liquids by adding an antagonistic salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakane, Koichiro; Seto, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    Antagonistic salts are composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ions. In a binary mixture, such as water and organic solvent, these ion pairs preferentially dissolve to those phases, respectively, and there is a coupling between the charge density and the composition. The heterogeneous distribution of ions forms a large electric double layer at the interface between these solvents. This reduces the interfacial tension between water and organic solvent, and stabilizes an ordered structure, such as a membrane. These phenomena have been extensively studied from both theoretical and experimental point of view. In addition, the numerical simulations can reproduce such ordered structures.

  4. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jun [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Department of Physiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Fan, Xiaotang [Department of Histology and Embryology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xu, Haiwei, E-mail: haiweixu2001@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Physiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Bai, Yun, E-mail: baiyungene@gmail.com [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2009-07-31

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  5. Aerial Warfare: A Volatile Dialogue between the Plant Pathogen Verticillium longisporum and Its Antagonist Paenibacillus polymyxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Rybakova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Verticillium wilt caused by Verticillium spp. results in severe yield losses in a broad range of crops. Verticillium outbreaks are challenging to control, and exacerbated by increases in soil temperatures and drought associated with global warming. Employing natural antagonists as biocontrol agents offers a promising approach to addressing this challenge. Paenibacillus polymyxa Sb3-1 was proven to reduce the growth of Verticillium longisporum during in vitro experiments and was shown to promote the growth of oilseed rape seedlings infested with V. longisporum. Our novel approach combined in vitro and in planta methods with the study of the mode of interaction between Sb3-1 and V. longisporum EVL43 via their volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Volatile and soluble substances, produced by both microorganisms as a reaction to one another's VOCs, were detected by using both gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. P. polymyxa Sb3-1 continually produced antimicrobial and plant growth promoting VOCs, such as 2-nonanone and 3-hydroxy-2-butanone. Several other antimicrobial volatile substances, such as isoamyl acetate and durenol, were downregulated. The general metabolic activity of Sb3-1, including protein and DNA biotransformations, was upregulated upon contact with EVL43 VOCs. V. longisporum increased its production of antimicrobial substances, such as 1-butanol, and downregulated its metabolic activities upon exposure to Sb3-1 VOCs. Additionally, several stress response substances such as arabitol and protein breakdown products (e.g., L-Isoleucyl-L-glutamic acid, were increased in the co-incubated samples. The results obtained depict an ongoing dialog between these microorganisms resulting in growth inhibition, the slowing down of metabolism, and the cell death of V. longisporum due to contact with the P. polymyxa Sb3-1 VOCs. Moreover, the results indicate that VOCs make a substantial contribution to the interaction between pathogens and

  6. Novel ABCG2 Antagonists Reverse Topotecan-Mediated Chemotherapeutic Resistance in Ovarian Carcinoma Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Jerec W; Lovato, Debbie M; Severns, Virginia; Sklar, Larry A; Larson, Richard S

    2016-12-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance remains a challenge in the treatment of ovarian carcinoma, especially in recurrent disease. Despite the fact that most patients with newly diagnosed tumors attain complete remission following cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy, ovarian carcinoma has a recurrence rate that exceeds 75%. The ATP-binding cassette family G member 2 (ABCG2) efflux protein has been described as one mechanism that confers multiple-drug resistance to solid tumors and contributes to topotecan resistance in ovarian carcinoma. In fact, one clinical trial demonstrated ABCG2 expression in all patients with primary or recurrent ovarian carcinoma. On the basis of our previous work, we hypothesized that three compounds (CID44640177, CID1434724, and CID46245505), which represent a new piperazine-substituted pyrazolo[1,5]pyrimidine substructure class of ABCG2-specific antagonists, would restore chemosensitivity to drug-resistant ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo To address the treatment difficulties associated with chemotherapeutic resistance in ovarian cancer, we combined each compound (CID44640177, CID1434724, and CID46245505) with topotecan and administered the mixture to chemoresistant Igrov1/T8 ovarian cancer cells in vitro and Igrov1/T8 xenografts in CB-17 SCID mice. We found that only nanomolar concentrations of each ABCG2 inhibitor in combination with topotecan were required to restore chemosensitivity to Igrov1/T8 cells in vitro In vivo, substantial tumor reduction was achieved with each compound in 4 days, with CID1434724 causing the largest reduction in excess of 60%. No signs of secondary toxic effects were observed with the ABCG2 antagonists. These novel compounds should be viewed as promising drug candidates to reverse ABCG2-mediated chemoresistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2853-62. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Characterization of Pseudomonas chlororaphis from Theobroma cacao L. rhizosphere with antagonistic activity against Phytophthora palmivora (Butler).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acebo-Guerrero, Y; Hernández-Rodríguez, A; Vandeputte, O; Miguélez-Sierra, Y; Heydrich-Pérez, M; Ye, L; Cornelis, P; Bertin, P; El Jaziri, M

    2015-10-01

    To isolate and characterize rhizobacteria from Theobroma cacao with antagonistic activity against Phytophthora palmivora, the causal agent of the black pod rot, which is one of the most important diseases of T. cacao. Among 127 rhizobacteria isolated from cacao rhizosphere, three isolates (CP07, CP24 and CP30) identified as Pseudomonas chlororaphis, showed in vitro antagonistic activity against P. palmivora. Direct antagonism tested in cacao detached leaves revealed that the isolated rhizobacteria were able to reduce symptom severity upon infection with P. palmivora Mab1, with Ps. chlororaphis CP07 standing out as a potential biocontrol agent. Besides, reduced symptom severity on leaves was also observed in planta where cacao root system was pretreated with the isolated rhizobacteria followed by leaf infection with P. palmivora Mab1. The production of lytic enzymes, siderophores, biosurfactants and HCN, as well as the detection of genes encoding antibiotics, the formation of biofilm, and bacterial motility were also assessed for all three rhizobacterial strains. By using a mutant impaired in viscosin production, derived from CP07, it was found that this particular biosurfactant turned out to be crucial for both motility and biofilm formation, but not for the in vitro antagonism against Phytophthora, although it may contribute to the bioprotection of T. cacao. In the rhizosphere of T. cacao, there are rhizobacteria, such as Ps. chlororaphis, able to protect plants against P. palmivora. This study provides a theoretical basis for the potential use of Ps. chlororaphis CP07 as a biocontrol agent for the protection of cacao plants from P. palmivora infection. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Inhibitory effect of positively charged triazine antagonists of prokineticin receptors on the transient receptor vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Byun, Joon Seok; Sohn, Joo Mi; Lee, Jae Yeol; Vázquez-Romero, Ana; Garrido, Maria; Messeguer, Angel; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Zamponi, Gerald W; Deplano, Alessandro; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Balboni, Gianfranco; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    Four positively charged compounds, previously shown to produce analgesic activity by interacting with prokineticin receptor or T-type calcium channels, were tested for their ability to inhibit capsaicin-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) in HEK-293 cells stably transfected with the human recombinant TRPV1, with the goal of identifying novel TRPV1 open-pore inhibitors. KYS-05090 showed the highest potency as a TRPV1 antagonist, even higher than that of the open-pore triazine inhibitor 8aA. The latter showed quite remarkable agonist/desensitizer activity at the rat recombinant TRPM8 channel. The activity of KYS-05090 and the other compounds was selective because none of these compounds was able to modulate the rat TRPA1 channel. Open-pore inhibitors of TRPV1 may be a new class of multi-target analgesics with lesser side effects, such as loss of acute pain sensitivity and hyperthermia, than most TRPV1 antagonists developed so far. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interleukin Expression after Injury and the Effects of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Leiferman, Ellen M.; Frisch, Kayt E.; Brickson, Stacey L.; Murphy, William L.; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Ligament healing follows a series of complex coordinated events involving various cell types, cytokines, as well as other factors, producing a mechanically inferior tissue more scar-like than native tissue. Macrophages provide an ongoing source of cytokines to modulate inflammatory cell adhesion and migration as well as fibroblast proliferation. Studying interleukins inherent to ligament healing during peak macrophage activation and angiogenesis may elucidate inflammatory mediators involved in subsequent scar formation. Herein, we used a rat healing model assayed after surgical transection of their medial collateral ligaments (MCLs). On days 3 and 7 post-injury, ligaments were collected and used for microarray analysis. Of the 12 significantly modified interleukins, components of the interleukin-1 family were significantly up-regulated. We therefore examined the influence of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) on MCL healing. Transected rat MCLs received PBS or IL-1Ra at the time of surgery. Inhibition of IL-1 activation decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-2, and IFN-γ), myofibroblasts, and proliferating cells, as well as increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10), endothelial cells/blood vessel lumen, M2 macrophages, and granulation tissue size without compromising the mechanical properties. These results support the concept that IL-1Ra modulates MCL-localized granulation tissue components and cytokine production to create a transient environment that is less inflammatory. Overall, IL-1Ra may have therapeutic potential early in the healing cascade by stimulating the M2 macrophages and altering the granulation tissue components. However, the single dose of IL-1Ra used in this study was insufficient to maintain the more regenerative early response. Due to the transient influence on most of the healing components tested, IL-1Ra may have greater therapeutic potential with sustained delivery. PMID:23936523

  10. Combination of radiotherapy with EGFR antagonists for head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thariat, J.; Yildirim, G.; Mason, K.A.; Garden, A.S.; Milas, L.; Ang, K.K.

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of biologically sound radiation fractionation regimens and combinations of radiotherapy with chemotherapy have gradually improved both the survival of patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and the prospect of organ preservation. Long-term follow-up, however, has shown that some of the radiation-chemotherapy combinations are associated with increased late toxicity. This observation, in conjunction with advances in tumor biology, has led to the launch of investigations into molecular markers and targets for therapeutic interventions. Research on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling pathway has enriched our understanding of the biology of HNSCC, in terms of carcinogenesis and cellular processes governing tumor response to therapy. The finding that the addition of an antibody-based inhibitor of the EGFR pathway to radiotherapy significantly improves locoregional control and overall survival rates in patients with locally advanced HNSCC, without increasing radiation-induced toxicity, has resulted in the growing acceptance of such combined regimens as a frontline therapy option for locally advanced HNSCC. Because such therapy has benefited only an additional 10%-15% of patients, studies are being undertaken to identify markers and mechanisms of resistance to EGFR antagonists that are essential for the further refinement of therapy. Overall, preclinical and clinical studies on EGFR have validated the concept that selective tumor radiation sensitization can be achieved by modulating a specific perturbed signaling pathway, and these studies have increased the enthusiasm for developing and investigating other novel agents targeting other cellular processes. (author)

  11. The influence of certain molecular descriptors of fecal elimination of angiotensin II receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trbojević-Stanković Jasna B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs modulate the function of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and are commonly prescribed antihypertensive drugs, especially in patients with renal failure. In this study, the relationship between several molecular properties of seven ARBs (candesartan, eprosartan, irbesartan, losartan, olmesartan, telmisartan, valsartan and their fecal elimination data obtained from the literature were investigated. The ARB molecular descriptors were calculated using three software packages. Simple linear regression analysis showed the best 2 correlation between fecal elimination data and lipophilicity descriptor, ClogP values (R2 = 0.725. Multiple linear regression was applied to examine the correlation of ARBs’ fecal elimination data with their lipophilicity and one additional, calculated descriptor. The best correlation (R2 = 0.909 with an acceptable probability value, P <0.05 was established between the ARB fecal elimination data and their lipophilicity and aqueous solubility data. Applying computed molecular descriptors for evaluating drug elimination is of great importance in drug research.

  12. Effect of Flos carthami Extract and α1-Adrenergic Antagonists on the Porcine Proximal Ureteral Peristalsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Yuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been proposed to prevent urolithiasis. In China, Flos carthami (FC, also known as Carthamus tinctorius (Safflower; Chinese name: Hong Hua/紅花 has been used to treat urological diseases for centuries. We previously performed a screening and confirmed the in vivo antilithic effect of FC extract. Here, ex vivo organ bath experiment was further performed to study the effect of FC extract on the inhibition of phenylepinephrine (PE (10−4 and 10−3 M ureteral peristalsis of porcine ureters with several α1-adrenergic antagonists (doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin as experimental controls. The results showed that doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin dose (approximately 4.5 × 10−6 − 4.5 × 10−1 μg/mL dependently inhibited both 10−4 and 10−3 M PE-induced ureteral peristalsis. FC extract achieved 6.2% ± 10.1%, 21.8% ± 6.8%, and 24.0% ± 5.6% inhibitions of 10−4 M PE-induced peristalsis at doses of 5 × 103, 1 × 104, and 2 × 104 μg/mL, respectively, since FC extract was unable to completely inhibit PE-induced ureteral peristalsis, suggesting the antilithic effect of FC extract is related to mechanisms other than modulation of ureteral peristalsis.

  13. Erythropoietin and its antagonist regulate hypoxic fictive breathing in newborn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemiri, Hanan; Seaborn, Tommy; Gestreau, Christian; Soliz, Jorge

    2012-08-15

    Clinical use of erythropoietin in adult and newborn patients has revealed its involvement in neuroprotection, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis. More recently, we showed in adult mouse, that brain erythropoietin interacts with the major brainstem centers associated with respiration to enhance the ventilatory response to acute and chronic conditions of physiological hypoxia (e.g., as occurring at high altitude). However, whether brain erythropoietin is involved in breathing regulation in newborns remains unknown. In this study, en bloc brainstem-spinal cord preparations were obtained from mice at postnatal day 4. After various periods (30, 60, or 90 min) of incubation with 0, 25, or 250 U of erythropoietin, preparations were superfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid bubbled with normoxic or hypoxic gas mixtures. The electrophysiological fictive breathing produced by axons at the C4 ventral root was next recorded. Our results show that erythropoietin attenuates the hypoxia-mediated decrease of the central respiratory activity and improves post-hypoxic recovery. Additional analysis revealed that the soluble erythropoietin receptor (the endogenous erythropoietin antagonist) dramatically decreases neural hypoxic respiratory activity, confirming the specific erythropoietin effect on respiratory drive. These results imply that erythropoietin exerts main modulation and maintenance of respiratory motor output during hypoxic and post-hypoxic challenges in 4-days old mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dual orexin receptor antagonists - promising agents in the treatment of sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałasz, Artur; Lapray, Damien; Peyron, Christelle; Rojczyk-Gołębiewska, Ewa; Skowronek, Rafał; Markowski, Grzegorz; Czajkowska, Beata; Krzystanek, Marek; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Insomnia is a serious medical and social problem, its prevalence in the general population ranges from 9 to 35% depending on the country and assessment method. Often, patients are subject to inappropriate and therefore dangerous pharmacotherapies that include prolonged administration of hypnotic drugs, benzodiazepines and other GABAA receptor modulators. This usually does not lead to a satisfactory improvement in patients' clinical states and may cause lifelong drug dependence. Brain state transitions require the coordinated activity of numerous neuronal pathways and brain structures. It is thought that orexin-expressing neurons play a crucial role in this process. Due to their interaction with the sleep-wake-regulating neuronal population, they can activate vigilance-promoting regions and prevent unwanted sleep intrusions. Understanding the multiple orexin modulatory effects is crucial in the context of pathogenesis of insomnia and should lead to the development of novel treatments. An important step in this process was the synthesis of dual antagonists of orexin receptors. Crucially, these drugs, as opposed to benzodiazepines, do not change the sleep architecture and have limited side-effects. This new pharmacological approach might be the most appropriate to treat insomnia.

  15. Kinetic profiling an abundantly expressed planarian serotonergic GPCR identifies bromocriptine as a perdurant antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Chan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and uniqueness of flatworm G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs provides impetus for identifying ligands useful as tools for studying flatworm biology, or as therapeutics for treating diseases caused by parasitic flatworm infections. To catalyse this discovery process, technologies optimized for mammalian GPCR high throughput screening need be transposed for screening flatworm GPCRs. Here, we demonstrate the utility of a genetically encoded cAMP biosensor for resolving the properties of an abundantly expressed planarian serotonergic GPCR (S7.1R. Application of this methodology resolved the real time kinetics of GPCR modulation by ligands and demonstrated a marked difference in the kinetic action of antagonists at S7.1R. Notably, bromocriptine caused a protracted inhibition of S7.1R activity in vitro and a protracted paralysis of planarian movement, replicating the effect of S7.1R in vivo RNAi. The lengthy inhibition of function caused by bromocriptine at this abundantly expressed GPCR provides a useful tool to ablate serotonergic signaling in vivo, and is a noteworthy feature for exploitation as an anthelmintic vulnerability.

  16. Bone morphogenic protein antagonist Drm/gremlin is a novel proangiogenic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, Helena; Mitola, Stefania; Moroni, Emanuela; Belleri, Mirella; Nicoli, Stefania; Coltrini, Daniela; Peri, Francesco; Pessi, Antonello; Orsatti, Laura; Talamo, Fabio; Castronovo, Vincent; Waltregny, David; Cotelli, Franco; Ribatti, Domenico; Presta, Marco

    2007-03-01

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in various physiologic and pathologic conditions, including tumor growth. Drm/gremlin, a member the Dan family of bone morphogenic protein (BMP) antagonists, is commonly thought to affect different processes during growth, differentiation, and development by heterodimerizing various BMPs. Here, we identify Drm/gremlin as a novel proangiogenic factor expressed by endothelium. Indeed, Drm/gremlin was purified to homogeneity from the conditioned medium of transformed endothelial cells using an endothelial-cell sprouting assay to follow protein isolation. Accordingly, recombinant Drm/gremlin stimulates endothelial-cell migration and invasion in fibrin and collagen gels, binds with high affinity to various endothelial cell types, and triggers tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular signaling proteins. Also, Drm/gremlin induces neovascularization in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. BMP4 does not affect Drm/gremlin interaction with endothelium, and both molecules exert a proangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo when administered alone or in combination. Finally, Drm/gremlin is produced by the stroma of human tumor xenografts in nude mice, and it is highly expressed in endothelial cells of human lung tumor vasculature when compared with non-neoplastic lung. Our observations point to a novel, previously unrecognized capacity of Drm/gremlin to interact directly with target endothelial cells and to modulate angiogenesis.

  17. Reduced multiplication modules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    if M is a von Neumann regular module (VNM); i.e., every principal submodule of M is a summand submodule. Also if M is an injective R-module, then M is a VNM. Keywords. Multiplication module; reduced module; minimal prime submodule;. Zariski topology; extremally disconnected. 1. Introduction. In this paper all rings are ...

  18. Evodiamine as a novel antagonist of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hui; Tu, Yongjiu; Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Wang, Xi; Wang, Zhanli; Liang, Huaping

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Evodiamine interacted with the AhR. → Evodiamine inhibited the specific binding of [ 3 H]-TCDD to the AhR. → Evodiamine acts as an antagonist of the AhR. -- Abstract: Evodiamine, the major bioactive alkaloid isolated from Wu-Chu-Yu, has been shown to interact with a wide variety of proteins and modify their expression and activities. In this study, we investigated the interaction between evodiamine and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Molecular modeling results revealed that evodiamine directly interacted with the AhR. Cytosolic receptor binding assay also provided the evidence that evodiamine could interact with the AhR with the K i value of 28.4 ± 4.9 nM. In addition, we observed that evodiamine suppressed the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced nuclear translocation of the AhR and the expression of CYP1A1 dose-dependently. These results suggested that evodiamine was able to bind to the AhR as ligand and exhibit antagonistic effects.

  19. Histamine H1 antagonists and clinical characteristics of febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolaly, Mohammed A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures. The current descriptive study was carried out from April 2009 to February 2011 in 250 infants and children who visited the Madinah Maternity and Children's Hospital as a result of febrile convulsions. They were divided into two groups according to administration of antihistamines at the onset of fever. Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamines. The time from fever detection to seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than in the nonantihistamine group. No significant difference was found in time from fever detection to seizure onset or seizure duration between patients who received a first-generation antihistamine and those who received a second-generation antihistamine. Due to their central nervous system effects, H1 antagonists should not be administered to patients with febrile seizures and epilepsy. Caution should be exercised regarding the use of histamine H1 antagonists in young infants, because these drugs could potentially disturb the anticonvulsive central histaminergic system.

  20. Rogue sperm indicate sexually antagonistic coevolution in nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E Ellis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intense reproductive competition often continues long after animals finish mating. In many species, sperm from one male compete with those from others to find and fertilize oocytes. Since this competition occurs inside the female reproductive tract, she often influences the outcome through physical or chemical factors, leading to cryptic female choice. Finally, traits that help males compete with each other are sometimes harmful to females, and female countermeasures may thwart the interests of males, which can lead to an arms race between the sexes known as sexually antagonistic coevolution. New studies from Caenorhabditis nematodes suggest that males compete with each other by producing sperm that migrate aggressively and that these sperm may be more likely to win access to oocytes. However, one byproduct of this competition appears to be an increased probability that these sperm will go astray, invading the ovary, prematurely activating oocytes, and sometimes crossing basement membranes and leaving the gonad altogether. These harmful effects are sometimes observed in crosses between animals of the same species but are most easily detected in interspecies crosses, leading to dramatically lowered fitness, presumably because the competitiveness of the sperm and the associated female countermeasures are not precisely matched. This mismatch is most obvious in crosses involving individuals from androdioecious species (which have both hermaphrodites and males, as predicted by the lower levels of sperm competition these species experience. These results suggest a striking example of sexually antagonistic coevolution and dramatically expand the value of nematodes as a laboratory system for studying postcopulatory interactions.

  1. Human Homosexuality: A Paradigmatic Arena for Sexually Antagonistic Selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Andrea Camperio; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait. PMID:25635045

  2. Biological Control of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Lettuce Using Antagonistic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Goan Chon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To isolate antagonistic bacteria against sclerotinia rot of lettuce, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, soil samples were collected from the diseased greenhouse field in Namyangju city, Gyeong-gi province from 2007 to 2008. A total of 196 bacterial isolates were isolated using serial dilution method. In dual culture assay in vitro, 26 isolates showed more than 80% of inhibition rates of mycelial growth of S. sclerotiorum. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the 26 isolates were identified as Bacillus megaterium, B. cereus, B. subtilis, Arthrobacter nicotianae, A. ramosus, Pseudomonas filiscindens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Brevibacterium frigoritolerans and Sphingobacterium faecium. The 26 isolates inhibited the mycelial growth of S. sclerotiorum up to 80% and the sclerotial germination 0−100%. In the greenhouse pot test of ten isolates conducted in summer, 2 isolates B. megaterium (DK6 and B. cereus (C210 showed control efficacy on sclerotia viability of S. sclerotiorum, 20% and 35%, respectively. In the greenhouse pot test in winter, the disease incidence of the control group was 80%, whereas those of 9 isolates among 26 were approximately 20%. From the result, the 9 isolates are expected as potentially antagonistic bacteria for biological control of sclerotinia rot of lettuce caused by S. sclerotiorum.

  3. Opioid antagonists in broadly defined behavioral addictions: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquet-Pessôa, Marcelo; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2016-01-01

    Naltrexone (NTX), a mu-opioid receptor antagonist, has been approved for the treatment of alcoholism and opioid dependence. More recently, however, NTX and a related drug, nalmefene (NMF), have also shown positive results for the treatment of gambling disorders. In this study, we reviewed the trials testing the effect of opioid antagonists (OA) in gambling disorders and in other broadly defined behavioral addictions, including selected DSM-5 disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders, obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, eating disorders, and other conditions not currently recognized by official classification schemes. We found six randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of OA in gambling disorder, two RCTs of OA in trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder), two RCTs of OA in binge eating disorder, and one RCT of OA for kleptomania. We also reviewed case reports on hypersexual disorder, compulsive buying and skin picking disorders. The reviewed data supported the use of OA, namely NTX and NMF, in gambling disorder (both) and kleptomania (NTX). We did not find enough evidence to support the use of NTX or NMF in trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder), excoriation (skin-picking) disorder, compulsive buying disorder, hypersexual disorder, or binge eating disorder.

  4. Human homosexuality: a paradigmatic arena for sexually antagonistic selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-29

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  5. Pregnancy outcome of “delayed start” GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders: A clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aflatoonian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of poor-responding patients is still major challenge in assisted reproductive techniques (ART. Delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol is recommended to these patients, but little is known in this regards. Objective: The goal of this study was assessment of delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders, and in vitro fertilization (IVF outcomes. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included sixty infertile women with Bologna criteria for ovarian poor responders who were candidate for IVF. In case group (n=30, delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol administered estrogen priming followed by early follicular-phase GnRH antagonist treatment for 7 days before ovarian stimulation with gonadotropin. Control group (n=30 treated with estrogen priming antagonist protocol. Finally, endometrial thickness, the rates of oocytes maturation, , embryo formation, and pregnancy were compared between two groups. Results: Rates of implantation, chemical, clinical, and ongoing pregnancy in delayed-start cycles were higher although was not statistically significant. Endometrial thickness was significantly higher in case group. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of oocyte maturation, embryo formation, and IVF outcomes between two groups. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol.

  6. The opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in the treatment of trichotillomania: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Schreiber, Liana R N; Kim, Suck Won

    2014-02-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is characterized by repetitive hair pulling resulting in hair loss. Data on the pharmacological treatment of TTM are limited. This study examined the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, in adults with TTM who had urges to pull their hair. Fifty-one individuals with TTM were randomized to naltrexone or placebo in an 8-week, double-blind trial. Subjects were assessed with measures of TTM severity and selected cognitive tasks. Naltrexone failed to demonstrate significantly greater reductions in hair pulling compared to placebo. Cognitive flexibility, however, significantly improved with naltrexone (P = 0.026). Subjects taking naltrexone with a family history of addiction showed a greater numerical reduction in the urges to pull, although it was not statistically significant. Future studies will have to examine whether pharmacological modulation of the opiate system may provide promise in controlling pulling behavior in a subgroup of individuals with TTM.

  7. CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: FOCUS ON METABOLIC AND VASCULAR EFFECTS

    OpenAIRE

    D. V. Nebieridze

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of calcium antagonists widely used in cardiological practice is proved both by placebo-controlled studies and in comparative trials with end-point control. Calcium antagonists are the most effective vasoprotective medicines. In our study we had shown antihypertensive efficacy and ability to improve endothelium function of non-dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, diltiazem (Altiazem RR). Altiazem RR can be drug of choice in wide profile of patients with arterial hypertension, espec...

  8. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS: DATA OF EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE AND RECOM-MENDATIONS ON PRACTICAL USE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2015-01-01

    The classification of calcium antagonists is presented. There were considered the results of large randomized trials, which were devoted to study of influence of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists on the risk of cardiovascular complications. The place of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists in modern recommendations on treatment of arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease is defined. The clinical importance of differences between various presentations of dihy-dropyridine calcium antag...

  9. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS: DATA OF EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE AND RECOM-MENDATIONS ON PRACTICAL USE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2007-01-01

    The classification of calcium antagonists is presented. There were considered the results of large randomized trials, which were devoted to study of influence of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists on the risk of cardiovascular complications. The place of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists in modern recommendations on treatment of arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease is defined. The clinical importance of differences between various presentations of dihy-dropyridine calcium antag...

  10. How European cardiologists perceive the role of calcium antagonists in follow-up after myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Opie, L. H.; Lüscher, T. F.; Ferrari, R.; Hansen, J. Fischer

    2017-01-01

    About one hundred European cardiologists discussed the role of calcium antagonists in the follow-up management of myocardial infarction, β-blockers are the treatment of choice. Where these are contra-indicated or otherwise unsuitable, many clinicians would use a non-dihydropyridine calcium antagonist alone or in combination with an ACE inhibitor. There is broad agreement that calcium antagonists should not be used in patients with concomitant left ventricular failure. Cholesterol estimation i...

  11. Characterization and bioactivity of novel calcium antagonists - N-methoxy-benzyl haloperidol quaternary ammonium salt

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi-Cun; Zhu, Wei; Zhong, Shu-Ping; Zheng, Fu-Chun; Gao, Fen-Fei; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Xu, Han; Zheng, Yan-Shan; Shi, Gang-Gang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Calcium antagonists play an important role in clinical practice. However, most of them have serious side effects. We have synthesized a series of novel calcium antagonists, quaternary ammonium salt derivatives of haloperidol with N-p-methoxybenzyl (X1), N-m-methoxybenzyl (X2) and N-o-methoxybenzyl (X3) groups. The objective of this study was to investigate the bioactivity of these novel calcium antagonists, especially the vasodilation activity and cardiac side-effects. ...

  12. CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: FOCUS ON METABOLIC AND VASCULAR EFFECTS

    OpenAIRE

    D. V. Nebieridze

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of calcium antagonists widely used in cardiological practice is proved both by placebo-controlled studies and in comparative trials with end-point control. Calcium antagonists are the most effective vasoprotective medicines. In our study we had shown antihypertensive efficacy and ability to improve endothelium function of non-dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, diltiazem (Altiazem RR). Altiazem RR can be drug of choice in wide profile of patients with arterial hypertension, espec...

  13. Modulational effects in accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, T.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed

  14. Cascaded Amplitude Modulations in Sound Texture Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard McWalter

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sound textures, such as crackling fire or chirping crickets, represent a broad class of sounds defined by their homogeneous temporal structure. It has been suggested that the perception of texture is mediated by time-averaged summary statistics measured from early auditory representations. In this study, we investigated the perception of sound textures that contain rhythmic structure, specifically second-order amplitude modulations that arise from the interaction of different modulation rates, previously described as “beating” in the envelope-frequency domain. We developed an auditory texture model that utilizes a cascade of modulation filterbanks that capture the structure of simple rhythmic patterns. The model was examined in a series of psychophysical listening experiments using synthetic sound textures—stimuli generated using time-averaged statistics measured from real-world textures. In a texture identification task, our results indicated that second-order amplitude modulation sensitivity enhanced recognition. Next, we examined the contribution of the second-order modulation analysis in a preference task, where the proposed auditory texture model was preferred over a range of model deviants that lacked second-order modulation rate sensitivity. Lastly, the discriminability of textures that included second-order amplitude modulations appeared to be perceived using a time-averaging process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the inclusion of second-order modulation analysis generates improvements in the perceived quality of synthetic textures compared to the first-order modulation analysis considered in previous approaches.

  15. The Cultivation of Antagonistic Bacteria in Irradiated Sludge for Biological Control of Soft Rot Erwinias : Screening of Antagonistic Bacteria for biological Control of Soft Rot Erwinias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sermkiattipong, Ng.; Sangsuk, L; Rattanapiriyakul, P; Dejsirilert, S.; Thaveechai, N.

    1998-01-01

    Pure cultures of 57 bacterial isolates for antagonistic activity screening were isolated from three areas of soft rot infested vegetable soil and 58 isolates were obtained from commercial seed compost and seed compost product of Division of Soil and Water Conservation, Department of Land Development. A total of 115 bacterial isolates were evaluated for antagonizing activity against Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroceptica in vitro. Out of them, 18 isolates were antagonists by showing zone of inhibition ranging from 1 to 17 mm by diameter. Most of antagonistic bacteria were identified as Bacillus spp. whereas only one isolate was Pseudomonas vesicularis

  16. Generalized modular multilevel converter and modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    Modular multilevel converter (MMC) has gained popularity recently with its modulation, capacitor voltage balancing and circulating current issues widely discussed. Contributing to this effort, a study is presented here to show how the MMC topology can be derived from the viewpoint of two series....... For controlling the GMMC, a simple modulation scheme is also presented, where the goal is to achieve the desired performance at a minimized complexity. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the operation of the proposed topology....

  17. Serotonergic modulation of nicotine-induced kinetic tremor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Naofumi; Iha, Higor A; Nomura, Yuji; Onishi, Misaki; Matsubara, Nami; Shimizu, Saki; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2017-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that nicotine elicited kinetic tremor by elevating the neural activity of the inferior olive via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors. Since α7 nACh receptors reportedly facilitate synaptic monoamine release, we explored the role of 5-HT receptors in induction and/or modulation of nicotine tremor. Treatment of mice with nicotine induced kinetic tremor that normally appeared during movement. The 5-HT 1A agonist, 8-hydroxydipropylaminotetraline (8-OH-DPAT), significantly enhanced nicotine-induced tremor and the action of 8-OH-DPAT was antagonized by WAY-100135 (5-HT 1A antagonist). In addition, the cerebral 5-HT depletion by repeated treatment with p-chlorophenylalanine did not reduce, but rather potentiated the facilitatory effects of 8-OH-DPAT. In contrast, the 5-HT 2 agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), significantly attenuated nicotine tremor, which was antagonized by ritanserin (5-HT 2 antagonist). The 5-HT 3 agonist SR-57227 did not affect nicotine-induced tremor. Furthermore, when testing the direct actions of 5-HT antagonists, nicotine tremor was inhibited by WAY-100135, but was unaffected by ritanserin, ondansetron (5-HT 3 antagonist) or SB-258585 (5-HT 6 antagonist). These results suggest that postsynaptic 5-HT 1A receptors are involved in induction of nicotine tremor mediated by α7 nACh receptors. In addition, 5-HT 2 receptors have an inhibitory modulatory role in induction of nicotine tremor. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential effects of α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonists and partial-agonists on contextual fear extinction in male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Tumolo, Jessica M; Cann, Courtney; Gould, Thomas J

    2018-04-01

    Numerous studies have attributed the psychopathology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to maladaptive behavioral responses such as an inability to extinguish fear. While exposure therapies are mostly effective in treating these disorders by enhancing extinction learning, relapse of PTSD symptoms is common. Although several studies indicated a role for cholinergic transmission and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in anxiety and stress disorder symptomatology, very little is known about the specific contribution of nAChRs to fear extinction OBJECTIVES: In the present study, we examined the effects of inhibition and desensitization of α4β2 nAChRs via a full antagonist (Dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DhβE)) and two α4β2 nAChR partial-agonists (varenicline and sazetidine-A) on contextual fear extinction, locomotor activity, and spontaneous recovery of contextual fear in mice. We trained and tested the subjects in a contextual fear extinction as well as an open field paradigm and spontaneous recovery following injections of DhβE, varenicline, and sazetidine-A. Our results demonstrated that lower doses of DhβE (1 mg/kg) and sazetidine-A (0.01 mg/kg) enhanced contextual fear extinction whereas higher doses of varenicline (0.1 mg/kg) and sazetidine-A (0.1 mg/kg) resulted in impaired contextual fear extinction. However, the higher dose of sazetidine-A (0.1 mg/kg) decreased locomotor activity, which may contribute to increased freezing response observed during fear extinction. Finally, we found that the low dose of DhβE, but not sazetidine-A, also decreased spontaneous recovery of contextual fear following fear extinction. Overall, these results suggest that inhibition and desensitization of α4β2 nAChRs enhance extinction of contextual fear memories. This suggests that modulation of α4β2 nAChRs may be employed as an alternative pharmacological strategy to aid exposure therapies associated with PTSD by augmenting contextual fear extinction

  19. Context-Dependent Modulation of GABAAR-Mediated Tonic Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Bijal; Bright, Damian P; Mortensen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    of neurological disorders. Consequently, developing compounds to selectively modulate the activity of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition is likely to prove therapeutically useful. Here, we examine the GABAA receptor subtype selectivity of the weak partial agonist, 5-(4-piperidyl)isoxazol-3......-ol (4-PIOL), as a potential mechanism for modulating extrasynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated tonic currents. By using recombinant GABAA receptors expressed in HEK293 cells, and native GABAA receptors of cerebellar granule cells, hippocampal neurons, and thalamic relay neurons, 4-PIOL evidently...... displayed differential agonist and antagonist-type profiles, depending on the extrasynaptic GABAA receptor isoforms targeted. For neurons, this resulted in differential modulation of GABA tonic currents, depending on the cell type studied, their respective GABAA receptor subunit compositions, and critically...

  20. Transplantation of Expanded Fetal Intestinal Progenitors Contributes to Colon Regeneration after Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fordham, Robert P; Yui, Shiro; Hannan, Nicholas R F

    2013-01-01

    in the presence of the Wnt antagonist Dkk1, and new cultures can be induced to form mature intestinal organoids by exposure to Wnt3a. Following transplantation in a colonic injury model, FEnS contribute to regeneration of colonic epithelium by forming epithelial crypt-like structures expressing region...

  1. Design of potent and specific integrin antagonists. Peptide antagonists with high specificity for glycoprotein IIb-IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, R M; Naughton, M A; Teng, W; Rose, J W; Phillips, D R; Nannizzi, L; Arfsten, A; Campbell, A M; Charo, I F

    1993-01-15

    Members of the snake venon-derived, "disintegrin" peptide family containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) amino acid sequence are among the most potent inhibitors of the binding of adhesive proteins to platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa. However, GPIIb-IIIa antagonists containing the RGD sequence are not integrin specific and inhibit the adhesive functions of many other RGD-dependent integrins. The single disintegrin peptide, barbourin, containing a conservative amino acid substitution of Lys (K) for Arg (R) in the RGD sequence, is however, highly specific for GPIIb-IIIa. Using this information we have tested the hypothesis that both structural and conformational elements of barbourin are important for its high affinity and selectivity for platelet GPIIb-IIIa by synthesizing a series of conformationally constrained, disulfide-bridged peptides containing the KGD amino acid sequence. Incorporation of the KGD sequence into a cyclic peptide template, followed by systematic optimization of the cyclic ring size, optimization of secondary hydrophobic binding site interactions, and the derivatization of the lysyl side chain functionality of the KGD sequence has resulted in peptide analogs which display inhibitory potency and GPIIb-IIIa selectivity comparable to that of barbourin. This study demonstrates that the specificity and potency of the disintegrin family of antagonists, in particular barbourin, can be mimicked by small, conformationally restrained peptides.

  2. How could haloalkaliphilic microorganisms contribute to biotechnology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baisuo; Yan, Yanchun; Chen, Shulin

    2014-11-01

    Haloalkaliphiles are microorganisms requiring Na(+) concentrations of at least 0.5 mol·L(-1) and an alkaline pH of 9 for optimal growth. Their unique features enable them to make significant contributions to a wide array of biotechnological applications. Organic compatible solutes produced by haloalkaliphiles, such as ectoine and glycine betaine, are correlated with osmoadaptation and may serve as stabilizers of intracellular proteins, salt antagonists, osmoprotectants, and dermatological moisturizers. Haloalkaliphiles are an important source of secondary metabolites like rhodopsin, polyhydroxyalkanoates, and exopolysaccharides that play essential roles in biogeocycling organic compounds. These microorganisms also can secrete unique exoenzymes, including proteases, amylases, and cellulases, that are highly active and stable in extreme haloalkaline conditions and can be used for the production of laundry detergent. Furthermore, the unique metabolic pathways of haloalkaliphiles can be applied in the biodegradation and (or) biotransformation of a broad range of toxic industrial pollutants and heavy metals, in wastewater treatment, and in the biofuel industry.

  3. Serotonin-dependent maintenance of spatial performance and electroencephalography activation after cholinergic blockade: effects of serotonergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dringenberg, H C; Zalan, R M

    1999-08-07

    antagonists affected cortical activity when given alone. However, methiothepin, at the same dose that produced behavioral impairments, increased spectral power between 0.5 and 4 Hz and between 8 and 12 Hz during movement when co-administered with scopolamine. The results suggest that a concurrent blockade of multiple 5-HT receptors, but not selective blockade of serotonin(1A) or serotonin(2) receptors alone, mimics the ability of global 5-HT depletion to abolish behavioral capacities that are resistant to muscarinic receptor blockade. The behavioral deficits observed here are accompanied by a reduction in neocortical activation, suggesting that disturbances of processing in cortical networks can contribute to the behavioral disorganization apparent after cholinergic and serotonergic blockade. A focus on concurrent serotonergic-cholinergic deficits may provide a useful framework for the development of novel pharmacological treatments to counteract the behavioral disorganization and loss of EEG activation present in senile dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. The Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonist DL77 Ameliorates MK801-Induced Memory Deficits in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Eissa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of Histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs in memory, and the prospective of H3R antagonists in pharmacological control of neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer disease (AD is well-accepted. For that reason, the procognitive effects of the H3R antagonist DL77 on cognitive impairments induced with MK801 were tested in an inhibitory passive avoidance paradigm (PAP and novel object recognition (NOR task in adult male rats, using donepezil (DOZ as a standard drug. Acute systemic pretreatment with DL77 (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, i.p. significantly ameliorated memory deficits induced with MK801 in PAP (all P < 0.05, n = 7. The ameliorative effect of most promising dose of DL77 (5 mg/kg, i.p. was reversed when rats were co-injected with the H3R agonist R-(α-methylhistamine (RAMH, 10 mg/kg, i.p. (p = 0.701 for MK801-amnesic group vs. MK801+DL77+RAMH group, n = 6. In the NOR paradigm, DL77 (5 mg/kg, i.p. counteracted long-term memory (LTM deficits induced with MK801 (P < 0.05, n = 6–8, and the DL77-provided effect was similar to that of DOZ (p = 0.788, n = 6–8, and was reversed when rats were co-injected with RAMH (10 mg/kg, i.p. (p = 0.877, n = 6, as compared to the (MK801-amnesic group. However, DL77 (5 mg/kg, i.p. did not alter short-term memory (STM impairment in NOR test (p = 0.772, n = 6–8, as compared to (MK801-amnesic group. Moreover, DL77 (5 mg/kg failed to modify anxiety and locomotor behaviors of animals innate to elevated-plus maze (EPM (p = 0.67 for percentage of time spent exploring the open arms, p = 0.52 for number of entries into the open arms, p = 0.76 for percentage of entries into the open arms, and p = 0.73 number of closed arm entries as compared to saline-treated groups, all n = 6, demonstrating that the procognitive effects observed in PAP or NOR tests were unconnected to alterations in emotions or in natural locomotion of tested animals. These results signify the potential involvement of H3Rs in modulating

  5. I.c.v. administration of the nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, CP-472555, prevents exacerbated hypoglycemia during repeated insulin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, A Y; Paranjape, S A; Briski, K P

    2006-06-30

    Hypoglycemia elicits an integrated array of CNS-mediated counterregulatory responses, including activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The role of antecedent adrenocortical hypersecretion in impaired glucose counterregulation remains controversial. The present studies utilized the selective, nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, CP-472555, as a pharmacological tool to investigate the hypothesis that hypoglycemic hypercorticosteronemia modulates CNS efferent autonomic and neuroendocrine motor responses to recurring insulin-induced hypoglycemia via glucocorticoid receptor-dependent mechanisms. Groups of adult male rats were injected s.c. with either one or four doses of the intermediate-acting insulin, Humulin neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH), on as many days, while controls were injected with diluent alone. Animals injected with four doses of insulin were pretreated by i.c.v. administration of graded doses of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist or vehicle alone prior to the first three doses of insulin. Repeated daily injection of NPH exacerbated hypoglycemia, attenuated patterns of glucagon and epinephrine secretion, and diminished neuronal transcriptional activation in discrete CNS metabolic loci, including the lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the solitary tract. While i.c.v. delivery of 25 or 100 ng doses of CP-472555 did not alter any of these parameters, animals treated with 500 ng exhibited circulating glucose, glucagon, and epinephrine levels that were similar to those in rats injected with one dose of insulin, as well as a reversal of recurring insulin-induced hypoglycemia-associated reductions in Fos immunolabeling in the lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. These results provide unique pharmacological evidence that antecedent activation of central glucocorticoid receptor is required

  6. A shift toward T helper 2 responses and an increase in modulators of innate immunity in depressed patients treated with escitalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pei-Shen; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Huang, San-Yuan; Liang, Chih-Sung

    2015-03-01

    Depression is hypothesized to involve inflammatory processes, and identifying the key cytokines targeted by antidepressant drugs is critical for tailoring treatment to specific cases. However, investigating a limited number of cytokines at one time cannot provide a broad picture of antidepressant-associated immunomodulation. Cytokines act in a network where one could demonstrate pleiotropism, redundancy, synergy, and antagonism with other cytokine functions. This study was aimed at determining whether escitalopram functions as an anti-inflammatory agent and, if so, how it influences cytokine networks. A total of 24 healthy controls and 26 patients with clinical depression requiring inpatient treatment were recruited. A multiplex assay, an efficient tool to simultaneously measure 27 cytokines, was applied in patients with depression before and after 4-week escitalopram treatment. Healthy controls did not take escitalopram and completed cytokine analyses once. We demonstrated that escitalopram increased the levels of interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist and IL-2. Moreover, escitalopram contributed to a shift toward T helper 2 responses and an increase in modulators of innate immunity, leading to a decrease of immune system activation, both innate and adaptive. We suggest that escitalopram modulates the balance of IL-1 and IL-1 receptor antagonist and improves the function and number of T regulatory cells. However, diverse conclusions could be drawn if only a few cytokines were assessed or different significance levels were used. Further studies should investigate a wide range of cytokines in a reliable and valid way, which is key to disentangling the effects of different antidepressants on inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Castro, Sonia [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Maruoka, Hiroshi [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL; Costanzi, Stefano [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health; Hechler, Béatrice [University of Strasbourg; Gachet, Christian [EFS-Alsace, Strasbourg, France; Harden, T. Kendall [University of North Carolina School of Medicine; Jacobson, Kenneth A. [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor

  8. Clinical experience in Europe with uroselective alpha1-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, F M; Van der Poel, H G

    1999-01-01

    alpha1-Adrenoreceptors are thought to be involved in prostate smooth muscle contractions and could hence play a role in the dynamic component of intravesical obstruction associated with symptomatic BPH. Consequently, since the mid-eighties alpha receptor blocking agents have been used for the treatment of BPH. Non-selective alpha blockers are usually associated with systemic side-effects which resulted in an exclusion or withdrawal of many patients from this form of treatment. With the availability of so-called uroselective alpha blockers the management picture has changed since it was anticipated that these compounds cause lesser side-effects with at least the same, or even better, efficacy. Comparative clinical studies are essential for determining the eventual advantages of the uroselective alpha1-antagonists and a large number of such studies have been performed worldwide studying the various available compounds. European studies with terazosin showed clear superiority of the drug over the placebo while causing only limited side-effects. Various other studies using alpha-blocking agents such as doxazosin, tamsulosin and alfuzosin yielded identical results. Especially with tamsulosin and alfuzosin, the side-effects were comparable with those encountered in the placebo group. About 7% of the patients using tamsulosin experienced retrograde ejaculation in one study which did not occur in the alfuzosin studies. Important studies in Europe have also investigated the value of a combination of an alpha blocker with a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor. Comparable studies in which both alfuzosin and doxazosin were combined with the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor Proscar have shown that a combination is not superior to a blocker monotherapy and especially in the ALFIN study the results show that alfuzosin monotherapy is superior to Proscar in the management of symptomatic BPH. European studies have evaluated Quality of Life, sexuality as well as socio-economical outcome of the

  9. Effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists on cocaine discrimination in wild-type mice and in muscarinic receptor M1, M2, and M4 receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Lauren; Thomsen, Morgane

    2017-06-30

    Muscarinic M 1 /M 4 receptor stimulation can reduce abuse-related effects of cocaine and may represent avenues for treating cocaine addiction. Muscarinic antagonists can mimic and enhance effects of cocaine, including discriminative stimulus (S D ) effects, but the receptor subtypes mediating those effects are not known. A better understanding of the complex cocaine/muscarinic interactions is needed to evaluate and develop potential muscarinic-based medications. Here, knockout mice lacking M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 receptors (M 1 -/- , M 2 -/- , M 4 -/- ), as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline. Muscarinic receptor antagonists with no subtype selectivity (scopolamine), or preferential affinity at the M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 subtype (telenzepine, trihexyphenidyl; methoctramine, AQ-RA 741; tropicamide) were tested alone and in combination with cocaine. In intact animals, antagonists with high affinity at M 1 /M 4 receptors partially substituted for cocaine and increased the S D effect of cocaine, while M 2 -preferring antagonists did not substitute, and reduced the S D effect of cocaine. The cocaine-like effects of scopolamine were absent in M 1 -/- mice. The cocaine S D attenuating effects of methoctramine were absent in M 2 -/- mice and almost absent in M 1 -/- mice. The findings indicate that the cocaine-like S D effects of muscarinic antagonists are primarily mediated through M 1 receptors, with a minor contribution of M 4 receptors. The data also support our previous findings that stimulation of M 1 receptors and M 4 receptors can each attenuate the S D effect of cocaine, and show that this can also be achieved by blocking M 2 autoreceptors, likely via increased acetylcholine release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analytical ultracentrifugation with fluorescence detection system reveals differences in complex formation between recombinant human TNF and different biological TNF antagonists in various environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayukhina, Elena; Noda, Masanori; Ishii, Kentaro; Maruno, Takahiro; Wakabayashi, Hirotsugu; Tada, Minoru; Suzuki, Takuo; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Kato, Masahiko; Uchiyama, Susumu

    A number of studies have attempted to elucidate the binding mechanism between tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and clinically relevant antagonists. None of these studies, however, have been conducted as close as possible to physiologic conditions, and so the relationship between the size distribution of TNF-antagonist complexes and the antagonists' biological activity or adverse effects remains elusive. Here, we characterized the binding stoichiometry and sizes of soluble TNF-antagonist complexes for adalimumab, infliximab, and etanercept that were formed in human serum and in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation analyses revealed that adalimumab and infliximab formed a range of complexes with TNF, with the major complexes consisting of 3 molcules of the respective antagonist and one or 2 molcules of TNF. Considerably greater amounts of high-molecular-weight complexes were detected for infliximab in human serum. The emergence of peaks with higher sedimentation coefficients than the adalimumab monomer as a function of added human serum albumin (HSA) concentration in PBS suggested weak reversible interactions between HSA and immunoglobulins. Etanerept exclusively formed 1:1 complexes with TNF in PBS, and a small amount of complexes with higher stoichiometry was detected in human serum. Consistent with these biophysical characterizations, a reporter assay showed that adalimumab and infliximab, but not etanercept, exerted FcγRIIa- and FcγRIIIa-mediated cell signaling in the presence of TNF and that infliximab exhibited higher potency than adalimumab. This study shows that assessing distribution profiles in serum will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the in vivo behavior of therapeutic proteins.

  11. Reduced neurobehavioral impairment from sleep deprivation in older adults: Contribution of adenosinergic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter eLandolt

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A night without sleep is followed by enhanced sleepiness, increased low-frequency activity in the waking EEG, and reduced vigilant attention. The magnitude of these changes is highly variable among healthy individuals. Findings in young men of low and high subjective caffeine sensitivity suggest that adenosinergic mechanisms contribute to inter-individual differences in sleep deprivation-induced changes in EEG theta activity, as well as optimal performance on the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT. In comparison to young subjects, healthy adults of older age typically feel less sleepy after sleep deprivation, and show fewer response lapses, and faster RTs and on the PVT, especially in the morning after the night without sleep. We hypothesized that age-related changes in adenosine signal transmission underlie reduced vulnerability to sleep deprivation in older individuals. To test this hypothesis, the combined effects of prolonged wakefulness and the adenosine receptor antagonist, caffeine, on an antero-posterior power gradient in EEG theta activity and PVT performance were analyzed in healthy older and caffeine-insensitive and -sensitive young men. The results show that age-related differences in sleep loss-induced changes in brain rhythmic activity and neurobehavioral functions are mirrored in young individuals of low and high sensitivity to the stimulant effects of caffeine. Moreover, the effects of sleep deprivation and caffeine on regional theta power and vigilant attention are inversely correlated across older and young age groups. Genetic variants of the adenosine A2A receptor gene contribute to individual differences in neurobehavioral performance in rested and sleep deprived state, and modulate the actions of caffeine in wakefulness and sleep. Based upon this evidence, we propose that age-related differences in A2A receptor mediated signal transduction could be involved in age-related changes in the vulnerability to acute sleep deprivation.

  12. Smac modulates chemosensitivity in head and neck cancer cells through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Quanhong; Zheng, Xingnan; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2011-04-15

    Overexpression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAP) contributes to therapeutic resistance. Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac) promotes caspase activation by binding to IAPs upon release from the mitochondria. IAP antagonists, also called SMAC mimetics, are promising anticancer agents modeled after this mechanism. We investigated the role and mechanisms of Smac- and Smac mimetic-mediated chemosensitization in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The effects of SMAC knockdown, SMAC overexpression, and a small molecule Smac mimetic on the chemosensitivities of HNSCC cells were determined. The mechanisms of Smac- and Smac mimetic-mediated chemosensitization were investigated by analyzing growth suppression, the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, caspase activation, and IAP proteins. The therapeutic responses of HNSCC cells with different levels of Smac were compared in xenograft models. We found that Smac mediates apoptosis induced by several classes of therapeutic agents through the mitochondrial pathway. SMAC knockdown led to impaired caspase activation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and release of cytochrome c. A small molecule Smac mimetic, at nanomolar concentrations, significantly sensitized HNSCC cells to gemcitabine-induced apoptosis and restored gemcitabine sensitivity in SMAC knockdown cells, through caspase activation, X-linked IAP dissociation, and mitochondria-associated events, but not the TNF-α pathway. Furthermore, Smac levels modulated the therapeutic response of HNSCC cells to gemcitabine in xenograft models. Our results establish a critical role of Smac in mediating therapeutic responses of HNSCC cells and provide a strong rationale for combining Smac mimetics with other anticancer agents to treat HNSCC. ©2011 AACR.

  13. Pitx2 modulates a Tbx5-dependent gene regulatory network to maintain atrial rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Broman, Michael T; Boukens, Bastiaan; Mazurek, Stefan R; Yang, Xinan; van den Boogaard, Malou; Bekeny, Jenna; Gadek, Margaret; Ward, Tarsha; Zhang, Min; Qiao, Yun; Martin, James F; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jon; Christoffels, Vincent; Efimov, Igor R; McNally, Elizabeth M; Weber, Christopher R; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2016-08-31

    Cardiac rhythm is extremely robust, generating 2 billion contraction cycles during the average human life span. Transcriptional control of cardiac rhythm is poorly understood. We found that removal of the transcription factor gene Tbx5 from the adult mouse caused primary spontaneous and sustained atrial fibrillation (AF). Atrial cardiomyocytes from the Tbx5-mutant mice exhibited action potential abnormalities, including spontaneous depolarizations, which were rescued by chelating free calcium. We identified a multitiered transcriptional network that linked seven previously defined AF risk loci: TBX5 directly activated PITX2, and TBX5 and PITX2 antagonistically regulated membrane effector genes Scn5a, Gja1, Ryr2, Dsp, and Atp2a2 In addition, reduced Tbx5 dose by adult-specific haploinsufficiency caused decreased target gene expression, myocardial automaticity, and AF inducibility, which were all rescued by Pitx2 haploinsufficiency in mice. These results defined a transcriptional architecture for atrial rhythm control organized as an incoherent feed-forward loop, driven by TBX5 and modulated by PITX2. TBX5/PITX2 interplay provides tight control of atrial rhythm effector gene expression, and perturbation of the co-regulated network caused AF susceptibility. This work provides a model for the molecular mechanisms underpinning the genetic implication of multiple AF genome-wide association studies loci and will contribute to future efforts to stratify patients for AF risk by genotype. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Involvement of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a5 (Oatp1a5) in intestinal absorption of endothelin receptor antagonist in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tani, Takeshe; Gram, Luise Kvisgaard; Arakawa, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the contribution of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a5 (Oatp1a5/Oatp3) in the intestinal absorption of an orally active endothelin receptor antagonist, (+)-(5S,6R,7R)-2-butyl-7-[2-((2S)-2-carboxypropyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-5-(3,4-methylene-dioxyphenyl)cyclopenteno[1,2-b...... and taurocholic acid. CONCLUSIONS: These results consistently suggested that Oatp1a5 is contributing to the intestinal absorption of compound-A at least in part, and the transporter-mediated absorption seems to be maximized at the acidic microenvironment of epithelial cells in the small intestine in rats....

  15. 5-Hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and cardiac side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygger, Louise; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: 5-Hydroxytryptamine3-receptor antagonists (5-HT3-RA) are the most widely used antiemetics in oncology, and although tolerability is high, QTC prolongation has been observed in some patients. AREAS COVERED: The purpose of this article is to outline the risk of cardiac adverse events...... in clinical trials. Furthermore, polypharmacy is frequent and drug-drug interactions between chemotherapy and other QTc-prolonging drugs may influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the 5-HT3-RAs. During the next 10 - 15 years a huge increase in the number of cancer patients is expected......, primarily in the group of 65-plus-year old. Therefore it will be crucial to address the incidence of cardiac AEs in cancer patients with known heart disease receiving chemotherapy and a 5-HT3 RA for the prophylaxis of CINV....

  16. Mesenteric vascular reactivity to histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. [Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walus, K.M.; Fondacaro, J.D.; Jacobson, E.D.

    1981-05-01

    Response patterns of intestinal blood flow, oxygen extraction and consumption, blood flow distribution, and motility were assessed during intraarterial infusions of histamine, histamine after H1 or H2 blockade, dimaprit or dimaprit after H2 blockade. Histamine produced an initial peak response of blood flow with a slow decrease thereafter. Oxygen extraction was evenly depressed throughout the infusion, and oxygen consumption increased at the beginning. All initial responses were blocked by tripelennamine. Ranitidine, a new H2 antagonist, accelerated the decay of all responses. Dimaprit produced effects identical to those of histamine after tripelennamine. Distribution of blood flow was unchanged at the beginning of histamine infusion, but subsequently showed a shift to muscularis which was blocked by tripelennamine. Histamine usually stimulated intestinal contractions and this effect was abolished by tripelennamine. Thus, H1 stimulation, besides producing an initial vasodilation, increases oxygen uptake and redistributes flow to the muscularis.

  17. Identification of Bexarotene as a PPARγ Antagonist with HDX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Marciano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The retinoid x receptors (RXRs are the pharmacological target of Bexarotene, an antineoplastic agent indicated for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL. The RXRs form heterodimers with several nuclear receptors (NRs, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, to regulate target gene expression through cooperative recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX mass spectrometry to characterize the effects of Bexarotene on the conformational plasticity of the intact RXRα:PPARγ heterodimer. Interestingly, addition of Bexarotene to PPARγ in the absence of RXRα induced protection from solvent exchange, suggesting direct receptor binding. This observation was confirmed using a competitive binding assay. Furthermore, Bexarotene functioned as a PPARγ antagonist able to alter rosiglitazone induced transactivation in a cell based promoter:reporter transactivation assay. Together these results highlight the complex polypharmacology of lipophilic NR targeted small molecules and the utility of HDX for identifying and characterizing these interactions.

  18. [Chitinolytic activity of Bacillus Cohn.--phytopathogenic fungus antagonist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktuganov, G E; Melent'ev, A I; Kuz'mina, L Iu; Galimzianova, N F; Shirokov, A V

    2003-01-01

    Among the 70 tested Bacillus spp. strains antagonistic to phytopathogenic fungi, 19 were found to possess chitinolytic activity when grown on solid media with 0.5% colloidal chitin. The chitinolytic activity of almost all of these 19 strains grown in liquid cultures ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 U/ml. One of the 19 strains exhibited exochitinase activity. In addition to chitinase, two strains also produced chitosanase and one strain, beta-1,3-glucanase. No correlation was found between the antifungal activity of the bacillar strains studied and their ability to synthesize extracellular chitinase. Among the 19 chitinolytic strains, the correlation between these parameters was also low (r x,y = 0.45), although the enzymatic preparations of most of these strains inhibited the growth of the phytopathogenic fungus Helminthosporium sativum.

  19. Secondary prevention with calcium antagonists after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F

    1992-01-01

    and preventing reinfarction, nevertheless demonstrated pronounced differences between the 3 drugs. Nifedipine had no effect on reinfarction or death. Diltiazem had no overall effect but prevented first reinfarction or cardiac death (cardiac events) in patients without heart failure, and increased cardiac events......Experimental studies have demonstrated that the 3 calcium antagonists nifedipine, diltiazem, and verapamil have a comparable effect in the prevention of myocardial damage during ischaemia. Secondary prevention trials after acute myocardial infarction, which aimed at improving survival...... in patients with heart failure before randomisation. Verapamil prevented first reinfarction or death (major events); the most pronounced effect was found in patients without heart failure before randomisation. Verapamil did not have detrimental effects in patients treated for heart failure before...

  20. Interaction intimacy organizes networks of antagonistic interactions in different ways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Mathias M; Guimarães, Paulo R

    2013-01-06

    Interaction intimacy, the degree of biological integration between interacting individuals, shapes the ecology and evolution of species interactions. A major question in ecology is whether interaction intimacy also shapes the way interactions are organized within communities. We combined analyses of network structure and food web models to test the role of interaction intimacy in determining patterns of antagonistic interactions, such as host-parasite, predator-prey and plant-herbivore interactions. Networks describing interactions with low intimacy were more connected, more nested and less modular than high-intimacy networks. Moreover, the performance of the models differed across networks with different levels of intimacy. All models reproduced well low-intimacy networks, whereas the more elaborate models were also capable of reproducing networks depicting interactions with higher levels of intimacy. Our results indicate the key role of interaction intimacy in organizing antagonisms, suggesting that greater interaction intimacy might be associated with greater complexity in the assembly rules shaping ecological networks.

  1. Discovery of novel N-aryl piperazine CXCR4 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huanyu; Prosser, Anthony R; Liotta, Dennis C; Wilson, Lawrence J

    2015-11-01

    A novel series of CXCR4 antagonists with substituted piperazines as benzimidazole replacements is described. These compounds showed micromolar to nanomolar potency in CXCR4-mediated functional and HIV assays, namely inhibition of X4 HIV-1(IIIB) virus in MAGI-CCR5/CXCR4 cells and inhibition of SDF-1 induced calcium release in Chem-1 cells. Preliminary SAR investigations led to the identification of a series of N-aryl piperazines as the most potent compounds. Results show SAR that indicates type and position of the aromatic ring, as well as type of linker and stereochemistry are significant for activity. Profiling of several lead compounds showed that one (49b) reduced susceptibility towards CYP450 and hERG, and the best overall profile when considering both SDF-1 and HIV potencies (6-20 nM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alpha antagonists and intraoperative floppy iris syndrome: A spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif A Issa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Sharif A Issa, Omar H Hadid, Oliver Baylis, Margaret DayanDepartment of Ophthalmology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UKBackground: To determine occurrence of features of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS during cataract surgery in patients taking systemic alpha-antagonists (AA.Methods: We prospectively studied patients on AA and who underwent phacoemulsification. The following were recorded: pupil diameter preoperatively, iris flaccidity, iris prolapse and peroperative miosis.Results: We studied 40 eyes of 31 subjects. Mean age was 78 years. Overall, 14 eyes (13 patients showed signs of IFIS: 9/13 (69% eyes of patients on tamsulosin, 1/18 (6% eyes in the doxazosin group, 2/2 prazosin patients, 1/4 eyes in the indoramin group, and 1/2 eyes in two patients on a combination of doxazosin and tamsulosin. Most cases (92% had only one or two signs of IFIS. Bilateral cataract surgery was undertaken in 9 patients but only one patient (on tamsulosin had features of IFIS in both eyes, while 4 patients (2 on tamsulosin and 2 on other AA showed signs of IFIS in one eye only, and 4 patients did not show IFIS in either eye.Conclusion: Most AA were associated with IFIS, but it tends to present as a spectrum of signs rather than full triad originally described. Tamsulosin was most likely to be associated with IFIS; however, its intake does not necessarily mean that IFIS will occur. For patients on AA, the behavior of the iris intraoperatively in one eye is a poor predictor of the other eye. Surgeons should anticipate the occurrence of IFIS in any patient on AA.Keywords: alpha blocker, alpha antagonist, cataract surgery, intraoperative floppy iris syndrome, tamsulosin.

  3. Caffeine and a selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist induce sensitization and cross-sensitization behavior associated with increased striatal dopamine in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chih W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caffeine, a nonselective adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonist, is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world. Evidence demonstrates that caffeine and selective adenosine A2A antagonists interact with the neuronal systems involved in drug reinforcement, locomotor sensitization, and therapeutic effect in Parkinson's disease (PD. Evidence also indicates that low doses of caffeine and a selective adenosine A2A antagonist SCH58261 elicit locomotor stimulation whereas high doses of these drugs exert locomotor inhibition. Since these behavioral and therapeutic effects are mediated by the mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways which project to the striatum, we hypothesize that low doses of caffeine and SCH58261 may modulate the functions of dopaminergic neurons in the striatum. Methods In this study, we evaluated the neuroadaptations in the striatum by using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC to quantitate the concentrations of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, dihydroxylphenylacetic acid (DOPAC and homovanilic acid (HVA, and using immunoblotting to measure the level of phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH at Ser31, following chronic caffeine and SCH58261 sensitization in mice. Moreover, to validate further that the behavior sensitization of caffeine is through antagonism at the adenosine A2A receptor, we also evaluate whether chronic pretreatment with a selective adenosine A2A antagonist SCH58261 or a selective adenosine A1 antagonist DPCPX can sensitize the locomotor stimulating effects of caffeine. Results Chronic treatments with low dose caffeine (10 mg/kg or SCH58261 (2 mg/kg increased the concentrations of dopamine, DOPAC and HVA, concomitant with increased TH phosphorylation at Ser31 and consequently enhanced TH activity in the striatal tissues in both caffeine- and SCH58261-sensitized mice. In addition, chronic caffeine or SCH58261 administration induced

  4. A novel snake venom-derived GPIb antagonist, anfibatide, protects mice from acute experimental ischaemic stroke and reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting-Ting; Fan, Man-Li; Hou, Shi-Xiang; Li, Xiao-Yi; Barry, Devin M; Jin, Hui; Luo, Sheng-Yong; Kong, Feng; Lau, Lit-Fui; Dai, Xiang-Rong; Zhang, Guo-Hui; Zhou, Lan-Lan

    2015-08-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a serious disease with limited therapy options. Glycoprotein (GP)Ib binding to von Willebrand factor (vWF) exposed at vascular injury initiates platelet adhesion and contributes to platelet aggregation. GPIb has been suggested as an effective target for antithrombotic therapy in stroke. Anfibatide is a GPIb antagonist derived from snake venom and we investigated its protective effect on experimental brain ischaemia in mice. Focal cerebral ischaemia was induced by 90 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). These mice were then treated with anfibatide (4, 2, 1 μg·kg(-1) ), injected i.v., after 90 min of MCAO, followed by 1 h of reperfusion. Tirofiban, a GPIIb/IIIα antagonist, was used as a positive control. Twenty-four hours after MCAO, anfibatide-treated mice showed significantly improved ischaemic lesions in a dose-dependent manner. The mice had smaller infarct volumes, less severe neurological deficits and histopathology of cerebrum tissues compared with the untreated MCAO mice. Moreover, anfibatide decreased the amount of GPIbα, vWF and accumulation of fibrin(ogen) in the vasculature of the ischaemic hemisphere. Tirofiban had similar effects on infarct size and fibrin(ogen) deposition compared with the MCAO group. Importantly, the anfibatide-treated mice showed a lower incidence of intracerebral haemorrhage and shorter tail bleeding time compared with the tirofiban-treated mice. Our data indicate anfibatide is a safe GPIb antagonist that exerts a protective effect on cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion injury. Anfibatide is a promising candidate that could be beneficial for the treatment of ischaemic stroke. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist effects on prefrontal cortical connectivity better model early than chronic schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevic, Alan; Corlett, Philip R; Cole, Michael W; Savic, Aleksandar; Gancsos, Mark; Tang, Yanqing; Repovs, Grega; Murray, John D; Driesen, Naomi R; Morgan, Peter T; Xu, Ke; Wang, Fei; Krystal, John H

    2015-03-15

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) function contributes to schizophrenia onset and progression. However, little is known about neural mechanisms behind PFC functional alterations along illness stages. Recent pharmacologic studies indicate that glutamate dysfunction may produce increased functional connectivity. However, pharmacologic models of schizophrenia overlook effects of illness progression on PFC function. This study compared N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist effects in healthy volunteers with stages of schizophrenia with respect to PFC functional connectivity. First, we tested ketamine effects on PFC functional connectivity in healthy volunteers in a data-driven way (n = 19). Next, we compared healthy subjects (n = 96) with three clinical groups: individuals at high risk for schizophrenia (n = 21), people early in their course of schizophrenia (EC-SCZ) (n = 28), and patients with chronic illness (n = 20). Across independent analyses, we used data-driven global brain connectivity techniques restricted to PFC to identify functional dysconnectivity. Results revealed robust PFC hyperconnectivity in healthy volunteers administered ketamine (Cohen's d = 1.46), resembling individuals at high risk for schizophrenia and EC-SCZ. Hyperconnectivity was not found in patients with chronic illness relative to EC-SCZ patients. Results provide the first evidence that ketamine effects on PFC functional connectivity resemble early course but not chronic schizophrenia. Results suggest an illness phase-specific relevance of NMDAR antagonist administration for prefrontal dysconnectivity associated with schizophrenia. This finding has implications for the neurobiology of illness progression and for the widespread use of NMDAR antagonists in the development of therapeutics for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Role of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in the treatment of hypertension in patients aged >or=65 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradman, Alan H

    2009-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases with age, and hypertension affects approximately two-thirds of adults in the US aged >60 years. Blood pressure (BP) increases as a consequence of age-related structural changes in large arteries, which lead to loss of elasticity and reduced vascular compliance. Increased pulse wave velocity augments SBP, resulting in a high prevalence of isolated systolic hypertension. Because age itself elevates cardiovascular risk, effective treatment of hypertension in an older (aged >or=65 years) patient population prevents many more events per 1000 patients treated than treatment of younger hypertensive patients. Recommendations for treating hypertension are similar in older patients compared with the general population. The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Prevention, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends target BP goals of hypertension, and treatment goals to include patients with coronary artery disease, other types of vascular disease and heart failure. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of calcium channel antagonists (calcium channel blockers [CCBs]), low-dose diuretics, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) in reducing the risk of stroke and other adverse cardiovascular outcomes in older patients; beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are less effective in terms of endpoint reduction. The majority of older patients require two or more drugs to achieve BP goals. Despite active treatment, half of these patients do not achieve target BP, in part because of the reluctance of physicians to intensify treatment, a phenomenon referred to as 'clinical inertia'. ARBs are effective antihypertensive agents in older patients and have been shown to reduce cardiovascular endpoints in patients with hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, cerebrovascular disease and heart failure. ARBs produce additive BP reduction when

  7. Neuroprotection, excitotoxicicity and nmda antagonists Neuroproteção, excitotoxicidade e antagonistas do NMDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUBENS JOSÉ GAGLIARDI

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze the main aspects of neuroprotection and excitotoxicity. DISCUSSION: This is a significant theory on the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia; it is based on the release of excitatory aminoacid (EAA, mainly glutamate. The sequence starts with a decrease of the blood flow and ends in neuronal death. The main stages of this reaction are herein presented and discussed. An in depth study of the effects of the excessive intracellular calcium is undertaken. Neuroprotectors (NP are a group of drugs that reduce the excitotoxicity, opposing the excessive release of EAA and its intracellular effects. Neuroprotectors represent a rational approach to stroke treatment and offer a number of potential advantages. They prevent or limit ischemia-induced damage. CONCLUSION: There are many experimental and clinical NP trials. A minimum of 800 trials are currently under study worldwide. The most important NP subgroups are: N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA antagonists, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA agonists, amino-hydroxy-methyl-isoxalone propionic acid (AMPA antagonists, reducers of intracellular Ca++ inhibitors of nitric oxide modulation pathway free radicals scavengers, sodium channel antagonists, glutamate release inhibitor, growth factors, hypothermia and potassium channel activators.PROPÓSITO: Analisar importantes aspectos da neuroproteção e da excitotoxicidade. DISCUSSÃO: Excitotoxicidade é teoria que explica os mecanismos básicos da fisiopatologia da isquemia cerebral; é baseada na liberação excessiva de amino-ácidos excitatórios (AAE, principalmente o glutamato. A sequência se inicia com o decréscimo do fluxo sanguíneo cerebral e termina com a morte neuronal. Os principais aspectos desta cadeia de reações são apresentados e discutidos. Os efeitos do excesso de cálcio intracelular são analisados. Neuroprotetores (NP são um grupo de drogas que reduzem a excitotoxicidade combatendo a excessiva liberação de AAE e os seus

  8. Anti-inflammatory properties of a novel peptide interleukin 1 receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klementiev, Boris; Li, Shizhong; Korshunova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide.......Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide....

  9. Translational modelling of prolactin response following administration of D2 antagonists in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taneja, Amit; Vermeulen, An; Huntjens, D.; Danhof, Meindert; de Lange, ECM; Proost, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment with D2 antagonists results in prolactin release, and thus prolactin is a biomarker of dopamine antagonism. We compare the model performance of two semi-mechanistic PKPD models, the pool model and the agonist-antagonist interaction model, to describe prolactin release following

  10. CGRP receptor antagonists and antibodies against CGRP and its receptor in migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonistic molecules have shown promising results in clinical trials for acute treatment of migraine attacks. Drugs from the gepant class of CGRP receptor antagonists are effective and do not cause vasoconstriction, one...

  11. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, K Y; Gupta, S; de Vries, R

    2010-01-01

    studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by alpha-CGRP, capsaicin...

  12. Does treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vivo alter human adenylate cyclase responsiveness in vitro?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Klüppel, M.; Philipp, T.; Brodde, O. E.

    1991-01-01

    1. Treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vivo can alter adenylate cyclase responsiveness in the human heart. We have determined the effects of treatment with four different beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vivo on the responsiveness of lymphocyte and platelet adenylate cyclase in vitro in

  13. Folic acid sensitive birth defects in association with intrauterine exposure to folic acid antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, W.M.; Walle, H.E.K.de; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W.S; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina

    2005-01-01

    Since the protective effect of folic acid (FA) on birth defects is well known, it is reasonable to assume intrauterine exposure to FA antagonists increases the risk on these defects. We have therefore performed case-control analyses to investigate the risk of intrauterine exposure to FA antagonists,

  14. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Lien; De Bruijn, I.; de Mot, Rene; Readers, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens.Weshowed thatwhen using the samemedium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacteriumwas strongly affected.

  15. Electroabsorption optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogen, Erik J.

    2017-11-21

    An electroabsorption modulator incorporates waveguiding regions along the length of the modulator that include quantum wells where at least two of the regions have quantum wells with different bandgaps. In one embodiment of the invention, the regions are arranged such that the quantum wells have bandgaps with decreasing bandgap energy along the length of the modulator from the modulator's input to its output. The bandgap energy of the quantum wells may be decreased in discrete steps or continuously. Advantageously, such an arrangement better distributes the optical absorption as well as the carrier density along the length of the modulator. Further advantageously, the modulator may handle increased optical power as compared with prior art modulators of similar dimensions, which allows for improved link gain when the optical modulator is used in an analog optical communication link.

  16. Electroabsorption optical modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skogen, Erik J.

    2017-11-21

    An electroabsorption modulator incorporates waveguiding regions along the length of the modulator that include quantum wells where at least two of the regions have quantum wells with different bandgaps. In one embodiment of the invention, the regions are arranged such that the quantum wells have bandgaps with decreasing bandgap energy along the length of the modulator from the modulator's input to its output. The bandgap energy of the quantum wells may be decreased in discrete steps or continuously. Advantageously, such an arrangement better distributes the optical absorption as well as the carrier density along the length of the modulator. Further advantageously, the modulator may handle increased optical power as compared with prior art modulators of similar dimensions, which allows for improved link gain when the optical modulator is used in an analog optical communication link.

  17. CDC 7600 module slice

    CERN Multimedia

    Each module contained 8 circuit cards for a total of about 300-500 uncovered transistors packaged with face plates so the Freon plates wouldn't touch the circuits. (cooling plates that surrounded each module).

  18. Exploration Augmentation Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Exploration Augmentation Module (EAM) project goal is to design and deliver a flight module that is to be deployed to Earth-Lunar Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO)....

  19. Reduced Multiplication Modules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for some ideal of . As defined for a commutative ring , an -module is said to be reduced if the intersection of prime submodules of is zero. The prime spectrum and minimal prime submodules of the reduced module are studied.

  20. Reduced multiplication modules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for some ideal of . As defined for a commutative ring , an -module is said to be reduced if the intersection of prime submodules of is zero. The prime spectrum and minimal prime submodules of the reduced module are studied.

  1. CDC 6600 Cordwood Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1964-01-01

    The CDC 6600 cordwood module containing 64 silicon transistors. The module was mounted between two plates that were cooled conductive by a refrigeration unit via the front panel. The construction of this module uses the cord method, so called because the resistors seem to be stacked like cord between the two circuit boards in order to obtain a high density. The 6600 model contained nearly 6,000 such modules.

  2. Antagonistic activity of autosimbionts А. viridans, B. subtilis and their probiotic association to conditionally microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepansky D.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research the data on examination of antagonist qualities of bioassotiantes A. viridans and strain B. subtilis 3 towards pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic microflora isolated from oropharynx and nasopharynx of children who were in contact with patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (MBT + are submitted. The expressed antagonist activity of autosimbionts A. viridans towards pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic microflora was shown. Common antagonist activity of A. viridans (k N 1 and B. subtilis 3 towards diverse strains of test-cultures is 1,5-2 times higher, than separate antagonist activity of A. viridans (k №1 and B. subtilis 3. Received research data showed the possibility of continuing work on development of probiotic associations, that contain representatives of normal microflora - bioassociants A. viridans and probiotic strains B. subtilis 3 with broadspectrum of antagonistic activity in relation to the various groups of bacterium.

  3. Pharmacophore modeling, atom based 3D-QSAR and Molecular docking approaches to screen C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 antagonists as microbicides for human immunodeficiency virus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Radhika; Piramanyagam, Shanmughavel

    2017-09-01

    The C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 receptor CXCR4 which acts as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus-1, expressed in the later stages of infection is considered as an attractive and new target for drug design. Microbicides acting as co-receptor blockers are highly significant as these drugs block HIV lifecycle at early stage itself. The urgent need for a safe and effective microbicide urges to explore new CXCR4 antagonists which could be developed as microbicides. The pharmacophore based 3D-QSAR models and docking models were developed using PHASE and GLIDE modules of Schrodinger software. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) studies and pharmacophore modelling was carried out on a dataset of 114 CXCR4 antagonists with the intention of exploring entry inhibitors with better therapeutic potential. A training set of 43 compounds was used to create 3D-QSAR models and they were validated using a test set of 28 compounds. CXCR4 antagonists with good inhibitory activity could be designed and structurally modified based upon the QSAR model developed with necessary pharmacophore features. The results revealed that the common pharmacophore hypothesis ADHPR.1 was used for 3D-QSAR model development and the most active compound, CXCR4 antagonist no.44 which is a imidazopyridine-tetrahydro-8-quinolinamine derivative interacted with the CXCR4 receptor residue ASP 97 by the formation of a hydrogen bond. Also, the docking studies were carried out for the dataset for analyzing the binding conformation of CXCR4 and 114 antagonists. The results obtained from the 3D-QSAR studies and docking simulation can be used for designing new and potent CXCR4 antagonists. The compound identified from this study can be taken up further for validation by in vitro / in vivo studies.

  4. Roles of dopamine receptors in mediating acute modulation of immunological responses in Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhong-Wen; Ke, Zhi-Han; Chang, Chin-Chyuan

    2016-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) was found to influence the immunological responses and resistance to pathogen infection in invertebrates. To clarify the possible modulation of DA through dopamine receptors (DAR) against acute environmental stress, the levels of DA, glucose and lactate in the haemolymph of Macrobrachium rosenbergii under hypo- and hyperthermal stresses were measured. The changes in immune parameters such as total haemocyte count (THC), differential haemocyte count (DHC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts (RBs), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and phagocytic activity (PA) were evaluated in prawns which received DAR antagonists (SCH23390, SCH, D1 antagonist; domperidone, DOM, D2 antagonist; chlorpromazine, CH, D1+2 antagonist) followed by hypo- (15 °C) and hyperthermal (34 °C) stresses. In addition, pharmacological analysis of the effect DA modulation was studied in haemocytes incubated with DA and DAR antagonists. The results revealed a significant increase in haemolymph DA accompanied with upregulated levels of glucose and lactate in prawns exposed to both hypo- and hyperthermal stresses in 2 h. In addition, a significant decrease in RBs per haemocyte was noted in prawns which received DAR antagonists when they exposed to hyperthermal stress for 30 min. In in vitro test, antagonism on RBs, SOD and GPx activity of haemocytes were further evidenced through D1, D1, D1+D2 DARs, respectively, in the meantime, no significant difference in PO activity and PA was observed among the treatment groups. These results suggest that the upregulation of DA, glucose and lactate in haemolymph might be the response to acute thermal stress for the demand of energy, and the DAR occupied by its antagonistic action impart no effect on immunological responses except RBs in vivo even though the modulation mediated through D1 DAR was further evidenced in RBs, SOD and GPx activities in vitro. It is therefore concluded that thermal

  5. Rescue Manual. Module 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The fifth of 10 modules contains information on hazardous materials. Key points, an introduction, and conclusion accompany substantive material in this module. In addition, the module contains a Department of Transportation guide chart on…

  6. Modulating lignin in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  7. QUAD TAG MODULE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiino, K.; Maruyama, K.

    1981-08-01

    Electronic circuits called QUAD TAG MODULE were developed and constructed, which were of exclusive use for signals from scintillation counter hodoscope of the photon tagging system. The circuit has functions of amplifiers, discriminators, and strobed coincidences in one NIM module. A description on functions and specifications of the module is given. (author)

  8. Endogenous angiotensin II modulates nNOS expression in renovascular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M.C. Pereira

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO influences renal blood flow mainly as a result of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. Nevertheless, it is unclear how nNOS expression is modulated by endogenous angiotensin II, an inhibitor of NO function. We tested the hypothesis that the angiotensin II AT1 receptor and oxidative stress mediated by NADPH oxidase contribute to the modulation of renal nNOS expression in two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C hypertensive rats. Experiments were performed on male Wistar rats (150 to 170 g body weight divided into 2K1C (N = 19 and sham-operated (N = 19 groups. nNOS expression in kidneys of 2K1C hypertensive rats (N = 9 was compared by Western blotting to that of 2K1C rats treated with low doses of the AT1 antagonist losartan (10 mg·kg-1·day-1; N = 5 or the superoxide scavenger tempol (0.2 mmol·kg-1·day-1; N = 5, which still remain hypertensive. After 28 days, nNOS expression was significantly increased by 1.7-fold in the clipped kidneys of 2K1C rats and by 3-fold in the non-clipped kidneys of 2K1C rats compared with sham rats, but was normalized by losartan. With tempol treatment, nNOS expression increased 2-fold in the clipped kidneys and 1.4-fold in the non-clipped kidneys compared with sham rats. The changes in nNOS expression were not followed by changes in the enzyme activity, as measured indirectly by the cGMP method. In conclusion, AT1 receptors and oxidative stress seem to be primary stimuli for increased nNOS expression, but this up-regulation does not result in higher enzyme activity.

  9. Effects of H[sub 1]-receptor antagonists on [sup 14]C-aminopyrine accumulated in histamine-stimulated rabbit gastric glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, G.; Romell, B.; Girma, K.; Seensalu, R. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Science, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    After stimulation of gastric acid production there is a considerable delay before the acid starts to appear in the gastric lumen. The present study was carried out on isolated gastric glands to test the hypothesis that there may be a mechanisms in the parietal cell that contributes to this delay by preventing emptying of the secretory canaliculi. Glands were incubated with [sup 14]C-aminopyrine and stimulated with histamine. After accumulation of [sup 14]C-aminopyrine, various concentration of H[sub 1]-receptor antagonists were added. Clemastine, promethazine, and hydroxyzine effectively and cetirizine and tripelennamine less effectively decreased the accumulated [sup 14]C-aminopyrine content in a dose-dependent manner without significantly reducing the oxygen consumption. The H[sub 1]-receptor antagonists influenced the [sup 14]C-aminopyrine content in another manner than H[sub 2]-receptor antagonists. No effects were obtained by atropine or lidocaine, indicating that the elimination of [sup 14]C-amionopyrine is not an inticholinergic effect or due to membrane effects as exerted by local anesthetics. Stimulation of glands by further addition of histamine did not significantly stimulate the uptake of [sup 14]C-aminopyrine in the glands, whereas stimulation with db-cAMP produced an increase that was most pronounced when low concentrations of hydroxyzine had been used. It is suggested that H[sub 1]-receptor antagonists do not inhibit stimulation of acid production in the secretory canaliculi. They may, however, interfere with a mechanism preventing acid from leaving the parietal cell. Such a mechanism may contribute to the delay in appearance of acid in the gastric lumen after stimulation of gastric acid production. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Muscarinic receptor modulation of acetylcholine release from rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, M G; Pepeu, G

    1995-04-28

    An attempt to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine (ACh) release from cortical and hippocampal slices was made by means of several muscarinic antagonists. Cortical and hippocampal slices prepared from adult rats were superfused with Krebs solution containing physostigmine; ACh content of the superfusate at rest and after electrical stimulation (1 Hz) was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. The antagonists were added to the Krebs at the concentration of 1 microM. ACh release at rest was enhanced only in the cortex by (+/-)-5,11-dihydro-11-([(2-[2-[(dipropylamino)methyl]-1- piperidinyl)ethyl)amino]carbonyl)-6H-pyrido[2,3-b](1,4)- benzodiazepine-6-one (AFDX384), an M2/M4 selective antagonist. The evoked ACh release from the cerebral cortex was significantly increased by AFDX384, methoctramine, pirenzepine, M2/M4, M2 and M1 selective antagonists, respectively, and scopolamine. This finding suggests that M1, M2 and M4 presynaptic receptor subtypes could regulate evoked ACh release in the cortex. In hippocampal slices, the evoked ACh release was enhanced by AFDX384, pirenzepine and scopolamine but not by methoctramine. In this region ACh release seems therefore regulated only by M1 and M4 receptor subtypes. The M3 antagonist (+/-)-p-fluorohexahydro-sila-difenidol hydrochloride did not affect ACh release.

  11. High affinity recognition of serotonin transporter antagonists defined by species-scanning mutagenesis. An aromatic residue in transmembrane domain I dictates species-selective recognition of citalopram and mazindol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, E L; Perlman, M A; Adkins, E M; Houlihan, W J; Pristupa, Z B; Niznik, H B; Blakely, R D

    1998-07-31

    Human and Drosophila melanogaster serotonin (5-HT) transporters (SERTs) exhibit similar 5-HT transport kinetics and can be distinguished pharmacologically by many, but not all, biogenic amine transporter antagonists. By using human and Drosophila SERT chimeras, major determinants of potencies of two transporter antagonists, mazindol and citalopram, were tracked to the amino-terminal domains encompassing transmembrane domains I and II. Species-scanning mutagenesis, whereby amino acid substitutions are made switching residues from one species to another, was employed on the eight amino acids that differ between human and Drosophila SERTs in this region, and antagonist potencies were reassessed in 5-HT uptake assays. A single mutation in transmembrane domain I of human SERT, Y95F, shifted both citalopram and mazindol to Drosophila SERT-like potencies. Strikingly, these potency changes were in opposite directions suggesting Tyr95 contributes both positive and negative determinants of antagonist potency. To gain insight into how the Y95F mutant might influence mazindol potency, we determined how structural variants of mazindol responded to the mutation. Our studies demonstrate the importance of the hydroxyl group on the heterocyclic nucleus of mazindol for maintaining species-selective recognition of mazindol and suggest that transmembrane domain I participates in the formation of antagonist-binding sites for amine transporters.

  12. Effects of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2Aand 5-HT2Creceptor agonists and antagonists on responding for a conditioned reinforcer and its enhancement by methylphenidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Paul J; Zeeb, Fiona D; Browne, Caleb J; Higgins, Guy A; Soko, Ashlie D

    2017-03-01

    These experiments examined the effects of selective 5-HT 1A , 5-HT 2A and 5-HT 2C receptor ligands on responding for a conditioned reinforcer (CRf). Effects of these ligands were measured under basal conditions and following elevated dopamine (DA) activity produced by the DA reuptake inhibitor methylphenidate. Water-restricted rats learned to associate a conditioned stimulus (CS) with water in operant chambers. Subsequently, two response levers were made available; responding on one lever delivered the CS (now a CRf), while responding on the second lever had no consequences. The effects of agonist and antagonists of 5-HT 1A (8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) and N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635)), 5-HT 2A (DOI and M100907) and 5-HT 2C (Ro60-0175 and SB242084) receptors on responding were examined alone, as well as in the presence of methylphenidate. Responding for a CRf was reduced by the agonists 8-OH-DPAT, DOI and Ro60-0175. 8-OH-DPAT also reduced responding for water and seemed to impair responding in a non-specific fashion. None of the receptor antagonists affected responding. Methylphenidate dose-dependently enhanced responding for a CRf, and this was attenuated by DOI and Ro60-0175. Conversely, the 5-HT 2C receptor antagonist SB242084 potentiated the effect of methylphenidate. No evidence was found for a behaviourally selective effect of 5-HT 1A receptor ligands on responding for a CRf. Activation of 5-HT 2A receptors selectively inhibits responding for a CRf. 5-HT 2C receptor ligands exerted bidirectional modulation of responding for a CRf, especially when DA activity was increased. This indicates that 5-HT 2C receptor activity is an important modulator of DA-dependent reward-related behaviours.

  13. mGluR5-antagonist mediated reversal of elevated stereotyped, repetitive behaviors in the VPA model of autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mili V Mehta

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are highly disabling developmental disorders with a population prevalence of 1-3%. Despite a strong genetic etiology, there are no current therapeutic options that target the core symptoms of ASD. Emerging evidence suggests that dysfunction of glutamatergic signaling, in particular through metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 receptors, may contribute to phenotypic deficits and may be appropriate targets for pharmacologic intervention. This study assessed the therapeutic potential of 2-methyl-6-phenylethyl-pyrididine (MPEP, an mGluR5-receptor antagonist, on repetitive and anxiety-like behaviors in the valproic acid (VPA mouse model of autism. Mice were exposed prenatally on day E13 to VPA and assessed for repetitive self-grooming and marble burying behaviors as adults. Anxiety-like behavior and locomotor activity were measured in an open-field. VPA-exposed mice displayed increased repetitive and anxiety-like behaviors, consistent with previously published results. Across both marble burying and self-grooming assays, MPEP significantly reduced repetitive behaviors in VPA-treated mice, but had no effect on locomotor activity. These results are consistent with emerging preclinical literature that mGluR5-antagonists may have therapeutic efficacy for core symptoms of autism.

  14. Effects of histamine and its antagonists on murine T-cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu XF

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Xiufen Hu,1,* Mohammad Ishraq Zafar,2,* Feng Gao2 1Department of Paediatrics, Tongji Hospital, 2Department of Endocrinology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We determined the effects of histamine and its antagonists on the surface marker expression of dendritic cells (DCs and the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, histamine, and histamine receptor antagonists on DCs and T-cells. The bone marrow was extracted from the femurs and tibiae of 6- to 8-week-old female Balb/c mice and cultured in medium containing penicillin, streptomycin, L-glutamine, fetal calf serum, or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF alone or with interleukin (IL-4. The cells received three different doses of LPS and histamine, plus three different doses of descarboethoxyloratadine (DCL. We assayed the supernatant for various cytokines. The spleen cells of DO11.10 mice were examined by flow cytometry, which included labeling and sorting CD4+ T-cells, as well as coculture of DCs and T-cells with ovalbumin (OVA323–339 peptide. Histamine or histamine plus DCL did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD11c, CD11b, CD86, and CD80. However, GM-CSF increased the expression of all markers except CD80. Histamine increased interferon-γ production in GM-CSF + IL-4-cultured cells; it also enhanced IL-10 production, but suppressed IL-12 production in LPS-stimulated DCs with no DCL. Cimetidine inhibited IL-10 production and restored IL-12 secretion in LPS-treated DCs. LPS increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 levels. GM-CSF + IL-4-generated DCs had a stronger stimulatory effect on DO11.10 T-cell proliferation than GM-CSF-generated DCs. Inducible costimulator ligand expression was higher in GM-CSF + IL-4- than in GM-CSF-generated DC groups after 2 days of coculture, but decreased 4 days

  15. P2Y12 receptor antagonist, clopidogrel, does not contribute to risk of osteoporotic fractures in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas R.; Schwarz, Peter; Iversen, Helle K.

    2017-01-01

    . Clopidogrel use was not associated with increased fracture risk in subjects with ischaemic stroke or TIA. In contrast, after adjusting for multiple confounders clopidogrel treatment was associated with a 10-35% reduced risk of fracture. Conclusion: Patients with stroke have increased risk of osteoporotic...

  16. Divisible ℤ-modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize the definition of divisible ℤ-module and its properties in the Mizar system [3]. We formally prove that any non-trivial divisible ℤ-modules are not finitely-generated.We introduce a divisible ℤ-module, equivalent to a vector space of a torsion-free ℤ-module with a coefficient ring ℚ. ℤ-modules are important for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lovász base reduction algorithm [15], cryptographic systems with lattices [16] and coding theory [8].

  17. Early Determination of the Periodontal Domain by the Wnt-Antagonist Frzb/Sfrp3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimios A. Mitsiadis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenesis results from the continuous and reciprocal interaction between cells of the oral epithelium and cranial neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in mediating these interactions from the earliest stages of tooth development. Here we analyze by in situ hybridization the expression patterns of the extracellular Wnt antagonist Frzb/Sfrp3. Although Frzb is expressed in dental mesenchymal cells from the earliest stages of odontogenesis, its expression is absent from a tiny population of mesenchymal cells immediately adjacent to the invaginating dental epithelium. Cell proliferation studies using BrdU showed that the Frzb expressing and Frzb non-expressing cell populations display different proliferative behavior during the initial stages of odontogenesis. DiI-mediated cell-fate tracing studies demonstrated that the Frzb expressing cells contribute to the formation of the dental follicle, the future periodontium. In contrast, the Frzb non-expressing cells give rise to the dental pulp. The present results indicate that Frzb is discriminating the presumptive periodontal territory from the rest of the dental mesenchyme from the very beginning of odontogenesis, where it might act as a barrier for the diffusion of Wnt molecules, thus regulating the activation of Wnt-dependent transcription within dental tissues.

  18. Comparative Genome Analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 Reveals Its High Antagonistic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengpeng; Kwok, Amy H. Y.; Jiang, Jingwei; Ran, Tingting; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu; Leung, Frederick C.

    2015-01-01

    S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens. PMID:25856195

  19. Comparative genome analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 reveals its high antagonistic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengpeng; Kwok, Amy H Y; Jiang, Jingwei; Ran, Tingting; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu; Leung, Frederick C

    2015-01-01

    S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens.

  20. Effects of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil in hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansky, G; Meier, P J; Riederer, E; Walser, H; Ziegler, W H; Schmid, M

    1989-09-01

    If increased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neurotransmission contributes to the mediation of hepatic encephalopathy, it may be possible to induce ameliorations of the syndrome by pharmacologically antagonizing a component of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex. To test this possibility we administered the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil by intravenous injection to 14 patients with hepatic encephalopathy complicating cirrhosis. Flumazenil administration induced variable and transient, but distinct, improvements of the mental status in 71% of the patients. The degree of encephalopathy improved from stage IV to stage II in 4 patients and from stage IV to stage III in 2 patients. The mental status of all patients with less advanced encephalopathy (3 with stage III, 1 with stage II) also improved, but these responses were clinically less impressive. The arousal effect occurred within minutes after the injection and lasted for 1 to 2 h. Furthermore, it was associated with a significant increase of the mean electroencephalographic frequency from 4.2 to 5.2 cycle/s. Of the 8 patients who were ultimately discharged from the hospital, 7 had responded to flumazenil. No patient who died within 48 h of receiving flumazenil had shown any arousal effect. These findings strongly favor a prominent pathogenetic role of increased GABAergic tone in hepatic encephalopathy in humans and suggest that a positive response to flumazenil might be of prognostic value in predicting short-term survival in encephalopathic patients with liver disease.

  1. Comparative genome analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 reveals its high antagonistic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Li

    Full Text Available S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens.

  2. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadek B

    2016-11-01

    , in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-ylpropoxyphenylmethanol, and its (S-enantiomer (4 significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R-enantiomer (3 in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and reversed when rats were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist R-(α-methyl-histamine. Comparisons of the observed antagonistic in vitro affinities among the ligands 1–6 revealed profound stereoselectivity at human H3Rs with varying preferences for this receptor subtype. Moreover, the in vivo anticonvulsant effects observed in this study for ligands 1–6 showed stereoselectivity in different convulsion models in male adult rats. Keywords: histamine, H3 receptor, isomeric antagonists, anticonvulsant activity, stereo­selectivity

  3. Effect of gonadal hormones on hypophagic property of opioid antagonist Naloxone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargate Ashwini R, Kulkarni Dushant V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that hormonal fluctuations that occur over the estrous cycle in rats affect food intake. It is possible that estrogen affects food intake via Opioid system and other brain areas which are involved in regulation of food intake. Therefore it may affect the sensitivity of female rats to hypophagic effect of Opioid antagonist Naloxone. Testosterone in male rats also changes food intake. However, little is known about hoe these Gonadal hormones interact with Opioid receptors to modulate food intake. Objective: The aim of the study was to find out how Gonadal hormones affect hypophagic property of Naloxone. Methods: Basal food intake of 40 healthy adult females and 20 healthy adult male rats was recorded. Then they were injected intraperitoneally with Naloxone after fasting for 24 hrs. In female rats food intake was measured during different phases of the estrous cycle. All the rats were then subjected to gonadectomy. The food intake was measured after gonadectomy. The effect of Naloxone was also measured in deprivation paradigm after gonadectomy. Results: Female rats showed decreased food intake during proestrous and estrous phases. In female rats there was no hypophagia after Naloxone injection during these phases. Male rats showed hypophagia on Naloxone injection. Male rats showed increased food intake after gonadectomy. In female rats the increase in food intake was not significant when gonadectomy was done during metestrous and diestrous. However, Naloxone could induce hypophagia in all female rats after gonadectomy. Conclusion: Estrogen decreases food intake, it decreases sensitivity of female rats to hypophasic effects of Naloxone. Testosterone decreases food intake. Testosterone does not interfere with hypophagic effect of Naloxone.

  4. Locus Coeruleus and Tuberomammillary Nuclei Ablations Attenuate Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist-Mediated REM Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Palmerston, Jeremiah B; Thomas, Alexia M; Morairty, Stephen R; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Hypocretin 1 and 2 (Hcrts; also known as orexin A and B), excitatory neuropeptides synthesized in cells located in the tuberal hypothalamus, play a central role in the control of arousal. Hcrt inputs to the locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC NE) system and the posterior hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary nuclei (TMN HA) are important efferent pathways for Hcrt-induced wakefulness. The LC expresses Hcrt receptor 1 (HcrtR1), whereas HcrtR2 is found in the TMN. Although the dual Hcrt/orexin receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases wakefulness and increases NREM and REM sleep time, the neural circuitry that mediates these effects is currently unknown. To test the hypothesis that ALM induces sleep by selectively disfacilitating subcortical wake-promoting populations, we ablated LC NE neurons (LCx) or TMN HA neurons (TMNx) in rats using cell-type-specific saporin conjugates and evaluated sleep/wake following treatment with ALM and the GABAA receptor modulator zolpidem (ZOL). Both LCx and TMNx attenuated the promotion of REM sleep by ALM without affecting ALM-mediated increases in NREM sleep. Thus, eliminating either HcrtR1 signaling in the LC or HcrtR2 signaling in the TMN yields similar effects on ALM-induced REM sleep without affecting NREM sleep time. In contrast, neither lesion altered ZOL efficacy on any measure of sleep-wake regulation. These results contrast with those of a previous study in which ablation of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons attenuated ALM-induced increases in NREM sleep time without affecting REM sleep, indicating that Hcrt neurotransmission influences distinct aspects of NREM and REM sleep at different locations in the sleep-wake regulatory network.

  5. Artist Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-Yang Lien

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a full-color photovoltaic (PV module, called the artist PV module, is developed by laser processes. A full-color image source is printed on the back of a protective glass using an inkjet printer, and a brightened grayscale mask is used to precisely define regions on the module where colors need to be revealed. Artist PV modules with 1.1 × 1.4 m2 area have high a retaining power output of 139 W and an aesthetic appearance making them more competitive than other building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV products. Furthermore, the installation of artist PV modules as curtain walls without metal frames is also demonstrated. This type of installation offers an aesthetic advantage by introducing supporting fittings, originating from the field of glass technology. Hence, this paper is expected to elevate BIPV modules to an art form and generate research interests in developing more functional PV modules.

  6. The NK1 Receptor Antagonist L822429 Reduces Heroin Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects. PMID:23303056

  7. Distinctive Modulation of Dopamine Release in the Nucleus Accumbens Shell Mediated by Dopamine and Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Hoon; Adrover, Martin F; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2017-11-15

    Nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell shows unique dopamine (DA) signals in vivo and plays a unique role in DA-dependent behaviors such as reward-motivated learning and the response to drugs of abuse. A disynaptic mechanism for DA release was reported and shown to require synchronized firing of cholinergic interneurons (CINs) and activation of nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) in DA neuron (DAN) axons. The properties of this disynaptic mechanism of DA transmission are not well understood in the NAc shell. In this study, in vitro fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to examine the modulation of DA transmission evoked by CINs firing in the shell of mice and compared with other striatal regions. We found that DA signals in the shell displayed significant degree of summation in response to train stimulation of CINs, contrary to core and dorsal striatum. The summation was amplified by a D2-like receptor antagonist and experiments with mice with targeted deletion of D2 receptors to DANs or CINs revealed that D2 receptors in CINs mediate a fast inhibition observed within 100 ms of the first pulse, whereas D2 autoreceptors in DAN terminals are engaged in a slower inhibition that peaks at ∼500 ms. ACh also contributes to the use-dependent inhibition of DA release through muscarinic receptors only in the shell, where higher activity of acetylcholinesterase minimizes nAChR desensitization and promotes summation. These findings show that DA signals are modulated differentially by endogenous DA and ACh in the shell, which may underlie the unique features of shell DA signals in vivo SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The present study reports that dopamine (DA) release evoked by activation of cholinergic interneurons displays a high degree of summation in the shell and shows unique modulation by endogenous DA and acetylcholine. Desensitization of nicotinic receptors, which is a prevailing mechanism for use-dependent inhibition in the nucleus accumbens core and dorsal striatum, is

  8. Epigenetic modulators of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodero, Sandra; Delgado-Álvarez, Elías; Díaz-Naya, Lucía; Martín Nieto, Alicia; Menéndez Torre, Edelmiro

    2017-01-01

    There are some well known factors involved in the etiology of thyroid cancer, including iodine deficiency, radiation exposure at early ages, or some genetic changes. However, epigenetic modulators that may contribute to development of these tumors and be helpful to for both their diagnosis and treatment have recently been discovered. The currently known changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNAs in each type of thyroid carcinoma are reviewed here. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Social Contributions in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Gyorgy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Social contributions have an important impact on payroll policy. Also, social contributions represent a significant budgetary revenue item which can be viewed at the edge between taxation and insurance. Social contributions in Romania experienced many changes which ended in 2008. Nowadays, they are within a long transaction period towards partial externalization of the insurance activity to privately managed funds. The aim of this paper is to analyse the homogeneity of Romanian social security public scheme using annual data extracted from 2002-2009.The main findings reveal that social contributions reached the pinnacle of diversification, being too many, some of them with a small contribution rates; fiscal reforms which reduced contribution rates advantaged employers, and state will be interested to externalize this activity as far private sector will be able to assume this responsibility and the budgetary effects are acceptable for the public finance.

  10. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modulation spectroscopy; saturation absorption spectroscopy; Zeeman splitting. PACS Nos 42.62.Fi; 32.60.+i; 33.55. ... easily circumvent the usual problem of laser intensity fluctuation and offer en suite phase-sensitive detection of the ..... Faraday effect can contribute to the signal profile. It has been established that optical.

  11. FGFR antagonist induces protective autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wang, Peiqi [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University (China); Jing, Qian; Yue, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Cheng, Zhong [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Li, Jingyi, E-mail: li--jingyi@hotmail.com [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Song, Haixing [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Li, Guoyu, E-mail: liguoyulisa@163.com [School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China); Liu, Rui, E-mail: liurui_scu@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University (China); Wang, Jinhui [School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Breast cancer, representing approximately 30% of all gynecological cancer cases diagnosed yearly, is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for women. Amplification of FGFR1 is frequently observed in breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Though FGFRs have long been considered as anti-cancer drug targets, and a cluster of FGFR antagonists are currently under clinical trials, the precise cellular responses under the treatment of FGFR antagonists remains unclear. Here, we show that PD166866, an FGFR1-selective inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and triggers anoikis in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines. Notably, we demonstrate that PD166866 induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines, while blockage of autophagy by Atg5 knockdown further enhances the anti-proliferative activities of PD166866. Moreover, mechanistic study reveals that PD166866 induces autophagy through repressing Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of FGFR antagonists, and may further assist the FGFRs-based drug discovery. -- Highlights: •FGFR1 antagonist inhibits cell viability in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist-induced autophagy is protective. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy by inhibiting Akt/mTOR pathway.

  12. Association of calcium antagonist use with lower hemoglobin levels in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikrikcioglu, M A; Ozdemir, A A; Sekin, Y; Yalcin, B; Altay, M; Gundogdu, A; Erkal, S N; Kazancioglu, R; Erkoc, R

    2015-09-01

    Objective of the present study was to investigate whether calcium antagonist use is associated with lower hemoglobin levels and/or higher erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) requirement in hemodialysis patients. A total of 130 adult hemodialysis patients were classified into two groups based on calcium antagonist usage for a period of at least 3 months as calcium antagonist users and calcium antagonist non-users. The two groups were compared cross-sectionally in a retrospective manner in terms of demographics, chronic kidney disease aetiologies, Charlson's Comorbidty Index, blood pressure, type of dialysis access, interdialytic body weight gain, cardiothoracic index, complete blood count, biochemistry, regular medication use and consumption of ESA. All independent variables that were different between the groups were subjected to logistic regression analysis. Linear regression analysis with dependent variable of hemoglobin value was also performed ESA consumption and blood pressure were higher, diabetic nephropathy, doxazosin and ACE inhibitor use were more frequent, and hemoglobin was lower in the calcium antagonist users. After logistic regression analysis, diabetic nephropathy, doxazosin use, ACE inhibitor use and lower hemoglobin were associated with calcium antagonist use. After lineer regression analysis, Age, BMI, gender, predialysis creatinine value, dialysis duration, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, doxazosin use, diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy were not related with hemoglobin value. But, higher amount of ESA consumption, ACE inhibitor use and calcium antagonist use were significantly associated with lower hemoglobin value. CA use was associated with lower hemoglobin levels in our hemodialysis patient population.

  13. Exploitation of microbial antagonists for the control of postharvest diseases of fruits: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukare, Ajinath Shridhar; Paul, Sangeeta; Nambi, V Eyarkai; Gupta, Ram Kishore; Singh, Rajbir; Sharma, Kalyani; Vishwakarma, Rajesh Kumar

    2018-01-16

    Fungal diseases result in significant losses of fruits and vegetables during handling, transportation and storage. At present, post-production fungal spoilage is predominantly controlled by using synthetic fungicides. Under the global climate change scenario and with the need for sustainable agriculture, biological control methods of fungal diseases, using antagonistic microorganisms, are emerging as ecofriendly alternatives to the use of fungicides. The potential of microbial antagonists, isolated from a diversity of natural habitats, for postharvest disease suppression has been investigated. Postharvest biocontrol systems involve tripartite interaction between microbial antagonists, the pathogen and the host, affected by environmental conditions. Several modes for fungistatic activities of microbial antagonists have been suggested, including competition for nutrients and space, mycoparasitism, secretion of antifungal antibiotics and volatile metabolites and induction of host resistance. Postharvest application of microbial antagonists is more successful for efficient disease control in comparison to pre-harvest application. Attempts have also been made to improve the overall efficacy of antagonists by combining them with different physical and chemical substances and methods. Globally, many microbe-based biocontrol products have been developed and registered for commercial use. The present review provides a brief overview on the use of microbial antagonists as postharvest biocontrol agents and summarises information on their isolation, mechanisms of action, application methods, efficacy enhancement, product formulation and commercialisation.

  14. FGFR antagonist induces protective autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wang, Peiqi; Jing, Qian; Yue, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Jingyi; Song, Haixing; Li, Guoyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, representing approximately 30% of all gynecological cancer cases diagnosed yearly, is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for women. Amplification of FGFR1 is frequently observed in breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Though FGFRs have long been considered as anti-cancer drug targets, and a cluster of FGFR antagonists are currently under clinical trials, the precise cellular responses under the treatment of FGFR antagonists remains unclear. Here, we show that PD166866, an FGFR1-selective inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and triggers anoikis in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines. Notably, we demonstrate that PD166866 induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines, while blockage of autophagy by Atg5 knockdown further enhances the anti-proliferative activities of PD166866. Moreover, mechanistic study reveals that PD166866 induces autophagy through repressing Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of FGFR antagonists, and may further assist the FGFRs-based drug discovery. -- Highlights: •FGFR1 antagonist inhibits cell viability in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist-induced autophagy is protective. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy by inhibiting Akt/mTOR pathway.

  15. The Role of α1-Adrenoceptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Prostate and Other Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Batty

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluates the role of α-adrenoceptor antagonists as a potential treatment of prostate cancer (PCa. Cochrane, Google Scholar and Pubmed were accessed to retrieve sixty-two articles for analysis. In vitro studies demonstrate that doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin (quinazoline α-antagonists induce apoptosis, decrease cell growth, and proliferation in PC-3, LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines. Similarly, the piperazine based naftopidil induced cell cycle arrest and death in LNCaP-E9 cell lines. In contrast, sulphonamide based tamsulosin did not exhibit these effects. In vivo data was consistent with in vitro findings as the quinazoline based α-antagonists prevented angiogenesis and decreased tumour mass in mice models of PCa. Mechanistically the cytotoxic and antitumor effects of the α-antagonists appear largely independent of α 1-blockade. The proposed targets include: VEGF, EGFR, HER2/Neu, caspase 8/3, topoisomerase 1 and other mitochondrial apoptotic inducing factors. These cytotoxic effects could not be evaluated in human studies as prospective trial data is lacking. However, retrospective studies show a decreased incidence of PCa in males exposed to α-antagonists. As human data evaluating the use of α-antagonists as treatments are lacking; well designed, prospective clinical trials are needed to conclusively demonstrate the anticancer properties of quinazoline based α-antagonists in PCa and other cancers.

  16. Evaluation of a Computer Application for Retrospective Detection of Vitamin K Antagonist Treatment Imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferret, Laurie; Luyckx, Michel; Ficheur, Grégoire; Chazard, Emmanuel; Beuscart, Régis

    2016-01-20

    Management of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) is difficult, and overdoses can have dramatic hemorrhagic consequences. The adverse drug event (ADE) scorecards is a tool intended for the detection and description of adverse drug reaction/ADE developed during a European computerized medical data processing project. It is used in a quality assurance process. Our objective was to evaluate the performance of the ADE scorecards in the detection of the contributing factors for VKA overdoses, among the cases where a VKA overdose is observed. Twenty-eight rules allow the detection of VKA treatment overdose related to drug or a clinical situation. They were applied on 14,748 electronic medical records from a community hospital. Among 582 records including a VKA prescription, 59 cases of VKA overdoses (international normalized ratio ≥ 5) during the hospital stay have been identified. The ADE scorecards detected 49 of them. We evaluated the positive predictive value and sensitivity of these rules, by an expert review of the cases. The expert review confirmed the contribution of a detected risk factor to the VKA overdose in 11 cases. Therefore, the precision of the rules is 22.4%. The sensitivity is 84.6%. The risk factors were mainly infection and amiodarone introduction. The 4 cases of clinical injury related to a drug were properly designated by the rules. Our study shows the great potential of the ADE scorecards for detecting cofactors of VKA overdoses and gives an argument to include complex rules in the knowledge bases used for the detection and identification of ADEs in large medical databases.

  17. Image analysis of PV module electroluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, T.; Ramirez, C.; Potter, B. G.; Simmons-Potter, K.

    2017-08-01

    Electroluminescence imaging can be used as a non-invasive method to spatially assess performance degradation in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Cells, or regions of cells, that do not produce an infra-red luminescence signal under electrical excitation indicate potential damage in the module. In this study, an Andor iKon-M camera and an image acquisition tool provided by Andor have been utilized to obtain electroluminescent images of a full-sized multicrystalline PV module at regular intervals throughout an accelerated lifecycle test (ALC) performed in a large-scale environmental degradation chamber. Computer aided digital image analysis methods were then used to automate degradation assessment in the modules. Initial preprocessing of the images was designed to remove both background noise and barrel distortion in the image data. Image areas were then mapped so that changes in luminescent intensity across both individual cells and the full module could be identified. Two primary techniques for image analysis were subsequently investigated. In the first case, pixel intensity distributions were evaluated over each individual PV cell and changes to the intensities of the cells over the course of an ALC test were evaluated. In the second approach, intensity line scans of each of the cells in a PV module were performed and variations in line scan data were identified during the module ALC test. In this report, both the image acquisition and preprocessing technique and the contribution of each image analysis approach to an assessment of degradation behavior will be discussed.

  18. Degradation analysis of thin film photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radue, C., E-mail: chantelle.radue@nmmu.ac.z [Department of Physics, PO Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Dyk, E.E. van [Department of Physics, PO Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2009-12-01

    Five thin film photovoltaic modules were deployed outdoors under open circuit conditions after a thorough indoor evaluation. Two technology types were investigated: amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Two 14 W a-Si:H modules, labelled Si-1 and Si-2, were investigated. Both exhibited degradation, initially due to the well-known light-induced degradation described by Staebler and Wronski [Applied Physics Letters 31 (4) (1977) 292], and thereafter due to other degradation modes such as cell degradation. The various degradation modes contributing to the degradation of the a-Si:H modules will be discussed. The initial maximum power output (P{sub MAX}) of Si-1 was 9.92 W, with the initial light-induced degradation for Si-1 approx30% and a total degradation of approx42%. For Si-2 the initial P{sub MAX} was 7.93 W, with initial light-induced degradation of approx10% and a total degradation of approx17%. Three CIGS modules were investigated: two 20 W modules labelled CIGS-1 and CIGS-2, and a 40 W module labelled CIGS-3. CIGS-2 exhibited stable performance while CIGS-1 and CIGS-3 exhibited degradation. CIGS is known to be stable over long periods of time, and thus the possible reasons for the degradation of the two modules are discussed.

  19. Degradation analysis of thin film photovoltaic modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radue, C.; Dyk, E.E. van

    2009-01-01

    Five thin film photovoltaic modules were deployed outdoors under open circuit conditions after a thorough indoor evaluation. Two technology types were investigated: amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Two 14 W a-Si:H modules, labelled Si-1 and Si-2, were investigated. Both exhibited degradation, initially due to the well-known light-induced degradation described by Staebler and Wronski [Applied Physics Letters 31 (4) (1977) 292], and thereafter due to other degradation modes such as cell degradation. The various degradation modes contributing to the degradation of the a-Si:H modules will be discussed. The initial maximum power output (P MAX ) of Si-1 was 9.92 W, with the initial light-induced degradation for Si-1 ∼30% and a total degradation of ∼42%. For Si-2 the initial P MAX was 7.93 W, with initial light-induced degradation of ∼10% and a total degradation of ∼17%. Three CIGS modules were investigated: two 20 W modules labelled CIGS-1 and CIGS-2, and a 40 W module labelled CIGS-3. CIGS-2 exhibited stable performance while CIGS-1 and CIGS-3 exhibited degradation. CIGS is known to be stable over long periods of time, and thus the possible reasons for the degradation of the two modules are discussed.

  20. How I treat poisoning with vitamin K antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Sol; Furie, Bruce

    2015-01-15

    Severe deficiency of vitamin K-dependent proteins in patients not maintained on vitamin K antagonists is most commonly associated with poisoning by or surreptitious ingestion of warfarin, warfarin-like anticoagulants, or potent rodenticides ("superwarfarins"), such as brodifacoum. Serious bleeding manifestations are common. Superwarfarins are 2 orders of magnitude more potent than warfarin and have a half-life measured in weeks. These rodenticides are readily available household environmental hazards and are sometimes consumed accidentally or as manifestations of psychiatric disease. Immediate diagnosis and proper therapy is critically important to minimize morbidity and mortality because this condition, affecting thousands of patients annually, is reversible. Treatment with large doses of oral vitamin K1, often over months to years, to maintain a near-normal prothrombin time can reverse the coagulopathy associated with superwarfarins. Although these patients initially present to various medical specialties, the hematologist is often consulted to offer the definitive diagnosis and proper therapy. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Blood flow distribution with adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.H.; Davis, D.L.; Sutton, E.T.

    1989-03-01

    Superficial fibular nerve stimulation (SFNS) causes increased pre- and post-capillary resistances as well as increased capillary permeability in the dog hind paw. These responses indicate possible adrenergic and histaminergic interactions. The distribution of blood flow between capillaries and arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) may depend on the relative effects of these neural inputs. Right hind paws of anesthetized heparinized dogs were vascularly and neurally isolated and perfused with controlled pressure. Blood flow distribution was calculated from the venous recovery of 85Sr-labeled microspheres (15 microns). The mean transit times of 131I-albumin and 85Sr-labeled microspheres were calculated. The effects of adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists with and without SFNS were determined. Phentolamine blocked the entire response to SFNS. Prazosin attenuated increases in total and AVA resistance. Yohimbine prevented increased total resistance, attenuated the AVA resistance increase, and revealed a decrease in capillary circuit resistance. Pyrilamine attenuated total resistance increase while SFNS increased capillary and AVA resistances. Metiamide had no effect on blood flow distribution with SFNS. The increase in AVA resistance with SFNS apparently resulted from a combination of alpha 1 and alpha 2 receptor stimulation but not histaminergic effects.

  2. Blood flow distribution with adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.H.; Davis, D.L.; Sutton, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Superficial fibular nerve stimulation (SFNS) causes increased pre- and post-capillary resistances as well as increased capillary permeability in the dog hind paw. These responses indicate possible adrenergic and histaminergic interactions. The distribution of blood flow between capillaries and arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) may depend on the relative effects of these neural inputs. Right hind paws of anesthetized heparinized dogs were vascularly and neurally isolated and perfused with controlled pressure. Blood flow distribution was calculated from the venous recovery of 85Sr-labeled microspheres (15 microns). The mean transit times of 131I-albumin and 85Sr-labeled microspheres were calculated. The effects of adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists with and without SFNS were determined. Phentolamine blocked the entire response to SFNS. Prazosin attenuated increases in total and AVA resistance. Yohimbine prevented increased total resistance, attenuated the AVA resistance increase, and revealed a decrease in capillary circuit resistance. Pyrilamine attenuated total resistance increase while SFNS increased capillary and AVA resistances. Metiamide had no effect on blood flow distribution with SFNS. The increase in AVA resistance with SFNS apparently resulted from a combination of alpha 1 and alpha 2 receptor stimulation but not histaminergic effects

  3. Effect of platelet activating factor antagonist treatment on gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Barbero

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess whether PAF could be involved in the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity, we have studied the effect of PAF antagonist BN-52021 on renal function in rats after gentamicin (GENTA treatment. Experiments were completed in 21 Wistar rats divided into three groups: group GENTA was injected with gentamicin 100 mg kg−1 body wt/day s.c. for 6 days. Group GENTA + BN received gentamicin and BN-52021 i.p. 5 mg kg−1 body wt/day. A third group served as control. Rats were placed in meta-bolic cages and plasma creatinine and creatinine clearance were measured daily. GENTA group showed a progressive increase in plasma creatinine, a drop in creatinine clearance and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and alkaline phosphatase. GENTA + BN group showed a lesser change in plasma creatinine and a creatinine clearance, but no difference with GENTA group in urinary excretion of NAG and AP were observed. Histological examination revealed a massive cortical tubular necrosis in rats treated with gentamicin, whereas in BN-52021 injected animals tubular damage was markedly attenuated. The present results suggest a role for PAF in the gentamicininduced nephro-toxicity.

  4. Discovery and Characterization of an Endogenous CXCR4 Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onofrio Zirafi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling controls multiple physiological processes and its dysregulation is associated with cancers and inflammatory diseases. To discover as-yet-unknown endogenous ligands of CXCR4, we screened a blood-derived peptide library for inhibitors of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains. This approach identified a 16 amino acid fragment of serum albumin as an effective and highly specific CXCR4 antagonist. The endogenous peptide, termed EPI-X4, is evolutionarily conserved and generated from the highly abundant albumin precursor by pH-regulated proteases. EPI-X4 forms an unusual lasso-like structure and antagonizes CXCL12-induced tumor cell migration, mobilizes stem cells, and suppresses inflammatory responses in mice. Furthermore, the peptide is abundant in the urine of patients with inflammatory kidney diseases and may serve as a biomarker. Our results identify EPI-X4 as a key regulator of CXCR4 signaling and introduce proteolysis of an abundant precursor protein as an alternative concept for chemokine receptor regulation.

  5. Chitinolytic Enterobacter agglomerans Antagonistic to Fungal Plant Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, L; Ismailov, Z; Haran, S; Chet, I

    1995-05-01

    Three Enterobacter agglomerans strains which produce and excrete proteins with chitinolytic activity were found while screening soil-borne bacteria antagonistic to fungal plant pathogens. The chitinolytic activity was induced when the strains were grown in the presence of colloidal chitin as the sole carbon source. It was quantitated by using assays with chromogenic p-nitrophenyl analogs of disaccharide, trisaccharide, and tetrasaccharide derivatives of N-acetylglucosamine. A set of three fluorescent substrates with a 4-methylumbelliferyl group linked by (beta)-1,4 linkage to N-acetylglucosamine mono- or oligosaccharides were used to identify the chitinolytic activities of proteins which had been renatured following their separation by electrophoresis. This study provides the most complete evidence for the presence of a complex of chitinolytic enzymes in Enterobacter strains. Four enzymes were detected: two N-acetyl-(beta)-d-glucosaminidases of 89 and 67 kDa, an endochitinase with an apparent molecular mass of 59 kDa, and a chitobiosidase of 50 kDa. The biocontrol ability of the chitinolytic strains was demonstrated under greenhouse conditions. The bacteria decreased the incidence of disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani in cotton by 64 to 86%. Two Tn5 mutants of one of the isolates, which were deficient in chitinolytic activity, were unable to protect plants against the disease.

  6. [Vascular calcifications, the hidden side effects of vitamin K antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Youssef; Vengadessane, Subashini; Bodeau, Sandra; Gras, Valérie; Bricca, Giampiero; Kamel, Saïd; Liabeuf, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Despite the availability of new oral anticoagulants, vitamin K antagonists (VKA, such as fluindione, acenocoumarol or warfarin) remain currently the goal standard medicines for oral prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. They inhibit the cycle of the vitamin K and its participation in the enzymatic gamma-carboxylation of many proteins. The VKA prevent the activation of the vitamin K-dependent blood clotting factors limiting thus the initiation of the coagulation cascade. But other proteins are vitamin K-dependent and also remain inactive in the presence of VKA. This is the case of matrix Gla-protein (MGP), a protein that plays a major inhibitory role in the development of vascular calcifications. Several experimental and epidemiological results suggest that the use of the VKA could promote the development of vascular calcifications increasing thus the cardiovascular risk. This risk seems to be higher in patients with chronic kidney disease or mellitus diabetes who are more likely to develop vascular calcifications, and may be due to a decrease of the MGP activity. This review aims at summarizing the data currently available making vascular calcifications the probably underestimated side effects of VKA. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Depierre, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Angeli, F., E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frizon, F. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LP2C, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

  8. IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Inhibits Early Granulation Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolli, Elizabeth A; Ghosh, Ankona; Haft, Sunny; Frank, Renee; Saunders, Cecil James; Cohen, Noam; Mirza, Natasha

    2016-04-01

    Using a functional model of airway granulation tissue in laryngotracheal stenosis, we investigated changes in histopathology and inflammatory markers within granulation tissue in response to an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra). This study allows us to further delineate the immune response to wound healing and potentially identify treatment markers. Laryngotracheal complexes (LTCs) of donor mice underwent direct airway injury. The LTCs were transplanted into subcutaneous tissue of recipient mice in 2 groups: IL-1Ra treated and untreated. The IL-1Ra-treated arm received daily intraperitoneal injections of IL-1Ra for 3 weeks. The LTCs were then harvested. Granulation formation was measured. The mRNA expression of transforming growth factor (TGF) beta and IL-1 was quantified using real-time reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction. There were statistically significant differences in lamina propria thickness. There were no statistically significant changes in mRNA expression of TGF-β and IL-1β between the treated and untreated specimens. Using a previously described murine model, we delineate inflammatory markers that can be targeted for potential therapy. While the levels of inflammatory markers do not change significantly, the lamina propria thickness shows that the effects of IL-1 have been inhibited. The early use of the IL-1Ra will inhibit the efficacy of IL-1 in the inflammatory cascade and can prevent early granulation formation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Development of specific dopamine D-1 agonists and antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakolchai, S.

    1987-01-01

    To develop potentially selective dopamine D-1 agonists and to investigate on the structural requirement for D-1 activity, the derivatives of dibenzocycloheptadiene are synthesized and pharmacologically evaluated. The target compounds are 5-aminomethyl-10,11-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxy-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cycloheptene hydrobromide 10 and 9,10-dihydroxy-1,2,3,7,8,12b-hexahydrobenzo[1,2]cyclohepta[3,4,5d,e]isoquinoline hydrobromide 11. In a dopamine-sensitive rat retinal adenylate cyclase assay, a model for D-1 activity, compound 10 is essentially inert for both agonist and antagonist activity. In contrast, compound 11 is approximately equipotent to dopamine in activation of the D-1 receptor. Based on radioligand and binding data, IC 50 of compound 11 for displacement of 3 H-SCH 23390, a D-1 ligand, is about 7 fold less than that for displacement of 3 H-spiperone, a D-2 ligand. These data indicate that compound 11 is a potent selective dopamine D-1 agonist. This study provides a new structural class of dopamine D-1 acting agent: dihydroxy-benzocycloheptadiene analog which can serve as a lead compound for further drug development and as a probe for investigation on the nature of dopamine D-1 receptor

  10. Streptomycetes and micromycetes as perspective antagonists of fungal phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolaky, O; Syrbu, T; Poiras, N; Baltsat, K; Maslobrod, S; Boortseva, S

    2012-01-01

    Among natural factors that permanently influence on the plants, the soil microorganisms play a special role for the growing of plants as habitants of their rhizosphere. Mainly they are the representatives of actinomycetes genus Streptomyces and fungal genus Penicillium and their metabolic products stimulate plant growth and inhibit the growth of pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The aim of our study was to determine the antagonism of actinomycetes and micromycetes isolated from soils of R. Moldova against the fungal pathogens of agricultural plants. The strains were isolated from 5 types of chernozem (black soil) from central zone of R. Moldova, with different concentration of humus. Most of micromycetes and streptomycetes were isolated from soil sample 1 (monoculture of maize) and soil sample 2 (Poltava road border) with similar humus content (2.4-2.6%). The antifungal activity of micromycetes strains was occurring mostly against Fusarium solani and Thelaviopsis basicola, at streptomycetes against Alternaria alternata and Botrytis cinerea. It was revealed the strains completely inhibit the growth of Alt. alternata (streptomycetes strains 23, 33, 37), B. cinerea (Streptomyces sp. 17), and F. solani (Penicillium sp. 104). Our results allow to consider the actinomycetes Streptomyces sp.9, Streptomyces sp. 12, Streptomyces sp. 17, Streptomyces sp. 37 Streptomyces sp. 66 and micromycetes Penicillium sp. 5, Penicillium sp. 65, Penicillium sp. 104 isolated from soils of R. Moldova, as prospective strains-antagonists against the phytopathogenic fungus, the causative agents of agricultural plants deseasis.

  11. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaird, Catherine R.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to “fight” the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations. PMID:23307949

  12. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clementina Equihua

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning.Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor, although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects.Orexin (hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties. However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia.

  13. CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS IN THE TREATMENT OF ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION DURING PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Striuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to WHO data, arterial hypertension (HT is revealed in 15-20% of pregnant women. In different regions of Russia the incidence of pregnancy HT varies from 7 to 29%. In women with HT started before pregnancy , perinatal losses are observed in 3, 8%, premature births – in 15, 3% and intrauterine growth retardation - in 16, 6%. Physiological gestational changes of hemodynamics are described. Hypertensive pregnant patients of high and low risk are defined. Non-pharmacological treatment of pregnant women with HT is presented in details. Antihypertensive therapy may not be used in hypertensive patients of low risk with blood pressure (BP of 140-160\\90-110 mm Hg. If BP is higher antihypertensive therapy should be used immediately. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists (CA is drugs of choice for HT treatment during pregnancy , especially “advanced” CA of the third generation. They have predictable efficacy. It is possible to use short-acting nifedipine for treatment of acute HT in pregnant patients.

  14. Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacillus Isolates against Salmonella typhi In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Daim, Amira; Hassouna, Nadia; Hafez, Mohamed; Ashor, Mohamed Seif Aldeen; Aboulwafa, Mohammad M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Enteric fever is a global health problem, and rapidly developing resistance to various drugs makes the situation more alarming. The potential use of Lactobacillus to control typhoid fever represents a promising approach, as it may exert protective actions through various mechanisms. Methods. In this study, the probiotic potential and antagonistic activities of 32 Lactobacillus isolates against Salmonella typhi were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity of cell free supernatants of Lactobacillus isolates, interference of Lactobacillus isolates with the Salmonella adherence and invasion, cytoprotective effect of Lactobacillus isolates, and possibility of concurrent use of tested Lactobacillus isolates and antibiotics were evaluated by testing their susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents, and their oxygen tolerance was also examined. Results. The results revealed that twelve Lactobacillus isolates could protect against Salmonella typhi infection through interference with both its growth and its virulence properties, such as adherence, invasion, and cytotoxicity. These Lactobacillus isolates exhibited MIC values for ciprofloxacin higher than those of Salmonella typhi and oxygen tolerance and were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum. Conclusion. The tested Lactobacillus plantarum isolates can be introduced as potential novel candidates that have to be subjected for in vivo and application studies for treatment and control of typhoid fever. PMID:24191248

  15. Iontophoresis of endothelin receptor antagonists in rats and men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Roustit

    Full Text Available The treatment of scleroderma-related digital ulcers is challenging. The oral endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA bosentan has been approved but it may induce liver toxicity. The objective of this study was to test whether ERAs bosentan and sitaxentan could be locally delivered using iontophoresis.Cathodal and anodal iontophoresis of bosentan and sitaxentan were performed on anaesthetized rat hindquarters without and during endothelin-1 infusion. Skin blood flow was quantified using laser-Doppler imaging and cutaneous tolerability was assessed. Iontophoresis of sitaxentan (20 min, 20 or 100 µA was subsequently performed on the forearm skin of healthy men (n = 5.In rats neither bosentan nor sitaxentan increased skin blood flux compared to NaCl. When simultaneously infusing endothelin-1, cathodal iontophoresis of sitaxentan increased skin blood flux compared to NaCl (AUC(0-20 were 44032.2 ± 12277 and 14957.5 ± 23818.8 %BL.s, respectively; P = 0.01. In humans, sitaxentan did not significantly increase skin blood flux as compared to NaCl. Iontophoresis of ERAs was well tolerated both in animals and humans.This study shows that cathodal iontophoresis of sitaxentan but not bosentan partially reverses endothelin-induced skin vasoconstriction in rats, suggesting that sitaxentan diffuses into the dermis. However, sitaxentan does not influence basal skin microvascular tone in rats or in humans.

  16. A new class of NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Marini, Elisabetta; Rolando, Barbara; Sorba, Giovanni; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2004-05-01

    Synthesis and pharmacological characterisation of a series of compounds obtained by joining, through appropriate spacers, NO-donor furoxan and nitrooxy moieties to the imidazole ring, as well as their structurally related analogues devoid of NO-donating properties are described. All the products were studied for their capacity to interact with H3-receptors present on the guinea-pig ileum and with H2-receptors present on guinea-pig right atrium. The whole series of products displayed reversible H3-antagonistic activity. No activity on H2-receptors was observed when the products were tested at 10 microM concentration. Many of the products were also able to induce partial relaxation when added to the bath after electrical contraction of the guinea-pig ileum during the study of their H3-antagonism. This phenomenon seems to be dependent on various factors; for some compounds it proved to be dependent on NO-mediated sGC activation, for other products it could be due to their weak M3-antagonism. The investigation of the lipophilic-hydrophilic balance of all the products indicates, for many of them, an ideal value to cross the blood-brain barrier. Copyright 2004 Elsevier SAS

  17. Torque values of antagonistic muscles of the hipjoint. Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derewiecki, Tomasz; Duda, Marta; Majcher, Piotr; Mroczek, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The hip joint is a multiaxial articulation and the most mobile joint of the lower extremity. It can be subject to overloading by the repetition of a motor pattern produced by imbalanced muscle groups. To determine mean torque values of the external forces acting on the hip joint in various age groups; to compare the relations between the torque values of antagonistic hip muscles; to correlate changes in mean torque values of the hip muscles with age. The study involved a group of 120 women aged 19-85 years divided into 6 age groups of 20 subjects each. The presence of knee or hip pathology was an exclusion criterion. The tests were carried out in the Zamość Rehabilitation Department of CMPA in an SPB2-FM unit. The highest mean torque values for all muscle groups were seen in women aged 19-25 years. The values gradually decreased with age. 1. The SPB2-FM unit is an objective tool for evaluating torques of the hip muscles and makes it possible to monitor changes occurring in the process of rehabilitation, as well as to diagnose risks resulting from a decrease in hip muscle strength. 2. The present study of healthy subjects provides baseline data for further comparisons with patient