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Sample records for antagonist l-ap3 demonstrated

  1. Long-term, repeated dose in vitro neurotoxicity of the glutamate receptor antagonist L-AP3, demonstrated in rat hippocampal slice cultures by using continuous propidium iodide incubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bjarne W; Blaabjerg, Morten; Noraberg, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    Most in vitro models are only used to assess short-term effects of test compounds. However, as demonstrated here, hippocampal slice cultures can be used for long-term studies. The test compound used was the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, L(+)-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (L-AP3...

  2. Antagonistic roles of Dmrt1 and Foxl2 in sex differentiation via estrogen production in tilapia as demonstrated by TALENs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Hui; Yang, Hui-Hui; Li, Meng-Ru; Sun, Yun-Lv; Jiang, Xiao-Long; Xie, Qing-Ping; Wang, Ting-Ru; Shi, Hong-Juan; Sun, Li-Na; Zhou, Lin-Yan; Wang, De-Shou

    2013-12-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful approach for targeted genome editing and have been proved to be effective in several organisms. In this study, we reported that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Nile tilapia, an important species for worldwide aquaculture, with reliably high efficiency. Six pairs of TALENs were constructed to target genes related to sex differentiation, including dmrt1, foxl2, cyp19a1a, gsdf, igf3, and nrob1b, and all resulted in indel mutations with maximum efficiencies of up to 81% at the targeted loci. Effects of dmrt1 and foxl2 mutation on gonadal phenotype, sex differentiation, and related gene expression were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR. In Dmrt1-deficient testes, phenotypes of significant testicular regression, including deformed efferent ducts, degenerated spermatogonia or even a complete loss of germ cells, and proliferation of steroidogenic cells, were observed. In addition, disruption of Dmrt1 in XY fish resulted in increased foxl2 and cyp19a1a expression and serum estradiol-17β and 11-ketotestosterone levels. On the contrary, deficiency of Foxl2 in XX fish exhibited varying degrees of oocyte degeneration and significantly decreased aromatase gene expression and serum estradiol-17β levels. Some Foxl2-deficient fish even exhibited complete sex reversal with high expression of Dmrt1 and Cyp11b2. Furthermore, disruption of Cyp19a1a in XX fish led to partial sex reversal with Dmrt1 and Cyp11b2 expression. Taken together, our data demonstrated that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing in tilapia genome. Foxl2 and Dmrt1 play antagonistic roles in sex differentiation in Nile tilapia via regulating cyp19a1a expression and estrogen production.

  3. A naturally occurring Lgr4 splice variant encodes a soluble antagonist useful for demonstrating the gonadal roles of Lgr4 in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Jen Hsu

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4 promotes the Wnt signaling through interaction with R-spondins or norrin. Using PCR amplification from rat ovarian cDNAs, we identified a naturally occurring Lgr4 splice variant encoding only the ectodomain of Lgr4, which was named Lgr4-ED. Lgr4-ED can be detected as a secreted protein in the extracts from rodent and bovine postnatal gonads, suggesting conservation of Lgr4-ED in mammals. Recombinant Lgr4-ED purified from the conditioned media of transfected 293T cells was found to dose-dependently inhibit the LGR4-mediated Wnt signaling induced by RSPO2 or norrin, suggesting that it is capable of ligand absorption and could have a potential role as an antagonist. Intraperitoneal injection of purified recombinant Lgr4-ED into newborn mice was found to significantly decrease the testicular expression of estrogen receptor alpha and aquaporin 1, which is similar to the phenotype found in Lgr4-null mice. Administration of recombinant Lgr4-ED to superovulated female rats can also decrease the expression of estrogen receptor alpha, aquaporin 1, LH receptor and other key steroidogenic genes as well as bring about the suppression of progesterone production. Thus, these findings suggest that endogenously expressed Lgr4-ED may act as an antagonist molecule and help to fine-tune the R-spondin/norrin-mediated Lgr4-Wnt signaling during gonadal development.

  4. GABAB antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Hansen, J J; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1994-01-01

    Phaclofen, which is the phosphonic acid analogue of the GABAB agonist (RS)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-aminobutyric acid (baclofen), is a GABAB antagonist. As part of our studies on the structural requirements for activation and blockade of GABAB receptors, we have resolved phaclofen using chiral chroma...

  5. Tetrahydroindolizinone NK1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianming; Lu, Huagang; Morriello, Gregori J; Carlson, Emma J; Wheeldon, Alan; Chicchi, Gary G; Kurtz, Marc M; Tsao, Kwei-Lan C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Mills, Sander G; DeVita, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    A new class of potent NK(1) receptor antagonists with a tetrahydroindolizinone core has been identified. This series of compounds demonstrated improved functional activities as compared to previously identified 5,5-fused pyrrolidine lead structures. SAR at the 7-position of the tetrahydroindolizinone core is discussed in detail. A number of compounds displayed high NK(1) receptor occupancy at both 1 h and 24 h in a gerbil foot tapping model. Compound 40 has high NK(1) binding affinity, good selectivity for other NK receptors and promising in vivo properties. It also has clean P(450) inhibition and hPXR induction profiles.

  6. Novel benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Andrew J; Al-Barazanji, Kamal A; Barvian, Kevin K; Bishop, Michael J; Britt, Christy S; Cooper, Joel P; Goetz, Aaron S; Grizzle, Mary K; Hertzog, Donald L; Ignar, Diane M; Morgan, Ronda O; Peckham, Gregory E; Speake, Jason D; Swain, Will R

    2006-10-01

    The identification of an MCH R1 antagonist screening hit led to the optimization of a class of benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists. Structure-activity relationships and efforts to optimize pharmacokinetic properties are detailed along with the demonstration of the effectiveness of an MCH R1 antagonist in an animal model of obesity.

  7. Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N...

  8. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢婉婷; 代明香; 薛方正

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonis-tic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups, and agents in the same group collab-orate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results.

  9. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  10. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  11. Secondary prevention with calcium antagonists after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the 3 calcium antagonists nifedipine, diltiazem, and verapamil have a comparable effect in the prevention of myocardial damage during ischaemia. Secondary prevention trials after acute myocardial infarction, which aimed at improving survival...

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  13. Survivin mRNA antagonists using locked nucleic acid, potential for molecular cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Niels; Westergaard, Majken; Hansen, Henrik Frydenlund;

    2007-01-01

    synergistic effect when combining the mRNA antagonists against Survivin with the chemotherapeutic Taxol. This effect was demonstrated at concentrations of antagonists far lower than any previously demonstrated, indicating the high potential of locked nucleic acid for therapeutic use. Further characterisations...

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  15. Complete Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  1. ICT Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Bay, Gina

    In this demonstration we present and discuss two interrelated on-line learning resources aimed at supporting international students at Danish universities in building study skills (the Study Metro) and avoiding plagiarism (Stopplagiarism). We emphasize the necessity of designing online learning r...

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  3. Zebrafish phenotypic screen identifies novel Notch antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaithan, Vithya; Okuda, Kazuhide Shaun; Ng, Mei Fong; Samat, Norazwana; Leong, Sze Wei; Faudzi, Siti Munirah Mohd; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Cheong, Sok Ching; Tan, Pei Jean; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-04-01

    Zebrafish represents a powerful in vivo model for phenotype-based drug discovery to identify clinically relevant small molecules. By utilizing this model, we evaluated natural product derived compounds that could potentially modulate Notch signaling that is important in both zebrafish embryogenesis and pathogenic in human cancers. A total of 234 compounds were screened using zebrafish embryos and 3 were identified to be conferring phenotypic alterations similar to embryos treated with known Notch inhibitors. Subsequent secondary screens using HEK293T cells overexpressing truncated Notch1 (HEK293TΔE) identified 2 compounds, EDD3 and 3H4MB, to be potential Notch antagonists. Both compounds reduced protein expression of NOTCH1, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1) in HEK293TΔE and downregulated Notch target genes. Importantly, EDD3 treatment of human oral cancer cell lines demonstrated reduction of Notch target proteins and genes. EDD3 also inhibited proliferation and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of ORL-150 cells through inducing p27(KIP1). Our data demonstrates the utility of the zebrafish phenotypic screen and identifying EDD3 as a promising Notch antagonist for further development as a novel therapeutic agent.

  4. Synthesis of potential mescaline antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, F; Nieforth, K A

    1976-10-01

    1-[2-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-3-pyrroline, 2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, N-n-propylmescaline, N-cyclopropylmethylmescaline, and N-allylmescaline were synthesized as potential mescaline antagonists. The ability of these compounds to antagonize mescaline-induced disruption of swim behavior is also given.

  5. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation......)-phenylethylamine salt of N-BOC-(R)-ATAA. Like ATAA, neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly affected (IC50 > 100 microM) the receptor binding of tritiated AMPA, kainic acid, or (RS)-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid, the latter being a competitive NMDA antagonist. Electrophysiological experiments......, using the rat cortical wedge preparation, showed the NMDA antagonist effect as well as the AMPA antagonist effect of ATAA to reside exclusively in the (R)-enantiomer (Ki = 75 +/- 5 microM and 57 +/- 1 microM, respectively). Neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly reduced kainic acid-induced excitation...

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW LHRH ANTAGONISTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENGDun-Ren; XIAOShao-Bo

    1989-01-01

    An ideal antagonist of LHRH is one which can act on the pitutary to inhibit LHRH-stimulatod LH / FSH secretion by competitive occupying the LHRH receptor in the pitutary gland. Its action should be very specific, fast and highly effective, the durations

  7. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  8. Hyperglycemia of Diabetic Rats Decreased by a Glucagon Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David G.; Ulichny Goebel, Camy; Hruby, Victor J.; Bregman, Marvin D.; Trivedi, Dev

    1982-02-01

    The glucagon analog [l-Nα-trinitrophenylhistidine, 12-homoarginine]-glucagon (THG) was examined for its ability to lower blood glucose concentrations in rats made diabetic with streptozotocin. In vitro, THG is a potent antagonist of glucagon activation of the hepatic adenylate cyclase assay system. Intravenous bolus injections of THG caused rapid decreases (20 to 35 percent) of short duration in blood glucose. Continuous infusion of low concentrations of the inhibitor led to larger sustained decreases in blood glucose (30 to 65 percent). These studies demonstrate that a glucagon receptor antagonist can substantially reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic animals without addition of exogenous insulin.

  9. GASIS demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidas, E.H. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  10. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Kelly

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of pharmacological and medical aspects of the muscarinic class of acetylcholine agonists and antagonists is presented. The therapeutic benefits of achieving receptor subtype selectivity are outlined and applications in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are discussed. A selection of chemical routes are described, which illustrate contemporary methodology for the synthesis of chiral medicinal compounds (asymmetric synthesis, chiral pool, enzymes. Routes to bicyclic intrannular amines and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions are highlighted.

  11. Epiminocyclohepta[b]indole analogs as 5-HT6 antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henderson, Alan J; Guzzo, Peter R; Ghosh, Animesh;

    2012-01-01

    A new series of epiminocyclohepta[b]indoles with potent 5-HT(6) antagonist activity were discovered and optimized using in vitro protocols. One compound from this series was progressed to advanced pharmacokinetic (PK) studies followed by 5-HT(6) receptor occupancy studies. The compound was found...... to have excellent oral absorption, a highly favorable PK profile and demonstrated pharmacodynamic interaction with the 5-HT(6) receptor as shown by ex vivo autoradiography....

  12. The Role of α1-Adrenoceptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Prostate and Other Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Batty

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluates the role of α-adrenoceptor antagonists as a potential treatment of prostate cancer (PCa. Cochrane, Google Scholar and Pubmed were accessed to retrieve sixty-two articles for analysis. In vitro studies demonstrate that doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin (quinazoline α-antagonists induce apoptosis, decrease cell growth, and proliferation in PC-3, LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines. Similarly, the piperazine based naftopidil induced cell cycle arrest and death in LNCaP-E9 cell lines. In contrast, sulphonamide based tamsulosin did not exhibit these effects. In vivo data was consistent with in vitro findings as the quinazoline based α-antagonists prevented angiogenesis and decreased tumour mass in mice models of PCa. Mechanistically the cytotoxic and antitumor effects of the α-antagonists appear largely independent of α 1-blockade. The proposed targets include: VEGF, EGFR, HER2/Neu, caspase 8/3, topoisomerase 1 and other mitochondrial apoptotic inducing factors. These cytotoxic effects could not be evaluated in human studies as prospective trial data is lacking. However, retrospective studies show a decreased incidence of PCa in males exposed to α-antagonists. As human data evaluating the use of α-antagonists as treatments are lacking; well designed, prospective clinical trials are needed to conclusively demonstrate the anticancer properties of quinazoline based α-antagonists in PCa and other cancers.

  13. New antagonist agents of neuropeptide y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Aldana

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the CNS, NPY has been implicated in obesity and feeding, endocrine function and metabolism. Potent and selective rNPY antagonists will be able to probe the merits of this approach for the treatment of obesity. We report the synthesis and preliminary evaluation of some hydrazide derivatives as antagonists of rNPY.

  14. Anti-antimicrobial peptides: folding-mediated host defense antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2013-07-12

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance.

  15. Antagonists of the kappa opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The research community has increasingly focused on the development of OPRK antagonists as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addictive disorders and other psychiatric conditions produced or exacerbated by stress. Short-acting OPRK antagonists have been recently developed as a potential improvement over long-acting prototypic ligands including nor-BNI and JDTic. Remarkably the short-acting LY2456302 is undergoing phase II clinical trials for the augmentation of the antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression. This Letter reviews relevant chemical and pharmacological advances in the identification and development of OPRK antagonists.

  16. Nalmefene: radioimmunoassay for a new opioid antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R; Hsiao, J; Taaffe, W; Hahn, E; Tuttle, R

    1984-11-01

    A specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) has been developed for the quantitation of a new opioid antagonist, nalmefene, in human plasma. The method employs a rabbit antiserum to an albumin conjugate of naltrexone-6-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime and [3H]naltrexone as the radioligand. Assay specificity was achieved by extraction of nalmefene from plasma at pH 9 into ether prior to RIA. The procedure has a limit of sensitivity of 0.2 ng/mL of nalmefene using a 0.5-mL sample of plasma for analysis. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation did not exceed 5.6 and 11%, respectively. The specificity of the RIA was established by demonstrating excellent agreement (r = 0.99) with a less sensitive and more time consuming HPLC procedure in the analysis of clinical plasma samples. The use of the RIA for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of nalmefene is illustrated with plasma concentration profiles of the drug in humans following intravenous and oral administration.

  17. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  18. Twisted gastrulation, a BMP antagonist, exacerbates podocyte injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Yamada

    Full Text Available Podocyte injury is the first step in the progression of glomerulosclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp7 in podocyte injury and the existence of native Bmp signaling in podocytes. Local activity of Bmp7 is controlled by cell-type specific Bmp antagonists, which inhibit the binding of Bmp7 to its receptors. Here we show that the product of Twisted gastrulation (Twsg1, a Bmp antagonist, is the central negative regulator of Bmp function in podocytes and that Twsg1 null mice are resistant to podocyte injury. Twsg1 was the most abundant Bmp antagonist in murine cultured podocytes. The administration of Bmp induced podocyte differentiation through Smad signaling, whereas the simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. The administration of Bmp also inhibited podocyte proliferation, whereas simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. Twsg1 was expressed in the glomerular parietal cells (PECs and distal nephron of the healthy kidney, and additionally in damaged glomerular cells in a murine model of podocyte injury. Twsg1 null mice exhibited milder hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia, and milder histological changes while maintaining the expression of podocyte markers during podocyte injury model. Taken together, our results show that Twsg1 plays a critical role in the modulation of protective action of Bmp7 on podocytes, and that inhibition of Twsg1 is a promising means of development of novel treatment for podocyte injury.

  19. Anti-idiotypic antibody: A new strategy for the development of a growth hormone receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hainan; Zheng, Xin; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Li, Steven

    2015-11-01

    In general, traditional growth hormone receptor antagonist can be divided into two major classes: growth hormone (GH) analogues and anti-growth hormone receptor (GHR) antibodies. Herein, we tried to explore a new class of growth hormone receptor (GHR) antagonist that may have potential advantages over the traditional antagonists. For this, we developed a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody growth hormone, termed CG-86. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize and evaluate this antibody, and the results from a competitive receptor-binding assay, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) and epitope mapping demonstrate that CG-86 behaved as a typical Ab2β. Next, we examined its antagonistic activity using in vitro cell models, and the results showed that CG-86 could effectively inhibit growth hormone receptor-mediated signalling and effectively inhibit growth hormone-induced Ba/F3-GHR638 proliferation. In summary, these studies show that an anti-idiotypic antibody (CG-86) has promise as a novel growth hormone receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the current findings also suggest that anti-idiotypic antibody may represent a novel strategy to produce a new class of growth hormone receptor antagonist, and this strategy may be applied with other cytokines or growth factors.

  20. Histamine H3 receptor antagonist decreases cue-induced alcohol reinstatement in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuutinen, Saara; Mäki, Tiia; Rozov, Stanislav; Bäckström, Pia; Hyytiä, Petri; Piepponen, Petteri; Panula, Pertti

    2016-07-01

    We have earlier found that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonism diminishes motivational aspects of alcohol reinforcement in mice. Here we studied the role of H3Rs in cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in C57BL/6J mice using two different H3R antagonists. Systemic administration of H3R antagonists attenuated cue-induced alcohol seeking suggesting that H3R antagonists may reduce alcohol craving. To understand how alcohol affects dopamine and histamine release, a microdialysis study was performed on C57BL/6J mice and the levels of histamine, dopamine and dopamine metabolites were measured in the nucleus accumbens. Alcohol administration was combined with an H3R antagonist pretreatment to reveal whether modulation of H3R affects the effects of alcohol on neurotransmitter release. Alcohol significantly increased the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens but did not affect histamine release. Pretreatment with H3R antagonist ciproxifan did not modify the effect of alcohol on dopamine release. However, histamine release was markedly increased with ciproxifan. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that H3R antagonism attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in mice. Alcohol alone does not affect histamine release in the nucleus accumbens but H3R antagonist instead increases histamine release significantly suggesting that the mechanism by which H3R antagonist inhibits alcohol seeking found in the present study and the decreased alcohol reinforcement, reward and consumption found earlier might include alterations in the histaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. These findings imply that selective antagonists of H3Rs could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent relapse and possibly diminish craving to alcohol use. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  1. Auxin-Oxylipin Crosstalk: Relationship of Antagonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maik Hoffmann; Mathias Hentrich; Stephan Pollmann

    2011-01-01

    Phytohormones regulate a wide array of developmental processes throughout the life cycle of plants. Herein, the various plant hormones may interact additively, synergistically, or antagonistically. By their cooperation they create a delicate regulatory network whose net output largely depends on the action of specific phytohormone combinations rather than on the independent activities of separate hormones. While most classical studies of plant hormonal control have focused mainly on the action of single hormones or on the synergistic interaction of hormones in regulating various developmental processes, recent work is beginning to shed light on the crosstalk of nominally antagonistic plant hormones, such as gibberellins and auxins with oxylipins or abscisic acid. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how two of the first sight antagonistic plant hormones, i.e. auxins and oxylipins,interact in controlling plant responses and development.

  2. Genetic factors influencing pyrimidine-antagonist chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maring, JG; Groen, HJM; Wachters, FM; Uges, DRA; de Vries, EGE

    2005-01-01

    Pyrimidine antagonists, for example, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cytarabine (ara-C) and gemcitabine (dFdC), are widely used in chemotherapy regimes for colorectal, breast, head and neck, non-small-cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukaemias. Extensive metabolism is a prerequisite for conversion of

  3. Why are mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists cardioprotective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Chai (Wenxia); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractTwo clinical trials, the Randomized ALdosterone Evaluation Study (RALES) and the EPlerenone HEart failure and SUrvival Study (EPHESUS), have recently shown that mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists reduce mortality in patients with heart failure on top of ACE inhibition. This effe

  4. Bicyclic and tricyclic heterocycle derivatives as histamine H3 receptor antagonists for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lera Ruiz, Manuel; Zheng, Junying; Berlin, Michael Y; McCormick, Kevin D; Aslanian, Robert G; West, Robert; Hwa, Joyce; Lachowicz, Jean; van Heek, Margaret

    2013-11-01

    A novel series of non-imidazole bicyclic and tricyclic histamine H3 receptor antagonists has been discovered. Compound 17 was identified as a centrally penetrant molecule with high receptor occupancy which demonstrates robust oral activity in rodent models of obesity. In addition compound 17 possesses clean CYP and hERG profiles and shows no behavioral changes in the Irwin test.

  5. Imaging of infection and inflammation with an improved 99mTc-labeled LTB4 antagonist.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerd-Vismale, J.E.M. van; Broekema, M.; Harris, T.D.; Edwards, D.S.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2005-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the bivalent (111)In-labeled leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist DPC11870 reveals infectious and inflammatory lesions in various rabbit models. The radioactive tracer accumulates quickly at the site of infection and clears rapidly from the circulation, resulting in high-q

  6. Bicyclams, selective antagonists of the human chemokine receptor CXCR4, potently inhibit feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Clercq, E. de; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Balzarini, J.; Bridger, G.J.; Henson, G.; Schols, D.

    1999-01-01

    Bicyclams are low-molecular-weight anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents that have been shown to act as potent and selective CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that bicyclams are potent inhibitors of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication when evalua

  7. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n=6,each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit+ bosentan group and Nit+ losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment of nitroglycerin patch (0.05 mg/h). AngiotensinⅡ receptor antagonist losartan ( 10 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) and endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group . The effective percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit+ losartan group and Nit+ bosentan group compared with Nit group [(31.95± 4.45 ) % vs (21.00± 3.69 ) % , P Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance .

  8. Discovery of Isoquinolinoquinazolinones as a Novel Class of Potent PPARγ Antagonists with Anti-adipogenic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yifeng; Han, Younho; Khadka, Daulat Bikram; Zhao, Chao; Lee, Kwang Youl; Cho, Won-Jea

    2016-01-01

    Conformational change in helix 12 can alter ligand-induced PPARγ activity; based on this reason, isoquinolinoquinazolinones, structural homologs of berberine, were designed and synthesized as PPARγ antagonists. Computational docking and mutational study indicated that isoquinolinoquinazolinones form hydrogen bonds with the Cys285 and Arg288 residues of PPARγ. Furthermore, SPR results demonstrated strong binding affinity of isoquinolinoquinazolinones towards PPARγ. Additionally, biological assays showed that this new series of PPARγ antagonists more strongly inhibit adipocyte differentiation and PPARγ2-induced transcriptional activity than GW9662. PMID:27695006

  9. Mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists in animal models of anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, SM; KorteBouws, GAH; Koob, GF; DeKloet, ER; Bohus, B

    1996-01-01

    The behavioral effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of a specific mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist [RU28318 (10-50 ng/2 mu l)], a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist [RU38486 (1-50 ng/2 mu l)], or both antagonists (50 ng/2 mu l), were studied in two different animal

  10. High affinity retinoic acid receptor antagonists: analogs of AGN 193109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A T; Wang, L; Gillett, S J; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-02-22

    A series of high affinity retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists were prepared based upon the known antagonist AGN 193109 (2). Introduction of various phenyl groups revealed a preference for substitution at the para-position relative to the meta-site. Antagonists with the highest affinities for the RARs possessed hydrophobic groups, however, the presence of polar functionality was also well tolerated.

  11. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Substituted Desloratadines as Potent Arginine Vasopressin V2 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Mu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one non-peptide substituted desloratadine class compounds were synthesized as novel arginine vasopressin receptor antagonists from desloratadine via successive acylation, reduction and acylation reactions. Their structures were characterized by 1H-NMR and HRMS, their biological activity was evaluated by in vitro and in vivo studies. The in vitro binding assay and cAMP accumulation assay indicated that these compounds are potent selective V2 receptor antagonists. Among them compounds 1n, 1t and 1v exhibited both high affinity and promising selectivity for V2 receptors. The in vivo diuretic assay demonstrated that 1t presented remarkable diuretic activity. In conclusion, 1t is a potent novel AVP V2 receptor antagonist candidate.

  12. Discovery of novel indazole derivatives as dual angiotensin II antagonists and partial PPARγ agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamotte, Yann; Faucher, Nicolas; Sançon, Julien; Pineau, Olivier; Sautet, Stéphane; Fouchet, Marie-Hélène; Beneton, Véronique; Tousaint, Jean-Jacques; Saintillan, Yannick; Ancellin, Nicolas; Nicodeme, Edwige; Grillot, Didier; Martres, Paul

    2014-02-15

    Identification of indazole derivatives acting as dual angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists and partial peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists is described. Starting from Telmisartan, we previously described that indole derivatives were very potent partial PPARγ agonists with loss of AT1 receptor antagonist activity. Design, synthesis and evaluation of new central scaffolds led us to the discovery of pyrrazolopyridine then indazole derivatives provided novel series possessing the desired dual activity. Among the new compounds, 38 was identified as a potent AT1 receptor antagonist (IC50=0.006 μM) and partial PPARγ agonist (EC50=0.25 μM, 40% max) with good oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of compound 38 was demonstrated in two preclinical models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (Zucker fa/fa rat).

  13. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability, ...... antagonists are additive with those of beta agonists. These data provide strong support for the use of leukotriene receptor antagonists for treating asthma.......Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability...... ciliary motility, which may hinder mucociliary clearance. Asthmatic patients demonstrate increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes during naturally occurring asthma and acute asthma attacks as well as after allergen and exercise challenge. The leukotriene receptor antagonists montelukast, zafirlukast...

  14. Opioid analgesics as noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, B; Thorkildsen, C; Andersen, S;

    1998-01-01

    Much evidence points to the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the development and maintainance of neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, there is generally involved a presumed opioid-insensitive component, which apparently can be blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists. However......, in order to obtain complete analgesia, a combination of an NMDA receptor antagonist and an opioid receptor agonist is needed. Recent in vitro data have demonstrated that methadone, ketobemidone, and dextropropoxyphene, in addition to being opioid receptor agonists, also are weak noncompetitive NMDA...... receptor antagonists. Clinical anecdotes suggest that the NMDA receptor antagonism of these opioids may play a significant role in the pharmacological action of these compounds; however, no clinical studies have been conducted to support this issue. In the present commentary, we discuss evidence...

  15. Orexin Receptor Antagonists: New Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecker, Anthony J; Cox, Christopher D; Coleman, Paul J

    2016-01-28

    Since its discovery in 1998, the orexin system, composed of two G-protein coupled receptors, orexins 1 and 2, and two neuropeptide agonists, orexins A and B, has captured the attention of the scientific community as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity, anxiety, and sleep/wake disorders. Genetic evidence in rodents, dogs, and humans was revealed between 1999 and 2000, demonstrating a causal link between dysfunction or deletion of the orexin system and narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by hypersomnolence during normal wakefulness. These findings encouraged efforts to discover agonists to treat narcolepsy and, alternatively, antagonists to treat insomnia. This perspective will focus on the discovery and development of structurally diverse orexin antagonists suitable for preclinical pharmacology studies and human clinical trials. The work described herein culminated in the 2014 FDA approval of suvorexant as a first-in-class dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment of insomnia.

  16. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.; (UW)

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  17. [Cutaneous adverse effects of TNFalpha antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, V; Sabatiello, M; Lebas, E; de Schaetzen, V; Dezfoulian, B; Nikkels, A F

    2012-01-01

    The TNFalpha antagonists, including adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab, represent a class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Although cutaneous adverse effects are uncommon, they are varied. There is no particular risk profile to develop cutaneous adverse effects. The principal acute side effects are injection site reactions and pruritus. The major long term cutaneous side effects are infectious and inflammatory conditions. Neoplastic skin diseases are exceptional. The association with other immunosuppressive agents can increase the risk of developing cutaneous adverse effects. Some adverse effects, such as lupus erythematosus, require immediate withdrawal of the biological treatment, while in other cases temporary withdrawal is sufficient. The majority of the other cutaneous adverse effects can be dealt without interrupting biologic treatment. Preclinical and clinical investigations revealed that the new biologics, aiming IL12/23, IL23 and IL17, present a similar profile of cutaneous adverse effects, although inflammatory skin reactions may be less often encountered compared to TNFalpha antagonists.

  18. Aminopyrimidine derivatives as adenosine antagonists / Janke Kleynhans

    OpenAIRE

    Kleynhans, Janke

    2013-01-01

    Aims of this project - The aim of this study was to design and synthesise novel 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives as potential adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists. Background and rationale - Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder (after Alzheimer’s disease) and is characterised by the selective death of the dopaminergic neurons of the nigro-striatal pathway. Distinctive motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscle rigidity and tremor, while non-m...

  19. The Justification of Antagonistic Response to Wrongdoing

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    There is a strong Western tradition of opposing angry, hostile, or antagonistic reactions to wrongdoing. In the twentieth century, leaders like Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. counseled responding to wrongdoing with forgiveness and love rather than anger, hate, or vindictiveness.This ideal has taken on an exalted status in Western culture. Gandhi and King are widely regarded as moral saints. And yet sometimes antagonism seems deeply appropriate. Consider a very serious wrong: s...

  20. Antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kölliker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In species across taxa, offspring have means to influence parental investment (PI. PI thus evolves as an interacting phenotype and indirect genetic effects may strongly affect the co-evolutionary dynamics of offspring and parental behaviors. Evolutionary theory focused on explaining how exaggerated offspring solicitation can be understood as resolution of parent-offspring conflict, but the evolutionary origin and diversification of different forms of family interactions remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In contrast to previous theory that largely uses a static approach to predict how "offspring individuals" and "parental individuals" should interact given conflict over PI, we present a dynamic theoretical framework of antagonistic selection on the PI individuals obtain/take as offspring and the PI they provide as parents to maximize individual lifetime reproductive success; we analyze a deterministic and a stochastic version of this dynamic framework. We show that a zone for equivalent co-adaptation outcomes exists in which stable levels of PI can evolve and be maintained despite fast strategy transitions and ongoing co-evolutionary dynamics. Under antagonistic co-adaptation, cost-free solicitation can evolve as an adaptation to emerging preferences in parents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that antagonistic selection across the offspring and parental life-stage of individuals favors co-adapted offspring and parental behavior within a zone of equivalent outcomes. This antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation does not require solicitation to be costly, allows for rapid divergence and evolutionary novelty and potentially explains the origin and diversification of the observed provisioning forms in family life.

  1. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  2. Screening for cardiovascular safety: a structure-activity approach for guiding lead selection of melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kym, Philip R; Souers, Andrew J; Campbell, Thomas J; Lynch, John K; Judd, Andrew S; Iyengar, Rajesh; Vasudevan, Anil; Gao, Ju; Freeman, Jennifer C; Wodka, Dariusz; Mulhern, Mathew; Zhao, Gang; Wagaw, Seble H; Napier, James J; Brodjian, Sevan; Dayton, Brian D; Reilly, Regina M; Segreti, Jason A; Fryer, Ryan M; Preusser, Lee C; Reinhart, Glenn A; Hernandez, Lisa; Marsh, Kennan C; Sham, Hing L; Collins, Christine A; Polakowski, James S

    2006-04-06

    An inactin-anesthetized rat cardiovascular (CV) assay was employed in a screening mode to triage multiple classes of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHr1) antagonists. Lead identification was based on a compound profile producing high drug concentration in both plasma (>40 microM) and brain (>20 microg/g) with optimization activities on multiple classes of MCHr1 antagonists were terminated. After providing evidence that the cardiovascular liabilities were not a function of MCHr1 antagonism, continued screening identified the chromone-substituted aminopiperidine amides as a class of MCHr1 antagonists that demonstrated a safe cardiovascular profile at high drug concentrations in both plasma and brain. The high incidence of adverse cardiovascular effects associated with an array of MCHr1 antagonists of significant chemical diversity, combined with the stringent safety requirements for antiobesity drugs, highlight the importance of incorporating cardiovascular safety assessment early in the lead selection process.

  3. Antagonistic and Biocontrol Potential of Trichoderma asperellum ZJSX5003 Against the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqian; Sun, Ruiyan; Yu, Jia; Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Chen, Jie

    2016-09-01

    The efficacy of seven strains of Trichoderma asperellum collected from the fields in Southern China was assessed against Fusarium graminearum (FG) the causal agent of corn stalk rot of maize were in vitro for their antagonistic properties followed by statistical model of principal compound analysis to identify the beneficial antagonist T. asperellum strain. The key factors of antagonist activity were attributed to a total of 13 factors including cell wall degrading enzymes (chitnase, protease and β-glucanases), secondary metabolites and peptaibols and these were analyzed from eight strains of Trichoderma. A linear regression model demonstrated that interaction of enzymes and secondary metabolites of T. asperellum strain ZJSX5003 enhanced the antagonist activity against FG. Further, this strain displayed a disease reduction of 71 % in maize plants inoculated with FG compared to negative control. Pointing out that the T. asperellum strain ZJSX5003 is a potential source for the development of a biocontrol agent against corn stalk rot.

  4. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建梅; 陈永红; 王晓红; 唐朝枢

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n =6, each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit + bosentan group and Nit + losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment ofnitroglycerin patch (0. 05mg/h). Angiotensin I1 receptor antagonist losartan (10mg ·kg-1·d-1) and endothe-lin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg·kg-1· d-1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group. The effec-tive percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit + losartan group and Nit + bosentangroup compared with Nit group [(31.95±4.45) % vs (21.00±3.69) %, P <0.01and (33. 18±6. 16)% vs (21.00±3.69 ) %, P < 0. 01 , respectivelyl. The maximal vessel relaxation induced by SNP was thesame in 4 different groups but the highest EC50 (concentration which produces 50% of the maximal response toSNP) was found in tolerant group[ (34 ±10) nmol/L, P < 0. 01 ]. The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vasculartissue were markedly increased by 54% and 60% in Nit group compared with those in control group( P<0. 01). The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vascular tissue were decreased by 30% and 37% in Nit + losartangroup compared with those in Nit group ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance.

  5. The POSEIDON Demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, P.J.L.J. van de

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the Poseidon demonstrator: a demonstrator that integrates the individual research results of all partners of the Poseidon project. After describing how the Poseidon demonstrator was built, deployed, and operated, we will not only show many results obtained from the demons

  6. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details two demonstrations for use with an overhead projector in a chemistry lecture. Includes "A Very Rapidly Growing Silicate Crystal" and "A Colorful Demonstration to Simulate Orbital Hybridization." The materials and directions for each demonstration are included as well as a brief explanation of the essential learning involved. (CW)

  7. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  8. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  9. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-04-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in internalization, and if antagonists binding to the CCR4 receptor could themselves evoke receptor internalization. CCL22 binding coupled CCR4 efficiently to β-arrestin and stimulated GTPγS binding however CCL17 did not couple to β-arrestin and only partially stimulated GTPγS binding. CCL22 potently induced internalization of almost all cell surface CCR4, while CCL17 showed only weak effects. We describe four small molecule antagonists that were demonstrated to bind to two distinct allosteric sites on the CCR4 receptor, and while both classes inhibited agonist ligand binding and chemotaxis, one of the allosteric sites also evoked receptor internalization. Furthermore, we also characterize an N-terminally truncated version of CCL22 which acts as a competitive antagonist at the orthosteric site, and surprisingly also evokes receptor internalization without demonstrating any agonist activity. Collectively this study demonstrates that orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the CCR4 receptor are capable of evoking receptor internalization, providing a novel strategy for drug discovery against this class of target.

  10. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    A high degree of structural heterogeneity of the GABAA receptors (GABAARs) has been revealed and is reflected in multiple receptor subtypes. The subunit composition of GABAAR subtypes is believed to determine their localization relative to the synapses and adapt their functional properties...... to the local temporal pattern of GABA impact, enabling phasic or tonic inhibition. Specific GABAAR antagonists are essential tools for physiological and pharmacological elucidation of the different type of GABAAR inhibition. However, distinct selectivity among the receptor subtypes (populations) has been shown...

  11. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  12. Antioxidant effects of calcium antagonists in rat brain homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, K; Ina, Y; Nagashima, K; Ohmori, K; Ohno, T

    2000-06-01

    We studied the antioxidant activities of calcium antagonists against autoxidation in rat brain homogenates. The homogenates were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with or without a calcium antagonist and subsequently assayed for lipid peroxide content. Percent inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was used as an index of the antioxidant effect. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists exhibited concentration-dependent (3-300 micromol/l) inhibitory effects against lipid peroxidation. The relative order of antioxidant potency and associated IC50 values (micromol/l) of the calcium antagonists for inhibition of the lipid peroxidation were as follows: nifedipine (51.5)>barnidipine (58.6)>benidipine (71.2)>nicardipine (129.3)>amlodipine (135.5)>nilvadipine (167.3)>nitrendipine (252.1)> diltiazem (>300)=verapamil (>300). These results suggest that some dihydropyridine calcium antagonists show antioxidant properties. The antioxidant effects of the calcium antagonists may contribute to their pharmacological actions.

  13. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Camperio Ciani

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness, accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  14. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-06-18

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  15. Activins and activin antagonists in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alev Deli; Emanuel Kreidl; Stefan Santifaller; Barbara Trotter; Katja Seir; Walter Berger; Rolf Schulte-Hermann; Chantal Rodgarkia-Dara; Michael Grusch

    2008-01-01

    In many parts of the world hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the leading causes of cancer-related mortality but the underlying molecular pathology is still insufficiently understood. There is increasing evidence that activins, which are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of growth and differentiation factors, could play important roles in liver carcinogenesis. Activins are disulphide-linked homo-or heterodimers formed from four different β subunits termed βA, βB, βC, and βE, respectively. Activin A, the dimer of two βA subunits, is critically involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, and tissue architecture in the liver, while the hepatic function of other activins is largely unexplored so far. Negative regulators of activin signals include antagonists in the extracellular space like the binding proteins follistatin and FLRG, and at the cell membrane antagonistic co-receptors like Cripto or BAMBI. Additionally, in the intracellular space inhibitory Smads can modulate and control activin activity. Accumulating data suggest that deregulation of activin signals contributes to pathologic conditions such as chronic inflammation, fibrosis and development of cancer. The current article reviews the alterations in components of the activin signaling pathway that have been observed in HCC and discusses their potential significance for liver tumorigenesis.

  16. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects. In resista......The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects....... In resistance arteries, the long-lasting contractile effects can only be partly and reversibly relaxed by low-molecular-weight ET(A) antagonists (ERAs). However, the neuropeptide calcitonin-gene-related peptide selectively terminates binding of ET1 to ET(A). We propose that ET1 binds polyvalently to ET(A......) and that ERAs and the physiological antagonist allosterically reduce ET(A) functions. Combining the two-state model and the two-domain model of GPCR function and considering receptor activation beyond agonist binding might lead to better anti-endothelinergic drugs. Future studies could lead to compounds...

  17. Evaluation of H2 receptor antagonists in chronic idiopathic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minocha Y

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available H1-antagonist (hydroxyzine hydrochloride in dosage of 10 mg-25 mg thrice a day failed to elicit satisfactory response in 60 out of 170 patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria. Additional administration of H2-antagonist (cimetidine in dosage of 200 mg four times a day, in patients not responding earlier to H1-antagonist alones exhibited moderate to good improvement of various parameters of urticaria in approximately 85% patients

  18. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  19. Toy Demonstrator's "VISIT" Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Phyllis

    The role of the toy demonstrator in a home-based, mother-involved intervention effort (Verbal Interaction Project) is presented in this handbook for staff members. It is believed that the prerequisites for functioning in the toy demonstrator's role are a sense of responsibility, patience with the children and their mothers, and willingness to be…

  20. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  1. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  2. Phenylthiophenecarboxamide antagonists of the olfactory receptor co-receptor subunit from a mosquito.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisi Chen

    Full Text Available Insects detect environmental chemicals using chemosensory receptors, such as the ORs, a family of odorant-gated ion channels. Insect ORs are multimeric complexes of unknown stoichiometry, formed by a common subunit (the odorant receptor co-receptor subunit, Orco and one of many variable subunits that confer odorant specificity. The recent discovery of Orco directed ligands, including both agonists and antagonists, suggests Orco as a promising target for chemical control of insects. In addition to competitively inhibiting OR activation by Orco agonists, several Orco antagonists have been shown to act through a non-competitive mechanism to inhibit OR activation by odorants. We previously identified a series of Orco antagonists, including N-(4-ethylphenyl-2-thiophenecarboxamide (OX1a, previously referred to as OLC20. Here, we explore the chemical space around the OX1a structure to identify more potent Orco antagonists. Cqui\\Orco+Cqui\\Or21, an OR from Culex quinquefasciatus (the Southern House Mosquito that responds to 3-methylindole (skatole and is thought to mediate oviposition behavior, was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and receptor function assayed by two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. 22 structural analogs of OX1a were screened for antagonism of OR activation by an Orco agonist. By varying the moieties decorating the phenyl and thiophene rings, and altering the distance between the rings, we were able to identify antagonists with improved potency. Detailed examination of three of these compounds (N-mesityl-2-thiophenecarboxamide, N-(4-methylbenzyl-2-thiophenecarboxamide and N-(2-ethylphenyl-3-(2-thienyl-2-propenamide demonstrated competitive inhibition of receptor activation by an Orco agonist and non-competitive inhibition of receptor activation by an odorant. The ability to inhibit OR activation by odorants may be a general property of this class of Orco antagonist, suggesting that odorant mediated behaviors can be manipulated

  3. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of 4-phenylpyrrole derivatives as novel androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Nobuyuki; Hitaka, Takenori; Yamada, Masami; Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Junichi; Santou, Takashi; Kusaka, Masami; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Furuya, Shuichi; Tasaka, Akihiro; Hamamura, Kazumasa; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A series of 4-phenylpyrrole derivatives D were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their potential as novel orally available androgen receptor antagonists therapeutically effective against castration-resistant prostate cancers. 4-Phenylpyrrole compound 1 exhibited androgen receptor (AR) antagonistic activity against T877A and W741C mutant-type ARs as well as wild-type AR. An arylmethyl group incorporated into compound 1 contributed to enhancement of antagonistic activity. Compound 4n, 1-{[6-chloro-5-(hydroxymethyl)pyridin-3-yl]methyl}-4-(4-cyanophenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-3-carbonitrile exhibited inhibitory effects on tumor cell growth against the bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP-cxD2 cell line as well as the androgen receptor-dependent JDCaP cell line in a mouse xenograft model. These results demonstrate that this series of pyrrole compounds are novel androgen receptor antagonists with efficacy against prostate cancer cells, including castration-resistant prostate cancers such as bicalutamide-resistant prostate cancer.

  4. Therapeutic efficacy and immunological response of CCL5 antagonists in models of contact skin reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Canavese

    Full Text Available Skin-infiltrating T-cells play a predominant role in allergic and inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis. These T-cells are attracted by several chemotactic factors including the chemokine CCL5/RANTES, a CC chemokine inducing both the migration and activation of specific leukocyte subsets. CCL5 has been found to be associated with various cell-mediated hypersensitive disorders such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis. We have used two antagonists, the first, Met-CCL5, a dual CCR1/CCR5 antagonist and the second, a variant in which GAG binding is abrogated, (44AANA(47-CCL5, which acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of CCL5. The antagonists were tested in two models of contact skin reaction. The first, irritant contact dermatitis (ICD is a pathological non-specific inflammatory skin condition arising from the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by keratinocytes in response to haptens, usually chemicals. The second, contact hypersensitivity (CHS is a T-cell dependent model, mimicking in part the T-cell-mediated skin diseases such as psoriasis. In both models, the CCL5 antagonists showed therapeutic efficacy by reducing swelling by 50% as well as the reduction of soluble mediators in homogenates derived from challenged ears. These results demonstrate that blocking the receptor or the ligand are both effective strategies to inhibit skin inflammation.

  5. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  6. TENCompetence tool demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijfhout, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Kluijfhout, E. (2009). TENCompetence tool demonstration. Presented at Zorgacademie Parkstad (Health Academy Parkstad), Limburg Leisure Academy, Life Long Learning Limburg and a number of regional educational institutions. May, 18, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands, T

  7. Land Management Research Demonstration

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2002, Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge became one of the first Land Management and Research Demonstration (LMRD) sites. These sites are intended to serve as...

  8. [Antagonists of the type 3 serotonin receptor (5 -HT3) in IBS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Shunsuke; Miura, Soichiro

    2006-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) is an important neurotransmitter involved in the brain-gut connection. Alosetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, has been demonstrated in randomized, placebo-controlled trials (RCT) to be effective in diarrhea-predominant IBS(IBS-D). Constipation is the most common adverse event. Alosetron improved abdominal pain and discomfort and stool consistency in both female and male patients, but it did not improve other symptoms (sense of urgency, stool frequency and bloating) in male patients. Although less is known about the gender differences in therapeutic benefit, a new 5-HT3 antagonist, cilansetron, has demonstrated effectiveness in male and female IBS-D patients and is currently under clinical trials.

  9. Pancreaticopleural fistula : CT demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Jin Kyeung [Chuncheon Medical Center, ChunChon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the pancreaticopleural fistula is known to cause recurrent exudative or hemorrhagic pleural effusions. These are often large in volume and require treatment, unlike the effusions in acute pancreatitis. Diagnosis can be made either by the finding of elevated pleural fluid amylase level or, using imaging studies, by the direct demonstration of the fistulous tract. We report two cases of pancreaticopleural fistula demonstrated by computed tomography.

  10. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  11. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the universe (using big-bang chocolate chip cookies); differentiation during the formation of the Earth and planets (using chocolate or chocolate milk with marshmallows, cereal, candy pieces or nuts); and radioactivity/radioactive dating (using popcorn). Other possible demonstrations include: plate tectonics (crackers with peanut butter and jelly); convection (miso soup or hot chocolate); mud flows on Mars (melted chocolate poured over angel food cake); formation of the Galactic disk (pizza); formation of spiral arms (coffee with cream); the curvature of Space (Pringles); constellations patterns with chocolate chips and chocolate chip cookies; planet shaped cookies; star shaped cookies with different colored frostings; coffee or chocolate milk measurement of solar radiation; Oreo cookie lunar phases. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  12. Exploration of structure-activity relationships for dual serotonin transporter reuptake inhibitors-histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocking, Emily M; Letavic, Michael A; Bonaventure, Pascal; Carruthers, Nicholas I

    2010-01-01

    Depression is a major health issue, which is routinely treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. However, although these agents display a favorable effect on mood, they often fail to improve conditions that accompany depression including cognitive impairment and fatigue. In pre-clinical studies histamine H(3) receptor antagonists have demonstrated both pro-cognitive and wake-promoting effects suggesting that the combination of a histamine H(3) receptor antagonist and a serotonin reuptake inhibitor may have utility as an antidepressant therapy. To this end we sought to introduce histamine H(3) receptor antagonist activity into both known selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and novel templates. These efforts have afforded several series of compounds with the desired activities. Selected examples demonstrated in vivo efficacy both in pre-clinical models of depression and wakefulness.

  13. Mutually-Antagonistic Interactions in Baseball Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra, Serguei; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A; Mucha, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit interesting structural changes over time. We also find that these networks exhibit a significant network structure that is sensitive to baseball's rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions. We find that a player's position in the network does not correlate with his success in the random walker ranking but instead has a substantial effect on its sensitivity to changes in his own aggregate performance.

  14. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  15. Antagonists of IAP proteins as cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynek, Jasmin N; Vucic, Domagoj

    2013-05-28

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins play pivotal roles in cellular survival by blocking apoptosis, modulating signal transduction, and affecting cellular proliferation. Through their interactions with inducers and effectors of apoptosis IAP proteins can effectively suppress apoptosis triggered by diverse stimuli including death receptor signaling, irradiation, chemotherapeutic agents, or growth factor withdrawal. Evasion of apoptosis, in part due to the action of IAP proteins, enhances resistance of cancer cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and contributes to tumor progression. Additionally, IAP genes are known to be subject to amplification, mutation, and chromosomal translocation in human malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this review we will discuss the role of IAP proteins in cancer and the development of antagonists targeting IAP proteins for cancer treatment.

  16. The Attractiveness of Opposites: Agonists and Antagonists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Tony

    2015-02-02

    ABSTRACT Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, of which constipation is the most common aspect, is a major limiting factor in the use of opioids for pain management. The availability of an oral, long-acting formulation of oxycodone and naloxone represents a highly significant development in pain management. The combination of an opioid analgesic with an opioid antagonist offers reliable pain control with a significant reduction in the burden of opioid-induced constipation. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 3, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd, and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http:\\/\\/www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  17. A novel series of glucagon receptor antagonists with reduced molecular weight and lipophilicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipski, Kevin J; Bian, Jianwei; Ebner, David C; Lee, Esther C Y; Li, Jian-Cheng; Sammons, Matthew F; Wright, Stephen W; Stevens, Benjamin D; Didiuk, Mary T; Tu, Meihua; Perreault, Christian; Brown, Janice; Atkinson, Karen; Tan, Beijing; Salatto, Christopher T; Litchfield, John; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Guzman-Perez, Angel

    2012-01-01

    A novel series of glucagon receptor antagonists has been discovered. These pyrazole ethers and aminopyrazoles have lower molecular weight and increased polarity such that the molecules fall into better drug-like property space. This work has culminated in compounds 44 and 50 that were shown to have good pharmacokinetic attributes in dog, in contrast to rats, in which clearance was high; and compound 49, which demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in glucose excursion in a rat glucagon challenge experiment.

  18. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj; Dhevendaran Kandasamy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology), nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance), physiological (pH, temperature) and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate), soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are universally well

  19. Solar renovation demonstration projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun Joergensen, O. [ed.

    1998-10-01

    In the framework of the IEA SHC Programme, a Task on building renovation was initiated, `Task 20, Solar Energy in Building Renovation`. In a part of the task, Subtask C `Design of Solar Renovation Projects`, different solar renovation demonstration projects were developed. The objective of Subtask C was to demonstrate the application of advanced solar renovation concepts on real buildings. This report documents 16 different solar renovation demonstration projects including the design processes of the projects. The projects include the renovation of houses, schools, laboratories, and factories. Several solar techniques were used: building integrated solar collectors, glazed balconies, ventilated solar walls, transparent insulation, second skin facades, daylight elements and photovoltaic systems. These techniques are used in several simple as well as more complex system designs. (au)

  20. PARTIAL AGONISTS, FULL AGONISTS, ANTAGONISTS - DILEMMAS OF DEFINITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOYER, D; BODDEKE, HWGM

    1993-01-01

    The absence of selective antagonists makes receptor characterization difficult, and largely dependent on the use of agonists. However, there has been considerable debate as to whether certain drugs acting at G protein-coupled receptors are better described as agonists, partial agonists or antagonist

  1. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Inany, Hesham G.; Youssef, Mohamed A.; Ayeleke, Reuben Olugbenga; Brown, Julie; Lam, Wai Sun; Broekmans, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-oestrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists direct

  2. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  3. Optimisation of GnRH antagonist use in ART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdine, O.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the optimisation of controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF using exogenous FSH and GnRH antagonist co-treatment, by studying the timing of the initiation of GnRH antagonist co-medication and the role of ovarian reserve markers in optimising ovarian response and reproductive ou

  4. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deri, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  5. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  6. Demonstrating marketing accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombeski, William R; Britt, Jason; Taylor, Jan; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Adkins, Wanda; Springate, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Pressure on health care marketers to demonstrate effectiveness of their strategies and show their contribution to organizational goals is growing. A seven-tiered model based on the concepts of structure (having the right people, systems), process (doing the right things in the right way), and outcomes (results) is discussed. Examples of measures for each tier are provided and the benefits of using the model as a tool for measuring, organizing, tracking, and communicating appropriate information are provided. The model also provides a framework for helping management understand marketing's value and can serve as a vehicle for demonstrating marketing accountability.

  7. Characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Carrie H; Chan, Wai Y; Castetter, Andrea M; Watt, Marla L; Quets, Anne T; Felder, Christian C

    2016-07-05

    Identification of synthetic ligands selective for muscarinic receptor subtypes has been challenging due to the high sequence identity and structural homology among the five muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Here, we report the pharmacological characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist. PCS1055 inhibited radioligand [(3)H]-NMS binding to the M4 receptor with a Ki=6.5nM. Though the potency of PCS1055 is lower than that of pan-muscarinic antagonist atropine, it has better subtype selectivity over previously reported M4-selective reagents such as the muscarinic-peptide toxins (Karlsson et al., 1994; Santiago and Potter, 2001a) at the M1 subtype, and benzoxazine ligand PD102807 at the M3-subtype (Bohme et al., 2002). A detailed head-to-head comparison study using [(3)H]-NMS competitive binding assays characterizes the selectivity profiles of PCS1055 to that of other potent muscarinic-antagonist compounds PD102807, tropicamide, AF-DX-384, pirenzapine, and atropine. In addition to binding studies, the subtype specificity of PCS1055 is also demonstrated by functional receptor activation as readout by GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding. These GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding studies showed that PCS1055 exhibited 255-, 69.1-, 342- and >1000-fold greater inhibition of Oxo-M activity at the M4 versus the M1-, M2(-), M3-or M5 receptor subtypes, respectively. Schild analyses indicates that PCS1055 acts as a competitive antagonist to muscarinic M4 receptor, and confirms the affinity of the ligand to be low nanomolar, Kb=5.72nM. Therefore, PCS1055 represents a new M4-preferring antagonist that may be useful in elucidating the roles of M4 receptor signaling.

  8. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  9. Monty Roberts’ public demonstrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loftus, Loni; Marks, Kelly; Jones-McVey, Rosie; Gonzales, Jose L.; Fowler, Veronica L.

    2016-01-01

    Effective training of horses relies on the trainer’s awareness of learning theory and equine ethology, and should be undertaken with skill and time. Some trainers, such as Monty Roberts, share their methods through the medium of public demonstrations. This paper describes the opportunistic analys

  10. Passive damping technology demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Robert E.; Spencer, Susan M.; Austin, Eric M.; Johnson, Conor D.

    1995-05-01

    A Hughes Space Company study was undertaken to (1) acquire the analytical capability to design effective passive damping treatments and to predict the damped dynamic performance with reasonable accuracy; (2) demonstrate reasonable test and analysis agreement for both baseline and damped baseline hardware; and (3) achieve a 75% reduction in peak transmissibility and 50% reduction in rms random vibration response. Hughes Space Company teamed with CSA Engineering to learn how to apply passive damping technology to their products successfully in a cost-effective manner. Existing hardware was selected for the demonstration because (1) previous designs were lightly damped and had difficulty in vibration test; (2) multiple damping concepts could be investigated; (3) the finite element model, hardware, and test fixture would be available; and (4) damping devices could be easily implemented. Bracket, strut, and sandwich panel damping treatments that met the performance goals were developed by analysis. The baseline, baseline with damped bracket, and baseline with damped strut designs were built and tested. The test results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical predictions and demonstrated that the desired reduction in dynamic response could be achieved. Having successfully demonstrated this approach, it can now be used with confidence for future designs as a means for reducing weight and enhancing reliability.

  11. Calculus Demonstrations Using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Peter K.; Harman, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The note discusses ways in which technology can be used in the calculus learning process. In particular, five MATLAB programs are detailed for use by instructors or students that demonstrate important concepts in introductory calculus: Newton's method, differentiation and integration. Two of the programs are animated. The programs and the…

  12. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  13. PHARUS ASAR demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.J.E.; Bree, R.J.P. van; Calkoen, C.J.; Dekker, R.J.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van

    2001-01-01

    PHARUS is a polarimetric phased array C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), designed and built for airborne use. Advanced SAR (ASAR) data in image and alternating polarization mode have been simulated with PHARUS to demonstrate the use of Envisat for a number of typical SAR applications that are no

  14. Arctic Craft Demonstration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    it received a lot of attention from the local population. Demonstration personnel, both Coast Guard and contractors, were asked to be receptive to...www.uscg.mil/top/missions/ . Counter-Drug Interdiction and Alien Migrant Interdiction operations are currently not included. In the non-Polar regions

  15. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  16. Effects of different rest intervals between antagonist paired sets on repetition performance and muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Marianna F; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Paz, Gabriel A; Miranda, Humberto

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that exercising the antagonist musculature acutely enhances subsequent performance for the agonist musculature. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different rest intervals between sets for exercises that involve antagonistic muscle groups, a technique referred to as antagonist paired sets (APS). Fifteen recreationally trained men were tested for knee extension (KE) exercise performance, with or without previous knee flexion (KF) exercise for the antagonist musculature. The following protocols were performed in random order with 10 repetition maximum loads for the KF and KE exercises: (a) traditional protocol (TP)-1 set of KE only to repetition failure; (b) paired sets with minimal allowable rest (PMR)-1 set of KF followed immediately by a set of KE; (c) P30-30-second rest between paired sets of KF and KE; (d) P1-1-minute rest between paired sets; (e) P3-3-minute rest between paired sets; and (f) P5-5-minute rest between paired sets. The number of repetitions performed and electromyographic (EMG) activity of vastus lateralis, vastus medialis (VM), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles were recorded during the KE set in each protocol. It was demonstrated that significantly greater KE repetitions were completed during the PMR, P30, and P1 protocols vs. the TP protocol. Significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the RF muscle during the KE exercise in the PMR and P30 vs. the TP, P3, and P5, respectively. In addition, significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the VM muscle during the PMR vs. all other protocols. The results of this study indicate that no rest or relatively shorter rest intervals (30 seconds and 1 minute) between APS might be more effective to elicit greater agonist repetition enhancement and muscle activation.

  17. Cardiac β 2-adrenoceptor sensitization by chronic β1-selective antagonist treatment in patients with essential hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yingxin; Qi Xiaoyong; Xue Hao; Zhang Jianqing; Ma Shuping

    2002-01-01

    Objective:It has been hypothesized that with drawal of treatment with β 1-selective antagonist leads to increased sensitivity of β - adrenoceptor stimulation with isoproterenol.Several studies in vitro have shown that cardiac β 2- adrenoceptor was sensitized by β 1-selective antagonist treatment in patients with coronary heart disease.Therefore,the object of the present study was to explore in vivo to demonstrate that the cardiac β 2- adrenoceptor is sensitized in patients with essential hypertension by the chronic β 1-selective antagonis. Methods: β - adrenoceptor in peripheral lymphocytes was assessed by 3H-dihydyoalprenolol(3H-DHA) radio ligand binding. β - adrenaleptor responsiveness was measured by sulbtamol( β 2-selective agonist) in male patients with essential hypertension after β 1-selective antagonist treatment for at least 4 months (twenty cases)and.with drugs other than β 1-antagonist for at least 4 months(twenty cases).Results:In patients with β 1-selective antagonist treatment and those with non- β -antagonist treatment the maximal number of binding sites( β max)in peripheral lymphocytes was not significantly different(528+104fmol/107cell v s.571±98fmol/107cell ,P>0.05) In β 1-selective antagonist treatment group the chronotropic dose of sulbtamol(in) required to increase heart rate by 30beats/min.(CD30) was significantly lower than that in non - β -antagonist treatment group(1.8±0.3 μ g/kg v s.2.7±0.2 μ g/kg,P<0.001).The maximal fall of diastolic pressure(0.96±0.50kPa v s.0.91±0.42kPa) were not significatn changed(P>0.05) after sulbtamol injection. Conclusion:The treatment with β 1-selective antagonist led to sensitization of β 2-adrenoceptor function,while no change in β 2- adrenoceptors density in peripheral lymphocytes in vivo in patients with essential hypertension,the dissociation between function and density of cardiac β 2- adrenoceptors may partially explain the mechanism of β -antagonist withdrawal syndrome.

  18. Nucla CFB Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

  19. The Majorana Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Combs, Dustin C.; Leviner, L.; Young, A.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Konovalov, S.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, Vladimir; Bergevin, M.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Detwiler, Jason A.; Loach, J. C.; Martin, R. D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Vetter, Kai; Bertrand, F.; Cooper, R. J.; Radford, D. C.; Varner, R. L.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Boswell, M.; Elliott, S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Hime, Andrew; Kidd, M. F.; LaRoque, B. H.; Rielage, Keith; Ronquest, M. C.; Steele, David; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Gusey, K.; Kochetov, Oleg; Shirchenko, M.; Timkin, V.; Yakushev, E.; Busch, Matthew; Esterline, James H.; Tornow, Werner; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Horton, Mark; Howard, S.; Sobolev, V.; Collar, J. I.; Fields, N.; Creswick, R.; Doe, Peter J.; Johnson, R. A.; Knecht, A.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Marino, Michael G.; Miller, M. L.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Wolfe, B. A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Hazama, R.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Shima, T.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Henning, Reyco; Howe, M. A.; MacMullin, S.; Phillips, D.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Strain, J.; Vorren, Kris R.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Keller, C.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Thomas, K.; Zhang, C.; Hallin, A. L.; Keeter, K.; Mizouni, Leila; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2011-09-03

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program, including background reduction techniques, is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% to 76Ge is given.

  20. The Majorana Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Aguayo, E; Hoppe, E W; Keillor, M E; Kephart, J D; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Merriman, J; Orrell, J L; Overman, N R; Avignone, F T; Back, H O; Combs, D C; Leviner, L E; Young, A R; Barabash, A S; Konovalov, S I; Vanyushin, I; Yumatov, V; Bergevin, M; Chan, Y-D; Detwiler, J A; Loach, J C; Martin, R D; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Vetter, K; Bertrand, F E; Cooper, R J; Radford, D C; Varner, R L; Yu, C -H; Boswell, M; Elliott, S R; Gehman, V M; Hime, A; Kidd, M F; LaRoque, B H; Rielage, K; Ronquest, M C; Steele, D; Brudanin, V; Egorov, V; Gusey, K; Kochetov, O; Shirchenko, M; Timkin, V; Yakushev, E; Busch, M; Esterline, J; Tornow, W; Christofferson, C D; Horton, M; Howard, S; Sobolev, V; Collar, J I; Fields, N; Creswick, R J; Doe, P J; Johnson, R A; Knecht, A; Leon, J; Marino, M G; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G; Wolfe, B A; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Hazama, R; Nomachi, M; Shima, T; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Giovanetti, G K; Green, M P; Henning, R; Howe, M A; MacMullin, S; Phillips, D G; Snavely, K J; Strain, J; Vorren, K; Guiseppe, V E; Keller, C; Mei, D -M; Perumpilly, G; Thomas, K; Zhang, C; Hallin, A L; Keeter, K J; Mizouni, L; Wilkerson, J F

    2011-01-01

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program including background reduction techniques is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% in 76Ge is given.

  1. IGCC technology and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palonen, J. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Karhula (Finland). Hans Ahlstrom Lab.; Lundqvist, R.G. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Helsinki (Finland); Staahl, K. [Sydkraft AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    Future energy production will be performed by advanced technologies that are more efficient, more environmentally friendly and less expensive than current technologies. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants have been proposed as one of these systems. Utilising biofuels in future energy production will also be emphasised since this lowers substantially carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere due to the fact that biomass is a renewable form of energy. Combining advanced technology and biomass utilisation is for this reason something that should and will be encouraged. A. Ahlstrom Corporation of Finland and Sydkraft AB of Sweden have as one part of company strategies adopted this approach for the future. The companies have joined their resources in developing a biomass-based IGCC system with the gasification part based on pressurised circulating fluidized-bed technology. With this kind of technology electrical efficiency can be substantially increased compared to conventional power plants. As a first concrete step, a decision has been made to build a demonstration plant. This plant, located in Vaernamo, Sweden, has already been built and is now in commissioning and demonstration stage. The system comprises a fuel drying plant, a pressurised CFB gasifier with gas cooling and cleaning, a gas turbine, a waste heat recovery unit and a steam turbine. The plant is the first in the world where the integration of a pressurised gasifier with a gas turbine will be realised utilising a low calorific gas produced from biomass. The capacity of the Vaernamo plant is 6 MW of electricity and 9 MW of district heating. Technology development is in progress for design of plants of sizes from 20 to 120 MWe. The paper describes the Bioflow IGCC system, the Vaernamo demonstration plant and experiences from the commissioning and demonstration stages. (orig.)

  2. Performance of ultrasound to monitor Achilles enthesitis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis during TNF-a antagonist therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong-hua; Feng, Yuan; Ren, Zhen; Yang, Xichao; Jia, Jun-feng; Rong, Meng-yao; Li, Xue-yi; Wu, Zhen-biao

    2015-06-01

    Enthesitis is considered as the primary anatomical lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We aimed to investigate the potential of ultrasound to detect early changes after TNF-a antagonist therapy of Achilles enthesitis of AS patients. One hundred AS patients with active disease, requiring TNF-a antagonist therapy, were included (etanercept n = 25, infliximab n = 25, adalimumab n = 25, non-biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) n = 25). Physical examination was performed to evaluate disease activity and detect Achilles enthesitis and/or retrocalcaneal bursitis. Ultrasound of the Achilles enthesitis was performed bilaterally. Follow-up examinations were performed 3 months after the initiation of therapy. Gray scale (GS) scores, Power Doppler (PD) scores, and total additive scores (TS) decreased significantly during TNF-a antagonist therapy but not in traditional non-biologic traditional DMARDs group. The bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI), bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI), and Maastricht ankylosing spondylitis enthesitis score (MASES) all showed significant improvements. When three different TNF-a antagonists were analyzed separately, no significant difference was observed in GS, PD, and total scores. Subclinical Achilles enthesitis, detected only with GS ultrasound, is present in a subset of AS patients and a significant improvement can be demonstrated after 3 months of TNF-a antagonist therapy. Doppler ultrasound provides a reliable estimation to monitor the therapeutic response to TNF antagonists in AS patients with Achilles enthesitis. TNF-a antagonists have been shown to be effective in decreasing ultrasound signs of enthesitis after 3 months of therapy in AS patients.

  3. Characterization of a novel small molecule subtype specific estrogen-related receptor alpha antagonist in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Chisamore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. It was identified through a search for genes encoding proteins related to estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha. An endogenous ligand has not been found. Novel ERRalpha antagonists that are highly specific for binding to the ligand binding domain (LBD of ERRalpha have been recently reported. Research suggests that ERRalpha may be a novel drug target to treat breast cancer and/or metabolic disorders and this has led to an effort to characterize the mechanisms of action of N-[(2Z-3-(4,5-dihydro-1,3-thiazol-2-yl-1,3-thiazolidin-2-yl idene]-5H dibenzo[a,d][7]annulen-5-amine, a novel ERRalpha specific antagonist. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate this ERRalpha ligand inhibits ERRalpha transcriptional activity in MCF-7 cells by luciferase assay but does not affect mRNA levels measured by real-time RT-PCR. Also, ERalpha (ESR1 mRNA levels were not affected upon treatment with the ERRalpha antagonist, but other ERRalpha (ESRRA target genes such as pS2 (TFF1, osteopontin (SPP1, and aromatase (CYP19A1 mRNA levels decreased. In vitro, the ERRalpha antagonist prevents the constitutive interaction between ERRalpha and nuclear receptor coactivators. Furthermore, we use Western blots to demonstrate ERRalpha protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is increased by the ERRalpha-subtype specific antagonist. We demonstrate by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP that the interaction between ACADM, ESRRA, and TFF1 endogenous gene promoters and ERRalpha protein is decreased when cells are treated with the ligand. Knocking-down ERRalpha (shRNA led to similar genomic effects seen when MCF-7 cells were treated with our ERRalpha antagonist. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the mechanism of action of a novel ERRalpha specific antagonist that inhibits transcriptional activity of ERRalpha, disrupts the constitutive

  4. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis SE86 in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Scapin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the main pathogens responsible for foodborne illness in Brazil. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in defense and recovery from enteropathogenic -infections. In this study, the ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 to colonise and exert anta-gonistic effects in the gastrointestinal tract was tested before and during experimental infection in conventional mice contaminated with S. Enteritidis (SE86. A dose of 0.1 mL containing 10(8 viable cells of SE86 and L. acidophilus LA10 was orally administered by gavage to mice. The experiment was divided into groups. As a negative control, Group 1 was administered only sterile saline solution. As a positive control, Group 2 was administered only SE86. Group 3 was first administered SE86, and after 10 days, treated with L. acidophilus LA10. Group 4 was first administered L. acidophilus LA10,and after 10 days, challenged with SE86.The results demonstrated that a significant number of SE86 cells were able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of mice, specifically in the colon and ileum. L. acidophilus LA10 demonstrated an antagonistic effect against SE86, with better results observed for Group 3 over Group 4. Thus, L. acidophilus LA10 shows potential antagonistic effects against S. Enteritidis SE86, especially if administered after infection.

  5. Antagonist capacity of Newly Isolated Strains of Pseudomonas Fluorescens against Three Important Phytopathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo D.L. Cruz-Quiroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Phytopatogenic bacteria cause several damages to plants with important economical consequences. They provoke losses of product quality affecting all commercial chain of crops, for this reason, their control is a priority. Approach: We evaluated antagonist capacity of newly isolated Pseudonomas fluorescens strains against three important phytopatogenic bacteria (Clavibacter michiganensis, Xanthomonas axonopodis and Erwinia carotovora. Soils from commercial cropping of Capsicum annum L of several Mexican regions were used to isolate P. fluorescens strains. Results: Isolates producing flourescein were purified on King B agar and biochemically identified. Crude extracts with and without cells were produced in King B broths and their antagonist capacities were evaluated by the plate diffusion procedure on nutritive agar. Conclusion: Obtained results demonstrated that cell free extracts exhibited a limited antagonist capacity in comparison of those extracts with cells, which showed an excellent capacity to inhibit the growth of C. michiganensis, X. axonopodis and E. carotovora, demonstrating the intracellular nature of the bioactive metabolites associated to bacterial growth inhibition.

  6. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis SE86 in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapin, Diane; Grando, Williani Fabiola; Rossi, Eliandra Mirlei; Perez, Karla Joseane; Malheiros, Patrícia da Silva; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the main pathogens responsible for foodborne illness in Brazil. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in defense and recovery from enteropathogenic infections. In this study, the ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 to colonise and exert antagonistic effects in the gastrointestinal tract was tested before and during experimental infection in conventional mice contaminated with S. Enteritidis (SE86). A dose of 0.1 mL containing 108 viable cells of SE86 and L. acidophilus LA10 was orally administered by gavage to mice. The experiment was divided into groups. As a negative control, Group 1 was administered only sterile saline solution. As a positive control, Group 2 was administered only SE86. Group 3 was first administered SE86, and after 10 days, treated with L. acidophilus LA10. Group 4 was first administered L. acidophilus LA10, and after 10 days, challenged with SE86. The results demonstrated that a significant number of SE86 cells were able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of mice, specifically in the colon and ileum. L. acidophilus LA10 demonstrated an antagonistic effect against SE86, with better results observed for Group 3 over Group 4. Thus, L. acidophilus LA10 shows potential antagonistic effects against S. Enteritidis SE86, especially if administered after infection. PMID:24159284

  7. Fine Tuning of a Type 1 Interferon Antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Urin

    Full Text Available Type I interferons are multi-potent cytokines that serve as first line of defense against viruses and other pathogens, posses immunomudolatory functions and elicit a growth inhibitory response. In recent years it has been shown that interferons are also detrimental, for example in lupus, AIDS, tuberculosis and cognitive decline, highlighted the need to develop interferon antagonists. We have previously developed the antagonist IFN-1ant, with much reduced binding to the IFNAR1 receptor and enhanced binding to IFNAR2. Here, we further tune the IFN-1ant by producing three additional antagonists based on IFN-1ant but with altered activity profiles. We show that in all three cases the antiproliferative activity of interferons is blocked and the induction of gene transcription of immunomudolatory and antiproliferative associated genes are substantially decreased. Conversely, each of the new antagonists elicits a different degree of antiviral response, STAT phosphorylation and related gene induction. Two of the new antagonists promote decreased activity in relation to the original IFN-1ant, while one of them promotes increased activity. As we do not know the exact causes of the detrimental effects of IFNs, the four antagonists that were produced and analyzed provide the opportunity to investigate the extent of antagonistic and agonistic activity optimal for a given condition.

  8. Antagonistic Neural Networks Underlying Differentiated Leadership Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eleftherios Boyatzis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950’s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task oriented and socio-emotional oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks -- the Task Positive Network (TPN and the Default Mode Network (DMN. Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  9. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  10. Learning From Demonstration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor

    2014-01-01

    , and micro combined heat and power using hydrogen. Using sociological and business economic theories of innovation, the paper discusses how early movers of innovation tend to obtain only partial success when demonstrating their products and often feel obstructed by minor details. The empirical work...... encompasses both an evaluation of the design and Construction process as well as a post-occupancy evaluation. Process experiences include the use of a multidisciplinary competence group and performance measurement. The commencement of the project was enthusiastic, but it was forced into more traditional forms...

  11. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships and Docking Studies of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Kyani, Anahita

    2012-01-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range...... of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression....... The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model...

  12. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation.

  13. Molecular characterization of soil bacteria antagonistic to Rhizoctonia solani, sheath blight of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padaria, Jasdeep C; Singh, Aqbal

    2009-05-01

    Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 has been identified as a potent isolate against Rhizocotonia solani, the fungal pathogen causing sheath blight in rice. The study aimed at probing the role of a 23kb size plasmid pJCP07 of Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 in its fungal antagonism towards Rhizocotonia solani. Plasmid pJCP07 was found to be involved in production of a fungal antagonistic compound as demonstrated by plasmid curing and conjugational transfer experiments. Tn5 insertional studies further confirmed that the plasmid pJCP07 of Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 carries some of the gene(s) involved in production of compound antagonistic to Rhizocotonia solani. The plasmid pJCP07 is thus a mobilizable medium-sized plasmid carrying genes responsible for antagonism of Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 towards Rhizocotonia solani.

  14. PFBC Utility Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

  15. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Craig [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Carroll, Paul [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Bell, Abigail [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  16. Antagonists of toll like receptor 4 maybe a new strategy to counteract opioid-induced hyperalgesia and opioid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian

    2012-12-01

    Long term opioid treatment results in hyperalgesia and tolerance, which is a troublesome phenomenon in clinic application. Recent studies have revealed a critical role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the neuropathological process of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance. TLR4 is predominantly expressed by microglial cells and is a key modulator in the activation of the innate immune system. Activation of TLR4 may initiate the activation of microglia and hence a number of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators that could enhance neuronal excitability are released. Blockade of TLR4 activation by its antagonists alleviate neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that opioid antagonists such as naloxone and naltrexone, which were also demonstrated to be TLR4 antagonist, may have clinic application value in attenuation of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance.

  17. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  18. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  19. Identification of a novel conformationally constrained glucagon receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther C Y; Tu, Meihua; Stevens, Benjamin D; Bian, Jianwei; Aspnes, Gary; Perreault, Christian; Sammons, Matthew F; Wright, Stephen W; Litchfield, John; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Sharma, Raman; Didiuk, Mary T; Ebner, David C; Filipski, Kevin J; Brown, Janice; Atkinson, Karen; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Guzman-Perez, Angel

    2014-02-01

    Identification of orally active, small molecule antagonists of the glucagon receptor represents a novel treatment paradigm for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present work discloses novel glucagon receptor antagonists, identified via conformational constraint of current existing literature antagonists. Optimization of lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE or LipE) culminated in enantiomers (+)-trans-26 and (-)-trans-27 which exhibit good physicochemical and in vitro drug metabolism profiles. In vivo, significant pharmacokinetic differences were noted with the two enantiomers, which were primarily driven through differences in clearance rates. Enantioselective oxidation by cytochrome P450 was ruled out as a causative factor for pharmacokinetic differences.

  20. New potential uroselective NO-donor alpha1-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Donatella; Tron, Gian Cesare; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Poggesi, Elena; Motta, Gianni; Leonardi, Amedeo

    2003-08-14

    A recent uroselective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, REC15/2739, has been joined with nitrooxy and furoxan NO-donor moieties to give new NO-donor alpha(1)-antagonists. All the compounds studied proved to be potent and selective ligands of human cloned alpha(1a)-receptor subtype. Derivatives 6 and 7 were able to relax the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens contracted by (-)-noradrenaline because of both their alpha(1A)-antagonist and their NO-donor properties.

  1. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1-3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  2. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith E; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-04-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to "fight" the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations.

  3. Histamine and histamine receptor antagonists in cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Bruno; Nicolau-Galmés, Francesca; Jangi, Shawkat M; Ortega-Martínez, Idoia; Alonso-Tejerina, Erika; Burgos-Bretones, Juan; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Asumendi, Aintzane; Boyano, María D

    2010-07-01

    Histamine has been demonstrated to be involved in cell proliferation, embryonic development, and tumour growth. These various biological effects are mediated through the activation of specific histamine receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4) that differ in their tissue expression patterns and functions. Although many in vitro and in vivo studies of the modulatory roles of histamine in tumour development and metastasis have been reported, the effect of histamine in the progression of some types of tumours remains controversial; however, recent findings on the role of histamine in the immune system have shed new light on this question. This review focuses on the recent advances in understanding the roles of histamine and its receptors in tumour biology. We report our recent observations of the anti-tumoural effect of H1 histamine antagonists on experimental and human melanomas. We have found that in spite of exogenous histamine stimulated human melanoma cell proliferation, clonogenic ability and migration activity in a dose-dependent manner, the melanoma tumour growth was not modulated by in vivo histamine treatment. On the contrary, terfenadine-treatment in vitro induced melanoma cell death by apoptosis and in vivo terfenadine treatment significantly inhibited tumour growth in murine models. These observations increase our understanding of cancer biology and may inspire novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

  4. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  5. Kinetic properties of 'dual' orexin receptor antagonists at OX1R and OX2R orexin receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Elizabeth Callander

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orexin receptor antagonists represent attractive targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of insomnia. Both efficacy and safety are crucial in clinical settings and thorough investigations of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can predict contributing factors such as duration of action and undesirable effects. To this end, we studied the interactions between various ‘dual’ orexin receptor antagonists and the orexin receptors, OX1R and OX2R, over time using saturation and competition radioligand binding with [3H]-BBAC ((S-N-([1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl-1-(2-((1-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylthioacetylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide. In addition, the kinetics of these compounds were investigated in cells expressing human, mouse and rat OX1R and OX2R using FLIPR® assays for calcium accumulation. We demonstrate that almorexant reaches equilibrium very slowly at OX2R, whereas SB-649868, suvorexant and filorexant may take hours to reach steady state at both orexin receptors. By contrast, compounds such as BBAC or the selective OX2R antagonist IPSU ((2-((1H-Indol-3-ylmethyl-9-(4-methoxypyrimidin-2-yl-2,9-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-1-one bind rapidly and reach equilibrium very quickly in both binding and / or functional assays. Overall, the dual antagonists tested here tend to be rather unselective under non-equilibrium conditions and reach equilibrium very slowly. Once equilibrium is reached, each ligand demonstrates a selectivity profile that is however, distinct from the non-equilibrium condition. The slow kinetics of the dual antagonists tested suggest that in vitro receptor occupancy may be longer lasting than would be predicted. This raises questions as to whether pharmacokinetic studies measuring plasma or brain levels of these antagonists are accurate reflections of receptor occupancy in vivo.

  6. The pharmacological properties of lipophilic calcium antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zwieten, P A

    1998-01-01

    Several types of calcium antagonists (CA) (verapamil, diltiazem, nifedipine and related drugs) may be used as antihypertensives. In practice, the dihydropyridines (nifedipine and related drugs) are the CA used most frequently as antihypertensives. Apart from the lowering of blood pressure CA may lead to other, theoretically beneficial, effects: regression of left ventricular and vascular hypertrophy, renal protection, weak natriuretic, weak antiplatelet, anti-ischaemic and antiatherogenic activity. Several new dihydropyridine CA have been introduced in recent years. The advantages of the newer compounds, such as amlodipine, felodipine, isradipine, lacidipine and lercanidipine, may include: vasoselectivity, hence little or no cardiodepressant activity; an improved kinetic profile, resulting in a slow onset and long duration of action, fewer side-effects such as reflex tachycardia and headache, owing to the slow onset of the antihypertensive action. For a few newer CA a predominant effect on specialized circulatory beds (renal, coronary and cerebral) has been claimed. The new CA, which are clearly lipophilic, deserve special attention. Owing to the lipophilic character of such compounds considerable concentration occurs in lipid-containing membrane depots. The CA thus concentrated are slowly released from these depots and, subsequently, reach their targets, the L-type calcium channels. This phenomenon explains both the slow onset and the long duration of action of these CA. Owing to the slow onset of action reflex tachycardia is virtually absent. The long duration of action allows satisfactory control of blood pressure in hypertensives by means of a single daily dose. A few lipophilic dihydropyridine CA are vasoselective. This property implies that at therapeutic, vasodilatory dosages no cardiodepressant activity occurs. Lercanidipine is a recently introduced example of a lipophilic and vasoselective dihydropyridine CA. It is an effective vasodilator

  7. A SELECTIVE ANTAGONIST OF MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR EPLERENONE IN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Gegenava

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of aldosterone in pathophysiological processes is considered. The effects of the selective antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor eplerenone are analyzed. The advantages of eplerenone compared with spironolactone are discussed.

  8. Structure-based drug design identifies novel LPA3 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fells, James I; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Liu, Jianxiong; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L

    2009-11-01

    Compound 5 ([5-(3-nitrophenoxy)-1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-2-isoindol-2-yl]acetic acid) was identified as a weak selective LPA(3) antagonist (IC(50)=4504 nM) in a virtual screening effort to optimize a dual LPA(2 and 3) antagonist. Structure-based drug design techniques were used to prioritize similarity search matches of compound 5. This strategy rapidly identified 10 novel antagonists. The two most efficacious compounds identified inhibit activation of the LPA(3) receptor by 200 nM LPA with IC(50) values of 752 nM and 2992 nM. These compounds additionally define changes to our previously reported pharmacophore that will improve its ability to identify more potent and selective LPA(3) receptor antagonists. The results of the combined computational and experimental screening are reported.

  9. Perampanel: A Selective AMPA Antagonist for Treating Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Krauss, Gregory L.

    2013-01-01

    Perampanel is a selective, noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that has recently been approved for treating localization-related epilepsy. This article reviews the pharmacology, clinical development, efficacy, and safety/tolerability of perampanel.

  10. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  11. Tidd PFBC demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrocco, M. [American Electric Power, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Tidd project was one of the first joint government-industry ventures to be approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in its Clean Coal Technology Program. In March 1987, DOE signed an agreement with the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power, to refurbish the then-idle Tidd plant on the banks of the Ohio River with advanced pressurized fluidized bed technology. Testing ended after 49 months of operation, 100 individual tests, and the generation of more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity. The demonstration plant has met its objectives. The project showed that more than 95 percent of sulfur dioxide pollutants could be removed inside the advanced boiler using the advanced combustion technology, giving future power plants an attractive alternative to expensive, add-on scrubber technology. In addition to its sulfur removal effectiveness, the plant`s sustained periods of steady-state operation boosted its availability significantly above design projections, heightening confidence that pressurized fluidized bed technology will be a reliable, baseload technology for future power plants. The technology also controlled the release of nitrogen oxides to levels well below the allowable limits set by federal air quality standards. It also produced a dry waste product that is much easier to handle than wastes from conventional power plants and will likely have commercial value when produced by future power plants.

  12. Nuclear power demonstrating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmajian, V. V.; Haldeman, C. W.

    1980-08-12

    Apparatus for demonstrating the operation of a closed loop nuclear steam electric generating plant includes a transparent boiler assembly having immersion heating elements, which may be quartz lamps or stainless steel encased resistive immersion heating units with a quartz iodide lamp providing a source of visible radiation when using the encased immersion heating units. A variable voltage autotransformer is geared to a support rod for simulated reactor control rods for controlling the energy delivered to the heating elements and arranged so that when the voltage is high, the rods are withdrawn from the boiler to produce increased heating and illumination proportional to rod position, thereby simulating nuclear reaction. A relief valve, steam outlet pipe and water inlet pipe are connected to the boiler with a small stainless steel resistive heating element in the steam outlet pipe providing superheat. This heater is connected in series with a rheostat mounted on the front panel to provide superheat adjustments and an interlock switch that prevents the superheater from being energized when the steam valve is off with with no flow through the superheater. A heavy blue plastic radiation shield surrounds the boiler inside a bell jar.

  13. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists as immunomodulators: new therapeutic views?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    from such studies are currently accumulating and suggest that the histamine-2 receptor antagonists have potential beneficial effects in the treatment of certain malignant, autoimmune and skin diseases, either alone or in combination with other drugs. The beneficial effect of histamine-2 receptor...... antagonists as adjuvant single drugs to reduce trauma-, blood transfusion- and sepsis-induced immunosuppression has led to research in combined treatment regimens in major surgery, particularly, of patients operated on for malignant diseases....

  14. Structure-activity relationships of benzothiazole GPR35 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalhameed, Manahil M; Zhao, Pingwei; Hurst, Dow P; Reggio, Patricia H; Abood, Mary E; Croatt, Mitchell P

    2017-02-01

    The first structure-activity relationships for a benzothiazole scaffold acting as an antagonist at GPR35 is presented. Analogues were designed based on a lead compound that was previously determined to have selective activity as a GPR35 antagonist. The synthetic route was modular in nature to independently explore the role of the middle and both ends of the scaffold. The activities of the analogues illustrate the importance of all three segments of the compound.

  15. Deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist responsive to anakinra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnellbacher, Charlotte; Ciocca, Giovanna; Menendez, Roxanna; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Duarte, Ana M; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acute-phase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy.

  16. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad eKhanfar; Anna eAffini; Kiril eLutsenko; Katarina eNikolic; Stefania eButini; Holger eStark

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex...

  17. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists as induction therapy after heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Gustafsson, Finn; Gluud, Christian;

    2008-01-01

    About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras.......About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras....

  18. Xerostomia: prevalence and pharmacotherapy. With special reference to beta-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederfors, T

    1996-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to estimate the prevalence of subjectively perceived dry mouth, xerostomia, in a representative general adult population, and the possible co-morbidity between xerostomia and on-going pharmacotherapy. Further, to evaluate the effects of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on saliva flow rate and composition. The prevalence of xerostomia was evaluated by means of a questionnaire mailed to a random sample of 4.200 adult subjects living in the southern part of the province of Halland, Sweden. Three hundred men and equally many women aged 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 years were selected from the national census register. From 3311 (81%) evaluable questionnaires was concluded that, in the studied population, 21.3% of the men and 27.3% of the women reported xerostomia. The difference between the sexes was statistically significant, women reporting higher prevalence of dry mouth than men. It was also found that xerostomia was significantly age-related. Further, it was demonstrated that there was a strong co-morbidity between reported prevalence of dry mouth and on-going pharmacotherapy. Generally, no specific drug or drug-group proved to be especially xerogenic, rather, polypharmacy was strongly correlated to reported symptoms of dry mouth, and it was also a significant correlation between increasing xerostomia and the number of medications taken. The effects of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on saliva flow rate and composition were evaluated both in healthy volunteers and in hypertensive patients. The effects of one week of treatment with the non-selective (propranolol) and the beta 1-selective (atenolol) adrenoceptor antagonists were compared with that of placebo in three different clinical trials, including 38, 11 and 19 healthy volunteers, respectively. Two of these studies were focused on the effects on whole saliva secretion rate and composition and the third study on the secretions from the parotid and the submandibular

  19. Interfering with Resistance to Smoothened Antagonists by Inhibition of the PI3K Pathway in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonamici, Silvia; Williams, Juliet; Morrissey, Michael; Wang, Anlai; Guo, Ribo; Vattay, Anthony; Hsiao, Kathy; Yuan, Jing; Green, John; Ospina, Beatrice; Yu, Qunyan; Ostrom, Lance; Fordjour, Paul; Anderson, Dustin L.; Monahan, John E.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Peukert, Stefan; Pan, Shifeng; Wu, Xu; Maira, Sauveur-Michel; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Briggs, Kimberly J.; Watkins, D. Neil; Yao, Yung-mae; Lengauer, Christoph; Warmuth, Markus; Sellers, William R.; Dorsch, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in Hedgehog (Hh) pathway genes, leading to constitutive activation of Smoothened (Smo), occur in medulloblastoma. Antagonists of Smo induce tumor regression in mouse models of medulloblastoma and hold great promise for treating this disease. However, acquired resistance has emerged as a challenge to targeted therapeutics and may limit their anti-cancer efficacy. Here, we describe novel mechanisms of acquired resistance to Smo antagonists in medulloblastoma. NVP-LDE225, a potent and selective Smo antagonist, inhibits Hh signaling and induces tumor regressions in allograft models of medulloblastoma that are driven by mutations of Patched (Ptch), a tumor suppressor in the Hh pathway. However, evidence of resistance was observed during the course of treatment. Molecular analysis of resistant tumors revealed distinct resistance mechanisms. Chromosomal amplification of Gli2, a downstream effector of Hh signaling, or more rarely point mutations in Smo led to reactivated Hh signaling and restored tumor growth. Unexpectedly, analysis of pathway gene-expression signatures selectively deregulated in resistant tumors identified increased phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling as another potential resistance mechanism. Probing the functional relevance of increased PI3K signaling, we demonstrated that the combination of NVP-LDE225 with the PI3K class I inhibitor NVP-BKM120 or the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 markedly delayed the development of resistance. Our findings have important clinical implications for future treatment strategies in medulloblastoma. PMID:20881279

  20. FGFR antagonist induces protective autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wang, Peiqi; Jing, Qian; Yue, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Jingyi; Song, Haixing; Li, Guoyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Jinhui

    2016-05-20

    Breast cancer, representing approximately 30% of all gynecological cancer cases diagnosed yearly, is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for women. Amplification of FGFR1 is frequently observed in breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Though FGFRs have long been considered as anti-cancer drug targets, and a cluster of FGFR antagonists are currently under clinical trials, the precise cellular responses under the treatment of FGFR antagonists remains unclear. Here, we show that PD166866, an FGFR1-selective inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and triggers anoikis in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines. Notably, we demonstrate that PD166866 induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines, while blockage of autophagy by Atg5 knockdown further enhances the anti-proliferative activities of PD166866. Moreover, mechanistic study reveals that PD166866 induces autophagy through repressing Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of FGFR antagonists, and may further assist the FGFRs-based drug discovery.

  1. Retinoid antagonists inhibit normal patterning during limb regeneration in the axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rincón, Sonia V; Scadding, Steven R

    2002-04-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) has been detected in the regenerating limb of the axolotl, and exogenous RA can proximalize, posteriorize, and ventralize blastemal cells. Thus, RA may be an endogenous regulatory factor during limb regeneration. We have investigated whether endogenous retinoids are essential for patterning during axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) limb regeneration by using retinoid antagonists that bind to specific RAR (retinoic acid receptor) or RXR (retinoid X receptor) retinoid receptor subtypes. Retinoid antagonists (Ro41-5253, Ro61-8431, LE135, and LE540) were administered to regenerating limbs using implanted silastin blocks loaded with each antagonist. The skeletal pattern of regenerated limbs treated with Ro41-5253 or Ro61-8431 differed only slightly from control limbs. Treatment with LE135 inhibited limb regeneration, while treatment with LE540 allowed relatively normal limb regeneration. When LE135 and LE540 were implanted together, regeneration was not completely inhibited and a hand-like process regenerated. These results demonstrate that interfering with retinoid receptors can modify pattern in the regenerating limb indicating that endogenous retinoids are important during patterning of the regenerating limb.

  2. Inter-genomic sexual conflict drives antagonistic coevolution in harvester ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Michael; Cahan, Sara Helms

    2014-12-22

    The reproductive interests of males and females are not always aligned, leading to sexual conflict over parental investment, rate of reproduction and mate choice. Traits that increase the genetic interests of one sex often occur at the expense of the other, selecting for counter-adaptations leading to antagonistic coevolution. Reproductive conflict is not limited to intraspecific interactions; interspecific hybridization can produce pronounced sexual conflict between males and females of different species, but it is unclear whether such conflict can drive sexually antagonistic coevolution between reproductively isolated genomes. We tested for hybridization-driven sexually antagonistic adaptations in queens and males of the socially hybridogenetic 'J' lineages of Pogonomyrmex harvester ants, whose mating system promotes hybridization in queens but selects against it in males. We conducted no-choice mating assays to compare patterns of mating behaviour and sperm transfer between inter- and intra-lineage pairings. There was no evidence for mate discrimination on the basis of pair type, and the total quantity of sperm transferred did not differ between intra- and inter-lineage pairs; however, further dissection of the sperm transfer process into distinct mechanistic components revealed significant, and opposing, cryptic manipulation of copulatory investment by both sexes. Males of both lineages increased their rate of sperm transfer to high-fitness intra-lineage mates, with a stronger response in the rarer lineage for whom mating mistakes are the most likely. By contrast, the total duration of copulation for intra-lineage mating pairs was significantly shorter than for inter-lineage crosses, suggesting that queens respond to prevent excessive sperm loading by prematurely terminating copulation. These findings demonstrate that sexual conflict can lead to antagonistic coevolution in both intra-genomic and inter-genomic contexts. Indeed, the resolution of sexual conflict

  3. Antagonist profile of ibodutant at the tachykinin NK2 receptor in guinea pig isolated bronchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santicioli, Paolo; Meini, Stefania; Giuliani, Sandro; Lecci, Alessandro; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2013-10-24

    In this study we have characterized the pharmacological profile of the non-peptide tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist ibodutant (MEN15596) in guinea pig isolated main bronchi contractility. The antagonist potency of ibodutant was evaluated using the selective NK2 receptor agonist [βAla(8)]NKA(4-10)-mediated contractions of guinea pig isolated main bronchi. In this assay ibodutant (30, 100 and 300nM) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the [βAla(8)]NKA(4-10) concentration-response curves without affecting the maximal contractile effect. The analysis of the results yielded a Schild-plot linear regression with a slope not different from unity (0.95, 95% c.l. 0.65-1.25), thus indicating a surmountable behaviour. The calculated apparent antagonist potency as pKB value was 8.31±0.05. Ibodutant (0.3-100nM), produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) contractile response induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic airway nerves in guinea pig isolated main bronchi. At the highest concentration tested (100nM) ibodutant almost abolished the EFS-induced bronchoconstriction (95±4% inhibition), the calculated IC50 value was 2.98nM (95% c.l. 1.73-5.16nM). In bronchi from ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized guinea pigs ibodutant (100nM) did not affect the maximal contractile response to OVA, but completely prevented the slowing in the fading of the motor response induced by phosphoramidon pretreatment linked to the endogenous neurokinin A release. Altogether, the present study demonstrate that ibodutant is a potent NK2 receptor antagonist in guinea pig airways.

  4. The BMP2 antagonist inhibitor L51P enhances the osteogenic potential of BMP2 by simultaneous and delayed synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Hany Mohamed; Ono, Mitsuaki; Sonoyama, Wataru; Oida, Yasutaka; Shinkawa, Shigehiko; Yoshioka, Yuya; Maekawa, Kenji; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sugama, Kazushige; Sebald, Walter; Kuboki, Takuo

    2014-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) is a potent osteoinductive cytokine that plays crucial roles in bone repair. However, large amounts of BMP2 are required to induce sufficient bone formation in humans possibly due to a feedback response of BMP antagonists. The engineered BMP2 variant L51P is deficient in BMP receptor type I activation but maintains affinity for BMP antagonists and can allow for the inactivation of BMP antagonists, and eventually enhance BMP2 action. As hypothesized, simultaneous addition of L51P enhanced the BMP2-induced osteogenesis. To test the ability of L51P to competitively inactivate BMP antagonists, cell binding affinity of BMP2 ligands was investigated in the presence or absence of L51P. Because the BMP antagonists were highly expressed 3 days after exogenous BMP2 stimulation, we collected supernatants from 3-day stimulated cell cultures and used as condition culture media (CM). The results showed a significant decrease in the cell binding of BMP2 ligands when cells were incubated with exogenous BMP2 and CM, whereas L51P addition competitively rescued the suppression of BMP2-to-cell binding induced by CM incubation. In a delayed experimental model, L51P was applied 3 days after exogenous BMP2 stimulation and we could observe a striking enhancement of the BMP2-induced SMAD-1/5/8 phosphorylation and luciferase activity of the Id1 promoter compared to the simultaneous addition of the two factors. These findings provide a deeper insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the effect of L51P in suppressing the BMP antagonists and enhancing BMP activity. Additionally, these results demonstrate that L51P is a promising down regulator of BMP-induced negative feedback, which could have a significant impact in future applications of BMP2 in research and clinical settings.

  5. Primary cardiac B cell lymphoma: Manifestation of Felty's syndrome or TNFα antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerdjeb, Nazim; Ameur, Fatima; Ikoli, Jean-Fortune; Sevestre, Henri

    2016-12-01

    Primary cardiac B cell lymphoma is rare. To date, fewer than 90 cases have been described in the literature. We report a 67-year-old woman with a 30-year history of rheumatoid arthritis, who had received treatment with leflunomide for 10 years and infliximab for 2 years. Secondary Felty's syndrome appeared. She was admitted to the hospital for abdominal pain. Investigations disclosed a 5cm cardiac mass in the right atrium. Histopathologic examination of tissue specimens obtained at surgical myocardial biopsy demonstrated primary cardiac B cell lymphoma. The other iatrogenic lymphoproliferative disorders are reviewed. This lesion might be a manifestation of long term TNFα antagonists treatment.

  6. Hydroxylated analogues of 5-aminovaleric acid as 4-aminobutyric acidB receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, U; Hedegaard, A; Herdeis, C;

    1992-01-01

    The (R) and (S) forms of 5-amino-2-hydroxyvaleric acid (2-OH-DAVA) and 5-amino-4-hydroxyvaleric acid (4-OH-DAVA) were designed as structural hybrids of the 4-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist (R)-(-)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [(R)-(-)-3-OH-GABA] and the GABAB antagonist 5-aminovaleric acid....... All four compounds were weak inhibitors of GABAA receptor binding in rat brain, and none of them significantly affected synaptosomal GABA uptake. Based on molecular modeling studies it has been demonstrated that low-energy conformations of (R)-(-)-3-OH-GABA, (S)-(-)-2-OH-DAVA, and (R)-(-)-4-OH...

  7. A pharmacophore model for dopamine D4 receptor antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Jonas; Gundertofte, Klaus; Liljefors, Tommy

    2000-11-01

    A pharmacophore model for dopamine D4 antagonists has been developed on the basis of a previously reported dopamine D2 model. By using exhaustive conformational analyses (MM3* force field and the GB/SA hydration model) and least-squares molecular superimposition studies, a set of eighteen structurally diverse high affinity D4 antagonists have successfully been accommodated in the D4 pharmacophore model. Enantioselectivities may be rationalized by conformational energies required for the enantiomers to adopt their proposed bioactive conformations. The pharmacophore models for antagonists at the D4 and D2 receptor subtypes have been compared in order to get insight into molecular properties of importance for D2/D4 receptor selectivity. It is concluded that the bioactive conformations of antagonists at the two receptor subtypes are essentially identical. Receptor essential volumes previously identified for the D2 receptor are shown to be present also in the D4 receptor. In addition, a novel receptor essential volume in the D4 receptor, not present in the D2 receptor, has been identified. This feature may be exploited for the design of D4 selective antagonists. However, it is concluded that the major determinant for D2/D4 selectivity is the nature of the interactions between the receptor and aromatic ring systems. The effects of the electronic properties of these ring systems on the affinities for the two receptor subtypes differ substantially.

  8. Antagonist targeting microRNA-155 protects against lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in C57BL/6 mice by activating brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengxu eCai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a severe brain disorder affecting numerous patients. Recently, it is inferred that modulation of microRNA-155 (miR-155 could serve as a promising treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. In the current study, the therapeutic potential of miR-155 antagonist against TLE was evaluated and the underlying mechanism involved in this regulation was explored. TLE model was induced by lithium-pilocarpine method. The effect of miR-155 antagonist on epilepticus symptoms of TLE mice was assessed using Racine classification and electroencephalogram (EEG recordings. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its association with miR-155 were also assessed with a series of experiments. Our results showed that level of miR-155 was significantly up-regulated after induction of TLE model. Based on the results of EEG and behavior analyses, seizures in mice were alleviated by miR-155 antagonist. Moreover, administration of miR-155 antagonist also significantly increased the level of BDNF. The results of dual luciferase assay and western blotting showed that miR-155 antagonist exerted its action on status epilepticus by directly regulating the activity of BDNF. Taken all the information together, our results demonstrated that miR-155 antagonist might firstly induce the expression of BDNF, which then contributed to the alleviation of epilepsy in the current study.

  9. The Use of Chlorella Vulgaris in a Simple Demonstration of Heavy Metal Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipps, J. F.; Biro, P.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental system, suitable for secondary schools, uses Chlorella vulgaris to demonstrate the effects of mercury and cadmium. Very low concentrations of mercury or cadmium decrease growth, whereas lead or arsenic have little effect. Further experiments show additive interactions between mercury and cadmium and antagonistic interactions…

  10. The Apolipoprotein E Antagonistic Pleiotropy Hypothesis: Review and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Tuminello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on apolipoprotein E (APOE has consistently revealed a relationship between the gene's ε4 allele and risk for development of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, research with younger populations of ε4 carriers has suggested that the APOE ε4 allele may in fact be beneficial in earlier ages and may only confer risk of cognitive decline later in life. Accordingly, we and others have proposed that APOE may represent an example of antagonistic pleiotropy. Antagonistic pleiotropy is an evolutionary biology concept that proposes certain genes or alleles that may differentially impact fitness during different life stages. We critically review this hypothesis in light of new research of the impact of APOE on cognition and neural integrity across the lifespan. We provide recommendations for the revision of the antagonistic pleiotropy hypothesis of APOE and suggest important avenues for future research in this area.

  11. Discovery of the improved antagonistic prolactin variants by library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Gong, Wei; Breinholt, Jens; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Zhang, Jinchao; Ma, Qinhong; Chen, Jianhe; Panina, Svetlana; Guo, Wei; Li, Tengkun; Zhang, Jingyuan; Kong, Meng; Liu, Zibing; Mao, Jingjing; Christensen, Leif; Hu, Sean; Wang, Lingyun

    2011-11-01

    Prolactin (PRL), a potent growth stimulator of the mammary epithelium, has been suggested to be a factor contributing to the development and progression of breast and prostate cancer. Several PRL receptor (PRLR) antagonists have been identified in the past decades, but their in vivo growth inhibitory potency was restricted by low receptor affinity, rendering them pharmacologically unattractive for clinical treatment. Thus, higher receptor affinity is essential for the development of improved PRLR antagonistic variants with improved in vivo potency. In this study, we generated Site 1 focused protein libraries of human G129R-PRL mutants and screened for those with increased affinity to the human PRLR. By combining the mutations with enhanced affinities for PRLR, we identified a novel G129R-PRL variant with mutations at Site 1 that render nearly 50-fold increase in the antagonistic potency in vitro.

  12. ANTAGONISTIC BACTERIA AGAINST SCHIZOPHYLLUM COMMUNE FR. IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTARJO DIKIN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophyllum commune Fr., is one of the important fungi, causes brown germ and seed rot of oil palm. Biodiversity of antagonistic bacteria from oil palm plantations in Peninsular Malaysia is expected to support in development of biopesticide. Isolation with liquid assay and screening antagonistic bacteria using dual culture assay were carried out in the bioexploration. A total of 265 bacterial isolates from plant parts of oil palm screened 52 antagonistic bacterial isolates against 5. commune. Bacterial isolates were identified by using Biolog* Identification System i.e. Bacillus macroccanus, B. thermoglucosidasius, Burkholderia cepacia, B. gladioli, B. multivorans, B pyrrocinia, B. spinosa, Corynebacterium agropyri, C. misitidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Microbacterium testaceum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. citronellolis, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, Serratia ficaria, Serratia sp., S. marcescens, Staphylococcus sciuri, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia.

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  14. First Irish birth following IVF therapy using antagonist protocol.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mocanu, E V

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: During in vitro fertilization (IVF), the prevention of a premature LH surge was traditionally achieved using a gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a), and more recently, a GnRH antagonist. AIMS: We report a case of a 37 year old treated using the GnRH antagonist in a second completed cycle of IVF. METHODS: IVF was performed for primary infertility of 5-year duration due to frozen pelvis secondary to endometriosis. RESULTS: Following controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, oocyte recovery and fertilization, cleavage and transfer of two zygotes, a pregnancy established. A twin gestation was diagnosed at 7-weeks scan and pregnancy ended with the delivery of twin girls by emergency caesarean section. CONCLUSION: This is a first report of a delivery following IVF using the antagonist protocol in Ireland. Such therapy is patient friendly and its use should be introduced on a larger scale in clinical practice.

  15. Development and characterization of high affinity leptins and leptin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-02-11

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin.

  16. Development and Characterization of High Affinity Leptins and Leptin Antagonists*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin. PMID:21119198

  17. Phenylethanol promotes adhesion and biofilm formation of the antagonistic yeast Kloeckera apiculata for the control of blue mold on citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Liu; Jingfan, Fang; Kai, Chen; Chao-an, Long; Yunjiang, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    The yeast Kloeckera apiculata strain 34-9 is an antagonist with biological control activity against postharvest diseases of citrus fruit. In a previous study it was demonstrated that K. apiculata produced the aromatic alcohol phenylethanol. In the present study, we found that K. apiculata was able to form biofilm on citrus fruit and embed in an extracellular matrix, which created a mechanical barrier interposed between the wound surface and pathogen. As a quorum-sensing molecule, phenylethanol can promote the formation of filaments by K. apiculata in potato dextrose agar medium, whereas on the citrus fruit, the antagonist remains as yeast after being treated with the same concentration of phenylethanol. It only induced K. apiculata to adhere and form biofilm. Following genome-wide computational and experimental identification of the possible genes associated with K. apiculata adhesion, we identified nine genes possibly involved in triggering yeast adhesion. Six of these genes were significantly induced after phenylethanol stress treatment. This study provides a new model system of the biology of the antagonist-pathogen interactions that occur in the antagonistic yeast K. apiculata for the control of blue mold on citrus caused by Penicillium italicum.

  18. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-05

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems.

  19. In vitro antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius and their fermentative broth on periodontal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Ju Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As lactobacilli possess an antagonistic growth property, these bacteria may be beneficial as bioprotective agents for infection control. However, whether the antagonistic growth effects are attributed to the lactobacilli themselves or their fermentative broth remains unclear. The antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum as well as their fermentative broth were thus tested using both disc agar diffusion test and broth dilution method, and their effects on periodontal pathogens, including Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalisin vitro at different concentrations and for different time periods were also compared. Both Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum and their concentrated fermentative broth were shown to inhibit significantly the growth of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, althoughdifferent inhibitory effects were observed for different pathogens. The higher the counts of lactobacilli and the higher the folds of concentrated fermentative broth, the stronger the inhibitory effects are observed. The inhibitory effect is demonstrated to be dose-dependent. Moreover, for the lactobacilli themselves, Lactobacillus fermentum showed stronger inhibitory effects than Lactobacillus salivarius. However, the fermentative broth of Lactobacillus fermentum showed weaker inhibitory effects than that of Lactobacillus salivarius. These data suggested that lactobacilli and their fermentative broth exhibit antagonistic growth activity, and consumption of probiotics or their broth containing lactobacilli may benefit oral health.

  20. Accelerated habit formation following amphetamine exposure is reversed by D1, but enhanced by D2, receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Dudley Nelson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Repeated exposure to the psychostimulant amphetamine has been shown to disrupt goal-directed instrumental actions and promote the early and abnormal development of goal-insensitive habitual responding (Nelson and Killcross, 2006. To investigate the neuropharmacological specificity of this effect as well as restore goal-directed responding in animals with pre-training amphetamine exposure, animals were treated with the non-selective dopamine antagonist α-flupenthixol, the selective D1 antagonist SCH 23390 or the selective D2 antagonist eticlopride, prior to instrumental training (3 sessions. Subsequently, the reinforcer was paired with LiCL-induced gastric-malaise and animals were given a test of goal-sensitivity both in extinction and reacquisition. The effect of these dopaminergic antagonists on the sensitivity of lever press performance to outcome devaluation was assessed in animals with pre-training exposure to amphetamine (Experiments 1a-1c or in non-sensitized animals (Experiment 2. Both α-flupenthixol and SCH23390 reversed accelerated habit formation following amphetamine sensitization. However, eticlopride appeared to enhance this effect and render instrumental performance compulsive as these animals were unable to inhibit responding both in extinction and reacquisition, even though a consumption test confirmed they had acquired an aversion to the reinforcer. These findings demonstrate that amphetamine induced-disruption of goal-directed behaviour is mediated by activity at distinct dopamine receptor subtypes and may represent a putative model of the neurochemical processes involved in the loss of voluntary control over behaviour.

  1. Estrogen agonist/antagonist properties of dibenzyl phthalate (DBzP) based on in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Hu, Ying; Zhao, Liang; Li, Jun; Bai, Huicheng; Zhu, Desheng; Hu, Jianying

    2011-11-10

    The most commonly used phthalates have been banned or restricted for use as plasticizers in toys in some countries because of their endocrine-disrupting properties. Dibenzyl phthalate (DBzP) has been proposed as a possible alternative for the banned/restricted phthalates. In this study, the estrogen agonist/antagonist properties of DBzP were predicted by molecular docking and confirmed by yeast estrogen screen (YES) and immature mouse uterotrophic assays. The YES assay results showed a dose-dependent increase in DBzP estrogen agonist activity from 10⁻⁶ to 10⁻⁴ M, and at concentrations from 1.95×10⁻⁶ M to higher, DBzP significantly inhibited the agonist activity of 10⁻⁹ M 17β-estradiol (E₂), inhibiting 10⁻⁹ M E₂ by 74.5% at its maximum effectiveness. The in vivo estrogen agonist/antagonist activities of DBzP were demonstrated in immature mouse uterotrophic assays. The antagonist activity of DBzP inhibited E₂-induced uterine growth promoted at 40 and 400 μg/kg bw (body weight) (Pestrogen agonist/antagonist potentials of benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) by YES, and found both were weaker than those of DBzP, suggesting DBzP would be more toxic than BBP and should not be used as an alternative plasticizer.

  2. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Vaag, Allan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expression of interleukin-1-receptor antagonist is reduced in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and high glucose concentrations induce the production of interleukin-1beta in human pancreatic beta cells, leading to impaired insulin secretion, decreased cell...... proliferation, and apoptosis. METHODS: In this double-blind, parallel-group trial involving 70 patients with type 2 diabetes, we randomly assigned 34 patients to receive 100 mg of anakinra (a recombinant human interleukin-1-receptor antagonist) subcutaneously once daily for 13 weeks and 36 patients to receive...

  3. Barnidipine, a long-acting slow onset calcium antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korstanje, C

    2000-11-01

    Barnidipine is a stereochemically pure dihydropyridine calcium antagonist with a high potency. The drug showed a slow onset and long-lasting vasorelaxating effect in vitro, and strong antihypertensive activity in hypertension models. Barnidipine was shown to have a high vasoselectivity and offered protection in cardiac and renal ischaemia models. The in vitro drug:drug interaction profile suggests a low potential for clinically relevant interactions with concomitant medication. It can be anticipated that barnidipine is an attractive calcium antagonist, offering good blood pressure control without compensatory baroreflex activity.

  4. Dual-pharmacology muscarinic antagonist and β₂ agonist molecules for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adam D; Jones, Lyn H

    2011-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of death in the world today. Bronchodilators, particularly muscarinic antagonists and β(2) agonists, are recommended for patients with moderate to severe COPD. Dual-pharmacology muscarinic antagonist- β(2) agonist (MABA) molecules present an exciting new approach to the treatment of COPD by combining muscarinic antagonism and β(2) agonism in a single entity. They have the potential to demonstrate additive or synergistic bronchodilation over either pharmacology alone. Due to this enticing prospect, several companies have now reported MABA discovery efforts through a conjugated/linked strategy with one candidate (GSK-961081) demonstrating clinical proof of concept. Several MABA crystal forms have been identified, satisfying the requirements for inhaled dosing devices. There are significant challenges in designing MABAs, but the potential to achieve enhanced bronchoprotection in patients and facilitate 'triple therapy' makes this an extremely important and exciting area of pharmaceutical research.

  5. The NK-1 Receptor Antagonist L-732,138 Induces Apoptosis and Counteracts Substance P-Related Mitogenesis in Human Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Miguel, E-mail: mmunoz@cica.es; Rosso, Marisa; González-Ortega, Ana [Research Laboratory on Neuropeptides, Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Sevilla (Spain); Coveñas, Rafael [Institute of Neurosciences of Castilla y León (INCYL), Laboratory of Neuroanatomy of the Peptidergic Systems (Laboratory 14), Salamanca (Spain)

    2010-04-20

    It has been recently demonstrated that substance P (SP) and neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonists induce cell proliferation and cell inhibition in human melanoma cells, respectively. However, the antitumor action of the NK-1 receptor antagonist L-732,138 on such cells is unknown. The aim of this study was to demonstrate an antitumor action of L-732,138 against three human melanoma cell lines (COLO 858, MEL HO, COLO 679). We found that L-732,138 elicits cell growth inhibition in a concentration dependent manner in the melanoma cells studied. Moreover, L-732,138 blocks SP mitogen stimulation. The specific antitumor action of L-732,138 occurred through the NK-1 receptor and melanoma cell death was by apoptosis. These findings indicate that the NK-1 receptor antagonist L-732,138 could be a new antitumor agent in the treatment of human melanoma.

  6. Blockade of catecholamine-induced growth by adrenergic and dopaminergic receptor antagonists in Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyte Mark

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of catecholamines to stimulate bacterial growth was first demonstrated just over a decade ago. Little is still known however, concerning the nature of the putative bacterial adrenergic and/or dopaminergic receptor(s to which catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine may bind and exert their effects, or even whether the binding properties of such a receptor are similar between different species. Results Use of specific catecholamine receptor antagonists revealed that only α, and not β, adrenergic antagonists were capable of blocking norepinephrine and epinephrine-induced growth, while antagonism of dopamine-mediated growth was achieved with the use of a dopaminergic antagonist. Both adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists were highly specific in their mechanism of action, which did not involve blockade of catecholamine-facilitated iron-acquisition. Use of radiolabeled norepinephrine suggested that the adrenergic antagonists could be acting by inhibiting catecholamine uptake. Conclusion The present data demonstrates that the ability of a specific pathogen to respond to a particular hormone is dependent upon the host anatomical region in which the pathogen causes disease as well as the neuroanatomical specificity to which production of the particular hormone is restricted; and that both are anatomically coincidental to each other. As such, the present report suggests that pathogens with a high degree of exclusivity to the gastrointestinal tract have evolved response systems to neuroendocrine hormones such as norepinephrine and dopamine, but not epinephrine, which are found with the enteric nervous system.

  7. Effect of SDF-1/Cxcr4 Signaling Antagonist AMD3100 on Bone Mineralization in Distraction Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Chen, Yuanfeng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jinfang; Kang, Qinglin; Ho, Kiwai; Chai, Yimin; Li, Gang

    2017-03-16

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a widely applied technique in orthopedics surgery, which involves rapid stem cell migration, homing, and differentiation. Interactions between the chemokine receptor Cxcr4 and its ligand, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1), regulate hematopoietic stem cell trafficking to the ischemic area and induce their subsequent differentiation. Here, we examined SDF-1 expression and further investigated the role of SDF-1/Cxcr4 signaling antagonist AMD3100 during bone regeneration in rat DO model. The results showed that expression levels of SDF-1 and osteogenic genes were higher in DO zones than in the fracture zones, and SDF-1 expression level was the highest at the termination of the distraction phase. Radiological, mechanical, and histological analyses demonstrated that the local administration of AMD3100 (400 μM) to DO rats significantly inhibited new bone formation. In the rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells culture, comparing to the group treated with osteogenic induction medium, AMD3100 supplement led to a considerable decrease in the expression of alkaline phosphatase and early osteogenic marker genes. However, the amount of calcium deposits in rat MSCs did not differ between the groups. Therefore, our study demonstrated that the DO process induced higher expression of SDF-1, which collated to rapid induction of callus formation. Local application of SDF-1/Cxcr4 signaling antagonist AMD3100 significantly inhibited bone mineralization and osteogenesis in DO, which may represent a potential therapeutic approach to the enhancement of bone consolidation in patients undergoing DO.

  8. Salvianolic Acid A, as a Novel ETA Receptor Antagonist, Shows Inhibitory Effects on Tumor in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Wang, Shifeng; Yu, Yangyang; Sun, Shengnan; Zhang, Yuxin; Zhang, Yanling; Yang, Wei; Li, Shiyou; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2016-08-02

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) autocrine and paracrine signaling modulate cell proliferation of tumor cells by activating its receptors, endothelin A receptor (ETAR) and endothelin B receptor (ETBR). Dysregulation of ETAR activation promotes tumor development and progression. The potential of ETAR antagonists and the dual-ETAR and ETBR antagonists as therapeutic approaches are under preclinical and clinical studies. Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) is a hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen), which has been reported as an anti-cancer and cardio-protective herbal medicine. In this study, we demonstrate that Sal A inhibits ETAR activation induced by ET-1 in both recombinant and endogenous ETAR expression cell lines. The IC50 values were determined as 5.7 µM in the HEK293/ETAR cell line and 3.14 µM in HeLa cells, respectively. Furthermore, our results showed that Sal A suppressed cell proliferation and extended the doubling times of multiple cancer cells, including HeLa, DU145, H1975, and A549 cell lines. In addition, Sal A inhibited proliferation of DU145 cell lines stimulated by exogenous ET-1 treatment. Moreover, the cytotoxicity and cardio-toxicity of Sal A were assessed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs), which proved that Sal A demonstrates no cytotoxicity or cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that Sal A is a novel anti-cancer candidate through targeting ETAR.

  9. 5-Hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and cardiac side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygger, Louise; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: 5-Hydroxytryptamine3-receptor antagonists (5-HT3-RA) are the most widely used antiemetics in oncology, and although tolerability is high, QTC prolongation has been observed in some patients. AREAS COVERED: The purpose of this article is to outline the risk of cardiac adverse events...

  10. The Effect of Antagonist Muscle Sensory Input on Force Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Onushko

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand how stretch-related sensory feedback from an antagonist muscle affects agonist muscle output at different contraction levels in healthy adults. Ten young (25.3 ± 2.4 years, healthy subjects performed constant isometric knee flexion contractions (agonist at 6 torque levels: 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of their maximal voluntary contraction. For half of the trials, subjects received patellar tendon taps (antagonist sensory feedback during the contraction. We compared error in targeted knee flexion torque and hamstring muscle activity, with and without patellar tendon tapping, across the 6 torque levels. At lower torque levels (5%, 10%, and 15%, subjects produced greater knee torque error following tendon tapping compared with the same torque levels without tendon tapping. In contrast, we did not find any difference in torque output at higher target levels (20%, 30%, and 40% between trials with and without tendon tapping. We also observed a load-dependent increase in the magnitude of agonist muscle activity after tendon taps, with no associated load-dependent increase in agonist and antagonist co-activation, or reflex inhibition from the antagonist tapping. The findings suggest that at relatively low muscle activity there is a deficiency in the ability to correct motor output after sensory disturbances, and cortical centers (versus sub-cortical are likely involved.

  11. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antagonists and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Lyeth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Despite more than 30 years of research, no pharmacological agents have been identified that improve neurological function following TBI. However, several lines of research described in this review provide support for further development of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. Following TBI, neurons and astrocytes experience a rapid and sometimes enduring increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. These fluxes in [Ca2+]i drive not only apoptotic and necrotic cell death, but also can lead to long-term cell dysfunction in surviving cells. In a limited number of in vitro experiments, both L-type and N-type VGCC antagonists successfully reduced calcium loads as well as neuronal and astrocytic cell death following mechanical injury. In rodent models of TBI, administration of VGCC antagonists reduced cell death and improved cognitive function. It is clear that there is a critical need to find effective therapeutics and rational drug delivery strategies for the management and treatment of TBI, and we believe that further investigation of VGCC antagonists should be pursued before ruling out the possibility of successful translation to the clinic.

  12. How Hybrid Organizations Turn Antagonistic Assets into Complementarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockerts, Kai

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on people excluded from traditional markets as employees, producers, or consumers on the grounds that they lack the appropriate skills. It describes the processes through which these perceived liabilities can be overcome by so-called hybrid organizations. Hybrids pursue expli...... for complementarities, and by creating demands for antagonistic assets, or by using partnerships....

  13. Serotonin 2A receptor antagonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Rasmussen, Hans; Arnt, Jørn;

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: All approved antipsychotic drugs share an affinity for the dopamine 2 (D2) receptor; however, these drugs only partially ameliorate the symptoms of schizophrenia. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to identify new treatment strategies for schizophrenia. Areas covered: Preclin......Introduction: All approved antipsychotic drugs share an affinity for the dopamine 2 (D2) receptor; however, these drugs only partially ameliorate the symptoms of schizophrenia. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to identify new treatment strategies for schizophrenia. Areas covered...... receptor antagonists is evaluated. Moreover, the investigational pipeline of major pharmaceutical companies is examined and an Internet search conducted to identify other pharmaceutical companies investigating 5-HT2A receptor antagonists for the treatment of schizophrenia. Expert opinion: 5-HT2A receptor...... antagonists appear to assume an intermediate position by being marginally superior to placebo but inferior to conventional antipsychotic drugs. Three previous 5-HT2A receptor antagonists have been discontinued after Phase II or III trials, and available Phase IIa data on the remaining 5-HT2A receptor...

  14. Facilitative and antagonistic interactions between plant viruses in mixed infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syller, Jerzy

    2012-02-01

    Mixed infections of plant viruses are common in nature, and a number of important virus diseases of plants are the outcomes of interactions between causative agents. Multiple infections lead to a variety of intrahost virus-virus interactions, many of which may result in the generation of variants showing novel genetic features, and thus change the genetic structure of the viral population. Hence, virus-virus interactions in plants may be of crucial significance for the understanding of viral pathogenesis and evolution, and consequently for the development of efficient and stable control strategies. The interactions between plant viruses in mixed infections are generally categorized as synergistic or antagonistic. Moreover, mixtures of synergistic and antagonistic interactions, creating usually unpredictable biological and epidemiological consequences, are likely to occur in plants. The mechanisms of some of these are still unknown. This review aims to bring together the current knowledge on the most commonly occurring facilitative and antagonistic interactions between related or unrelated viruses infecting the same host plant. The best characterized implications of these interactions for virus-vector-host relationships are included. The terms 'synergism' and 'helper dependence' for facilitative virus-virus interactions, and 'cross-protection' and 'mutual exclusion' for antagonistic interactions, are applied in this article.

  15. Determinants of effective, safe and convenient vitamin K antagonist use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Hilde Afra Margaretha

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are frequently used anticoagulants. They are very effective in preventing atrial fibrillation related strokes and recurrent venous thrombosis. However, it can be difficult to achieve an optimal balance between the efficacy and side effects (bleeding), as the dose response

  16. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A. [Cell Systems Division, Invitrogen, Madison, WI (United States); Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Mais, Dale E. [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); MPI Research, Mattawan, MI (United States); Wang, Ming-Wei, E-mail: wangmw@mail.shcnc.ac.cn [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  17. Reversal strategies for vitamin K antagonists in acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parry-Jones, A.R.; Napoli, M. Di; Goldstein, J.N.; Schreuder, F.H.; Tetri, S.; Tatlisumak, T.; Yan, B.; Nieuwenhuizen, K.M.; Dequatre-Ponchelle, N.; Lee-Archer, M.; Horstmann, S.; Wilson, D.; Pomero, F.; Masotti, L.; Lerpiniere, C.; Godoy, D.A.; Cohen, A.S.; Houben, R.; Al-Shahi Salman, R.; Pennati, P.; Fenoglio, L.; Werring, D.; Veltkamp, R.; Wood, E.; Dewey, H.M.; Cordonnier, C.; Klijn, C.J.M.; Meligeni, F.; Davis, S.M.; Huhtakangas, J.; Staals, J.; Rosand, J.; Meretoja, A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is little evidence to guide treatment strategies for intracerebral hemorrhage on vitamin K antagonists (VKA-ICH). Treatments utilized in clinical practice include fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC). Our aim was to compare case fatality with different

  18. Reversal strategies for vitamin K antagonists in acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parry-Jones, Adrian R.; Di Napoli, Mario; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Schreuder, Floris H B M; Tetri, Sami; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Yan, Bernard; Van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M.; Dequatre-Ponchelle, Nelly; Lee-Archer, Matthew; Horstmann, Solveig; Wilson, Duncan; Pomero, Fulvio; Masotti, Luca; Lerpiniere, Christine; Godoy, Daniel Agustin; Cohen, Abigail S.; Houben, Rik; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Pennati, Paolo; Fenoglio, Luigi; Werring, David; Veltkamp, Roland; Wood, Edith; Dewey, Helen M.; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Klijn, Catharina J M; Meligeni, Fabrizio; Davis, Stephen M.; Huhtakangas, Juha; Staals, Julie; Rosand, Jonathan; Meretoja, Atte

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence to guide treatment strategies for intracerebral hemorrhage on vitamin K antagonists (VKA-ICH). Treatments utilized in clinical practice include fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC). Our aim was to compare case fatality with different

  19. Aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines as 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeeyeon; Kim, Youngjae; Tae, Jinsung; Yeom, Miyoung; Moon, Bongjin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Lee, Kangho; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choo, Il Han; Chong, Youhoon; Keum, Gyochang; Nam, Ghilsoo; Choo, Hyunah

    2013-11-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7 R) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of depression and neuropathic pain. The 5-HT7 R antagonist SB-269970 exhibited antidepressant-like activity, whereas systemic administration of the 5-HT7 R agonist AS-19 significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. In our efforts to discover selective 5-HT7 R antagonists or agonists, aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines were designed, synthesized, and biologically evaluated against the 5-HT7 R. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-([2'-methoxy-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-yl]methyl)-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (28) was the best binder to the 5-HT7 R (pKi =7.83), and its antagonistic property was confirmed by functional assays. The selectivity profile of compound 28 was also recorded for the 5-HT7 R over other serotonin receptor subtypes, such as 5-HT1 R, 5-HT2 R, 5-HT3 R, and 5-HT6 R. In a molecular modeling study, the 2-methoxyphenyl moiety attached to the piperazine ring of compound 28 was proposed to be essential for the antagonistic function.

  20. Bronchoprotection with a leukotriene receptor antagonist in asthmatic preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Nielsen, K G

    2000-01-01

    We hypothesized that a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) could provide bronchoprotection against the cold, dry air-induced response in asthmatic preschool children. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we examined the effect of the specific LTRA montelukast at 5...

  1. Does intergenerational social mobility affect antagonistic attitudes towards ethnic minorities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolsma, J.; Graaf, N.D. de; Quillian, L.

    2009-01-01

    Up till now, no study satisfactorily addressed the effect of social mobility on antagonistic attitudes toward ethnic minorities. In this contribution, we investigate the effect of educational and class intergenerational mobility on ethnic stereotypes, ethnic threat, and opposition to ethnic intermar

  2. Komplikationer til langtidsbehandling med vitamin K-antagonister

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, O; Garne, E; Mickley, H

    1990-01-01

    Long-term treatment with vitamin K antagonists (vKA) frequently involves complications. The commonest complication is haemorrhage and cases of serious haemorrhage are stated in the literature to occur with a frequency per 1,000 treatment years of 12-108, of which 2-17 are fatal. The majority...

  3. Myofascial force transmission via extramuscular pathways occurs between antagonistic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijing, Peter A; Baan, Guus C

    2008-01-01

    Most often muscles (as organs) are viewed as independent actuators. To test if this is true for antagonistic muscles, force was measured simultaneously at: (1) the proximal and distal tendons of the extensor digitorum muscle (EDL) to quantify any proximo-distal force differences, as an indicator of myofascial force transmission, (2) at the distal tendons of the whole antagonistic peroneal muscle group (PER) to test if effects of EDL length changes are present and (3) at the proximal end of the tibia to test if myofascially transmitted force is exerted there. EDL length was manipulated either at the proximal or distal tendons. This way equal EDL lengths are attained at two different positions of the muscle with respect to the tibia and antagonistic muscles. Despite its relatively small size, lengthening of the EDL changed forces exerted on the tibia and forces exerted by its antagonistic muscle group. Apart from its extramuscular myofascial connections, EDL has no connections to either the tibia or these antagonistic muscles. Proximal EDL lengthening increased distal muscular forces (active PER DeltaF approximately +1.7%), but decreased tibial forces (passive from 0.3 to 0 N; active DeltaF approximately -5%). Therefore, it is concluded that these antagonistic muscles do not act independently, because of myofascial force transmission between them. Such a decrease in tibial force indicates release of pre-strained connections. Distal EDL lengthening had opposite effects (tripling passive force exerted on tibia; active PER force DeltaF approximately -3.6%). It is concluded that the length and relative position of the EDL is a co-determinant of passive and active force exerted at tendons of nearby antagonistic muscle groups. These results necessitate a new view of the locomotor apparatus, which needs to take into account the high interdependence of muscles and muscle fibres as force generators, as well as proximo-distal force differences and serial and parallel

  4. QSAR and pharmacophore analysis of a series of piperidinyl urea derivatives as HERG blockers and H3 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, N S Hari Narayana; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro A

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, a computational based pharmacophore and structural analysis were performed on a series of piperidinyl urea derivatives, a limited number of compounds which have variation in structures and activities that exhibit hERG blocking and H3 antagonistic activities. The conducted QSAR studies demonstrated that the developed models are statistically significant, which have been confirmed through validation. The Q2 values for the models developed with hERG blocking activity are > 0.8 and with the H3 antagonistic activity are > 0.6. The descriptors contributed in the models show that the distributed polar properties on the vdW surface of the molecules are important for the hERG blocking activity. The vsurf_ descriptors (surface area, volume and shape) such as vsurf_DD13 and vsurf_Wp4 correlate with the H3 antagonistic activity of these compounds. The distances between the pharmacophore sites were measured in order to confirm their significance to the activities. The results reveal that the acceptor (acc), donor (don), hydrophobic (hyd) and aromatic/hydrophobic (aro/hyd) pharmacophore properties are favorable contours sites for both the activities. Also, our study reveals that the distance between the polar contours (acc, don, etc) has to be small for better hERG blocking activity. The distances between the aro/hyd to the polar groups should be higher for better hERG blocking activity. However, the H3 antagonistic activity for these series depends upon hydrophobic property of the molecules, particularly the hyd and the hyd/aro contours of the molecules. Hence, these results reveal the requirements on the structural properties and the distances between the pharmacophore contour sites of the molecules responsible for their hERG and H3 antagonistic activities.

  5. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening, biological evaluation and binding mode analysis of a novel protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Chul; Seo, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Dohee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Ju, Jeongmin; Seong, Jihye; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Iiyoun; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Yun Kyung; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2016-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor, mediating inflammation and pain signaling in neurons, thus it is considered to be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. In this study, we performed a ligand-based virtual screening of 1.6 million compounds by employing a common-feature pharmacophore model and two-dimensional similarity search to identify a new PAR2 antagonist. The common-feature pharmacophore model was established based on the biological screening results of our in-house library. The initial virtual screening yielded a total number of 47 hits, and additional biological activity tests including PAR2 antagonism and anti-inflammatory effects resulted in a promising candidate, compound 43, which demonstrated an IC50 value of 8.22 µM against PAR2. In next step, a PAR2 homology model was constructed using the crystal structure of the PAR1 as a template to explore the binding mode of the identified ligands. A molecular docking method was optimized by comparing the binding modes of a known PAR2 agonist GB110 and antagonist GB83, and applied to predict the binding mode of our hit compound 43. In-depth docking analyses revealed that the hydrophobic interaction with Phe2435.39 is crucial for PAR2 ligands to exert antagonistic activity. MD simulation results supported the predicted docking poses that PAR2 antagonist blocked a conformational rearrangement of Na+ allosteric site in contrast to PAR2 agonist that showed Na+ relocation upon GPCR activation. In conclusion, we identified new a PAR2 antagonist together with its binding mode, which provides useful insights for the design and development of PAR2 ligands.

  6. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening, biological evaluation and binding mode analysis of a novel protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Chul; Seo, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Dohee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Ju, Jeongmin; Seong, Jihye; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Iiyoun; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Yun Kyung; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2016-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor, mediating inflammation and pain signaling in neurons, thus it is considered to be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. In this study, we performed a ligand-based virtual screening of 1.6 million compounds by employing a common-feature pharmacophore model and two-dimensional similarity search to identify a new PAR2 antagonist. The common-feature pharmacophore model was established based on the biological screening results of our in-house library. The initial virtual screening yielded a total number of 47 hits, and additional biological activity tests including PAR2 antagonism and anti-inflammatory effects resulted in a promising candidate, compound 43, which demonstrated an IC50 value of 8.22 µM against PAR2. In next step, a PAR2 homology model was constructed using the crystal structure of the PAR1 as a template to explore the binding mode of the identified ligands. A molecular docking method was optimized by comparing the binding modes of a known PAR2 agonist GB110 and antagonist GB83, and applied to predict the binding mode of our hit compound 43. In-depth docking analyses revealed that the hydrophobic interaction with Phe243(5.39) is crucial for PAR2 ligands to exert antagonistic activity. MD simulation results supported the predicted docking poses that PAR2 antagonist blocked a conformational rearrangement of Na(+) allosteric site in contrast to PAR2 agonist that showed Na(+) relocation upon GPCR activation. In conclusion, we identified new a PAR2 antagonist together with its binding mode, which provides useful insights for the design and development of PAR2 ligands.

  7. Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations Near Sexually Antagonistic Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Connallon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutation generates a steady supply of genetic variation that, while occasionally useful for adaptation, is more often deleterious for fitness. Recent research has emphasized that the fitness effects of mutations often differ between the sexes, leading to important evolutionary consequences for the maintenance of genetic variation and long-term population viability. Some forms of sex-specific selection—i.e., stronger purifying selection in males than females—can help purge a population’s load of female-harming mutations and promote population growth. Other scenarios—e.g., sexually antagonistic selection, in which mutations that harm females are beneficial for males—inflate genetic loads and potentially dampen population viability. Evolutionary processes of sexual antagonism and purifying selection are likely to impact the evolutionary dynamics of different loci within a genome, yet theory has mostly ignored the potential for interactions between such loci to jointly shape the evolutionary genetic basis of female and male fitness variation. Here, we show that sexually antagonistic selection at a locus tends to elevate the frequencies of deleterious alleles at tightly linked loci that evolve under purifying selection. Moreover, haplotypes that segregate for different sexually antagonistic alleles accumulate different types of deleterious mutations. Haplotypes that carry female-benefit sexually antagonistic alleles preferentially accumulate mutations that are primarily male harming, whereas male-benefit haplotypes accumulate mutations that are primarily female harming. The theory predicts that sexually antagonistic selection should shape the genomic organization of genetic variation that differentially impacts female and male fitness, and contribute to sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fitness variation.

  8. Ubiquitination profiling identifies sensitivity factors for IAP antagonist treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Eugene; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Yu, Kebing; Bustos, Daisy; Goncharov, Tatiana; Belmont, Lisa D; Masselot, Alexandre; Bakalarski, Corey E; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Vucic, Domagoj

    2015-02-15

    Evasion of cell death is one crucial capability acquired by tumour cells to ward-off anti-tumour therapies and represents a fundamental challenge to sustaining clinical efficacy for currently available agents. Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins use their ubiquitin E3 ligase activity to promote cancer cell survival by mediating proliferative signalling and blocking cell death in response to diverse stimuli. Using immunoaffinity enrichment and MS, ubiquitination sites on thousands of proteins were profiled upon initiation of cell death by IAP antagonists in IAP antagonist-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cell lines. Our analyses identified hundreds of proteins with elevated levels of ubiquitin-remnant [K-GG (Lys-Gly-Gly)] peptides upon activation of cell death by the IAP antagonist BV6. The majority of these were observed in BV6-sensitive, but not-resistant, cells. Among these were known pro-apoptotic regulators, including CYC (cytochrome c), RIP1 (receptor-interacting protein 1) and a selection of proteins known to reside in the mitochondria or regulate NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) signalling. Analysis of early time-points revealed that IAP antagonist treatment stimulated rapid ubiquitination of NF-κB signalling proteins, including TRAF2 [TNF (tumour necrosis factor) receptor-associated factor 2], HOIL-1 (haem-oxidized iron-regulatory protein 2 ubiquitin ligase-1), NEMO (NF-κB essential modifier), as well as c-IAP1 (cellular IAP1) auto-ubiquitination. Knockdown of several NF-κB pathway members reduced BV6-induced cell death and TNF production in sensitive cell lines. Importantly, RIP1 was found to be constitutively ubiquitinated in sensitive breast-cancer cell lines at higher basal level than in resistant cell lines. Together, these data show the diverse and temporally defined roles of protein ubiquitination following IAP-antagonist treatment and provide critical insights into predictive diagnostics that may enhance clinical efficacy.

  9. Teleoperation for learning by demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kukliński, Kamil; Fischer, Kerstin; Marhenke, Ilka;

    2014-01-01

    Learning by demonstration is a useful technique to augment a robot's behavioral inventory, and teleoperation allows lay users to demonstrate novel behaviors intuitively to the robot. In this paper, we compare two modes of teleoperation of an industrial robot, the demonstration by means of a data...... glove and by means of a control object (peg). Experiments with 16 lay users, performing assembly task on the Cranfield benchmark objects, show that the control peg leads to more success, more efficient demonstration and fewer errors....

  10. Novel class of medications, orexin receptor antagonists, in the treatment of insomnia - critical appraisal of suvorexant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jessica L; Anderson, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia, a highly prevalent disorder, can be detrimental to patients' overall health and worsen existing comorbidities. Patients may have acute episodes of insomnia related to a traumatic event, but more commonly insomnia occurs chronically. While proper sleep hygiene and behavioral therapy play important roles in the nonpharmacologic management of short-term and chronic insomnia, medications may also be required. Historically, insomnia has been treated with agents such as benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonists, and melatonin agonists. Dual orexin receptor antagonists represent a new class of medications for the treatment of insomnia, which block the binding of wakefulness-promoting neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B to their respective receptor sites. Suvorexant (Belsomra) is the first dual orexin receptor antagonist to be approved in the US and Japan and has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing time to sleep onset and increasing total sleep time. Its unique mechanism of action, data to support efficacy and safety over 12 months of use, and relative lack of withdrawal effects when discontinued may represent an alternative for patients with chronic insomnia who cannot tolerate or do not receive benefit from more traditional sleep agents. Suvorexant is effective and well tolerated, but precautions exist for certain patient populations, including females, obese patients, and those with respiratory disease. Suvorexant has only been studied vs placebo, and hence it is unknown how it directly compares with other medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for insomnia. Suvorexant is not likely to replace benzodiazepines or nonbenzodiazepine receptor antagonists as a first-line sleep agent but does represent a novel option for the treatment of patients with chronic insomnia.

  11. The pheromone production of female Plodia interpunctella is inhibited by tyraminergic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Akinori; Kimizu, Megumi; Shigeta, Yoko; Matsugu, Sachiko; Eiraku, Tomohiko; Kuwano, Eiichi; Eto, Morifusa

    2004-11-01

    Several compounds were found to suppress the calling behavior and in vitro pheromone biosynthesis of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. The compounds were screened by means of a calling-behavior bioassay with female P. interpunctella. Five derivatives with activities in the nanomolar range were identified, in order of decreasing pheromonostatic activity: 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde semicarbazone (42) > 5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-oxazole (38) > 5-[4-(tert-butyl)phenyl]-1,3-oxazole (40) > 5-(3-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-oxazole (35) > 5-(4-cyanophenyl)-1,3-oxazole (36). These compounds also showed in vitro inhibitory activity in intracellular de novo pheromone biosynthesis, as determined with isolated pheromone-gland preparations that incorporated [1-(14)C]sodium acetate in the presence of the so-called pheromone-biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN). The non-additive effect of the inhibitor with antagonist (yohimbine) for the tyramine (TA) receptor suggests that it could be a tyraminergic antagonist. Three-dimensional (3D) computer models were built from a set of compounds. Among the common-featured models generated by the program Catalyst/HipHop, aromatic-ring (AR) and H-bond-acceptor-lipophilic (HBAl) features were considered to be essential for inhibitory activity in the calling behavior and in vitro pheromone biosynthesis. Active compounds, including yohimbine, mapped well onto all the AR and HBAl features of the hypothesis. Less-active compounds were shown to be unable to achieve an energetically favorable conformation, consistent with our 3D common-feature pharmacophore models. The present hypothesis demonstrates that calling behavior and PBAN-stimulated incorporation of radioactivity are inhibited by tyraminergic antagonists.

  12. Effect of α₇ nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A; Lima, Flavia G; Green, Benedict T; Gardner, Dale R

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline.

  13. Critical Evaluation of P2X7 Receptor Antagonists in Selected Seizure Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Wolfgang; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute; Müller, Heiko; Dinkel, Klaus; Lord, Brian; Letavic, Michael A.; Henshall, David C.; Engel, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-gated P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a non-selective cation channel which senses high extracellular ATP concentrations and has been suggested as a target for the treatment of neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. The use of P2X7R antagonists may therefore be a viable approach for treating CNS pathologies, including epileptic disorders. Recent studies showed anticonvulsant potential of P2X7R antagonists in certain animal models. To extend this work, we tested three CNS-permeable P2X7R blocker (Brilliant Blue G, AFC-5128, JNJ-47965567) and a natural compound derivative (tanshinone IIA sulfonate) in four well-characterized animal seizure models. In the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test and the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure threshold test in mice, none of the four compounds demonstrated anticonvulsant effects when given alone. Notably, in combination with carbamazepine, both AFC-5128 and JNJ-47965567 increased the threshold in the maximal electroshock seizure test. In the PTZ-kindling model in rats, useful for testing antiepileptogenic activities, Brilliant Blue G and tanshinone exhibited a moderate retarding effect, whereas the potent P2X7R blocker AFC-5128 and JNJ-47965567 showed a significant and long-lasting delay in kindling development. In fully kindled rats, the investigated compounds revealed modest effects to reduce the mean seizure stage. Furthermore, AFC-5128- and JNJ-47965567-treated animals displayed strongly reduced Iba 1 and GFAP immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA3 region. In summary, our results show that P2X7R antagonists possess no remarkable anticonvulsant effects in the used acute screening tests, but can attenuate chemically-induced kindling. Further studies would be of interest to support the concept that P2X7R signalling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders. PMID:27281030

  14. Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship of novel CCR2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Donnely, Karla L; Butora, Gabor; Jiao, Richard; Pasternak, Alexander; Morriello, Gregori J; Goble, Stephen D; Zhou, Changyou; Mills, Sander G; Maccoss, Malcolm; Vicario, Pasquale P; Ayala, Julia M; Demartino, Julie A; Struthers, Mary; Cascieri, Margaret A; Yang, Lihu

    2009-03-15

    A series of novel 1-aminocyclopentyl-3-carboxyamides incorporating substituted tetrahydropyran moieties have been synthesized and subsequently evaluated for their antagonistic activity against the human CCR2 receptor. Among them analog 59 was found to posses potent antagonistic activity.

  15. Development of maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV, using a novel tropism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ryst, Elna; Heera, Jayvant; Demarest, James; Knirsch, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Assays to identify infectious organisms are critical for diagnosis and enabling the development of therapeutic agents. The demonstration that individuals with a 32-bp deletion within the CCR5 locus were resistant to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, while those heterozygous for the mutation progressed more slowly, led to the discovery of maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist. As MVC is only active against CCR5-tropic strains of HIV, it was critical to develop a diagnostic assay to identify appropriate patients. Trofile™, a novel phenotypic tropism assay, was used to identify patients with CCR5-tropic virus for the MVC development program. Results of these clinical studies demonstrated that the assay correctly identified patients likely to respond to MVC. Over time, the performance characteristics of the phenotypic assay were enhanced, necessitating retesting of study samples. Genotypic tropism tests that have the potential to allow for local use and more rapid turnaround times are also being developed.

  16. Chronic psychosocial stress in tree shrews : effect of the substance P (NK1 receptor) antagonist L-760735 and clomipramine on endocrine and behavioral parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hart, MGC; de Biurrun, G; Czeh, B; Rupniak, NMJ; den Boer, JA; Fuchs, E

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Substance P and its preferred receptor, the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R), have been proposed as possible targets for new antidepressant therapies, although results of a recently completed phase III trial failed to demonstrate that the NK1R antagonist MK-869 is more effective than placebo

  17. Design and discovery of 1,3-benzodiazepines as novel dopamine antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaoning; Sun, Zhong-Yue; Ye, Yuanzan; McKittrick, Brian; Greenlee, William; Czarniecki, Michael; Fawzi, Ahmad; Zhang, Hongtao; Lachowicz, Jean E

    2009-09-01

    A series of novel 1,3-benzodiazapine based D1 antagonists was designed according to the understanding of pharmacophore models derived from SCH 23390 (1b), a potent and selective D1 antagonist. The new design features an achiral cyclic-amidine that maintains desired basicity. Solid phase synthesis was developed for SAR development of the novel dopamine antagonists.

  18. 1-Sulfonyl-6-Piperazinyl-7-Azaindoles as potent and pseudo-selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabritius, Charles-Henry; Pesonen, Ullamari; Messinger, Josef; Horvath, Raymond; Salo, Harri; Gałęzowski, Michał; Galek, Mariusz; Stefańska, Klaudia; Szeremeta-Spisak, Joanna; Olszak-Płachta, Marta; Buda, Anna; Adamczyk, Justyna; Król, Marcin; Prusis, Peteris; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Mikulski, Maciej; Kuokkanen, Katja; Chapman, Hugh; Obuchowicz, Radosław; Korjamo, Timo; Jalava, Niina; Nowak, Mateusz

    2016-06-01

    A series of 1-Sulfonyl-6-Piperazinyl-7-Azaindoles, showing strong antagonistic activity to 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) was synthesized and characterized. The series was optimized to reduce activity on D2 receptor. Based on the selectivity against this off-target and the analysis of the ADME-tox profile, compound 1c was selected for in vivo efficacy assessment, which demonstrated procognitive effects as shown in reversal of scopolamine induced amnesia in an elevated plus maze test in mice. Compound 3, the demethylated version of compound 1c, was profiled against a panel of 106 receptors, channels and transporters, indicating only D3 receptor as a major off-target. Compound 3 has been selected for this study over compound 1c because of the higher 5-HT6R/D2R binding ratio. These results have defined a new direction for the design of our pseudo-selective 5-HT6R antagonists.

  19. Molecular decodification of gymnemic acids from Gymnema sylvestre. Discovery of a new class of liver X receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renga, Barbara; Festa, Carmen; De Marino, Simona; Di Micco, Simone; D'Auria, Maria Valeria; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela

    2015-04-01

    The individual chemical components of commercial extract of Gymnema sylvestre, a medicinal plant used in the traditional systems of the Indian medicine for its antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties, were isolated and evaluated for their capability to act as modulators of nuclear and membrane receptors involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. The study disclosed for the first time that individual gymnemic acids are potent and selective antagonists for the β isoform of LXR. Indeed the above activity was shared by the most abundant aglycone gymnemagenin (10) whereas gymnestrogenin (11) was endowed with a dual LXRα/β antagonistic profile. Deep pharmacological investigation demonstrated that gymnestrogenin, reducing the expression of SREBP1c and ABCA1 in vitro, is able to decrease lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. The results of this study substantiate the use of G. sylvestre extract in LXR mediated dislypidemic diseases.

  20. Two short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonists (zyklophin and LY2444296) exhibited different behavioral effects from the long-acting antagonist norbinaltorphimine in mouse anxiety tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-02-26

    Prototypical long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists [e.g., norbinaltorphimine (norBNI)] have been reported to exert anxiolytic-like effects in several commonly used anxiety tests in rodents including the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. It remains unknown if the short-acting KOPR antagonists (e.g., zyklophin and LY2444296) have similar effects. In this study effects of zyklophin and LY2444296 (s.c.) were investigated in the NIH and EPM tests in mice 1h post-injection and compared with norBNI (i.p.) 48h post-administration. In the NIH test, zyklophin at 3 and 1mg/kg, but not 0.3mg/kg, or LY2444296 at 30mg/kg decreased the latency of palatable food consumption in novel cages, but had no effect in training cages, similar to norBNI (10mg/kg). Zyklophin at 3 or 1mg/kg increased or had a trend of increasing the amount of palatable food consumption in novel cages, with no effects in training cages, further indicating its anxiolytic-like effect, but norBNI (10mg/kg) and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) did not. In the EPM test, norBNI (10mg/kg) increased open arm time and % open arm entries or time, but zyklophin at all three doses and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) had no effects. In addition, zyklophin at 3mg/kg increased numbers of close and total arm entries on EPM, suggesting increased activity; however, norBNI and LY2444296 had no effects on close and total arm entries. Thus, all three KOPR antagonists had anxiolytic-like effects in the NIH test. However, only the long-acting one (norBNI), but not the short-acting ones (zyklophin and LY2444296), demonstrated anti-anxiety like effects in the EPM test. It remains to be investigated if the differences are due to the differences in their durations of action and/or pharmacodynamic properties.

  1. Design and synthesis of novel 3-substituted-indole derivatives as selective H3 receptor antagonists and potent free radical scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Zhao, Liying; Hong, Lingjuan; Yang, Fenyan; Sheng, Rong; Chen, Jianzhong; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naimin; Hu, Yongzhou

    2013-10-01

    A series of novel 3-substituted-indole derivatives with a benzyl tertiary amino moiety were designed, synthesized and evaluated as H3 receptor antagonists and free radical scavengers for Alzheimer's disease therapy. Most of these synthesized compounds exhibited moderate to potent antagonistic activities in CREs driven luciferase assay. In particular, compound 2d demonstrated the most favorable H3 receptor antagonistic activity with the IC50 value of 0.049μM. Besides, it also displayed high binding affinity to H3 receptor (Ki=4.26±2.55nM) and high selectivity over other three histamine receptors. Moreover, 2d and other two 3-substituted indole derivatives 1d and 3d exerted potent ABTS radical cation scavenging capacities similar to melatonin. Above results illustrate that 2d is an interesting lead for extensive optimization to explore new drug candidate for AD therapy.

  2. A novel BLyS antagonist peptide designed based on the 3-D complex structure of BCMA and BLyS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Yan; Shen, Beifen

    2006-08-11

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is a member of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family. Because of its roles in autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and Sjogren syndrome (SS), BLyS antagonists have been tested to treat SLE- and RA-like symptoms in mice and obtained optimistic results. So far, reported BLyS antagonists were mostly decoyed BLyS receptors or anti-BLyS antibodies. In this study, a novel BLyS antagonist peptide, PT, was designed based on the modeling 3-D complex structure of BCMA and BLyS. The interaction mode of PT with BLyS was analyzed theoretically. The results of competitive ELISA demonstrated that PT could inhibit the binding of BCMA-Fc and anti-BLyS antibody to BLyS in vitro. In addition, PT could partly block the proliferating activity of BLyS on mice splenocytes. The BLyS antagonizing activity of PT was significant (p<0.05). This study highlights the possibility of using BLyS antagonist peptide to neutralize BLyS activity. Further optimization of PT with computer-guided molecular design method to enhance its biopotency may be useful in developing new BLyS antagonists to treat BLyS-related autoimmune diseases.

  3. Laser Communications Relay Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration project will advance optical communications technology, expanding industry’s capability to produce competitive,...

  4. Discriminating agonist and antagonist ligands of the nuclear receptors using 3D-pharmacophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Nathalie; Delahaye, Solenne; Zagury, Jean-François; Montes, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) constitute an important class of therapeutic targets. We evaluated the performance of 3D structure-based and ligand-based pharmacophore models in predicting the pharmacological profile of NRs ligands using the NRLiSt BDB database. We could generate selective pharmacophores for agonist and antagonist ligands and we found that the best performances were obtained by combining the structure-based and the ligand-based approaches. The combination of pharmacophores that were generated allowed to cover most of the chemical space of the NRLiSt BDB datasets. By screening the whole NRLiSt BDB on our 3D pharmacophores, we demonstrated their selectivity towards their dedicated NRs ligands. The 3D pharmacophores herein presented can thus be used as a predictor of the pharmacological activity of NRs ligands.Graphical AbstractUsing a combination of structure-based and ligand-based pharmacophores, agonist and antagonist ligands of the Nuclear Receptors included in the NRLiSt BDB database could be separated.

  5. Suppressant effects of selective 5-HT2 antagonists on rapid eye movement sleep in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella, F C; Echevarria, E; Pastel, R H; Cox, B; Blackburn, T P

    1989-04-24

    The effects of the novel, highly selective serotonin-2 (5-HT2) antagonists, ICI 169,369 and ICI 170,809, on 24 h EEG sleep-wake activity were studied in the rat. Both compounds caused a dose-related increase in the latency to rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and significantly suppressed cumulative REMS time up to 12 h postinjection. In contrast, neither drug disrupted slow-wave sleep continuity in as much as the latency to non-REMS (NREMS) and cumulative NREMS time were unchanged. However, at the highest dose tested (20 mg/kg) ICI 170,809 did produce a significant increase in total NREMS time during the second half of the sleep-awake cycle. These results demonstrate effects of selective 5-HT2 antagonists on sleep in rats which appear to be specific for REMS behavior, suggesting that the priming influence of serotonin on REMS may involve 5-HT2 receptor subtypes. The relationship between the REMS suppressant actions of these compounds and their consideration as therapeutic agents in depression is discussed.

  6. Antagonistic Effects of Sodium Butyrate and N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl-retinamide on Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kuefer

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Butyrates and retinoids are promising antineoplastic agents. Here we analyzed effects of sodium butyrate and N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-retinamide (4-HPR on prostate cancer cells as monotherapy or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Sodium butyrate and 4-HPR induced concentration-dependent growth inhibition in prostate cancer cells in vitro. The isobologram analysis revealed that sodium butyrate and 4-HPR administered together antagonize effects of each other. For the in vivo studies, a water-soluble complex (4-HPR with a cyclodextrin was created. A single dose of sodium butyrate and 4-HPR showed a peak level in chicken plasma within 30 minutes. Both compounds induced inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis in xenografts of the chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Analysis of the cytotoxic effects of the drugs used in combination demonstrated an antagonistic effect on inhibition of proliferation and on induction of apoptosis. Prolonged jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation induced by sodium butyrate and 4-HPR was strongly attenuated when both compounds were used in combination. Both compounds induced inhibition of NF-κ,B. This effect was strongly antagonized in LNCaP cells when the compounds were used in combination. These results indicate that combinational therapies have to be carefully investigated due to potential antagonistic effects in the clinical setting despite promising results of a monotherapy.

  7. A two-degrees-of-freedom miniature manipulator actuated by antagonistic shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Ming; Chu, Cheng-Yu; Lan, Chao-Chieh

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a miniature manipulator that can provide rotations around two perpendicularly intersecting axes. Each axis is actuated by a pair of shape memory alloy (SMA) wires. SMA wire actuators are known for their large energy density and ease of actuation. These advantages make them ideal for applications that have stringent size and weight constraints. SMA actuators can be temperature-controlled to contract and relax like muscles. When correctly designed, antagonistic SMA actuators have a faster response and larger range of motion than bias-type SMA actuators. This paper proposes an antagonistic actuation model to determine the manipulator parameters that are required to generate sufficient workspace. Effects of SMA prestrain and spring stiffness on the manipulator are investigated. Taking advantage of proper prestrain, the actuator size can be made much smaller while maintaining the same motion. The use of springs in series with SMA can effectively reduce actuator stress. A controller and an anti-slack algorithm are developed to ensure fast and accurate motion. Speed, stress, and loading experiments are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the manipulator.

  8. A Combined Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Research of Quinolinone Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Bai, Fang; Cao, Hong; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Antiandrogens bicalutamide, flutamide and enzalutamide etc. have been used in clinical trials to treat prostate cancer by binding to and antagonizing androgen receptor (AR). Although initially effective, the drug resistance problem will emerge eventually, which results in a high medical need for novel AR antagonist exploitation. Here in this work, to facilitate the rational design of novel AR antagonists, we studied the structure-activity relationships of a series of 2-quinolinone derivatives and investigated the structural requirements for their antiandrogenic activities. Different modeling methods, including 2D MLR, 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA, were implemented to evolve QSAR models. All these models, thoroughly validated, demonstrated satisfactory results especially for the good predictive abilities. The contour maps from 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA models provide visualized explanation of key structural characteristics relevant to the antiandrogenic activities, which is summarized to a position-specific conclusion at the end. The obtained results from this research are practically useful for rational design and screening of promising chemicals with high antiandrogenic activities.

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of compact, conformationally constrained bifunctional opioid agonist – neurokinin-1 antagonist peptidomimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemyn, Karel; Kleczkowska, Patrycia; Lesniak, Anna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Van der Poorten, Olivier; Van den Eynde, Isabelle; Keresztes, Attila; Varga, Eva; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Chung, Nga N.; Lemieux, Carole; Mika, Joanna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Przewlocka, Barbara; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Schiller, Peter W.; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A reported mixed opioid agonist - neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist 4 (Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-(3’,5’-(CF3)2)NMe-benzyl) was modified to identify important features in both pharmacophores. The new dual ligands were tested in vitro and subsequently two compounds (lead structure 4 and one of the new analogues 22, Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-β-Ala-NMe-Bn) were selected for in vivo behavioral assays, which were conducted in acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (cold plate and von Frey) in rats. Compared to the parent opioid compound 33 (without NK1R pharmacophore), hybrid 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Attenuation of neuropathic pain emerged from NK1R antagonism as demonstrated by the pure NK1R antagonist 6. Surprisingly, despite a lower in vitro activity at NK1R in comparison with 4, compound 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Although potent analgesic effects were observed for 4 and 22, upon chronic administration, both manifested a tolerance profile similar to that of morphine and cross tolerance with morphine in a neuropathic pain model in rat. PMID:25544687

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of compact, conformationally constrained bifunctional opioid agonist - neurokinin-1 antagonist peptidomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemyn, Karel; Kleczkowska, Patrycia; Lesniak, Anna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Van der Poorten, Olivier; Van den Eynde, Isabelle; Keresztes, Attila; Varga, Eva; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Chung, Nga N; Lemieux, Carole; Mika, Joanna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Przewlocka, Barbara; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-03-06

    A reported mixed opioid agonist - neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist 4 (Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-(3',5'-(CF3)2)NMe-benzyl) was modified to identify important features in both pharmacophores. The new dual ligands were tested in vitro and subsequently two compounds (lead structure 4 and one of the new analogues 22, Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-β-Ala-NMe-Bn) were selected for in vivo behavioural assays, which were conducted in acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (cold plate and von Frey) in rats. Compared to the parent opioid compound 33 (without NK1R pharmacophore), hybrid 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Attenuation of neuropathic pain emerged from NK1R antagonism as demonstrated by the pure NK1R antagonist 6. Surprisingly, despite a lower in vitro activity at NK1R in comparison with 4, compound 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Although potent analgesic effects were observed for 4 and 22, upon chronic administration, both manifested a tolerance profile similar to that of morphine and cross tolerance with morphine in a neuropathic pain model in rat.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of novel angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists as anti-hypertension drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaolu; Zhu, Weibo; Zhang, Ruijing; Wen, Caihong; Wang, Li; Yan, Yijia; Tang, Hesheng; Chen, Zhilong

    2016-05-01

    Three new angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists, 1, 2 and 3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated. The AT1 receptor-binding assays in vitro showed that all the synthesized compounds had nanomolar affinity for the AT1 receptor. From which compound 3 was found to be the most potent ligands with an IC50 value of 2.67±0.23 nM. Biological evaluation in vivo revealed that all the compounds could cause significant decrease on MBP in a dose dependent manner in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and compound 3 especially showed an efficient and long-lasting effect in reducing blood pressure, whose maximal response lowered 41 mmHg of MBP at 10mg/kg and 62 mmHg at 15 mg/kg after oral administration, the significant anti-hypertensive effect lasted beyond 12 h, which is better than the reference compound losartan. The pharmacokinetic experiments showed that compound 3 could be absorbed efficiently and metabolized smoothly both in blood and in tissues in Wistar rats. The acute toxicity assay suggested that it has low toxicity with the LD50 value of 2974.35 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that compound 3 is a potent angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist which could be considered as a novel anti-hypertension candidate and deserved for further investigation.

  12. Lead optimization studies of cinnamic amide EP2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Yang, Myung-Soon; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-05-22

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role.

  13. Churg-Strauss syndrome associated with leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchacovich, R; Justiniano, M; Espinoza, L R

    2007-10-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare vasculitic disorder that generally occurs in patients with bronchial asthma. CSS is being increasingly recognized in asthmatic patients treated with leukotriene receptor antagonists. However, the nature of this relationship remains to be elucidated. The present report describes three asthmatic patients who developed clinical manifestations highly suggestive of CSS, although one patient lacked the presence of eosinophilia. The patient, however, exhibited biopsy-proven cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis, which improved after withdrawal of montelukast. The second patient presented with systemic constitutional signs including fever, malaise, arthralgias, clinical jaundice, peripheral blood eosinophilia, and biopsy-proven eosinophilic hepatitis. The third patient also had circulating eosinophilia, scleritis, and arthritis. All patients improved after discontinuation of the leukotriene receptor antagonist (montelukast).

  14. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Kane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Urotensin-II (UII, which binds to its receptor UT, plays an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland and CNS. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in ACAT-1 activity leading to SMC proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII, as well as inflammation, high blood pressure and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  15. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists as immunomodulators: new therapeutic views?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    Considerable evidence has emerged to suggest that histamine participates in the regulation of the inflammatory response, immune reaction, coagulation cascade, and cardiovascular function. Furthermore, histamine may play a major role in the growth of normal and malignant tissue as a regulator...... of proliferation and angiogenesis. Specific histamine receptors have been identified on the surface of bone marrow cells, immune competent cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and also on malignant cells. This has prompted research in regulation by specific histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Results...... from such studies are currently accumulating and suggest that the histamine-2 receptor antagonists have potential beneficial effects in the treatment of certain malignant, autoimmune and skin diseases, either alone or in combination with other drugs. The beneficial effect of histamine-2 receptor...

  16. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  17. Non-imidazole histamine NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Recently a series of H3-antagonists related to Imoproxifan was realised (I); in these products the oxime substructure of the lead was constrained in NO-donor furoxan systems and in the corresponding furazan derivatives. In this paper, a new series of compounds derived from I by substituting the imidazole ring with the ethoxycarbonylpiperazino moiety present in the non-imidazole H3-ligand A-923 is described. For all the products synthesis and preliminary pharmacological characterisation, as well as their hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, are reported. The imidazole ring replacement generally results in a decreased H3-antagonist activity with respect to the analogues of series I and, in some cases, induces relaxing effects on the electrically contracted guinea-pig ileum, probably due to increased affinity for other receptor systems.

  18. Antagonist properties of Conus parius peptides on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and their effects on CREB signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailaja Kunda

    Full Text Available Three members of a family of small neurotoxic peptides from the venom of Conus parius, conantokins (Con Pr1, Pr2, and Pr3, function as antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR. We report structural characterizations of these synthetic peptides, and also demonstrate their antagonistic properties toward ion flow through NMDAR ion channels in primary neurons. ConPr1 and ConPr2 displayed moderate increases in α-helicity after addition of Mg(2+. Native apo-ConPr3 possessed an α-helical conformation, and the helicity increased only slightly on addition of Mg(2+. Additionally, these peptides diminished NMDA/Gly-mediated currents and intracellular Ca(2+ (iCa(2+ influx in mature rat primary hippocampal neurons. Electrophysiological data showed that these peptides displayed slower antagonistic properties toward the NMDAR than conantokins from other species of cone snails, e.g., ConT and ConG. Furthermore, to demonstrate selectivity of the C. parius-derived conantokins towards specific NMDAR subunits, cortical neurons from GluN2A(-/- and GluN2B(-/- mice were utilized. Robust inhibition of NMDAR-mediated stimulation in GluN2A(-/--derived mouse neurons, as compared to those isolated from GluN2B(-/--mouse brains, was observed, suggesting a greater selectivity of these antagonists towards the GluN2B subunit. These C. parius conantokins mildly inhibited NMDAR-induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser(133, suggesting that the peptides modulated iCa(2+ entry and, thereby, activation of CREB, a transcription factor that is required for maintaining long-term synaptic activity. Our data mechanistically show that while these peptides effectively antagonize NMDAR-directed current and iCa(2+ influx, receptor-coupled CREB signaling is maintained. The consequence of sustained CREB signaling is improved neuronal plasticity and survival during neuropathologies.

  19. Antagonist properties of Conus parius peptides on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and their effects on CREB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Shailaja; Cheriyan, John; Hur, Michael; Balsara, Rashna D; Castellino, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    Three members of a family of small neurotoxic peptides from the venom of Conus parius, conantokins (Con) Pr1, Pr2, and Pr3, function as antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR). We report structural characterizations of these synthetic peptides, and also demonstrate their antagonistic properties toward ion flow through NMDAR ion channels in primary neurons. ConPr1 and ConPr2 displayed moderate increases in α-helicity after addition of Mg(2+). Native apo-ConPr3 possessed an α-helical conformation, and the helicity increased only slightly on addition of Mg(2+). Additionally, these peptides diminished NMDA/Gly-mediated currents and intracellular Ca(2+) (iCa(2+)) influx in mature rat primary hippocampal neurons. Electrophysiological data showed that these peptides displayed slower antagonistic properties toward the NMDAR than conantokins from other species of cone snails, e.g., ConT and ConG. Furthermore, to demonstrate selectivity of the C. parius-derived conantokins towards specific NMDAR subunits, cortical neurons from GluN2A(-/-) and GluN2B(-/-) mice were utilized. Robust inhibition of NMDAR-mediated stimulation in GluN2A(-/-)-derived mouse neurons, as compared to those isolated from GluN2B(-/-)-mouse brains, was observed, suggesting a greater selectivity of these antagonists towards the GluN2B subunit. These C. parius conantokins mildly inhibited NMDAR-induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser(133), suggesting that the peptides modulated iCa(2+) entry and, thereby, activation of CREB, a transcription factor that is required for maintaining long-term synaptic activity. Our data mechanistically show that while these peptides effectively antagonize NMDAR-directed current and iCa(2+) influx, receptor-coupled CREB signaling is maintained. The consequence of sustained CREB signaling is improved neuronal plasticity and survival during neuropathologies.

  20. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Center for Substance Abuse Research Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University 3500 N, Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19140 AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...processes), affect the ability of opioid drugs to counteract pain. We predicted that one way of increasing the effectiveness of the pain-relieving... drugs would be to eliminate or reduce the activity of the chemokines by administering chemokine receptor antagonists (CRAs). The blockade of one or

  1. Potent and orally efficacious benzothiazole amides as TRPV1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besidski, Yevgeni; Brown, William; Bylund, Johan; Dabrowski, Michael; Dautrey, Sophie; Harter, Magali; Horoszok, Lucy; Hu, Yin; Johnson, Dean; Johnstone, Shawn; Jones, Paul; Leclerc, Sandrine; Kolmodin, Karin; Kers, Inger; Labarre, Maryse; Labrecque, Denis; Laird, Jennifer; Lundström, Therese; Martino, John; Maudet, Mickaël; Munro, Alexander; Nylöf, Martin; Penwell, Andrea; Rotticci, Didier; Slaitas, Andis; Sundgren-Andersson, Anna; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Villanueva, Huascar; Walpole, Christopher; Zemribo, Ronald; Griffin, Andrew M

    2012-10-01

    Benzothiazole amides were identified as TRPV1 antagonists from high throughput screening using recombinant human TRPV1 receptor and structure-activity relationships were explored to pinpoint key pharmacophore interactions. By increasing aqueous solubility, through the attachment of polar groups to the benzothiazole core, and enhancing metabolic stability, by blocking metabolic sites, the drug-like properties and pharmokinetic profiles of benzothiazole compounds were sufficiently optimized such that their therapeutic potential could be verified in rat pharmacological models of pain.

  2. Exploration of a new series of PAR1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planty, Bruno; Pujol, Chantal; Lamothe, Marie; Maraval, Catherine; Horn, Clemens; Le Grand, Bruno; Perez, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Two series of new PAR1 antagonists have been identified. The first incorporates a cinnamoylpiperidine motif and the second a cinnamoylpyridine pattern. The synthesis, biological activity and structure-activity relationship of these compounds are presented. In each series, one analog showed potent in vivo antithrombotic activity in a rat AV shunt model, with up to 53% inhibition at 1.25mpk iv for compound 30.

  3. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists: emerging roles in cardiovascular medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Funder JW

    2013-01-01

    John W FunderPrince Henry's Institute, Clayton, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Spironolactone was first developed over 50 years ago as a potent mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist with undesirable side effects; it was followed a decade ago by eplerenone, which is less potent but much more MR-specific. From a marginal role as a potassium-sparing diuretic, spironolactone was shown to be an extraordinarily effective adjunctive agent in the treatment of progressive heart failure, as ...

  4. Approaches to the rational design of selective melanocortin receptor antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Victor J; Cai, Minying; Nyberg, Joel; Muthu, Dhanasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction When establishing the physiological roles of specific receptors in normal and disease states, it is critical to have selective antagonist ligands for each receptor in a receptor system with several subtypes. The melanocortin receptors have five subtypes referred to as the melanocortin 1 receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor, melanocortin 3 receptor, melanocortin 4 receptor and melanocortin 5 receptor, and they are of critical importance for many aspects of human health and disease. Areas covered This article reviews the current efforts to design selective antagonistic ligands for the five human melanocortin receptors summarizing the currently published orthosteric and allosteric antagonists for each of these receptors. Expert opinion Though there has been progress, there are still few drugs available that address the many significant biological activities and diseases that are associated with these receptors, which is possibly due to the lack of receptor selectivity that these designed ligands are currently showing. The authors believe that further studies into the antagonists’ 3D conformational and topographical properties in addition to future mutagenesis studies will provide greater insight into these ligands which could play a role in the treatment of various diseases in the future. PMID:22646078

  5. Synergistic and antagonistic drug combinations depend on network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ning; Ma, Wenzhe; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi; Tang, Chao; Lai, Luhua

    2014-01-01

    Drug combinations may exhibit synergistic or antagonistic effects. Rational design of synergistic drug combinations remains a challenge despite active experimental and computational efforts. Because drugs manifest their action via their targets, the effects of drug combinations should depend on the interaction of their targets in a network manner. We therefore modeled the effects of drug combinations along with their targets interacting in a network, trying to elucidate the relationships between the network topology involving drug targets and drug combination effects. We used three-node enzymatic networks with various topologies and parameters to study two-drug combinations. These networks can be simplifications of more complex networks involving drug targets, or closely connected target networks themselves. We found that the effects of most of the combinations were not sensitive to parameter variation, indicating that drug combinational effects largely depend on network topology. We then identified and analyzed consistent synergistic or antagonistic drug combination motifs. Synergistic motifs encompass a diverse range of patterns, including both serial and parallel combinations, while antagonistic combinations are relatively less common and homogenous, mostly composed of a positive feedback loop and a downstream link. Overall our study indicated that designing novel synergistic drug combinations based on network topology could be promising, and the motifs we identified could be a useful catalog for rational drug combination design in enzymatic systems.

  6. IAP antagonists sensitize murine osteosarcoma cells to killing by TNFα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Tanmay M.; Miles, Mark A.; Gupte, Ankita; Taylor, Scott; Tascone, Brianna; Walkley, Carl R.; Hawkins, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes for patients diagnosed with the bone cancer osteosarcoma have not improved significantly in the last four decades. Only around 60% of patients and about a quarter of those with metastatic disease survive for more than five years. Although DNA-damaging chemotherapy drugs can be effective, they can provoke serious or fatal adverse effects including cardiotoxicity and therapy-related cancers. Better and safer treatments are therefore needed. We investigated the anti-osteosarcoma activity of IAP antagonists (also known as Smac mimetics) using cells from primary and metastatic osteosarcomas that arose spontaneously in mice engineered to lack p53 and Rb expression in osteoblast-derived cells. The IAP antagonists SM-164, GDC-0152 and LCL161, which efficiently target XIAP and cIAPs, sensitized cells from most osteosarcomas to killing by low levels of TNFα but not TRAIL. RIPK1 expression levels and activity correlated with sensitivity. RIPK3 levels varied considerably between tumors and RIPK3 was not required for IAP antagonism to sensitize osteosarcoma cells to TNFα. IAP antagonists, including SM-164, lacked mutagenic activity. These data suggest that drugs targeting XIAP and cIAP1/2 may be effective for osteosarcoma patients whose tumors express abundant RIPK1 and contain high levels of TNFα, and would be unlikely to provoke therapy-induced cancers in osteosarcoma survivors. PMID:27129149

  7. Histamine H1 antagonists and clinical characteristics of febrile seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolaly MA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed A ZolalyDepartment of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures.Methods: The current descriptive study was carried out from April 2009 to February 2011 in 250 infants and children who visited the Madinah Maternity and Children's Hospital as a result of febrile convulsions. They were divided into two groups according to administration of antihistamines at the onset of fever.Results: Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamines. The time from fever detection to seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than in the nonantihistamine group. No significant difference was found in time from fever detection to seizure onset or seizure duration between patients who received a first-generation antihistamine and those who received a second-generation antihistamine.Conclusion: Due to their central nervous system effects, H1 antagonists should not be administered to patients with febrile seizures and epilepsy. Caution should be exercised regarding the use of histamine H1 antagonists in young infants, because these drugs could potentially disturb the anticonvulsive central histaminergic system.Keywords: antihistamine, nonantihistamine, histamine H1 antagonist, febrile seizures

  8. Receptor discrimination and control of agonist-antagonist binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, R J

    1995-08-01

    The law of mass action is the common model for the interaction of agonist and antagonist compounds with cellular receptors. Parameters of the interaction, obtained from functional and radioligand-binding studies, allow discrimination and subtyping of receptors and aid in understanding specific mechanisms. This article reviews the theory and associated mathematical models and graphical transformations of data that underlie the determination of receptor parameters. The main theory assumes that agonist and antagonist compounds bind to cells that have a fixed number of receptors and provides the framework for obtaining drug-receptor parameters from data and their graphical transformations. Conditions that produce a change in receptor number, a newer concept in pharmacology, can have an important effect on the parameter values derived in the usual way. This review concludes with a discussion of the quantitative study of receptor-mediated feedback control of endogenous ligands, a very new topic with potentially important implications for understanding antagonist effectiveness, loss of control, and chaos in regulated mass action binding.

  9. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  10. Newer calcium channel antagonists and the treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, D F

    1999-07-01

    Calcium channel antagonists have become popular medications for the management of hypertension. These agents belong to the diphenylalkylamine, benzothiazepine, dihydropyridine, or tetralol chemical classes. Although the medications share a common pharmacological mechanism in reducing peripheral vascular resistance, clinical differences between the sub-classes can be linked to structural profiles. This heterogeneity is manifested by differences in vascular selectivity, effects on cardiac conduction and adverse events. The lack of differentiation between calcium channel antagonists in clinical trials has contributed to uncertainty associated with their impact on morbidity and mortality. Data from more recent studies in specific patient populations underscores the importance of investigating these antihypertensives as individual agents. A proposed therapeutic classification system suggests that newer agents should share the slow onset and long-acting antihypertensive effect of amlodipine. Additionally, a favourable trough-to-peak ratio has been recommended as an objective measurement of efficacy. The newer drugs, barnidipine and lacidipine, have a therapeutic profile similar to amlodipine, but trough-to-peak ratios are not substantially greater than the recommended minimum of 0.50. Aranidipine, cilnidipine and efonidipine have unique pharmacological properties that distinguish them from traditional dihydropyridines. Although clinical significance is unconfirmed, these newer options may be beneficial for patients with co-morbid conditions that preclude use of older antagonists.

  11. Teaching and Demonstrating Classical Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, John; Fernald, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Discusses classroom demonstrations of classical conditioning and notes tendencies to misrepresent Pavlov's procedures. Describes the design and construction of the conditioner that is used for demonstrating classical conditioning. Relates how students experience conditioning, generalization, extinction, discrimination, and spontaneous recovery.…

  12. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  13. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  14. Demonstrative and non-demonstrative reasoning by analogy

    OpenAIRE

    Ippoliti, Emiliano

    2008-01-01

    The paper analizes a set of issues related to analogy and analogical reasoning, namely: 1) The problem of analogy and its duplicity; 2) The role of analogy in demonstrative reasoning; 3) The role of analogy in non-demonstrative reasoning; 4) The limits of analogy; 5) The convergence, particularly in multiple analogical reasoning, of these two apparently distinct aspects and its methodological and philosophical consequences. The paper, using example from number theory, argues for an heuristc c...

  15. Kappa opioid receptor antagonist and N-methyl-D- aspartate receptor antagonist affect dynorphin- induced spinal cord electrophysiologic impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Chen; Liangbi Xiang; Jun Liu; Dapeng Zhou; Hailong Yu; Qi Wang; Wenfeng Han; Weijian Ren

    2012-01-01

    The latencies of motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials were prolonged to different degrees, and wave amplitude was obviously decreased, after injection of dynorphin into the rat subarachnoid cavity.The wave amplitude and latencies of motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials were significantly recovered at 7 and 14 days after combined injection of dynorphin and either the kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine or the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801.The wave amplitude and latency were similar in rats after combined injection of dynorphin and nor-binaltorphimine or MK-801.These results suggest that intrathecal injection of dynorphin causes damage to spinal cord function.Prevention of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor or kappa receptor activation lessened the injury to spinal cord function induced by dynorphin.

  16. Anti free radical action of calcium antagonists and H1 and H2 receptors antagonists in neoplastic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    della Rovere, F; Broccio, M; Granata, A; Zirilli, A; Brugnano, L; Artemisia, A; Broccio, G

    1996-01-01

    The blood of the subjects suffering from Neoplastic Disease (ND) shows phenomena of membrane peroxidation due to the presence of Free Radicals (FRs), in a quantity much greater than the one observed in the blood of healthy subjects. This can be detected either by calculating the time necessary for the formation of "Heinz bodies" (Hbs), (p < 0.00001) after oxidative stress of the blood in vitro with acetylphenylidrazine (APH), or by calculating the methemoglobin (metHb) quantity that forms after the same treatment (P < 0.00001). The statistical analyses we carried out showed that metHb formation was not affected by age, sex, smoking habits, red blood cell number, Hb, Ht or tumor staging. In this study, by using equal parameters of investigation, we noted that the blood of the subjects with ND who were previously treated with calcium-antagonists drugs and with antagonists of H1 and H2 receptors, gave results completely superimposable on the results obtained from healthy subjects, implying that the treatment had avoided the increase of FRs. Therefore we concluded that calcium-antagonists and the antagonists of the H1 and H2 receptors behave as antioxidant substances, having decreased the FRs damaging activity on the cellular membranes, thus controlling, although to a limited degree, the pejorative evolution of the disease. It is also important to remember that investigations into the ND, even possible screenings, must take into account the above said data, submitting the subjects under investigation to a pharmacological wash out, particularly with those substances which, are considered to be scavengers of FRs. Some of these substances are investigated in this work.

  17. Conformational studies of 3-amino-1-alkyl-cyclopentane carboxamide CCR2 antagonists leading to new spirocyclic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Alexander; Goble, Stephen D; Doss, George A; Tsou, Nancy N; Butora, Gabor; Vicario, Pasquale P; Ayala, Julia Marie; Struthers, Mary; Demartino, Julie A; Mills, Sander G; Yang, Lihu

    2008-02-15

    In an effort to shed light on the active binding conformation of our 3-amino-1-alkyl-cyclopentane carboxamide CCR2 antagonists, we prepared several conformationally constrained analogs resulting from backbone cyclization. Evaluation of CCR2 binding affinities for these analogs gave insight into the optimal relative positions of the piperidine and benzylamide moieties while simultaneously leading to the discovery of a new, potent lead type based upon a spirocyclic acetal scaffold.

  18. Crafting a Gauss Gun Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, Matthew E.; Blodgett, E. D.

    2006-12-01

    A Gauss Gun launches a ferromagnetic projectile using a pulsed electromagnet. This demonstration provides a nice counterpoint to the popular Thompson's jumping ring demonstration, which launches a nonferromagnetic ring via repulsion of an induced current. The pulsed current must be short enough in duration so that the projectile is not retarded by lingering current in the launch solenoid, but also large enough to provide a suitably impressive velocity. This project involved an iterative design process, as we worked through balancing all the different design criteria. We recommend it as a very nice electronics design project which will produce a very portable and enjoyable demonstration. AAPT sponsor Earl Blodgett.

  19. Demonstration of Cauchy: Understanding Algebraic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.L. Costa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In this study we present some considerations about the End of Course Work undergraduate Full Degree in Mathematics / UFMT, drafted in 2011, and by taking title "A story about Cauchy and Euler's theorem on polyhedra" that gave birth to our research project Master of Education, begun in 2012, on the approaches of Euler's theorem on polyhedra in mathematics textbooks. At work in 2011 presented some considerations about the history of Euler's theorem for polyhedra which focus the demonstration presented by Cauchy (1789-1857, who tries to generalize it, relying on assumptions not observable in Euclidean geometry. Therefore, we seek the accessible literature on the history of mathematics; relate some aspects of the demonstration Cauchy with historical events on the development of mathematics in the nineteenth century, which allowed the acceptance of such a demonstration by mathematicians of his time.Keywords: History of Mathematics. Euler's Theorem on Polyhedra. Demonstration of Cauchy.

  20. Status of the Majorana Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuesta, C.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Avignone, Frank T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Detwiler, Jason A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, John L.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, Nicole R.; Poon, Alan; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Schmitt, C.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Tedeschi, D.; Timkin, V.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2015-06-09

    The Majorana Collaboration is constructing the Majorana Demonstrator, an ultra-low background, 40-kg modular high purity Ge detector array to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double-beta decay searches that will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted hierarchy region, a major goal of the Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. The current status of the Demonstrator is discussed, as are plans for its completion.

  1. Status of the MAJORANA Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, C; Arnquist, I J; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Buuck, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Detwiler, J A; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Greenn, M P; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Jasinski, B R; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Schmitt, C; Shanks, B; Shirchenko, M; Snyder, N; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Timkin, V; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V

    2014-01-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA Demonstrator, an ultra-low background, 40-kg modular high purity Ge detector array to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in Ge. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double-beta decay searches that will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region, a major goal of the Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. The current status of the Demonstrator is discussed, as are plans for its completion.

  2. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  3. Teacher Training: The Demonstration Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alan C.

    1977-01-01

    A teacher training technique is discussed involving a demonstration class given by a local teacher and observed by prospective teachers. After the class a discussion is held analyzing lesson content and teaching techniques. (CHK)

  4. Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Volume I. Demonstration plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The objective of this project is for Babcock Contractors Inc. (BCI) to provide process designs, and gasifier retort design for a fuel gas demonstration plant for Erie Mining Company at Hoyt Lake, Minnesota. The fuel gas produced will be used to supplement natural gas and fuel oil for iron ore pellet induration. The fuel gas demonstration plant will consist of five stirred, two-stage fixed-bed gasifier retorts capable of handling caking and non-caking coals, and provisions for the installation of a sixth retort. The process and unit design has been based on operation with caking coals; however, the retorts have been designed for easy conversion to handle non-caking coals. The demonstration unit has been designed to provide for expansion to a commercial plant (described in Commercial Plant Package) in an economical manner.

  5. Slant Borehole Demonstration Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GARDNER, M.G.

    2000-07-19

    This report provides a summary of the demonstration project for development of a slant borehole to retrieve soil samples from beneath the SX-108 single-shell tank. It provides a summary of the findings from the demonstration activities and recommendations for tool selection and methods to deploy into the SX Tank Farm. Daily work activities were recorded on Drilling and Sampling Daily Work Record Reports. The work described in this document was performed during March and April 2000.

  6. Orcc's Compa-Backend demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva, Yaset; Casseau, Emmanuel; Martin, Kevin; Bomel, Pierre; Diguet, Jean-Philippe; Yviquel, Hervé; Raulet, Mickael; Raffin, Erwan; Morin, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents the implementation of a video decoding application starting from its dataflow and CAL representations. Our objective is to demonstrate the ability of the Open RVC-CAL Compiler (Orcc) to generate code for embedded systems. For the demonstration, the video application will be an MPEG-4 Part2 decoder. The targeted architecture is a multi-core heterogeneous system deployed onto the Zynq platform from Xilinx.

  7. Screening and identification of receptor antagonist for shiga toxin from random peptides displayed on filamentous bacteriophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩照中; 苏国富; 黄翠芬

    1999-01-01

    The bacteriophage clones which can bind with shiga toxin B subunit (StxB) and inhibit cytotoxicity of shiga toxin were obtained by using antibody capturing method from a 15-mer random peptide library displayed on the surface of bacteriophage fd. Among them, one peptide encoded by the random DNA region of a selected bacteriophage (A12) was synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo, where the peptide competed with the receptor of shiga toxin to bind StxB, and inhibited the cytotoxicity and enterotoxicity of shiga toxin. The peptide can also block other apparently unrelated StxB binding bacteriophage (A3), which suggests that there are overlapping StxB interaction sites for those ligands with different sequences. The results provide a demonstration of bacteriophage display to screen peptide ligands for a small and/or unable biotinylated molecule by antibodies-capturing strategy, and take the lead for the development of receptor antagonists for shiga toxin.

  8. Presenilin 2 Modulates Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondria Coupling by Tuning the Antagonistic Effect of Mitofusin 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Filadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Communication between organelles plays key roles in cell biology. In particular, physical and functional coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria is crucial for regulation of various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here, we demonstrate that Presenilin 2 (PS2, mutations in which underlie familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD, promotes ER-mitochondria coupling only in the presence of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2. PS2 is not necessary for the antagonistic effect of Mfn2 on organelle coupling, although its abundance can tune it. The two proteins physically interact, whereas their homologues Mfn1 and PS1 are dispensable for this interplay. Moreover, PS2 mutants associated with FAD are more effective than the wild-type form in modulating ER-mitochondria tethering because their binding to Mfn2 in mitochondria-associated membranes is favored. We propose a revised model for ER-mitochondria interaction to account for these findings and discuss possible implications for FAD pathogenesis.

  9. Antagonistic action of Lactobacillus spp. against Staphylococcus aureus in cheese from Mompox - Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedad M. Montero Castillo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the food industry, food preservation techniquesthat do not use chemical products are becoming more common.Therefore, the aim of this research was to evaluate the antagonisticactivity (antibiosis of lactic-acid bacterial strains againstpathogenic microorganisms. Lactic-acid bacterial strains wereisolated from layered cheese and a commercial product (yogurt;and the same was done with pathogenic bacteria solely fromlayered cheese. The lactic-acid bacterial strains were identified asspecies from the Lactobacilli family, while the pathogenic bacteriafrom layered cheese were identified as Micrococcaceae familyspecies (Staphylococcus aureus. Subsequently, in the sameculture medium, bacteria of each species were sowed in order todetermine the inhibitory activity ability of the Lactic Acid Bacteria(BAL As a result, the highly antagonistic activity of the Lactobacilli(inhibition halos were larger than 0.5 centimeters in diameteragainst isolated pathogenic microorganisms was demonstrated.

  10. The GHS-R Blocker D-[Lys3] GHRP-6 Serves as CCR5 Chemokine Receptor Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpesh Patel, Vishwa Deep Dixit, Jun Ho Lee, Jie Wan Kim, Eric M. Schaffer, Dzung Nguyen, Dennis D. Taub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available [D-Lys3]-Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-6 (DLS is widely utilized in vivo and in vitro as a selective ghrelin receptor (GHS-R antagonist. This antagonist is one of the most common antagonists utilized in vivo to block GHS-R function and activity. Here, we found that DLS also has the ability to modestly block chemokine function and ligand binding to the chemokine receptor CCR5. The DLS effects on RANTES binding and Erk signaling as well as calcium mobilization appears to be much stronger than its effects on MIP-1α and MIP-1β. CCR5 have been shown to act as major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the CD4 positive host cells. To this end, we also found that DLS blocks M-tropic HIV-1 propagation in activated human PBMCs. These data demonstrate that DLS may not be a highly selective GHS-R1a inhibitor and may also effects on other G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family members. Moreover, DLS may have some potential clinical applications in blocking HIV infectivity and CCR5-mediated migration and function in various inflammatory disease states.

  11. Pre-medication with H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptor antagonists for intravenous urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, H.J.; Tauber, R.; Kramann, B.; Gmeinwieser, J.; Schmidt, U.; Reiser, M.

    1986-02-01

    Intravenous urography using Telebrix was performed on 500 patients. Two hundred patients (group I) received no pre-medication; 300 patients (group II) were premedicated with H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptor antagonists. All patients were examined for signs of contrast reactions, blood pressure, pulse rate and plasma histamine levels. These were measured before and three minutes after the administration of the antihistamine substances and/or the contrast medium, and also at the end of the examination. Following the administration of H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptor antagonists, a slight, transient and insignificant rise in plasma histamine could be demonstrated. Both groups showed a significant rise in plasma histamine levels after the injection of the contrast medium. Although the pre-medicated group contained a higher percentage of high risk patients, there were significantly fewer patients with contrast reactions. Pre-medication with H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptor antagonists in high risk patients is therefore advisable.

  12. Regulating role of acetylcholine and its antagonists in inward rectified K~+ channels from guard cell protoplasts of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷强; 花宝光; 郭玉海; 娄成后

    2000-01-01

    The inward rectified potassium current of Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts treated with acetylcholine (ACh) or the antagonists of its receptors were recorded by employing the patch clamp technique. The results show that ACh at lower concentrations increases the inward K+ current, in contrast, ACh at higher concentrations inhibits it. Treated with d-Tubocurarine (d-Tub), an antagonist of the nicotine ACh receptor (nAChR) inhibits the inward K+ current by 30%. Treated with atropine (Atr), an antagonist of the muscarine (Mus) ACh receptor (mAChR) also inhibits it by 36%. However, if guard cell protoplasts are treated with d-Tub and Atr together, the inward K+ current is inhibited by 60%-75%. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a strong inhibitor of K+ channels has no effect on the inward K+ current regulated by ACh, suggesting that there are inward K+ channels modulated by AChRs on the membrane of the guard cell protoplasts. These data demonstrate an ACh-regulated mechanism for stomatal movement.

  13. Regulating role of acetylcholine and its antagonists in inward rectified K+ channels from guard cell protoplasts of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The inward rectified potassium current of Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts treated with acetylcholine (ACh) or the antagonists of its receptors were recorded by employing the patch clamp technique. The results show that ACh at lower concentrations increases the inward K+ current, in contrast, ACh at higher concentrations inhibits it. Treated with d-Tubocurarine (d-Tub), an antagonist of the nicotine ACh receptor (nAChR) inhibits the inward K+ current by 30%. Treated with atropine (Atr), an antagonist of the muscarine (Mus) ACh receptor (mAChR) also inhibits it by 36%.However,if guard cell protoplasts are treated with d-Tub and Atr together, the inward K+ current is inhibited by 60%-75%. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a strong inhibitor of K+ channels has no effect on the inward K+ current regulated by ACh, suggesting that there are inward K+ channels modulated by AChRs on the membrane of the guard cell protoplasts. These data demonstrate an ACh-regulated mechanism for stomatal movement.

  14. Development of a FLIPR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of MrgD Agonists and Antagonists from a Single Screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seena K. Ajit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MrgD, a member of the Mas-related gene family, is expressed exclusively in small diameter IB4+ neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. This unique expression pattern, the presence of a single copy of MrgD in rodents and humans, and the identification of a putative ligand, beta-alanine, make it an experimentally attractive therapeutic target for pain with limited likelihood of side effects. We have devised a high throughput calcium mobilization assay that enables identification of both agonists and antagonists from a single screen for MrgD. Screening of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC validated this assay approach, and we identified both agonists and antagonists active at micromolar concentrations in MrgD expressing but not in parental CHO-DUKX cell line. Further characterization was performed using a subset of these screening hits. Our results demonstrated that the dual agonist/antagonist assay format is feasible and likely can be extended to most GPCRs with known agonist.

  15. Therapeutic activity of an interleukin-4/interleukin-13 dual antagonist on oxazolone-induced colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaian, Marion T; Page, Karen M; Fish, Susan; Brennan, Agnes; Cook, Timothy A; Moreira, Karen; Zhang, Melvin; Jesson, Michael; Marquette, Kimberly; Agostinelli, Rita; Lee, Julie; Williams, Cara M M; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Thakker, Paresh

    2014-11-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13 are critical drivers of immune activation and inflammation in ulcerative colitis, asthma and other diseases. Because these cytokines may have redundant function, dual targeting holds promise for achieving greater efficacy. We have recently described a bifunctional therapeutic targeting IL-4 and IL-13 developed on a novel protein scaffold, generated by combining specific binding domains in an optimal configuration using appropriate linker regions. In the current study, the bifunctional IL-4/IL-13 antagonist was evaluated in the murine oxazolone-induced colitis model, which produces disease with features of ulcerative colitis. The bifunctional IL-4/IL-13 antagonist reduced body weight loss throughout the 7-day course of the model, and ameliorated the increased colon weight and decreased colon length that accompany disease. Colon tissue gene expression was modulated in accordance with the treatment effect. Concentrations of serum amyloid P were elevated in proportion to disease severity, making it an effective biomarker. Serum concentrations of the bifunctional IL-4/IL-13 antagonist were inversely proportional to disease severity, colon tissue expression of pro-inflammatory genes, and serum amyloid P concentration. Taken together, these results define a panel of biomarkers signifying engagement of the IL-4/IL-13 pathway, confirm the T helper type 2 nature of disease in this model, and demonstrate the effectiveness of dual cytokine blockade.

  16. Predictions of in vivo prolactin levels from in vitro k I values of d 2 receptor antagonists using an agonist-antagonist interaction model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersson, K.J.; Vermeulen, A.M.J.; Friberg, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin elevation is a side effect of all currently available D2 receptor antagonists used in the treatment of schizophrenia. Prolactin elevation is the result of a direct antagonistic D2 effect blocking the tonic inhibition of prolactin release by dopamine. The aims of this work were to assess th

  17. Urinary responses to acute moxonidine are inhibited by natriuretic peptide receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ayoubi, Rouwayda; Menaouar, Ahmed; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Mukaddam-Daher, Suhayla

    2005-05-01

    We have previously shown that acute intravenous injections of moxonidine and clonidine increase plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a vasodilator, diuretic and natriuretic hormone. We hypothesized that moxonidine stimulates the release of ANP, which would act on its renal receptors to cause diuresis and natriuresis, and these effects may be altered in hypertension. Moxonidine (0, 10, 50, 100 or 150 microg in 300 microl saline) and clonidine (0, 1, 5 or 10 microg in 300 microl saline) injected intravenously in conscious normally hydrated normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats (SD, approximately 200 g) and 12-14-week-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) dose-dependently stimulated diuresis, natriuresis, kaliuresis and cGMP excretion, with these effects being more pronounced during the first hour post-injection. The actions of 5 microg clonidine and 50 microg moxonidine were inhibited by yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist, and efaroxan, an imidazoline I1-receptor antagonist. Moxonidine (100 microg) stimulated (P<0.01) diuresis in SHR (0.21+/-0.04 vs 1.16+/-0.06 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1)), SD (0.42+/-0.06 vs 1.56+/-0.19 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1)) and WKY (0.12+/-0.04 vs 1.44+/-0.21 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1)). Moxonidine-stimulated urine output was lower in SHR than in SD and WKY. Moxonidine-stimulated sodium and potassium excretions were lower in SHR than in SD, but not WKY, demonstrating an influence of strain but not of pressure. Pretreatment with the natriuretic peptide antagonist anantin (5 or 10 microg) resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of moxonidine-stimulated urinary actions. Anantin (10 microg) inhibited (P<0.01) urine output to 0.38+/-0.06, 0.12+/-0.01, and 0.16+/-0.04 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1) in SD, WKY, and SHR, respectively. Moxonidine increased (P<0.01) plasma ANP in SD (417+/-58 vs 1021+/-112 pg ml(-1)) and WKY (309+/-59 vs 1433+/-187 pg ml(-1)), and in SHR (853+/-96 vs 1879+/-229 pg ml(-1)). These results demonstrate that natriuretic

  18. Antagonistic activity of Bacillus probiotics against bacteria isolates of oral cavity of patients with periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rivis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is admitted that the normal human microflora plays an important role in supporting homeostasis, forming immune mechanisms and metabolism. Nowadays, there is a constant growth of different diseases due to microbiological imbalance in a human organism. Preparations containing “good bacteria” have been used for therapeutic purposes since ancient times. The mechanism of probiotics influence comprises their ability to compete for adhesion sites with the pathogens, to exhibit antagonistic activity and stimulate the immune system of a host. Most of probiotics commonly used are the spores of Bacillus. Initially the main focus of their use was the prevention of gastrointestinal disorders. So, the use of probiotics in dental practice is a poorly studied area. In recent years, probiotics have been investigated to provide the oral health. Therefore the study of using probiotics for correction of the oral microflora in people with inflammatory diseases of the periodontal tissues is promising. Our previous studies have shown changes in microbial community of an oral cavity in patients with periodontitis. In particular, the reducing number of obligate microorganisms and increasing number of pathogens was demonstrated. The paper describes the current data on the potential benefits and basic properties of the Bacillus spore probiotics, which demonstrate the viability and relevance in dental practice. The study tested antagonistic activity of commercial Bacillus probiotics "Biosporin" ("Biopharma", Ukraine, "Subalinum" ("Biopharma", Ukraine, "Normaflore" ("Sanofi-Aventis Zrt.", Hungary and "Enterogermina" ("Sanofi-Synthelabo SpA", Italy against clinical strains of microorganisms isolated from the oral cavity of patients with periodontitis. Thus, further studies on the role of spore probiotics in correction of the oral cavity microflora as a part of complex treatment of periodontitis should be carried out.

  19. Salvianolic Acid A, as a Novel ETA Receptor Antagonist, Shows Inhibitory Effects on Tumor in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Endothelin-1 (ET-1 autocrine and paracrine signaling modulate cell proliferation of tumor cells by activating its receptors, endothelin A receptor (ETAR and endothelin B receptor (ETBR. Dysregulation of ETAR activation promotes tumor development and progression. The potential of ETAR antagonists and the dual-ETAR and ETBR antagonists as therapeutic approaches are under preclinical and clinical studies. Salvianolic acid A (Sal A is a hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen, which has been reported as an anti-cancer and cardio-protective herbal medicine. In this study, we demonstrate that Sal A inhibits ETAR activation induced by ET-1 in both recombinant and endogenous ETAR expression cell lines. The IC50 values were determined as 5.7 µM in the HEK293/ETAR cell line and 3.14 µM in HeLa cells, respectively. Furthermore, our results showed that Sal A suppressed cell proliferation and extended the doubling times of multiple cancer cells, including HeLa, DU145, H1975, and A549 cell lines. In addition, Sal A inhibited proliferation of DU145 cell lines stimulated by exogenous ET-1 treatment. Moreover, the cytotoxicity and cardio-toxicity of Sal A were assessed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs, which proved that Sal A demonstrates no cytotoxicity or cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that Sal A is a novel anti-cancer candidate through targeting ETAR.

  20. Status of the Majorana Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuesta, C.; Buuck, M.; Detwiler, J. A.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Leon, J.; Robertson, R. G. H. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Abgrall, N.; Bradley, A. W.; Chan, Y.-D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Arnquist, I. J.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Bertrand, F. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); and others

    2015-10-28

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an ultra-low background, modular, HPGe detector array with a mass of 44-kg (29 kg {sup 76}Ge and 15 kg {sup nat}Ge) to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. The next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double beta decay searches will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is envisioned to demonstrate a path forward to achieve a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value of 2039 keV. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR follows a modular implementation to be easily scalable to the next generation experiment. First, the prototype module was assembled; it has been continuously taking data from July 2014 to June 2015. Second, Module 1 with more than half of the total enriched detectors and some natural detectors has been assembled and it is being commissioned. Finally, the assembly of Module 2, which will complete MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, is already in progress.

  1. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  2. Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, C; Arnquist, I J; Avignone, F T; Baldenegro-Barrera, C X; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Bradley, A W; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Buuck, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Chu, P -H; Detwiler, J A; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilliss, T; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Jasinski, B R; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Massarczyk, R; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Shanks, B; Shirchenko, M; Snyder, N; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhitnikov, I

    2015-01-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an ultra-low background, modular, HPGe detector array with a mass of 44-kg (29 kg 76Ge and 15 kg natGe) to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Ge-76. The next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double beta decay searches will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is envisioned to demonstrate a path forward to achieve a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value of 2039 keV. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR follows a modular implementation to be easily scalable to the next generation experiment. First, the prototype module was assembled; it has been continuously taking data from July 2014 to June 2015. Second, Module 1 with more than half of the total enriched detectors and some natural detectors has been assembled and it is being commissioned. Finally, the assembly of Module 2, which will complete MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, ...

  3. Novel class of medications, orexin receptor antagonists, in the treatment of insomnia – critical appraisal of suvorexant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman JL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Jessica L Norman, Sarah L Anderson Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Insomnia, a highly prevalent disorder, can be detrimental to patients’ overall health and worsen existing comorbidities. Patients may have acute episodes of insomnia related to a traumatic event, but more commonly insomnia occurs chronically. While proper sleep hygiene and behavioral therapy play important roles in the nonpharmacologic management of short-term and chronic insomnia, medications may also be required. Historically, insomnia has been treated with agents such as benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonists, and melatonin agonists. Dual orexin receptor antagonists represent a new class of medications for the treatment of insomnia, which block the binding of wakefulness-promoting neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B to their respective receptor sites. Suvorexant (Belsomra is the first dual orexin receptor antagonist to be approved in the US and Japan and has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing time to sleep onset and increasing total sleep time. Its unique mechanism of action, data to support efficacy and safety over 12 months of use, and relative lack of withdrawal effects when discontinued may represent an alternative for patients with chronic insomnia who cannot tolerate or do not receive benefit from more traditional sleep agents. Suvorexant is effective and well tolerated, but precautions exist for certain patient populations, including females, obese patients, and those with respiratory disease. Suvorexant has only been studied vs placebo, and hence it is unknown how it directly compares with other medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for insomnia. Suvorexant is not likely to replace benzodiazepines or nonbenzodiazepine receptor antagonists as a first-line sleep agent but does represent a novel option for the treatment of

  4. Estrogenic effects of the new opioid antagonist naltrexone-estrone azine on pituitary luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armeanu, M C; van Dieten, J A; Kolb, V M; Schoemaker, J; de Koning, J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the new opioid antagonist naltrexone-estrone azine (EH-NX) on pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in the ovariectomized rat was studied. EH-NX is a hybrid between the steroid component estrone and the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NX). It is a potent and long-acting opioid antagonist in vitro and in vivo, but its effect upon in vivo LH secretion has not been tested before. The aims of the study were to investigate whether, unlike naltrexone, EH-NX can stimulate LH secretion without the need of additional estrogen pretreatment and whether EH-NX has peripheral estrogenic effects upon the uterine weight, when administered chronically to long-term ovariectomized rats. Female rats were injected subcutaneously with EH-NX 21 days after ovariectomy. The effects of EH-NX injections on LH secretion were compared to the effects of NX and estrone hydrazone (EH) alone, or in combination, with or without estradiol-benzoate (EB) pretreatment. Inhibition of LH secretion and uterine proliferation were observed in rats treated chronically with EH-NX in dosages of 0.250 mg/kg bw and higher. These effects were similar to those caused by EH and EB. In short-term OVX rats EH-NX appeared to act faster than EH. In contrast to NX, no stimulatory effect on LH secretion was seen with EH-NX in EB primed OVX rats. These results surprisingly demonstrate that EH-NX behaves like an estrogen and not like an opioid antagonist. The unexpected pharmacological profile of this new drug may open up doors for several medical applications.

  5. Lead generation using pharmacophore mapping and three-dimensional database searching: application to muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, D P; Dougall, I G; Meghani, P; Liu, Y J; Flower, D R

    1999-08-26

    By using a pharmacophore model, a geometrical representation of the features necessary for molecules to show a particular biological activity, it is possible to search databases containing the 3D structures of molecules and identify novel compounds which may possess this activity. We describe our experiences of establishing a working 3D database system and its use in rational drug design. By using muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonists as an example, we show that it is possible to identify potent novel lead compounds using this approach. Pharmacophore generation based on the structures of known M(3) receptor antagonists, 3D database searching, and medium-throughput screening were used to identify candidate compounds. Three compounds were chosen to define the pharmacophore: a lung-selective M(3) antagonist patented by Pfizer and two Astra compounds which show affinity at the M(3) receptor. From these, a pharmacophore model was generated, using the program DISCO, and this was used subsequently to search a UNITY 3D database of proprietary compounds; 172 compounds were found to fit the pharmacophore. These compounds were then screened, and 1-[2-(2-(diethylamino)ethoxy)phenyl]-2-phenylethanone (pA(2) 6.67) was identified as the best hit, with N-[2-(piperidin-1-ylmethyl)cycohexyl]-2-propoxybenz amide (pA(2) 4. 83) and phenylcarbamic acid 2-(morpholin-4-ylmethyl)cyclohexyl ester (pA(2) 5.54) demonstrating lower activity. As well as its potency, 1-[2-(2-(diethylamino)ethoxy)phenyl]-2-phenylethanone is a simple structure with limited similarity to existing M(3) receptor antagonists.

  6. Treatment with a substance P receptor antagonist is neuroprotective in the intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine model of early Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Thornton

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation and blood brain barrier (BBB dysfunction have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD. The neuropeptide substance P (SP is an important mediator of both neuroinflammation and BBB dysfunction through its NK1 receptor in a process known as neurogenic inflammation. Increased SP content has previously been reported following 6-OHDA treatment in vitro, with the levels of SP correlating with cell death. The present study used an in vivo 6-OHDA lesion model to determine if dopaminergic degeneration was associated with increased SP in the substantia nigra and whether this degeneration could be prevented by using a SP, NK1 receptor antagonist. Unilateral, intrastriatal 6-OHDA lesions were induced and SP (10 µg/2 µL or the NK1 receptor antagonists, N-acetyl-L-tryptophan (2 µL at 50 nM or L-333,060 (2 µL at 100 nM, administered immediately after the neurotoxin. Nigral SP content was then determined using immunohistochemical and ELISA methods, neuroinflammation and barrier integrity was assessed using Iba-1, ED-1, GFAP and albumin immunohistochemistry, while dopaminergic cell loss was assessed with tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. Motor function in all animals was assessed using the rotarod task. Intrastriatal 6-OHDA lesioning produced an early and sustained increase in ipsilateral nigral SP content, along with a breakdown of the BBB and activation of microglia and astrocytes. Further exacerbation of SP levels accelerated disease progression, whereas NK1 receptor antagonist treatment protected dopaminergic neurons, preserved barrier integrity, reduced neuroinflammation and significantly improved motor function. We propose that neurogenic inflammation contributes to dopaminergic degeneration in early experimental PD and demonstrate that an NK1 receptor antagonist may represent a novel neuroprotective therapy.

  7. SECURES: Austin, Texas demonstration results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Glynn; Shaw, Scott; Scharf, Peter; Stellingworth, Bob

    2003-09-01

    The Law Enforcement technology development community has a growing interest in the technologies associated with gunshot detection and localization. These interests revolve around community-oriented policing. Technologies of interest include those associated with muzzle blast and bullet shockwave detection and the inter-netting of these acoustic sensors with electro-optic sensors. To date, no one sensor technology has proven totally effective for a complete solution. PSI has a muzzle blast detection and localization product which is wireless, highly mobile and reconfigurable, with a user-friendly laptop processor and display unit, which completed a one-year demonstration in Austin, Texas on July 6, 2002. This demonstration was conducted under a Cooperative Agreement with the National Institute of Justice and in cooperation with the Austin Police Department. This paper will discuss the details of the demonstrations, provide a summarized evaluation, elucidate the lessons learned, make recommendations for future deployments and discuss the developmental directions indicated for the future.

  8. Demonstration of blind quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2012-01-20

    Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to preserve the privacy of a computation. We present an experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing in which the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. Various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover quantum algorithms, are demonstrated. The client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.

  9. Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Mallinger

    2004-08-27

    Project Description: Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants The Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants was established to demonstrate the benefits of new propane equipment. The US Department of Energy, the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) and the Propane Vehicle Council (PVC) partnered in this program. The project impacted ten different states, 179 vehicles, and 15 new propane fueling facilities. Based on estimates provided, this project generated a minimum of 1,441,000 new gallons of propane sold for the vehicle market annually. Additionally, two new off-road engines were brought to the market. Projects originally funded under this project were the City of Portland, Colorado, Kansas City, Impco Technologies, Jasper Engines, Maricopa County, New Jersey State, Port of Houston, Salt Lake City Newspaper, Suburban Propane, Mutual Liquid Propane and Ted Johnson.

  10. Probability of Detection Demonstration Transferability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Bradford H.

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Propellant Tank Penetrant Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Probability of Detection (POD) Assessment (NESC activity) has surfaced several issues associated with liquid penetrant POD demonstration testing. This presentation lists factors that may influence the transferability of POD demonstration tests. Initial testing will address the liquid penetrant inspection technique. Some of the factors to be considered in this task are crack aspect ratio, the extent of the crack opening, the material and the distance between the inspection surface and the inspector's eye.

  11. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Yasuyuki, E-mail: y.fujii@po.rd.taisho.co.jp [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Igarashi, Yasuyuki [Laboratory of Biomembrane and Biofunctional Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Goitsuka, Ryo [Division of Development and Aging, Research Institute for Biological Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  12. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  13. Sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive" of the sex chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Rice

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic conflict is perplexing because it causes the fitness of a species to decline rather than improve. Many diverse forms of genomic conflict have been identified, but this extant tally may be incomplete. Here, we show that the unusual characteristics of the sex chromosomes can, in principle, lead to a previously unappreciated form of sexual genomic conflict. The phenomenon occurs because there is selection in the heterogametic sex for sex-linked mutations that harm the sex of offspring that does not carry them, whenever there is competition among siblings. This harmful phenotype can be expressed as an antagonistic green-beard effect that is mediated by epigenetic parental effects, parental investment, and/or interactions among siblings. We call this form of genomic conflict sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive", because it is functionally equivalent to meiotic drive, except that it operates during the zygotic and postzygotic stages of the life cycle rather than the meiotic and gametic stages. A combination of mathematical modeling and a survey of empirical studies is used to show that sexually antagonistic zygotic drive is feasible, likely to be widespread in nature, and that it can promote a genetic "arms race" between the homo- and heteromorphic sex chromosomes. This new category of genomic conflict has the potential to strongly influence other fundamental evolutionary processes, such as speciation and the degeneration of the Y and W sex chromosomes. It also fosters a new genetic hypothesis for the evolution of enigmatic fitness-reducing traits like the high frequency of spontaneous abortion, sterility, and homosexuality observed in humans.

  14. Discovery of dopamine D₄ receptor antagonists with planar chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Ortner, Birgit; Hübner, Harald; Löber, Stefan; Tschammer, Nuska; Gmeiner, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Employing the D4 selective phenylpiperazine 2 as a lead compound, planar chiral analogs with paracyclophane substructure were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to bind and activate dopamine receptors. The study revealed that the introduction of a [2.2]paracyclophane moiety is tolerated by dopamine receptors of the D2 family. Subtype selectivity for D4 and ligand efficacy depend on the absolute configuration of the test compounds. Whereas the achiral single-layered lead 2 and the double-layered paracyclophane (R)-3 showed partial agonist properties, the enantiomer (S)-3 behaved as a neutral antagonist.

  15. Lymphocyte homing antagonists in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruta, Masayuki; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2014-09-01

    Lymphocyte homing antagonists represent promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several critical molecules involved in the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the intestine, including integrins and chemokine receptors, have been successfully targeted for the treatment of IBD. These agents have shown great promise for the induction and maintenance of remission for both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. This article discusses currently approved prototypic agents for the treatment of IBD (natalizumab, anti-α4 integrin; vedolizumab, anti-α4β7 integrin), and several other agents in the same class currently under development.

  16. The opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in the treatment of trichotillomania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N;

    2014-01-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is characterized by repetitive hair pulling resulting in hair loss. Data on the pharmacological treatment of TTM are limited. This study examined the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, in adults with TTM who had urges to pull their hair. Fifty-one individuals with TTM were...... improved with naltrexone (P = 0.026). Subjects taking naltrexone with a family history of addiction showed a greater numerical reduction in the urges to pull, although it was not statistically significant. Future studies will have to examine whether pharmacological modulation of the opiate system may...

  17. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter.

  18. Antagonistic action of pitrazepin on human and rat GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuro, Angelo; Martinez-Torres, Ataulfo; Francesconi, Walter; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Pitrazepin, 3-(piperazinyl-1)-9H-dibenz(c,f) triazolo(4,5-a)azepin is a piperazine antagonist of GABA in a variety of electrophysiological and in vitro binding studies involving GABA and glycine receptors. In the present study we have investigated the effects of pitrazepin, and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, on membrane currents elicited by GABA in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat cerebral cortex mRNA or cDNAs encoding α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptor subunits.The three types of GABAA receptors expressed were reversibly antagonized by bicuculline and pitrazepin in a concentration-dependent manner. GABA dose-current response curves for the three types of receptors were shifted to the right, in a parallel manner, by increasing concentrations of pitrazepin.Schild analyses gave pA2 values of 6.42±0.62, n=4, 6.41±1.2, n=5 and 6.21±1.24, n=6, in oocytes expressing rat cerebral cortex, α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptors respectively (values are given as means±s.e.mean), and the Hill coefficients were all close to unity. All this is consistent with the notion that pitrazepin acts as a competitive antagonist of these GABAA receptors; and that their antagonism by pitrazepin is not strongly dependent on the subunit composition of the receptors here studied.Since pitrazepin has been reported to act also at the benzodiazepine binding site, we studied the effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil) on the inhibition of α1β2γ2S receptors by pitrazepin. Co-application of Ro 15-1788 did not alter the inhibiting effect of pitrazepin. Moreover, pitrazepin did not antagonize the potentiation of GABA-currents by flunitrazepam. All this suggests that pitrazepin does not affect the GABA receptor-chloride channel by interacting with the benzodiazepine receptor site. PMID:10369456

  19. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  20. Demonstrating Fermat's Principle in Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleiov, Orr; Pupko, Ofir; Lipson, S. G.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate Fermat's principle in optics by a simple experiment using reflection from an arbitrarily shaped one-dimensional reflector. We investigated a range of possible light paths from a lamp to a fixed slit by reflection in a curved reflector and showed by direct measurement that the paths along which light is concentrated have either…

  1. Phenolphthalein-Pink Tornado Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prall, Bruce R.

    2008-01-01

    The titration of HCl with NaOH has traditionally been used to introduce beginning chemistry students to the concepts of acid-base chemistry and stoichiometry. The demonstration described in this article utilizes this reaction as a means of providing students an opportunity to observe the dynamic motion associated with a swirling vortex and its…

  2. Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model. The effect of vibration on launch vehicle dynamics was studied. Conditions included three modes of instability. The film includes close up views of the simulator fuel tank with and without stability control. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030984. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  3. SunJammer Technology Demonstration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sunjammer Project is a NASA funded contract to L?Garde Inc. to fly a solar sail demonstration for a period of approximately one year. L?Garde is also partnered...

  4. Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

  5. Demonstration of melatonin in amphibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerdonk, F.C.G. van de

    1967-01-01

    The presence of melatonin in the amphibian epiphysis has been ascertained earlier by several indirect methods, demonstrating the synthesizing enzyme or precursors of the compound. This communication describes the presence of melatonin in amphibian brain in a direct way, using dextran gel chromatogra

  6. Natural Hazard Demonstrations for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud, B. D.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents several demonstrations that have been developed or gathered from other sources in the general area of natural hazards (e.g. landslides, earthquakes, volcanoes, wildfires, tsunamis, mass movements, asteroid impacts, etc.). There are many methods of teaching, but as university lecturers, particularly for large class sizes, we find ourselves too often presenting material to students by direct speaking, or some combination of blackboard/whiteboard/slide projector/digital projector. There are certainly a number of techniques to more actively involve students, so that teaching is not just `receiving of information', including breaking up students into small group discussions, encouraging students to actively participate in class through comments and questions, and/or some combination of hands-on activities and demonstrations. It is this latter which is concentrated on here. As a teaching tool, the students themselves became much more excited about what they are learning if use is made of 5--10 minute demonstrations, even if only peripherally related to the subject at hand. The resultant discussion with questions and comments by students keeps both the students and the lecturer (in this case the author) motivated and intrigued about the subjects being discussed. Days, weeks, and months later, the students remember these `demonstrations', but to set these up takes time, effort, and resources of equipment, although not necessarily a large amount of the latter. Several natural hazards demonstrations are presented here, most inexpensive, that have been used in front of large university classes and smaller `break-out groups', and which can also be adapted for secondary-school students.

  7. Suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin via induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyprianou, N; Benning, C M

    2000-08-15

    Recent evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin induced apoptosis in prostate epithelial and smooth muscle cells in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH; J. Urol., 159: 1810-1815, 1998; J. Urol., 161: 2002-2007, 1999). In this study, we investigated the biological action of three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, doxazosin, terazosin, and tamsulosin, against prostate cancer cell growth. The antigrowth effect of the three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists was examined in two human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, and a prostate smooth muscle cell primary culture, SMC-1, on the basis of: (a) cell viability assay; (b) rate of DNA synthesis; and (c) induction of apoptosis. Our results indicate that treatment of prostate cancer cells with doxazosin or terazosin results in a significant loss of cell viability, via induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, whereas tamsulosin had no effect on prostate cell growth. Neither doxazosin nor terazosin exerted a significant effect on the rate of cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells. Exposure to phenoxybenzamine, an irreversible inhibitor of alpha1-adrenoceptors, does not abrogate the apoptotic effect of doxazosin or terazosin against human prostate cancer or smooth muscle cells. This suggests that the apoptotic activity of doxazosin and terazosin against prostate cells is independent of their capacity to antagonize alpha1-adrenoceptors. Furthermore, an in vivo efficacy trial demonstrated that doxazosin administration (at tolerated pharmacologically relevant doses) in SCID mice bearing PC-3 prostate cancer xenografts resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. These findings demonstrate the ability of doxazosin and terazosin (but not tamsulosin) to suppress prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing apoptosis without affecting cell proliferation. This evidence provides the rationale for targeting both

  8. Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration, a Regional Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yinger, Robert [Southern California Edison Company, Rosemead, CA (United States); Irwin, Mark [Southern California Edison Company, Rosemead, CA (United States)

    2015-12-29

    ISGD was a comprehensive demonstration that spanned the electricity delivery system and extended into customer homes. The project used phasor measurement technology to enable substation-level situational awareness, and demonstrated SCE’s next-generation substation automation system. It extended beyond the substation to evaluate the latest generation of distribution automation technologies, including looped 12-kV distribution circuit topology using URCIs. The project team used DVVC capabilities to demonstrate CVR. In customer homes, the project evaluated HAN devices such as smart appliances, programmable communicating thermostats, and home energy management components. The homes were also equipped with energy storage, solar PV systems, and a number of energy efficiency measures (EEMs). The team used one block of homes to evaluate strategies and technologies for achieving ZNE. A home achieves ZNE when it produces at least as much renewable energy as the amount of energy it consumes annually. The project also assessed the impact of device-specific demand response (DR), as well as load management capabilities involving energy storage devices and plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. In addition, the ISGD project sought to better understand the impact of ZNE homes on the electric grid. ISGD’s SENet enabled end-to-end interoperability between multiple vendors’ systems and devices, while also providing a level of cybersecurity that is essential to smart grid development and adoption across the nation. The ISGD project includes a series of sub-projects grouped into four logical technology domains: Smart Energy Customer Solutions, Next-Generation Distribution System, Interoperability and Cybersecurity, and Workforce of the Future. Section 2.3 provides a more detailed overview of these domains.

  9. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR radioassay program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Arnquist, I.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F.T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Back, H.O. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Barabash, A.S. [National Research Center, “Kurchatov Institute” Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertrand, F.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boswell, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bradley, A.W. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Busch, M. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Buuck, M. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Byram, D. [Department of Physics, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Caldwell, A.S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Chan, Y.-D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Christofferson, C.D. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Chu, P.-H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); and others

    2016-08-21

    The MAJORANA collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the Homestake gold mine, in Lead, SD. The apparatus will use Ge detectors, enriched in isotope {sup 76}Ge, to demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale Ge detector experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The long half-life of this postulated process requires that the apparatus be extremely low in radioactive isotopes whose decays may produce backgrounds to the search. The radioassay program conducted by the collaboration to ensure that the materials comprising the apparatus are sufficiently pure is described. The resulting measurements from gamma-ray counting, neutron activation and mass spectroscopy of the radioactive-isotope contamination for the materials studied for use in the detector are reported. We interpret these numbers in the context of the expected background for the experiment.

  10. Performance demonstration by ROC method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Hannelore; Nockemann, Christina; Tillack, Gerd-Rüdiger; Mattis, Arne

    1994-12-01

    The question of the efficiency of a material testing system is important, when a competing or advanced system appears at the market. The comparison of the different systems can be done partly by the comparison of the technical specification of the systems, but not all parameters can be expressed by measured values, especially not the influence of human inspectors. A testing system in the field of NDT - for example weld inspection - often consists of several different devices and components (radiographic film, its irradiation and development, conventional inspection with a light box, human inspector). The demonstration of the performance of such a system with similar or advanced methods can be done by a statistical method, the ROC method. This quantitative measure for testing performance allows the comparison of complex NDT systems which will be demonstrated in detail by the comparison of conventional weld inspection with inspection of welds using the digitised image of the radiographs.

  11. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR radioassay program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, H. O.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P.-H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Dunmore, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Finnerty, P.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, V. M.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Massarczyk, R.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, D.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2016-08-01

    The MAJORANA collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the Homestake gold mine, in Lead, SD. The apparatus will use Ge detectors, enriched in isotope 76Ge, to demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale Ge detector experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The long half-life of this postulated process requires that the apparatus be extremely low in radioactive isotopes whose decays may produce backgrounds to the search. The radioassay program conducted by the collaboration to ensure that the materials comprising the apparatus are sufficiently pure is described. The resulting measurements from gamma-ray counting, neutron activation and mass spectroscopy of the radioactive-isotope contamination for the materials studied for use in the detector are reported. We interpret these numbers in the context of the expected background for the experiment.

  12. The MAJORANA Demonstrator Radioassay Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P. H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Dunmore, J. A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S.; Finnerty, P.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, Victor M.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Massarcyk, R.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Orrell, John L.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, Nicole R.; Poon, Alan W.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, David; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, K.; Vorren, Kris R.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhitnikov, I.

    2016-05-03

    The Majorana collaboration is constructing the Majorana Demonstrator at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the Homestake gold mine, in Lead, SD. The apparatus will use Ge detectors, enriched in isotope 76Ge, to demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale Ge detector experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The long half-life of this postulated process requires that the apparatus be extremely low in radioactive isotopes whose decays may produce backgrounds to the search. The radioassay program conducted by the collaboration to ensure that the materials comprising the apparatus are suffciently pure is described. The resulting measurements of the radioactiveisotope contamination for a number of materials studied for use in the detector are reported.

  13. The evolution of histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebois, Evan P; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W

    2011-01-01

    This article describes our efforts along with recent advances in the development, biological evaluation and clinical proof of concept of small molecule histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists. The H3 receptor is a presynaptic autoreceptor within the Class A GPCR family, but also functions as a heteroreceptor modulating levels of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate. Thus, H₃R has garnered a great deal of interest from the pharmaceutical industry for the possible treatment of obesity, epilepsy, sleep/wake, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, neuropathic pain and ADHD. Within the two main classes of H₃ ligands, both imidazole and non-imidazole derived, have shown sufficient potency and specificity which culminated with efficacy in preclinical models for various CNS disorders. Importantly, conserved elements have been identified within the small molecule H₃ ligand scaffolds that resulted in a highly predictive pharmacophore model. Understanding of the pharmacophore model has allowed several groups to dial H₃R activity into scaffolds designed for other CNS targets, and engender directed polypharmacology. Moreover, Abbott, GSK, Pfizer and several others have reported positive Phase I and/or Phase II data with structurally diverse H₃R antagonists/inverse agonists.

  14. Evodiamine as a novel antagonist of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hui [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns, and Combined Injury, Department 1, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Affiliated Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Tu, Yongjiu; Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Wang, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns, and Combined Injury, Department 1, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Wang, Zhanli [College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Liang, Huaping, E-mail: huaping_liang@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns, and Combined Injury, Department 1, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Evodiamine interacted with the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine inhibited the specific binding of [{sup 3}H]-TCDD to the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine acts as an antagonist of the AhR. -- Abstract: Evodiamine, the major bioactive alkaloid isolated from Wu-Chu-Yu, has been shown to interact with a wide variety of proteins and modify their expression and activities. In this study, we investigated the interaction between evodiamine and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Molecular modeling results revealed that evodiamine directly interacted with the AhR. Cytosolic receptor binding assay also provided the evidence that evodiamine could interact with the AhR with the K{sub i} value of 28.4 {+-} 4.9 nM. In addition, we observed that evodiamine suppressed the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced nuclear translocation of the AhR and the expression of CYP1A1 dose-dependently. These results suggested that evodiamine was able to bind to the AhR as ligand and exhibit antagonistic effects.

  15. CCR9 Antagonists in the Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirow Bekker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While it has long been established that the chemokine receptor CCR9 and its ligand CCL25 are essential for the movement of leukocytes into the small intestine and the development of small-intestinal inflammation, the role of this chemokine-receptor pair in colonic inflammation is not clear. Toward this end, we compared colonic CCL25 protein levels in healthy individuals to those in patients with ulcerative colitis. In addition, we determined the effect of CCR9 pharmacological inhibition in the mdr1a−/− mouse model of ulcerative colitis. Colon samples from patients with ulcerative colitis had significantly higher levels of CCL25 protein compared to healthy controls, a finding mirrored in the mdr1a−/− mice. In the mdr1a−/− mice, CCR9 antagonists significantly decreased the extent of wasting and colonic remodeling and reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the colon. These findings indicate that the CCR9:CCL25 pair plays a causative role in ulcerative colitis and suggest that CCR9 antagonists will provide a therapeutic benefit in patients with colonic inflammation.

  16. Suppression of Aldosterone Synthesis and Secretion by Channel Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Ikeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldosterone, a specific mineralocorticoid receptor (MR agonist and a key player in the development of hypertension, is synthesized as a final product of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Hypertension can be generally treated by negating the effects of angiotensin II through the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is or angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (ARBs. However, the efficacy of angiotensin II blockade by such drugs is sometimes diminished by the so-called “aldosterone breakthrough” effect, by which ACE-Is or ARBs (renin-angiotensin system (RAS inhibitors gradually lose their effectiveness against hypertension due to the overproduction of aldosterone, known as primary aldosteronism. Although MR antagonists are used to antagonize the effects of aldosterone, these drugs may, however, give rise to life-threatening adverse actions, such as hyperkalemia, particularly when used in conjunction with RAS inhibitors. Recently, several groups have reported that some dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blockers (CCBs have inhibitory actions on aldosterone production in in vitro and in the clinical setting. Therefore, the use of such dihydropyridine CCBs to treat aldosterone-related hypertension may prove beneficial to circumvent such therapeutic problems. In this paper, we discuss the mechanism of action of CCBs on aldosterone production and clinical perspectives for CCB use to inhibit MR activity in hypertensive patients.

  17. CGRP antagonists and antibodies for the treatment of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vécsei, László; Szok, Délia; Csáti, Anett; Tajti, János

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine is a highly devastating neurovascular disorder that affects up to 16% of the population worldwide. In spite of intensive research, its origin remains enigmatic with no therapeutic option appropriate for all migraine patients. One of the leading hypotheses is related to the function of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Regardless, the pharmaceutical options currently applied for the acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine are not appropriate for all migraine patients. Areas covered: This article is based on a literature review using the PubMed database and highlights the CGRP theory of the pathomechanism of migraine. Expert opinion: Since migraine is a CGRP-related disorder, it appeared obvious to develop CGRP receptor antagonists that exert high efficacy, both intravenously and orally. Unfortunately, the frequent use of these antagonists results in an elevated liver transaminase level. In an attempt to bypass these harmful side effects, efforts should be made to modify these pharmacons. The use of fully humanized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target CGRP and its receptors may also be possible. However, while Phase I and II clinical trials are promising, a long-term follow-up of these therapies is still needed.

  18. Implications of hedgehog signaling antagonists for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwu Xie

    2008-01-01

    The hedgehog(Hh)pathway,initially discovered inDrosophila by two Nobel laureates,Dr.Eric Wieschaus and Dr.Christiane Nusslein-Volhard,is a major regulator for cell differentiation,tissue polarity and cell proliferation.Studies from many laboratories,including ours,reveal activation of this pathway in most basal cell carcinomas and in approximately 30% of extracutaneous human cancers,including medulloblastomas,gastrointestinal,lung,breast and prostate cancers.Thus,it is believed that targeted inhibition of Hh signaling may be effective in treating and preventing many types of human cancers.Even more exciting is the discovery and synthesis of specific signaling antagonists for the Hh pathway,which have significant clinical implications in novel cancer therapeutics.This review discusses the major advances in the current understanding of Hh signaling activation in different types of human cancers,the molecular basis of Hh signaling activation,the major antagonists for Hh signaling inhibition and their potential clinical application in human cancer therapy.

  19. Rogue sperm indicate sexually antagonistic coevolution in nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E Ellis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intense reproductive competition often continues long after animals finish mating. In many species, sperm from one male compete with those from others to find and fertilize oocytes. Since this competition occurs inside the female reproductive tract, she often influences the outcome through physical or chemical factors, leading to cryptic female choice. Finally, traits that help males compete with each other are sometimes harmful to females, and female countermeasures may thwart the interests of males, which can lead to an arms race between the sexes known as sexually antagonistic coevolution. New studies from Caenorhabditis nematodes suggest that males compete with each other by producing sperm that migrate aggressively and that these sperm may be more likely to win access to oocytes. However, one byproduct of this competition appears to be an increased probability that these sperm will go astray, invading the ovary, prematurely activating oocytes, and sometimes crossing basement membranes and leaving the gonad altogether. These harmful effects are sometimes observed in crosses between animals of the same species but are most easily detected in interspecies crosses, leading to dramatically lowered fitness, presumably because the competitiveness of the sperm and the associated female countermeasures are not precisely matched. This mismatch is most obvious in crosses involving individuals from androdioecious species (which have both hermaphrodites and males, as predicted by the lower levels of sperm competition these species experience. These results suggest a striking example of sexually antagonistic coevolution and dramatically expand the value of nematodes as a laboratory system for studying postcopulatory interactions.

  20. Human homosexuality: a paradigmatic arena for sexually antagonistic selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-29

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait.

  1. Comparative proteome analysis of two antagonist Bacillus subtilis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C X; Zhao, X; Han, F; Yang, M F; Chen, H; Chida, T; Shen, S H

    2009-04-01

    Natural wild-type strains of Bacillus subtilis are extensively used in agriculture as biocontrol agents for plants. This study examined two antagonist B. subtilis strains, KB-1111 and KB-1122, and the results illustrated that KB-1122 was a more potent inhibitor of the indicator pathogen than KB- 1111. Thus, to investigate the intrinsic differences between the two antagonist strains under normal culture conditions, samples of KB-1111 and KB-1122 were analyzed using MALDI-TOF-MS. The main differences were related to 20 abundant intracellular and 17 extracellular proteins. When searching the NCBI database, a number of the differentially expressed proteins were identified, including 11 cellular proteins and 10 secretory proteins. Among these proteins, class III stress-response-related ATPase, aconitate hydratase, alpha-amylase precursor, and a secretory protein, endo-1, 4-beta-glucanase, were differentially expressed by the two strains. These results are useful to comprehend the intrinsic differences between the antagonism of KB-1111 and KB-1122.

  2. Solar heating demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonicatto, L.; Kozak, C.

    1980-01-01

    The demonstration involved a 4-panel solar collector mounted on the industrial arts building. A 120 gallon storage tank supplements a 66 gallon electric hot water heater which supplies hot water for 5 shop wash basins, girl's and boy's lavatories, and a pressure washer in the auto shop. The installation and educational uses of the system are described. (MHR)

  3. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

  4. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

  5. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, David L.; Mills, Raymond A.; Bowden, Mary L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) was to create a near-term Shuttle flight experiment focusing on the deployment and erection of structural truss elements. The activities of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory consist of three major areas: preparing and conducting neutral buoyancy simulation test series; producing a formal SADE Experiment plan; and studying the structural dynamics issues of the truss structure. Each of these areas is summarized.

  6. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human pregnane X-receptor in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulton, Emma Jane [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Levy, Lisa [Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States); Lampe, Johanna W. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States); Shen, Danny D. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States); Tracy, Julia [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Shuhart, Margaret C. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine (United States); Thummel, Kenneth E. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States); Eaton, David L., E-mail: deaton@uw.edu [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand — rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 μmol SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. -- Highlights: ► The effects of SFN on PXR mediated CYP3A4 induction in humanized PXR mice and humans were examined. ► SFN had no effect on rifampicin mediated CYP3A4 induction in humans or humanized mice. ► SFN had a modest effect on basal CYP3A4 activity among subjects with higher baseline activity. ► Humanized PXR

  7. Inhibition of establishment of primary and micrometastatic tumors by a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignar, D M; Andrews, J L; Witherspoon, S M; Leray, J D; Clay, W C; Kilpatrick, K; Onori, J; Kost, T; Emerson, D L

    1998-01-01

    Tumor establishment and metastasis are dependent on extracellular matrix proteolysis, tumor cell migration, and angiogenesis. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor are essential mediators of these processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a recombinant human uPAR antagonist on growth, establishment, and metastasis of tumors derived from human cancer cell lines. A noncatalytic recombinant protein, consisting of amino acids 1-137 of human uPA and the CH2 and CH3 regions of mouse IgG1 (uPA-IgG), was expressed, purified, and shown to bind specifically to human uPAR and to saturate the surface of human tumor cells which express uPAR. Daily i.p. administration of uPA-IgG to nude mice extended latencies of unstaged tumors derived from Lox melanoma and SW48 colon carcinoma cells by 7.7 and 5.5 days, respectively. uPA-IgG treatment did not affect the growth of Lox or KB tumors staged to 200 mg before antagonist treatment commenced. The effect of uPA-IgG on the establishment of micrometastases was assessed in SCID mice. KB head/neck tumor cells were injected in the tail vein and allowed to seed for 48 h before initiation of daily i.p. injections of uPA-IgG for 24 days. The number of lung colonies ranged between 5 and 30% of vehicle-treated mice in two separate experiments. Furthermore, a single 800 microg dose of uPA-IgG administered 1 h prior to tail vein injection of KB cells reduced lung colony formation to just 3.5% of vehicle-treated SCID mice. These data demonstrate that antagonism of uPAR arrested metastasis and inhibited the establishment of primary tumors and micrometastases. Thus, small molecule uPAR antagonists may serve as useful adjuvant agents in combination with existing cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Actions of dopamine antagonists on stimulated striatal and limbic dopamine release: an in vivo voltammetric study.

    OpenAIRE

    Stamford, J. A.; Kruk, Z L; Millar, J.

    1988-01-01

    1. Fast cyclic voltammetry at carbon fibre microelectrodes was used to study the effects of several dopamine antagonists upon stimulated dopamine release in the rat striatum and nucleus accumbens. 2. In both nuclei, stimulated dopamine release was increased by D2-receptor-selective and mixed D1/D2-receptor antagonists. The D1-selective antagonist SCH 23390 had no effect. 3. Striatal and limbic dopamine release were elevated by cis- but not trans-flupenthixol. 4. The 'atypical' neuroleptics (c...

  9. Demonstration projects : learning by experience : the Seabird Island demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-10-15

    This article described the Seabird Island sustainable community housing demonstration project near Agassiz, British Columbia. The project provides a sustainable, affordable place for 7 families and demonstrates a new way to build and design communities using renewable energy technologies to provide residents with better quality, energy efficient housing while reducing costs and minimizing environmental impacts. The design integrates renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and geothermal energy to save on heating and lighting costs. This article noted some of the dubious design features that could have been screened out at the design stage if careful analysis had been carried out. It described features such as the solar orientation; climatic factors that influenced the form and details of the building; the high-efficiency, condensing, natural gas water heater for space heating combined with a forced-air and radiant-floor heating system; solariums that provided solar preheating of domestic hot water; ventilation air preheating; the solar roof; an earth-tube ventilation system; and 3 wind turbines to generate electricity to offset conventional electricity sources. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation has monitored several of the systems in order to evaluate the extent to which these features have influenced the performance of the dwelling units. The energy use in all 7 units was documented along with indoor air quality. An energy performance rating of EnerGuide 80 was achieved, which is comparable to R-2000. The monitoring study revealed that wind energy at this location was not sufficient to justify the installation of the wind turbines. The solar steel roof/solarium energy system did not perform as expected. In addition, the earth-tube ventilation system provided little heat and its overall contribution to ventilation was uncertain. Other deficiencies were also noted, such as leaky ductwork, non-operational dampers and poorly integrated control systems. The

  10. Oral Administration of a Retinoic Acid Receptor Antagonist Reversibly Inhibits Spermatogenesis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Sanny S. W.; Wang, Xiangyuan; Roberts, Shelby S.; Stephen M Griffey; Reczek, Peter R.; Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2011-01-01

    Meeting men's contraceptive needs, orally administered retinoic acid receptor antagonists represent new lead molecules in developing non-hormonal, reversible male contraceptives without adverse side effects.

  11. Synthesis and Dual Histamine H1 and H2 Receptor Antagonist Activity of Cyanoguanidine Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Premedication with a combination of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) and H2 receptor (H2R) antagonists has been suggested as a prophylactic principle, for instance, in anaesthesia and surgery. Aiming at pharmacological hybrids combining H1R and H2R antagonistic activity, a series of cyanoguanidines 14–35 was synthesized by linking mepyramine-type H1R antagonist substructures with roxatidine-, tiotidine-, or ranitidine-type H2R antagonist moieties. N-desmethylmepyramine was connected via a poly-met...

  12. Effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 on premature responding in the five-choice serial reaction time test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforuk, Agnieszka; Hołuj, Małgorzata; Potasiewicz, Agnieszka; Popik, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    The antagonists of serotonin 5-HT7 receptors have been demonstrated to ameliorate cognitive impairments in pharmacological animal models of schizophrenia that involve blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). The administration of NMDAR antagonists evokes a broad range of cognitive deficits, including a loss of impulse control. The involvement of 5-HT7 receptors in the modulation of impulsivity has been recently suggested but has not been studied in great detail. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 on a measure of impulsive action, i.e., premature responding on the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) in rats. The antagonist of 5-HT2A receptor M100,907 was used as a positive control. The efficacies of both compounds were assessed in conditions of increased impulsivity that were produced by the administration of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 or/and non-drug stimuli, i.e., using variable inter-trial intervals (vITIs). To examine the general ability of SB-269970 to counteract the MK-801-induced impairments, a discrete paired-trial delayed alternation task in a T-maze was employed. MK-801 significantly increased the number of premature responses in 5-CSRTT, and this effect was abolished by the administration of M100,907 (0.5 mg/kg) and SB-269970 (1 mg/kg). In addition, M100,907, but not SB-269970, reduced premature responding in the prolonged ITI trials. Both M100,907 and SB-269970 attenuated MK-801-induced working memory impairment in a T-maze. The present study demonstrated the efficacy of SB-269970 against MK-801-induced premature responding in the 5-CSRTT. This anti-impulsive action may offer additional benefits to the cognitive-enhancing effects of pharmacological blockade of 5-HT7 receptors.

  13. Idalopirdine - a small molecule antagonist of 5-HT6 with therapeutic potential against obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Magdalena; Marcinkowska, Monika; Bucki, Adam; Olczyk, Adrian; Kołaczkowski, Marcin

    2015-12-01

    5HT6 receptor antagonists offer the potential for safe and effective drugs against obesity, because they can reduce weight without causing serious side effects in the cardiovascular system. Also, their anorexic effect is associated with reduced food intake via an enhancement of satiety. In the present study we investigated the anorexic effect of idalopirdine (LuAE58054) in a model of obesity induced by high-fat diet. To induce obesity in rats, the animals were treated with feed with a fat content of 40 %. Body weight was controlled and the amount of food and water consumed was determined. The influence of the test compound on the lipid profile and glucose level was measured, as well as locomotor activity in home cages on the 20th day of the treatment. LuAE58054, at 5 mg kg(-1)/day i.p., was significantly anorectic in this model of obesity. Animals treated with LuAE58054 weighed 8 and 9.2 % less than the control obese animals on the 12th and 21st days, respectively. It significantly reduced food intake and the amount of peritoneal fat in animals, and reduced the level of triglycerides in plasma. LuAE58054 did not have a statistically significant effect on the spontaneous activity of diet-induced obese rats. The present study clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of LuAE58054 in reducing body weight. This compound is in phase III of clinical trials for the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. It is a 5HT6 receptor antagonist and is, therefore, free of those unacceptable side effects that preclude chronic use of anti-obesity drugs with other mechanisms of action. The search for an effective and safe anti-obesity drug is essential for an increasingly obese population; therefore, the anorectic action of LuAE58054 is important and there is a need for more research in this direction.

  14. Rational design of an auxin antagonist of the SCF(TIR1) auxin receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Neve, Joshua; Hirose, Masakazu; Kuboki, Atsuhito; Shimada, Yukihisa; Kepinski, Stefan; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2012-03-16

    The plant hormone auxin is a master regulator of plant growth and development. By regulating rates of cell division and elongation and triggering specific patterning events, indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) regulates almost every aspect of plant development. The perception of auxin involves the formation of a ternary complex consisting of an F-box protein of the TIR1/AFB family of auxin receptors, the auxin molecule, and a member the Aux/IAA family of co-repressor proteins. In this study, we identified a potent auxin antagonist, α-(phenylethyl-2-oxo)-IAA, as a lead compound for TIR1/AFB receptors by in silico virtual screening. This molecule was used as the basis for the development of a more potent TIR1 antagonist, auxinole (α-[2,4-dimethylphenylethyl-2-oxo]-IAA), using a structure-based drug design approach. Auxinole binds TIR1 to block the formation of the TIR1-IAA-Aux/IAA complex and so inhibits auxin-responsive gene expression. Molecular docking analysis indicates that the phenyl ring in auxinole would strongly interact with Phe82 of TIR1, a residue that is crucial for Aux/IAA recognition. Consistent with this predicted mode of action, auxinole competitively inhibits various auxin responses in planta. Additionally, auxinole blocks auxin responses of the moss Physcomitrella patens, suggesting activity over a broad range of species. Our works not only substantiates the utility of chemical tools for plant biology but also demonstrates a new class of small molecule inhibitor of protein-protein interactions common to mechanisms of perception of other plant hormones, such as jasmonate, gibberellin, and abscisic acid.

  15. Definition of critical periods for Hedgehog pathway antagonist-induced holoprosencephaly, cleft lip, and cleft palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen W Heyne

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway mediates multiple spatiotemporally-specific aspects of brain and face development. Genetic and chemical disruptions of the pathway are known to result in an array of structural malformations, including holoprosencephaly (HPE, clefts of the lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P, and clefts of the secondary palate only (CPO. Here, we examined patterns of dysmorphology caused by acute, stage-specific Hh signaling inhibition. Timed-pregnant wildtype C57BL/6J mice were administered a single dose of the potent pathway antagonist vismodegib at discrete time points between gestational day (GD 7.0 and 10.0, an interval approximately corresponding to the 15th to 24th days of human gestation. The resultant pattern of facial and brain dysmorphology was dependent upon stage of exposure. Insult between GD7.0 and GD8.25 resulted in HPE, with peak incidence following exposure at GD7.5. Unilateral clefts of the lip extending into the primary palate were also observed, with peak incidence following exposure at GD8.875. Insult between GD9.0 and GD10.0 resulted in CPO and forelimb abnormalities. We have previously demonstrated that Hh antagonist-induced cleft lip results from deficiency of the medial nasal process and show here that CPO is associated with reduced growth of the maxillary-derived palatal shelves. By defining the critical periods for the induction of HPE, CL/P, and CPO with fine temporal resolution, these results provide a mechanism by which Hh pathway disruption can result in "non-syndromic" orofacial clefting, or HPE with or without co-occurring clefts. This study also establishes a novel and tractable mouse model of human craniofacial malformations using a single dose of a commercially available and pathway-specific drug.

  16. The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, D.C.; Scandrol, R.O.; Statnick, R.M.; Stouffer, M.R.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Wu, M.M.; Yoon, H. [CONSOL, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1992-02-01

    The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration met the program objectives which were to determine Coolside SO{sub 2} removal performance, establish short-term process operability, and evaluate the economics of the process versus a limestone wet scrubber. On a flue gas produced from the combustion of 3% sulfur coal, the Coolside process achieved 70% SO{sub 2} removal using commercially-available hydrated lime as the sorbent. The operating conditions were Ca/S mol ratio 2.0, Na/Ca mol ratio 0.2, and 20{degree}F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature ({del}T). During tests using fresh plus recycle sorbent, the recycle sorbent exhibited significant capacity for additional SO{sub 2} removal. The longest steady state operation was eleven days at nominally Ca/S = 2, Na/Ca = 0.22, {del}T = 20--22{degree}F, and 70% SO{sub 2} removal. The operability results achieved during the demonstration indicate that with the recommended process modifications, which are discussed in the Coolside process economic analysis, the process could be designed as a reliable system for utility application. Based on the demonstration program, the Coolside process capital cost for a hypothetical commercial installation was minimized. The optimization consisted of a single, large humidifier, no spare air compressor, no isolation dampers, and a 15 day on-site hydrated lime storage. The levelized costs of the Coolside and the wet limestone scrubbing processes were compared. The Coolside process is generally economically competitive with wet scrubbing for coals containing up to 2.5% sulfur and plants under 350 MWe. Site-specific factors such as plant capacity factor, SO{sub 2} emission limit, remaining plant life, retrofit difficulty, and delivered sorbent cost affect the scrubber-Coolside process economic comparison.

  17. The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, D.C.; Scandrol, R.O.; Statnick, R.M.; Stouffer, M.R.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Wu, M.M.; Yoon, H. (CONSOL, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration met the program objectives which were to determine Coolside SO[sub 2] removal performance, establish short-term process operability, and evaluate the economics of the process versus a limestone wet scrubber. On a flue gas produced from the combustion of 3% sulfur coal, the Coolside process achieved 70% SO[sub 2] removal using commercially-available hydrated lime as the sorbent. The operating conditions were Ca/S mol ratio 2.0, Na/Ca mol ratio 0.2, and 20[degree]F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature ([del]T). During tests using fresh plus recycle sorbent, the recycle sorbent exhibited significant capacity for additional SO[sub 2] removal. The longest steady state operation was eleven days at nominally Ca/S = 2, Na/Ca = 0.22, [del]T = 20--22[degree]F, and 70% SO[sub 2] removal. The operability results achieved during the demonstration indicate that with the recommended process modifications, which are discussed in the Coolside process economic analysis, the process could be designed as a reliable system for utility application. Based on the demonstration program, the Coolside process capital cost for a hypothetical commercial installation was minimized. The optimization consisted of a single, large humidifier, no spare air compressor, no isolation dampers, and a 15 day on-site hydrated lime storage. The levelized costs of the Coolside and the wet limestone scrubbing processes were compared. The Coolside process is generally economically competitive with wet scrubbing for coals containing up to 2.5% sulfur and plants under 350 MWe. Site-specific factors such as plant capacity factor, SO[sub 2] emission limit, remaining plant life, retrofit difficulty, and delivered sorbent cost affect the scrubber-Coolside process economic comparison.

  18. Charge sniffer for electrostatics demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Mihai P.

    2011-02-01

    An electronic electroscope with a special design for demonstrations and experiments on static electricity is described. It operates as an electric charge sniffer by detecting slightly charged objects when they are brought to the front of its sensing electrode. The sniffer has the advantage of combining high directional sensitivity with a logarithmic bar display. It allows for the identification of electric charge polarity during charge separation by friction, peeling, electrostatic induction, batteries, or secondary coils of power transformers. Other experiments in electrostatics, such as observing the electric field of an oscillating dipole and the distance dependence of the electric field generated by simple charge configurations, are also described.

  19. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Emanuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI, reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours, these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the

  20. Parker Hybrid Hydraulic Drivetrain Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, Raymond [Parker-Hannifin Corporation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Howland, James [Parker-Hannifin Corporation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Venkiteswaran, Prasad [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-03-31

    This report examines the benefits of Parker Hannifin hydraulic hybrid brake energy recovery systems used in commercial applications for vocational purposes. A detailed background on the problem statement being addressed as well as the solution set specific for parcel delivery will be provided. Objectives of the demonstration performed in high start & stop applications included opportunities in fuel usage reduction, emissions reduction, vehicle productivity, and vehicle maintenance. Completed findings during the demonstration period and parallel investigations with NREL, CALSTART, along with a literature review will be provided herein on this research area. Lastly, results identified in the study by third parties validated the savings potential in fuel reduction of on average of 19% to 52% over the baseline in terms of mpg (Lammert, 2014, p11), Parker data for parcel delivery vehicles in the field parallels this at a range of 35% - 50%, emissions reduction of 17.4% lower CO2 per mile and 30.4% lower NOx per mile (Gallo, 2014, p15), with maintenance improvement in the areas of brake and starter replacement, while leaving room for further study in the area of productivity in terms of specific metrics that can be applied and studied.

  1. Demonstration Telescopes Using "Dollar Optics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Paul

    2008-05-01

    I propose a poster that illustrates the use of "dollar optics” for experimentation and for the creation of demonstration telescopes. Handling a variety of lenses and mirrors provides an opportunity for discovering practical optics. Some part of this path of exploration must have been traveled by Galileo as he experimented with spectacle lenses. "Dollar optics” include reading glasses (positive meniscus lenses), convex and concave mirrors, Fresnel sheets, magnifying lenses, and eye loupes. Unwanted distance spectacles (negative meniscus lenses) are available at second-hand stores. Galileo telescopes, "long” 17th century telescopes, and useful demonstration models of Newtonian reflectors can be made with "dollar” optics. The poster will illustrate practical information about "dollar optics” and telescopes: magnification, focal length, and "diopters” disassembling spectacles; creating cheap mounts for spectacle lenses; the importance of optical axes and alignment; eyepieces; and focusing. (A table would be useful with the poster to set out a hands-on display of "dollar optic” telescopes.) Educators, experimenters, and those concerned with astronomy outreach might be interested in this poster. Working with "dollar optics” requires facility with simple tools, interest in planning projects, patience, imagination, and the willingness to invest some time and effort. "Dollar optics” may help to foster creativity and hands-on enthusiasm - as did Galileo's work with simple lenses 400 years ago. "Oh! When will there be an end put to the new observations and discoveries of this admirable instrument?” - Galileo Galilei as quoted by Henry C. King, The History of the Telescope.

  2. Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M.G.

    1994-12-30

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

  3. Effects of the selective dopamine D(1) antagonists NNC 01-0112 and SCH 39166 on latent inhibition in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Karen M; Bell, Robert; King, David J

    2002-09-01

    Dopamine D(1) receptor blockade does not appear to be a prerequisite for antipsychotic activity since many clinically effective antipsychotics have little or no affinity for this receptor subtype. Clozapine, however, which has minimal liability for extrapyramidal symptoms, possesses affinities of similar order for D(1) and D(2) receptors. In earlier animal models used to predict antipsychotic effect, selective D(1) antagonists have shown effects similar to standard antipsychotics with preferential D(2) or mixed D(1)/D(2) antagonism. We investigated the effects of haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg) and two selective D(1) antagonists, NNC 01-0112 (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg) and SCH 39166 (0.02, 0.2 and 2.0 mg/kg), on latent inhibition (LI) in rats. LI is a behavioural paradigm in which repeated nonreinforced preexposure to a stimulus retards subsequent associations to that stimulus. Disrupted LI has been suggested as a model for the attentional deficits in schizophrenia. Using preexposure to a flashing light stimulus, which subsequently served as a conditioned stimulus for suppression of water licking, we demonstrated a clear LI effect with haloperidol but with neither of the two D(1) antagonists. Since selective D(1) antagonists are not clinically effective, these results add further credibility for the relevance of LI as an animal model of psychosis.

  4. Closed headpiece of integrin [alpah]IIb[beta]3 and its complex with an [alpha]IIb[beta]3-specific antagonist that does not induce opening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jieqing; Zhu, Jianghai; Negri, Ana; Provasi, Davide; Filizola, Marta; Coller, Barry S.; Springer, Timothy A. (Sinai); (Rockefeller); (CH-Boston)

    2011-08-24

    The platelet integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis through its binding of adhesive plasma proteins. We have determined crystal structures of the {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} headpiece in the absence of ligand and after soaking in RUC-1, a novel small molecule antagonist. In the absence of ligand, the {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} headpiece is in a closed conformation, distinct from the open conformation visualized in presence of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) antagonists. In contrast to RGD antagonists, RUC-1 binds only to the {alpha}{sub IIb} subunit. Molecular dynamics revealed nearly identical binding. Two species-specific residues, {alpha}{sub IIb} Y190 and {alpha}{sub aIIb} D232, in the RUC-1 binding site were confirmed as important by mutagenesis. In sharp contrast to RGD-based antagonists, RUC-1 did not induce {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} to adopt an open conformation, as determined by gel filtration and dynamic light scattering. These studies provide insights into the factors that regulate integrin headpiece opening, and demonstrate the molecular basis for a novel mechanism of integrin antagonism.

  5. Antagonistic activity of dairy lactobacilli against gram-foodborne pathogens - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v36i1.18776

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Geria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-five strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from artisanal raw milk cheese, presumptively identified and tested against one dairy Escherichia coli strain. Six lactobacilli, exhibiting antagonistic activity, were identified at the species level and their action was evaluated against four strains of Gram-foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O26, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. 1023, and Salmonella Typhimurium and the control strain Escherichia coli ATCC 45922. The antagonistic activity was determined by spot method and the inhibition zones were measured by Autodesk AutoCAD 2007. Three strains, all Lactobacillus paracasei, were active against all the pathogens; the other strains, all Lactobacillus plantarum, showed antagonistic activity against some pathogens. This study highlights the intense and different antagonistic activity induced by lactobacilli against various foodborne pathogens thus demonstrating that using selected lactic acid bacteria strains as adjunct cultures could be an effective strategy to prevent the development of foodborne pathogens in artisanal raw milk cheeses, and thus improving their safety.

  6. Clinical experience in Europe with uroselective alpha1-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, F M; Van der Poel, H G

    1999-01-01

    alpha1-Adrenoreceptors are thought to be involved in prostate smooth muscle contractions and could hence play a role in the dynamic component of intravesical obstruction associated with symptomatic BPH. Consequently, since the mid-eighties alpha receptor blocking agents have been used for the treatment of BPH. Non-selective alpha blockers are usually associated with systemic side-effects which resulted in an exclusion or withdrawal of many patients from this form of treatment. With the availability of so-called uroselective alpha blockers the management picture has changed since it was anticipated that these compounds cause lesser side-effects with at least the same, or even better, efficacy. Comparative clinical studies are essential for determining the eventual advantages of the uroselective alpha1-antagonists and a large number of such studies have been performed worldwide studying the various available compounds. European studies with terazosin showed clear superiority of the drug over the placebo while causing only limited side-effects. Various other studies using alpha-blocking agents such as doxazosin, tamsulosin and alfuzosin yielded identical results. Especially with tamsulosin and alfuzosin, the side-effects were comparable with those encountered in the placebo group. About 7% of the patients using tamsulosin experienced retrograde ejaculation in one study which did not occur in the alfuzosin studies. Important studies in Europe have also investigated the value of a combination of an alpha blocker with a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor. Comparable studies in which both alfuzosin and doxazosin were combined with the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor Proscar have shown that a combination is not superior to a blocker monotherapy and especially in the ALFIN study the results show that alfuzosin monotherapy is superior to Proscar in the management of symptomatic BPH. European studies have evaluated Quality of Life, sexuality as well as socio-economical outcome of the

  7. Effect of histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, microinjected into cerebellar vermis, on emotional memory consolidation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Serafim, K R; Canto-de-Souza, A; Mattioli, R

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of histamine H1 or H2 receptor antagonists on emotional memory consolidation in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM). The cerebellar vermis of male mice (Swiss albino) was implanted using a cannula guide. Three days after recovery, behavioral tests were performed in the EPM on 2 consecutive days (T1 and T2). Immediately after exposure to the EPM (T1), animals received a microinjection of saline (SAL) or the H1 antagonist chlorpheniramine (CPA; 0.016, 0.052, or 0.16 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 1, and SAL or the H2 antagonist ranitidine (RA; 0.57, 2.85, or 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 2. Twenty-four hours later, mice were reexposed to the EPM (T2) under the same experimental conditions but they did not receive any injection. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Duncan test. In Experiment 1, mice microinjected with SAL and with CPA entered the open arms less often (%OAE) and spent less time in the open arms (%OAT) in T2, and there was no difference among groups. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrated that the values of %OAE and %OAT in T2 were lower compared to T1 for the groups that were microinjected with SAL and 2.85 nmol/0.1 µL RA. However, when animals were microinjected with 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA, they did not show a reduction in %OAE and %OAT. These results demonstrate that CPA did not affect behavior at the doses used in this study, while 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA induced impairment of memory consolidation in the EPM.

  8. Effect of histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, microinjected into cerebellar vermis, on emotional memory consolidation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.L. Gianlorenco

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of histamine H1 or H2 receptor antagonists on emotional memory consolidation in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM. The cerebellar vermis of male mice (Swiss albino was implanted using a cannula guide. Three days after recovery, behavioral tests were performed in the EPM on 2 consecutive days (T1 and T2. Immediately after exposure to the EPM (T1, animals received a microinjection of saline (SAL or the H1 antagonist chlorpheniramine (CPA; 0.016, 0.052, or 0.16 nmol/0.1 µL in Experiment 1, and SAL or the H2 antagonist ranitidine (RA; 0.57, 2.85, or 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL in Experiment 2. Twenty-four hours later, mice were reexposed to the EPM (T2 under the same experimental conditions but they did not receive any injection. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Duncan test. In Experiment 1, mice microinjected with SAL and with CPA entered the open arms less often (%OAE and spent less time in the open arms (%OAT in T2, and there was no difference among groups. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrated that the values of %OAE and %OAT in T2 were lower compared to T1 for the groups that were microinjected with SAL and 2.85 nmol/0.1 µL RA. However, when animals were microinjected with 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA, they did not show a reduction in %OAE and %OAT. These results demonstrate that CPA did not affect behavior at the doses used in this study, while 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA induced impairment of memory consolidation in the EPM.

  9. Effect of histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, microinjected into cerebellar vermis, on emotional memory consolidation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianlorenço, A.C.L.; Serafim, K.R. [Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Canto-de-Souza, A. [Laboratório de Psicologia da Aprendizagem, Departamento de Psicologia, Centro de Educação e Ciências Humanas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Psicologia da Aprendizagem, Departamento de Psicologia, Centro de Educação e Ciências Humanas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Mattioli, R. [Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-17

    This study investigated the effects of histamine H1 or H2 receptor antagonists on emotional memory consolidation in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM). The cerebellar vermis of male mice (Swiss albino) was implanted using a cannula guide. Three days after recovery, behavioral tests were performed in the EPM on 2 consecutive days (T1 and T2). Immediately after exposure to the EPM (T1), animals received a microinjection of saline (SAL) or the H1 antagonist chlorpheniramine (CPA; 0.016, 0.052, or 0.16 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 1, and SAL or the H2 antagonist ranitidine (RA; 0.57, 2.85, or 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 2. Twenty-four hours later, mice were reexposed to the EPM (T2) under the same experimental conditions but they did not receive any injection. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Duncan test. In Experiment 1, mice microinjected with SAL and with CPA entered the open arms less often (%OAE) and spent less time in the open arms (%OAT) in T2, and there was no difference among groups. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrated that the values of %OAE and %OAT in T2 were lower compared to T1 for the groups that were microinjected with SAL and 2.85 nmol/0.1 µL RA. However, when animals were microinjected with 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA, they did not show a reduction in %OAE and %OAT. These results demonstrate that CPA did not affect behavior at the doses used in this study, while 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA induced impairment of memory consolidation in the EPM.

  10. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikram, Ajit [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), SAS Nagar, Mohali, Punjab 160 062 (India); Jena, Gopabandhu, E-mail: gbjena@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), SAS Nagar, Mohali, Punjab 160 062 (India)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields}Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. {yields}Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. {yields}Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. {yields}Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report that S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia ({approx}18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 {+-} 16.32 vs. 126.37 {+-} 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance ({approx}78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.

  11. Screening and modes of action of antagonistic bacteria to control the fungal pathogen Phaeomoniella chlamydospora involved in grapevine trunk diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Rana; Roudet, Jean; Bonnard, Olivier; Dufour, Marie Cécile; Corio-Costet, Marie France; Fert, Mathieu; Gautier, Thomas; Deschamps, Alain; Fermaud, Marc

    2016-11-01

    The antagonistic activity of 46 bacterial strains isolated from Bordeaux vineyards were evaluated against Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, a major grapevine pathogen involved in Esca. The reduction of the necrosis length of stem cuttings ranged between 31.4% and 38.7% for the 8 most efficient strains. Two in planta trials allowed the selection of the two best strains, Bacillus pumilus (S32) and Paenibacillus sp. (S19). Their efficacy was not dependent on application method; co-inoculation, prevention in the wood and soil inoculation were tested. The involvement of antibiosis by the secretion of diffusible and/or volatile compounds in the antagonistic capacity of these two strains was assessed in vitro. Volatile compounds secreted by B. pumilus (S32) and Paenibacillus sp. (S19) were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The volatile compounds 1-octen-3-ol and 2,5-dimethyl pyrazine were obtained commercially and tested, and they showed strong antifungal activity against P. chlamydospora, which suggested that these compounds may play an important role in the bacterial antagonistic activity in planta. Furthermore, the expression of 10 major grapevine defense genes was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, which demonstrated that the two strains significantly affected the grapevine transcripts four days after their application on the plants. High expression levels of different genes associated with P. chlamydospora infection in B. pumilus pre-treated plants suggests that this strain induces systemic resistance in grapevine. For the first time, we demonstrated the ability of two bacterial strains, B. pumilus and Paenibacillus sp., isolated from grapevine wood, to control P. chlamydospora via direct and/or indirect mechanisms.

  12. Screening computer-assisted dosage programs for anticoagulation with warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists: minimum safety requirements for individual programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poller, L; Roberts, C; Ibrahim, S;

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of the previous European Action on Anticoagulation (EAA) multicenter study, a simplified minimum procedure is described for screening the safety and effectiveness of marketed programs for dosage of oral anticoagulant drugs (vitamin K antagonists). The aim was to demonstrate n...... study, that is, 57.5%. The simplified procedure proposed, although not an absolute guide to safety, is designed to screen against gross unreliability of a test program, without the need to repeat a massive clinical endpoint study for each and every program.......Based on the results of the previous European Action on Anticoagulation (EAA) multicenter study, a simplified minimum procedure is described for screening the safety and effectiveness of marketed programs for dosage of oral anticoagulant drugs (vitamin K antagonists). The aim was to demonstrate non...

  13. Energy 2007. Research, development, demonstration; Energi 07. Forskning, udvikling, demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byriel, I.P.; Justesen, Helle; Beck, A.; Borup Jensen, J.; Rosenfeldt Jakobsen, Kl; Jacobsen, Steen Hartvig (eds.)

    2007-08-10

    Danish energy research is in an exciting and challenging situation. Rising oil prices, unstable energy supply, climate policy responsibilities and globalization have brought development of new environmentally friendly and more efficient energy technologies into focus. Promising international markets for newly developed energy technologies are emerging, and at the same time well established Danish positions of strength are challenged by new strong actors on the global market. The Danish government has set to work on its vision of an appreciable strengthening of public energy research funding through the recent law on the energy technological development and demonstration programme EUDP and the realization of globalization funds. The interaction between basic and applied research must be kept intact. In this report the various Danish energy research programmes administered by Energinet.dk, Danish Energy Authority, Danish Energy Association, Danish Council for Strategic Research's Programme Commission on Energy and Environment and Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation, coordinate their annual reports for the first time. The aim of Energy 2007 is to give the reader an idea of how the energy research programmes collaborate on solving the major energy technology challenges - also in an international context. (BA)

  14. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Dvorak, E; Hahn, A; Jaskierny, W; Johnson, C; Jostlein, H; Kendziora, C; Lockwitz, S; Pahlka, B; Plunkett, R; Pordes, S; Rebel, B; Schmitt, R; Stancari, M; Tope, T; Voirin, E; Yang, T

    2014-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  15. Pilot Scale Advanced Fogging Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, Rick L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, Don T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Archiblad, Kip E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in 2006 developed a useful fog solution using three different chemical constituents. Optimization of the fog recipe and use of commercially available equipment were identified as needs that had not been addressed. During 2012 development work it was noted that low concentrations of the components hampered coverage and drying in the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory’s testing much more so than was evident in the 2006 tests. In fiscal year 2014 the Idaho National Laboratory undertook a systematic optimization of the fogging formulation and conducted a non-radioactive, pilot scale demonstration using commercially available fogging equipment. While not as sophisticated as the equipment used in earlier testing, the new approach is much less expensive and readily available for smaller scale operations. Pilot scale testing was important to validate new equipment of an appropriate scale, optimize the chemistry of the fogging solution, and to realize the conceptual approach.

  16. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  17. Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Wilson

    2006-10-31

    A Clean Coal Diesel project was undertaken to demonstrate a new Clean Coal Technology that offers technical, economic and environmental advantages over conventional power generating methods. This innovative technology (developed to the prototype stage in an earlier DOE project completed in 1992) enables utilization of pre-processed clean coal fuel in large-bore, medium-speed, diesel engines. The diesel engines are conventional modern engines in many respects, except they are specially fitted with hardened parts to be compatible with the traces of abrasive ash in the coal-slurry fuel. Industrial and Municipal power generating applications in the 10 to 100 megawatt size range are the target applications. There are hundreds of such reciprocating engine power-plants operating throughout the world today on natural gas and/or heavy fuel oil.

  18. A demonstrator for bolometric interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ghribi, Adnan; Galli, Silvia; Piat, Michel; Breelle, Eric; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Spinelli, Sebastiano; Gervasi, Massimo; Zannoni, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Bolometric Interferometry (BI) is one of the most promising techniques for precise measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background polarization. In this paper, we present the results of DIBO (Demonstrateur d'Interferometrie Bolometrique), a single-baseline demonstrator operating at 90 GHz, built to proof the validity of the BI concept applied to a millimeter-wave interferometer. This instrument has been characterized in the laboratory with a detector at room temperature and with a 4 K bolometer. This allowed us to measure interference patterns in a clean way, both (1) rotating the source and (2) varying with time the phase shift among the two interferometer's arms. Detailed modelisation has also been performed and validated with measurements.

  19. Contaminant analysis automation demonstration proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, M.G.; Schur, A.; Heubach, J.G.

    1993-10-01

    The nation-wide and global need for environmental restoration and waste remediation (ER&WR) presents significant challenges to the analytical chemistry laboratory. The expansion of ER&WR programs forces an increase in the volume of samples processed and the demand for analysis data. To handle this expanding volume, productivity must be increased. However. The need for significantly increased productivity, faces contaminant analysis process which is costly in time, labor, equipment, and safety protection. Laboratory automation offers a cost effective approach to meeting current and future contaminant analytical laboratory needs. The proposed demonstration will present a proof-of-concept automated laboratory conducting varied sample preparations. This automated process also highlights a graphical user interface that provides supervisory, control and monitoring of the automated process. The demonstration provides affirming answers to the following questions about laboratory automation: Can preparation of contaminants be successfully automated?; Can a full-scale working proof-of-concept automated laboratory be developed that is capable of preparing contaminant and hazardous chemical samples?; Can the automated processes be seamlessly integrated and controlled?; Can the automated laboratory be customized through readily convertible design? and Can automated sample preparation concepts be extended to the other phases of the sample analysis process? To fully reap the benefits of automation, four human factors areas should be studied and the outputs used to increase the efficiency of laboratory automation. These areas include: (1) laboratory configuration, (2) procedures, (3) receptacles and fixtures, and (4) human-computer interface for the full automated system and complex laboratory information management systems.

  20. 1/f scaling in heart rate requires antagonistic autonomic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Hayano, Junichiro; Sakata, Seiichiro; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    We present systematic evidence for the origins of 1/f -type temporal scaling in human heart rate. The heart rate is regulated by the activity of two branches of the autonomic nervous system: the parasympathetic (PNS) and the sympathetic (SNS) nervous systems. We examine alterations in the scaling property when the balance between PNS and SNS activity is modified, and find that the relative PNS suppression by congestive heart failure results in a substantial increase in the Hurst exponent H towards random-walk scaling 1/f2 and a similar breakdown is observed with relative SNS suppression by primary autonomic failure. These results suggest that 1/f scaling in heart rate requires the intricate balance between the antagonistic activity of PNS and SNS.

  1. Pathological gambling induced by dopamine antagonists: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grötsch, Philipp; Lange, Claudia; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Lang, Undine

    2015-03-01

    Pathological gambling is defined as inappropriate, persistent, and maladaptive gambling behaviour. It is a non-pharmacological addiction classified as an impulse control disorder. However, pathological gambling has been associated with dopamine agonist use. Here we report of a 28-year-old man with a first major depressive episode and a post-traumatic stress disorder who has been treated with a combination of the serotonine/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine and the tricyclic antidepressant maprotiline. The administration of antipsychotic flupentixole (up to 7 mg) turned this slight online poker gambler into an excessive gambler. Only after the discontinuation of the antidopaminergic agents and the switch to bupropion did this gambling behaviour stop which suggests a causal relationship between dopamine antagonists and pathological gambling.

  2. Pharmacoepidemiological assessment of drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Christensen, R. D.; Wang, S. V.;

    2014-01-01

    PurposeWe present a database of prescription drugs and international normalized ratio (INR) data and the applied methodology for its use to assess drug-drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). We use the putative interaction between VKAs and tramadol as a case study. MethodsWe used...... a self-controlled case series to estimate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) comparing the rate of INR measurements of 4.0 in concomitant tramadol and VKA-exposed periods to VKA-only-exposed periods. Secondary analyses considered specific subgroups, alternative exposure criteria, alternative outcome...... definitions, and other drugs. ResultsWe identified 513 VKA users with at least 1 INR measurement 4.0 and concomitant tramadol and VKA exposure during the observation period. The overall IRR was 1.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53-2.10), with a stronger association among users of phenprocoumon compared...

  3. Discovery and characterization of carbamothioylacrylamides as EP2 selective antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Dingledine, Ray

    2013-07-11

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 is emerging as a novel target for development of anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of chronic neurodegenerative and peripheral diseases; however, the availability of EP2 antagonist probes for exploration of peripheral disease models is very limited. We now report identification and characterization of a novel chemical class of compounds that show nanomolar potency and competitive antagonism of the EP2 receptor. A compound in this class, TG6-129, showed prolonged plasma half-life and did not cross the blood brain barrier. This compound also suppressed the induction of inflammatory mRNA markers in a macrophage cell line upon activation of EP2. Thus, this compound could be useful as a probe for a variety of peripheral chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in which EP2 appears to play a pathogenic role.

  4. [Antifibrillatory activity of dipeptide antagonist of nerve growth factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanovskiĭ, S A; Stoliarchuk, V N; Vititnova, M B; Tsorin, I B; Pekel'dina, E S; Gudasheva, T A

    2012-01-01

    In experiments on anesthetized rats were assessed antifibrillatoty action of dipeptide GK-1. This compound is the fragment of fourth loop of nerve growth factor (NGF) and manifests antagonistic activity in respect to TrkA receptor, that specified for NGF. It is shown that this compound is able to significantly increase the threshold of electrical fibrillation of the heart and its effectiveness is not inferior to the reference antiarrhythmics I and III class on Vaughan Williams classification. However, unlike the latter, antifibrillatory action of dipeptide GK-1 was delayed and realized within 40-60 minutes after its administration. It is discussed possible mechanisms underlying antifibrillatory action of dipeptide GK-1, that, to some extent, may be associated with its ability to change the reactivity of beta-adrenergic structures of the heart.

  5. Suvorexant: The first orexin receptor antagonist to treat insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K Dubey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary insomnia is mainly treated with drugs acting on benzodiazepine receptors and a few other classes of drugs used for different co-morbidities. A novel approach to treat insomnia has been introduced recently, with the approval of suvorexant, the first in a new class of orexin receptor antagonists. Orexin receptors in the brain have been found to play an important role in the regulation of various aspects of arousal and motivation. The drugs commonly used for insomnia therapy to date, have often been associated with adverse effects, such as, day-time somnolence, amnesia, confusion, and gait disturbance, apart from the risk of dependence on chronic use. Suvorexant has not shown these adverse effects because of its unique mechanism of action. It also appears to be suitable as a chronic therapy for insomnia, because of minimal physical dependence. The availability of this new drug as an effective and safe alternative is an important and welcome development in insomnia management.

  6. Thogoto virus lacking interferon-antagonistic protein ML is strongly attenuated in newborn Mx1-positive but not Mx1-negative mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlmair, Andreas; Buse, Johanna; Jennings, Stephanie; Haller, Otto; Kochs, Georg; Staeheli, Peter

    2004-10-01

    The Thogoto virus ML protein suppresses interferon synthesis in infected cells. Nevertheless, a virus mutant lacking ML remained highly pathogenic in standard laboratory mice. It was strongly attenuated, however, in mice carrying the interferon-responsive Mx1 gene found in wild mice, demonstrating that enhanced interferon synthesis is protective only if appropriate antiviral effector molecules are present. Our study shows that the virulence-enhancing effects of some viral interferon antagonists may escape detection in conventional animal models.

  7. The Peptidic GHS-R Antagonist [D-Lys]GHRP-6 Markedly Improves Adiposity and Related Metabolic Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Postmenopausal Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Maletínská, L. (Lenka); Matyšková, R.; Maixnerová, J.; Sýkora, D.; Pýchová, M.; Špolcová, A.; Blechová, M.; Drápalová, J.; Lacinová, Z.; Haluzík, M.; Železná, B.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract It was demonstrated that estrogen deficiency and consuming high fat (HF) diet enhanced orexigenic activity of ghrelin. Therefore, we hypothesized that antagonizing of ghrelin action would attenuate food intake and body weight in mice obese both from ovariectomy (OVX) and feeding a HF diet. Ghrelin receptor antagonist [D-Lys3]GHRP-6 after seven days of subcutaneous treatment markedly decreased food intake in OVX mice fed both HF and standard diets; furthermore, i...

  8. Effects of a 5-HT3 antagonist, ondansetron, on fasting and postprandial small bowel water content assessed by magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background 5-HT3 antagonists have been shown to be effective in relieving symptoms of IBS-D. Using a recently validated MRI method we have demonstrated reduced fasting small bowel water content (SBWC) in IBS-D associated with accelerated small bowel transit. We hypothesized that slowing of transit with ondansetron would lead to an increase in SBWC by inhibiting fasting motility. Aim To assess the effects of ondansetron compared with placebo in healthy volunteers o...

  9. SP 01-3 ALDOSTERONE ANTAGONISTS IN HEART FAILURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Colin

    2016-09-01

    Aldosterone's deleterious pathophysiological effects on the cardiovascular system if blocked by mineralcorticord antagonists (MRAs) logically should lead to improvement in heart function and outcomes in heart failure (HF). The first trial to test this hypothesis was tthe RALES trial in 1999 which treated patients with class III-IV HF with spironolactone. It showed significant reduction in mortality and cardiovascular hospitalzation rates. This was confirmed & extended in EMHASIS-HF RCT with classs II-III being treated with ACEIs & BB who received placebo or elperinone (a MRA) with again a statistically significant fall in mortality & hospitalization.The possible cardioprotective effects of MRA post acute myocardial infarct (MI) is less clear. The EPHESUS RCT in 2003 demostrated that elperinone given 3-14 days AMI in patients with early signs of HF reduced mortality & morbidity. However in the ALBTROSS trial using spironolactone 2 days after AMI showed no benfit in patients without HF but in a subgroup with ST elevation there was a 80% reduction in mortality after 6 months. However a recent meta-analysis from 25 RCT with data invovling 19,333 patients with either HF or post MI assigned aldosterone antagonists (AA)or placebo showed a 18% reduction in mortality including a 20% fall in CV mortality and a 19% reduction in SCD.The role of AA in HFPEF is even even more contraversial. The TOPCAT RCT of 3445 patients with symptomatc HFPEF randomised to spironolactone failed to meet the primary composite end point of death, aborted cardiac arrest or hospitalization although there was a reduction in hospitalization for HF (HR 0.83 P = 0.04).The differences between selective or non-selective MRAs, their ADRs & off target effects will also be discussed.

  10. Agonistic and antagonistic estrogens in licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rudy; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Mol, Loes A M; The, Susan A M; Bovee, Toine F H; Luijendijk, Teus J C; Verbruggen, Marian A; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-07-01

    The roots of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) are a rich source of flavonoids, in particular, prenylated flavonoids, such as the isoflavan glabridin and the isoflavene glabrene. Fractionation of an ethyl acetate extract from licorice root by centrifugal partitioning chromatography yielded 51 fractions, which were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and screened for activity in yeast estrogen bioassays. One third of the fractions displayed estrogenic activity towards either one or both estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ). Glabrene-rich fractions displayed an estrogenic response, predominantly to the ERα. Surprisingly, glabridin did not exert agonistic activity to both ER subtypes. Several fractions displayed higher responses than the maximum response obtained with the reference compound, the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E(2)). The estrogenic activities of all fractions, including this so-called superinduction, were clearly ER-mediated, as the estrogenic response was inhibited by 20-60% by known ER antagonists, and no activity was found in yeast cells that did not express the ERα or ERβ subtype. Prolonged exposure of the yeast to the estrogenic fractions that showed superinduction did, contrary to E(2), not result in a decrease of the fluorescent response. Therefore, the superinduction was most likely the result of stabilization of the ER, yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein, or a combination of both. Most fractions displaying superinduction were rich in flavonoids with single prenylation. Glabridin displayed ERα-selective antagonism, similar to the ERα-selective antagonist RU 58668. Whereas glabridin was able to reduce the estrogenic response of E(2) by approximately 80% at 6 × 10(-6) M, glabrene-rich fractions only exhibited agonistic responses, preferentially on ERα.

  11. Anticonvulsive effect of nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Kuder, Kamil; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Stark, Holger; Lażewska, Dorota; Adem, Abdu; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2014-06-01

    To determine the potential of histamine H3 receptor (H3R) ligands as new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), aromatic ether, and diether derivatives (1-12) belonging to the nonimidazole class of ligands, with high in-vitro binding affinity at human H3R, were tested for their in-vivo anticonvulsive activity in the maximal electroshock (MES)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled seizure models in rats. The anticonvulsive effects of a systemic injection of 1-12 on MES-induced and PTZ-kindled seizures were evaluated against the reference AED phenytoin (PHT) and the structurally related H3R antagonist/inverse agonist pitolisant (PIT). Among the most promising ligands 2, 4, 5, and 11, there was a significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension (THLE) in MES-induced seizure subsequent to administration of 4 and 5 [(5, 10, and 15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)]. The protective effects observed for the 1-(3-(3-(4-chlorophenyl)propoxy)propyl)-3-methylpiperidine derivative 11 at 10 mg/kg, i.p. were significantly greater than those of PIT, and were reversed by pretreatment with the central nervous system penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) (10 mg/kg). Moreover, the protective action of the reference AED PHT, at a dose of 5 mg/kg (without considerable protection in the MES model), was significantly augmented when coadministered with derivative 11 (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Surprisingly, pretreatment with derivative 7 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), an ethylphenoxyhexyl-piperidine derivative without considerable protection in the MES model, potently altered PTZ-kindled seizure, significantly prolonged myoclonic latency time, and clearly shortened the total seizure time when compared with control, PHT, and PIT. These interesting results highlight the potential of H3R ligands as new AEDs or as adjuvants to available AED therapeutics.

  12. Alpha antagonists and intraoperative floppy iris syndrome: A spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif A Issa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Sharif A Issa, Omar H Hadid, Oliver Baylis, Margaret DayanDepartment of Ophthalmology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UKBackground: To determine occurrence of features of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS during cataract surgery in patients taking systemic alpha-antagonists (AA.Methods: We prospectively studied patients on AA and who underwent phacoemulsification. The following were recorded: pupil diameter preoperatively, iris flaccidity, iris prolapse and peroperative miosis.Results: We studied 40 eyes of 31 subjects. Mean age was 78 years. Overall, 14 eyes (13 patients showed signs of IFIS: 9/13 (69% eyes of patients on tamsulosin, 1/18 (6% eyes in the doxazosin group, 2/2 prazosin patients, 1/4 eyes in the indoramin group, and 1/2 eyes in two patients on a combination of doxazosin and tamsulosin. Most cases (92% had only one or two signs of IFIS. Bilateral cataract surgery was undertaken in 9 patients but only one patient (on tamsulosin had features of IFIS in both eyes, while 4 patients (2 on tamsulosin and 2 on other AA showed signs of IFIS in one eye only, and 4 patients did not show IFIS in either eye.Conclusion: Most AA were associated with IFIS, but it tends to present as a spectrum of signs rather than full triad originally described. Tamsulosin was most likely to be associated with IFIS; however, its intake does not necessarily mean that IFIS will occur. For patients on AA, the behavior of the iris intraoperatively in one eye is a poor predictor of the other eye. Surgeons should anticipate the occurrence of IFIS in any patient on AA.Keywords: alpha blocker, alpha antagonist, cataract surgery, intraoperative floppy iris syndrome, tamsulosin.

  13. Comparison of GnRH Agonist, GnRH Antagonist, and GnRH Antagonist Mild Protocol of Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation in Good Prognosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Stimpfel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reports on how to stimulate the ovaries for oocyte retrieval in good prognosis patients are contradictory and often favor one type of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH. For this reason, we retrospectively analyzed data from IVF/ICSI cycles carried out at our IVF Unit in good prognosis patients (aged <38 years, first and second attempts of IVF/ICSI, more than 3 oocytes retrieved to elucidate which type of COH is optimal at our condition. The included patients were undergoing COH using GnRH agonist, GnRH antagonist or GnRH antagonist mild protocol in combination with gonadotrophins. We found significant differences in the average number of retrieved oocytes, immature oocytes, fertilized oocytes, embryos, transferred embryos, embryos frozen per cycle, and cycles with embryo freezing between studied COH protocols. Although there were no differences in live birth rate (LBR, miscarriages, and ectopic pregnancies between compared protocols, pregnancy rate was significantly higher in GnRH antagonist mild protocol in comparison with both GnRH antagonist and GnRH agonist protocols and cumulative LBR per cycle was significantly higher in GnRH antagonist mild protocol in comparison to GnRH agonist protocol. Our data show that GnRH antagonist mild protocol of COH could be the best method of choice in good prognosis patients.

  14. The ideal hydrogen demonstration platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, J. [Village Technology, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper suggested that the best platform to demonstrate hydrogen's capability as an emission-free fuel regime is an urban pedestrian system. The on-grade bi-directional downtown people-mover was designed to fit in existing street-scapes without eliminating traffic lanes. The system is comprised of rubber-tired tram-buses that are synchronized to arrive at stop-boarding areas at the same time in order to provide a seamless headway along a single, dedicated guide-lane. The system was designed to operate along strategic urban corridors in order to reduce traffic congestion and air pollution. The vehicles are inductively charged with fixed fuel cell generators at stop-boarding areas. A single people-mover has the capacity to replace several thousand car trips and parking movements per day, or 8000 tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). It was concluded that the system was designed to dovetail with fuel cell generator stations planned for private vehicles as they begin to be converted in the future. 8 figs.

  15. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  16. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, L; De Bruijn, I; De Mot, R; Rediers, H; Lievens, B

    2016-08-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens. We showed that when using the same medium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacterium was strongly affected. Consequently, results from in vitro screenings should be interpreted cautiously.

  17. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of "new drug delivery systems" is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today.

  18. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of “new drug delivery systems” is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today.

  19. Screening of Fungus Antagonists against Six Main Disease Pathogens in Crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    28 soil samples were collected from the rhizosphere of 16 plant species in six different districts in Hunan. As a result of isolation and purification, 122 fungus strains were obtained of which the antagonistic activity was tested against six fungus pathogens in tomato, cotton, cucumber, chilli, rice and rape, and 17 strains were found antagonistic to one or more pathogenic fungi.

  20. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Lien; De Bruijn, I.; de Mot, Rene; Readers, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens.Weshowed thatwhen using the samemedium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacteriumwas strongly affected.

  1. Anti-inflammatory properties of a novel peptide interleukin 1 receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klementiev, Boris; Li, Shizhong; Korshunova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide.......Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide....

  2. Discovery of the CCR1 antagonist, BMS-817399, for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Joseph B; Gardner, Daniel S; Duncia, John V; Wu, Hong; Dhar, Murali; Cavallaro, Cullen; Tebben, Andrew J; Carter, Percy H; Barrish, Joel C; Yarde, Melissa; Briceno, Stephanie W; Cvijic, Mary Ellen; Grafstrom, R Robert; Liu, Richard; Patel, Sima R; Watson, Andrew J; Yang, Guchen; Rose, Anne V; Vickery, Rodney D; Caceres-Cortes, Janet; Caporuscio, Christian; Camac, Daniel M; Khan, Javed A; An, Yongmi; Foster, William R; Davies, Paul; Hynes, John

    2014-09-25

    High-affinity, functionally potent, urea-based antagonists of CCR1 have been discovered. Modulation of PXR transactivation has revealed the selective and orally bioavailable CCR1 antagonist BMS-817399 (29), which entered clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Inhibition of tryptase release from human colon mast cells by histamine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shao-Heng; Xie, Hua; Fu, Yi-Ling

    2005-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the ability of histamine receptor antagonists to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells induced by histamine. Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with histamine in the absence or presence of the histamine receptor antagonists, and the tryptase release was determined. It was found that histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 61.5% and 24% by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine and the H2 histamine receptor antagonist cimetidine, respectively, when histamine and its antagonists were added to cells at the same time. The H3 histamine receptor antagonist clobenpropit had no effect on histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells at all concentrations tested. Preincubation of terfenadine, cimetidine or clobenpropit with cells for 20 minutes before challenging with histamine did not enhance the ability of these antihistamines to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release. Apart from terfenadine at 100 microg/ml, the antagonists themselves did not stimulate tryptase release from colon mast cells following both 15 minutes and 35 minutes incubation periods. It was concluded that H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists were able to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells. This not only added some new data to our hypothesis of self-amplification mechanisms of mast cell degranulation, but also suggested that combining these two types of antihistamine drugs could be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  4. Transitions between male and female heterogamety caused by sex-antagonistic selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, G. Sander; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Many animal taxa show frequent and rapid transitions between male heterogamety (XY) and female heterogamety (ZW). We develop a model showing how these transitions can be driven by sex-antagonistic selection. Sex-antagonistic selection acting on loci linked to a new sex-determination mutation can cau

  5. Draft genome sequence of the antagonistic rhizosphere bacterium Serratia plymuthica strain PRI-2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbeva, P; van Elsas, J D; de Boer, W

    2012-08-01

    Serratia plymuthica strain PRI-2C is a rhizosphere bacterial strain with antagonistic activity against different plant pathogens. Here we present the 5.39-Mb (G+C content, 55.67%) draft genome sequence of S. plymuthica strain PRI-2C with the aim of providing insight into the genomic basis of its antagonistic activity.

  6. Effect of GABAB Receptor Antagonist (CGP35348 on Learning and Memory in Albino Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quratulane Gillani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to demonstrate the potential effect of CGP 35348 (GABAB receptor antagonist on the learning, memory formation, and neuromuscular coordination in albino mouse. Mice were intrapertoneally injected with 1 mg CGP 35348/mL of distilled water/Kg body weight, while the control animals were injected with equal volume of saline solution. A battery of neurological tests was applied following the intrapertoneal injections. Results of rota rod indicated that CGP 35348 had no effect on neuromuscular coordination in both male (P=0.528 and female (P=0.125 albino mice. CGP 35348 treated females demonstrated poor exploratory behavior during open filed for several parameters (time mobile (P=0.04, time immobile (P=0.04, rotations (P=0.04, and anticlockwise rotations (P=0.038. The results for Morris water maze (MWM retention phase indicated that CGP 35348 treated male mice took shorter latency to reach the hidden platform (P=0.04 than control indicating improved memory. This observation was complemented by the swim strategies used by mice during training days in MWM as CGP 35348 treated males used more direct and focal approach to reach the platform as the training proceeded.

  7. Pharmacological profiling an abundantly expressed schistosome serotonergic GPCR identifies nuciferine as a potent antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Chan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT is a key regulator of muscle contraction in parasitic flatworms. In Schistosoma mansoni, the myoexcitatory action of 5-HT is effected through activation of a serotonergic GPCR (Sm.5HTRL, prioritizing pharmacological characterization of this target for anthelmintic drug discovery. Here, we have examined the effects of several aporphine alkaloids on the signaling activity of a heterologously expressed Sm.5HTRL construct using a cAMP biosensor assay. Four structurally related natural products – nuciferine, D-glaucine, boldine and bulbocapnine – were demonstrated to block Sm.5HTRL evoked cAMP generation with the potency of GPCR blockade correlating well with the ability of each drug to inhibit contractility of schistosomule larvae. Nuciferine was also effective at inhibiting both basal and 5-HT evoked motility of adult schistosomes. These data advance our understanding of structure-affinity relationships at Sm.5HTRL, and demonstrate the effectiveness of Sm.5HTRL antagonists as hypomotility-evoking drugs across different parasite life cycle stages.

  8. Kinetic profiling an abundantly expressed planarian serotonergic GPCR identifies bromocriptine as a perdurant antagonist

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    John D. Chan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and uniqueness of flatworm G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs provides impetus for identifying ligands useful as tools for studying flatworm biology, or as therapeutics for treating diseases caused by parasitic flatworm infections. To catalyse this discovery process, technologies optimized for mammalian GPCR high throughput screening need be transposed for screening flatworm GPCRs. Here, we demonstrate the utility of a genetically encoded cAMP biosensor for resolving the properties of an abundantly expressed planarian serotonergic GPCR (S7.1R. Application of this methodology resolved the real time kinetics of GPCR modulation by ligands and demonstrated a marked difference in the kinetic action of antagonists at S7.1R. Notably, bromocriptine caused a protracted inhibition of S7.1R activity in vitro and a protracted paralysis of planarian movement, replicating the effect of S7.1R in vivo RNAi. The lengthy inhibition of function caused by bromocriptine at this abundantly expressed GPCR provides a useful tool to ablate serotonergic signaling in vivo, and is a noteworthy feature for exploitation as an anthelmintic vulnerability.

  9. Magnetic Launch Assist Demonstration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows a 1/9 subscale model vehicle clearing the Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly referred to as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev), test track during a demonstration test conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Engineers at MSFC have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies. To launch spacecraft into orbit, a Magnetic Launch Assist System would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at very high speeds. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, a launch-assist system would electromagnetically drive a space vehicle along the track. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. This track is an advanced linear induction motor. Induction motors are common in fans, power drills, and sewing machines. Instead of spinning in a circular motion to turn a shaft or gears, a linear induction motor produces thrust in a straight line. Mounted on concrete pedestals, the track is 100-feet long, about 2-feet wide and about 1.5-feet high. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  10. Antagonistic activity of autosimbionts А. viridans, B. subtilis and their probiotic association to conditionally microflora

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    Stepansky D.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research the data on examination of antagonist qualities of bioassotiantes A. viridans and strain B. subtilis 3 towards pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic microflora isolated from oropharynx and nasopharynx of children who were in contact with patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (MBT + are submitted. The expressed antagonist activity of autosimbionts A. viridans towards pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic microflora was shown. Common antagonist activity of A. viridans (k N 1 and B. subtilis 3 towards diverse strains of test-cultures is 1,5-2 times higher, than separate antagonist activity of A. viridans (k №1 and B. subtilis 3. Received research data showed the possibility of continuing work on development of probiotic associations, that contain representatives of normal microflora - bioassociants A. viridans and probiotic strains B. subtilis 3 with broadspectrum of antagonistic activity in relation to the various groups of bacterium.

  11. Screening of antagonistic bacteria for biological control of nursery wilt of black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anith, K N; Radhakrishnan, N V; Manomohandas, T P

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial antagonists of Phytophthora capsici were isolated from underground shoot portions of rooted cuttings of black pepper. Initially isolates were screened by dual culture on potato dextrose agar and carrot agar. Further, a screening was done on black pepper shoots for supression of lesion caused by the pathogen. Most of the antagonists showed varying levels of antagonism in the dual culture and the shoot assay. Isolate PN-026, showing the highest suppression of lesion development in the shoot assay was found to be the most efficient antagonist in reducing Phytophthora capsici induced nursery wilt of black pepper. This screening involving the host, pathogen, and the antagonist, performed on black pepper shoot (the planting material for this vegetatively propagated crop), could be used as a rapid and reliable method for the isolation of efficient bacterial antagonists of P. capsici.

  12. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

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    Nan Hua

    Full Text Available Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs. In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC.

  13. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: The effects of montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist

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    James P Kemp

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available James P KempClinical Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology and Allergy, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB is very common in both patients with asthma and those who are otherwise thought to be normal. The intensity of exercise as well as the type of exercise is important in producing symptoms. This may make some types of exercise such as swimming more suitable and extended running more difficult for patients with this condition. A better understanding of EIB will allow the physician to direct the patient towards a type of exercise and medications that can result in a more active lifestyle without the same concern for resulting symptoms. This is especially important for schoolchildren who are usually enrolled in physical education classes and elite athletes who may desire to participate in competitive sports. Fortunately several medications (short- and long-acting β2-agonists, cromolyn, nedocromil, inhaled corticosteroids, and more recently leukotriene modifiers have been shown to be effective in preventing or attenuating the effects of exercise in many patients. In addition, inhaled β2-agonists have been shown to quickly reverse the airway obstruction that develops in patients and continue to be the reliever medications of choice. Inhaled corticosteroids are increasingly being recommended as regular therapy now that the role of inflammation and airway injury has been identified in EIB. With the discovery that there is a release of mediators such as histamine and leukotrienes from cells in the airway following exercise with resulting airway obstruction in susceptible individuals, interest has turned to attenuating their effects with mediator antagonists especially those that block the effects of leukotrienes. Studies with an oral leukotriene antagonist, montelukast, have shown beneficial effects in adults and children aged as young as 6 years with EIB

  14. Effects of calcium channel antagonists on the motivational effects of nicotine and morphine in conditioned place aversion paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzynska, Barbara; Polak, Piotr; Biala, Grazyna

    2012-03-01

    The motivational component of drug withdrawal may contribute to drug seeking and relapse through the negative reinforcement-related process; thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms that mediate affective withdrawal behaviors. The present study was undertaken to examine the calcium-dependent mechanism of negative motivational symptoms of nicotine and morphine withdrawal using the conditioned place aversion (CPA) paradigm. Rats were chronically treated with nicotine (1.168 mg/kg, free base, s.c., 11 days, three times daily) or morphine (10 mg/kg,s.c., 11 days, twice daily). Then, during conditioning, rats pre-treated with nicotine or morphine received a nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (3.5 mg/kg) or an opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg/kg) to precipitate withdrawal in their initially preferred compartment, or saline in their non-preferred compartment. Our results demonstrated that after three conditioning sessions, mecamylamine induced a clear place aversion in rats that had previously received nicotine injections, and naloxone induced a significant place aversion in rats that had previously received morphine injections. Further, the major findings showed that calcium channel antagonists, i.e., nimodipine, verapamil and flunarizine (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.), injected before the administration of mecamylamine or naloxone, attenuated nicotine or morphine place aversion. As an outcome, these findings support the hypothesis that similar calcium-dependent mechanisms are involved in aversive motivational component associated with nicotine a morphine withdrawal. We can suggest that calcium channel blockers have potential for alleviating nicotine and morphine addiction by selectively decreasing the incentive motivational properties of both drugs, and may be beneficial as smoking cessation or opioid dependence pharmacotherapies.

  15. Novel class of medications, orexin receptor antagonists, in the treatment of insomnia – critical appraisal of suvorexant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jessica L; Anderson, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia, a highly prevalent disorder, can be detrimental to patients’ overall health and worsen existing comorbidities. Patients may have acute episodes of insomnia related to a traumatic event, but more commonly insomnia occurs chronically. While proper sleep hygiene and behavioral therapy play important roles in the nonpharmacologic management of short-term and chronic insomnia, medications may also be required. Historically, insomnia has been treated with agents such as benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonists, and melatonin agonists. Dual orexin receptor antagonists represent a new class of medications for the treatment of insomnia, which block the binding of wakefulness-promoting neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B to their respective receptor sites. Suvorexant (Belsomra) is the first dual orexin receptor antagonist to be approved in the US and Japan and has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing time to sleep onset and increasing total sleep time. Its unique mechanism of action, data to support efficacy and safety over 12 months of use, and relative lack of withdrawal effects when discontinued may represent an alternative for patients with chronic insomnia who cannot tolerate or do not receive benefit from more traditional sleep agents. Suvorexant is effective and well tolerated, but precautions exist for certain patient populations, including females, obese patients, and those with respiratory disease. Suvorexant has only been studied vs placebo, and hence it is unknown how it directly compares with other medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for insomnia. Suvorexant is not likely to replace benzodiazepines or nonbenzodiazepine receptor antagonists as a first-line sleep agent but does represent a novel option for the treatment of patients with chronic insomnia. PMID:27471419

  16. Antiproliferative effect of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH antagonist on ovarian cancer cells through the EGFR-Akt pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Jozsef

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH are being developed for the treatment of various human cancers. Methods MTT assay was used to test the proliferation of SKOV3 and CaOV3. The splice variant expression of GHRH receptors was examined by RT-PCR. The expression of protein in signal pathway was examined by Western blotting. siRNA was used to block the effect of EGFR. Results In this study, we investigated the effects of a new GHRH antagonist JMR-132, in ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and CaOV3 expressing splice variant (SV1 of GHRH receptors. MTT assay showed that JMR-132 had strong antiproliferative effects on SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent fashion. JMR-132 also induced the activation and increased cleaved caspase3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner in both cell lines. In addition, JMR-132 treatments decreased significantly the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR level and the phosphorylation of Akt (p-Akt, suggesting that JMR-132 inhibits the EGFR-Akt pathway in ovarian cancer cells. More importantly, treatment of SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells with 100 nM JMR-132 attenuated proliferation and the antiapoptotic effect induced by EGF in both cell lines. After the knockdown of the expression of EGFR by siRNA, the antiproliferative effect of JMR-132 was abolished in SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the inhibitory effect of the GHRH antagonist JMR-132 on proliferation is due, in part, to an interference with the EGFR-Akt pathway in ovarian cancer cells.

  17. Role of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in the treatment of hypertension in patients aged >or=65 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradman, Alan H

    2009-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases with age, and hypertension affects approximately two-thirds of adults in the US aged >60 years. Blood pressure (BP) increases as a consequence of age-related structural changes in large arteries, which lead to loss of elasticity and reduced vascular compliance. Increased pulse wave velocity augments SBP, resulting in a high prevalence of isolated systolic hypertension. Because age itself elevates cardiovascular risk, effective treatment of hypertension in an older (aged >or=65 years) patient population prevents many more events per 1000 patients treated than treatment of younger hypertensive patients. Recommendations for treating hypertension are similar in older patients compared with the general population. The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Prevention, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends target BP goals of heart failure. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of calcium channel antagonists (calcium channel blockers [CCBs]), low-dose diuretics, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) in reducing the risk of stroke and other adverse cardiovascular outcomes in older patients; beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are less effective in terms of endpoint reduction. The majority of older patients require two or more drugs to achieve BP goals. Despite active treatment, half of these patients do not achieve target BP, in part because of the reluctance of physicians to intensify treatment, a phenomenon referred to as 'clinical inertia'. ARBs are effective antihypertensive agents in older patients and have been shown to reduce cardiovascular endpoints in patients with hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, cerebrovascular disease and heart failure. ARBs produce additive BP reduction when combined with diuretics or CCBs. They also have the advantage of placebo-like tolerability, and this contributes favourably to

  18. The orally active melanocortin-4 receptor antagonist BL-6020/979: a promising candidate for the treatment of cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, R; Weyermann, P; Anklin, C; Boroff, M; Bray-French, K; Cardel, B; Courdier-Fruh, I; Deppe, H; Dubach-Powell, J; Erb, M; Haefeli, R H; Henneböhle, M; Herzner, H; Hufschmid, M; Marks, D L; Nordhoff, S; Papp, M; Rummey, C; Santos, G; Schärer, F; Siendt, H; Soeberdt, M; Sumanovski, L T; Terinek, M; Mondadori, C; Güven, N; Feurer, A

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Under physiological conditions, the melanocortin system is a crucial part of the complex network regulating food intake and energy expenditure. In pathological states, like cachexia, these two parameters are deregulated, i.e., food intake is decreased and energy expenditure is increased-a vicious combination leading to catabolism. Agouti-related protein (AgRP), the endogenous antagonist at the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC-4R), was found to increase food intake and to reduce energy expenditure. This qualifies MC-4R blockade as an attractive mode of action for the treatment of cachexia. Based on this rationale, a novel series of small-molecule MC-4R antagonists was designed, from which the orally active compound BL-6020/979 (formerly known as SNT207979) emerged as the first promising development candidate showing encouraging pre-clinical efficacy and safety properties which are presented here. METHODS AND RESULTS: BL-6020/979 is an orally available, selective and potent MC-4R antagonist with a drug-like profile. It increased food intake and decreased energy expenditure in healthy wild-type but not in MC-4R deficient mice. More importantly, it ameliorated cachexia-like symptoms in the murine C26 adenocarcinoma model; with an effect on body mass and body composition and on the expression of catabolic genes. Moreover, BL-6020/979 showed antidepressant-like properties in the chronic mild stress model in rats and exhibits a favorable safety profile. CONCLUSION: The properties of BL-6020/979 demonstrated in animal models and presented here make it a promising candidate suitable for further development towards a first-in-class treatment option for cachexia that potentially opens up the opportunity to treat two hallmarks of the disease, i.e., decreased food intake and increased energy expenditure, with one drug.

  19. Volatile organic compounds: a potential direct long-distance mechanism for antagonistic action of Fusarium oxysporum strain MSA 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerdi, Daniela; Bossi, Simone; Gullino, Maria Lodovica; Garibaldi, Angelo

    2009-04-01

    Fusarium oxysporum MSA35 [wild-type (WT) strain] is an antagonistic Fusarium that lives in association with a consortium of bacteria belonging to the genera Serratia, Achromobacter, Bacillus and Stenotrophomonas in an Italian soil suppressive to Fusarium wilt. Typing experiments and virulence tests provided evidence that the F. oxysporum isolate when cured of the bacterial symbionts [the cured (CU) form], is pathogenic, causing wilt symptoms identical to those caused by F. oxysporum f. sp. lactucae. Here, we demonstrate that small volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the WT strain negatively influence the mycelial growth of different formae speciales of F. oxysporum. Furthermore, these VOCs repress gene expression of two putative virulence genes in F. oxysporum lactucae strain Fuslat10, a fungus against which the WT strain MSA 35 has antagonistic activity. The VOC profile of the WT and CU fungus shows different compositions. Sesquiterpenes, mainly caryophyllene, were present in the headspace only of WT MSA 35. No sesquiterpenes were found in the volatiles of ectosymbiotic Serratia sp. strain DM1 and Achromobacter sp. strain MM1. Bacterial volatiles had no effects on the growth of the different ff. spp. of F. oxysporum examined. Hyphae grownwithVOCfrom WT F. oxysporum f. sp. lactucae strain MSA 35 were hydrophobic whereas those grown without VOCs were not, suggesting a correlation between the presence of volatiles in the atmosphere and the phenotype of the mycelium. This is the first report of VOC production by antagonistic F. oxysporum MSA35 and their effects on pathogenic F. oxysporum. The results obtained in this work led us to propose a new potential direct long-distance mechanism for antagonism by F. oxysporum MSA 35 mediated by VOCs. Antagonism could be the consequence of both reduction of pathogen mycelial growth and inhibition of pathogen virulence gene expression.

  20. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadek B

    2016-11-01

    , in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-ylpropoxyphenylmethanol, and its (S-enantiomer (4 significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R-enantiomer (3 in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and reversed when rats were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist R-(α-methyl-histamine. Comparisons of the observed antagonistic in vitro affinities among the ligands 1–6 revealed profound stereoselectivity at human H3Rs with varying preferences for this receptor subtype. Moreover, the in vivo anticonvulsant effects observed in this study for ligands 1–6 showed stereoselectivity in different convulsion models in male adult rats. Keywords: histamine, H3 receptor, isomeric antagonists, anticonvulsant activity, stereo­selectivity

  1. Dopamine D(3) receptor antagonists: The quest for a potentially selective PET ligand. Part two: Lead optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Fabrizio; Holmes, Ian; Arista, Luca; Bonanomi, Giorgio; Braggio, Simone; Cardullo, Francesca; Di Fabio, Romano; Donati, Daniele; Gentile, Gabriella; Hamprecht, Dieter; Terreni, Silvia; Heidbreder, Christian; Savoia, Chiara; Griffante, Cristiana; Worby, Angela

    2009-08-01

    The lead optimization process to identify new selective dopamine D(3) receptor antagonists is reported. DMPK parameters and binding data suggest that selective D(3) receptor antagonists as potential PET ligands might have been identified.

  2. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Schwed, Johannes Stephan; Weizel, Lilia; Walter, Miriam; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT), valproic acid, and modern antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), eg, remacemide, loreclezole, and safinamide, are only effective within a maximum of 70%-80% of epileptic patients, and in many cases the clinical use of AEDs is restricted by their side effects. Therefore, a continuous need remains to discover innovative chemical entities for the development of active and safer AEDs. Ligands targeting central histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) for epilepsy might be a promising therapeutic approach. To determine the potential of H3Rs ligands as new AEDs, we recently reported that no anticonvulsant effects were observed for the (S)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propanamide (1). In continuation of our research, we asked whether anticonvulsant differences in activities will be observed for its R-enantiomer, namely, (R)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propaneamide (2) and analogs thereof, in maximum electroshock (MES)-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and strychnine (STR)-induced convulsion models in rats having PHT and valproic acid (VPA) as reference AEDs. Unlike the S-enantiomer (1), the results show that animals pretreated intraperitoneally (ip) with the R-enantiomer 2 (10 mg/kg) were moderately protected in MES and STR induced models, whereas proconvulsant effect was observed for the same ligand in PTZ-induced convulsion models. However, animals pretreated with intraperitoneal doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg of structurally bulkier (R)-enantiomer (3), in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)phenyl)methanol, and its (S)-enantiomer (4) significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R)-enantiomer (3) in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and

  3. The NK1 receptor antagonist L822429 reduces heroin reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects.

  4. A maraviroc-resistant HIV-1 with narrow cross-resistance to other CCR5 antagonists depends on both N-terminal and extracellular loop domains of drug-bound CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, John C; Wilen, Craig B; Didigu, Chukwuka A; Sinha, Rohini; Harrison, Jessamina E; Agrawal-Gamse, Caroline; Henning, Elizabeth A; Bushman, Frederick D; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Doms, Robert W

    2010-10-01

    CCR5 antagonists inhibit HIV entry by binding to a coreceptor and inducing changes in the extracellular loops (ECLs) of CCR5. In this study, we analyzed viruses from 11 treatment-experienced patients who experienced virologic failure on treatment regimens containing the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc (MVC). Viruses from one patient developed high-level resistance to MVC during the course of treatment. Although resistance to one CCR5 antagonist is often associated with broad cross-resistance to other agents, these viruses remained sensitive to most other CCR5 antagonists, including vicriviroc and aplaviroc. MVC resistance was dependent upon mutations within the V3 loop of the viral envelope (Env) protein and was modulated by additional mutations in the V4 loop. Deep sequencing of pretreatment plasma viral RNA indicated that resistance appears to have occurred by evolution of drug-bound CCR5 use, despite the presence of viral sequences predictive of CXCR4 use. Envs obtained from this patient before and during MVC treatment were able to infect cells expressing very low CCR5 levels, indicating highly efficient use of a coreceptor. In contrast to previous reports in which CCR5 antagonist-resistant viruses interact predominantly with the N terminus of CCR5, these MVC-resistant Envs were also dependent upon the drug-modified ECLs of CCR5 for entry. Our results suggest a model of CCR5 cross-resistance whereby viruses that predominantly utilize the N terminus are broadly cross-resistant to multiple CCR5 antagonists, whereas viruses that require both the N terminus and antagonist-specific ECL changes demonstrate a narrow cross-resistance profile.

  5. Survey of H2-antagonist usage in acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, B D; Meriano, F V; Phipps, T L; Ho, H; Zuckerman, M J

    1990-02-01

    H2-antagonists are frequently used in the management of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage despite their lack of proven efficacy. In order to determine the pattern of H2-antagonist usage for this indication, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 137 patients admitted with acute UGI bleeding over a 1-year period at two teaching hospitals in West Texas. An H2-antagonist was ordered in 89% of patients (77%) intravenous, 12% oral). It was administered within 2 h of admission in 25% of these patients, within 4 h in 54%, and within 8 h in 78%. An H2-antagonist was ordered among the initial six orders in 49% and among the initial 10 orders in 77% of patients. Considering orders for specific therapies, an H2-antagonist was in the initial three orders in 60% of patients and among the initial six orders in 97%. Of the patients who were prescribed an H2-antagonist and who also had upper endoscopy, the drug was ordered prior to endoscopy in 86%. This review of H2-antagonist usage in the management of acute UGI bleeding has identified a prescribing pattern of writing for these drugs early in the sequence of order writing, with the drugs being given early in the course of hospitalization.

  6. Agonists and Antagonists of TGF-β Family Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chenbei

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family ligands and the realization that their bioactivities need to be tightly controlled temporally and spatially led to intensive research that has identified a multitude of extracellular modulators of TGF-β family ligands, uncovered their functions in developmental and pathophysiological processes, defined the mechanisms of their activities, and explored potential modulator-based therapeutic applications in treating human diseases. These studies revealed a diverse repertoire of extracellular and membrane-associated molecules that are capable of modulating TGF-β family signals via control of ligand availability, processing, ligand-receptor interaction, and receptor activation. These molecules include not only soluble ligand-binding proteins that were conventionally considered as agonists and antagonists of TGF-β family of growth factors, but also extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and proteoglycans that can serve as "sink" and control storage and release of both the TGF-β family ligands and their regulators. This extensive network of soluble and ECM modulators helps to ensure dynamic and cell-specific control of TGF-β family signals. This article reviews our knowledge of extracellular modulation of TGF-β growth factors by diverse proteins and their molecular mechanisms to regulate TGF-β family signaling.

  7. Antagonistic evolution in an aposematic predator-prey signaling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Michael P; Franks, Daniel W

    2014-10-01

    Warning signals within species, such as the bright colors of chemically defended animals, are usually considered mutualistic, monomorphic traits. Such a view is however increasingly at odds with the growing empirical literature, showing nontrivial levels of signal variation within prey populations. Key to understanding this variation, we argue, could be a recognition that toxicity levels frequently vary within populations because of environmental heterogeneity. Inequalities in defense may undermine mutualistic monomorphic signaling, causing evolutionary antagonism between loci that determine appearance of less well-defended and better defended prey forms within species. In this article, we apply a stochastic model of evolved phenotypic plasticity to the evolution of prey signals. We show that when toxicity levels vary, then antagonistic interactions can lead to evolutionary conflict between alleles at different signaling loci, causing signal evolution, "red queen-like" evolutionary chase, and one or more forms of signaling equilibria. A key prediction is that variation in the way that predators use information about toxicity levels in their attack behaviors profoundly affects the evolutionary characteristics of the prey signaling systems. Environmental variation is known to cause variation in many qualities that organisms signal; our approach may therefore have application to other signaling systems.

  8. Preliminary investigations into triazole derived androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altimari, Jarrad M; Niranjan, Birunthi; Risbridger, Gail P; Schweiker, Stephanie S; Lohning, Anna E; Henderson, Luke C

    2014-05-01

    A range of 1,4-substituted-1,2,3-N-phenyltriazoles were synthesized and evaluated as non-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) antagonists. The motivation for this study was to replace the N-phenyl amide portion of small molecule antiandrogens with a 1,2,3-triazole and determine effects, if any, on biological activity. The synthetic methodology presented herein is robust, high yielding and extremely rapid. Using this methodology a series of 17 N-aryl triazoles were synthesized from commercially available starting materials in less than 3h. After preliminary biological screening at 20 and 40 μM, the most promising three compounds were found to display IC50 values of 40-50 μM against androgen dependent (LNCaP) cells and serve as a starting point for further structure-activity investigations. All compounds in this work were the focus of an in silico study to dock the compounds into the human androgen receptor ligand binding domain (hARLBD) and compare their predicted binding affinity with known antiandrogens. A comparison of receptor-ligand interactions for the wild type and T877A mutant AR revealed two novel polar interactions. One with Q738 of the wild type site and the second with the mutated A877 residue.

  9. Iontophoresis of endothelin receptor antagonists in rats and men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Roustit

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The treatment of scleroderma-related digital ulcers is challenging. The oral endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA bosentan has been approved but it may induce liver toxicity. The objective of this study was to test whether ERAs bosentan and sitaxentan could be locally delivered using iontophoresis. METHODS: Cathodal and anodal iontophoresis of bosentan and sitaxentan were performed on anaesthetized rat hindquarters without and during endothelin-1 infusion. Skin blood flow was quantified using laser-Doppler imaging and cutaneous tolerability was assessed. Iontophoresis of sitaxentan (20 min, 20 or 100 µA was subsequently performed on the forearm skin of healthy men (n = 5. RESULTS: In rats neither bosentan nor sitaxentan increased skin blood flux compared to NaCl. When simultaneously infusing endothelin-1, cathodal iontophoresis of sitaxentan increased skin blood flux compared to NaCl (AUC(0-20 were 44032.2 ± 12277 and 14957.5 ± 23818.8 %BL.s, respectively; P = 0.01. In humans, sitaxentan did not significantly increase skin blood flux as compared to NaCl. Iontophoresis of ERAs was well tolerated both in animals and humans. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that cathodal iontophoresis of sitaxentan but not bosentan partially reverses endothelin-induced skin vasoconstriction in rats, suggesting that sitaxentan diffuses into the dermis. However, sitaxentan does not influence basal skin microvascular tone in rats or in humans.

  10. Discovery and Characterization of an Endogenous CXCR4 Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onofrio Zirafi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling controls multiple physiological processes and its dysregulation is associated with cancers and inflammatory diseases. To discover as-yet-unknown endogenous ligands of CXCR4, we screened a blood-derived peptide library for inhibitors of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains. This approach identified a 16 amino acid fragment of serum albumin as an effective and highly specific CXCR4 antagonist. The endogenous peptide, termed EPI-X4, is evolutionarily conserved and generated from the highly abundant albumin precursor by pH-regulated proteases. EPI-X4 forms an unusual lasso-like structure and antagonizes CXCL12-induced tumor cell migration, mobilizes stem cells, and suppresses inflammatory responses in mice. Furthermore, the peptide is abundant in the urine of patients with inflammatory kidney diseases and may serve as a biomarker. Our results identify EPI-X4 as a key regulator of CXCR4 signaling and introduce proteolysis of an abundant precursor protein as an alternative concept for chemokine receptor regulation.

  11. Nalmefene: intravenous safety and kinetics of a new opioid antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R; Howes, J; Gentile, J; Hsu, H B; Hsiao, J; Garg, D; Weidler, D; Meyer, M; Tuttle, R

    1986-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study we evaluated the safety and kinetics of a new narcotic antagonist, nalmefene, after 2, 6, 12, and 24 mg intravenous doses to healthy men. At each dose level four subjects received active drug and two received placebo. The drug was well tolerated at all dose levels with only mild and transient side effects, the most common of which was lightheadedness. The plasma concentration-time data were best fit with a triexponential equation, and the terminal elimination phase had a harmonic mean t1/2 of 8 to 9 hours. Only about 5% of the dose was excreted in the urine as intact nalmefene, with up to 60% excreted as nalmefene glucuronide. Although intersubject differences were noted, mean or dose-normalized mean kinetic parameters such as clearance, steady-state volume of distribution, terminal t1/2, and AUC showed no consistent trends related to increasing doses, indicating that nalmefene has linear pharmacokinetics.

  12. Bioisosteric phentolamine analogs as potent alpha-adrenergic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seoung-Soo; Bavadekar, Supriya A; Lee, Sang-Il; Patil, Popat N; Lalchandani, S G; Feller, Dennis R; Miller, Duane D

    2005-11-01

    The synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of bioisosteric phentolamine analogs are described. Replacement of the carbon next to the imidazoline ring of phentolamine with a nitrogen atom provides compounds (2, 3) that are about 1.6 times and 4.1 times more potent functionally than phentolamine on rat alpha1-adrenergic receptors, respectively. In receptor binding assays, the affinities of phentolamine and its bioisosteric analogs were determined on the human embryonic kidney (HEK) and Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing the human alpha1- and alpha2-AR subtypes, respectively. Analogs 2 and 3, both, displayed higher binding affinities at the alpha2- versus the alpha1-ARs, affinities being the least at the alpha1B-AR. Binding affinities of the methoxy ether analog 2 were greater than those of the phenolic analog 3 at all six alpha-AR subtypes. One of the nitrogen atoms in the imidazoline ring of phentolamine was replaced with an oxygen atom to give compounds 4 and 5, resulting in a 2-substituted oxazoline ring. The low functional antagonist activity on rat aorta, and binding potencies of these two compounds on human alpha1A- and alpha2A-AR subtypes indicate that a basic functional group is important for optimum binding to the alpha1- and alpha2A-adrenergic receptors.

  13. Blood flow distribution with adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.H.; Davis, D.L.; Sutton, E.T.

    1989-03-01

    Superficial fibular nerve stimulation (SFNS) causes increased pre- and post-capillary resistances as well as increased capillary permeability in the dog hind paw. These responses indicate possible adrenergic and histaminergic interactions. The distribution of blood flow between capillaries and arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) may depend on the relative effects of these neural inputs. Right hind paws of anesthetized heparinized dogs were vascularly and neurally isolated and perfused with controlled pressure. Blood flow distribution was calculated from the venous recovery of 85Sr-labeled microspheres (15 microns). The mean transit times of 131I-albumin and 85Sr-labeled microspheres were calculated. The effects of adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists with and without SFNS were determined. Phentolamine blocked the entire response to SFNS. Prazosin attenuated increases in total and AVA resistance. Yohimbine prevented increased total resistance, attenuated the AVA resistance increase, and revealed a decrease in capillary circuit resistance. Pyrilamine attenuated total resistance increase while SFNS increased capillary and AVA resistances. Metiamide had no effect on blood flow distribution with SFNS. The increase in AVA resistance with SFNS apparently resulted from a combination of alpha 1 and alpha 2 receptor stimulation but not histaminergic effects.

  14. Montelukast: More than a Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Tintinger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prototype cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, montelukast, is generally considered to have a niche application in the therapy of exercise- and aspirin-induced asthma. It is also used as add-on therapy in patients whose asthma is poorly controlled with inhaled corticosteroid monotherapy, or with the combination of a long-acting β(2-agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid. Recently, however, montelukast has been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory properties, apparently unrelated to conventional antagonism of cysteinyl leukotriene receptors. These novel activities enable montelukast to target eosinophils, monocytes, and, in particular, the corticosteroid-insensitive neutrophil, suggesting that this agent may have a broader spectrum of anti-inflammatory activities than originally thought. If so, montelukast is potentially useful in the chemotherapy of intermittent asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and viral bronchiolitis, which, to a large extent, involve airway epithelial cell/neutrophil interactions. The primary objective of this mini-review is to present evidence for the cysteinyl leukotrien–independent mechanisms of action of montelukast and their potential clinical relevance.

  15. [Vascular calcifications, the hidden side effects of vitamin K antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Youssef; Vengadessane, Subashini; Bodeau, Sandra; Gras, Valérie; Bricca, Giampiero; Kamel, Saïd; Liabeuf, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Despite the availability of new oral anticoagulants, vitamin K antagonists (VKA, such as fluindione, acenocoumarol or warfarin) remain currently the goal standard medicines for oral prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. They inhibit the cycle of the vitamin K and its participation in the enzymatic gamma-carboxylation of many proteins. The VKA prevent the activation of the vitamin K-dependent blood clotting factors limiting thus the initiation of the coagulation cascade. But other proteins are vitamin K-dependent and also remain inactive in the presence of VKA. This is the case of matrix Gla-protein (MGP), a protein that plays a major inhibitory role in the development of vascular calcifications. Several experimental and epidemiological results suggest that the use of the VKA could promote the development of vascular calcifications increasing thus the cardiovascular risk. This risk seems to be higher in patients with chronic kidney disease or mellitus diabetes who are more likely to develop vascular calcifications, and may be due to a decrease of the MGP activity. This review aims at summarizing the data currently available making vascular calcifications the probably underestimated side effects of VKA.

  16. Effect of antagonist muscle fatigue on knee extension torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; Ball, D; Maganaris, C N; de Haan, A

    2003-09-01

    The effect of hamstring fatigue on knee extension torque was examined at different knee angles for seven male subjects. Before and after a dynamic flexion fatigue protocol (180 degrees s(-1), until dynamic torque had declined by 50%), maximal voluntary contraction extension torque was measured at four knee flexion angles (90 degrees, 70 degrees, 50 degrees and 30 degrees ). Maximal torque generating capacity and voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle were determined using electrical stimulation. Average rectified EMG of the biceps femoris was determined. Mean dynamic flexion torque declined by 48+/-11%. Extensor maximal voluntary contraction torque, maximal torque generating capacity, voluntary activation and average rectified EMG at the four knee angles were unaffected by the hamstring fatigue protocol. Only at 50 degrees knee angle was voluntary activation significantly lower (15.7%) after fatigue ( P<0.05). In addition, average rectified EMG before fatigue was not significantly influenced by knee angle. It was concluded that a fatigued hamstring muscle did not increase the maximal voluntary contraction extension torque and knee angle did not change coactivation. Three possible mechanisms may explain the results: a potential difference in recruited fibre populations in antagonist activity compared with the fibres which were fatigued in the protocol, a smaller loss in isometric torque generating capacity of the hamstring muscle than was expected from the dynamic measurements and/or a reduction in voluntary activation.

  17. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Domenic A

    2015-01-01

    Spironolactone and eplerenone are both mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists. These compounds block both the epithelial and nonepithelial actions of aldosterone, with the latter assuming increasing clinical relevance. Spironolactone and eplerenone both affect reductions in blood pressure either as mono- or add-on therapy; moreover, they each afford survival benefits in diverse circumstances of heart failure and the probability of renal protection in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. However, as use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has expanded, the hazards inherent in taking such drugs have become more apparent. Whereas the endocrine side effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance, the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove disastrous, even fatal, if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia emerge. For most patients, however, the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the sensible clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered a possibility in patients receiving either of these medications; therefore, anticipatory steps should be taken to minimize the likelihood of its occurrence if long-term therapy of these agents is being considered.

  18. Spatial working memory in rats: effects of monoaminergic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, W W; Rush, J R

    1983-01-01

    To assess the possible involvement of the monoaminergic neurotransmitters norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin in the maintenance of spatial working memory rats were treated with antagonists 0 or 2 hr after completing the first 4 choices in an 8 arm maze. Haloperidol (0.25-1 mg/kg), when administered 2 hr after Choice 4, produced a small but consistent impairment in performance on retention tests given 5 hr after the first 4 choices. This deficit closely resembled natural forgetting in terms of the type of errors committed. By contrast, haloperidol in the same doses given 0 hr after Choice 4 or 3 hr before the first 4 choices did not affect retention. Likewise treatment with propranolol (10-20 mg/kg), phentolamine (5-20 mg/kg) or methysergide (5-15 mg/kg) did not impair spatial memory, regardless of when these drugs were injected within the session. Evidently dopaminergic neuronal systems are important in the maintenance of normal spatial working memory.

  19. Antagonistic functions of two stardust isoforms in Drosophila photoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, Natalia A; Rentsch, Michaela; Knust, Elisabeth

    2010-11-15

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are scaffolding proteins that organize supramolecular protein complexes, thereby partitioning the plasma membrane into spatially and functionally distinct subdomains. Their modular organization is ideally suited to organize protein complexes with cell type- or stage-specific composition, or both. Often more than one MAGUK isoform is expressed by one gene in the same cell, yet very little is known about their individual in vivo functions. Here, we show that two isoforms of Drosophila stardust, Sdt-H (formerly called Sdt-B2) and Sdt-D, which differ in their N terminus, are expressed in adult photoreceptors. Both isoforms associate with Crumbs and PATJ, constituents of the conserved Crumbs-Stardust complex. However, they form distinct complexes, localized at the stalk, a restricted region of the apical plasma membrane. Strikingly, Sdt-H and Sdt-D have antagonistic functions. While Sdt-H overexpression increases stalk membrane length and prevents light-dependent retinal degeneration, Sdt-D overexpression reduces stalk length and enhances light-dependent retinal degeneration. These results suggest that a fine-tuned balance of different Crumbs complexes regulates photoreceptor homeostasis.

  20. Effect of platelet activating factor antagonist treatment on gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Barbero

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess whether PAF could be involved in the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity, we have studied the effect of PAF antagonist BN-52021 on renal function in rats after gentamicin (GENTA treatment. Experiments were completed in 21 Wistar rats divided into three groups: group GENTA was injected with gentamicin 100 mg kg−1 body wt/day s.c. for 6 days. Group GENTA + BN received gentamicin and BN-52021 i.p. 5 mg kg−1 body wt/day. A third group served as control. Rats were placed in meta-bolic cages and plasma creatinine and creatinine clearance were measured daily. GENTA group showed a progressive increase in plasma creatinine, a drop in creatinine clearance and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and alkaline phosphatase. GENTA + BN group showed a lesser change in plasma creatinine and a creatinine clearance, but no difference with GENTA group in urinary excretion of NAG and AP were observed. Histological examination revealed a massive cortical tubular necrosis in rats treated with gentamicin, whereas in BN-52021 injected animals tubular damage was markedly attenuated. The present results suggest a role for PAF in the gentamicininduced nephro-toxicity.

  1. A new class of NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Marini, Elisabetta; Rolando, Barbara; Sorba, Giovanni; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2004-05-01

    Synthesis and pharmacological characterisation of a series of compounds obtained by joining, through appropriate spacers, NO-donor furoxan and nitrooxy moieties to the imidazole ring, as well as their structurally related analogues devoid of NO-donating properties are described. All the products were studied for their capacity to interact with H3-receptors present on the guinea-pig ileum and with H2-receptors present on guinea-pig right atrium. The whole series of products displayed reversible H3-antagonistic activity. No activity on H2-receptors was observed when the products were tested at 10 microM concentration. Many of the products were also able to induce partial relaxation when added to the bath after electrical contraction of the guinea-pig ileum during the study of their H3-antagonism. This phenomenon seems to be dependent on various factors; for some compounds it proved to be dependent on NO-mediated sGC activation, for other products it could be due to their weak M3-antagonism. The investigation of the lipophilic-hydrophilic balance of all the products indicates, for many of them, an ideal value to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  2. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clementina Equihua

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning.Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor, although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects.Orexin (hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties. However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia.

  3. Simultaneous Determination of Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid, and Eugenol in Syzygium aromaticum and Verification of Chemical Antagonistic Effect by the Combination with Curcuma aromatica Using Regression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hoon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to perform simultaneous determination of three reference compounds in Syzygium aromaticum (SA, gallic acid, ellagic acid, and eugenol, and to investigate the chemical antagonistic effect when combining Curcuma aromatica (CA with SA, based on chromatographic analysis. The values of LODs and LOQs were 0.01–0.11 μg/mL and 0.03–0.36 μg/mL, respectively. The intraday and interday precisions were 0.87, indicating a linear relationship between SA and SAC. These results demonstrate that the components contained in CA could affect the extraction of components of SA mainly in a decreasing manner. The antagonistic effect of CA on SA was verified by chemical analysis.

  4. Impaired effect of activation of rat hippocampal 5-HT7 receptors, induced by treatment with the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB 269970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusek, M; Sowa, J; Tokarski, K; Hess, G

    2015-04-01

    Effects of the 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB 269970, administered for 14 days (1.25 mg/kg), were studied in ex vivo slices of rat hippocampus. To activate the 5-HT(7) receptor, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, 200 nM) was applied in the presence of WAY 100635 (2 μM), a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist. In contrast to control preparations, no 5-HT(7) receptor-mediated increase in excitability nor depolarization and an increase in the input resistance of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons were present in slices prepared from rats treated with SB 269970. The treatment also abolished the stimulatory effect of 5-HT(7) receptor activation on spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents recorded from CA1 stratum radiatum/lacunosum-moleculare interneurons. These data demonstrate that repeated administration of SB 269970 impairs the reactivity of the CA1 hippocampal neuronal network to 5-HT(7) receptor activation.

  5. Discovery and biological evaluation of tetrahydrothieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivatives as selective metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 antagonists for the potential treatment of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Mina; Kim, TaeHun; Kwak, Jinsook; Seo, Seon Hee; Ko, Min Kyung; Lim, Eun Jeong; Min, Sun-Joon; Cho, Yong Seo; Keum, Gyochang; Baek, Du-Jong; Lee, Jiyoun; Pae, Ae Nim

    2015-06-05

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) has been a prime target for drug discovery due to its heavy involvement in various brain disorders. Recent studies suggested that mGluR1 is associated with chronic pain and can serve as a promising target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. In an effort to develop a novel mGluR1 antagonist, we designed and synthesized a library of compounds with tetrahydrothieno[2,3-c]pyridine scaffold. Among these compounds, compound 9b and 10b showed excellent antagonistic activity in vitro and demonstrated pain-suppressing activity in animal models of pain. Both compounds were orally active, and compound 9b exhibited a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in rats. We believe that these compounds can provide a promising lead compound that is suitable for the potential treatment of neuropathic pain.

  6. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  7. Anticonvulsant and procognitive properties of the non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonist DL77 in male adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Łażewska, Dorota; Kieć-Kononowiczc, Katarzyna

    2016-07-01

    It has become clear that histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are implicated in modulating epilepsy and memory in laboratory animals. The new non-imidazole H3R antagonist DL77 has excellent selectivity profile and shows high in-vivo potency as well as in-vitro antagonist affinity with ED50 values of 2.1 ± 0.2 mg/kg and 8.4 ± 1.3 [nM], respectively. In the present study, the anticonvulsant effects of DL77 on maximal electroshock (MES)-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and strychnine (STR)-induced seizure models were investigated. Moreover, the procognitive properties of DL77 were tested on acquisition, consolidation and retrieval processes in a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task in male Wistar rats. The results indicate that DL77 (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly and dose-dependently reduced MES-induced seizure duration, whereas no protection was observed in PTZ- or STR-induced seizures. Importantly, the protective action observed for DL77 in MES-induced seizure was comparable to that of the reference antiepileptic drug (AED) phenytoin (PHT), and was also reversed when rats were pretreated with the CNS penetrant pyrilamine (PYR) (10 mg/kg, i.p.), or with the selective H3R agonist R-(α)-methyl-histamine (RAMH) (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Furthermore, the procognitive studies indicate that acute pre-training systemic administration of DL77 (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) facilitated acquisition, whereas pre-testing acute administration of DL77 (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) improved retrieval. Interestingly, the procognitive effect of DL77 on retrieval was completely abrogated when rats were pretreated with the centrally-acting H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL) but not the centrally acting H1R antagonist PYR, indicating that histaminergic pathways through activation of H2Rs appear to be participating in neuronal circuits involved in retrieval processes. Taken together, our results show that DL77 demonstrates anticonvulsant properties in the MES-induced seizure model and improves cognitive

  8. Effect of α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Kevin D., E-mail: kevin.welch@ars.usda.gov [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Pfister, James A. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Lima, Flavia G. [Federal University of Goías, School of Veterinary Medicine, Goiânia, Goías (Brazil); Green, Benedict T.; Gardner, Dale R. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ► Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ► These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ► There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.

  9. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies: a TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovic, I; Sester, M; Gomez-Reino, J J

    2010-01-01

    risk of reactivating latent infections, especially tuberculosis (TB). Following TNF antagonist therapy, the relative risk for TB is increased up to 25 times, depending on the clinical setting and the TNF antagonist used. Interferon-¿ release assays or, as an alternative in individuals without a history...... of bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination, tuberculin skin testing is recommended to screen all adult candidates for TNF antagonist treatment for the presence of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Moreover, paediatric practice suggests concomitant use of both the tuberculin skin test...

  10. [Comparative pharmacophore analysis of dual dopamine D2/5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-shen; Guo, Zong-ru

    2009-03-01

    Dual dopamine D2/5-HT2A receptor antagonists have potent activity and are referred to atypical antipsychotics due to their lower propensity to elicit EPS and their moderate efficacy toward negative symptoms. However, an on-going challenge in developing atypical antipsychotics drugs is to maintain the favorable profiles and avoid of cardiovascular risk. In this paper, comparative pharmacophore analysis of dual dopamine D2/5-HT2A receptor antagonists, hERG K+ channel blockers, and alA adrenoceptor antagonists is carried out, and the results could give some insight into multi-target drug design.

  11. Development of selective agonists and antagonists of P2Y receptors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Although elucidation of the medicinal chemistry of agonists and antagonists of the P2Y receptors has lagged behind that of many other members of group A G protein-coupled receptors, detailed qualitative and quantitative structure–activity relationships (SARs) were recently constructed for several of the subtypes. Agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2, and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors are now known. Selective nonnucleotide antagonists were report...

  12. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo;

    2014-01-01

    be divided into two groups with most likely two topographically distinct binding sites. The aim of the current study was to identify the binding site of one such group of ligands, exemplified by three allosteric antagonists, CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. We first used a chimeric CCR2/CCR5 receptor......The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly...

  13. Pharmacology of glutamate receptor antagonists in the kindling model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, W

    1998-04-01

    It is widely accepted that excitatory amino acid transmitters such as glutamate are involved in the initiation of seizures and their propagation. Most attention has been directed to synapses using NMDA receptors, but more recent evidence indicates potential roles for ionotropic non-NMDA (AMPA/kainate) and metabotropic glutamate receptors as well. Based on the role of glutamate in the development and expression of seizures, antagonism of glutamate receptors has long been thought to provide a rational strategy in the search for new, effective anticonvulsant drugs. Furthermore, because glutamate receptor antagonists, particularly those acting on NMDA receptors, protect effectively in the induction of kindling, it was suggested that they may have utility in epilepsy prophylaxis, for example, after head trauma. However, first clinical trials with competitive and uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists in patients with partial (focal) seizures, showed that these drugs lack convincing anticonvulsant activity but induce severe neurotoxic adverse effects in doses which were well tolerated in healthy volunteers. Interestingly, the only animal model which predicted the unfavorable clinical activity of competitive NMDA antagonists in patients with chronic epilepsy was the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy, indicating that this model should be used in the search for more effective and less toxic glutamate receptor antagonists. In this review, results from a large series of experiments on different categories of glutamate receptor antagonists in fully kindled rats are summarized and discussed. NMDA antagonists, irrespective whether they are competitive, high- or low-affinity uncompetitive, glycine site or polyamine site antagonists, do not counteract focal seizure activity and only weakly, if at all, attenuate propagation to secondarily generalized seizures in this model, indicating that once kindling is established, NMDA receptors are not critical for the expression of

  14. The Antagonistic Effect of Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone on Metabolic Profiling in Serum and Liver of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic profiling in liver and serum of mice was studied for the combined toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEN, through gas chromatography mass spectrum. The spectrum of serum and liver sample of mice, treated with individual 2 mg/kg DON, 20 mg/kg ZEN, and the combined DON + ZEN with final concentration 2 mg/kg DON and 20 mg/kg ZEN for 21 days, were deconvoluted, aligned and identified with MS DIAL. The data matrix was processed with univariate analysis and multivariate analysis for selection of metabolites with variable importance for the projection (VIP > 1, t-test p value < 0.05. The metabolic pathway analysis was performed with MetaMapp and drawn by CytoScape. Results show that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an obvious “antagonistic effect” in serum and liver tissue metabolic profiling of mice. The blood biochemical indexes, like alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and albumin (ALB/globulin (GLO, reveal a moderated trend in the combined DON + ZEN treatment group, which is consistent with histopathological examination. The metabolic pathway analysis demonstrated that the combined DON and ZEN treatment could down-regulate the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, and O-glycosyl compounds related glucose metabolism in liver tissue. The metabolic profiling in serum confirmed the finding that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an “antagonistic effect” on liver metabolism of mice.

  15. Leptin modulates β cell expression of IL-1 receptor antagonist and release of IL-1β in human islets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Sergeev, Pavel; Ehses, Jan A.; Mathe, Zoltan; Bosco, Domenico; Berney, Thierry; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Reinecke, Manfred; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2004-01-01

    High concentrations of glucose induce β cell production of IL-1β, leading to impaired β cell function and apoptosis in human pancreatic islets. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring antagonist of IL-1β and protects cultured human islets from glucotoxicity. Therefore, the balance of IL-1β and IL-1Ra may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. In the present study, we observed expression of IL-1Ra in human pancreatic β cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro, chronic exposure of human islets to leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes, decreased β cell production of IL-1Ra and induced IL-1β release from the islet preparation, leading to impaired β cell function, caspase-3 activation, and apoptosis. Exogenous addition of IL-1Ra protected cultured human islets from the deleterious effects of leptin. Antagonizing IL-1Ra by introduction of small interfering RNA to IL-1Ra into human islets led to caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and impaired β cell function. Moreover, siIL-1Ra enhanced glucose-induced β cell apoptosis. These findings demonstrate expression of IL-1Ra in the human β cell, providing localized protection against leptin- and glucose-induced islet IL-1β. PMID:15141093

  16. Trunk response to sudden forward perturbations - effects of preload and sudden load magnitudes, posture and abdominal antagonistic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahvarpour, Ali; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Mecheri, Hakim; Larivière, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Unexpected loading of the spine is a risk factor for low back pain. The trunk neuromuscular and kinematics responses are likely influenced by the perturbation itself as well as initial trunk conditions. The effect of four parameters (preload, sudden load, initial trunk flexed posture, initial abdominal antagonistic activity) on trunk kinematics and back muscles reflex response were evaluated. Twelve asymptomatic subjects participated in sudden forward perturbation tests under six distinct conditions. Preload did not change the reflexive response of back muscles and the trunk displacement; while peak trunk velocity and acceleration as well as the relative load peak decreased. Sudden load increased reflex response of muscles, trunk kinematics and loading variables. When the trunk was initially flexed, back muscles latency was delayed, trunk velocity and acceleration increased; however, reflex amplitude and relative trunk displacement remained unchanged. Abdominal antagonistic preactivation increased reflexive response of muscles but kinematics variables were not affected. Preload, initial flexed posture and abdominal muscles preactivation increased back muscles preactivity. Both velocity and acceleration peaks of the trunk movement decreased with preload despite greater total load. In contrast, they increased in the initial flexed posture and to some extent when abdominal muscles were preactivated demonstrating the distinct effects of pre-perturbation variables on trunk kinematics and risk of injury.

  17. Nitric oxide-dependent antiplatelet action of AT1-receptor antagonists in a pulmonary thromboembolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, Tomasz; Kucharewicz, Iwona; Pawlak, Robert; Chabielska, Ewa; Domaniewski, Tomasz; Buczko, Wlodzimierz

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether AT1-receptor antagonists could inhibit platelet activation-dependent pulmonary thromboembolism in mice and to investigate the involvement of nitric oxide in this action. Losartan, its active metabolite EXP3174, and valsartan given intraperitoneally 1 hour before the thrombotic challenge (in doses of 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg) protected mice from death or hind-limb paralysis in response to intravenous injection of a mixture of collagen and epinephrine; losartan was effective in all doses used, whereas EXP3174 and valsartan reduced mortality only in the two higher doses. The protective action of EXP3174 and valsartan was abolished when nitric oxide synthase was inhibited with l-NAME, whereas that of losartan was only partially reduced. Moreover, only losartan protected mice from death caused by intravenous injection of the thromboxane A2 mimetic U46619 and this action was preserved in l-NAME-pretreated animals. Our results demonstrate the ability of AT1-receptor antagonists to inhibit platelet activation in vivo in a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. Stronger antiplatelet activity of losartan, most likely due to its blockade of thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor, could be of potential clinical relevance, particularly in conditions in which synthesis of endogenous nitric oxide is impaired.

  18. The Antagonistic Effect of Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone on Metabolic Profiling in Serum and Liver of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jian; Zhu, Pei; Cui, Fangchao; Pi, Fuwei; Zhang, Yinzhi; Li, Yun; Wang, Jiasheng; Sun, Xiulan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic profiling in liver and serum of mice was studied for the combined toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN), through gas chromatography mass spectrum. The spectrum of serum and liver sample of mice, treated with individual 2 mg/kg DON, 20 mg/kg ZEN, and the combined DON + ZEN with final concentration 2 mg/kg DON and 20 mg/kg ZEN for 21 days, were deconvoluted, aligned and identified with MS DIAL. The data matrix was processed with univariate analysis and multivariate analysis for selection of metabolites with variable importance for the projection (VIP) > 1, t-test p value < 0.05. The metabolic pathway analysis was performed with MetaMapp and drawn by CytoScape. Results show that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an obvious “antagonistic effect” in serum and liver tissue metabolic profiling of mice. The blood biochemical indexes, like alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and albumin (ALB)/globulin (GLO), reveal a moderated trend in the combined DON + ZEN treatment group, which is consistent with histopathological examination. The metabolic pathway analysis demonstrated that the combined DON and ZEN treatment could down-regulate the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, and O-glycosyl compounds related glucose metabolism in liver tissue. The metabolic profiling in serum confirmed the finding that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an “antagonistic effect” on liver metabolism of mice. PMID:28075412

  19. Orexin receptor antagonists differ from standard sleep drugs by promoting sleep at doses that do not disrupt cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslaner, Jason M; Tye, Spencer J; Eddins, Donnie M; Wang, Xiaohai; Fox, Steven V; Savitz, Alan T; Binns, Jacquelyn; Cannon, Christopher E; Garson, Susan L; Yao, Lihang; Hodgson, Robert; Stevens, Joanne; Bowlby, Mark R; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Brunner, Joseph; Mcdonald, Terrence P; Gotter, Anthony L; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J

    2013-04-03

    Current treatments for insomnia, such as zolpidem (Ambien) and eszopiclone (Lunesta), are γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA)-positive allosteric modulators that carry a number of side effects including the potential to disrupt cognition. In an effort to develop better tolerated medicines, we have identified dual orexin 1 and 2 receptor antagonists (DORAs), which promote sleep in preclinical animal models and humans. We compare the effects of orally administered eszopiclone, zolpidem, and diazepam to the dual orexin receptor antagonist DORA-22 on sleep and the novel object recognition test in rat, and on sleep and two cognition tests (delayed match to sample and serial choice reaction time) in the rhesus monkey. Each compound's minimal dose that promoted sleep versus the minimal dose that exerted deficits in these cognitive tests was determined, and a therapeutic margin was established. We found that DORA-22 has a wider therapeutic margin for sleep versus cognitive impairment in rat and rhesus monkey compared to the other compounds tested. These data were further supported with the demonstration of a wider therapeutic margin for DORA-22 compared to the other compounds on sleep versus the expression of hippocampal activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc), an immediate-early gene product involved in synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that DORAs might provide an effective treatment for insomnia with a greater therapeutic margin for sleep versus cognitive disturbances compared to the GABAA-positive allosteric modulators currently in use.

  20. Combinatorial assembly of small molecules into bivalent antagonists of TrkC or TrkA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Brahimi

    Full Text Available A library of peptidomimetics was assembled combinatorially into dimers on a triazine-based core. The pharmacophore corresponds to β-turns of the neurotrophin polypeptides neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, nerve growth factor (NGF, or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. These are the natural ligands for TrkC, TrkA, and TrkB receptors, respectively. The linker length and the side-chain orientation of each monomer within the bivalent mimics were systematically altered, and the impact of these changes on the function of each ligand was evaluated. While the monovalent peptidomimetics had no detectable binding or bioactivity, four bivalent peptidomimetics (2c, 2d, 2e, 3f are selective TrkC ligands with antagonistic activity, and two bivalent peptidomimetics (1a, 1b are TrkC and TrkA ligands with antagonistic activity. All these bivalent compounds block ligand-dependent receptor activation and cell survival, without affecting neuritogenic differentiation. This work adds to our understanding of how the neurotrophins function through Trk receptors, and demonstrates that peptidomimetics can be designed to selectively disturb specific biological signals, and may be used as pharmacological probes or as therapeutic leads. The concept of altering side-chain, linker length, and sequence orientation of a subunit within a pharmacophore provides an easy modular approach to generate larger libraries with diversified bioactivity.

  1. LINGO-1 antagonist promotes functional recovery and axonal sprouting after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Benxiu; Li, Mingwei; Wu, Wu-Tian; Yick, Leung-Wah; Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Wang, Joy; So, Kwok-Fai; McCoy, John M; Pepinsky, R Blake; Mi, Sha; Relton, Jane K

    2006-11-01

    LINGO-1 is a CNS-specific protein and a functional component of the NgR1/p75/LINGO-1 and NgR1/TAJ(TROY)/LINGO-1 signaling complexes that mediate inhibition of axonal outgrowth. These receptor complexes mediate the axonal growth inhibitory effects of Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) via RhoA activation. Soluble LINGO-1 (LINGO-1-Fc), which acts as an antagonist of these pathways by blocking LINGO-1 binding to NgR1, was administered to rats after dorsal or lateral hemisection of the spinal cord. LINGO-1-Fc treatment significantly improved functional recovery, promoted axonal sprouting and decreased RhoA activation and increased oligodendrocyte and neuronal survival after either rubrospinal or corticospinal tract transection. These experiments demonstrate an important role for LINGO-1 in modulating axonal outgrowth in vivo and that treatment with LINGO-1-Fc can significantly enhance recovery after spinal cord injury.

  2. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist suppresses neurotrophin response in injured rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKosky, S T; Styren, S D; O'Malley, M E; Goss, J R; Kochanek, P; Marion, D; Evans, C H; Robbins, P D

    1996-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces astrocytic and microglial activation and proliferation and augmented production of the cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and nerve growth factor (NGF). The increase in NGF temporally follows the increase in IL-1 beta, suggesting that the IL-1 beta up-regulation after trauma directly induces the increase in NGF. We examined the effect of IL-1 receptor antagonist protein (IL-1ra) on microglial proliferation and NGF production in rat cortex, following two different models of TBI. Rabbit fibroblasts infected with a retroviral vector containing the human IL-1ra gene were implanted into the wound cavity immediately following a cortical stab wound or 6 hours after a weight drop-induced trauma. Both microglial proliferation and NGF up-regulation were decreased significantly in animals receiving IL-1ra-expressing cells compared with animals receiving naive (untransfected) fibroblasts. These data demonstrate that the increase in NGF after central nervous system trauma is directly mediated through IL-1 beta and that blocking IL-1 beta following brain injury leads to suppression of an NGF-mediated reparative response. Such blockade of inflammation, however, may prove to be of significant therapeutic benefit in human brain injury and other inflammatory states.

  3. Agonistic and Antagonistic Interactions between Chlorhexidine and Other Endodontic Agents: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Giardino, Luciano; Palazzi, Flavio; Asgary, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Root canal irrigants play a significant role in elimination of the microorganisms, tissue remnants, and removal of the debris and smear layer. No single solution is able to fulfill all these actions completely; therefore, a combination of irrigants may be required. The aim of this investigation was to review the agonistic and antagonistic interactions between chlorhexidine (CHX) and other irrigants and medicaments. An English-limited Medline search was performed for articles published from 2002 to 2014. The searched keywords included: chlorhexidine AND sodium hypochlorite/ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid/calcium hydroxide/mineral trioxide aggregate. Subsequently, a hand search was carried out on the references of result articles to find more matching papers. Findings showed that the combination of CHX and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) causes color changes and the formation of a neutral and insoluble precipitate; CHX forms a salt with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). In addition, it has been demonstrated that the alkalinity of calcium hydroxide (CH) remained unchanged after mixing with CHX. Furthermore, mixing CHX with CH may enhance its antimicrobial activity; also mixing mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) powder with CHX increases its antimicrobial activity but this may negatively affect its mechanical properties.

  4. DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM, a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM, we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD but not long-term potentiation (LTP, was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory.

  5. Antischistosomal activity of a calcium channel antagonist on schistosomula and adult Schistosoma mansoni worms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Silva-Moraes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Current schistosomiasis control strategies are largely based on chemotherapeutic agents and a limited number of drugs are available today. Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug currently used in schistosomiasis control programs. Unfortunately, this drug shows poor efficacy in patients during the earliest infection phases. The effects of PZQ appear to operate on the voltage-operated Ca2+channels, which are located on the external Schistosoma mansoni membrane. Because some Ca2+channels have dihydropyridine drug class (a class that includes nifedipine sensitivity, an in vitro analysis using a calcium channel antagonist (clinically used for cardiovascular hypertension was performed to determine the antischistosomal effects of nifedipine on schistosomula and adult worm cultures. Nifedipine demonstrated antischistosomal activity against schistosomula and significantly reduced viability at all of the concentrations used alone or in combination with PZQ. In contrast, PZQ did not show significant efficacy when used alone. Adult worms were also affected by nifedipine after a 24 h incubation and exhibited impaired motility, several lesions on the tegument and intense contractility. These data support the idea of Ca2+channels subunits as drug targets and favour alternative therapeutic schemes when drug resistance has been reported. In this paper, strong arguments encouraging drug research are presented, with a focus on exploring schistosomal Ca2+channels.

  6. Histamine and Skin Barrier: Are Histamine Antagonists Useful for the Prevention or Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedetto, Anna; Yoshida, Takeshi; Fridy, Sade; Park, Joo-Eun S; Kuo, I-Hsin; Beck, Lisa A

    2015-04-21

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD), the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease, is characterized by an overactive immune response to a host of environmental allergens and dry, itchy skin. Over the past decade important discoveries have demonstrated that AD develops in part from genetic and/or acquired defects in the skin barrier. Histamine is an aminergic neurotransmitter involved in physiologic and pathologic processes such as pruritus, inflammation, and vascular leak. Enhanced histamine release has been observed in the skin of patients with AD and antihistamines are often prescribed for their sedating and anti-itch properties. Recent evidence suggests that histamine also inhibits the terminal differentiation of keratinocytes and impairs the skin barrier, raising the question whether histamine might play a role in AD barrier impairment. This, coupled with the notion that histamine's effects mediated through the recently identified histamine receptor H4R, may be important in allergic inflammation, has renewed interest in this mediator in allergic diseases. In this paper we summarize the current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor antagonists in AD and skin barrier function.

  7. Gene expression profiling of the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide and vinclozolin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) gonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma, E-mail: dalma@stthomas.edu [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); University of St. Thomas, 2115 Summit Ave, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Wang Ronglin [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Villeneuve, Daniel L. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Bencic, David C.; Lazorchak, Jim [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Ankley, Gerald T. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States)

    2011-01-25

    The studies presented in this manuscript focus on characterization of transcriptomic responses to anti-androgens in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Research on the effects of anti-androgens in fish has been characterized by a heavy reliance on apical endpoints, and molecular mechanisms of action (MOA) of anti-androgens remain poorly elucidated. In the present study, we examined effects of a short term exposure (24-96 h) to the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide (FLU) and vinclozolin (VZ) on gene expression in gonads of sexually mature zebrafish, using commercially available zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays (4 x 44 K platform). We found that VZ and FLU potentially impact reproductive processes via multiple pathways related to steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and fertilization. Observed changes in gene expression often were shared by VZ and FLU, as demonstrated by overlap in differentially-expressed genes and enrichment of several common key pathways including: (1) integrin and actin signaling, (2) nuclear receptor 5A1 signaling, (3) fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, (4) polyamine synthesis, and (5) androgen synthesis. This information should prove useful to elucidating specific mechanisms of reproductive effects of anti-androgens in fish, as well as developing biomarkers for this important class of endocrine-active chemicals.

  8. Isolation of maize soil and rhizosphere bacteria with antagonistic activity against Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Jeffrey D; O'Keeffe, Teresa L; Abbas, Hamed K

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial isolates from Mississippi maize field soil and maize rhizosphere samples were evaluated for their potential as biological control agents against Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides. Isolated strains were screened for antagonistic activities in liquid coculture against A. flavus and on agar media against A. flavus and F. verticillioides. We identified 221 strains that inhibited growth of both fungi. These bacteria were further differentiated by their production of extracellular enzymes that hydrolyzed chitin and yeast cell walls and by production of antifungal metabolites. Based on molecular and nutritional identification of the bacterial strains, the most prevalent genera isolated from rhizosphere samples were Burkholderia and Pseudomonas, and the most prevalent genera isolated from nonrhizosphere soil were Pseudomonas and Bacillus. Less prevalent genera included Stenotrophomonas, Agrobacterium, Variovorax, Wautersia, and several genera of coryneform and enteric bacteria. In quantitative coculture assays, strains of P. chlororaphis and P. fluorescens consistently inhibited growth of A. flavus and F. verticillioides in different media. These results demonstrate the potential for developing individual biocontrol agents for simultaneous control of the mycotoxigenic A. flavus and F. verticillioides.

  9. The Genomic Landscape and Evolutionary Resolution of Antagonistic Pleiotropy in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Qian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic pleiotropy (AP, or genetic tradeoff, is an important concept that is frequently invoked in theories of aging, cancer, genetic disease, and other common phenomena. However, the prevalence of AP, which genes are subject to AP, and to what extent and how AP may be resolved remain unclear. By measuring the fitness difference between the wild-type and null alleles of ∼5,000 nonessential genes in yeast, we found that in any given environment, yeast expresses hundreds of genes that harm rather than benefit the organism, demonstrating widespread AP. Nonetheless, under sufficient selection, AP is often resolvable through regulatory evolution, primarily by trans-acting changes, although in one case we also detected a cis-acting change and localized its causal mutation. However, AP is resolved more slowly in smaller populations, predicting more unresolved AP in multicellular organisms than in yeast. These findings provide an empirical foundation for AP-dependent theories and have broad biomedical and evolutionary implications.

  10. Sexually antagonistic coevolution for sexual harassment can act as a barrier to further invasions by parthenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawatsu, Kazutaka

    2013-02-01

    The assumption of a twofold cost of sex not only complicates the maintenance of sex but also sets conditions for sexual conflict: in organisms with the twofold cost, males often sexually harass females. Sexual harassment is detrimental to female fitness and thus might help maintain sexual populations if male harassment inflicts a harsher cost on parthenogens than on sexual females (asymmetric harassment cost). However, the generality of this concept is now considered doubtful because selective harassment of parthenogens results in loss of mating opportunities for males. Using three mathematical models, I show here that sexual harassment still can impose the asymmetric cost on parthenogens. First, I apply the Lotka-Volterra model to show the degree of asymmetric harassment cost that permits sex to be maintained stably in the population. Second, using adaptive dynamics, I examine whether sexually antagonistic coevolution for sexual harassment, which occurs only in sexual populations, can promote the asymmetric harassment cost. Finally, an individual-based model, which assumes a spatial structure unlike that in the other two, demonstrates that the asymmetric evolution of harassment cost prevents further invasions of parthenogens from different patches into sexual lineages; these mechanisms may account for allopatric distributions of sexual and parthenogenetic lineages as well as the maintenance of sex.

  11. An Accurately Controlled Antagonistic Shape Memory Alloy Actuator with Self-Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Hua Zhang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of miniaturization, shape memory alloy (SMA actuators exhibit high energy density, self-sensing ability and ease of fabrication, which make them well suited for practical applications. This paper presents a self-sensing controlled actuator drive that was designed using antagonistic pairs of SMA wires. Under a certain pre-strain and duty cycle, the stress between two wires becomes constant. Meanwhile, the strain to resistance curve can minimize the hysteresis gap between the heating and the cooling paths. The curves of both wires are then modeled by fitting polynomials such that the measured resistance can be used directly to determine the difference between the testing values and the target strain. The hysteresis model of strains to duty cycle difference has been used as compensation. Accurate control is demonstrated through step response and sinusoidal tracking. The experimental results show that, under a combination control program, the root-mean-square error can be reduced to 1.093%. The limited bandwidth of the frequency is estimated to be 0.15 Hz. Two sets of instruments with three degrees of freedom are illustrated to show how this type actuator could be potentially implemented.

  12. Comparative virtual screening and novelty detection for NMDA-GlycineB antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Bjoern A; Weil, Tanja; Schneider, Gisbert

    2009-12-01

    Identification of novel compound classes for a drug target is a challenging task for cheminformatics and drug design when considerable research has already been undertaken and many potent lead structures have been identified, which leaves limited unclaimed chemical space for innovation. We validated and successfully applied different state-of-the-art techniques for virtual screening (Bayesian machine learning, automated molecular docking, pharmacophore search, pharmacophore QSAR and shape analysis) of 4.6 million unique and readily available chemical structures to identify promising new and competitive antagonists of the strychnine-insensitive Glycine binding site (Glycine(B) site) of the NMDA receptor. The novelty of the identified virtual hits was assessed by scaffold analysis, putting a strong emphasis on novelty detection. The resulting hits were tested in vitro and several novel, active compounds were identified. While the majority of the computational methods tested were able to partially discriminate actives from structurally similar decoy molecules, the methods differed substantially in their prospective applicability in terms of novelty detection. The results demonstrate that although there is no single best computational method, it is most worthwhile to follow this concept of focused compound library design and screening, as there still can new bioactive compounds be found that possess hitherto unexplored scaffolds and interesting variations of known chemotypes.

  13. Amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing interleukin-1 receptor antagonist improve fulminant hepatic failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Bao Zheng

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled hepatic immunoactivation is regarded as the primary pathological mechanism of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF. The major acute-phase mediators associated with FHF, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, impair the regeneration of liver cells and stem cell grafts. Amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs have the capacity, under specific conditions, to differentiate into hepatocytes. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra plays an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic role in acute and chronic inflammation, and has been used in many experimental and clinical applications. In the present study, we implanted IL-1Ra-expressing AF-MSCs into injured liver via the portal vein, using D-galactosamine-induced FHF in a rat model. IL-1Ra expression, hepatic injury, liver regeneration, cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and animal survival were assessed after cell transplantation. Our results showed that AF-MSCs over-expressing IL-1Ra prevented liver failure and reduced mortality in rats with FHF. These animals also exhibited improved liver function and increased survival rates after injection with these cells. Using green fluorescent protein as a marker, we demonstrated that the engrafted cells and their progeny were incorporated into injured livers and produced albumin. This study suggests that AF-MSCs genetically modified to over-express IL-1Ra can be implanted into the injured liver to provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of FHF.

  14. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine Distorts Object Recognition by Reducing Feedback to Early Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Anouk M; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; van der Velde, Bauke; Lirk, Philipp B; Vulink, Nienke C C; Hollmann, Markus W; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F

    2016-05-01

    It is a well-established fact that top-down processes influence neural representations in lower-level visual areas. Electrophysiological recordings in monkeys as well as theoretical models suggest that these top-down processes depend on NMDA receptor functioning. However, this underlying neural mechanism has not been tested in humans. We used fMRI multivoxel pattern analysis to compare the neural representations of ambiguous Mooney images before and after they were recognized with their unambiguous grayscale version. Additionally, we administered ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, to interfere with this process. Our results demonstrate that after recognition, the pattern of brain activation elicited by a Mooney image is more similar to that of its easily recognizable grayscale version than to the pattern evoked by the identical Mooney image before recognition. Moreover, recognition of Mooney images decreased mean response; however, neural representations of separate images became more dissimilar. So from the neural perspective, unrecognizable Mooney images all "look the same", whereas recognized Mooneys look different. We observed these effects in posterior fusiform part of lateral occipital cortex and in early visual cortex. Ketamine distorted these effects of recognition, but in early visual cortex only. This suggests that top-down processes from higher- to lower-level visual areas might operate via an NMDA pathway.

  15. Nicalin and its binding partner Nomo are novel Nodal signaling antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Christof; Frauli, Mélanie; Topp, Stephanie; Irmler, Martin; Hofmann, Kay; Regula, Jörg T; Bally-Cuif, Laure; Haass, Christian

    2004-08-04

    Nodals are signaling factors of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily with a key role in vertebrate development. They control a variety of cell fate decisions required for the establishment of the embryonic body plan. We have identified two highly conserved transmembrane proteins, Nicalin and Nomo (Nodal modulator, previously known as pM5), as novel antagonists of Nodal signaling. Nicalin is distantly related to Nicastrin, a component of the Alzheimer's disease-associated gamma-secretase, and forms a complex with Nomo. Ectopic expression of both proteins in zebrafish embryos causes cyclopia, a phenotype that can arise from a defect in mesendoderm patterning mediated by the Nodal signaling pathway. Accordingly, downregulation of Nomo resulted in an increase in anterior axial mesendoderm and the development of an enlarged hatching gland. Inhibition of Nodal signaling by ectopic expression of Lefty was rescued by reducing Nomo levels. Furthermore, Nodal- as well as Activin-induced signaling was inhibited by Nicalin and Nomo in a cell-based reporter assay. Our data demonstrate that the Nicalin/Nomo complex antagonizes Nodal signaling during mesendodermal patterning in zebrafish.

  16. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2016-04-04

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4(+)T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra-deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra.

  17. Cyclic lipopeptide profile of three Bacillus subtilis strains; antagonists of Fusarium head blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Christopher A; Schisler, David A; Price, Neil P; Vaughn, Steven F

    2011-08-01

    The objective of the study was to identify the lipopetides associated with three Bacillus subtilis strains. The strains are antagonists of Gibberella zeae, and have been shown to be effective in reducing Fusarium head blight in wheat. The lipopeptide profile of three B. subtilis strains (AS43.3, AS43.4, and OH131.1) was determined using mass spectroscopy. Strains AS43.3 and AS43.4 produced the anti-fungal lipopeptides from the iturin and fengycin family during the stationary growth phase. All three strains produced the lipopeptide surfactin at different growth times. Strain OH131.1 only produced surfactin under these conditions. The antifungal activity of the culture supernatant and individual lipopeptides was determined by the inhibition of G. zeae. Cell-free supernatant from strains AS43.3 and AS43.4 demonstrated strong antibiosis of G. zeae, while strain OH131.1 had no antibiosis activity. These results suggest a different mechanism of antagonism for strain OH131.1, relative to AS43.3 and AS43.4.

  18. Neuroprotective actions of endogenous interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) are mediated by glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinteaux, Emmanuel; Rothwell, Nancy J; Boutin, Herve

    2006-04-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1), contributes to neuronal inflammation and cell death induced by ischemia, excitotoxicity, or trauma, while administration of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) reduces neuronal injury. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that endogenous IL-1ra is neuroprotective in vivo and in vitro, and to identify its mechanism of actions. Mice lacking IL-1ra (IL-1ra knock-out (KO]) exhibited a dramatic increase in neuronal injury (3.6-fold increase in infarct size) induced by transient cerebral ischemia compared to wild-type (WT) animals. Basal cell death of cultured cortical neurons from WT and IL-1ra KO was identical, and treatment with NMDA or AMPA (20 microM) increased cell death to the same extent in WT and IL-1ra KO neurons. However, basal and NMDA- or AMPA-induced cells death was significantly higher in glial-neuronal co-cultures from IL-1ra KO than from WT mice. We further showed that pure microglial cultures, but not pure astrocytes cultures, released IL-1ra in response to treatment with conditioned medium from NMDA- or AMPA-treated primary neurons. These results demonstrate that endogenous IL-1ra produced by microglia is neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia or excitotoxicity.

  19. Fenobam: a clinically validated nonbenzodiazepine anxiolytic is a potent, selective, and noncompetitive mGlu5 receptor antagonist with inverse agonist activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Richard H P; Jaeschke, Georg; Spooren, Will; Ballard, Theresa M; Büttelmann, Bernd; Kolczewski, Sabine; Peters, Jens-Uwe; Prinssen, Eric; Wichmann, Jürgen; Vieira, Eric; Mühlemann, Andreas; Gatti, Silvia; Mutel, Vincent; Malherbe, Pari

    2005-11-01

    Fenobam [N-(3-chlorophenyl)-N'-(4,5-dihydro-1-methyl-4-oxo-1H-imidazole-2-yl)urea] is an atypical anxiolytic agent with unknown molecular target that has previously been demonstrated both in rodents and human to exert anxiolytic activity. Here, we report that fenobam is a selective and potent metabotropic glutamate (mGlu)5 receptor antagonist acting at an allosteric modulatory site shared with 2-methyl-6-phenylethynyl-pyridine (MPEP), the protypical selective mGlu5 receptor antagonist. Fenobam inhibited quisqualate-evoked intracellular calcium response mediated by human mGlu5 receptor with IC(50) = 58 +/- 2 nM. It acted in a noncompetitive manner, similar to MPEP and demonstrated inverse agonist properties, blocking 66% of the mGlu5 receptor basal activity (in an over expressed cell line) with an IC(50) = 84 +/- 13 nM. [(3)H]Fenobam bound to rat and human recombinant receptors with K(d) values of 54 +/- 6 and 31 +/- 4 nM, respectively. MPEP inhibited [(3)H]fenobam binding to human mGlu5 receptors with a K(i) value of 6.7 +/- 0.7 nM, indicating a common binding site shared by both allosteric antagonists. Fenobam exhibits anxiolytic activity in the stress-induced hyperthermia model, Vogel conflict test, Geller-Seifter conflict test, and conditioned emotional response with a minimum effective dose of 10 to 30 mg/kg p.o. Furthermore, fenobam is devoid of GABAergic activity, confirming previous reports that fenobam acts by a mechanism distinct from benzodiazepines. The non-GABAergic activity of fenobam, coupled with its robust anxiolytic activity and reported efficacy in human in a double blind placebo-controlled trial, supports the potential of developing mGlu5 receptor antagonists with an improved therapeutic window over benzodiazepines as novel anxiolytic agents.

  20. Antagonistic effect of Lactobacillus strains against gas-producing coliforms isolated from colicky infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oggero Roberto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infantile colic is a common disturb within the first 3 months of life, nevertheless the pathogenesis is incompletely understood and treatment remains an open issue. Intestinal gas production is thought to be one of the causes of abdominal discomfort in infants suffering from colic. However, data about the role of the amount of gas produced by infants' colonic microbiota and the correlation with the onset of colic symptoms are scanty. The benefit of supplementation with lactobacilli been recently reported but the mechanisms by which they exert their effects have not yet been fully defined. This study was performed to evaluate the interaction between Lactobacillus spp. strains and gas-forming coliforms isolated from stools of colicky infants. Results Strains of coliforms were isolated from stools of 45 colicky and 42 control breastfed infants in McConkey Agar and identified using PCR with species-specific primers, and the BBL™ Enterotube™ II system for Enterobacteriaceae. Gas-forming capability of coliforms was assessed in liquid cultures containing lactose as sole carbon source. The average count of total coliforms in colicky infants was significantly higher than controls: 5.98 (2.00-8.76 log10 vs 3.90 (2.50-7.10 CFU/g of faeces (p = 0.015. The following strains were identified: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterococcus faecalis. Then, 27 Lactobacillus strains were tested for their antagonistic effect against coliforms both by halo-forming method and in liquid co-cultures. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.delbrueckii DSM 20074 and L. plantarum MB 456 were able to inhibit all coliforms strains (halo-forming method, also in liquid co-cultures, thus demonstrating an antagonistic activity. Conclusions This study shows that two out of 27 strains of Lactobacillus examined possess an antimicrobial effect against six species of gas-forming coliforms

  1. Preclinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of AZD3783, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minli; Zhou, Diansong; Wang, Yi; Maier, Donna L; Widzowski, Daniel V; Sobotka-Briner, Cynthia D; Brockel, Becky J; Potts, William M; Shenvi, Ashok B; Bernstein, Peter R; Pierson, M Edward

    2011-11-01

    The preclinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetic properties of (2R)-6-methoxy-8-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-N-(4-morpholin-4-ylphenyl)chromane-2-carboxamide (AZD3783), a potent 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B (5-HT(1B)) receptor antagonist, were characterized as part of translational pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic hypothesis testing in human clinical trials. The affinity of AZD3783 to the 5-HT(1B) receptor was measured in vitro by using membrane preparations containing recombinant human or guinea pig 5-HT(1B) receptors and in native guinea pig brain tissue. In vivo antagonist potency of AZD3783 for the 5HT(1B) receptor was investigated by measuring the blockade of 5-HT(1B) agonist-induced guinea pig hypothermia. The anxiolytic-like potency was assessed using the suppression of separation-induced vocalization in guinea pig pups. The affinity of AZD3783 for human and guinea pig 5-HT(1B) receptor (K(i), 12.5 and 11.1 nM, respectively) was similar to unbound plasma EC(50) values for guinea pig receptor occupancy (11 nM) and reduction of agonist-induced hypothermia (18 nM) in guinea pig. Active doses of AZD3783 in the hypothermia assay were similar to doses that reduced separation-induced vocalization in guinea pig pups. AZD3783 demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties. The predicted pharmacokinetic parameters (total plasma clearance, 6.5 ml/min/kg; steady-state volume of distribution, 6.4 l/kg) were within 2-fold of the values observed in healthy male volunteers after a single 20-mg oral dose. This investigation presents a direct link between AZD3783 in vitro affinity and in vivo receptor occupancy to preclinical disease model efficacy. Together with predicted human pharmacokinetic properties, we have provided a model for the quantitative translational pharmacology of AZD3783 that increases confidence in the optimal human receptor occupancy required for antidepressant and anxiolytic effects in patients.

  2. Proteomic study of three component interactions:plant, pathogens and antagonistic fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marra R; Turrà D; Scala F; Lorito M; Ambrosino P; Scala V; Romano C; Vinale F; Ferraioli S; Ruocco M; Carbone V; Woo S L

    2004-01-01

    silico analysis of some of those spots revealed homology with intracellular enzymes (GTPases,hydrolases) and with stress-related proteins (heat shock proteins HSP70, bacteriocin cloacin). Specific proteins in the plant proteome, i.e. pathogenesis-related proteins, have been identified during the in vivo interaction of bean with R. solani and T. atroviride strain Pl. This is in agreement with the demonstrated ability of these beneficial fungi to induce plant systemic disease resistance by activating expression of defenc-related genes.Proteins extracted from T. atrovride strain Pi which were analysed by mass spectrometry, revealed some interesting homologies with a fungal hydrophobin of Pleurotus ostreatus and an ABC transporter of Ralstonia metallidurans. These could represent molecular factors involved in the antagonistic mechanisms of Trichoderma and play a role in the three-way interaction with the plant and other microbes.

  3. ANTAGONISTIC ACTIVITY OF SERRATIA MARCESCENS AGAINST PYRICULARIA ORYZAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. JAIGANESH

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Rice is an important crop, widely affected by quite a number of diseases that results in higher yield losses. Among the fungal diseases, blast incited by Pyricularia oryzae is a major disease. The biological method of plant disease management seems to be an alternative to chemical fungicides in managing the blast disease. A new bio control agent viz., Serratia marcescens appears to be an ideal agent for the control of P. oryzae, because it produces chitinolytic enzymes which causes degradation of the fungal cell walls, induction of plant defence reaction and certain antifungal low molecular weight molecules. A study was undertaken to investigate the effect of a new bio control agent like S. marcescens against P. oryzae. The talc based formulation of S. marcescens (@ 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 kg/ha was sprayed on old IR 50 rice plants in fields. Out of the six-bio protectants tested, S. marcescens was found very effective against P. oryzae under in vitro conditions. S. marcescens could be isolated from shoots as well as roots emerging from the treated seeds and the plant parts from treated seeds inhibited P. oryzae. The antagonist S. marcescens survived in the phyllosphere even 80 days after spray. The results revealed that rice blast control was achieved by spraying S. marcescens @ 1.0 kg/ha. The increasing dose of talc-based inoculum when applied on foliage increased the phyllosphere population of S. marcescens and controlled rice blast. The maximum disease control was achieved when inoculum was applied at 2.5 kg/ha.

  4. Pediatric heart failure therapy with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Susan R; Canter, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Management of chronic heart failure in pediatrics has been altered by the adult literature showing improvements in mortality and hospitalization rates with the use of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (beta-blockers) for routine therapy of all classes of ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure. Many pediatric heart failure specialists have incorporated these agents into their routine management of pediatric heart failure related to dilated cardiomyopathy or ventricular dysfunction in association with congenital heart disease. Retrospective and small prospective case series have shown encouraging improvements in cardiac function and symptoms, but interpretation has been complicated by the high rate of spontaneous recovery in pediatric patients. A recently completed pediatric double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed no difference between placebo and two doses of carvedilol over a 6-month period of follow-up, with significant improvement of all three groups over the course of evaluation. Experience with adults has suggested that only certain beta-blockers, including carvedilol, bisoprolol, nebivolol, and metoprolol succinate, should be used in the treatment of heart failure and that patients with high-grade heart failure may derive the most benefit. Other studies surmise that early or prophylactic use of these medications may alter the risk of disease progression in some high-risk subsets, such as patients receiving anthracyclines or those with muscular dystrophy. This article reviews these topics using experience as well as data from all the recent pediatric studies on the use of beta-blockers to treat congestive heart failure, especially when related to systolic ventricular dysfunction.

  5. Update on leukotriene receptor antagonists in preschool children wheezing disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montella Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common chronic disease in young children. About 40% of all preschool children regularly wheeze during common cold infections. The heterogeneity of wheezing phenotypes early in life and various anatomical and emotional factors unique to young children present significant challenges in the clinical management of this problem. Anti-inflammatory therapy, mainly consisting of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS, is the cornerstone of asthma management. Since Leukotrienes (LTs are chemical mediators of airway inflammation in asthma, the leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs are traditionally used as potent anti-inflammatory drugs in the long-term treatment of asthma in adults, adolescents, and school-age children. In particular, montelukast decreases airway inflammation, and has also a bronchoprotective effect. The main guidelines on asthma management have confirmed the clinical utility of LTRAs in children older than five years. In the present review we describe the most recent advances on the use of LTRAs in the treatment of preschool wheezing disorders. LTRAs are effective in young children with virus-induced wheeze and with multiple-trigger disease. Conflicting data do not allow to reach definitive conclusions on LTRAs efficacy in bronchiolitis or post-bronchiolitis wheeze, and in acute asthma. The excellent safety profile of montelukast and the possibility of oral administration, that entails better compliance from young children, represent the main strengths of its use in preschool children. Montelukast is a valid alternative to ICS especially in poorly compliant preschool children, or in subjects who show adverse effects related to long-term steroid therapy.

  6. Endothelin receptor antagonist and airway dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borst Mathias M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH, peripheral airway obstruction is frequent. This is partially attributed to the mediator dysbalance, particularly an excess of endothelin-1 (ET-1, to increased pulmonary vascular and airway tonus and to local inflammation. Bosentan (ET-1 receptor antagonist improves pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise limitation, and disease severity in IPAH. We hypothesized that bosentan might affect airway obstruction. Methods In 32 IPAH-patients (19 female, WHO functional class II (n = 10, III (n = 22; (data presented as mean ± standard deviation pulmonary vascular resistance (11 ± 5 Wood units, lung function, 6 minute walk test (6-MWT; 364 ± 363.7 (range 179.0-627.0 m, systolic pulmonary artery pressure, sPAP, 79 ± 19 mmHg, and NT-proBNP serum levels (1427 ± 2162.7 (range 59.3-10342.0 ng/L were measured at baseline, after 3 and 12 months of oral bosentan (125 mg twice per day. Results and Discussion At baseline, maximal expiratory flow at 50 and 25% vital capacity were reduced to 65 ± 25 and 45 ± 24% predicted. Total lung capacity was 95.6 ± 12.5% predicted and residual volume was 109 ± 21.4% predicted. During 3 and 12 months of treatment, 6-MWT increased by 32 ± 19 and 53 ± 69 m, respectively; p Conclusion This study gives first evidence in IPAH, that during long-term bosentan, improvement of hemodynamics, functional parameters or serum biomarker occur independently from persisting peripheral airway obstruction.

  7. Hepcidin antagonists for potential treatments of disorders with hepcidin excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poli eMaura

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hepcidin clarified the basic mechanism of the control of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin is mainly produced by the liver as a propeptide and processed by furin into the mature active peptide. Hepcidin binds ferroportin, the only cellular iron exporter, causing the internalization and degradation of both. Thus hepcidin blocks iron export from the key cells for dietary iron absorption (enterocytes, recycling of haemoglobin iron (the macrophages and the release of storage iron from hepatocytes, resulting in the reduction of systemic iron availability. The BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway is the major regulator of hepcidin expression that responds to iron status. Also inflammation stimulates hepcidin via the IL6/STAT3 pathway with a support of an active BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway. In some pathological conditions hepcidin level is inadequately elevated and reduces iron availability in the body, resulting in anemia. These conditions occur in the genetic Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia (IRIDA and the common Anemia of Chronic Disease (ACD or Anemia of Inflammation. Currently, there is no definite treatment for ACD. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and intravenous iron have been proposed in some cases but they are scarcely effective and may have adverse effects. Alternative approaches aimed to a pharmacological control of hepcidin expression have been attempted, targeting different regulatory steps. They include hepcidin sequestering agents (antibodies, anticalins and aptamers, inhibitors of BMP/SMAD or of IL6/STAT3 pathway or of hepcidin transduction (siRNA/shRNA or ferroportin stabilizers. In this review we summarized the biochemical interactions of the proteins involved in the BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway and its natural inhibitors, the murine and rat models with high hepcidin levels currently available and finally the progresses in the development of hepcidin antagonists, with particular attention to the role of heparins and heparin sulphate

  8. Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists - Still a viable approach for obesity treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, T.; Frimurer, T.M.; Sasmal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with multiple severe diseases. Several pharmacotherapies have been investigated including the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor 1. The development of MCHR1 antagonists are described with a specific perspective on different chemotypes...

  9. Antagonist muscle moment is increased in ACL deficient subjects during maximal dynamic knee extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Magnusson, S Peter;

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coactivation of the hamstring muscles during dynamic knee extension may compensate for increased knee joint laxity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient subjects. This study examined if antagonist muscle coactivation during maximal dynamic knee extension was elevated...... in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency compared to age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: Electromyography (EMG) and net knee joint moments were recorded during maximal concentric quadriceps and eccentric hamstring contractions, performed in an isokinetic dynamometer (ROM: 90......-10°, angular speed: 30°/s). Hamstring antagonist EMG recorded during concentric quadriceps contraction was converted into antagonist moment based on the EMG-moment relationship observed during eccentric agonist contractions. RESULTS: The magnitude of antagonist hamstring EMG was 65.5% higher in ACL deficient...

  10. A novel antagonistic role of natural compound icariin on neurotoxicity of amyloid β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The results indicated a novel antagonistic role of icariin in the neurotoxicity of Aβ1-42 via inhibiting its aggregation, suggesting that icariin might have potential therapeutic benefits to delay or modify the progression of AD.

  11. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies: a TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovic, I.; Sester, M.; Gomez-Reino, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibodies or soluble TNF receptors have become an invaluable treatment against chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Individuals who are treated with TNF antagonists are at an increased...... and an interferon-gamma release assay, as there are insufficient data in children to recommend one test over the other. Consequently, targeted preventive chemotherapy is highly recommended for all individuals with persistent M. tuberculosis-specific immune responses undergoing TNF antagonist therapy...... risk of reactivating latent infections, especially tuberculosis (TB). Following TNF antagonist therapy, the relative risk for TB is increased up to 25 times, depending on the clinical setting and the TNF antagonist used. Interferon-gamma release assays or, as an alternative in individuals without...

  12. Epimuscular myofascial force transmission between antagonistic and synergistic muscles can explain movement limitation in spastic paresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijing, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Details and concepts of intramuscular, extramuscular and intermuscular myofascial force transmission are reviewed. Some new experimental data are added regarding myofascial force transmission between antagonistic muscles across the interosseal membrane of the lower hind limb of the rat. Combined wit

  13. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of a subcutaneous depot for GnRH antagonist degarelix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg;

    Purpose. The objective of this study is to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model that describes the subcutaneous (SC) depot formation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist degarelix, which is being developed for treatment of prostate cancer, exhibiting dose-volume and dose...... depot model describes the PK profile of GnRH antagonist degarelix. This modeling approach might also be applicable for other depot-formulated drugs exhibiting complex PK profiles....

  14. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of a Subcutaneous Depot for GnRH Antagonist Degarelix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg;

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of this study is to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model that describes the subcutaneous (SC) depot formation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone ( GnRH) antagonist degarelix, which is being developed for treatment of prostate cancer, exhibiting dose-volume and dose...... depot model describes the PK profile of GnRH antagonist degarelix. This modeling approach might also be applicable for other depot-formulated drugs exhibiting complex PK profiles....

  15. The discovery of the benzazepine class of histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David M; Apps, James; Bailey, Nicholas; Bamford, Mark J; Beresford, Isabel J; Briggs, Michael A; Calver, Andrew R; Crook, Barry; Davis, Robert P; Davis, Susannah; Dean, David K; Harris, Leanne; Heightman, Tom D; Panchal, Terry; Parr, Christopher A; Quashie, Nigel; Steadman, Jon G A; Schogger, Joanne; Sehmi, Sanjeet S; Stean, Tania O; Takle, Andrew K; Trail, Brenda K; White, Trevor; Witherington, Jason; Worby, Angela; Medhurst, Andrew D

    2013-12-15

    This Letter describes the discovery of a novel series of H3 receptor antagonists. The initial medicinal chemistry strategy focused on deconstructing and simplifying an early screening hit which rapidly led to the discovery of a novel series of H3 receptor antagonists based on the benzazepine core. Employing an H3 driven pharmacodynamic model, the series was then further optimised through to a lead compound that showed robust in vivo functional activity and possessed overall excellent developability properties.

  16. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, K Y; Gupta, S; de Vries, R;

    2010-01-01

    studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by alpha-CGRP, capsaicin......During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical...

  17. Biological Control of Chickpea Collar Rot by Co-inoculation of Antagonistic Bacteria and Compatible Rhizobia

    OpenAIRE

    Hameeda, B.; Harini, G.; Rupela, O. P.; Kumar Rao, J. V. D. K.; Reddy, Gopal

    2010-01-01

    Two hundred and seven bacteria were isolated from composts and macrofauna and screened for plant growth promoting and antagonistic traits. Seven of the 207 isolates showed antagonistic activity against Sclerotium rolfsii in plate culture. Inhibition of S. rolfsii by the bacterial isolates ranged between 61 and 84%. Two of the seven isolates were Bacillus sp. and rest belonged to Pseudomonas sp. Two isolates, Pseudomonas sp. CDB 35 and Pseudomonas sp. BWB 21 was compatible with chickpea Rhizob...

  18. Synthesis and dual histamine H₁ and H₂ receptor antagonist activity of cyanoguanidine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Alisch, Rudi; Buschauer, Armin; Elz, Sigurd

    2013-11-15

    Premedication with a combination of histamine H₁ receptor (H₁R) and H₂ receptor (H₂R) antagonists has been suggested as a prophylactic principle, for instance, in anaesthesia and surgery. Aiming at pharmacological hybrids combining H₁R and H₂R antagonistic activity, a series of cyanoguanidines 14-35 was synthesized by linking mepyramine-type H₁R antagonist substructures with roxatidine-, tiotidine-, or ranitidine-type H₂R antagonist moieties. N-desmethylmepyramine was connected via a poly-methylene spacer to a cyanoguanidine group as the "urea equivalent" of the H₂R antagonist moiety. The title compounds were screened for histamine antagonistic activity at the isolated ileum (H₁R) and the isolated spontaneously beating right atrium (H₂R) of the guinea pig. The results indicate that, depending on the nature of the H₂R antagonist partial structure, the highest H₁R antagonist potency resided in roxatidine-type compounds with spacers of six methylene groups in length (compound 21), and tiotidine-type compounds irrespective of the alkyl chain length (compounds 28, 32, 33), N-cyano-N'-[2-[[(2-guanidino-4-thiazolyl)methyl]thio]ethyl]-N″-[2-[N-[2-[N-(4-methoxybenzyl)-N-(pyridyl)-amino] ethyl]-N-methylamino]ethyl] guanidine (25, pKB values: 8.05 (H₁R, ileum) and 7.73 (H₂R, atrium) and the homologue with the mepyramine moiety connected by a six-membered chain to the tiotidine-like partial structure (compound 32, pKB values: 8.61 (H₁R) and 6.61 (H₂R) were among the most potent hybrid compounds. With respect to the development of a potential pharmacotherapeutic agent, structural optimization seems possible through selection of other H₁R and H₂R pharmacophoric moieties with mutually affinity-enhancing properties.

  19. Synthesis and Dual Histamine H1 and H2 Receptor Antagonist Activity of Cyanoguanidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassem Sadek

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Premedication with a combination of histamine H1 receptor (H1R and H2 receptor (H2R antagonists has been suggested as a prophylactic principle, for instance, in anaesthesia and surgery. Aiming at pharmacological hybrids combining H1R and H2R antagonistic activity, a series of cyanoguanidines 14–35 was synthesized by linking mepyramine-type H1R antagonist substructures with roxatidine-, tiotidine-, or ranitidine-type H2R antagonist moieties. N-desmethylmepyramine was connected via a poly-methylene spacer to a cyanoguanidine group as the “urea equivalent” of the H2R antagonist moiety. The title compounds were screened for histamine antagonistic activity at the isolated ileum (H1R and the isolated spontaneously beating right atrium (H2R of the guinea pig. The results indicate that, depending on the nature of the H2R antagonist partial structure, the highest H1R antagonist potency resided in roxatidine-type compounds with spacers of six methylene groups in length (compound 21, and tiotidine-type compounds irrespective of the alkyl chain length (compounds 28, 32, 33, N-cyano-N'-[2-[[(2-guanidino-4-thiazolylmethyl]thio]ethyl]-N″-[2-[N-[2-[N-(4-methoxybenzyl-N-(pyridyl-amino] ethyl]-N-methylamino]ethyl] guanidine (25, pKB values: 8.05 (H1R, ileum and 7.73 (H2R, atrium and the homologue with the mepyramine moiety connected by a six-membered chain to the tiotidine-like partial structure (compound 32, pKB values: 8.61 (H1R and 6.61 (H2R were among the most potent hybrid compounds. With respect to the development of a potential pharmacotherapeutic agent, structural optimization seems possible through selection of other H1R and H2R pharmacophoric moieties with mutually affinity-enhancing properties.

  20. Action of CB1 and CB2 antagonists/inverse agonists on mantle cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chui, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effects of antagonists to the cannabinoid receptors in MCL cell lines were studied. Results presented in this study show that signalling through cannabinoid receptor with antagonists such as SR141716, SR144528 decreases cell viability but hemopressin when analyzing with XTT. The decrease in cell viability by SR141716 is caused by apoptosis triggered after 5 hours of treatment. The CB1 expression was confirmed in all MCL cell lines tested via western blotting but the express...

  1. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  2. Data on the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant) in patients with uncontrolled allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This article contains data on clinical endpoints (Peak Flow Expiratory Rate, fractional exhaled nitric oxide and total IgE serum levels) and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters concerning the use of the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant) in mild to moderate asthma patients. Information on experimental design and methods on how this data was obtained is also described. Further interpretation and discussion of this data can be found in the article “The oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipi...

  3. Antimüllerian hormone in gonadotropin releasing-hormone antagonist cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; La Marca, Antonio; Mirner Klein, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol.......To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol....

  4. Effects of H1–receptor antagonists in antidepressant tests in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chitra C. Khanwelkar

    2008-01-01

    : Considering the vast data suggesting the role of brain histamine(HA) in behaviour,emotions,anxiety and depression;four H1-receptor antagonists; promethazine, diphenhydramine, cyclizine and pheniramine were subjected to antidepressant tests in rats. All H1 – antagonists behaved like antidepressants in animal tests. They antagonized reserpine induced catalepsy, potentiated methamphetamine induced stereotypy and reduced the period of immobility in Porsolt’s behavioural despair test. It is sug...

  5. The molecular marker of antagonistic genes of biological bacteria against rice sheath blight by RAPD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Forrty-one isolates of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were differentiated from 184 G + bacterial strains having genetic similarities over 75%based on BOX-PCR fingerprint. Antagonism against to Rhizotonia solani in vitro was tested.Four isolates of B. arayloliquefaciens (2 isolates with antagonistic ability, G 396 + and G229 +, and 2 isolates without antagonistic ability, G433-and G434-) were selected to screen effective primers for RAPD analysis. Of 124 random primers (AA, AB, AC, AD, AE, AM, and AL) tested.

  6. Identification and Characterization of MEDI4736, an Antagonistic Anti-PD-L1 Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ross; Morrow, Michelle; Hammond, Scott A; Mulgrew, Kathy; Marcus, Danielle; Poon, Edmund; Watkins, Amanda; Mullins, Stefanie; Chodorge, Matthieu; Andrews, John; Bannister, David; Dick, Emily; Crawford, Nicola; Parmentier, Julie; Alimzhanov, Marat; Babcook, John S; Foltz, Ian N; Buchanan, Andrew; Bedian, Vahe; Wilkinson, Robert W; McCourt, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    Programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) is a member of the B7/CD28 family of proteins that control T-cell activation. Many tumors can upregulate expression of PD-L1, inhibiting antitumor T-cell responses and avoiding immune surveillance and elimination. We have identified and characterized MEDI4736, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds with high affinity and specificity to PD-L1 and is uniquely engineered to prevent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In vitro assays demonstrate that MEDI4736 is a potent antagonist of PD-L1 function, blocking interaction with PD-1 and CD80 to overcome inhibition of primary human T-cell activation. In vivo MEDI4736 significantly inhibits the growth of human tumors in a novel xenograft model containing coimplanted human T cells. This activity is entirely dependent on the presence of transplanted T cells, supporting the immunological mechanism of action for MEDI4736. To further determine the utility of PD-L1 blockade, an anti-mouse PD-L1 antibody was investigated in immunocompetent mice. Here, anti-mouse PD-L1 significantly improved survival of mice implanted with CT26 colorectal cancer cells. The antitumor activity of anti-PD-L1 was enhanced by combination with oxaliplatin, which resulted in increased release of HMGB1 within CT26 tumors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that inhibition of PD-L1 function can have potent antitumor activity when used as monotherapy or in combination in preclinical models, and suggest it may be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. MEDI4736 is currently in several clinical trials both alone and in combination with other agents, including anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1, and inhibitors of IDO, MEK, BRAF, and EGFR.

  7. Gallic Acid Is an Antagonist of Semen Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRicco, Josephine G; Xu, Changmingzi Sherry; Neidleman, Jason; Bergkvist, Magnus; Greene, Warner C; Roan, Nadia R; Makhatadze, George I

    2016-07-01

    Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that amyloid fibrils found in semen from healthy and HIV-infected men, as well as semen itself, can markedly enhance HIV infection rates. Semen fibrils are made up of multiple naturally occurring peptide fragments derived from semen. The best characterized of these fibrils are SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection), made up of residues 248-286 of prostatic acidic phosphatase, and the SEM1 fibrils, made up of residues 86-107 of semenogelin 1. A small molecule screen for antagonists of semen fibrils identified four compounds that lowered semen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity. One of the four, gallic acid, was previously reported to antagonize other amyloids and to exert anti-inflammatory effects. To better understand the mechanism by which gallic acid modifies the properties of semen amyloids, we performed biophysical measurements (atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, thioflavin T and Congo Red fluorescence assays, zeta potential measurements) and quantitative assays on the effects of gallic acid on semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and inflammation. Our results demonstrate that gallic acid binds to both SEVI and SEM1 fibrils and modifies their surface electrostatics to render them less cationic. In addition, gallic acid decreased semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection but did not decrease the inflammatory response induced by semen. Together, these observations identify gallic acid as a non-polyanionic compound that inhibits semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and suggest the potential utility of incorporating gallic acid into a multicomponent microbicide targeting both the HIV virus and host components that promote viral infection.

  8. Effects of the N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptor antagonist dextromethorphan on vibrotactile adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folger Stephen E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have demonstrated that short durations of vibrotactile stimuli (less than or equal to 2 sec effectively and consistently modify both the perceptual response in humans as well as the neurophysiological response in somatosensory cortex. The change in cortical response with adaptation has been well established by a number of studies, and other reports have extended those findings in determining that both GABA- and NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission play a significant role in the dynamic response of somatosensory cortical neurons. In this study, we evaluated the impact that dextromethorphan (DXM, an NMDAR antagonist, had on two distinct vibrotactile adaptation tasks. Results All subjects, both those that ingested 60 mg DXM and those that ingested placebo, were evaluated for their amplitude discriminative capacity between two simultaneously delivered vibrotactile stimuli both with and without 3 conditions of pre-exposure to adapting stimulation. The results demonstrated that the perceptual metrics of subjects who ingested 60 mg DXM were significantly altered from that of controls when the amplitude discrimination task followed one of the conditions of adapting stimulation. Without the condition of pre-exposure to an adapting stimulus (or stimuli, there was little difference between the observations obtained from the subjects that ingested DXM and controls. Peak impact on subject response occurred at 60 min post-ingestion, whereas the scores of controls who ingested placebo were not impacted. Conclusion The results – that DXM blocks vibrotactile adaptation – is consistent with the suggestion that NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission plays a significant role in the perceptual adaptive response. This finding is also consistent with neurophysiological findings that report observations of the effects of NMDAR block on the SI cortical response to repetitive vibrotactile stimulation.

  9. Effects of the N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptor antagonist dextromethorphan on vibrotactile adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Stephen E; Tannan, Vinay; Zhang, Zheng; Holden, Jameson K; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous reports have demonstrated that short durations of vibrotactile stimuli (less than or equal to 2 sec) effectively and consistently modify both the perceptual response in humans as well as the neurophysiological response in somatosensory cortex. The change in cortical response with adaptation has been well established by a number of studies, and other reports have extended those findings in determining that both GABA- and NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission play a significant role in the dynamic response of somatosensory cortical neurons. In this study, we evaluated the impact that dextromethorphan (DXM), an NMDAR antagonist, had on two distinct vibrotactile adaptation tasks. Results All subjects, both those that ingested 60 mg DXM and those that ingested placebo, were evaluated for their amplitude discriminative capacity between two simultaneously delivered vibrotactile stimuli both with and without 3 conditions of pre-exposure to adapting stimulation. The results demonstrated that the perceptual metrics of subjects who ingested 60 mg DXM were significantly altered from that of controls when the amplitude discrimination task followed one of the conditions of adapting stimulation. Without the condition of pre-exposure to an adapting stimulus (or stimuli), there was little difference between the observations obtained from the subjects that ingested DXM and controls. Peak impact on subject response occurred at 60 min post-ingestion, whereas the scores of controls who ingested placebo were not impacted. Conclusion The results – that DXM blocks vibrotactile adaptation – is consistent with the suggestion that NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission plays a significant role in the perceptual adaptive response. This finding is also consistent with neurophysiological findings that report observations of the effects of NMDAR block on the SI cortical response to repetitive vibrotactile stimulation. PMID:18796147

  10. Bosentan, a mixed endothelin receptor antagonist, inhibits superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafim, Karla G G; Navarro, Suelen A; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Cunha, Thiago M; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-11-01

    Bosentan is a mixed endothelin receptor antagonist widely used to treat patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the emerging literature suggests bosentan as a potent anti-inflammatory drug. Superoxide anion is produced in large amounts during inflammation, stimulates cytokine production, and thus contributes to inflammation and pain. However, it remains to be determined whether endothelin contributes to the inflammatory response triggered by the superoxide anion. The present study investigated the effects of bosentan in a mouse model of inflammation and pain induced by potassium superoxide, a superoxide anion donor. Male Swiss mice were treated with bosentan (10-100 mg/kg) by oral gavage, 1 h before potassium superoxide injection, and the inflammatory response was evaluated locally and at spinal cord (L4-L6) levels. Bosentan (100 mg/kg) inhibited superoxide anion-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, overt pain-like behavior (abdominal writhings, paw flinching, and licking), paw edema, myeloperoxidase activity (neutrophil marker) in the paw skin, and leukocyte recruitment in the peritoneal cavity. Bosentan also inhibited superoxide anion-induced interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production, while it enhanced IL-10 production in the paw skin and spinal cord. Bosentan inhibited the reduction of antioxidant capacity (reduced glutathione, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and ABTS radical scavenging ability) induced by the superoxide anion. Finally, we demonstrated that intraplantar injection of potassium superoxide induces the mRNA expression of prepro-endothelin-1 in the paw skin and spinal cord. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that superoxide anion-induced inflammation, pain, cytokine production, and oxidative stress depend on endothelin; therefore, these responses are amenable to bosentan treatment.

  11. The variability of co-activation pattern of antagonist muscles in human infant crawling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qi L; Wu, Xiao Y; Nong Xiao; Zeng, Si Y; Zheng, Xiao L; Di Wu; Hou, Wen S

    2016-08-01

    Infant crawling is part of normal human gross motor development, and a 4-beat gait that involves rhythmical flexion and extension of limbs and the underlying muscle co-activation of antagonist muscle around the joint. However, detection the co-activation pattern of antagonist muscle are sparse due to the general difficulty of measuring locomotion in human infants. In this paper, sEMG of antagonist muscles and the corresponding kinematics data of limbs were collected when infants were crawling on hands and knees at their self-selected speed. The infant's gross motor developmental status was assessed by the global Gross Motor Function Measure Scale (GMFM-88) as well. The method based on EMG-EMG plots was used to quantify the variability of co-activation pattern of antagonist muscle. After that, we observed that antagonist muscles of upper limb (triceps brachii and biceps brachii) showed less variability of co-activation pattern of muscles than lower limb(quadriceps femoris and hamstrings) during crawling, and this variability was also varied in different crawling phases (stance and swing). Furthermore, we found some varied behaviors in the co-activation patterns of antagonist muscles when gross motor developmental level increased. The preliminary work suggests that such adaptive changes may be related to the adjustment of neuromuscular in the early stage of gross motor development.

  12. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function.

  13. Ondansetron, a selective 5-HT3 antagonist, antagonizes methamphetamine-induced anorexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginawi, O T; Al-Majed, A A; Al-Suwailem, A K

    2005-03-01

    Effects of some selective serotonergic (5-HT) antagonists on methamphetamine-induced anorexia were investigated in male mice. The least possible dose of methamphetamine alone that caused significant anorectic activity was 11 micromolkg(-1), i.p. (2 mgkg(-1)). Various doses of some selective serotonergic receptor antagonists were administered half an hour before the above mentioned dose of methamphetamine. Methiothepin potentiated, whereas NAN-190, methysergide, mianserin and ondansetron antagonized methamphetamine-induced anorectic activity. The least possible doses of these antagonists which modified methamphetamine-induced anorexia were as follows: methiothepin (1.1 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), NAN-190 (4.2 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), methysergide (2.1 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), mianserin (3.3 micromolkg(-1), i.p.) and ondansetron (0.003 micromolkg(-1), i.p.). The serotonergic antagonists at the above mentioned doses did not modify the food intake of animals not treated with methamphetamine, except for methiothepin, which produced a significant reduction, and mianserin, which produced a significant increase in food intake. The results of the present study indicated that the anorectic activity induced by methamphetamine is related to the interactions of methamphetamine with 5-HT receptor. Since a very small dose (0.003 micromolkg(-1)) of ondansetron (the 5-HT(3) antagonist), as compared with the other antagonists used in this study, antagonized the anorexia induced by methamphetamine, the 5-HT(3) receptor is likely to be the site for this interaction.

  14. Novel antagonists of alcohol inhibition of l1-mediated cell adhesion: multiple mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkemeyer, Michael F; Menkari, Carrie E; Charness, Michael E

    2002-11-01

    1-Octanol antagonizes ethanol inhibition of L1-mediated cell adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis in mouse whole embryo culture. Herein, we identify a new series of alcohol antagonists and study their mechanism of action. Cell aggregation assays were carried out in ethanol-sensitive, human L1-transfected NIH/3T3 cells in the absence and presence of 100 mM ethanol or 2 mM 1-butanol and candidate antagonists. Antagonist potency for 1-alcohols increased progressively over 5 log orders from 1-pentanol (C5) to 1-dodecanol (C12). Antagonist potency declined from 1-dodecanol (C12) to 1-tridecanol (C13), and 1-tetradecanol (C14) and 1-pentadecanol (C15) were inactive. The presence and position of a double bond in the 1-butanol molecule determined whether a compound was a full agonist (1-butanol), a mixed agonist-antagonist (2-buten-1-ol), or an antagonist (3-buten-1-ol). Increasing the concentration of agonist (1-butanol or ethanol) overcame the antagonism of 3-buten-1-ol, benzyl alcohol, cyclopentanol, and 3-pentanol, but not that of 4-methyl-1-pentanol, 2-methyl-2-pentanol, 1-pentanol, 2-pentanol, 1-octanol, and 2,6-di-isopropylphenol (propofol), suggesting that the mechanisms of antagonism may differ between these groups of compounds. These findings suggest that selective straight, branched, and cyclic alcohols may act at multiple, discrete sites to antagonize the actions of ethanol and 1-butanol on L1-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

  15. Graphene-coated meshes for electroactive flow control devices utilizing two antagonistic functions of repellency and permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassian, Rassoul; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Sooyeun; Kim, Donggyu; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Seung-Min; Koratkar, Nikhil; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-10-01

    The wettability of graphene on various substrates has been intensively investigated for practical applications including surgical and medical tools, textiles, water harvesting, self-cleaning, oil spill removal and microfluidic devices. However, most previous studies have been limited to investigating the intrinsic and passive wettability of graphene and graphene hybrid composites. Here, we report the electrowetting of graphene-coated metal meshes for use as electroactive flow control devices, utilizing two antagonistic functions, hydrophobic repellency versus liquid permeability. Graphene coating was able to prevent the thermal oxidation and corrosion problems that plague unprotected metal meshes, while also maintaining its hydrophobicity. The shapes of liquid droplets and the degree of water penetration through the graphene-coated meshes were controlled by electrical stimuli based on the functional control of hydrophobic repellency and liquid permeability. Furthermore, using the graphene-coated metal meshes, we developed two active flow devices demonstrating the dynamic locomotion of water droplets and electroactive flow switching.

  16. Chemical Feature-Based Molecular Modeling of Urotensin-II Receptor Antagonists: Generation of Predictive Pharmacophore Model for Early Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhuti Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For a series of 35 piperazino-phthalimide and piperazino-isoindolinone based urotensin-II receptor (UT antagonists, a thoroughly validated 3D pharmacophore model has been developed, consisting of four chemical features: one hydrogen bond acceptor lipid (HBA_L, one hydrophobe (HY, and two ring aromatic (RA. Multiple validation techniques like CatScramble, test set prediction, and mapping analysis of advanced known antagonists have been employed to check the predictive power and robustness of the developed model. The results demonstrate that the best model, Hypo 1, shows a correlation (r of 0.902, a root mean square deviation (RMSD of 0.886, and the cost difference of 39.69 bits. The model obtained is highly predictive with good correlation values for both internal (r2=0.707 as well as external (r2=0.614 test set compounds. Moreover, the pharmacophore model has been used as a 3D query for virtual screening which served to detect prospective new lead compounds which can be further optimized as UT antagonists with potential for treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and up-regulation of LINGO-1 are involved in LINGO-1 antagonist regulated survival of cerebellar granular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang-Hui; Jin, Wei-Lin; Wu, Jiang; Mi, Sha; Ju, Gong

    2008-08-01

    LINGO-1 has been critically implicated in the central regulation of CNS axon regeneration and oligodendrocyte maturation. We have recently demonstrated that pretreatment with LINGO-1 antagonist (LINGO-1-Fc) inhibited low potassium-induced cerebellar granular neurons (CGNs) apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the neuroprotective mechanism of LINGO-1-Fc by Western blot and in situ GST pull-down assay. CGN cultures were preincubated in medium with LINGO-1-Fc or control protein at the concentration of 10 mug/ml for 2 h and then switched to low potassium medium in the presence of corresponding proteins. Cultures were harvested at indicated time intervals for successive analysis. Several apoptosis-associated signaling factors, GSK-3beta, ERK1/2, and Rho GTPases, were observed to be activated in response to potassium deprivation and the activation/dephosphorylation of GSK-3beta was suppressed by LINGO-1-Fc pretreatment compared with control group. Besides, the endogenous LINGO-1 expression level of CGN cultures was augmented by low potassium stimuli and restrained by LINGO-1 antagonist treatment. Although the protein level of p75(NTR) and Nogo-A were down-regulated in different patterns during apoptosis, neither of them was affected by LINGO-1-Fc application. Taken together, these results suggest a new mechanism of LINGO-1 antagonist regulated neuronal survival involving protein synthesis of LINGO-1 and inactivation of GSK-3 pathway.

  18. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of nonretinoid retinol binding protein 4 antagonists for the potential treatment of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Dobri, Nicoleta; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Golden, Kathy C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Racz, Boglarka; Qin, Qiong; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2014-09-25

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4(-/-) mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%.

  19. Structure-activity relationships in a new series of insecticidally active dioxatricycloalkenes derived by structural comparison of the GABA (. gamma. -aminobutyric acid) antagonists bicycloorthocarboxylates and endosulfan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Sawada, Yoshihiro; Mochida, Kazuo; Nakamura, Toshiie (Shimane Univ. (Japan)); Matsumura, Fumio (Univ. of California, Davis (USA))

    1990-05-01

    To study structural requirements for picrotoxinin-type GABA ({gamma}-aminobutyric acid) antagonists to interact with the receptor site, 5-substituted 4,6-dioxatricyclo(7.2.1.0{sup 2,8})dodec-10-enes and related compounds were prepared and examined for their insecticidal activity and potency in displacing ({sup 35}S)tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding. Compounds with high insecticidal activity possessed a phenyl group with an electron-withdrawing para substituent, a cycloalkyl group, or a C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} straight-chain alkyl group at the 5-position. The effect of the 5-substituents on insecticidal activity was very similar to that of the 1-substituents of the bicyloorthocarboxylate GABA antagonists. Representative dioxatricycloalkenes displaced the binding of the GABA antagonist ({sup 35}S)TBPS to housefly head membranes by 29-53% at 10 {mu}M. X-ray crystal structure analysis demonstrated that this class of compounds had structures superimposable on those of 4-tert-butylbicycloorthocarboxylates. These findings indicate that the dioxatricycloalkenes and some other analogues occupy the picrotoxinin binding site in such a way that the fourth interacting subsite of the receptor site accommodates the 5-substituent.

  20. Isolation and Characterisation of Antagonistic Actinobacteria from Mangrove Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Raghava Rao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 The aim of the present study was to isolate and screen actinobacteria having antagonistic activities against pathogenic microorganisms. A total of twenty actinobacteria strains were isolated from the mangrove sediment. Of these four active isolates were identified as Streptomyces species by means of morphological, physiological, biochemical and cultural characteristics. These isolates were subjected to shake flask fermentation and the secondary metabolites were extracted with ethyl acetate and screened for their antimicrobial activities against selected bacterial and fungal pathogens. The results showed that among the active isolates, four isolates (BC 01, BC 02, BC 03 and BC 04 showed promising activities against the selected test pathogens. These four extracted isolates were analyzed for UV Spectrophotometric and HPLC. Spectral data of the extracted compound revealed its antimicrobial nature. The UV spectrum of the methanol extracts for the active isolates showed absorbance peaks ranging between 207-223 nm. Two to three bioactive regions were detected on the HPLC. The results indicate that Streptomyces strains isolated from mangrove sediment produce potential antibacterial, antifungal and broad spectrum antibiotic compounds. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}