WorldWideScience

Sample records for ansto

  1. ANSTO - Program of Research 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The report outlines the planned research and development activities for 1994-1995 in five major research units: Advanced Materials, Applications of Nuclear Physics, Biomedicine and Health, Environmental Sciences and the Safety and Reliability Centre. A list of recent publication originated from ANSTO`s scientific and engineering activities is also included. ills.

  2. ANSTO. Annual Report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Organizational highlights during the period under review could be summarised as follow: ANSTO`s mission review identified three main objectives for the organization, namely, support for the Government`s nuclear policies; contribution towards industrial competitiveness and innovation; and the development of a high quality nuclear science base through maintenance of unique facilities and expertise to which academic institutions and other scientific organizations can have access. ANSTO became full partner in the Australian Centre for mine site rehabilitation research. An innovative arsenic treatment process was developed by ANSTO scientists through the Cooperative Research Centre for waste management and Pollution Control Ltd. Record sales by Australian Radioisotopes were announced, while the National Medical Cyclotron met most of Australia`s needs for cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals, thus reducing reliance on imports. New strategies for Communications and Information Management have been developed as an essential element in supporting ANSTO`s scientific and commercial activities. The Government reaffirmed its support for the concept of Triennium Funding for ANSTO, which provided financial certainty and facilitated longer planning of resource allocations. ills., tabs.

  3. ANSTO. Annual report 1990-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tasks and activities of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) are reviewed. Five priority areas of research have been identified which warrant the investment of resources in order to achieve national priorities: advanced ceramics, crystal and molecular structures, processing and utilisation of radioactive materials, radiopharmaceuticals waste management. The main achievements are briefly outlined. Detailed financial statements are also included. External revenues from the private sector represented 77% of the total revenue while export earnings were 6.3%. ANSTO has achieved a revenue level of 30.3% of its total appropriation, well ahead of the timetable set by Government for revenue earning by ANSTO. tabs., ills

  4. ANSTO strategic plan 1988-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Strategic Plan outlines the development of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation in the five year period 1988/89-1992/93. Its formulation is a continuation of the corporate planning process, initiated after the promulgation of the ANSTO Act in April 1987, which culminated in the publication of the ANSTO Corporate Plan, 1987. The Plan constitutes the basis for the development of business plans for each sector of the Organisation

  5. ANSTO's future plans for nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are four key themes in ANSTO's future plans for nuclear science and technology: 1) ANSTO plans for the future - within its established 'core business areas', following a rigorous process, and incorporating extensive interaction with organisations around Australia and overseas. 2) The replacement research reactor (RRR) - a Major National Research Facility and the cornerstone of ANSTO's future activities. 3) A number of business development initiatives that have been launched by ANSTO over the past year, under the banner of Good science is good business at ANSTO. 4) ANSTO involvement in the national research priorities that the Prime Minister announced last December, in particular, by pursuing new research in the security and forensics area; its contribution to the 'Safeguarding Australia' national research priority. The Replacement Research Reactor now under construction will make an enormous difference to the work that ANSTO can undertake, and that others can perform using ANSTO's facilities

  6. ANSTO - program of research 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direction and priorities of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) research program are outlined. During the period under review. Many of the initiatives of previous years come to fruition, adding significant strength and dimension to the Organisation's research capabilities. The advent of Australian Supercomputing Technology, a joint venture between Fujitsu Australia and ANSTO, will enable the grand challenges of computational science to underpin Ansto research generally but specifically in environmental science. The development of the accelerator mass spectrometry facilities on the tandem accelerator supported new initiatives in environmental research and management. The National Medical Cyclotron opens a new era in radiopharmaceutical research and development. Finally, the recently commissioned hot isostatic press provides a unique national resource for the development of new ceramics and their applications. The direction and priorities of Ansto's research program are determined through a combination of external and internal review. The Program Advisory Committees provide external evaluation against national objectives. New Committees have been formed and membership reflects the national and international nature of the ANSTO research programs. ills

  7. ANSTO. Annual Report 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizational highlights during the period under review could be summarised as follow: ANSTO's mission review identified three main objectives for the organization, namely, support for the Government's nuclear policies; contribution towards industrial competitiveness and innovation; and the development of a high quality nuclear science base through maintenance of unique facilities and expertise to which academic institutions and other scientific organizations can have access. ANSTO became full partner in the Australian Centre for mine site rehabilitation research. An innovative arsenic treatment process was developed by ANSTO scientists through the Cooperative Research Centre for waste management and Pollution Control Ltd. Record sales by Australian Radioisotopes were announced, while the National Medical Cyclotron met most of Australia's needs for cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals, thus reducing reliance on imports. New strategies for Communications and Information Management have been developed as an essential element in supporting ANSTO's scientific and commercial activities. The Government reaffirmed its support for the concept of Triennium Funding for ANSTO, which provided financial certainty and facilitated longer planning of resource allocations. ills., tabs

  8. ANSTO - Annual Report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of achievements during 1996-1997 at the Australian Nuclear Science and technology (ANSTO) include: release of the new ANSTO Strategic Plan for the period till June 2000 and the establishment of a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Board. In accordance with the Strategic Plan, ANSTO has continued to focus its activities in six core business areas. The major outcomes and outputs of this work are outlined. The majority of ANSTO strategic research was directed at several topics launched during the year, including: international cooperative research to enhance safety of nuclear facilities and safeguards for nuclear materials, environmental dynamics, global climate change, radioactive waste management, ecological sustainability of the mining and mineral industries, radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the 21st century and the design and process of novel interfaces. During the year major upgrades were made to he National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) and the Australian National Tandem Accelerator for Applied Research (ANTARES). The Annual Report documents the uses of these facilities by universities, industry, medicine and Government. Details are also provided of the organization development and support which support the core scientific areas. The financial statement for the year under review is also included

  9. ANSTO - Program of Research 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report outlines the planned research and development activities for 1994-1995 in five major research units: Advanced Materials, Applications of Nuclear Physics, Biomedicine and Health, Environmental Sciences and the Safety and Reliability Centre. A list of recent publication originated from ANSTO's scientific and engineering activities is also included. ills

  10. ANSTO - Annual Report 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Highlights of achievements during 1996-1997 at the Australian Nuclear Science and technology (ANSTO) include: release of the new ANSTO Strategic Plan for the period till June 2000 and the establishment of a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Board. In accordance with the Strategic Plan, ANSTO has continued to focus its activities in six core business areas. The major outcomes and outputs of this work are outlined. The majority of ANSTO strategic research was directed at several topics launched during the year, including: international cooperative research to enhance safety of nuclear facilities and safeguards for nuclear materials, environmental dynamics, global climate change, radioactive waste management, ecological sustainability of the mining and mineral industries, radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the 21st century and the design and process of novel interfaces. During the year major upgrades were made to he National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) and the Australian National Tandem Accelerator for Applied Research (ANTARES). The Annual Report documents the uses of these facilities by universities, industry, medicine and Government. Details are also provided of the organization development and support which support the core scientific areas. The financial statement for the year under review is also included tabs, ills, figs.

  11. ANSTO. Annual report 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and investment at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) has continued to be focussed on providing facilities that are of the world standard. The opening of the tandem accelerator and the supercomputing facility are examples of this commitment. The opening of the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) in March 1992 provides Australia with new capabilities in nuclear medicine since it produces radiopharmaceuticals which complements those produced by the HIFAR research reactor. The objectives and research projects of Advanced Materials, Application of Nuclear Physics, Biomedicine and Health, Environmental Science, Industrial Technology, the NMC, Nuclear Technology and ANSTO Engineering programs are presented. The financial statement for the year under review is also presented. tabs. ills

  12. ANSTO - Program of Research 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1993-1994 Program of Research outlines ANSTO's scientific activities in four key research areas, Advanced Materials, Application of Nuclear Physics, Biomedicine and Health and Environmental Science. The effort has been channeled into applied research and development in partnership with industry and appropriate national and international institutions and into interdisciplinary strategic research projects to enhance the scientific base of the key research activities. A list of scientific publications originated from these program areas is also included. ills

  13. ANSTO. Annual Report 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientific highlights during 1993-1994 financial year at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) as outlined in the Annual Report include: a new Synroc facility was commissioned to provide microsphere feedstocks and confirmed the choice of the dry precursor route for the Synroc conceptual plant; joint research in plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) with the Technical University of Clausthal, Germany; the design and manufacture of a prototype ceramic knee prosthesis; international collaboration established in the use of accelerator techniques to measure aerosol pollution; the discovery of new low temperature phases of palladium deuteride which crystal structures were determined using neutron scattering; elucidate the controversial age of the Venafro Chessmen using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Achievements in the biomedical fields included: the successful clinical evaluation of 123I-iododexetimide in patients with Alzheimer's disease or frontal lobe epilepsy and the completed clinical trial of technetium-99m 3B6/22 antibody for the diagnosis of lung cancer. ANSTO has also completed two studies on the treatment of contaminated wastes arising from the flooding of uranium mines in Germany and advised the German Ministry of Economics on treatment options, developed new processes for the production of high purity cerium compounds from monazite concentrates and a computer software to assess the likelihood of a pollution release from the failure of industrial equipment and containment or clean-up systems. Details are also given of the Corporate and Information Services activities. The financial statements for the year under review is included. ills., tabs

  14. The ANSTO waste management action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levins, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    ANSTO`s Waste Management Action Plan is a five-year program which addresses legacy issues that have arisen from the accumulation of radioactive wastes at Lucas Heights over the last forty years. Following an extensive review of waste management practices, a detailed Action Plan was prepared involving seventeen projects in the areas of solid wastes, liquid wastes, control of effluents and emissions, spent reactor fuel and organisational issues. The first year of the Waste Management Action Plan has resulted in significant achievements, especially in the areas of improved storage of solid wastes, stabilisation of uranium scrap, commissioning and operation of a scanning system for low-level waste drums, treatment of intermediate-level liquid wastes and improvements in the methods for monitoring of spent fuel storage facilities. The main goal of the Waste Management Action Plan is to achieve consistency, by the year 2000, with best practice as identified in the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards and Guidelines currently under development by the IAEA. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  15. ANSTO. Annual Report 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    Scientific highlights during 1993-1994 financial year at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) as outlined in the Annual Report include: a new Synroc facility was commissioned to provide microsphere feedstocks and confirmed the choice of the dry precursor route for the Synroc conceptual plant; joint research in plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) with the Technical University of Clausthal, Germany; the design and manufacture of a prototype ceramic knee prosthesis; international collaboration established in the use of accelerator techniques to measure aerosol pollution; the discovery of new low temperature phases of palladium deuteride which crystal structures were determined using neutron scattering; elucidate the controversial age of the Venafro Chessmen using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Achievements in the biomedical fields included: the successful clinical evaluation of {sup 123}I-iododexetimide in patients with Alzheimer`s disease or frontal lobe epilepsy and the completed clinical trial of technetium-99m 3B6/22 antibody for the diagnosis of lung cancer. ANSTO has also completed two studies on the treatment of contaminated wastes arising from the flooding of uranium mines in Germany and advised the German Ministry of Economics on treatment options, developed new processes for the production of high purity cerium compounds from monazite concentrates and a computer software to assess the likelihood of a pollution release from the failure of industrial equipment and containment or clean-up systems. Details are also given of the Corporate and Information Services activities. The financial statements for the year under review is included. ills., tabs.

  16. ANSTO Strategic Plan 2000/2001 - 2004/2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new five-year plan outlines strategies to prepare ANSTO for the opportunities provided by the replacement research reactor, building on the successes of its predecessor plan in reforming the organisation.The Strategic Plan focuses on the innovation process itself as a driver of future prosperity. It embodies the Commonwealth Government's emphasis on an outputs and outcomes framework to deliver results, and to further strengthen accountability in light of the significant research investment at ANSTO. A balanced Scorecard approach of driving strategic and business processes through four different perspectives will ensure the efficient achievement of relevant results. ANSTO is responsible for delivering specific scientific services and products to government, industry, academia and other research organisations. Activities are grouped into five externally focused core business areas.These are the areas through which ANSTO will develop new knowledge, deliver quality services, support business opportunities and ensure that nuclear science and technology and related capabilities provide an innovative impetus to benefit society. A separate internal stream provides support for organisational development. The challenge of the next five years is to streamline the innovation process to improve delivery of results. ANSTO is a knowledge-based organisation with the major strengths being its people, a multidisciplinary approach to its operation, and its facilities.Through a collaborative effort driven by this strategic plan, ANSTO will be able to deliver new and exciting outcomes that can be put into practice by participants and clients across Australia. ANSTO's strategic direction, as presented in this plan, is owned by the Board and staff

  17. CURRENT ANSTO RESEARCH ON WASTEFORM DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, E.R.; Perera, D.S.; Stewart, M.W.A.; Begg, B.D.; Carter, M.L.; Day, R.A.; Moricca, S.; Smith, K.L.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Hanna, J.V.

    2003-02-27

    Current ANSTO scientific research on wasteform development for mainly high-level radioactive waste is directed towards practical applications. Titanate wasteform products we have developed or are developing are aimed at immobilization of: (a) tank wastes and sludges; (b) U-rich wastes from radioisotope production from reactor irradiation of UO2 targets; (c) Al-rich wastes arising from reprocessing of Al-clad fuels; (d) 99Tc; (e) high- Mo wastes arising from reprocessing of U-Mo fuels and (f) partitioned Cs-rich wastes. Other wasteforms include encapsulated zeolites or silica/alumina beads for immobilization of 129I. Wasteform production techniques cover hot isostatic and uniaxial pressing, sintering, and cold-crucible melting. In addition, building on previous work on speciation and leach resistance of Cs in cementitious products, we are studying geopolymers. Although we have a strong focus on candidate wasteforms for actual wastes, we have a considerable program directed at basic understanding of the wasteforms in regard to crystal chemistry, their dissolution behavior in aqueous media, radiation damage effects and processing techniques.

  18. ANSTO strategic plan 1996/1997-1999/2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Strategic Plan for ANSTO is the result of major reviews of its processes, capabilities, activities, performance and structures. It responds to the views of its stakeholders to provide Australia with the capacity to benefit from the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. Five core areas are identified. Within these areas, the quality services are being delivered and the development of knowledge has the potential for generating future economic benefits, as well as for sustaining essential nuclear-related capabilities. In addition, the strategic plan provides the framework through which ANSTO will provide specific, on demand scientific services to government, industry, academia and research organisations. The plan sets out objectives and strategies which the Board and ANSTO staff believe will ensure that the organisation will continue to fulfil its mission. The plan also identifies the planning processes and the mechanisms for performance evaluation

  19. ANSTO strategic plan 1996/1997-1999/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This Strategic Plan for ANSTO is the result of major reviews of its processes, capabilities, activities, performance and structures. It responds to the views of its stakeholders to provide Australia with the capacity to benefit from the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. Five core areas are identified. Within these areas, the quality services are being delivered and the development of knowledge has the potential for generating future economic benefits, as well as for sustaining essential nuclear-related capabilities. In addition, the strategic plan provides the framework through which ANSTO will provide specific, on demand scientific services to government, industry, academia and research organisations. The plan sets out objectives and strategies which the Board and ANSTO staff believe will ensure that the organisation will continue to fulfil its mission. The plan also identifies the planning processes and the mechanisms for performance evaluation

  20. ANSTO strategic plan.. an update 1991/2-1995/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization's research priorities have been reassesed and determined within the national context. This involve a close association with industry, academia and the general community. Seventy percent of ANSTO's research is applied and is market driven, while thirty percent is longer term and basic research and addresses national economic and environmental objectives as determined by the Government. ills

  1. A review of vacuum ARC ion source research at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P.J.; Noorman, J.T.; Watt, G.C. [ANSTO, Menai (Australia)

    1996-08-01

    The authors talk briefly describes the history and current status of vacuum arc ion source research at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). In addition, the author makes some mention of the important role of previous Vacuum Arc Ion Source Workshops in fostering the development of this research field internationally. During the period 1986 - 89, a type of plasma centrifuge known as a vacuum arc centrifuge was developed at ANSTO as part of a research project on stable isotope separation. In this device, a high current vacuum arc discharge was used to produce a metal plasma which was subsequently rotated in an axial magnetic field. The high rotational speeds (10{sup 5} - 10{sup 6} rad sec{sup {minus}1}) achievable with this method produce centrifugal separation of ions with different mass:charge ratios such as isotopic species. The first portent of things to come occurred in 1985 when Dr. Ian Brown visited ANSTO`s Lucas Heights Research Laboratories and presented a talk on the metal vapour vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source which had only recently been invented by Brown and co-workers, J. Galvin and R. MacGill, at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. For those of us involved in vacuum arc centrifuge research, this was an exciting development primarily because the metal vapour vacuum arc plasma source was common to both devices. Thus, a type of arc, which had since the 1930`s been extensively investigated as a means of switching high current loads, had found wider application as a useful plasma source.

  2. ANSTO's radioactive waste management policy. Preliminary environmental review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For over forty years, radioactive wastes have been generated by ANSTO (and its predecessor, the AAEC) from the operation of nuclear facilities, the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial use, and from various research activities. the quantities and activities of radioactive waste currently at Lucas Heights are very small compared to many other nuclear facilities overseas, especially those in countries with nuclear power program. Nevertheless, in the absence of a repository for nuclear wastes in Australia and guidelines for waste conditioning, the waste inventory has been growing steadily. This report reviews the status of radioactive waste management at ANSTO, including spent fuel management, treatment of effluents and environmental monitoring. It gives details of: relevant legislative, regulatory and related requirements; sources and types of radioactive waste generated at ANSTO; waste quantities and activities (both cumulative and annual arisings); existing practices and procedures for waste management and environmental monitoring; recommended broad strategies for dealing with radioactive waste management issues. Detailed proposals on how the recommendations should be implemented is the subject of a companion internal document, the Radioactive Waste Management Action Plan 1996-2000 which provides details of the tasks to be undertaken, milestones and resource requirements. 44 refs., 2 tabs., 18 figs

  3. Radioactive waste management at ANSTO - Managing current and historic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) carries out nuclear research and development at Lucas Heights about 40 km southeast of Sydney, Australia. The 10 MW heavy water research reactor (HIFAR) has operated at Lucas Heights site for over 40 years with associated radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities and a wide range of nuclear science and technology R and D is carried out. Most of the radioactive waste generated by these activities is stored at the site. Following a review of ANSTO's waste management facilities and practices in 1996, an integrated five-year Waste Management Action Plan (WMAP) was established to address legacy issues and ensure that ANSTO waste management met international standards. Topics undertaken under the Waste Management Action Plan (WMAP) included construction and operation of improved storage facilities for low-level solid radioactive waste, better monitoring of storage facilities for spent research reactor fuel and intermediate level liquid wastes, development of processes to convert liquid and solid wastes into forms more suitable for long term storage and disposal, improved characterisation of wastes and development of a database for radioactive waste. (author)

  4. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Annual Report 1997-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This is the 46th Annual Report of ANSTO or its predecessor, AAEC outlining the quality services being delivered and the development of knowledge in areas where ANSTO`s nuclear science and technology and related capabilities are of strategic and technical benefit. ANSTO is reporting against established performance indicators within the the five core scientific business areas: International strategic relevance of Nuclear Science; Core nuclear facilities operation and development; Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology to the understanding of natural processes; Treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; and Competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry. Also presented are the objectives, outcomes and activities which supports the core scientific areas by providing best practice corporate support, safety management, information and human resource management for ANSTO staff

  5. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2001 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC-controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2001 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2001 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This is well below the ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv per year for off-site doses that ANSTO has set and much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv per year (above natural background and medical doses) and the natural background dose in Australia of 1.5 mSv per year (Webb et al; 1999). It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  6. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Annual Report 1997-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the 46th Annual Report of ANSTO or its predecessor, AAEC outlining the quality services being delivered and the development of knowledge in areas where ANSTO's nuclear science and technology and related capabilities are of strategic and technical benefit. ANSTO is reporting against established performance indicators within the the five core scientific business areas: International strategic relevance of Nuclear Science; Core nuclear facilities operation and development; Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology to the understanding of natural processes; Treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; and Competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry. Also presented are the objectives, outcomes and activities which supports the core scientific areas by providing best practice corporate support, safety management, information and human resource management for ANSTO staff

  7. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Annual Report 2000-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ANSTO's main activities and outputs during the year under review (1 July 2000- 30 June 2001) are presented in this report. Highlights include: the replacement research reactor project, to be completed in 2005, proceeded on schedule and within budget, a great deal of effort has been expended on the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the reactor, as well as the review of the detailed engineering design; the fifth shipment of spent fuel was made successfully, so that more than half of the spent fuel accumulated over the entire lifetime of HIFAR has now been shipped overseas; radiopharmaceutical sales reached $17.9 million, a $2 million increase over the previous year. Another milestone this year, not only for ANSTO but Australia as a whole, was the entry into force in January of an Integrated Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA. ANSTO, together with the Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office have led the world on the implementation of integrated safeguards, and other countries are now following. In the health sector, ANSTO's reputation and capabilities continued to grow with Therapeutic Goods Administration approval for FDGenTM, a metabolic tracer used in the diagnosis of the staging of cancer in cardiac imaging and the imaging of certain neurological conditions. In the field of strategic research, the use of neutron scattering techniques to understand the structure of a range of materials from charcoal to polymers has yielded significant results. In response to funding challenges, the organisation increased external earnings, improved efficiencies and reduced expenditure on research and development. With regard to revenue, ANSTO generated $35.8 million (1999-2000, $32.2 million) from external services, representing 29.5% of total income, excluding capital use charge. With the aim of establishing an appropriate base for the future, ANSTO undertook an output pricing review with the Department of Finance. This review concluded that the price for operating

  8. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2000 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2000 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2000 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1 % of the 1 milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  9. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the 1 millisievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  10. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the I milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron (authors)

  11. The rotamak - contributions from ANSTO and Flinders University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The investigation of plasma/field configurations of the compact torus variety is of current interest in the field of fusion research. Two configurations of this genre are the field reversed configuration (FRC), which does not have an externally applied toroidal magnetic field, and the spherical tokamak (ST) which possesses such a field. Both of these compact torus concepts, as studied outside Australia, suffer from the very serious disadvantage that they are inherently pulsed devices; the toroidal plasma current is not maintained indefinitely. The rotamak is a compact torus configuration having the unique and distinctive feature that the toroidal plasma current is driven in a steady-state, non-inductive fashion by means of the application of a rotating magnetic field. In its basic form, the rotamak is operated as an FRC. However, by means of a simple modification, a steady toroidal magnetic field can be added to the basic rotamak apparatus and the configuration then becomes that of an ST. The rotamak concept was conceived and developed in Australia and the bulk of investigations in this field, both theoretical and experimental, have been undertaken at Flinders University (1979-1998) and AAEC/ANSTO (1982-1988). This talk will cover the history of the project in this country, will dwell on the marvelous interaction which flourished between the two research groups and will finish with the news that the rotamak concept has been enthusiastically embraced by fusion research teams in the United States

  12. Environmental and Effluent Monitoring at ANSTO Sites, 2002-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) from January 2002 to June 2003. Potential effective dose rates to the general public from airborne discharges from the LHSTC site were less than 0.01 mSv/year, well below the 1 mSv/year dose rate limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the Australian National Occupational Health and Safety Commission. The effective dose rates to hypothetical individuals potentially exposed to radiation in routine liquid effluent discharges from the LHSTC were recently calculated to be less than 0.001 mSv/year. This is much less than dose rates estimated for members of public potentially exposed to airborne emissions. The levels of tritium detected in roundwater and stormwater at the LHSTC were less than the Australian drinking water guidelines. The airborne and liquid effluent emissions from the NMC were below the ARPANSA-approved notification levels and NSW EPA limits, respectively. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and the NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose experienced by members of the Australian public. (authors)

  13. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Annual Report 2001-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details outcomes, achievements and work underway. It has been a year of significant advancement with the awarding by ARPANSA in April of the Licence to Construct the Replacement Research Reactor at Lucas Heights after almost 10 years of substantiation and approval processes. Other operational highlights during the year included: the award of several facility licences by ARPANSA under their new procedures, including a licence for the ongoing operation of the HIFAR reactor and radiopharmaceutical production; the launch by the ANSTO business unit ARI in April 2002 of LeukoScan, a technetium-99m labelled diagnostic radiopharmaceutical for imaging infection; maintenance of Australia's leading role in the development of new nuclear safeguards procedures by cooperating with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to become the first country to adopt integrated safeguards; formal accreditation of ANSTO as a member of the IAEA's Network of Analytical Laboratories, the network that supports the international nuclear safeguards program; construction of a purpose-built waste treatment and packaging facility to enable state-of-the-art processing for ANSTO's low level radioactive waste in preparation for removal to the national low-level radioactive waste repository. Scientific highlights included: ANSTO's development of two new technologies that will lead to cleaner and more environmentally sustainable operations for uranium processors; new methods for depositing ceramics coatings at low temperatures for applications ranging from fibre optic communications to corrosion and scratch resistance; ANSTO sustaining its position as a world leader in carbon dating samples following the introduction of new sample preparation procedures that dramatically reduce the influence of background levels on the result and studies that provided information relating to the management and sustainable development of fishing and mining in the marine environment. ANSTO scientists, in

  14. VEGA, STAR, SIRIUS and ANTARES – from 1 to 10 MV: Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is recognized as one of the most significant advances in analytical isotope research in the 20th century. Since the 1980’s its impact in all subjects related to the study of planet Earth has been immeasurable. Commensurate with all these advances, numerous revolutions have occurred in AMS technology with the continual drive to reduce complexity, and improve performance. The ANSTO AMS Facility has and is contributing to this process. We have recently acquired two new NEC AMS systems at 1 MV (VEGA) and a 6 MV (SIRIUS) NEC plus a full suite of new sample preparation laboratories for actinides and cosmogenics. This seminar will provide an overview of the new ANSTO Centre for Accelerator Science and also some novel applications of in-situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in landscape change and glaciology. (author)

  15. Generationenübergreifende Entwicklung gesellschaftlicher Perspektiven in der Niederlausitz. Ergebnisse des Projektes Anstoß

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    "Das Projekt 'Anstoß - Generationenübergreifende Entwicklung gesellschaftlicher Perspektiven in der Niederlausitz' setzt gemeinsam mit Bewohnerinnen und Bewohnern vor Ort positive Impulse für die weitere Entwicklung der Region. Menschen verschiedener Generationen arbeiten in Zukunftsprojekten, in denen die persönliche und regionale Identität, berufliche Kompetenz und demokratische Handlungsbereitschaft gestärkt werden. Unterstütz von Verantwortlichen aus Wirtschaft und öffentlicher Verwaltung...

  16. Establishing a process for handling radiation protection and ALARA reviews of projects at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the exciting world of emerging opportunities, establishing new projects are often synonymous with a rollercoaster ride. Even in the best circumstances there is always something lost along the way. Very often this will be the small crack that might lead to the large break a few generations down the line. With the big focus on new developments at ANSTO, it has become necessary to have Radiation Protection Advisors who will be available to provide the inputs and expertise needed to influence the designs in the earliest phases of development. Specifically looking at designs where there might be no operational experience available, judgement has to be made on best engineering practise and taking into account best estimate values for the radiological exposures related to the design. A special process is being developed to highlight the inputs needed from the designers and engineers in every phase of the design process. This process establishes the steps to be followed by the Radiation Protection Advisors in performing radiation protection reviews and identifies the outputs for every phase. They are crucial in declaring design baselines and proceeding to the next phase of the project design. These reviews of the design, operation and maintenance of the systems and components is done taking into consideration international guidelines for good radiation protection and nuclear engineering practise with regards to material composition, system design, layout, operation, maintenance and waste minimisation. The aim is to integrate this process into the overall ANSTO project management process. It will be done by applying it to the various ANSTO capital expenditure and other projects which may be in various stages of development. This will help to identify process shortcomings and to measure its efficiency. Ultimately it will be tested in its entirety from the Concept to the Detail design phase and help to provide baseline information and reasoning throughout the facility

  17. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). Annual Report 1998-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1998/1999 Annual Report summarises ANSTO's performance and progress made on several major infrastructure projects and its research and development program. On 3 May 1999, the Government announced its support for a Replacement Research Reactor at Lucas Heights; the site licence has been granted by ARPANSA and the request for tender distributed to four pre qualified vendors. A significant effort during the year under review was directed towards the Replacement Research Reactor Project. Main objectives and achievements are also reported against established performance indicators within the the five core scientific business areas: International strategic relevance of Nuclear Science; Core nuclear facilities operation and development; Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology to the understanding of natural processes; Treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; and Competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry. Also presented are the objectives and activities which supports the core scientific areas by providing best practice corporate support, safety management, information and human resource management for ANSTO staff. The organization has developed its 1999/2000 Operational Plan predominantly on a project-based approach

  18. Neutron scattering science at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron scattering science at ANSTO is integrated into a number of fields in the Australian scientific and industrial research communities. The unique properties of the neutron are being used to investigate problems in chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering and biology. The reactor HIFAR at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation research laboratories is the only neutron source in Australia suitable for neutron scattering science. A suite of instruments provides a range of opportunities for the neutron scattering community that extends throughout universities, government and industrial research laboratories. Plans to replace the present research reactor with a modern multi-purpose research reactor are well advanced. The experimental and analysis equipment associated with a modern research reactor will permit the establishment of a national centre for world class neutron science research focussed on the structure and functioning of materials, industrial irradiations and analyses in support of Australian manufacturing, minerals, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals and information science industries. A brief overview will be presented of all the instruments presently available at ANSTO with emphasis on the SANS instrument. This will be followed by a description of the replacement research reactor and its instruments. (author)

  19. Neutron scattering science at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, Robert [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (Australia)

    2000-10-01

    Neutron scattering science at ANSTO is integrated into a number of fields in the Australian scientific and industrial research communities. The unique properties of the neutron are being used to investigate problems in chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering and biology. The reactor HIFAR at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation research laboratories is the only neutron source in Australia suitable for neutron scattering science. A suite of instruments provides a range of opportunities for the neutron scattering community that extends throughout universities, government and industrial research laboratories. Plans to replace the present research reactor with a modern multi-purpose research reactor are well advanced. The experimental and analysis equipment associated with a modern research reactor will permit the establishment of a national centre for world class neutron science research focussed on the structure and functioning of materials, industrial irradiations and analyses in support of Australian manufacturing, minerals, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals and information science industries. A brief overview will be presented of all the instruments presently available at ANSTO with emphasis on the SANS instrument. This will be followed by a description of the replacement research reactor and its instruments. (author)

  20. A high energy, heavy ion microprobe for ion beam research on the tandem accelerator at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.D.; Siegele, R.; Dytlewski, N.

    1996-04-01

    A comprehensive review is given on the production and use of heavy ion beams with spot sizes of a few {mu}m. The development of a high energy, heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO and its possible applications are discussed. The microprobe is designed to focus a wide range of ion beam types, from light ions such as protons up to ions as heavy as iodine. Details of the ion beam optics, optical calculations and a description of the proposed microbeam design are given. The unique combination of high energy, heavy ions and improved detection systems will provide high sensitivity elemental composition and depth profiling information, allowing surface topography and 3D surface reconstruction to be performed on a broad range of materials. 86 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs.

  1. ANSTO training for radiological emergency preparedness and response in South East Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the collaborative and systematic approach to training for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response and the outcomes of this work with ANSTO's South East Asian counterparts in Thailand, the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia. The standards and criteria being applied are discussed, along with the methods, design and conduct of workshops, table-top and field exercises. The following elements of this training will be presented: (a) identifying the priority areas for training through needs analysis; (b) strengthening individual professional expertise through a structured approach to training; and (c) enhancing individual Agency and National nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response arrangements and capabilities. Whilst the work is motivated by nuclear security concerns, the implications for effective and sustainable emergency response to any nuclear or radiological incidents are noted.

  2. A high energy, heavy ion microprobe for ion beam research on the tandem accelerator at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive review is given on the production and use of heavy ion beams with spot sizes of a few μm. The development of a high energy, heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO and its possible applications are discussed. The microprobe is designed to focus a wide range of ion beam types, from light ions such as protons up to ions as heavy as iodine. Details of the ion beam optics, optical calculations and a description of the proposed microbeam design are given. The unique combination of high energy, heavy ions and improved detection systems will provide high sensitivity elemental composition and depth profiling information, allowing surface topography and 3D surface reconstruction to be performed on a broad range of materials

  3. Portfolio of recent climate change studies utilizing AMS at ANTARES, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to the measurement of the radionuclides 14C, 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl has dramatically increased our understanding of factors that affect climate and has led to a greater understanding of natural processes. Using the ANTARES AMS facility at ANSTO we are able to analyse samples containing as few as 105 atoms of these radionuclides. Cosmogenic radionuclides produced by the interaction of cosmic rays with the upper atmosphere and exposed surface rocks are stored in natural archives. By measuring small variations in the concentrations of these isotopes over time, information can be inferred about the systems governing these changes. Over the last four years we have undertaken a broad range of climate change and environmental studies, based on the ultra-sensitive technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Some specific examples of projects investigating the ice sheet at Law Dome, Antarctica and minerals extracted from geological surface formations will be given

  4. Review of the ANSTO submission on the site geological investigations for the RRR at Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) and ANSTO's Consolidated Seismic Report were reviewed by ARPANSA's Regulatory Branch, and by an IAEA consultant to ARPANSA. It included a recommendation by the IAEA Peer Review Team (June 2001) that an additional study be undertaken for the Lucas Heights site in accordance with IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-S1. In particular this related to regional and local investigations to determine whether there exists a potential for surface faulting at the site area, to formulate the investigations that should be used to determine whether or not any faults in the area should be considered capable. The CEO of ARPANSA requested ANSTO to undertake such a task. The reviews that have been undertaken by experts from Geoscience Australia and the IAEA expert contracted by ARPANSA give confidence that the seismic design of the reactor structures, systems, and components important for safety should not be affected by the fault through the excavations for the foundations of the reactor building. The basis is the conclusions reached by these experts that the fault discovered is very old and not capable under either the USNRC Criteria or the IAEA Criteria. It is not now active, has not been active in the geologically recent past and is unlikely to re-activate within the foreseeable lifespan of the proposed facility. Consequently, this pre-existing fault presents no greater risk than the surrounding unfaulted material. Thus, the replacement reactor need not be designed for such displacement. The existence of this 'incapable' fault does not impact on the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment from which the seismic design basis for the reactor was derived. Therefore, the existing design response spectrum accepted in the Regulatory Assessment Report as the basis for seismic design of structures, systems and components, and approved in the Construction Licence, has not changed and remains adequately conservative with regard to vibratory motion at the site

  5. Atmospheric transport modelling of time resolved 133Xe emissions from the isotope production facility ANSTO, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöppner, M; Plastino, W; Hermanspahn, N; Hoffmann, E; Kalinowski, M; Orr, B; Tinker, R

    2013-12-01

    The verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) relies amongst other things on the continuous and worldwide monitoring of radioxenon. The characterization of the existing and legitimate background, which is produced mainly by nuclear power plants and isotope production facilities, is of high interest to improve the capabilities of the monitoring network. However, the emissions from legitimate sources can usually only be estimated. For this paper historic source terms of (133)Xe emissions from the isotope production facility at ANSTO, Sydney, Australia, have been made available in a daily resolution. Based on these high resolution data, different source term sets with weekly, monthly and yearly time resolution have been compiled. These different sets are then applied together with atmospheric transport modelling (ATM) to predict the concentration time series at two radioxenon monitoring stations. The results are compared with each other in order to examine the improvement of the prediction capability depending on the used time resolution of the most dominant source term in the region.

  6. The environmental radiological atmospheric impact modelling system (ERAIMS) at ANSTO, Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decision-makers managing the emergency response to an actual or potential release of airborne radionuclides from the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) require real-time estimates of the trajectory and dispersion of any released radionuclides. Complex terrain surrounding the LHSTC has an impact on the downwind trajectory and atmospheric dispersion of released radionuclides. Under certain atmospheric conditions, the released cloud could be transported into the valley without direct impact on the nearest population. This entrapment in the steep sided, narrow valley, might mean that the cloud could remain more concentrated and cause impacts on more distant receptor populations down the valley. Alternatively, the cloud could disperse directly across the valley to the nearest residential population without any significant entrainment into, or impact, on the valley. The Environmental Radiological Atmospheric Impact Modelling System (ERAIMS) is a realtime response model which has been developed for the LHSTC. It estimates downwind impacts based on a pre-set source term, prevailing meteorological conditions which are measured every 15 minutes, receptor characteristics and exposure pathways. This paper describes the total system, from collection and calibration of meteorological data, to the running of the models in the ANSTO emergency response facility and display of data for controllers of any emergency. The current assessment of different atmospheric dispersion models available for use in this facility will also be discussed in terms of atmospheric tracer studies conducted in the region and International Best Practice. Copyright (2000) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  7. Characterisation of a {delta}E-E particle telescope using the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegele, Rainer [Environment Division, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, PMB 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: rns@ansto.gov.au; Reinhard, Mark [Environment Division, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, PMB 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Prokopovich, Dale [Environment Division, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, PMB 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail [Environment Division, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, PMB 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Cohen, David D. [Environment Division, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, PMB 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Rosenfeld, Anatoly B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, NSW 2522 (Australia); Cornelius, Iwan M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, NSW 2522 (Australia); Wroe, Andrew [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, NSW 2522 (Australia); Lerch, Michael L.F. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, NSW 2522 (Australia); Fazzi, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Pola, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133, Milan (Italy); Agosteo, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133, Milan (Italy)

    2007-07-15

    Semiconductor planar processing technology has spurned the development of novel radiation detectors with applications in space, high energy physics, medical diagnostics, radiation protection and cancer therapy. The ANSTO heavy ion microprobe, which allows a wide range of ions to be focused into spot sizes of a few micrometers in diameter, has proven to be an essential tool for characterising these detectors using the Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) imaging technique. The use of different ions and the wide range of available energies on the heavy ion microprobe, allows the testing of these devices with ionising particles associated with different values of linear energy transfer (LET). Quadruple coincidence measurements have been used to map the charge collection characteristics of a monolithic {delta}E-E telescope. This was done through simultaneous measurement of the spatial coordinates of the microbeam relative to the sample and the response of both detector elements. The resulting charge collection maps were used to better understand the functionality of the device as well as to ascertain ways in which future device designs could be modified to improve performance.

  8. Regulatory review methods: Review of ANSTO application for a facility licence to operate the OPAL research reactor in Australia. Case study: Review of operational readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the review methods used by assessors of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) in advising the CEO of ARPANSA on the application to by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) for a facility licence authorising it to operate the OPAL reactor. It focuses on an aspect of that review that considered the operational readiness demonstrated by ANSTO in relation to the OPAL reactor. The review involved the systematic audit and assessment of the OPAL Business Management System against a comprehensive set of guidelines which were previously available to ANSTO. Assessment was also undertaken against international standards, principally the IAEA Safety Series. The paper concludes that there is benefit to the assessment of nuclear and radiation safety of a regulator gaining a comprehensive knowledge of the business management system implemented by the operating organisation. This benefit extends beyond the licensing decision into operation using targeted inspection and informed application of regulatory check and balances. (author)

  9. The small angle neutron scattering instrument on the HIFAR reactor (ANSTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) instrument on ANSTO's HIFAR reactor is a conventional design with a number of unique features. The instrument has a 5 m collimation length and sample-to-detector distance range of 1.5 - 5 m. The monochromator and first section of the collimator are located within the reactor containment building, and the second section of the collimator, the sample position and the detector system are located in an external, purpose-built laboratory. The monochromator is a double multilayer system in a dog-leg configuration that is efficient (>90%) at selecting the required neutron wavelength, and efficient at rejecting all other wavelengths, as well as fast neutrons and γ-radiation. At present, the multilayer monochromators are single d-spacing, planar geometry used in reflection mode, and d-spacing in the range 40 - 120 Angstroms will permit the selection of neutron wavelength and wavelength spread over a considerable range (λ 2 - 8 Angstroms andΔλ/λ 10 - 20%). Future developments in multilayer monochromators will enable beam focussing, polarised beam production and additional wavelength spread control. The large 64 x 64cm2 active area position sensitive detector (PSD) was designed and constructed at ANSTO in collaboration with BNL and ILL. The detector is a multi-wire proportional chamber of conventional design with greater than 60% detection efficiency and a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The gas mixture is 190 kPa 3 He plus 100 kPa CF4, and the neutron energy resolution on the anode grid is typically 15% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active volume is determined by the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 x 5mm2) is thereby defined by the wire geometry. The charge induced in the 128 x 128 cathode grids is processed by 16-channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator modules developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1V/fC, noise linewidth of 0.4fC (fwhm) and channel

  10. Improved resolution and sensitivity on the ANSTO microprobe and it's application to {mu}-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegele, R. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), PMB1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)], E-mail: rns@ansto.gov.au; Kachenko, A.G. [Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ionescu, M.; Cohen, D.D. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), PMB1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2009-06-15

    We report on the improved spatial resolution of the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe, achieved through the use of a higher brightness ion source for hydrogen. The improved resolution will be demonstrated for applications of {mu}-PIXE. With the higher brightness source, a 3 {mu}m resolution was achieved for {mu}-PIXE elemental analysis. This is illustrated in high resolution images of nickel (Ni)-hyperaccumulating Hybanthus floribundus subsp. floribundus leaf tissues, where individual cells were clearly visible in the acquired elemental images. The higher resolution images illustrated that Ni was localised in epidermal cell walls.

  11. Exploring the structure of biological macromolecules in solution using Quokka, the small angle neutron scattering instrument, at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Kathleen, E-mail: kw@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Jeffries, Cy M.; Knott, Robert B.; Sokolova, Anna [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Jacques, David A. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Duff, Anthony P. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2015-10-21

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is widely used to extract structural parameters, shape and other types of information from a vast array of materials. The technique is applied to biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution to reveal information often not accessible by other techniques. SANS measurements on biomolecules present some particular challenges however, one of which is suitable instrumentation. This review details SANS experiments performed on two well-characterised globular proteins (lysozyme and glucose isomerase) using Quokka, the recently commissioned SANS instrument at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The instrument configuration as well as data collection and reduction strategies for biological investigations are discussed and act as a general reference for structural biologists who use the instrument. Both model independent analysis of the two proteins and ab initio modelling illustrate that Quokka-SANS data can be used to successfully model the overall shapes of proteins in solution, providing a benchmark for users.

  12. Optimisation and fabrication of a composite pyrolytic graphite monochromator for the Pelican instrument at the ANSTO OPAL reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, A.K., E-mail: kafreund@free.f [Via Cordis, 92, rue Abbe de l' Epee, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Yu, D.H. [ANSTO, Bragg Institute, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2011-04-01

    The triple monochromator for the TOF neutron spectrometer Pelican at ANSTO has been fully optimised in terms of overall performance, including the determination of the thickness of the pyrolytic graphite crystals. A total of 24 composite crystals were designed and fabricated. The calculated optimum thickness of 1.3 mm and the length of 15 cm of the monochromator crystals, that are not available commercially, were obtained by cleaving and soldering with indium. An extensive characterisation of the crystals using X-ray and neutron diffraction was conducted before and after the cleaving and bonding processes. The results proved that no damage was introduced during fabrication and showed that the design goals were fully met. The measured peak reflectivity and rocking curve widths were indeed in an excellent agreement with theory. In addition to the superior efficiency of the triple monochromator achieved by this novel approach, the amount of the crystal material required could be reduced by 1/3.

  13. AMS analyses at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, E.M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Physics Division

    1998-03-01

    The major use of ANTARES is Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) with {sup 14}C being the most commonly analysed radioisotope - presently about 35 % of the available beam time on ANTARES is used for {sup 14}C measurements. The accelerator measurements are supported by, and dependent on, a strong sample preparation section. The ANTARES AMS facility supports a wide range of investigations into fields such as global climate change, ice cores, oceanography, dendrochronology, anthropology, and classical and Australian archaeology. Described here are some examples of the ways in which AMS has been applied to support research into the archaeology, prehistory and culture of this continent`s indigenous Aboriginal peoples. (author)

  14. Regulatory review methods: review of the ANSTO application for a facility licence to operate the OPAL research reactor in Australia: Case study review of operational readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will examine the review methods used by assessors of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency in advising the CEO of ARPANSA on the application by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) for a facility licence authorising it to operate the OPAL reactor. In particular it will focus on an aspect of that review that considered the operational readiness demonstrated by ANSTO in relation to the OPAL reactor as an aspect of the review of safety of the OPAL reactor. The review of operational readiness examined the extent to which the managerial, procedural and administrative controls that were proposed for the reactor were appropriate and the extent to which they demonstrated underlying support for the operation of the reactor. The review utilised guidance from International Atomic Energy Agency documents on the operations of research reactors and also an internal ARPANSA regulatory guide that has been based on a review of current international best practice in nuclear safety in this area. The review in particular focused on the adequacy and maturity of the information on matters such as effective control, safety management, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, ultimate disposal, security and emergency planning in relation to the OPAL reactor. The paper will focus in particular on the manner in which each of these plans and arrangements were reviewed and the overall importance that was placed on this review in the regulatory decision making process undertaken by ARPANSA. Key themes that will also be explored in the paper are: - The development and implementation of ARPANSA regulatory guidance, its basis in key international guidance and its use in undertaking regulatory reviews; - The importance of key safety management plans and the review of those plans in establishing regulatory confidence in the operator. - The importance of open and questioning safety management policy and procedures, with the

  15. Report on the ANSTO application for a licence to construct a Replacement Research Reactor, addressing seismic analysis and seismic design accident analysis, spent fuel and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Report of the Nuclear Safety Committee (NSC) covers specific terms of reference as requested by the Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA. The primary issue for the Working Group(WG) consideration was whether ANSTO had demonstrated: (i) that the overall approach to seismic analysis and its implementation in the design is both conservative and consistent with the international best practice; (ii) whether the full accident analysis in the Probabilistic Safety Assesment Report (PSAR) satisfies the radiation dose/frequency criteria specified in ARPANSA's regulatory assessment principle 28 and the assumptions used in the Reference Accident for the siting assessment have been accounted for in the PSAR; and (iii) the adequacy of the strategies for managing the spent fuel as proposed to be used in the Replacement Research Reactor and other radioactive waste (including emissions, taking into account the ALARA criterion) arising from the operation of the proposed replacement reactor and radioisotope production. The report includes a series of questions that were asked of the Applicant in the course of working group deliberations, to illustrate the breadth of inquiries that were made. The Committee noted that replies to some questions remain outstanding at the date of this document. The NSC makes a number of recommendations that appear in each section of the document, which has been compiled in three parts representing the work of each group. The NSC notes some lack of clarity in what was needed to be considered at this approval stage of the project, as against information that would be required at a later stage. While not in the original work plan, recent events of September 11, 2001 also necessitated some exploration of issues relating to construction security. Copyright (2002) Commonwealth of Australia

  16. X-ray fluorescence in Member States: Australia. Ion beam analysis and X ray methods at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Menai, NSW, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization techniques such as Particle Induced X ray Emission (PIXE), Particle Induced Gamma Ray Emission (PIGE), Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) have been developed individually and applied quantitatively for many years at ANSTO for both thick and thin samples. All these techniques rely on MeV ions from low to medium positive ion accelerators. PIXE and PIGE are used for elemental analysis and RBS is used for depth profiling of elements in environmental, geological and functional materials samples. All these accelerator based ion beam analysis characterization techniques are non-destructive, afford a high sensitivity, are suitable for most elements in the periodic table and provide short measurement times. It is well established that PIXE is mostly used for elements with atomic numbers above Al. In addition, when used in conjunction with appropriate X ray filters, the contributions of dominant elements can be diminished, and thus enhancing the sensitivity for trace elements. For medium proton energies of a few MeV created by common ion beam accelerators, the PIGE technique is mostly suitable for light element analysis, like Li, Mg, Na and Al, where the cross sections for gamma ray production tend to be larger. On the other hand, RBS is ideally suited for determining the depth distributions of trace elements heavier than the major constituents of the matrix or the substrate or for determining absolute matrix compositions for light elements such as carbon, nitrogen or oxygen. It is possible to use a combination of PIXE, PIGE and RBS simultaneously, as a single stand-alone package for quantitative elemental analysis. This integrated capability takes advantage of the strength of each individual technique, providing a better tool for characterization of materials. Each technique provides unique sample matrix information which can be iteratively feed back into the quantitative concentration estimates to produce more reliable results. In addition, this tool is

  17. ANSTO: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization conducts or is engaged in collaborative research and development in the application of nuclear science and associated technology. Through its Australian radio-isotopes unit, it markets radioisotopes, their products and other services for nuclear medicine industry and research. It also operates national nuclear facilities ( HIFAR and Moata research reactors), promote training, provide advice and disseminates information on nuclear science and technology. The booklet briefly outlines these activities. ills

  18. ANSTO program of research 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1989-1990 Program of Research of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization identifies the diversity of the organisation's current activities and the role of nuclear science and technology in achieving national goals. Major program areas continue to be biomedicine and health, advanced materials, applications of nuclear physics, environmental science, isotope technology and nuclear technology. Each project in a particular program area is defined in terms of background, objectives recent work and achievements, work planned and resources. External advisory committees which provide advice on research priorities, are viewed as a fundamental part of the ongoing evaluation process of the organization activities in response to changing priorities in industry, government and the community it serves

  19. ANSTO. Annual Report 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant events and achievements highlighted in the Annual Reports include: the Research Reactor Review, increase of external revenues by 12.5%, sales of Australian radioisotopes amounting to $8.5 M, regulatory approval for production of thallium-201 in National Medical Cyclotron, completion of first contracts with Wismut GmbH in Germany, production of a database of content of atmospheric particulate matter in air over NSW, word-wide licence agreement signed for further commercialization of blood clot radiopharmaceuticals, collaborative agreement signed with SURPAC Int. for development of geochemical speciation software, complete design of rings in HIFAR for silicon doping. ills., tabs

  20. Experience gained with the Synroc demonstration plant at ANSTO and its relevance to plutonium immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jostsons, A.; Ridal, A.; Mercer, D.J.; Vance, E.R.L. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1996-05-01

    The Synroc Demonstration Plant (SDP) was designed and constructed at Lucas Heights to demonstrate the feasibility of Synroc production on a commercial scale (10 kg/hr) with simulated Purex liquid HLW. Since commissioning of the SDP in 1987, over 6000 kg of Synroc has been fabricated with a range of feeds and waste loadings. The SDP utilises uniaxial hot-pressing to consolidate Synroc. Pressureless sintering and hot-isostatic pressing have also been studied at smaller scales. The results of this extensive process development have been incorporated in a conceptual design for a radioactive plant to condition HLW from a reprocessing plant with a capacity to treat 800 tpa of spent LWR fuel. Synroic containing TRU, including Pu, and fission products has been fabricated and characterised in a glove-box facility and hot cells, respectively. The extensive experience in processing of Synroc over the past 15 years is summarised and its relevance to immobilization of surplus plutonium is discussed.

  1. Phase space optimisation of the USANS instrument Kookaburra at the ANSTO OPAL reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, A.K., E-mail: kafreund@free.f [Via Cordis, 92, rue Abbe de l' Epee, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Rehm, C. [ANSTO, Bragg Institute, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2011-04-01

    An optimisation of the USANS instrument Kookaburra has been conducted determining the most efficient type of premonochromator crystal and scattering geometry. The approach has been based on representations in phase space combining direct and reciprocal space diagrams. Results are presented for several scenarios involving flat and curved, perfect and mosaic crystals, horizontal and vertical scattering planes. The highest peak current density of 1.7x10{sup 5} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} is provided for a wavelength of 4.43 A by a doubly curved pyrolytic graphite premonochromator diffracting in a horizontal plane and producing a beam size of about 50 cm{sup 2} at the sample position. The smallest background is achieved for a wavelength of 2.56 A and a vertical scattering plane using a bent perfect premonochromator crystal and optionally a collimator to decrease the divergence of the beam exiting the cold neutron guide. For this wavelength a peak current density of 6.6x10{sup 4} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} is collected into a sample area of 10 cm{sup 2}. The bent perfect crystal design is of particular advantage for small samples.

  2. The development of Dy-HMA at ANSTO: a new radiotherapeutic agent for the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation synovectomy is a rapid alternative to surgical synovectomy and is more comfortable for the patient. With radiation synovectomy, a beta-emitting radionuclide is injected into the synovial sac of the joint and the radiation painlessly destroys the inflamed tissue. The major disadvantage with the use of radionuclides for synovectomy is the leakage of radioactivity from the injected point to other organs, particularly the regional leg lymph nodes. Dysprosium-165 has a much shorter half-life of 2.3 hours, which provides two significant advantages. Any leakage of activity will have a reduced effect on other organs and patients can be treated in one day instead of the three days that it requires 90Y to decay to acceptable levels. Scientists at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories have recently developed a simple and rapid method for the production of a 165Dy product based solely on dysprosium hydroxide macroaggregates, Dy-HMA, with the majority of particles in the 3-5 μm range. Dy-HMA is a sterile suspension in saline at a pH in the range 10.5-12 and can be used up to nine house after preparation. Subsequent animal tests indicated minimal leakage of radioactivity from injected animal joints. 7 refs., 1 tab

  3. Final Report on Evaluating Residual Stresses and Internal Defects in Nuclear Materials at the Opal Reactor at ANSTO, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project is concerned with developing capabilities in characterizing materials of relevance to the nuclear energy sector with neutron beams. A number of measurements were; residual stress measurements on a fusion first wall candidate composite material and a Zircaloy vessel which contains the cold neutron source. Texture measurements were made on 3 Zircaloy samples from reactor components. Planned SANS measurements were not possible as the instrument was not available. The neutron imaging instrument Dingo was constructed, commissioned, and is now operating. (author)

  4. Der Raum ist der Freund des Seins. Bachelards Poetik des Raumes als Anstoß zu einer neuen Betrachtung des sozialen Raumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dörfler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Der folgende Text versucht, eine neue Perspektive auf die in der Sozialwissenschaft anhaltende Raumdebatte um den „spatial turn“ zu entwickeln. Hauptanliegen ist es, die darin waltende unproduktive Dichotomisierung von Raumessenzialismus versus  Raumkonstruktivismus hinter sich zu lassen, um das dialektische Verhältnis von Materie und sozialer Raumkonstitution (nicht: Konstruktion in den Vordergrund zu rücken. Es wird argumentiert, dass nur eine diese Wechselwirkung beachtende Theoriebildung das Problem sozialwissenschaftlicher Konzeption von Räumlichkeit in seiner Tragweite in den Griff bekommen kann. Grundlage und Ausgangspunkt ist eine Kritik an einer vereinfachenden Spielart des Konstruktivismus, wie er in den Sozial- und Kulturwissenschaften populär ist, und der das Nachdenken über Raum tendenziell verunmöglicht.

  5. Qualitätsmanagement für Kunst- und Museumsbibliotheken – ein Anstoß für Krankenhausbibliotheken?! [Quality management in art libraries – a starting point for patient libraries?!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangl, Martin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available [english] Short abstract of the quality management and certification procedure, developed by art and museum libraries to be seen as a starting point of similar projects in patient libraries? [german] Qualitätsmanagement für Krankenhausbibliotheken – das Verfahren der Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Kunst- und Museumsbibliotheken (AKMB als Vorbild?

  6. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation strategy review recommendations. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1994 the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO)'s Board initiated a comprehensive five month review which purpose was to develop a mission for ANSTO and thus define its role both domestically and internationally. The review took into account the needs of ANSTO stakeholders, analysed ANSTO capabilities as well as available international opportunities. Outcomes of the review included an assessment of the priorities and needs of stakeholders, an understanding of how these needs can be meet, and the resulting resource implications. ANSTO's major mission objectives, as defined in the consultants's report should be: to support the Government's nuclear policies (this objective is paramount), support industrial competitiveness and innovation through technology transfer, as well as to maintain a high quality nuclear science base and to enable academic institutions and other science organizations to perform research by providing access to unique facilities and expertise. The consultants also made recommendations on appropriate management arrangements for ANSTO, an implementation plan, progress milestones and operational targets. Details of the relevance-excellence analysis, commercial customer analysis and justification for recommended activity action imperatives are presented in the appendices. 48 figs

  7. Nuclear research in the tertiary sector: the role of AINSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering is a national organisation with a 45 year track record of collaboration and facilitation of the interaction of universities and one of the major Publicly Funded Research Agencies, ANSTO. AINSE supports research and training in fields that utilise the techniques and instrumentation of nuclear physics. AINSE currently has 37 Australian university members as well as the University of Auckland and the New Zealand Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences. Income is primarily obtained from members in the form of membership fees, ANSTO and a Commonwealth government contribution (also paid through ANSTO). Each university pays in proportion to the benefit received and the aggregate university augmented by equal contributions from ANSTO and the Federal Government (through ANSTO). This is seen as an essential element of this model which allows individual researchers to access the facilities irrespective of any funding from other major funding bodies. The replacement reactor for HIFAR will bring further impetus to AINSE collaborations with ANSTO. The new Tandetron accelerator that will come on-line this year is another collaborative AINSE initiative with ANSTO. Its use as an accelerator mass-spectrometer will provide a state-of-the art facility for dating and general ion-beam analysis experiments. AINSE supports research projects over a very wide range of disciplines, ranging from biomedical science/biotechnology, environmental science, material properties and engineering, archaeology and geosciences to material structure and dynamics. AINSE currently supports over 200 active projects

  8. Annual report 1988-1989. Implementing strategies for change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the research and commercial activities of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). In line with its strategic plan, ANSTO has been restructured into two major components: Scientific and Commercial areas plus small Corporate and External Affairs groups. Considerable progress was made to reorientate the research and development program to contain a 70/30 percent mixture of tactical applications oriented research and longer term strategic projects, aimed at identifying new, potentially commercial areas. Description of scientific and commercial activities relating to biomedicine and health, isotope technology, nuclear physics applications and environmental science are provided. Services such as engineering, computing, material testing ,information and ANSTO's involvement in regional and international technical co-operation programs are briefly outlined. Details are also given of the ANSTO revenue, expenditure, expenses and capital work. Ills

  9. Monitoring and reviewing research reactor safety in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Th research reactors operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) comprise the 10 MW reactor HIFAR and the 100 kW reactor Moata. Although there are no power reactors in Australia the problems and issues of public concern which arise in the operation of research reactors are similar to those of power reactors although on a smaller scale. The need for independent safety surveillance has been recognized by the Australian Government and the ANSTO Act, 1987, required the Board of ANSTO to establish a Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) with responsibility to the Minister for monitoring and reviewing the safety of nuclear plant operated by ANSTO. The Executive Director of ANSTO operates HIFAR subject to compliance with requirements and arrangements contained in a formal Authorization from the Board of ANSTO. A Ministerial Direction to the Board of ANSTO requires the NSB to report to him, on a quarterly basis, matters relating to its functions of monitoring and reviewing the safety of ANSTO's nuclear plant. Experience has shown that the Authorization provides a suitable framework for the operational requirements and arrangements to be organised in a disciplined and effective manner, and also provides a basis for audits by the NSB by which compliance with the Board's safety requirements are monitored. Examples of the way in which the NSB undertakes its monitoring and reviewing role are given. Moata, which has a much lower operating power level and fission product inventory than HIFAR, has not been subject to a formal Authorization to date but one is under preparation

  10. Research achievements and commercial interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ANSTO, in partnership with Australian and overseas organisations, continues to make significant contributions to selected fields of research and development. Major revenue for ANSTO is generated through sales of radiopharmaceuticals and radioisotopes for medical, industrial, environmental and research purposes and through neutron irradiation services. Further, ANSTO is actively trying to generate maximum value from its knowledge and know-how through protection and exploitation of its intellectual property. Strategic alliances have been developed to further the commercial utilisation of ANSTO know-how in, for example, delivery systems for tumour treatments, commercial waste remediation and applications of plasma implantation. The 2000-2001 financial year saw the establishment of an ANSTO business unit called Sulfide Solutions targeted at better management of environmental issues arising from mining operations. Overall, ANSTO's capacity to generate value from the application of its knowledge and know-how is being increasingly acknowledged, the organisation attaining credibility as an international leader in the application of nuclear science and technology in targeted areas

  11. Proposed replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, NSW. Statement of evidence to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This submission demonstrates the manner in which the replacement research reactor project is to be undertaken in accordance with all relevant Commonwealth requirements and standards. Successive submissions to Government have shown that the construction and operation of the replacement reactor will result in a range of significant benefits to Australia in the areas of health care, the national interest, scientific achievement and in industrial applications. ANSTO is confident that the construction and operation of the replacement research reactor will: meet the identified needs for an ongoing neutron source for Australia into the next century in a cost-effective manner; be effectively managed to ensure that the project is delivered to the agreed schedule and budget; involve an effective community consultation process with ongoing community consultation a feature of ANSTO's approach; will have negligible environmental and public health implications taking account of the environmental management measures and commitments made by ANSTO in the Environmental Impact Statement and the stringent licensing arrangement by ARPANSA

  12. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization. Annual Report 1995-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The report provides an overview of the outcomes achieved and the current activities of ANSTO related to its core business activities. The core business of ANSTO were identified as follows: international strategic relevance of nuclear science; core facilities operation and development; applications of nuclear science and technology to the understanding of natural processes; treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry and organizational development and support. The report also include specific reporting against those performance indicators that were negotiated with the Government as part of the Triennium Funding Agreement and are regarded as appropriate for science agencies or for ANSTO specifically. Contains a glossary and an detailed index. tables., figures.

  13. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization. Annual Report 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides an overview of the outcomes achieved and the current activities of ANSTO related to its core business activities. The core business of ANSTO were identified as follows: international strategic relevance of nuclear science; core facilities operation and development; applications of nuclear science and technology to the understanding of natural processes; treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry and organizational development and support. The report also include specific reporting against those performance indicators that were negotiated with the Government as part of the Triennium Funding Agreement and are regarded as appropriate for science agencies or for ANSTO specifically. Contains a glossary and an detailed index. tables., figures

  14. Program of research 1988-89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1 July 1988, the research activities of ANSTO have reorganised into five programs: advanced materials; applications of nuclear physics; environmental science; applications of radioisotopes and radiation; biomedicine and health. This structure not only groups the main research activities but also identifies the underpinning of ANSTO's commercial activities. This document describes the projects to be undertaken in the 1988-89 financial year. Each project in a particular program area is defined in terms of background, objective, recent work and achievements, work planned, resources and the project manager is identified. Research is also undertaken in areas of the operational activities of the organisation and these also are detailed

  15. Spent fuels transportation coming from Australia; Transport de combustible use en provenance d'Australie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Maritime transportation of spent fuels from Australia to France fits into the contract between COGEMA and ANSTO, signed in 1999. This document proposes nine information cards in this domain: HIFAR a key tool of the nuclear, scientific and technological australian program; a presentation of the ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization; the HIFAR spent fuel management problem; the COGEMA expertise in favor of the research reactor spent fuel; the spent fuel reprocessing at La Hague; the transports management; the transport safety (2 cards); the regulatory framework of the transports. (A.L.B.)

  16. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Act 1987 - No 3 of 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Act (ANSTO Act) is to establish a successor to the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) set up under the Atomic Energy Act 1953. The Act provides for a new Organization with functions which, according to Government policy, better reflect the directions in which Australia's principal research organization should tend in that area, namely realignment of AAEC activities away from work on the nuclear fuel cycle, towards greater emphasis on applications of radioisotopes and radiation in medicine, industry, agriculture, science, commerce, etc. ANSTO is prohibited from undertaking any R and D into the design and production of nuclear weapons or nuclear explosive devices. (NEA)

  17. Animals in nuclear research: where ethics and expediency meet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has a direct involvement in nuclear medicine, microbiological and environmental studies which utilise animals in the research work. The opposition to experiments on animals is briefly discussed. The Australia codes of practice for the care and use of animals for experimental purposes are outlined

  18. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (Transitional Provisions) Act 1987 - No 4 of 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Act implements certain transitional provisions consequent to the enactment of the ANSTO Act 1987. The legislation provides for the continuation of the body corporate from its present form as the Australian Atomic Energy Commission to the new body corporate, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization. (NEA)

  19. Planning for decommissioning of Hifar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has operated the 10MW HIFAR research reactor since 1958. In addition to its role in research, the reactor provides radioisotopes for medical and industrial use and is a major supplier of NTD silicon for the semi-conductor industry. It is anticipated that HIFAR will finally shut down operations in December 2006. Although ANSTO has successfully decommissioned MOATA and undertaken other smaller decommissioning projects the proposed HIFAR decommissioning project will be the largest ever undertaken by ANSTO. ANSTO faces a number of challenges in HIFAR's final year of operation. These include: the establishment of a modern decommissioning strategy in the absence of a long-term nuclear waste repository management facility or waste acceptance criteria for the material generated by the decommissioning; the impact of the impeding closure of the facility on staff morale and retention of key staff; and to meet the our customer's needs up to the final closure. These challenges are compounded by competition for skilled resources required to commission the new research reactor (OPAL) and the need to continue to supply radioisotopes. Important 'lessons in progress' that will be discussed in this paper include staffing the decommissioning team, maintenance of a strong safety culture during final stages of operation, working towards regulatory approval for decommissioning and strategies for knowledge retention. (author)

  20. Proposed replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, NSW. Statement of evidence to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    This submission demonstrates the manner in which the replacement research reactor project is to be undertaken in accordance with all relevant Commonwealth requirements and standards. Successive submissions to Government have shown that the construction and operation of the replacement reactor will result in a range of significant benefits to Australia in the areas of health care, the national interest, scientific achievement and in industrial applications. ANSTO is confident that the construction and operation of the replacement research reactor will: meet the identified needs for an ongoing neutron source for Australia into the next century in a cost-effective manner; be effectively managed to ensure that the project is delivered to the agreed schedule and budget; involve an effective community consultation process with ongoing community consultation a feature of ANSTO`s approach; will have negligible environmental and public health implications taking account of the environmental management measures and commitments made by ANSTO in the Environmental Impact Statement and the stringent licensing arrangement by ARPANSA 24 refs., 8 tabs., 5 figs.

  1. Thermoluminescence detection of irradiated herbs and spices: an Australasian trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence (TL) is generally regarded as the detection method offering most promise for irradiated herbs and spices. The method has been developed in several laboratories, especially in the United Kingdom and Germany. This paper describes a double blind trial of the method carried out by two Australasian laboratories (GNS and ANSTO). (author)

  2. The use of radioisotopes in human experiments: comments in response to recent media articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent newspaper articles question the propriety and ethical foundation of early experimental programs in which radioisotopes were administered to human subjects. This paper describes the relevant activities of ANSTO's predecessor, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, and provides an historical background to these and subsequent events

  3. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  4. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  5. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor. Supplement to Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a replacement research reactor at Lucas Heights, was available for public examination and comment for some three months during 1998. A Supplement to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Draft EIS) has been completed and was lodged with Environment Australia on 18 January 1999. The Supplement is an important step in the overall environmental assessment process. It reviews submissions received and provides the proponent`s response to issues raised in the public review period. General issues extracted from submissions and addressed in the Supplement include concern over liability issues, Chernobyl type accidents, the ozone layer and health issues. Further studies, relating to issues raised in the public submission process, were undertaken for the Supplementary EIS. These studies confirm, in ANSTO`s view, the findings of the Draft EIS and hence the findings of the Final EIS are unchanged from the Draft EIS

  6. Iron deposition in modern and archaeological teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.-M.M., E-mail: AnneMarie.Williams@utas.edu.au [School of Medicine, Private Bag 34, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001 (Australia); Siegele, R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Iron surface concentrations and profile maps were measured on the enamel of archaeological and modern teeth to determine how iron is deposited in tooth enamel and if it was affected by the post-mortem environment. Teeth from Australian children who died in the second half of the 19th century were compared with contemporary teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes. Surface analysis of the teeth was performed using the 3 MV Van Der Graff Accelerator at The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Sydney, Australia. A small sample of teeth were then cut in the mid sagittal plane and analysed using ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe. Maps and linear profiles were produced showing the distribution of iron across the enamel. Results show that both the levels and distribution of iron in archaeological teeth is quite different to contemporary teeth, raising the suggestion that iron has been significantly altered by the post-mortem environment.

  7. AINSE - The years between 1988 and 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This paper traces the history of AINSE between the years 1988 and 1998. It was a time of great change for AINSE. At the beginning of this period the Government implemented major structural reforms of the higher education system and new mechanisms for research infrastructure support followed a year later. This culminated in 1993 with a major restructuring of AINSE which had continued with little change since its inception in 1958. This was followed in 1994 with a comprehensive review and reorganisation of ANSTO, which also had a significant effect on AINSE. These events will be described and will include some of AINSE, considerable achievements and successes which saw the organisation, in partnership with ANSTO, in a strong position at the end of this ten year period

  8. A high-throughput neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, Anton; Noakes, Terry; Bartsch, Friedl; Bertinshaw, Joel; Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Raeside, Tyler; Yethiraj, Mohana; Danilkin, Sergey; Kearley, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    A cross-disciplinary high-throughput neutron spectrometer is currently under construction at OPAL, ANSTO's open pool light-water research reactor. The spectrometer is based on the design of a Be-filter spectrometer (FANS) that is operating at the National Institute of Standards research reactor in the USA. The ANSTO filter-spectrometer will be switched in and out with another neutron spectrometer, the triple-axis spectrometer, Taipan. Thus two distinct types of neutron spectrometers will be accessible: one specialised to perform phonon dispersion analysis and the other, the filter-spectrometer, designed specifically to measure vibrational density of states. A summary of the design will be given along with a detailed ray-tracing analysis. Some preliminary results will be presented from the spectrometer.

  9. Program of research - 1990-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1990-1991 Program of Research reflects the fundamental changes within the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) over the past three years as it has oriented itself towards being a more commercially driven organization, an organization responding to market demands and pressures. From July 1, 1990 several key projects have been linked together in the new Industrial Technology Program. The Program encompasses projects that have real potential to earn revenue for ANSTO and make measurable improvements in efficiency and productivity for Australian companies. The Isotope Technology project is researching and transferring to industry radioisotope technology for tracing the effectiveness of plant processes, the movement of materials within blast furnaces and leakages and outages in plant pipework. The two important newcomers are the Quality Technology Centre and the Safety and Reliability group. Details about project leaders, project titles and objectives are provided. ills

  10. Distribution and Solubility of Radionuclides and Neutron Absorbers in Waste Forms for Disposition of Plutonium Ash and Scraps, Excess Plutonium, and Miscellaneous Spent Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Denis M. Strachan; Dr. David K. Shuh; Dr. Rodney C. Ewing; Dr. Eric R. Vance

    2002-09-23

    The initial goal of this project was to investigate the solubility of radionuclides in glass and other potential waste forms for the purpose of increasing the waste loading in glass and ceramic waste forms. About one year into the project, the project decided to focus on two potential waste forms - glass at PNNL and itianate ceramics at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO).

  11. Annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For this thirtieth year of operation, the Institute's twenty constituent organisations were eighteen Australian universities, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). Through 1987-88, AINSE's operations supported research and training in the nuclear field, assisted the application of nuclear techniques in science, engineering and industrial technology, and assisted the universities and similar organisations in using the reactors, accelerators and other special facilities within the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories

  12. Thesen zur Soziologie der Stadt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Häußermann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mit der Wiederveröffentlichung des Textes „Thesen zur Soziologie der Stadt“, der zum ersten Mal 1978 im Leviathan erschienen ist, möchten wir zu einer trans- und interdisziplinären Debatte anregen. Wir gehen davon aus, dass der Text einerseits als Zeitzeugnis hilfreich sein kann, um heutige Debatten historisch zu kontextualisieren. Andererseits soll dessen Wiederveröffentlichung einen Anstoß dazu geben, die aktuelle Relevanz der Thesen zu diskutieren.

  13. Nuclear Safety Bureau. Annual Report 1997-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with its legislative functions, during the year the Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) continued to monitor and review the safety of nuclear plant operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), to provide advice to the Commonwealth and to participate in national and international fora on nuclear safety and regulatory matters. ANSTO completely revised and published two major items of the reactor safety documentation, following NSB review and agreement. They provide substantial additions to the safety knowledge of the High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) and practical improvements to the safety of its operations. In order to monitor ANSTO's nuclear plant, bureau officers attended, as observers, the accreditation interviews of all key reactor operating personnel and also attended meetings of the liaison committee, which coordinates involvement of local, State and Commonwealth agencies in emergency arrangements for the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC). The bureau also reviewed a submission from ANSTO for the siting of the proposed reactor against the bureau's siting assessment principles, which include, in part, that the calculated consequences of a hypothetical accident at a proposed facility satisfy the bureau's siting criteria. It was concluded that, in principle, a modern pool reactor with a power level of 20 MW, located safely at the Lucas Heights site, could meet the bureau's radiological siting criteria. From 1 July 1997, the NSB is designated a Competent Authority, under the Environment Protection (Nuclear Codes) Act 1978, for the land transport of radioactive material undertaken by the Commonwealth. During the year, the NSB has also reviewed its hypothetical accident and radiological criteria for assessing the suitability of Australian ports for visits by nuclear powered warships

  14. Nuclear wastes and its entry into the country through an unconstitutional contractual association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author analyzes, vis a vis the art. 41 of the Argentine Constitution and the national law 25.108 on radioactive wastes, the contractual and commercial relation between INVAP S.E of Argentina and ANSTO of Australia for the construction of a research reactor. He concludes that the possibility of the treatment of the spent fuels in Argentina for final disposal in Australia, may violate the Argentine regulations and proposes public hearings to debate the question

  15. The fourth conference on nuclear science and engineering in Australia, 2001. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference, with the theme 'New Nuclear Century' consists of invited papers supported by contributed posters on the following topics: nuclear research and ANSTO's Replacement Research Reactor; Australian uranium resources; radioactive waste management; low-level radiation, radiation protection, nuclear safety, the environment and sustainable development; application of nuclear energy in Nuclear Medicine, non-destructive testing; nuclear science and technology for the future and nuclear education

  16. Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and 133Xe data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of 133Xe from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8 x 1014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 2.2 x 1016 to 2.4 x 1016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 9.2 x 1013 to 3.7 x 1014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases

  17. Transport of HIFAR spent fuel from Lucas Heights Research Establishment to the United Kingdom for reprocessing. Public Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-27

    The normal operations of HIFAR produce thirty-eight spent fuel elements annually. Since 1958, when operations began, 1,660 spent fuel elements have been accumulated and are stored in ANSTO`s engineered interim storage facilities at Lucas Heights. In the light of the limited size of these storage facilities and following the Research Reactor Review (1993) and an Inter-Agency Review, the Commonwealth Government announced its decision to reduce the number of spent fuel elements stored at the site. Therefore, ANSTO has been authorised to negotiate the terms for shipment of spent fuel elements of United Kingdom (UK) origin to the Dounreay reprocessing plant in Scotland. This Public Environment Report, prepared under the Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974, describes the potential impacts and risks of a proposed initial shipment of 120 spent fuel elements to the Dounreay reprocessing plant. It describes the intended packaging and transport procedures and considers possible alternative methods of dealing with the continued production of spent fuel rods and the limited storage capacity at LHRL. The exhaustive analysis of every phase of operations involved in the shipping of a cask of spent HIFAR fuel elements from Lucas Heights to Dounreay, for reprocessing, has shown that there are no significant environmental or public health impacts from such a shipment conducted in accordance with standard, internationally established procedures. 18 refs., 12 tabs., 2 figs.

  18. Influence of atmospheric convection on the long and short-range transport of Xe133 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Krysta, Monika; Gheddou, Abdelhakim; Nikkinen, Mika

    2014-05-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 79 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases supported by the atmospheric transport modelling (ATM). The ATM system is based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model, FLEXPART, designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollution from point sources. In the operational configuration only the transport of the passive tracer is simulated. The question arises whether including other atmospheric processes, like convection, will improve results. To answer this question a series of forward simulations was conducted, assuming the maximum transport of 14 days. Each time 2 runs were performed: one with convection and one without convection. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. Due to the fact that CTBTO has recently received a noble gas emission inventory from the ANSTO facility we had a chance to do more accurate simulations. Studies have been performed to link Xe133 emissions with detections at the IMS stations supported by the ATM. The geographical localization to some extend justifies the assumption that the only source of Xe133 observed at the neighbouring stations, e.g. AUX04, AUX09 and NZX46, comes from the ANSTO facility. In simulations the analysed wind data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. The results of quantitative and qualitative comparison will be presented.

  19. Ion beam analysis techniques applied to large scale pollution studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.D.; Bailey, G.; Martin, J.; Garton, D.; Noorman, H.; Stelcer, E.; Johnson, P. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques are ideally suited to analyse the thousands of filter papers a year that may originate from a large scale aerosol sampling network. They are fast multi-elemental and, for the most part, non-destructive so other analytical methods such as neutron activation and ion chromatography can be performed afterwards. ANSTO in collaboration with the NSW EPA, Pacific Power and the Universities of NSW and Macquarie has established a large area fine aerosol sampling network covering nearly 80,000 square kilometres of NSW with 25 fine particle samplers. This network known as ASP was funded by the Energy Research and Development Corporation (ERDC) and commenced sampling on 1 July 1991. The cyclone sampler at each site has a 2.5 {mu}m particle diameter cut off and runs for 24 hours every Sunday and Wednesday using one Gillman 25mm diameter stretched Teflon filter for each day. These filters are ideal targets for ion beam analysis work. Currently ANSTO receives 300 filters per month from this network for analysis using its accelerator based ion beam techniques on the 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. One week a month of accelerator time is dedicated to this analysis. Four simultaneous accelerator based IBA techniques are used at ANSTO, to analyse for the following 24 elements: H, C, N, O, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn, Br and Pb. The IBA techniques were proved invaluable in identifying sources of fine particles and their spatial and seasonal variations accross the large area sampled by the ASP network. 3 figs.

  20. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, 2000-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some scientific achievements and advisory activities of Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), during the year are highlighted, including: development of a standardised assessment protocol for estimating the levels of radiofrequency radiation as a function of distance from mobile phone base stations; advice to Australian Customs on high energy X-ray beam facilities; advice on the health risks of naturally occurring radioactivity in relation to emissions from the BHP Sinter Plant in Wollongong; participation in the National Repository Advisory Committee and National Store Advisory Committee dealing with radioactive waste management for Australia; several publications of work associated with assessment of exposures to ultraviolet radiation. Three personal UV dosimetry projects have been organised or commenced in collaboration with health-related organisations. The licensing of the existing nuclear installations at ANSTO was a major activity during the year. There were some difficulties in obtaining and making public sufficient information to allow adequate public comment on the proposals. In the case of the HIFAR facility, the ARPANSA licence was replacing a regulatory system administered by the former Nuclear Safety Bureau, but it was still a challenge to demonstrate through a safety evaluation report that it met the statutory conditions required for issuing a licence under the ARPANS Act and ARPANS Regulations. For the other nuclear facilities, they were being brought within a formal regulatory process for the first time. The licences now issued include additional conditions requiring the licence holder to provide improved documentation and justification of safety practices. One of the roles inherited by ARPANSA from the Nuclear Safety Bureau is the monitoring of the operations of the ANSTO nuclear plant. From its monitoring over the year, ARPANSA has concluded that overall ANSTO's nuclear plant continued to be operated safely during

  1. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor: Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Vol. 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The appendices contains additional relevant information on: Environment Australia EIS Guidelines, composition of the Study Team, Consultation Activities and Resuits, Relevant Legislation and Regulatory Requirements, Exampies of Multi-Purpose Research Reactors, Impacts of Radioactive Emissions and Wastes Generated at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, Technical Analysis of the Reference Accident, Flora and Fauna Species Lists, Summary of Environmental Commitments and an Outline of the Construction Environmental Management Plan Construction Environmental Management Plan figs., ills., refs. Prepared for Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)

  2. Bals, Christoph/Hamm, Horst/ Jerger, Ilona/Milke i.A. von Germanwatch (Hg): Die Welt am Scheideweg: Wie retten wir das Klima? (2008), Reinbek: Rowohlt, 318 S. [...] [Sammelrezension

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Asit

    2009-01-01

    Sammelrezension zu: 1. Bals, Christoph/Hamm, Horst/ Jerger, Ilona/Milke i.A. von Germanwatch (Hg): Die Welt am Scheideweg: Wie retten wir das Klima? (2008), Reinbek: Rowohlt, 318 S., ISBN: 978-3-498-00653-2. 2. Berg, Christian/Hartung, Manuel J.: Welt retten für Einsteiger. 30 Gründe für ein gutes Gewissen(2007). München: dtv, 180 S., ISBN: 978-3-423-24649-1. 3. Brot für die Welt/eed/BUND (Hg): Zukunftfähiges Deutschland in einer globalisierten Welt. Ein Anstoß zur gesellschaftlichen Debatte....

  3. Heterogeneous Catalysis under pressure - In-situ neutron diffraction under industrial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes the application of a tubular reactor that allows in-situ neutron diffraction on working catalysts at high pressures. The designed reactor enables the application to a sample of industrially-relevant reaction conditions, i.e., in a temperature range up to 330° C and 60 bar pressure, coupled with online gas-analysis. Application of the cell is demonstrated by ammonia synthesis over a commercial catalyst with diffraction data obtained from the high-resolution powder diffractometer, Echidna, at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO.

  4. Applications of ion beam analysis workshop. Workshop handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop on applications of ion beam analysis was held at ANSTO, immediate prior to the IBMM-95 Conference in Canberra. It aims was to review developments and current status on use of ion beams for analysis, emphasizing the following aspects: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; material sciences, geological, life sciences, environmental and industrial applications; computing codes for use in accelerator research; high energy heavy ion scattering and recoil; recent technological development using ion beams. The handbook contains the workshop's program, 29 abstracts and a list of participants

  5. Monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief overview is presented of methods of monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation together with reasons for such monitoring and maintaining dose histories of radiation occupationally exposed persons. The various Australian providers of external radiation monitoring services and the types of dosemeters they supply are briefly described together with some monitoring results. Biological monitoring methods, are used to determine internal radiation dose. Whole body monitors, used for this purpose are available at Australian Radiation Lab., ANSTO and a few hospitals. Brief mention is made of the Australian National Radiation Dose Register and its objectives

  6. SIMS applications workshop. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first ANSTO/AINSE SIMS Workshop drew together a mixture of Surface Analysis experts and Surface Analysis users with the concept that SIMS analysis has to be enfolded within the spectrum of surface analysis techniques and that the user should select the technique most applicable to the problem. With this concept in mind the program was structured as sessions on SIMS Facilities; Applications to Mineral Surfaces; Applications to Biological Systems, Applications to Surfaces as Semi- conductors, Catalysts and Surface Coatings; and Applications to Ceramics

  7. Erinnerung und Geschichte – Ein früher Bericht aus dem Frauen-KZ Moringen 1936/37

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Schikorra

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Der Erinnerungsbericht von Gabriele Herz ist einerseits bedeutsam wegen der Beschreibung individuelle Erfahrungen und der Einnahme einer persönlichen Perspektive. Andererseits stellt er ein bedeutendes Dokument für die Geschichtsschreibung zu frühen Konzentrationslagern dar, und hier insbesondere zu den Verfolgungserfahrungen jüdischer Frauen im Deutschland der 30er Jahre. In der äußerst aufschlussreichen Einleitung der Historikerin Jane Caplan, die den Anstoß für die Herausgabe dieses einzigartigen Dokuments gab, wird die Komplexität des Erinnerungszeugnisses von Gabriele Herz aufgezeigt und gewürdigt.

  8. The evolving role of radiotracing in integrated coastal zone management investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of the off-shore radiotracing program at ANSTO. Special reference is made to the impact that sophisticated numerical modelling is making to the design of tracer studies underpinning engineering and environmental investigations in the coastal zone. Much of the research is designed to reduce the freedom modellers have in setting parameter values. Emphasis being placed on studying of the fate and behaviour of particulates and cohesive sediments, on measuring the impact of wind fields on transport and on obtaining field measurements of model parameters such as hydrodynamic shear stress. (author)

  9. RadCon: Parameter report focusing on Tropical and Subtropical environments in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models to simulate the transfer of radionuclides through air, water and terrestrial ecosystems have been developed and used regularly over the last 20 years. RadCon was developed as a simple model to assess the radiological consequences, as dose, to humans of short-term depositions of radionuclides. Internal exposure via inhalation and ingestion are included in this model as well as external exposure from the passing cloud (cloud shine) and from radioactivity deposited on the ground (ground shine).Initially, the RadCon model will deal with the Australian and South East Asian region but flexibility has been incorporated into the design to allow application in other regions. In a manner similar to a geographic information system, the display of input and output data allows quick access to the results, both numerically and graphically. Coloured concentration gradients, stepping through time, are superimposed on the area of interest to present atmospheric and ground concentrations of the radionuclides and, after the calculations, human dose. The model has portability across computer platforms.This report summarises the parameters and some of the transfer factors underlying the calculations. While the focus was on the tropical and subtropical regions in Australia, for many parameters the values may only have been available for temperate regions, in which case this has been used as the default value. The parameter flexibility is a major aspect of this model and a report to describe the editor has been written (Crawford and Domel, ANSTO/M-129). The aim of this document is to chronologically expand on the formulae and parameter tables presented in the Technical Guide (Crawford et al., ANSTO/E-744, May 2000). The two documents should be read together with the Technical Guide presenting the mathematical computations and this report presenting some of the input values used to calculate the end-point results from the computations. A User Guide to assist in the implementation

  10. The National Medical Cyclotron - An Australian experience in technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The establishment of the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) in the early 1990's was the practical outcome of a vision, held by nuclear medicine professionals, to complement the available neutron-rich radionuclides produced in Australia, with neutron-deficient radionuclides. The NMC is operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in collaboration with the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) in Sydney where the PET department is able to use the short-lived radiotracers to good advantage. Neutron-deficient radionuclides, are also produced by the NMC laboratories. The cyclotron-generated radionuclides are used in over 70,000 patient studies per year

  11. Combining computational modelling with radioisotope technology for a more cost- effective and time-efficient method of solving industrial and medical diagnostic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, some work on computational modelling for industrial operations and processes will be presented, for example, the modelling of fly-ash flow and the associated prediction of erosion in power utility boilers. The introduction and use of new formulations of encapsulated radioisotopes, currently being research at ANSTO, will open up further possibilities for the utilisation of radiotracer applications for a wider range of validation work not only in industrial but also in medical investigations. Applications of developed models to solving industrial problems will also be discussed in the paper

  12. Ion beam analysis of metal ion implanted surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P.J.; Chu, J.W.; Johnson, E.P.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation is an established method for altering the surface properties of many materials. While a variety of analytical techniques are available for the characterisation of implanted surfaces, those based on particle accelerators such as Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) provide some of the most useful and powerful for this purpose. Application of the latter techniques to metal ion implantation research at ANSTO will be described with particular reference to specific examples from recent studies. Where possible, the information obtained from ion beam analysis will be compared with that derived from other techniques such as Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Auger spectroscopies. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Development of customised environmental chambers for time-resolved in situ diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to mitigate the expense and broaden the applicability of customised environment chambers, researchers at the University of Melbourne and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have designed and are currently commissioning a modular reaction chamber, capable of separating the necessities of diffraction methodologies from those of the desired sample environment. The In Situ Reaction Chamber (ISRC) abstracts many of the details intrinsic to the diffractometer, allowing users to design inexpensive environmental inserts that may be readily customised to their individual needs. The first insert to be developed for use with the ISRC is a high temperature furnace capable of providing an oxidising sample environment up to 16000C.

  14. An historical review and perspective of AINSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ophel, T.R. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, (Australia). Department of Nuclear Physics

    1998-12-31

    Full text: ANSTO was formed in 1958 as a cooperative venture of modest scope, involving the newly established AAEC (created by the Atomic Energy Act of 1953 with facilities at Lucas Heights being formally opened in 1955) and the eight universities that existed at the time. Research emphasis was very much nuclear, with the two reactors MOATA and HIFAR and possible future nuclear energy developments defining it. Two accelerators, added in the early sixties - the 3 MV Van de Graaff and the 1.3 MV electron machine, were to sustain those original activities of the AAEC. It would probably be true to say that AINSE in those early days placed much importance on the general support of nuclear science throughout Australia, whereas now of course the facilitation of the use of ANSTO facilities has become the main function. Thereafter, both AINSE and the AAEC have undergone dramatic change. The number of universities expanded to 19 in the late sixties, along with more support and encouragement for research at both the new institutions and the original group of eight. University use of Lucas Heights facilities, through the agency of AINSE, expanded and began to diversify somewhat into other disciplines - a trend that has continued apace ever since. In the nineties, the Dawkins revolution led to a doubling of the number of tertiary institutions, so that once again AINSE experienced a quantum jump in size, with of course matching complexity. In parallel, AAEC broadened its activities to embrace a wide range of nuclear and energy related areas, though basic research began to taper off. Finally, the organization was given a new charter in 1985 and re-named ANSTO. A much expanded university system, the `new` ANSTO, the rise of economic rationalism and the creation of the Australian Research Council have combined to provide a succession of challenges to AINSE. From the original small, club-like beginning with narrow interests, AINSE has emerged with more than a four-fold increase in

  15. The fifth conference on nuclear science and engineering in Australia, 2003. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theme of the fifth Nuclear Science and Engineering in Australia conference was 'Building on 100 years of Nuclear Science and Technology'. During the six main sessions the following topics were presented: Nuclear research and progress on major nuclear facilities, including the ANSTO Research Replacement Reactor, the Australian synchrotron and irradiation facilities; Uranium and waste management; Radiation Protection and Nuclear safety; Safeguards and Security; Nuclear Power in the Asia/Pacific region and prospects for Australia. The opening address, given by Mr Peter McGauran, Minister for Science was followed by Dr Robin Batterham, Australian Chief Scientist's introductory address. Papers included in the handbook were separately indexed

  16. Alligator Rivers analogue project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium ore deposits, such as Koongarra in the Northern Territory of Australia, with their inventory of radionuclides provide researchers with excellent systems with which to study radionuclide migration over very long timescale. The current project, which is sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, is funded by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Inspectorate, the UKDOE and the USNRC. The project has been recently extended until 31 august 1992. ANSTO is the managing participant. Experimental and modelling tasks of the project consider the original weatering of the Koongarra region, the alteration of the host rock and primary uranium ore, groundwater flow and migration pathways, rock/groundwater interactions, radionuclide transport and the formation and continued development of the secondary mineralization. The overall objective is to produce a reliable and realistic model for the radionuclide migration within geological environments relevant to the assessment of the safety of radioactive waste repositories. An outline of technical programs is given followed by a series of technical reports which briefly describe current research tasks. These reports have been separately indexed

  17. Climate activities in Australia 2001 : a report on Australian participation in international scientific climate programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fifth report reviews the most recent Australian achievements in climate science, focussing on the two years since the last report. After a brief review of the processes which determine the broad features of Australia's climate, including its extreme variability, and an overview of Australian climate from 1999 to 2001, this report summarises the organisational arrangements for WCP-related activities in Australia and provides a chapter by chapter summary of recent Australian activities in: climate data and monitoring (Chapter 2); climate applications and services (Chapter 3); climate impact assessment and response strategy development (Chapter 4); climate research (Chapter 5); support of the implementation of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) which is being developed internationally to underpin the various objectives of the WCP (Chapter 6); support of the preparation of the Third Assessment Report, and other reports, of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (Chapter 7). As improved advances in computing and communications continues to make climate information more accessible, an increasing number of government agencies, research institutes and private concerns are applying this information to improve understanding, sustainable management practices and productivity. Thus, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) contributes to climate research, drawing on its unique expertise in identifying and tracking radionuclides. Jointly with CSIRO, Bureau of Meteorology and other organisations, ANSTO's research has enabled measurements of gaseous exchanges and refined dates in palaeoclimatic events

  18. Radioisotopes for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 3 decades, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has been the country's main supplier of radioisotopes for medical applications. The use of radioisotopes in medicine has revolutionised the diagnosis, management and treatment of many serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke. It is also beginning to play a key role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimers disease and epilepsy. More recently there has been considerable growth in the application of nuclear medicine to treat sport-related injuries - especially wrist, ankle and knees where more common techniques do not always enable accurate diagnosis. Australia is a recognised leader in nuclear medicine. This can be partially attributed to the close relationship between ANSTO and the medical community in providing opportunities to develop and evaluate new agents to support more effective patient care. A list of commercial isotopes produced in the reactor or the cyclotron and used in medical applications is given. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in the clinical environment and the timely supply of radioisotopes is a key element. ANSTO will continue to be the premier supplier of currently available and developing isotopes to support the health and well being of the Australian community

  19. The third conference on nuclear science and engineering in Australia, 1999. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Association has organised this third Conference in a biennial series with the theme: 'A Nuclear Renaissance'. The theme is based on our perception that nuclear science and technology is on the threshold of a major expansion after a period which many thought was the onset of the Dark Ages after the old Australian Atomic Energy Commission was abolished in 1987. Fortunately, nuclear science and technology was not abolished and the AAEC was replaced by the government with ANSTO, which the government has continued to support strongly. The most recent expression of this support has been the approval of nearly $300 millions in investment in a major Replacement Research Reactor to be operational in about 2005, and the establishment of the new regulatory body ARPANSA. The conference aims to review all of the major nuclear issues of importance to Australia as we enter the 21st Century. These include: uranium mining and upgrading; the management of nuclear waste; the plans for the future by the government's major nuclear research laboratory, operated by ANSTO, including plans for constructing a major Replacement Research Reactor at Lucas Heights, the status of safeguards and nuclear regulation in Australia now that the government has set up the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, and the many and varied applications of nuclear science in Australia. The conference also presents the plans for nuclear research by the universities through the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, and features in particular the work at the Australian National University in Canberra

  20. International Alligator Rivers Analog Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the U.K. Department of the Environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are participating under the aegis of the Nuclear Energy Agency in the International Alligator Rivers Analog Project. The project has a duration of 3 yr, starting in 1988. The project has grown out of a research program on uranium ore bodies as analogs of high-level waste (HLW) repositories undertaken by ANSTO supported by the NRC. A primary objective of the project is to develop an approach to radionuclide transport model validation that may be used by the participants to support assessments of the safety of radioactive waste repositories. The approach involves integrating mathematical and physical modeling with hydrological and geochemical field and laboratory investigations of the analog site. The Koongarra uranium ore body has been chosen as the analog site because it has a secondary ore body that has formed over the past million years as a result of leaching by groundwater flowing through fractures in the primary ore body

  1. Assessing and improving the safety culture of non-power nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and application of safety culture principles has understandably focused on nuclear power plant and fuel cycle facilities and has been based on studies in Europe, North America, Japan and Korea. However, most radiation injuries and deaths have resulted from the mishandling of radioactive sources, inadvertent over-exposure to X-rays and critically incidents, unrelated to nuclear power plant. Within the Forum on Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), Australia has been promoting initiatives to apply safety culture principles across all nuclear and radiation application activities and in a manner that is culturally appropriate for Asian countries. ANSTO initiated a Safety Culture Project in 1996 to develop methods for assessing and improving safety culture at nuclear and radiation installations other than power reactors and to trial these at ANSTO and in the Asian region. The project has sensibly drawn on experience from the nuclear power industry, particularly in Japan and Korea. There has been a positive response in the participating countries to addressing safety culture issues in non-power nuclear facilities. This paper reports on the main achievements of the project. Further goals of the project are also identified. (author)

  2. Transport of HIFAR spent fuel from Lucas Heights Research Establishment to the United Kingdom for reprocessing. Public Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The normal operations of HIFAR produce thirty-eight spent fuel elements annually. Since 1958, when operations began, 1,660 spent fuel elements have been accumulated and are stored in ANSTO's engineered interim storage facilities at Lucas Heights. In the light of the limited size of these storage facilities and following the Research Reactor Review (1993) and an Inter-Agency Review, the Commonwealth Government announced its decision to reduce the number of spent fuel elements stored at the site. Therefore, ANSTO has been authorised to negotiate the terms for shipment of spent fuel elements of United Kingdom (UK) origin to the Dounreay reprocessing plant in Scotland. This Public Environment Report, prepared under the Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974, describes the potential impacts and risks of a proposed initial shipment of 120 spent fuel elements to the Dounreay reprocessing plant. It describes the intended packaging and transport procedures and considers possible alternative methods of dealing with the continued production of spent fuel rods and the limited storage capacity at LHRL. The exhaustive analysis of every phase of operations involved in the shipping of a cask of spent HIFAR fuel elements from Lucas Heights to Dounreay, for reprocessing, has shown that there are no significant environmental or public health impacts from such a shipment conducted in accordance with standard, internationally established procedures. 18 refs., 12 tabs., 2 figs

  3. Solidification of acidic liquid waste from 99Mo isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has been producing 99Mo since 1967 for medical use of its decay product 99mTe. This early generation development of fission product 99Mo uses low enriched 235U as dioxide, nitric acid dissolution of the irradiated pellets and recovery of molybdenum by adsorption onto alumina. Increasing production over this period since the late 1960's has led to the accumulation of stored liquid waste in specifically designed storage tanks. ANSTO investigated a number of options to treat this liquid waste culminating in the development, commissioning and operation of a two-stage evaporation process with an intervening chemical treatment step. The need for chemical destruction of the low level of contained ammonia, as nitrate, arose due to the past practice of incorporating a small volume of ammoniacal condensate with the acid waste. This ammoniacal waste is no longer added to the acidic waste, but the need to remove ammonia from the historic waste has led to the development of a novel technique to destroy the ammonia content in the liquid. The liquor is reduced to a crystalline solid with the elimination of water and acid that can be treated by conventional means. (author)

  4. Radioisotopes for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division

    1998-03-01

    For more than 3 decades, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has been the country`s main supplier of radioisotopes for medical applications. The use of radioisotopes in medicine has revolutionised the diagnosis, management and treatment of many serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke. It is also beginning to play a key role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimers disease and epilepsy. More recently there has been considerable growth in the application of nuclear medicine to treat sport-related injuries - especially wrist, ankle and knees where more common techniques do not always enable accurate diagnosis. Australia is a recognised leader in nuclear medicine. This can be partially attributed to the close relationship between ANSTO and the medical community in providing opportunities to develop and evaluate new agents to support more effective patient care. A list of commercial isotopes produced in the reactor or the cyclotron and used in medical applications is given. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in the clinical environment and the timely supply of radioisotopes is a key element. ANSTO will continue to be the premier supplier of currently available and developing isotopes to support the health and well being of the Australian community 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. Proposed replacement nuclear research reactor, Lucas Heights, NSW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 17 February 1999, the House of Representatives referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report the proposed replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights, New South Wales. The Committee received a written submission from ANSTO and took evidence from ANSTO officials at public hearings held at Parliament House. It has also received submissions and took evidence from a number of organisations and individuals. Prior to the first day of public hearings, the Committee undertook an extensive inspection of the facilities at Lucas Heights. The Committee's main conclusion and recommendations are as follows: 1) A need exists to replace HIFAR with a modern research reactor. The need for the replacement of HIFAR arises as a consequence of national interest considerations, research and development requirements and the need to sustain the local production of radiopharmaceuticals.The comparative costs of locating the replacement research reactor at Lucas Heights or a green fields site favour the former by a considerable margin. The refurbishing HIFAR of would not provide an enhancement of its research and operational capabilities which are considered by the scientific community to be limited. Such limitations have led to a reduction in national research and development opportunities. It is estimated that the new national research reactor must be operational some time before HIFAR is decommissioned. Provided all recommendations and commitments contained in the Environment Assessment Report are implemented during construction and commissioning and for the expected life of the research reactor, the Committee believes, based on the evidence, that all known risks have been identified and their impact on public safety will be as low as technically possible. It is recommended that during the licensing, construction and commissioning phases ANSTO should provide the Committee with six-monthly reports on progress and that removal of

  6. Replacement reactor to revolutionise magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, G

    2002-01-01

    Electric motors, hearing aids and magnetic resonance imaging are only some of the applications that will benefit from the first advances in magnets in a quarter of a century. Magnets achieve their characteristics when electrons align themselves to produce a unified magnetic field. Neutrons can probe these magnetic structures. The focus is not just on making more powerful magnets, but also identifying the characteristics that make magnets cheaper and easier for industry to manufacture. Staff from the ANSTO's Neutron Scattering Group have already performed a number of studies on the properties of magnets using using HIFAR, but the Replacement Research Reactor that will produce cold neutrons would allow scientists to investigate the atomic properties of materials with large molecules. A suite of equipment will enable studies at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields

  7. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersez, T. [Reactor Operations, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: tez@ansto.gov.au; Braoudakis, G. [Reactor Operations, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Osborn, J.C. [Reactor Operations, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2006-11-15

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  8. The national medical cyclotron facility : statement of evidence to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proposal is made for the establishment of the national medical cyclotron by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), located at the operated jointly with the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH), Sydney. The proposal calls for the acquisition of a cyclotron and associated equipment together with the construction of a building to house the cyclotron and the radiopharmaceutical production facilities as well as the establishment of a positron emission tomography (PET) facility. The national medical cyclotron will produce radioisotopes for immediate medical application within the hospital and for nation-wide distribution. It will also provide PET facilities for the investigation and diagnosis of diseases of high social cost such as epilepsy, stroke, heart disease, cancer and certain psychiatric disorders. The estimated capital cost of the installation is $16.4M (January 1988) plus $4.1M for the purchase of the PET Camera

  9. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1997-06-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre during 1996. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by thr National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. Details of the environmental sample collection and analytical procedures are given in the appendices. (authors). 29 refs., 26 tabs., 6 figs.

  10. FY16 Annual Accomplishments - Waste Form Development and Performance: Evaluation Of Ceramic Waste Forms - Comparison Of Hot Isostatic Pressed And Melt Processed Fabrication Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dandeneau, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-13

    FY16 efforts were focused on direct comparison of multi-phase ceramic waste forms produced via melt processing and HIP methods. Based on promising waste form compositions previously devised at SRNL[13], simulant material was prepared at SRNL and a portion was sent to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) for HIP treatments, while the remainder of the material was melt processed at SRNL. The microstructure, phase formation, elemental speciation, and leach behavior, and radiation stability of the fabricated ceramics was performed. In addition, melt-processed ceramics designed with different fractions of hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite, and pyrochlore phases were investigated. for performance and properties. Table 1 lists the samples studied.

  11. The neutron texture diffractometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yun-Tao; Tian, Geng-Fang; Gao, Jian-Bo; Yu, Zhou-Xiang; Li, Yu-Qing; Wu, Li-Qi; Yang, Lin-Feng; Sun, Kai; Wang, Hong-Li; Santisteban, J. r.; Chen, Dong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The first neutron texture diffractometer in China has been built at the China Advanced Research Reactor, due to strong demand for texture measurement with neutrons from the domestic user community. This neutron texture diffractometer has high neutron intensity, moderate resolution and is mainly applied to study texture in commonly used industrial materials and engineering components. In this paper, the design and characteristics of this instrument are described. The results for calibration with neutrons and quantitative texture analysis of zirconium alloy plate are presented. The comparison of texture measurements with the results obtained in HIPPO at LANSCE and Kowari at ANSTO illustrates the reliability of the texture diffractometer. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11105231, 11205248, 51327902) and International Atomic Energy Agency-TC program (CPR0012)

  12. Unification of PIXE, PIGE and RBS ion beam analysis techniques for use as a single package for sample characterization in environmental and materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accelerator based ion beam analysis techniques of PIXE and PIGE using 2-3 MeV protons have been combined into one software analysis package which includes matrix corrections from PIGE for light elements being iteratively fed back into the matrix corrections for PIXE. This package can run in batch mode analysing hundreds of spectra at a time for elemental concentrations from fluorine to uranium to for concentrations from μg/g to 100%. This software package is called 'doiba' and has been published as an ANSTO external report. Future work is ongoing to include the proton Rutherford Backscattering technique as well into this doiba package particularly for carbon, nitrogen and oxide matrix corrections. (author)

  13. Analogue studies in the Alligator Rivers Region of Australia. Contribution to the scientific basis for the performance assessment of proposed repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analogue Studies in the Alligator Rivers Region (ASARR) project is coordinated by the OECD/NEA and involves ANSTO, JAERI, KAERI and the USNRC. Its aim is to contribute to the performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal sites through the building of confidence in predictive transport codes. The project is principally concerned with validating models of sub-surface retardation processes which underpin the codes. This paper will describe recent progress in extending sorption studies from reference minerals to natural materials. The first step in the laboratory program was to investigate uranium uptake on binary systems comprising ferrihydrite and kaolinite. Secondly, the significance of small levels of active minerals such as anatase in a standard kaolinite and iron nodules in geological samples from the Koongarra Uranium deposit is being assessed. Progress towards applying the natural analogue approach to a reference arid site will be reported. The scientific approaches of the individual laboratories are outlined in an annex. (author)

  14. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor. Supplement to Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a replacement research reactor at Lucas Heights, was available for public examination and comment for some three months during 1998. A Supplement to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Draft EIS) has been completed and was lodged with Environment Australia on 18 January 1999. The Supplement is an important step in the overall environmental assessment process. It reviews submissions received and provides the proponent's response to issues raised in the public review period. General issues extracted from submissions and addressed in the Supplement include concern over liability issues, Chernobyl type accidents, the ozone layer and health issues. Further studies, relating to issues raised in the public submission process, were undertaken for the Supplementary EIS. These studies confirm, in ANSTO's view, the findings of the Draft EIS and hence the findings of the Final EIS are unchanged from the Draft EIS

  15. Annual Report 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia has continued to take active part in the process of strengthening of the safeguards system. Activities during the year, discussed in detail in this report, included: participation in international experts' meeting and groups; field trials of new safeguards procedures and techniques to assess their effectiveness, and R and D into new safeguard technology. Australian Safeguard Office (ASO) was active in facilitating IAEA inspections; physical protection arrangements at ANSTO, the two uranium mines and related transport and storage areas were inspected during the year. Entry-into-force of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) is expected in the first half of 1997. In preparation, CWC Office has carried out an intensive survey of chemical related industries, and identified approximatively 60 facilities which are expected to be declarable under the CWC. ASO and CWCO activities in 1995-1996 are described, grouped according to the corporate strategy and evaluated in relation to particular performance indicators. tabs., ills

  16. 1993 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the accomplishments of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute for fiscal year 1993. The highlights of the report are the following: 1) active technology transfer and commercialization; 2) industry-responsive research and development; 3) nuclear regulations, licensing and safeguards; 4) development of strengthening of S and T; 5) infrastructure; 6) linkages were enhanced through the active participation of PNRI in the newly-formed Quezon City Science Community and the Inter-Agency Task Force on Public Acceptance of Nuclear Energy; and the 7) administrative report. List of experts/mission, foreign travel by PNRI and non-PNRI personnel, IAEA operational technical cooperation projects, research contracts, PNRI grants-in-aid, and technical papers are also included. Also in this period the signing of memorandum of understanding on mutual cooperation in the filed of nuclear energy peaceful applications between PNRI and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). (ISD). 7 tabs

  17. Estimating radiological consequences using the Java programming language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) a model is being developed to determine critical parameters affecting radioactive doses to humans following a release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. Java programming language was chosen because of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) capabilities and its portability across computer platforms, which were a requirement for the application, called RadCon. The mathematical models are applied over the 2D region, performing time varying calculations of dose to humans for each grid point, according to user selected options. The information combined includes: two dimensional time varying air and ground concentrations, transfer factors from soil to plant, plant to animal, plant to humans, plant interception factors to determine amount of radionuclide on plant surfaces, dosimetric data, such as dose conversion factors and user defined parameters, e.g. soil types, lifestyle, diet of animals and humans. Details of the software requirements, pathway parameters and implementation of RadCon are given

  18. Nuclear microprobe analysis of lead profile in crocodile bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlic, I.; Siegele, R.; Hammerton, K.; Jeffree, R. A.; Cohen, D. D.

    2003-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of lead were found in Australian free ranging saltwater crocodile ( Crocodylus porosus) bone and flesh. Lead shots were found as potential source of lead in these animals. ANSTO's heavy ion nuclear microprobe was used to measure the distribution of Pb in a number of bones and osteoderms. The aim was to find out if elevated Pb concentration remains in growth rings and if the concentration is correlated with the blood levels recorded at the time. Results of our study show a very distinct distribution of accumulated Pb in bones and osteoderms as well as good correlation with the level of lead concentration in blood. To investigate influence of ion species on detection limits measurements of the same sample were performed by using 3 MeV protons, 9 MeV He ions and 20 MeV carbon ions. Peak to background ratios, detection limits and the overall 'quality' of obtained spectra are compared and discussed.

  19. Radiological Consequences Model, A Radiological Consequences Model for use in the Australian and South East Asian Region, Model evaluation for the Iput scenario exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), a model - RadCon - was developed to assist in assessing the radiological consequences after an incident in any climate, depending on the meteorological and parameter input. The major areas of interest to the developers are those within tropical and subtropical climates, particularly of South East Asia. This is particularly so, given that nuclear energy use is increasing and may become a mainstay for economies in these regions within the foreseeable future. Therefore, data acquisition and choice of parameter values have been concentrated primarily on these climate types. The intended use of the model is for assessing consequences in an affected area following an accidental release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. The current RadCon model does not directly implement countermeasures, but these can be addressed through changes to the soil characteristics and food processing parameters

  20. Long- range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Gheddou, Abdelhakim

    2015-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). The aim of this study is to investigate the long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions. For that purpose a series of 14 days forward simulations was conducted using the Lagrangian Particle Diffusion Model FLEXPART, designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollution from point sources. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The geographical localization to some extent justifies the assumption that the only source of Xe-133 observed at the neighbouring stations, comes from the ANSTO facility. In the simulations the analysed wind data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. Studies have been performed to link Xe-133 emissions with detections at the IMS stations supported by the ATM, and to assess the impact of atmospheric convection on non-detections at the IMS stations. The results of quantitative and qualitative comparison will be presented.

  1. AINSE's role in tertiary sector applied nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) is a collaboration between the Universities and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). Its aim is to foster research and training in areas associated with the applications of Nuclear Science and allied techniques. AINSE is now into the fifth decade of this unique association and in 2001 can claim the active membership of thirty-six of the publicly funded Universities in Australia plus the University of Auckland and its NZ government partner the Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences (IGNS). The widespread membership has brought with it a breadth of research areas and the traditional domains of fundamental nuclear science and allied engineering have found that they are now the stable platforms from which are launched environmental, archaeological, biomedical and novel-materials science. ANSTO's fifth decade will see the replacement of HIFAR with a state of the art research reactor that will bring biological applications to a sharper focus. A new accelerator-mass spectrometer will be commissioned during 2002 and is funded, in part, by a $1 M RIEF grant which itself recognises the quality and track record of all AINSE members' research. It will significantly assist a wide range of dating applications and also provide support to ion beam analysis (IBA) experiments. AINSE will continue to aid community collaboration with its conferences, workshops and participation in national conferences such as the AIP Congress, Vacuum Society, etc. On the international scene it is actively participating in major conferences to be held in Australia. The winter school is a venture into the undergraduate sphere

  2. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor: Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Vol. 1. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the replacement of the Australian Research reactor has been released. An important objective of the EIS process is to ensure that all relevant information has been collected and assessed so that the Commonwealth Government can make an informed decision on the proposal. The environmental assessment of the proposal to construct and operate a replacement reactor described in the Draft EIS has shown that the scale of environmental impacts that would occur would be acceptable, provided that the management measures and commitments made by ANSTO are adopted. Furthermore, construction and operation of the proposed replacement reactor would result in a range of benefits in health care, the national interest, scientific achievement and industrial capability. It would also result in a range of benefits derived from increased employment and economic activity. None of the alternatives to the replacement research reactor considered in the Draft EIS can meet all of the objectives of the proposal. The risk from normal operations or accidents has been shown to be well within national and internationally accepted risk parameters. The dose due to reactor operations would continue to be small and within regulatory limits. For the replacement reactor, the principle of `As Low As Reasonably Achievable` would form an integral part of the design and licensing process to ensure that doses to operators are minimized. Costs associated with the proposal are $286 million (in 1997 dollars) for design and construction. The annual operating and maintenance costs are estimated to be $12 million per year, of which a significant proportion will be covered by commercial activities. The costs include management of the spent fuel from the replacement reactor as well as the environmental management costs of waste management, safety and environmental monitoring. Decommissioning costs for the replacement reactor would arise at the end of its lifetime

  3. Ion beam analysis techniques for the elemental fingerprinting of fine particle smoke from vegetation burning in NSW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator based ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques, including PIXE, PIGME, RBS and PESA, have been used to analyse elemental compositions of airborne particles covering a 60,000 square kilometres area of Wollongong, Sydney and Newcastle. These IBA techniques provide elemental concentrations for over 20 different elements from hydrogen to lead, they include H, C, N, O, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn, Br and Pb. The four ion beam techniques are performed simultaneously on the 3MV Van de Graaff accelerator at ANSTO and have been described in detail elsewhere. They are sufficiently sensitive to analyse for many of these elements to levels around 10 ng/m{sup 3} or less in about five minutes of accelerator running time per filter. This is more than adequate for aerosol analyses as most filters contain around 150 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of material which corresponds to about 10{mu}g/m{sup 3} of fine particles in the atmosphere. For this work fine particles are those with diameters less than 2.5{mu}m. Fine particle data has been collected twice a week and analysed for each of the above elements by ANSTO since 1991 at more than 25 different sites throughout NSW. This large dataset set allows us to not only determine the composition of fine particles and to look for signature elements for particular sources but also to use multivariate statistics to define elemental source fingerprints and then to determine the percentage contributions of these fingerprints to the total fine particle mass in the atmosphere. This paper describes the application of these techniques to the study of domestic wood fires and vegetation burning in NSW over a two year period from 1992-93. It also presents, for the first time, fine particle data related to the January 1994 bushfires in NSW. 6 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  4. The regulatory role of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency in relation to spent fuel arising from research reactors in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will describe the elements and performance of ARPANSA's regulatory management of spent fuel arising in Australia, with particular emphasis on the experience of ensuring compliance with the Code of Practice Code of Practice for Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials in relation to in land surface transport of spent fuel within Australia. The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency is the regulatory authority for Commonwealth entities, such as the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), who operate nuclear installations in Australia.. Nuclear installations that operate under ARPANSA facility licence include research reactors and plants for the storage and management of research reactor fuel. ANSTO is the only operator of nuclear installations in Australia. The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency is also the competent Authority for inland surface transport. ARPANSA has adopted the IAEA Safety Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials domestically in the form of the ARPANSA Code of Practice for Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials (RPS 2). s the competent authority ARPANSA approves the shipment and design of a new cask, validate original certificate applying the requirements of the RPS 2. RPANSA's regulatory oversight of compliance with the requirements of its own legislation and the requirements of the Code emphasises assurance of safety in the operation of nuclear installations and the shipment of spent fuel is achieved principally by prior assessment of the operator/consignors safety case, and by compliance monitoring through regular reporting (quarterly and annually), as well as planned and reactive inspections. During the operating life of these facilities for several decades there have been no incidents which have had off-site or significant on-site, consequences. This paper will examine that experience and in particular focus on the regulatory experience of oversight of

  5. Strange bedfellows: The curious case of STAR and Moata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. M.; Levchenko, V. A.; Malone, G.

    2013-01-01

    The 2 MV tandem accelerator named ‘STAR’ was installed at ANSTO in 2003 and commissioned in 2004. It is used for ion beam analysis (IBA) and for radiocarbon measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Convenient space for the accelerator was found in the same building occupied by the decommissioned Argonaut-class nuclear reactor ‘Moata’; the name derives from the aboriginal word for ‘fire stick’ or ‘gentle fire’, appropriate for a 100 kW research reactor. This reactor operated between 1961 and 1995. In 2007 ANSTO’s Engineering Division assembled a team to dismantle and remove the reactor structure, along with its 12.1 tonnes of graphite reflector. The removal and remediation was completed in November 2010 and has won the team a number of prestigious awards. The entire operation was conducted inside a negatively-pressurised double-walled vinyl tent. An air curtain was positioned around the reactor core. The exhaust air from the tent passed through 2-stage HEPA filters before venting through an external stack. Neither ANSTO staff nor contractors received any significant radiation dose during the operation. Given the sensitivity of STAR for detection of 14C/12C (∼10-16) and the numerous routes for production of 14C in the reactor such as 13C(n, γ)14C, 14N(n, p)14C and 17O(n, α)14C there was the potential to directly contaminate the STAR environment with 14C. Furthermore, there was concern that reactor-14C could find its way from this building into the building where the radiocarbon sample preparation laboratories are located. This necessitated restrictions on staff movement between the buildings. We report on 14C control measurements made during and after the operation. These involved direct measurements on the reactor graphite and concrete bioshield, blank targets that were exposed in the building, swipe samples taken inside the tent and around the building and aerosol samples that were collected inside the building throughout the

  6. Low-risk alternative waste forms for problematic high-level and long-lived nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The highest cost component the nuclear waste clean up challenge centres on high-level waste (HLW) and consequently the greatest opportunity for cost and schedule savings lies with optimising the approach to HLW cleanup. The waste form is the key component of the immobilisation process. To achieve maximum cost savings and optimum performance the selection of the waste form should be driven by the characteristics of the specific nuclear waste to be immobilised, rather than adopting a single baseline approach. This is particularly true for problematic nuclear wastes that are often not amenable to a single baseline approach. The use of tailored, high-performance, alternative waste forms that include ceramics and glass-ceramics, coupled with mature process technologies offer significant performance improvements and efficiency savings for a nuclear waste cleanup program. It is the waste form that determines how well the waste is locked up (chemical durability), and the number of repository disposal canisters required (waste loading efficiency). The use of alternative waste forms for problematic wastes also lowers the overall risk by providing high performance HLW treatment alternatives. The benefits tailored alternative waste forms bring to the HLW cleanup program will be briefly reviewed with reference to work carried out on the following: The HLW calcines at the Idaho National Laboratory; SYNROC ANSTO has developed a process utilising a glass-ceramic combined with mature hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) technology and has demonstrated this at a waste loading of 80 % and at a 30 kg HIP scale. The use of this technology has recently been estimated to result in a 70 % reduction in waste canisters, compared to the baseline borosilicate glass technology; Actinide-rich waste streams, particularly the work being done by SYNROC ANSTO with Nexia Solutions on the Plutonium-residues wastes at Sellafield in the UK, which if implemented is forecast to result in substantial

  7. On the calibration of radiotherapy dosemeters in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Dosemeters for external beam radiotherapy are calibrated in Australia by ARPANSA, against the national primary standards of exposure and absorbed dose. The primary standards are free air chambers for exposure at low and medium energy X-rays, a graphite cavity chamber for exposure at 60Co, and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose at 60Co and high energy (MV) X -rays. Radiotherapy dosemeters are calibrated against these standards using a well documented formalism to provide calibration factors suitable for use with dosimetry protocols. A dosemeter usually comprises an ionization chamber connected to an independent electrometer. These are calibrated separately if possible. A combined calibration factor is reported together with the electrometer calibration factor (sensitivity). The dosimetry protocol used in radiotherapy centres in Australia and New Zealand is currently the simplified version of the IAEA TRS277 protocol, published by the New Zealand NRL and recommended by the ACPSEM. This protocol requires the use of an exposure or air kerma calibration factor at 60Co (Nx or Nk) to evaluate the absorbed dose to air calibration factor ND. The chamber is then placed in a water phantom with its centre displaced from the reference point by peff. ARPANSA can also supply calibration factors in absorbed dose to water (ND,w), as required as input to the new IAEA CoP. If an absorbed dose to water calibration factor is used by the radiotherapy centre, the chamber should be placed with its centre at the reference point in the water phantom. ARPANSA has for some years coordinated the participation of Australian radiotherapy centres in the IAEA TLD Quality Audit service. Note that this service does not represent a calibration and should not be referred to as such. The only calibration is that provided by ARPANSA for a reference dosemeter at each radiotherapy centre. As soon as the ANSTO SSDL is operational, calibrations of reference dosemeters will also be available

  8. Media and Australia's replacement reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September 1997, the Commonwealth Government of Australia announced a proposal to build a replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights in Sydney. Extensive public consultation, parliamentary debate and independent reports were prepared to ensure that the new facility would meet strict international requirements, national safety and environmental standards, and performance specifications servicing the needs of Australia - for decades to come. On 6 June 2000, Argentine company INVAP SE was announced as the preferred tenderer. In July 2000 contracts were signed between INVAP and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation for the construction the replacement reactor, due to be completed in 2005. In order to retain a strong local presence, INVAP undertook a joint venture with two of Australia's foremost heavy construction businesses. Briefly the new research reactor will be a replacement for the ageing Australian Reactor (HIFAR). Nuclear science and technology, in Australia, is no stranger to media controversy and misinformation. Understandably the announcement of a preferred tenderer followed by the signing of contracts, attracted significant national and international media attention. However in the minds of the media, the issue is far from resolved and is now a constant 'news story' in the Australian media. Baseless media stories have made claims that the project will cost double the original estimates; question the credibility of the contractors; and raise issues of international security. The project is currently linked with Australia's requirements for long term nuclear waste management and there has been an attempt to bring national Indigenous People's issues into play. Some of these issues have been profiled in the press internationally. So, just to set the record straight and give you an appropriate impression of what's 'really happening' I would like to highlight a few issues, how ANSTO dealt with these, and what was finally reported

  9. Highlights of the PSA analyses performed for the RRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 2000, ANSTO signed a contract with the Argentinian company INVAP S.E. for the design, construction and commissioning of a replacement research reactor (RRR). INVAP contracted CEDIAC to prepare the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the RRR in support of the ANSTO application for the construction licence. The PSA is complementary to the Safety Analysis, in the sense that it asks questions such as 'What if the Postulated Initiating Events were to occur and more than one piece of equipment were to fail? What if several things were to go wrong?' The PSA attempts to determine all the possible combinations of how the plant could respond to an initiating event, group all the possible outcomes, obtain conservative estimates of the frequency, and bounding estimates of the consequences (i.e., doses to the worst exposed individual of the public). The frequency and consequence constitute the risk, and when evaluated for all possible events can be compared against the safety objectives set out in the regulatory principles. Besides the basic objective of the PSA, which is the quantitative evaluation of the risks associated with the RRR, and its comparison to the regulatory objectives, the PSA studies have been performed in parallel with the basic engineering phase of the project. Therefore, preliminary results from 'the risk point of view' were used as input to the design process, thus permitting improvements to be made to the design, and resulting in an effective reduction of the residual risk. To perform the PSA studies several methodological developments were made, in order to obtain a representative list of internal and external initiating events, to treat component and human-related failures, to consider common-cause failures, and to consider some specific aspects of the design (i.e., fail-safe components, passive systems, and lack of need for support systems). The PSA studies were performed to obtain not only quantitative estimations of the risk, but also

  10. The 1997 determination of the Australian standards of exposure and absorbed dose at {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, R.B.; Boas, J.F. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Van der Gaast, H. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1998-05-01

    The arrangements for the maintenance of the Australian standards for {sup 60}Co are described in detail. The primary standards are a graphite cavity chamber for exposure/air kerma and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose. These secondary standards are described and their responses in corresponding {sup 90}Sr reference sources are reported. Accurate ratios between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO) {sup 90}Sr reference sources are derived for use in future calibrations. The value of 28.8 years for the half-life of {sup 90}Sr is confirmed. The usefulness of {sup 90}Sr reference source measurements in quality assurance is discussed. The charge sensitivity and linearity of the ANSTO electrometers are reported by two different methods and are compared with previous results. Calibration factors for all the secondary standard ionization chambers are given, in terms of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to water. Calibration factors are also given for most of the chambers in terms of absorbed dose to graphite. The methods of deriving the calibration factors are explained in detail, including all the corrections applied to both the primary and secondary standard measurements. Three alternative methods of deriving the absorbed dose to water calibration factors are compared. The reported calibration factors are compared with previous results. Changes in the Australian units of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to graphite and water are derived from changes in the corresponding calibration factors. The Australian units of exposure and air kerma have not changed significantly since 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to graphite is now 1.1 % smaller than in 1993 and 1.3 % smaller than in 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to water is now 1.4 % smaller than in 1993, but is only 0.9 % smaller than in 1990. Comparisons of the Australian standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose with

  11. The use of long-lived radionuclides in antarctic ice as tracers and chronometers in global climate change studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collaborative project between the Physics Division at ANSTO, the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research [DAR], the Australian Antarctic Division [AAD] and the Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre is focused upon the record found in the ice and firn from Law Dome, Antarctica. The combined physical and intellectual resources of these organisations result in a potent and effective mix for climate change research which has already been demonstrated in a successful collaborative study entitled 'Determination of the Age and Age Spread of Air in Ice Cores', funded under a National Greenhouse Advisory Committee [NGAC] Grant. The broad objectives of this collaboration are to determine the global atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide budget and to correlate the variability in solar activity and historical climate change in the southern hemisphere. The aim is to define the levels of 'natural' variability in global climate change in the Holocene and to identify the mechanisms controlling the variations, with the emphasis on species which force or reflect global environmental change. Clearly answering all of these questions is beyond the scope of a short project, however we hope to develop the techniques and abilities which will allow us to investigate these matters in future studies. The combined effort by the collaborating organisations will result in a precise, high-time resolution, multi species record from Antarctic ice cores which will complement other southern hemisphere palaeo records throughout the Holocene and into the last Glacial. ANSTO's role is the examination of cosmogenic and bio-geochemical forcing of the atmospheric radionuclides 14C and 10Be in Antarctic ice. Specifically, we are using the ANTARES AMS facility for the measurement of 14C in carbon dioxide and methane contained in air extracted from the porous firn layer overlying the ice and from bubbles trapped within the ice. We are also using AMS to measure 10Be from the firn and ice. An indication

  12. Concentration-dependent binding of CO2 and CD4 in UiO-66(Zr): A combination of neutron powder diffraction and first-principle DFT calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last twenty years, tremendous progress has been achieved in the field of Metal Organic Frameworks. Among these materials, the zirconium terephthalate UiO-66(Zr) [1] has attracted a growing attention because of its interesting thermal, chemical and water stability and has shown to be a promising material for the separation of CO2/CH4 gas mixtures. In order to get a better understanding of its sorption behavior towards these gases, a Neutron Powder Diffraction (NPD) investigation of UiO-66 loaded with sequential doses of CO2 and CD4 has been carried out on the High Resolution Powder Diffractometer instrument “Echidna” at the OPAL reactor (ANSTO, Sydney). In total, three adsorption sites for CO2 and three adsorption sites for CD4 within the UiO-66(Zr) have been located by NPD then characterized by a combination of first-principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, binding energies and Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM) theory. An example of the first CO2 adsorption site is given in figure 1.

  13. Magnetic structure of melilite-related centrosymmetric K2CoP2O7: neutron diffraction and DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A great number of X2(ZT2)O7 compositions with large X=Ln, Ca-Ba, Na, K and small Z and T=Be,Al,Si,Ga,Ge,P,V adopt the melilite crystal structure type. The structure is built of tetrahedral layers of five-member rings and X is located in the interlayer space. Typically, the materials crystallize in the non-centrosymmetric P-421m space group. The compositions with magnetic ions (e.g. Z=Mn2+,Fe2+,Co2+,Cu2+) are very interesting systems from the magnetic structure point of view due to the 2D character of the structure and lack of inversion center. Depending on chemistry and geometry of a particular composition, a variety of magnetic structures were reported, from simple 3D antiferromagnets to 2D spirals and multiferroics. During our investigations of melilite-type materials a K2CoP2O7 composition was prepared and its magnetic property and structure characterized. The material is built of melilite-type tetrahedral layers but crystallizes in centro-symmetric P4/mnm space group. The magnetic structure has been determined using neutron powder diffraction on the Echidna diffractometer (ANSTO) and further explored with DFT. The results will be presented and discussed in the context of the broad melilite structural family.

  14. The agreement between the Argentine Republic and Australia on the cooperation for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and its fitting to the Argentine Constitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the legal aspects of the cooperation agreement between Australia and Argentina signed in Camberra on August 8, 2001, the authors elaborate upon the following points: 1. The interpretation of the constitutional texts. Its need; 2. Facts: the development of nuclear energy in Argentina. The contract INVAP-ANSTO. The cooperation agreement Argentina-Australia; 3. The great publicity campaign. The appeal to fear; 4. The difference with the case of power reactors. Distinction between power and research reactors; 5. The difference with the Chernobyl case; 6. Shipment safety; 7. Other clarifications; 8. Factual and juridical distinction between spent fuel and radioactive waste concepts; 9. The regulatory framework of the difference; 10. The essence of the adjective 'Immediate'. Its juridical meaning; 11. The concept of 'entry'. The need to overcome an intentional literalness; 12. The harmonious interpretation of the constitution; 13. The engagement with the future generations; 14. The adaptation to the global trends. The Kyoto protocol; 15. The bases of the constitutional doctrine. They conclude that nothing in the agreement is contrary to the Argentine constitution

  15. Cross-sections for sup 3 sup 6 Cl from Ti at E sub p =35-150 MeV Applications to in-situ exposure dating

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, D; Hotchkis, M

    2000-01-01

    We have measured the low-energy yield of sup 3 sup 6 Cl from Ti for proton energies from 35 to 150 MeV. Thin Ti foil irradiations were performed at the Harvard University Cyclotron Laboratory and sup 3 sup 6 Cl concentrations were determined using the ANTARES AMS facility at ANSTO. Cross-sections ranged smoothly with energy from 0.32+-0.05 mb at 35 MeV to 5.3+-0.4 mb at 150 MeV. Results for E<110 MeV are new, while the upper region from 110 to 150 MeV agrees well with overlapping data from other studies. The in-situ production rate for sup 3 sup 6 Cl from Ti at the earth's surface and high latitude based on this excitation function and calculations of Masarik and Reedy (normalised to the mean measured yield of sup 3 sup 6 Cl from Ca) is estimated at approx(13+-3) atoms sup 3 sup 6 Cl (g Ti yr) sup - sup 1. We thus conclude that in Ti-rich, Ca-poor rocks or in typical basalts, sup 3 sup 6 Cl yield from Ti can amount to approx 5-10% of total. This is similar to the contribution from slow muon capture on sup ...

  16. Managing the risks of legacy radioactive sources from a security perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety and security risk posed by highly radioactive, long-lived sources at the end of their normal use has not been consistently well-managed in previous decades. The Brazilian Cs-137 accident in 1986 and the Thailand Co-60 accident in 2000 are prime examples of the consequences that ensue from the loss of control of highly dangerous sources after their normal use. With the new international emphasis on security of radioactive sources throughout their life cycle, there is now further incentive to address the management of risks posed by legacy, highly dangerous radioactive sources. The ANSTO South-East Asia Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) Project has identified, and is addressing, a number of legacy situations that have arisen as a result of inadequate management practices in the past. Specific examples are provided of these legacy situations and the lessons learned for managing the consequent safety and security risk, and for future complete life-cycle management of highly radioactive sources. (author)

  17. International Nuclear Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    We are pleased to announce that the 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference (INPC2016) will take place in Adelaide (Australia) from September 11-16, 2016. The 25th INPC was held in Firenze in 2013 and the 24th INPC in Vancouver, Canada, in 2010. The Conference is organized by the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter at the University of Adelaide, together with the Australian National University and ANSTO. It is also sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by a number of organisations, including AUSHEP, BNL, CoEPP, GSI and JLab. INPC 2016 will be held in the heart of Adelaide at the Convention Centre on the banks of the River Torrens. It will consist of 5 days of conference presentations, with plenary sessions in the mornings, up to ten parallel sessions in the afternoons, poster sessions and a public lecture. The Conference will officially start in the evening of Sunday 11th September with Registration and a Reception and will end late on the afternoon of ...

  18. Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Uranium and Plutonium Residues Wastes - 13164

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Martin W.A.; Moricca, Sam A.; Zhang, Yingjie; Day, R. Arthur; Begg, Bruce D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Scales, Charlie R.; Maddrell, Ewan R. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, UK, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Hobbs, Jeff [Sellafield Limited, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, UK, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    A program of work has been undertaken to treat plutonium-residues wastes at Sellafield. These have arisen from past fuel development work and are highly variable in both physical and chemical composition. The principal radiological elements present are U and Pu, with small amounts of Th. The waste packages contain Pu in amounts that are too low to be economically recycled as fuel and too high to be disposed of as lower level Pu contaminated material. NNL and ANSTO have developed full-ceramic and glass-ceramic waste forms in which hot-isostatic pressing is used as the consolidation step to safely immobilize the waste into a form suitable for long-term disposition. We discuss development work on the glass-ceramic developed for impure waste streams, in particular the effect of variations in the waste feed chemistry glass-ceramic. The waste chemistry was categorized into actinides, impurity cations, glass formers and anions. Variations of the relative amounts of these on the properties and chemistry of the waste form were investigated and the waste form was found to be largely unaffected by these changes. This work mainly discusses the initial trials with Th and U. Later trials with larger variations and work with Pu-doped samples further confirmed the flexibility of the glass-ceramic. (authors)

  19. Chemical deuteration in neutron scattering: Demand, supply and impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular deuteration significantly increases the options in structure function investigations using Neutron Scatteringand diffraction techniques. There have been limited global initiatives in the field of molecular deuteration where the majority of these programs focus on biological deuteration of proteins and lipids, while more complex deuterated small molecules haven’t been widely available to the neutron community. This has limited the experiments that can be performed, and formed a bottle-neck for advancing the applications of neutron scattering. In this paper we will discuss the recent advancements and the impact of deuteration on the research outcomes achieved by using deuterated molecules produced by the chemical deuteration laboratories at the National Deuteration Facility in the Bragg Institute, ANSTO. Recent high-impact case studies will be presented which reveal the exciting and diverse characterisation studies which are now available for the neutron community. We describe here the synthesis and application of deuterated organic molecules used to investigate complex nanoscale systems in the fields of molecular electronics, structural biology, and biotechnology. The chemical deuteration of surfactants, sugars, heterocyclic and aromatic compounds has made possible a wide range of investigations. This includes the study of (i) the localisation of sugars in lipid membranes using neutron diffraction to give insights into cryoprotective mechanisms, (ii) the pH-responsiveness of the assembly of lipid digestion products in biologically relevant systems, and (iii) the structure and host-guest properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) using neutron diffraction.

  20. Processing of lateritic ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly weathered or lateritic ores that contain high proportions of fine clay minerals present specific problems when they are processed to extract uranium. Of perhaps the greatest significance is the potential of the fine minerals to adsorb dissolved uranium (preg-robbing) from leach liquors produced by processing laterites or blends of laterite and primary ores. These losses can amount to 25% of the readily soluble uranium. The clay components can also restrict practical slurry densities to relatively low values in order to avoid rheology problems in pumping and agitation. The fine fractions also contribute to relatively poor solid-liquid separation characteristics in settling and/or filtration. Studies at ANSTO have characterised the minerals believed to be responsible for these problems and quantified the effects of the fines in these types of ores. Processing strategies were also examined, including roasting, resin-in-leach and separate leaching of the laterite fines to overcome potential problems. The incorporation of the preferred treatment option into an existing mill circuit is discussed. (author)

  1. Australia's South East Asia Regional Security of Radioactive Sources Project (Achievements and Lessons Learned)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, as part of the Australian Government’s commitment to a broad range of counter-terrorism cooperation in South East Asia, the Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) Project was created by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The RSRS Project’s purpose is to reduce Australian and other States’ vulnerabilities to the unauthorised acquisition and malicious use of high activity, dangerous radioactive sources by working with Australia’s neighbouring countries to improve their physical protection and security management of radioactive sources and their associated facilities throughout their life-cycle. In addition, should prevention measures fail, the RSRS Project aims to improve those countries’ radiological emergency preparedness and response capabilities to deal effectively and safely with radioactive sources out of regulatory control and malicious acts involving radioactive materials. Covering both policy and operational matters, the RSRS Project cooperates with partner countries’ relevant organisations and other entities to develop and deliver their own effective and sustainable radioactive source security programs, consistent with the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and other international guidance and requirements. This paper reviews the achievements and lessons learned from such international cooperation. (author)

  2. Applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related analytical techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related techniques is a global CRP which started in 1992, and is scheduled to run until early 1997. The purpose of this CRP is to promote the use of nuclear analytical techniques in air pollution studies, e.g. NAA, XRF, and PIXE for the analysis of toxic and other trace elements in air particulate matter. The main purposes of the core programme are i) to support the use of nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques for research and monitoring studies on air pollution, ii) to identify major sources of air pollution affecting each of the participating countries with particular reference to toxic heavy metals, and iii) to obtain comparative data on pollution levels in areas of high pollution (e.g. a city centre or a populated area downwind of a large pollution source) and low pollution (e.g. rural area). This document reports the discussions held during the second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for the CRP which took place at ANSTO in Menai, Australia. (author)

  3. Operation of the Australian Store.Synchrotron for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Grischa R. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Aragão, David; Mudie, Nathan J.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); McGowan, Sheena; Bertling, Philip J.; Groenewegen, David; Quenette, Stevan M. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Bond, Charles S. [The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009, Western Australia (Australia); Buckle, Ashley M. [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Androulakis, Steve, E-mail: steve.androulakis@monash.edu [Monash Bioinformatics Platform, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-10-01

    The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The service automatically receives and archives raw diffraction data, related metadata and preliminary results of automated data-processing workflows. Data are able to be shared with collaborators and opened to the public. In the nine months since its deployment in August 2013, the service has handled over 22.4 TB of raw data (∼1.7 million diffraction images). Several real examples from the Australian crystallographic community are described that illustrate the advantages of the approach, which include real-time online data access and fully redundant, secure storage. Discoveries in biological sciences increasingly require multidisciplinary approaches. With this in mind, Store.Synchrotron has been developed as a component within a greater service that can combine data from other instruments at the Australian Synchrotron, as well as instruments at the Australian neutron source ANSTO. It is therefore envisaged that this will serve as a model implementation of raw data archiving and dissemination within the structural biology research community.

  4. Reactor training simulator for the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of the ANSTO Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) Reactor Training Simulator (RTS) are presented.The RTS is a full-scope and partial replica simulator.Its scope includes a complete set of plant normal evolutions and malfunctions obtained from the plant design basis accidents list.All the systems necessary to implement the operating procedures associated to these transients are included.Within these systems both the variables connected to the plant SCADA and the local variables are modelled, leading to several thousands input-output variables in the plant mathematical model (PMM).The trainee interacts with the same plant SCADA, a Foxboro I/A Series system.Control room hardware is emulated through graphical displays with touch-screen.The main system models were tested against RELAP outputs.The RTS includes several modules: a model manager (MM) that encapsulates the plant mathematical model; a simulator human machine interface, where the trainee interacts with the plant SCADA; and an instructor console (IC), where the instructor commands the simulation.The PMM is built using Matlab-Simulink with specific libraries of components designed to facilitate the development of the nuclear, hydraulic, ventilation and electrical plant systems models

  5. First application of simultaneous SANS and differential scanning calorimetry: Microphase separated alkane blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For almost 30 years, it has been possible at synchrotron facilities to perform small-angle x-ray scattering experiments whilst simultaneously measuring phase transitions using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). However, a range of challenges exist to enable the collection of simultaneous small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and DSC data associated not only with intrinsic flux limitations but also scattering geometry and thermal control. The development of a DSC (temperature range ca. −150 C to 500 C) suitable for SANS is detailed here which, to our knowledge, is the first and only one of its kind. An example study is presented from the 40 m SANS instrument, QUOKKA, at the OPAL reactor at ANSTO (Figure 1), concerned with phase transitions in a binary blend of normal alkanes in which one component has been deuterium labelled[1]. The ability to conduct simultaneous DSC and neutron scattering studies allows investigators to use these two complementary techniques to provide insight into structural and thermal changes and opens up the opportunity for SANS to make significant new contributions to a range of systems in which either scattering contrast is insufficient for SAXS studies or where neutron scattering is essential or inherently desirable (e.g. isotope effects).

  6. The use of honey bees in environmental monitoring of 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bees are excellent random samplers of relatively defined areas. A bee typically flies up to 1.5 km from the hive, covering an area of approximately 7 km2. Within this area the bee forages from many plants and collects water from various sources. Bee products, such as pollen and honey, therefore reflect the conditions of the immediate environment. In this study we were interested in the transfer of the anthropogenically produced isotope 137Cs from environmental sinks into the bee products. 137Cs originates principally from the atmospheric thermonuclear bomb tests conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Minute quantities could also originate from nuclear establishments (such as ANSTO in Australia) where it is used in scientific research. Once released into the environment 137Cs is known to bind tightly with the clay component and organic fractions in soil and its distribution largely reflects the physical transport of soil. In this work we compared the 137Cs levels from the Sydney region and other parts of NSW against Ireland (which were high as a result of the Chernobyl reactor accident)

  7. Comparison between XRF and IBA techniques in analysis of fine aerosols collected in Rijeka, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivošević, Tatjana; Mandić, Luka; Orlić, Ivica; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David D.

    2014-10-01

    The new system for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis has been installed at the Laboratory for Elemental Micro-Analysis (LEMA) at the University of Rijeka. Currently the key application of this new XRF system is in the field of environmental science, i.e. in the analysis of fine airborne particles. In this work, results of initial multi-elemental analysis of PM2.5 fraction is reported for the first time in the region of Rijeka, Croatia. Sampling was performed at the Rijeka City center, during a continuous 9-day period in February/March 2012. All samples were collected on stretched Teflon filters in 12 h periods. To check the reliability of the new XRF system, results of XRF analysis are compared with the results obtained by the well-established Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) laboratory at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The concentrations of H, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb were determined. In addition, black carbon was determined by Laser Integrating Plate Method (LIPM). Very good agreement between XRF and IBA techniques is obtained for all elements detected by both techniques. Elemental concentrations were correlated with the traffic volume and wind speed and direction. The summary of our findings is presented and discussed in this paper.

  8. Comparison between XRF and IBA techniques in analysis of fine aerosols collected in Rijeka, Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivošević, Tatjana [Faculty of Engineering, University of Rijeka, Vukovarska 58, HR-51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Mandić, Luka, E-mail: lukam@phy.uniri.hr [Department of Physics, University of Rijeka, Radmile Matejčić 2, HR-51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Orlić, Ivica [Department of Physics, University of Rijeka, Radmile Matejčić 2, HR-51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David D. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    The new system for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis has been installed at the Laboratory for Elemental Micro-Analysis (LEMA) at the University of Rijeka. Currently the key application of this new XRF system is in the field of environmental science, i.e. in the analysis of fine airborne particles. In this work, results of initial multi-elemental analysis of PM{sub 2.5} fraction is reported for the first time in the region of Rijeka, Croatia. Sampling was performed at the Rijeka City center, during a continuous 9-day period in February/March 2012. All samples were collected on stretched Teflon filters in 12 h periods. To check the reliability of the new XRF system, results of XRF analysis are compared with the results obtained by the well-established Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) laboratory at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The concentrations of H, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb were determined. In addition, black carbon was determined by Laser Integrating Plate Method (LIPM). Very good agreement between XRF and IBA techniques is obtained for all elements detected by both techniques. Elemental concentrations were correlated with the traffic volume and wind speed and direction. The summary of our findings is presented and discussed in this paper.

  9. Nuclear science and a better environment - an oxymoron?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Specialist Committee of AINSE is a relatively recent addition to the areas of special interest but AINSE and ANSTO have supported environmental research for many years in areas such as environmental engineering studies, insect control, sensitive analytical techniques (which are in many cases at the heart of an improved understanding of environmental processes) and environmental radioactivity and the control of radioactive waste. Such techniques make a direct contribution to the remediation of contaminated industrial and mining sites and to monitoring the continued effect of these sites on the environment. Recently the spread of quaternary studies with distinct environmental importance has increased the AINSE involvement in supporting the use of AMS techniques involving cosmogenic radionuclides, not only for studies of current processes but also for historic studies designed to reveal past climates and geomorphology. Nuclear science of this kind contributes to a better understanding of patterns of atmospheric circulation, underground water resources and climate change. Even a simple application of nuclear science, the neutron soil moisture probe, improves the efficiency of water use in agriculture and reduces the environmental impact of irrigation. The environmental impact of development in the third world will have major environmental consequences in the next twenty years. Developments in nuclear science in chemical analysis, the dynamics of environmental processes and in monitoring resources will help in controlling a sustainable and rational use of the environment

  10. Application of FEPs analysis to identify research priorities relevant to the safety case for an Australian radioactive waste facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has established a project to undertake research relevant to the safety case for the proposed Australian radioactive waste facility. This facility will comprise a store for intermediate level radioactive waste, and either a store or a near-surface repository for low-level waste. In order to identify the research priorities for this project, a structured analysis of the features, events and processes (FEPs) relevant to the performance of the facility was undertaken. This analysis was based on the list of 137 FEPs developed by the IAEA project on 'Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities' (ISAM). A number of key research issues were identified, and some factors which differ in significance for the store, compared to the repository concept, were highlighted. For example, FEPs related to long-term groundwater transport of radionuclides are considered to be of less significance for a store than a repository. On the other hand, structural damage from severe weather, accident or human interference is more likely for a store. The FEPs analysis has enabled the scientific research skills required for the inter-disciplinary project team to be specified. The outcomes of the research will eventually be utilised in developing the design, and assessing the performance, of the future facility. It is anticipated that a more detailed application of the FEPs methodology will be undertaken to develop the safety case for the proposed radioactive waste management facility. (authors)

  11. Progress in the Alligator Rivers analogue project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Steering Committee agreed on 1 October 1987 to sponsor the International Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) for a three year program with a formal starting date of 1 September 1987. The participants are six organisations from five NEA Member States with ANSTO as the managing participant. A detailed tehnical program was agreed by a Joint Technical Committee and this comprises six main technical sub-projects: modelling of radionuclide migration, hydrogeology at Koongarra, uranium/thorium series disequilibria studies, colloid and groundwater studies, fission product studies and transuranic nuclide studies. A modelling workshop for participants and contractors was held in Sydney in February 1988 and a field visit was undertaken in May 1988. Laboratory studies on samples obtained in previous field visits were carried out from September 1987. Data from the project are being provided for participants as case 8 in the INTRAVAL model validation project coordinated by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate. A Joint Technical Committee meeting to approve the technical program and budjet for the second year will be held in Sydney in July 1988

  12. Erinnerung und Geschichte – Ein früher Bericht aus dem Frauen-KZ Moringen 1936/37 Memory and History—An Early Report from the Women’s Concentration Camp in Moringen 1936/37

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Schikorra

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Der Erinnerungsbericht von Gabriele Herz ist einerseits bedeutsam wegen der Beschreibung individuelle Erfahrungen und der Einnahme einer persönlichen Perspektive. Andererseits stellt er ein bedeutendes Dokument für die Geschichtsschreibung zu frühen Konzentrationslagern dar, und hier insbesondere zu den Verfolgungserfahrungen jüdischer Frauen im Deutschland der 30er Jahre. In der äußerst aufschlussreichen Einleitung der Historikerin Jane Caplan, die den Anstoß für die Herausgabe dieses einzigartigen Dokuments gab, wird die Komplexität des Erinnerungszeugnisses von Gabriele Herz aufgezeigt und gewürdigt.Gabriele Herz’s memoir is important on the one hand because of its description of individual experience through its use of the personal perspective. On the other hand, it also presents an important document for historiography on early concentration camps and in particular on the experience of the persecution of Jewish women in 1930s Germany. The extremely enlightening introduction by the historian Jane Caplan, who also provided the impetus for the publication of this extraordinary testimonial, sketches and honors the complexities of Gabriele Herz’s memoir.

  13. Plutonium and uranium contamination in soils from former nuclear weapon test sites in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Child, D.P., E-mail: dpc@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Hotchkis, M.A.C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    The British government performed a number of nuclear weapon tests on Australian territory from 1952 through to 1963 with the cooperation of Australian government. Nine fission bombs were detonated in South Australia at Emu Junction and Maralinga, and a further three fission weapons were detonated in the Monte Bello Islands off the coast of Western Australia. A number of soil samples were collected by Australian Radiation Laboratories in 1972 and 1978 during field surveys at these nuclear weapon test sites. They were analysed by gamma spectrometry and, for a select few samples, by alpha spectrometry to measure the remaining activities of fission products, activation products and weapon materials. We have remeasured a number of these Montebello Islands and Emu Junction soil samples using the ANTARES AMS facility, ANSTO. These samples were analysed for plutonium and uranium isotopic ratios and isotopic concentrations. Very low {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratios were measured at both sites ({approx}0.05 for Alpha Island and {approx}0.02 for Emu Field), substantially below global fallout averages. Well correlated but widely varying {sup 236}U and plutonium concentrations were measured across both sites, but {sup 233}U did not correlate with these other isotopes and instead showed correlation with distance from ground zero, indicating in situ production in the soils.

  14. Human activity and climate variability project: annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of the state of the Australian environment, including natural climate variability, prior to colonial settlement is vital if we are to define and understand the impact of over two hundred years of post-industrial human activity on our landscape. ANSTO, in conjunction with university partners, is leading a major research effort to provide natural archives of human activity and climate variability over the last 500 years in Australia, utilising a variety of techniques, including lead-210 and radiocarbon dating and analyses of proxy indicators (such as microfossils) as well as direct evidence (such as trace elements) of human activity and climate variability. The other major project objectives were to contribute to the understanding of the impact of human induced and natural aerosols in the East Asian region on climate through analysis and sourcing of fine particles and characterisation of air samples using radon concentrations and to contribute to the improvement of land surface parameterisation schemes and investigate the potential to use stable isotopes to improve global climate models and thus improve our understanding of future climate

  15. Nuclear regulation in Australia - future possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.; Bardsley, J. [Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Australian Safeguards Office

    1997-12-31

    Australia`s current nuclear regulatory arrangements reflect two major factors: that we are a federation, with a constitutional division of powers between the Commonwealth and the States, and that we have no nuclear industry, other than uranium mining. Australia`s only nuclear facilities are operated by a Commonwealth instrumentality, ANSTO. Current Commonwealth regulatory arrangements are a response to international treaty commitments -principally the NPT (Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons) -and to the commencement of commercial uranium mining and export in the late 1970`s. Although at present no nuclear industry activities, other than mining, are in prospect, this might not always be the case, and with the establishment of ARPANSA (the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency) it is timely to give some thought to regulatory arrangements which might be appropriate to Australia`s future circumstances. This paper will discuss the regulation activities relating to the nuclear fuel cycle , i e activities involved with the production and use of nuclear materials (uranium, thorium and plutonium) for the generation of energy through nuclear fission.

  16. A new capability for ANTARES: {sup 7}Be by AMS for ice samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.M., E-mail: ams@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 (Australia); Mokhber-Shahin, L.; Simon, K.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    ANSTO, in collaboration with Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) and the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), has an on-going program of {sup 10}Be (t{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 1.39 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} a) concentration measurement in firn and ice at Law Dome, Antarctica. In recent years snow pit samples have also been measured for {sup 7}Be (t{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 53.28 d) concentration as this isotope has the potential to give further insight into the transport and deposition of cosmogenic beryllium to Law Dome and so improve the use of {sup 10}Be as a proxy for solar activity. Early {sup 7}Be measurements were made by gamma-ray spectrometry (GRS) with typical counting times of 3 days. In 2010, we developed the capability for {sup 7}Be/{sup 9}Be measurement on the 10 MV ANTARES (Australian National Tandem Accelerator for Applied Research) accelerator using carbon foil post-stripping of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} to {sup 7}Be{sup 4+} to eliminate the {sup 7}Li isobar. We describe the method and explain the advantages of using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) over GRS for {sup 7}Be analysis.

  17. Sulphur hexafluoride as a stripper gas for tandem accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkis, M.A.C., E-mail: mah@ansto.gov.au; Child, D.; Fink, D.; Garton, D.; Levchenko, V.; Wilcken, K.

    2013-05-01

    Highlights: •Sulphur hexafluoride is investigated as a stripper gas in tandem accelerators. •For heavy ions at low terminal voltage, mean charge states are found to be up to 1 charge unit higher than with argon gas. •Charge state distributions are found to be broader than with argon gas. •For charge states above the mean charge state, yields are typically doubled using SF{sub 6}. •Using SF{sub 6} stripper gas, the efficiency of actinides AMS analysis is doubled. -- Abstract: We have investigated sulphur hexafluoride as a stripper gas in tandem accelerators by using the ANTARES accelerator system at ANSTO to measure charge state distributions for this gas. Results are reported at 4 MV terminal voltage for injected negative ions ranging from carbon to uranium oxide. For iodine and thorium the distributions are extended across a range of energies of practical use for accelerator mass spectrometry, ion beam analysis and other accelerator applications. Charge state distributions using sulphur hexafluoride are found to have mean charge states up to 1 charge unit higher than, and to be broader than, corresponding distributions for argon gas, except in the case of carbon beams. As a result, SF{sub 6} is shown to provide significantly higher yields for charge states of heavy ions above the mean charge state. We now perform actinide AMS measurements with 9% yield to the 5+ charge state, compared to 4–5% achieved previously with argon gas.

  18. Radiation research in AINSE-affiliated universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) has enabled research workers from its member universities to make extensive use of the (sometimes unique) radiation facilities at Lucas Heights. This has resulted in a better understanding of the action of gamma, X-ray and electron beam radiation on physical, chemical and biological systems, and of the radical and excited species which are produced. A selection of the ensuing first class publications is described. Over the years the emphasis has changed from the obtaining of a fundamental understanding of the science and the refining of the techniques to utilising these in attacking problems in other fields. Examples are given of the use of radiation chemistry techniques in metal-organic, polymer, excited state and biological chemistry. In radiation biology, the early emphasis on genetics and on the production of chromosomal aberrations by radiation has given way to molecular biology and cancer treatment studies. In all of this, AAEC/ANSTO and CSIRO have played major roles. In addition, AINSE has organised a continuing series of specialist conferences which has facilitated interaction between research groups within the universities and involved other investigators in Australia, New Zealand and the rest of the world

  19. Immobilisation of Higher Activity Wastes from Nuclear Reactor Production of 99Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin W. A. Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of intermediate- and low-level liquid and solid wastes are produced from reactor production of 99Mo using UAl alloy or UO2 targets and in principle can be collectively or individually converted into waste forms. At ANSTO, we have legacy acidic uranyl-nitrate-rich intermediate level waste (ILW from the latter, and an alkaline liquid ILW, a U-rich filter cake, plus a shorter lived liquid stream that rapidly decays to low-level waste (LLW standards, from the former. The options considered consist of cementitious products, glasses, glass-ceramics, or ceramics produced by vitrification or hot isostatic pressing for intermediate-level wastes. This paper discusses the progress in waste form development and processing to treat ANSTO’s ILW streams arising from 99Mo. The various waste forms and the reason for the process option chosen will be reviewed. We also address the concerns over adapting our chosen process for use in a hot-cell environment.

  20. A New Neutron Radiography / Tomography / Imaging Station DINGO at OPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.; Davidson, G.; Pangelis, S.; Kennedy, S. J.

    A new neutron radiography / tomography / imaging instrument DINGO was built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument is designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defense, industrial, cultural heritage and archaeology applications. In the industrial field it provides a useful tool for studying cracking and defects in steel or other metals. The instrument construction was completed at the end of June 2013 and it is currently in the hot commissioning stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The instrument position for DINGO is the thermal neutron beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The measured flux (using gold foil) for an L/D of approximately 500 at HB-2 is 5.3*107 [n/cm2s], which is in a similar range to other facilities. A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator position in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 500 and 1000. A secondary collimator separates the two beams by blocking one and positions another aperture for the other beam. The whole instrument operates in two different positions, one for high resolution and one for high speed. In the current configuration DINGO measured first radiography and tomography data sets on friendly user test samples.

  1. Final guidelines for an Environmental Impact Statement on the proposed construction and operation of a replacement nuclear research reactor at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These guidelines are based on the requirements of paragraphs 4.1 and 4.3 of the Administrative Procedures under the Commonwealth Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974 (EPIP Act).The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has been designated as proponent under the EPIP Act in relation to the proposed replacement nuclear research reactor at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC). The term 'environment' refers to all aspects of the surroundings of human beings, whether affecting human beings as individuals or in social groupings. It includes the natural environment, the built environment, and social aspects of our surroundings. The definition covers such factors as air, water, soils, flora,fauna, buildings, roads, employment, hazards and risks, and safety. As set out in the guidelines, the scope of this assessment shall encompass those issues and alternatives directly related to the construction and operation of a replacement nuclear research reactor at the LHSTC. The EIS will need to make clear the site selection criteria used, and the basis, in assessing Lucas Heights as being suitable for a new reactor. While the EIS will address all aspects of the construction and operation of a replacement nuclear research reactor, it will not address issues associated with the treatment of spent nuclear fuel rods from the existing High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR facility). The EIS will also address issues associated with the eventual decommissioning of the proposed replacement reactor, and eventual decommissioning of the existing HIFAR facility

  2. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis of optoelectronic and semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N.; Cohen, D.D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Johnston, P.; Walker, S. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Whitlow, H.; Hult, M. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Oestling, M.; Zaring, C. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1993-12-31

    In recent years, the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil spectrometry (HIERDA) has been applied to analyse multi-phase, thin layer devices used in optoelectronics, semiconductors and solar power generation. HIERDA gives simultaneously, mass resolved elemental concentration vs depth profiles of the matrix constituents, and is particularly suited to the determination of light elements in a heavy matrix. The beam/target interaction process is similar to RBS, but has the difference that the recoiling target atoms are detected instead of the scattered projectile. High energy, heavy ions beams bombard the sample, ejecting recoil atoms which are detected at a forward angle of 45 deg. A time-of-flight and total energy detection system enables the ejected particle`s mass to be identified, and allows energy spectra to be obtained and interpreted in an analogous way to RBS, but with the important difference that the elemental spectra are separated, and not superimposed on a background as in RBS. Some of the measurements made with a HIERDA system on the ANTARES Tandem Accelerator at ANSTO are described. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Bilateral safeguards agreements; International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Agreement; The South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty Act; The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Act; The Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Health and Ageing; Minister for Foreign Affairs; Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts; Minister for, Resources, Energy and Tourism); 2. Advisory bodies (Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council; Advisory Committees); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA); Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office; Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO); Supervising Scientist)

  4. Radiolanthanides in therapeutic nuclear oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolanthanides such as Holmium-166 (T1/2 26.8h), Samarium-153 (T1/2 46.3h) and Lutetium-177 (T1/2 6.7 days) all have beta emissions suitable for radiopharmaceutical therapy, bone marrow ablation and for pain palliation of skeletal metastases. They also emit gamma photons of energies which permit quantitative imaging on conventional gamma cameras which facilitates calculation of dosimetry in individual patients. The range of half-lives has the potential to match the irradiation of tumour cells to the residence time of the radiopharmaceutical thus minimising radiotoxicity to normal tissues. Relative ease and low cost of production of these radiolanthanides in rectors such as HIFAR at ANSTO render radiolanthanides a practical option for radiopharmaceutical treatment of cancer for patients in whom conventional therapy has failed. Radioimmunotherapy of cancer using various monoclonal antibodies targeted to specific tumor-cell antigens has been performed with Samarium-153, Holmium-166 and Lutetium-177-labelled antibodies in human tumor xenographs in nude mice and in clinical trials. The development of a large animal model of human cancer will be described, in particular in relation to improving the accuracy of prediction of dosimetry and preclinical evaluation of efficacy and toxicity of radiolanthanides in therapeutic nuclear oncology

  5. Improvement of buried radioactive source situation at a hospital in Cambodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the successful outcome and completion of improvement works at the buried radioactive source site at a hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, by the ANSTO Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) Project. We describe the background of the situation and the efforts made since 2005 by the RSRS Project in collaboration with international partners, the New Zealand National Radiation Laboratory (NRL), as part of the New Zealand contribution to the Global Initiative to Combat Global Terrorism (GICNT), and the United States National Nuclear Security Administration represented by the Pacific North West National Laboratory (PNNL) who provided security upgrades as part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GIRD. We describe the objectives related to characterising the buried source and improving the site's safety, security and area amenity. The potential options available to meet these objectives, justification for the strategy chosen, and the preparation and conduct of the works involved are discussed. Shielding calculations, dose rate criteria, and occupational health and safety considerations from a radiation protection and construction perspective are presented.

  6. Radiocarbon in tropical tree rings during the Little Ice Age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross-dated tree-ring cores (Pinus maker's) from north-central Thailand, spanning AD 1620-1780, were used to investigate atmospheric 14C for the tropics during the latter part of the Little Ice Age. In addition, a cross-dated section of Huon pine from western Tasmania, covering the same period of time, was investigated. A total of 16 pairs of decadal samples were extracted to alpha-cellulose for AMS 14C analysis using the ANTARES facility at ANSTO. The 14C results from Thailand follow the trend of the southern hemisphere, rather than that of the northern hemisphere. This is a surprising result, and we infer that atmospheric 14C for north-central Thailand, at 17 deg. N, was strongly influenced by the entrainment of southern hemisphere air parcels during the southwest Asian monsoon, when the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone moves to the north of our sampling site. Such atmospheric transport and mixing are therefore considered to be one of the principal mechanisms for regional 14C offsets

  7. Radiation research in AINSE-affiliated universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangster, D. R. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) has enabled research workers from its member universities to make extensive use of the (sometimes unique) radiation facilities at Lucas Heights. This has resulted in a better understanding of the action of gamma, X-ray and electron beam radiation on physical, chemical and biological systems, and of the radical and excited species which are produced. A selection of the ensuing first class publications is described. Over the years the emphasis has changed from the obtaining of a fundamental understanding of the science and the refining of the techniques to utilising these in attacking problems in other fields. Examples are given of the use of radiation chemistry techniques in metal-organic, polymer, excited state and biological chemistry. In radiation biology, the early emphasis on genetics and on the production of chromosomal aberrations by radiation has given way to molecular biology and cancer treatment studies. In all of this, AAEC/ANSTO and CSIRO have played major roles. In addition, AINSE has organised a continuing series of specialist conferences which has facilitated interaction between research groups within the universities and involved other investigators in Australia, New Zealand and the rest of the world. 27 refs.

  8. Kino filmų titrai kaip kalbų mokymosi priemonė. Untertitel als Mittel zum Fremdsprachenerwerb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Baravykaitė

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Das in den letzten Jahren spürbare Bestreben der litauischen Gesetzgeber, Untertitelung von Fernsehfilmen zwecks Fremdsprachenerwerb gesetzlich anzuordnen, löste eine Auseinandersetzung in der Öffentlichkeit aus, die sich in der Presse sowie im Internet widerspiegelt und als Anstoß zum vorliegenden Beitrag dient. Diese Arbeit stellt den Versuch dar, die Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der Untertitelung als eines Mittels zum Fremdsprachenerwerb zu untersuchen. Auf Grund der fehlenden wissenschaftlichen Forschungen in diesem Bereich sollen dabei empirische Betrachtungen und die vergleichende Textanalyse von Original und Übersetzung als Hilfe dienen. Auch wenn die Relevanz der Untertitelung für den Fremdsprachenerwerb nicht bestreitbar ist, ist sie aber zugleich nicht zu überschätzen: Durch die lediglich für diese Form der audiovisuellen Übersetzung charakteristischen Merkmale (kurze Einblendezeit, kondensierte Sprache und begrenzte Übertragungsmöglichkeiten von Realia-Begriffen, Phraseologismen, Intertextualismen, dem Wortspiel etc. bleiben dem Zuschauer oft sprachliche Stilmittel vorenthalten und der in allen Übersetzungsbereichen vorkommende unausweichliche Sinn- und Wirkungsverlust des Originals wird erheblich verstärkt. Anbetracht der erwähnten Aspekte und der häufigen fehlerhaften Übersetzungen sollen Untertitel nur als Hilfsmittel beim Fremdsprachenerwerb angewendet werden, wobei herkömmliche Lehr- und Lernstrategien von Fremdsprachen in den Vordergrund treten müssen.

  9. Report on the workshop on neutrons for engineering and its conclusions regarding the residual-stress diffractometer at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the workshop was to: inform the Australian research organizations and universities of the capabilities of an engineering and materials science instrument; promote the use of neutron diffraction to map and investigate strains/stresses in materials and components for industrial applications and research; identify the future needs and opportunities in this area; present the options for a stress mapping diffractometer at the Replacement Research Reactor and receive feedback on these options; identify the ancillary equipment and facilities required. Presented papers and discussions at the workshop indicated that there are a number of important benefits to Australia in the building of a first-class instrument for materials science and engineering and many residual stress-related problems in a wide variety of fields in Australia, such as the manufacturing industries, mining, oil and gas, rail transport, defense and life extension. Stress scanning provides another tool for solving problems to complement facilities at the major research institutes, CSIRO, AMIRA, DSTO, ANSTO and the universities. It will create a regional pool of experts who may tap into the pool of expertise internationally. The turn around time for tests for Australian customers will be reduced thus avoiding having to go overseas to have the tests performed. From an educational perspective the instrument will build expertise in Australia and will help to attract graduates into engineering. A detailed list of the attendees and affiliations is in Appendix C

  10. Radiocarbon determinations for Chillagoe rock paintings: small sample AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armitage, R.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M. W. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States). Department of Chemistry; David, B. [Queensland Univ St. Lucia, QLD (Australia); Tuniz, C.; Lawson, E.; Jacobsen, G.; Hua, G. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Indirect dating methods have been applied to the rock paintings of Chillagoe, north Queensland, revealing patterns of superimposition, depictions of items of known antiquity, the use of fragile paints such as mud, and in-situ pigment stratigraphies (David 1994). These patterns suggest that the Chillagoe rock paintings are relatively young, likely less than 3000 years old. A change in the geographical distribution of rock painting styles suggests a regionalization of the styles starting around 3000 years BP. Such regionalization implies that major cultural changes accompanied the changes in rock painting styles. This model of temporal change is now being investigated through a collaboration between the University of Queensland, ANSTO and the Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University to directly analyze radiocarbon in the charcoal pigments in several of the Chillagoe rock paintings. Samples collected from fourteen separate charcoal rock drawings at five rock shelters in the Chillagoe region were submitted to plasma chemical treatment. Though unreactive, the excited and energetic argon atoms in the plasma remove surface-absorbed CO{sub 2} through inelastic collisions. Samples yielding less than 100 micrograms carbon required special handling for AMS analysis. An isotope dilution technique utilizing {sup 14}C-free carbon was chosen. Radiocarbon analysis were also performed and the results will be presented. Paper No. 25; 2 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Elastic recoil detection analysis of ferroelectric films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, W.B.; Johnston, P.N.; Walker, S.R.; Bubb, I.F. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Scott, J.F. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    There has been considerable progress in developing SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub O.7}Sr{sub O.3}TiO{sub 3} (BST) ferroelectric films for use as nonvolatile memory chips and for capacitors in dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). Ferroelectric materials have a very large dielectric constant ( {approx} 1000), approximately one hundred times greater than that of silicon dioxide. Devices made from these materials have been known to experience breakdown after a repeated voltage pulsing. It has been suggested that this is related to stoichiometric changes within the material. To accurately characterise these materials Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) is being developed. This technique employs a high energy heavy ion beam to eject nuclei from the target and uses a time of flight and energy dispersive (ToF-E) detector telescope to detect these nuclei. The recoil nuclei carry both energy and mass information which enables the determination of separate energy spectra for individual elements or for small groups of elements In this work ERDA employing 77 MeV {sup 127}I ions has been used to analyse Strontium Bismuth Tantalate thin films at the heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Biodeuterated microbial chitosan for characterisation by neutron scattering and development of new biocompatible materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan is one of the most abundant natural polysaccharides on earth and has found a wide range of applications in biomedical and environmental fields. The most common source of commercially available chitosan is produced through the deacetylation of chitin from crustacean (mostly shrimp) shells. However, chitosan (along with chitin) is also a major component of the cell walls of a range of fungi, which can be grown and processed under controlled conditions to influence the degree of deacetylation and molecular weight of the extracted chitosan. We have selected the single cell yeast Pichia pastoris, which can also be used for recombinant expression of biodeuterated proteins. P. pastoris was cultivated in a bioreactor using deuterated methanol (CD3OD,) as sole carbon source in the growth medium and heavy water (D20) as the solvent. NMR and mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated the complete deuteration of the non-exchangeable protons in the extracted chitosan molecule. Further tuning of the level of deuteration may be achieved by changing the H/D content in the growth medium. Apart from limited reports of partially deuterated chitosan through functional groups or exchangeable protons using deuterated solvent, there are no examples of biosynthesised deuterated chitosan in the literature. This capability, developed at the National Deuteration Facility, ANSTO, provides a range of possibilities for characterising chitosan materials using isotope-sensitive techniques.

  13. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of Australian Radiation Protection And Nuclear Safety Agency, 2001-200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period analysed ARPANSA contributed to the (then) Health and Aged Care portfolio's 'Outcome 1: Population Health and Safety'. The objective of this outcome was the promotion and protection of the health of all Australians and minimising the incidence of preventable mortality, illness, injury and disability. The main outcomes, as outlined in the reports are: regulation of Commonwealth activities involving radiation sources and nuclear facilities; progress towards the development of a National Directory for Radiation Protection; quality assurance programs in medical radiation and conduct evaluations of individual and population doses; health impact assessment of radiation exposure and methodologies for this assessment, recommendations and guidelines for limiting radiation exposure; progress towards third-party quality assurance certification for the personal radiation monitoring service, radionuclide analysis of gamma ray emitting nuclides, Ultraviolet Protection Factor; assessing radiopharmaceutical testing and the protection dosimeter calibration service; maintenance of a network for monitoring radionuclides in the atmosphere; safety standards and guidance in support of the work of the Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The major priorities for ARPANSA in the reporting year, included the assessment of an application to construct the replacement research reactor at ANSTO, implementation of a process for public consultation and participation in the licensing of nuclear facilities and the development of national standards and codes of practice, including a standard for radiofrequency radiation

  14. The national synchrotron ray of hope or ring of fire?

    CERN Document Server

    Hollis, T

    2002-01-01

    While most agree the synchrotron will be a boost for Australian science, the author reports on concerns about the cost of building and operating the project Biotech industry representatives want to know how that $100 million will be used and want to see the government's justification for pouring more than a third of its total technology budget for 2001/2 into the synchrotron. They, and the opposition, also want to know where the private money will come from to make up the balance or whether the state will ultimately have to pitch in the rest itself. Indeed, an Auditor-General's report released last week warned of the need for comprehensive financial risk management of the facility. The National Synchrotron, to be built at Monash University, will be a hollow ring of about 60 metres diameter and initially housing nine beamlines, each capable of performing independent experiments simultaneously. According to Dr Richard Garrett, director of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (http://www.ansto.gov.au/natf...

  15. A Risk Perspective for the Replacement Research Reactor in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 2000, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) signed a contract with the company INVAP S.E. of Argentina for the design, construction and commissioning of a replacement research reactor (RRR). INVAP contracted CEDIAC to prepare the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for the RRR in support of the ANSTO application for the construction licence. The PSA is complementary to the safety analysis, in the sense that it asks questions such as ''What if the postulated initiating events were to occur and more than one piece of equipment were to fail? What if several things were to go wrong?''The PSA attempts to determine all the possible combinations of how the plant could respond to an initiating event, group all the possible outcomes, obtain conservative estimates of the frequency, and bounding estimates of the consequences (i.e. doses to the worst exposed individual of the public). The frequency and consequence constitute the risk, and when evaluated for all possible events, can be compared against the safety objectives set out in the regulatory principles. Besides the basic objective of the PSA, which is the quantitative evaluation of the risks associated with the RRR, and its comparison to the regulatory objectives, the PSA studies have been performed in parallel with the basic engineering phase of the project. Therefore, preliminary results from the 'risk point of view' were used as input to the design process, thus permitting improvements to be made to the design, and resulting in an effective reduction of the residual risk. To perform the PSA studies, several methodological developments were made in order to obtain a representative list of internal and external initiating events, to treat component and human related failures, to consider common-cause failures, and to consider some specific aspects of the design (i.e. fail safe components, passive systems, and lack of need for support systems). The PSA studies were performed to

  16. Sterile insect technique applied to Queensland fruit fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) aims to suppress or eradicate pest populations by flooding wild populations with sterile males. To control fruit fly million of flies of both sexes are mass reared at the Gosford Post-Harvest laboratory near Sydney, mixed with sawdust and fluorescent dye at the pupal stage and transported to Ansto where they are exposed to low dose of 70-75Gy of gamma radiation from a Cobalt-60 source. Following irradiation the pupae are transported to the release site in plastic sleeves then transferred to large plastic garbage bins for hatching. These bins are held at 30 deg. C. to synchronise hatching and files are released 48-72 hours after hatching begins. In most cases these bins are placed among fruit trees in the form of an 800 metre grid. This maximises survival of the emerging flies which are released on an almost daily basis. Progress of the SIT program is monitored by collecting flies from traps dotted all over the infested site. The ratio of sterile to wild flies can be detected because the sterile files are coated with the fluorescent dust which can be seen under ultra-violet light. If the SIT program is successful entomologists will trap a high proportion of sterile flies to wild flies and this should result in a clear reduction in maggot infestations. Surveillance, quarantine, and trapping activities continue for 8 or 9 months to check for any surviving pockets of infestation. If any are found the SIT program is reactivated. These programs demonstrated that SIT was an efficient and environmental friendly non-chemical control method for eradicating outbreaks or suppressing fruit fly populations in important fruit growing areas. ills

  17. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor: Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Vol. 1. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the replacement of the Australian Research reactor has been released. An important objective of the EIS process is to ensure that all relevant information has been collected and assessed so that the Commonwealth Government can make an informed decision on the proposal. The environmental assessment of the proposal to construct and operate a replacement reactor described in the Draft EIS has shown that the scale of environmental impacts that would occur would be acceptable, provided that the management measures and commitments made by ANSTO are adopted. Furthermore, construction and operation of the proposed replacement reactor would result in a range of benefits in health care, the national interest, scientific achievement and industrial capability. It would also result in a range of benefits derived from increased employment and economic activity. None of the alternatives to the replacement research reactor considered in the Draft EIS can meet all of the objectives of the proposal. The risk from normal operations or accidents has been shown to be well within national and internationally accepted risk parameters. The dose due to reactor operations would continue to be small and within regulatory limits. For the replacement reactor, the principle of 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable' would form an integral part of the design and licensing process to ensure that doses to operators are minimized. Costs associated with the proposal are $286 million (in 1997 dollars) for design and construction. The annual operating and maintenance costs are estimated to be $12 million per year, of which a significant proportion will be covered by commercial activities. The costs include management of the spent fuel from the replacement reactor as well as the environmental management costs of waste management, safety and environmental monitoring. Decommissioning costs for the replacement reactor would arise at the end of its lifetime

  18. Radon-222 as a tracer of atmospheric transport phenomena on different spatial and temporal scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radon is the most frequently used naturally occurring radioactive tracer of atmospheric dynamics on local, regional, and hemispheric scales. The paper presents a short review of the most recent applications of this tracer relevant to the Pacific Basin. The first example relates to a five year experiment in which hourly measurements of atmospheric radon concentrations were made at three ground-based coastal stations in East Asia (Hok Tsui, Hong Kong Island, China; Gosan, Jeju Island, Korea; Sado, Sado Island, Japan). Results are contrasted with those from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, gathered during the same period. The experiment was part of the most recent Aerosol Characterisation Experiment in East Asia, and aimed to comprehensively characterise air masses associated with East Asian continental outflow events to the Pacific. Seasonal and inter-annual changes of the areas of strongest and weakest interaction with land have been delineated for each station using back trajectories corresponding to low and high hourly radon events. The ambient radon background at the four stations is also discussed. It shows strong seasonality due to the continental influence on outflow events to the Pacific. The second example focuses on a new capability developed at ANSTO for the quantitative characterisation of exchange and mixing processes in the lower atmosphere on different time scales based on the measurement of vertical radon gradients. The measurements rely on tower- and light aircraft-based platforms. First results obtained using the tower-based system (with inlets at 2m and 50m), which aimed to characterise the vertical mixing in the surface layer, are discussed, as well as a system based on an airborne radon sampler, which is capable of in-situ extraction of radon from up to 300 L of air at a given altitude with the resulting lower limit of detection of about 0.01 Bq m

  19. Zur Geschichte der Geowissenschaften im Museum für Naturkunde zu Berlin. Teil 3: Von A. G. Werner und R. J. Haüy zu C. S. Weiss – Der Weg von C. S. Weiss zum Direktor des Mineralogischen Museums der Berliner Universität

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hoppe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Der Berufung von C. S. Weiss an die Universität Berlin im Jahre 1810 gingen Entwicklungen voraus, die durch die Kristallographie des Franzosen R. J. Haüy, besonders durch dessen Lehrbuch der Mineralogie, ausgelöst wurden. Sie stehen mit der Übersetzung dieses Lehrbuchs im Zusammenhang und führten zur Qualifizierung von C. S. Weiss zum Mineralogen und Kristallographen sowie zur weiteren Entwicklung der Kristallographie innerhalb des Lehrgebäudes der Mineralogie. Den Anstoß gab der mit dem Berliner Mineralogen D. L. G. Karsten befreundete Geologe L. v. Buch, der die Kristallographie Haüys als Erster kennen lernte. Als dessen stark kristallographisch orientiertes Lehrbuch der Mineralogie erschien, entschloss sich Karsten, eine kommentierte Übersetzung desselben zu organisieren. Weiss, der hierfür gewonnen werden konnte, bildete sich zunächst an der Bergakademie Freiberg weiter aus, wobei er die Lehre des führenden Mineralogen A. G. Werner voll in sich aufnahm. Im Verlaufe der Mitarbeit an der Übersetzung gelangte Weiss gegenüber den atomistischen Vorstellungen Haüys zu Ansichten über die Gesetzmäßigkeiten des Kristallbaues. die sich auf Kants Naturphilosophie gründeten. Mit Haüy, den er in Paris näher kennen lernte, kam es deshalb zum Bruch. Seine "dynamische" Kristallographie baute Weiss mathematisch aus und vermochte bereits weit in die Gesetzmäßigkeiten des Kristallbaues einzudringen. Dadurch schuf er die Voraussetzungen für seine Berufung auf den für Karsten vorgesehenen Berliner Mineralogie-Lehrstuhl, der durch dessen frühen Tod frei wurde. doi:10.1002/mmng.20000030102x

  20. Progress report of Applications of Nuclear Physics. July 1993 - June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the Applications of Nuclear Physics Program Area are: The development and promotion of research programs on national nuclear science facilities such as charged particle accelerators and neutron beam instruments thereby encouraging strategic research in nuclear science and technology at ANSTO, in tertiary institutions and industrial research and development laboratories; Participation in and management ofA ustralian use of international neutron scattering, synchrotron radiation and high energy physics facilities to assist graduate training in the universities and to foster Australian benefits from developments in high technology; The maintenance of expertise in fundamental nuclear and atomic processes relevant to nuclear science and technology including neutron physics, ion interactions, radiation standards, dosimetry and laser enrichment; Expansion of the use of the accelerator mass spectrometry service both nationally and internationally to make major contributions in the understanding and remediation of severe environmental problems such as the greenhouse effect; The application of charged particle beams and ionizing radiation to industrial, biological and environmental problems; The exploitation of neutron scattering techniques in the development of new materials, drugs, biological substances and complex chemicals. The Program Area is continuing the development of several major new facilities. These include new beam lines and a new ion source on the Tandem accelerator (ANTARES), preliminary calibration of the small angle neutron scattering instrument (AUSANS) on the HIFAR reactor, refurbishment of one of the single crystal spectrometers on HIFAR (2TANA) and further development of the Australian National Beam line Facility at the Photon Factory at Tsukuba in Japan. In addition, significant improvements were made to the two neutron powder diffractometers on HIFAR (autor)

  1. Electrochemistry and structure of electode materials for li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of battery materials such as electrodes and electrolytes with good performance and stability is essential to emerging electric-vehicle technologies. Of serious environmental concern is that materials with these properties developed so far contain toxic and expensive elements, such as Co. Intensive studies on “green” Li-ion batteries (LIBs) have been undertaken at the Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials (ISEM) at the University of Wollongong. The strong collaboration of the ISEM team with the Energy materials research project at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) offers a good strategic platform for battery materials research. In this presentation we will discuss our study of the novel, Li-rich, Co-free Li1+xMO2 (M = Li, Ni, Mn, Fe) composite positive electrode material as an example result from this collaboration. The electrode is prepared via a template-free, onestep wet-chemical method followed by conventional annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. Although isotypic to the commercial LiCoO2 material, the Li1+xMO2 is Co free and exhibits superior cycling performance. Our collaborative studies used neutron powder diffraction (NPD) to characterize the material, connecting its electrochemical performance and function to its crystallography, yielding an atomistic-level understanding of function. High-resolution NPD studies (ECHIDNA) revealed that the material has an unprecedented level of cation mixing. Operando high-intensity NPD studies (WOMABT) revealed that the lithiation/delithiation of the electrode occurs via a solid-solution reaction where the lattice responds approximately linearly with cycling during the Ni2+/Ni3+/Ni4+ redox transitions, differing to that observed for the isostructural commercial cathodes containing a lower level of cation mixing. The understanding made in this work paves the way to develop new electrode materials for use in LIBs, as well as future Na-ion battery technology.

  2. Neutrons, deuteration and synchrotron X-rays for the study of biology and advanced materials: A match made in atoms..

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Together, the Australian Synchrotron in Melbourne and the OPAL research reactor, at the Bragg Institute in Sydney represent Australia's largest ever investment in scientific infrastructure. Both facilities commenced operation in 2007, have passed through their infancy and adolescence to take their place amongst the rank of top-flight international user facilities. Far from middle-aged, these two vibrant landmark facilities (each with 10 operational beamlines) and along with the National Deuteration Facility at ANSTO have provided transformational research capabilities for the Australian scientific community. Although modest in size compared to the well-established international competition, both institutions are producing excellent amounts of high-quality research with the Bragg Institute and the Australian Synchrotron generating more than 200 and 450 peer-reviewed publications per annum respectively. At first glance both synchrotron and neutron sources show similar scientific profiles, encompassing an extremely wide range of disciplines: materials, chemistry, biology, condensed matter physics, nanotechnology, engineering, geosciences, archaeology and studies relating to cultural heritage. Common to both are advanced capabilities for the study of atomic and molecular structure, as well as operational studies of functional materials under a diverse range of extreme environments. A more forensic examination however reveals fundamental differences in their DNA. While the biological, pharmaceutical and medical research communities drive substantial capability development and research outcomes at the Australian Synchrotron, neutron scattering and molecular deuteration at the Bragg Institute provides a focus for studies in soft condensed matter, physical and inorganic chemistry, solid state physics and crystallography. Although their respective probes are generated from different parts of the atom and interact with matter in fundamentally different ways, my

  3. The new neutron radiography/tomography/imaging station DINGO at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new neutron imaging instrument will be built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument will be designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defence, industrial, mining, space and aircraft applications. It will also be a useful tool for assessing oil and water flow in sedimentary rock reservoirs (like the North West Shelf), assessing water damage in aircraft components, and the study of hydrogen distribution and cracking in steel. The instrument is planned to be completed by the end of June 2013 and is currently in the design stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it also depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The designated instrument position for DINGO is the beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The estimated flux for an L/D of approximately 250 at HB-2 is calculated by Mcstas simulation in a range of 4.75x107 n/cm2 s, which is in the same range of other facilities like ANSTARES (FRM II; Schillinger et al., 2004 ) or BT2 (NIST; Hussey et al., 2005 ). A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator place in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 250 and 1000. A secondary collimator will separate the two beams and block one. The whole instrument will operate in two different positions, one for high resolution and the other for high speed.

  4. Regional Radiological Security Partnership in Southeast Asia - Increasing the Sustainability of Security Systems at the Site-Level by Using a Model Facility Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, Australia, through the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), created the Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) project and partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to form the Southeast Asian Regional Radiological Security Partnership (RRSP). The intent of the RRSP is to cooperate with countries in Southeast Asia to improve the security of their radioactive sources. This Southeast Asian Partnership supports objectives to improve the security of high risk radioactive sources by raising awareness of the need and developing national programs to protect and control such materials, improve the security of such materials, and recover and condition the materials no longer in use. The RRSP has utilized many tools to meet those objectives including: provision of physical protection upgrades, awareness training, physical protection training, regulatory development, locating and recovering orphan sources, and most recently - development of model security procedures at a model facility. This paper discusses the benefits of establishing a model facility, the methods employed by the RRSP, and three of the expected outcomes of the Model Facility approach. The first expected outcome is to increase compliance with source security guidance materials and national regulations by adding context to those materials, and illustrating their impact on a facility. Second, the effectiveness of each of the tools above is increased by making them part of an integrated system. Third, the methods used to develop the model procedures establishes a sustainable process that can ultimately be transferred to all facilities beyond the model. Overall, the RRSP has utilized the Model Facility approach as an important tool to increase the security of radioactive sources, and to position facilities and countries for the long term secure management of those sources.

  5. The scientific and technical requirements for biology at Australia's Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Symposium and Workshop on Neutrons for Biology was held in the School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Melbourne, under the auspices of AINSE, Univ of Melbourne and ANSTO. Invited talks were given on the subjects of Genome, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a critical framework for understanding bio-molecular, neutron diffraction at high and low resolution, and the investigation of viruses and large-scale biological structures using neutrons. There were also talks from prominent NMR practitioners and X-ray protein crystallographers, with substantial discussion about how the various methods might fit together in the future. Significant progress was made on defining Australia's needs, which include a strong push to use SANS and reflectometry for the study of macromolecular complexes and model membranes, and a modest network of supporting infrastructure in Brisbane, Melbourne and the Sydney Basin. Specific recommendations were that the small-angle neutron scattering and reflectometry instruments in the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) be pursued with high priority, that there be no specific effort to provide high-resolution protein-crystallography facilities at the RRR, but that a watching brief be kept on instrumentation and sample-preparation technologies elsewhere. A watch be kept on inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering capabilities elsewhere, although these methods will not initially be pursued at the RRR and that should be input from this community into the design of the biochemistry/chemistry laboratories at the Replacement Research Reactor. It was also recommended that a small number of regional facilities be established (or enhanced) to allow users to perform deuteration of biomolecules. These facilities would be of significant value to the NMR and neutron scattering communities

  6. Research and development of waste forms for geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics are candidate materials for immobilizing high-level waste (HLW) stemming from the reprocessing of spent fuels. We are proceeding with R and D on two types of ceramic waste form : a polyphase titanate ceramic named Synroc and three kinds of single-phase zirconium ceramics. The effect of self-irradiation damage on the long-term integrity of Synroc due to alpha decay was studied under a cooperative program between JAERI and ANSTO. The hot-pressed polyphase titanate ceramic (10 wt% waste loading) was doped with 244Cm to accumulate a dose of 1.6 x 1018 alpha decays/g. The phase assemblage of the curium-doped titanate ceramic included freudenbergite and loveringite in addition to three main phases: hollandite, perovskite and zirconolite. Accumulation of alpha decays was accompanied by a gradual decrease in density. The change in density was -2.7 % after an equivalent age of 45000 years. The durability of three single-phase zirconium ceramics which contained the appropriate amount of simulated high-level waste elements was examined at 90degC and 150degC in hydrochloric acid or deionized water. The waste forms examined included 10 mol% Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2, La2Zr2O7 with a pyrochlore structure, and CaZrO3 with a perovskite structure. La2Zr2O7 showed excellent durability, and leach rates of all constituents were less than about 10-4 g·m-2·day-1 at 150degC in deionized water. This suggests that La2Zr2O7 is a promising candidate material for immobilization of waste elements from HLW. (J.P.N.)

  7. Measurement of tritiated water transpiration from tree leaves following root injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sydney Water Board were looking for a means of assessing the efficacy and practicality of using tritiated water (HTO) for the treatment of sewer systems infested by tree roots. After discussion, it was agreed that ANSTO would assess the use of tritiated water as a means of determining the water transport function in roots. The proposed method of assessment is based upon measuring the rate at which tritiated water is moved away from the root infesting the sewer by the normal transpiration stream. The method assumes that the treatment applied to the sewer drastically reduces, if not destroys, root function. This should be reflected in a significant increase in the delay of HTO arrival at the leaves following application to the affected root. Any significant flux from the affected root would indicate inadequate treatment as water flow from the affected root would encourage subsequent re-invasion of the sewer. If deemed suitable, this tracer would in turn be used to determine the efficacy of the treatment in inhibiting root function. Constraints on the study as well as the optimal conditions for using HTO are discussed. The method which involves injection of tritium into the xylem tissue of the tree followed by collection of transpirate to observe the pattern of tritium arrival, is amenable to the task of assessing the efficiency of the treatment process if the site of infestation can be excavate without damage to the roots and if HDO can be injected and sealed with a root of adequate dimensions. 2 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  8. Larger scale structures in starch granules chartacterised via small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starch is the primary carbohydrate component in the human diet and the major storage polysaccharide in plants. Small angle scattering (SAS) techniques have an extensive track record in illuminating the semi-crystalline lamellar structure of the starch granule, however, there have been few attempts to use SAS techniques to characterise larger-scale structures reported from imaging techniques, such as growth rings, blocklets or pores. In this study, SAS data collected over an extended q range were gathered from dry and hydrated starch powders of various botanical origins. The use of neutrons and x-rays, as well as comparing dry and hydrated granules, allowed different levels of contrast in scattering length density to be probed and therefore selected structural regions to be highlighted. SAXS measurements were obtained with the Bruker Nanostar, whilst SANS measurements taken at the QUOKKA instrument, ANSTO. Data were analysed with the 'unified' method, which fits SAS curves from hierarchical structures, with each level consisting of a Guinier and Porod component which can be refined during fitting. The lowest q range, 0.002 - 0.04 Å-1, was found to be dominated by scattering from the starch granules themselves, especially in the dry powders; however an inflection point from a low contrast structure was observed at 0.035 Å-1. The associated scattering was interpreted within a unified scattering framework with the inflexion point correlating with a structure with radius of gyration -90 Å - a size comparable to small blocklets or superhelices. In hydrated starches, it is observed that there is an inflection point between lamellar and q-4 power-law scattering regions at approximately 0.004 Å-1 which may correlate with growth rings and large blocklets. The implications of these findings on existing models of starch lamellar scattering are discussed.

  9. Possible inverse proximity effect on the [YBCO(10nm)/LSMO (10nm)]4 superlattice films on STO (001) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strong coupling between the spin, orbital and lattice leads to abundant phenomena in oxide SC/FM superlattice films, such as a magnetic proximity effect, a giant magnetoresistance and a SC induced magnetic depletion in the FM layers. In this study, superlattice of [YBCO(10nm)/LSMO (10nm)]4 multilayer film were grown on SrTiO3 (001) substrates by a UHV pulse laser deposition technique. To reveal the magnetic structure fluctuation at SC/FM interfaces, a polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) measurements were carried out at 300 K (applied magnetic field 1.4mT & 1T) and at 8 K (applied magnetic field 1.4mT field cooled under 1T) in the Platypus beam line of ANSTO. The reflectivity intensities of each curve span over 5 orders of magnitude which reflect good interface quality with very low roughness. PNR data at 300 K where YBCO layers are in normal metal states shows presence of depletion layers at the SC/FM interfaces near the YBCO side. This depletion layers acts like YBCO in a normal metal state and is independent of the polarization of the incident Neutron beam. At low temperature, the depletion layer transfers to a magnetic layer with characteristics very similar both on the scattering length density and magnetization to LSMO layers. A thin interface layer near the YBCO/LSMO interface on the YBCO side shows destruction of superconductivity and induces a mall magnetic moment antiparallel to Mn moment FM layers. This phenomena can be explained on the basis of inverse proximity effect, where the suppression of superconductivity accompanying a Cu magnetic moment can be induced antiparallel to Mn moment as observed earlier by D. K. Satapathy et al.

  10. Japan-Australia Co-operative Program on research and development of technology for the management of high level radioactive wastes: phase II (1990-1995)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banba, Tsunetaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hart, K.P. [eds.

    1996-05-01

    The major activities associated with Japan-Australia Co-operative Program were the preparation, characterization and subsequent testing of both Cm-doped Synroc containing PW-4b simulated waste and Cm-doped single-phase zirconolite and perovskite, and the initiation of studies on naturally-occurring zirconolites to study the long-term durability of this mineral phase over geological time. The preparation of the Cm-doped samples was carried out in JAERI`s WASTEF facility at Tokai, with technical information and assistance provided by ANSTO where necessary. The experiments were designed to induce accelerated radiation damage in Synroc samples that would correspond to periods of Synroc storage of up to 100,000 years. The results are of considerable importance in evaluating the potential of the Synroc process as a means of dealing with HLW waste streams and represent a significant contribution to the understanding of the ability of Synroc to immobilize HLW elements. Overall the Phase II Co-operative Program has continued the excellent co-operative working relationship between the staff at the two institutions, and provided a better understanding of the potential advantages and limitations of Synroc as a second generation waste form. The work has shown the need for additional studies to be carried out on the effect of the levels of Cm-doping on the Cm leach rate, extension of natural analogue studies to define the geological conditions under which zirconolite is stable and development of models to provide long-term predictions of releases of HLW elements from Synroc under a range of repository conditions. It is strongly recommended that the program carried out in Phase II of the Co-operative Agreement be extended for a further three years to allow additional information on the above areas to be collected and reported in a document providing an overview of the Co-operative Program and recommendations on HLW management strategies. (J.P.N.).

  11. Flexible process options for the immobilisation of residues and wastes containing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Residues and waste streams containing plutonium present unique technical, safety, regulatory, security, and socio-political challenges. In the UK these streams range from lightly plutonium contaminated materials (PCM) through to residue s resulting directly from Pu processing operations. In addition there are potentially stocks of Pu oxide powders whose future designation may be either a waste or an asset, due to their levels of contamination making their reuse uneconomic, or to changes in nuclear policy. While waste management routes exist for PCM, an immobilisation process is required for streams containing higher levels of Pu. Such a process is being developed by Nexia Solutions and ANSTO to treat and immobilise Pu waste and residues currently stored on the Sellafield site. The characteristics of these Pu waste streams are highly variable. The physical form of the Pu waste ranges from liquids, sludges, powders/granules, to solid components (e.g., test fuels), with the Pu present as an ion in solution, as a salt, metal, oxide or other compound. The chemistry of the Pu waste streams also varies considerably with a variety of impurities present in many waste streams. Furthermore, with fissile isotopes present, criticality is an issue during operations and in the store or repository. Safeguards and security concerns must be assessed and controlled. The process under development, by using a combination of tailored waste form chemistry combined with flexible process technology aims to develop a process line to handle a broad range of Pu waste streams. It aims to be capable of dealing with not only current arisings but those anticipated to arise as a result of future operations or policy changes. (authors)

  12. Surface exposure history using in-situ cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl - applications to the Australian environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Physics Division

    1999-11-01

    Production of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides, {sup 10}Be (T{sub 1/2}=1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma), is dominated by the interaction of cosmic-rays with the upper atmosphere. They are also produced in exposed surface rocks and within the first meter or so of the Earth`s crust. This is called in-situ production and although only a million atoms or so of {sup 10}Be are produced within a ten thousand year exposure period per gram of surface rock, the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be applied to measure this tell-tale signal. The build-up over time of these radionuclides can be utilised as radiometric clocks to elucidate the exposure history of geomorphic formations and surfaces that have experienced some event or process that delivers previously unexposed material to cosmic-ray irradiation. Hence the reconstruction of glacial chronologies (ie time a bedrock surface was uncovered by ice retreat, or deposition age of glacial moraines), development of raised river terraces and paleo-beach ridges, age of meteorite impact craters and volcanic eruptions have been addressed with the in-situ method. Moreover, geomorphological processes of landscape evolution such as surface erosion rates, continental weathering, sediment transport and deposition, uplift rates can also be studied. The in-situ method is described along with examples of cosmogenic dating projects at ANSTO. It is estimated that it works best over the time period from 5 ka to 5 Ma and can identify erosion rates ranging from 0.1 to 10 mm/ka 20 refs., 4 figs.

  13. A study of the environmental impact on Australia of a nuclear accident in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, G.D.; Davidson, N.E.; Logan, W.; Mills, G.A.; Puri, K. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); McDonald, N.R.; Cameron, R.F.; Clark, G.; Crawford, J.; Domel, R.U.; Hambley, D.; Harris, F.F.; Barton, R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Manins, P.C.; Hibberd, M.F. [Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation, Aspendale, VIC (Australia). Division of Atmospheric Research

    1998-12-31

    This study has considered the circumstances under which radioactive material, released as a result of a severe accident in a reactor of the type that could be proposed for Indonesia, might reach Australia. This assumes the latest available technology for a pressurised water reactor, a boiling water reactor, or an `advanced` light-water reactor, each with a modern containment building. The methodology consisted of developing detailed definitions of the accident scenarios, calculating he transport of the radioactive cloud to Australia and its dispersion by means of a numerical meteorological model, developed by ANSTO, and determining the impact on individuals in Australia by means of a radiological consequences model. A single release was considered with variations in the time of release, the meteorological situation, the height of release, its duration, the amount and the type of material released. The calculations are currently based on the ICRP Standard 70 Kg man. The major pathways considered are inhalation, groundshine, cloudshine and ingestion of plants, meet and milk. A source term was determined for radionuclides, represented by Xenon-133, Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137. Three type of weather conditions that could cause a radioactive cloud to reach Australia were considered. The calculations have shown that the active monsoonal cases impact on north-western and northern Australia, the monsoonal break-period cases impact on western and north-western Australia and that mid-tropospheric cases can impact on a wide band across central and southern Australia. The area of impact for a mid-tropospheric release can be greater than for a near-surface release. It was concluded that even with an extreme release, for actual meteorological conditions, the maximum dose would be below the 5 mSv, dose at which the National Health and Medical Research Council advises that consideration be given to control of milk and foodstuff. This study has been limited in scope, primarily

  14. Micro-and nanodosimetry for radiobiological planning in radiotherapy and cancer risk assessment in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Microdosimetric and nanodosimetric measurements of 250 MeV proton radiation fields at the proton accelerator of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) using SOI microdosimeter and gas nanodosimeter will be presented. Good agreement between GEANT Monte Carlo simulations of ionization cluster and pattern of deposited energies measured by nanodosimeter and microdosimeter have been achieved. Replacement of a gas nanodosimeter with 10 nm SV volume of a silicon detector is a challenge. However with the development of Si nanotechnology it is feasible and track structure sensitive array of 3D submicron size Si detectors will be presented. Challenges in the conversion of Si microdosimetric and nanodosimetric spectra to tissue equivalent will be discussed. This project is a large scale collaboration with ANSTO and U NSW in Australia and LLUMC, USNA, Johns Hopkins Uni and MSKCC in the USA

  15. Currents trends in the application of IBA techniques to air pollution source fingerprinting and source apportionment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: IBA techniques have been used for many years to characterise fine particle air pollution. This is not new the techniques are well established. Typically 2-3 MeV protons are used to bombard thin filter papers and up to four simultaneous techniques like PIXE, PIGE, RBS and ERDA will be applied to obtain (μg/g) concentrations for elements from hydrogen to lead. Generally low volume samplers are used to sample between 20-30 m3 of air over a 24 hour period, this together with IBA's sensitivity means that concentrations down to 1 ng/m3 of air sampled can be readily achieved with only a few minutes of proton irradiation. With these short irradiation times and low sensitivities for a broad range of elements in the periodic table, large numbers of samples can be obtained and analysed very quickly and easily. At ANSTO we have used IBA methods to acquire a database of over 50,000 filters from 85 different sites through Australia and Asia, each filter has been analysed for more than 21 different chemical species. Large databases extending over many years means that modern statistical techniques like positive matrix factorisation (PMF) can be used to define well characterised source fingerprints and source contributions for a range of different fine particle air pollutants. In this paper we will discuss these PMF techniques and show how they identify both natural sources like sea spray and windblown soils as well as anthropogenic sources like automobiles, biomass burning, coal-fired power stations and industrial emissions. These data are particularly useful for Governments, EPA's and managers of pollution to better understanding pollution sources and their relative contributions and hence to better manage air pollution. Current trends are to take these IBA and PMF techniques a step further and to combine them with wind speed and back trajectory data to better pin point and identify emission sources. We show how this is now being applied on both a local

  16. A study of the environmental impact on Australia of a nuclear accident in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study has considered the circumstances under which radioactive material, released as a result of a severe accident in a reactor of the type that could be proposed for Indonesia, might reach Australia. This assumes the latest available technology for a pressurised water reactor, a boiling water reactor, or an 'advanced' light-water reactor, each with a modern containment building. The methodology consisted of developing detailed definitions of the accident scenarios, calculating he transport of the radioactive cloud to Australia and its dispersion by means of a numerical meteorological model, developed by ANSTO, and determining the impact on individuals in Australia by means of a radiological consequences model. A single release was considered with variations in the time of release, the meteorological situation, the height of release, its duration, the amount and the type of material released. The calculations are currently based on the ICRP Standard 70 Kg man. The major pathways considered are inhalation, groundshine, cloudshine and ingestion of plants, meet and milk. A source term was determined for radionuclides, represented by Xenon-133, Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137. Three type of weather conditions that could cause a radioactive cloud to reach Australia were considered. The calculations have shown that the active monsoonal cases impact on north-western and northern Australia, the monsoonal break-period cases impact on western and north-western Australia and that mid-tropospheric cases can impact on a wide band across central and southern Australia. The area of impact for a mid-tropospheric release can be greater than for a near-surface release. It was concluded that even with an extreme release, for actual meteorological conditions, the maximum dose would be below the 5 mSv, dose at which the National Health and Medical Research Council advises that consideration be given to control of milk and foodstuff. This study has been limited in scope, primarily

  17. Phase transformation studies of methane-propane hydrate using neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    hydrate nucleation process. Our first SANS experiments, on Quokka, reveal rapid uptake of methane-propane gas on ice crystallites well below the accepted phase boundary, offering the prospect of valuable insights in planned future experiments using a gas-liquid flow loop, which is under development at ANSTO.

  18. Present status and needs of human resource development in the nuclear field in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernido, Corazon C.; Roceles, Pilar C. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman, Quezon (Philippines)

    2000-12-01

    The first nuclear power plant was nearing completion. However, due to change in political climate and support for the nuclear power program, this has been mothballed. There is a possibility for the introduction of nuclear power plant in the country's projected energy sources by the year 2020. The country has one research reactor, but at the present time it is undergoing repair and is not operational. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), an Institute under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), is the sole government agency mandated by the law to take charge of all matters pertaining to nuclear science and technology, and the regulation of nuclear energy. There is one another government agency, the Radiation Health Service (RHS) of the Department of Health, which is responsible for regulating the use and application of X-rays and non-ionizing radiation. The PNRI conducts national training courses in nuclear science and technology, and radiation protection to users of radioisotopes. Individual courses are outlined in the paper. Up to the present time, around 7,300 have participated in national training courses conducted by PNRI. Distributions of PNRI trainees are: 53 % for industrial, 12 % medical, 12 % for academe, and 23 % for others. Nuclear science and technology education in schools and universities are presented. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) training activities availed 77 % of the total foreign training from 1993 to 1998; Japan follows next at 20 %; and others comprise the remaining 3 %. An approach to training and human resources development, which could reach out to more target trainees, is Distance Learning. In 1998, as a part of a Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) and IAEA project, the Philippines participated in the trial of distance learning modules in radiation protection. The distance learning modules were developed at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). These modules will

  19. Principle of shielding design for the target cave of a high current medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: During routine isotope production regimen at the H-ion Medical Cyclotron of the Radiopharmaceutical Division of ANSTO a thick copper plate electroplated with enriched target material is bombarded with a 30 MeV proton beam at 250μA which results in the production of fast evaporation neutrons with an average energy of 5.1 MeV (Nakamura, T. et al, Nucl Sci Engg, 83: 444-458, 1992). This paper highlights the principle of shielding design using the empirical method (Mukherjee, B. Proc. 14th Int. Conf. on Cyclotrons and their Applications, Cape Town, South Africa, October 1995) for a new target cave proposed to house a solid target irradiation station to be bombarded with a proton beam of 500μA and thereby producing an intense flux of fast neutrons. Important nuclear data such as the neutron and gamma source terms defined as the corresponding dose equivalent rates for lμA proton beam current at 1m from the target as well as the neutron energy distribution required for the shielding calculations were previously estimated experimentally (Mukherjee, B. Proc. 14th Int. Conf. on Cyclotrons and their Applications, Cape Town, South Africa, October 1995). The neutron attenuation coefficients of the 4 legged maze were explicitly evaluated from experiments conducted in the existing cyclotron vault and beam room (Mukherjee, B. et al, Appl Radiat Isot, in print, June 1996). Low sodium content high density (2350 kg.m-3) concrete was used as the shielding material. The optimum lateral thicknesses of the shielding walls (t1 and t2) were calculated to be 2.1 m and 2.5 m and the length of the maze legs (ab, bc, cd, de) were evaluated as 1.2 m, 3.1 m, 1.5 m and 6 m respectively. The dose equivalent (gamma plus neutron) rates at the locations of interest 'P1', 'P2' and 'e' were set at 0.5 μSvh-1, 10 pSvh-1 and 10 μSvh-1 respectively. The neutron shielding calculation method presented in this paper was found to be more suitable than the Monte Carlo code generally used for

  20. RadCon: A radiological consequences model. Technical guide - Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Radiological Consequence model (RadCon) is being developed at ANSTO to assess the radiological consequences, after an incident, in any climate, using appropriate meteorological and radiological transfer parameters. The major areas of interest to the developers are tropical and subtropical climates. This is particularly so given that it is anticipated that nuclear energy will become a mainstay for economies in these regions within the foreseeable future. Therefore, data acquisition and use of parameter values have been concentrated primarily on these climate types. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition for Australia can be modelled and supplied by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC, one of five in the world) which is part of the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC), Puri et al. (1992). RadCon combines these data (i.e. the time dependent air and ground concentration generated by the dispersion model or measured quantities in the case of an actual incident) with specific regional parameter values to determine the dose to people via the major pathways of external and internal irradiation. For the external irradiation calculations, data are needed on lifestyle information such as the time spent indoors/outdoors, the high/low physical activity rates for different groups of people (especially critical groups) and shielding factors for housing types. For the internal irradiation calculations, data are needed on food consumption, effect of food processing, transfer parameters (soil to plant, plant to animal) and interception values appropriate for the region under study. Where the relevant data are not available default temperate data are currently used. The results of a wide ranging literature search has highlighted where specific research will be initiated to determine the information required for tropical and sub-tropical regions. The user is able to initiate sensitivity analyses within RadCon. This allows the parameters to be ranked in

  1. Plutonium Immobilization Form Development Interim and Final Data Report Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanKonynenburg, R.; Ebbinghaus, B.

    2000-06-01

    Contained within this report are summaries of the available interim and final data summary reports provided by ANSTO, ANL, LLNL, and WSRC in support of work in the Form Development activity in the Plutonium Immobilization Development and Testing Program. Milestone reports and technical papers prepared for journals or conference proceedings are not included in this list. This document covers work from about 1997 to the present. All of the following reports are available from the Plutonium Immobilization Program Document Control Center (DCC) at LLNL. In most cases, the documents can also be obtained from the libraries the originating site or from the document's authors. All samples of the various formulations discussed in the following summaries were prepared by one of four processes: Wet-milling, dry-milling, an alkoxide-nitrate process, or attritor milling. The fabrication processes differ primarily in the mixing steps. The wet milling process is the one most commonly used. It is a simple ball milling process where water is added that provides intimate mixing of the materials. The dry milling process is a worst case dry mixing process. The alkoxide-nitrate process provides for very intimate mixing and is used when equilibrium samples are desired. The attritor milling process simulates the process being developed for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant. After mixing, the subsequent calcination and consolidation steps are generally the same. Most samples were consolidated by cold pressing and sintering although some of the earlier samples or Some of the single-phase samples were prepared by hot pressing. The sample identification numbers (ID's) that are referenced in the summaries (e.g. A-0, B3-13, etc.) are described in the Sample Test Matrix (PIP-99-012 and PIP-00-016). Samples which contain both plutonium and uranium are given the designation Hf-Pu-U samples. When Ce was used as a surrogate for Pu, the designation is Hf-Ce-U. When Th was used as a

  2. A SANS study of the adsorption of guar gum on talc surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reagents based on guar gum are commonly used as 'gangue' depressants in the flotation of sulphides from ores containing naturally floating layer silicate minerals such as talc. Nickel sulphide ores processed by WMC Resources Ltd. at the Leinster Nickel Operations in Western Australia typically contain 1-2 % talc. Guar gum, added to the flotation cell, depresses the talc by adsorbing onto its surface, thereby reducing its hydrophobic nature. Guar gum is a long chain polysaccharide containing many hydroxyl functional groups along the length of its chain. The ratio of chain length to the number of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups causes the guar gum to be selective in depressing talc rather than nickel sulphide minerals. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) it is an excellent tool for probing structures in the nano length scale. Unlike X-rays, neutrons are sensitive to low atomic weight elements, especially hydrogen and therefore organics. Using SANS it is possible to contrast different parts of a composite sample to get information on spatial arrangements. These qualities make SANS an obvious choice for studying the adsorption of guar gum on the surface of talc in aqueous solutions. Complimentary SANS experiments were carried out in Australia at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and in the United States at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Initially talc samples were studied 'as supplied', however as experiments proceeded attempts to reduce the particle size and distribution were carried out by milling and centrifuging procedures. Contrast matching techniques were used to observed the scattering behaviour of talc with and without the presence of guar gum and vice versa, over a total q range of 0.002 - 0.1 Angstroms-1. The size of the talc particles appears to affect the scattering behaviour not only of talc but also of guar gum in the same solutions. This implies that the structure of the guar gum is strongly

  3. Heavy metal pathways and archives in biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlic, I.; Siegele, R.; Menon, D. D.; Markich, S. J.; Cohen, D. D.; Jeffree, R. A.; McPhail, D. C.; Sarbutt, A.; Stelcer, E.

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear milli and microprobes at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) were used to determine lead accumulation in native Australian plants and animals. Three species of eucalypt plants ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus globulus and Eucalyptus lesouefii), one species of salt bush ( Atriplex burbhanyana) and one species each of acacia ( Acacia saligna) and estuarine crocodiles ( Crocodylus porosus) were investigated. Experimentally grown plants were subjected to a nutrient solution with a pH of 5 and spiked with a 200 μmol concentration of Pb. Lead concentrations in leaves of both E. globulus and E. camaldulensis showed an almost exponential decrease from the base of the main vein to the tip. Similarly, Pb concentrations decreased from the main vein to secondary veins. Concentrations of essential elements such as K, Fe, Zn and Br in the main and secondary veins were constant within experimental uncertainty. In contrast, the concentrations of Pb in the leaf veins of E. lesouefii were much lower and showed no systematic pattern. In stem and root samples the highest concentration of Pb was found in roots and stem of E. globulus and A. burbhanyana followed by E. camaldulensis. Some Pb was found in roots of A. saligna and only very low concentration in stem of the same plant. More detailed analysis of thin cross-sectional samples of roots and stem showed that Pb is present in much higher concentration in the growth area of the plant structure (i.e. meristemic region) and in relatively low concentration within the pith region and outer cortex. The osteoderms (dermal bones) of estuarine crocodiles, exposed to lead ammunition in food from the hunting activities of traditional Aboriginal owners, were sampled at two sites in Kakadu National Park, northern Australia. PIXE analyses showed enhanced, but relatively constant, ratios of Pb/Ca in the annual laminations. This was consistent with both their history of long term exposure to elevated

  4. Cooperation in Southeast Asia [Strengthening the infrastructure related to radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its budget of May 2004, the Australian Government made provision for two initiatives related to strengthening infrastructure related to radioactive sources. Both initiatives flow from Australia's history of active involvement in international efforts to develop the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and the Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources. The first initiative, a programme to enhance Australia's national radiation emergency preparedness and response capability, is being led by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Agency. The second programme is a three year, US $3 million project to strengthen the security of radioactive sources in the Southeast Asia and Pacific regions. It is based on the recognition of security threats in the region and on the Australian Government's desire to strengthen regional partnerships in the field of security and radiation protection. That project, known as the Securing Sources project, is being led by my organization, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The project has a wide scope that includes technical, administrative and regulatory aspects of source security. It is being delivered in two programmes, one of which covers 11 Southeast Asian countries closest to Australia. These include the seven IAEA Member States Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam, as well as four States that are not members of the IAEA: Laos, Cambodia, Brunei and East Timor. A companion programme focuses on 14 Pacific Island countries, including Papua New Guinea, Fiji and the Solomon Islands, which are not members of the IAEA. The Regional Security project aims are to assist countries in a region to manage poorly controlled sources and to generally improve source security. Activities include strategies for remediation of legacies of orphan sources and poorly controlled sources; sharing of historic information on source transfers

  5. A new research reactor? Report by the Select Committee for an inquiry into the contract for a new reactor at Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 15 August 2000, the Senate resolved to establish the Select Committee for an Inquiry into the Contract for a New Reactor at Lucas Heights and report to the Parliament. The Select committee majority report is divided into three parts: the need for a new reactor; the tendering process and the nature of the contract; and Australia's nuclear waste management strategy and public health and safety. There is a final chapter which brings together the major issues examined in the report. Based on the evidence presented to it, the Committee notes that some Australian scientists and engineers present a strong case for the new reactor. While the Committee is of the view that nuclear science and technology is not backward looking and does offer opportunities for researchers to keep at the forefront of important areas in scientific research and development it does not automatically follow that the best way to promote scientific and medical research in this country is by spending substantial amounts of public funds for the next forty years on a single research reactor. Nevertheless, the Committee recommends that before the Government proceeds any further with the proposed reactor, it undertake a thorough and comprehensive public review of funding for medical and scientific research in Australia with a view to assessing priorities including the role, if any, a research reactor would have in contributing to Australia's scientific, medical and industrial interests. The Committee also requested that the Australian National Audit Office consider examining the tender and contract documents for the new reactor at Lucas Heights with a view to determining: whether further investigation of the tendering process and the contract is warranted; whether, during the tendering process, ANSTO ensured that there was adequate and appropriate independent verification and validation of the tenderers claims. Two supplementary report are included: one from the Liberal and National members (minority

  6. Target preparation at the ANTARES AMS Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, G.E.; Hua, Q.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M.A.C.; Lawson, E.M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Antares Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy Centre at ANSTO has two chemistry labs dedicated to preparing targets for measurement. Target preparation encompasses a variety of activities ranging from the curation of incoming samples to the numerous steps involved in the purification and processing of dissimilar samples. One of the two laboratories is set up for the physical and chemical pretreatment of {sup 14}C samples. Treatments include cleaning by sonification, sorting, grinding and sieving, and chemical treatments such as the standard AAA treatment, and solvent extraction. Combustion and graphitization are also carried out in this laboratory. The second laboratory is a clean room and is dedicated to the combustion, hydrolysis and graphitization of {sup 14}C samples as well as the process of the targets for the other isotopes. Combustion is achieved by heating the sample to 900 deg C in the presence of CuO, the resulting gas is purified by passing over Ag and Cu wire at 600 deg C. Graphitization is carried out by reducing the CO{sub 2} with an iron catalyst (600 deg C) in the presence of zinc (400 deg C) and a small amount of hydrogen. Samples such as charcoal, shell bone, wood, sediment, seawater and groundwater, containing 0.3-1 mg or more of original carbon, are processed routinely for radiocarbon analysis. The current {sup 14}C chemistry background for 1 mg carbon is {approx} 0.3 percent of modern carbon (pMC) enabling us to date materials up to 45 000 BP. Samples of 0.5 - 3 mg carbon or more are routinely performed with a precision < 1% At present, procedures are being tested for the treatment of samples containing a minimum of 20 {mu}g original carbon. Such small samples sre more likely to be affected by contamination with modern carbon. These laboratories are also being expanded to cater for the processing of a variety of samples for the measurement of other isotopes, ie {sup 129}I, {sup 10}Be, {sup 36}CI and {sup 26}Al. Initial tests for the extraction of

  7. Medizinbibliotheken 20XX. Zuverlässig, Zukunftsweisend, Unverzichtbar [Medical Libraries 20XX. Reliable, forward-looking, indispensible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    ür interdisziplinäre Wissenschaft – eine Anforderungsanalyse aus Anwendersicht, Annette Kustos (Die neue Hochschulbibliothek für Gesundheitswissenschaften der Hochschule für Gesundheit (hsg Bochum, Christoph Poley (Mit MEDPILOT auf dem Weg ins Semantic Web, Henriette Senst & Jens Erling (Neue Arbeitsfelder in der Bibliothek des Robert Koch-Instituts: Open Access und institutionelles Repositorium, Matti Stöhr („Mich interessierten kostengünstige Alternativen zu Citavi“: Über den Fortbildungsworkshop „Literaturverwaltung im Fokus“ im Rahmen der AGMB-Tagung 2012, Martin Zangl (Qualitätsmanagement für Kunst- und Museumsbibliotheken – ein Anstoß für Krankenhausbibliotheken?! und Ulf Paepcke & Gabriele Menzel (Medizinbibliotheken 20XX. Zuverlässig, Zukunftsweisend, Unverzichtbar. Jahrestagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Medizinisches Bibliothekswesen (AGMB e.V. vom 24. bis 26.09.2012 in Aachen.

  8. Calendar of Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    78712. Tel +1-512-471-1322, E-mail stewart@hagar.ph.utexas.edu. 17 - 18 February 1997 Plasma '97: 21st Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering Plasma Science and Technology Conference Sydney, Australia Contact: Margaret Lanigan, Conference Manager, PMB 1, MENAI NSW 2234, Australia. Fax +61-(0)2-439-6561, E-mail ainse@ansto.gov.au. 6 - 11 April 1997 10th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating Ameland, The Netherlands Contact: J Hamers-Smit, FOM - Instituut voor Plasmafysica 'Rijnhuizen', Postbus 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein. Tel +31-30-6096999, Fax +31-30-6031204, E-mail ec10@rijnh.nl. Application and abstract deadline: 17 January 1997. 8 - 12 September 1997 12th International Conference on Gas Discharges and their Applications Greifswald, Germany Contact: Dr G Babucke, Inst. f. Niedertemperatur-Plasmaphysik, Robert-Blum-Str. 8 - 10, 17489 Greifswald, Germany. Tel +49-3834-554411, Fax +49-3834-554301, E-mail gd97@public.inp.uni-greifswald.de.

  9. Neutron beam instruments at the Bragg Institute, phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OPAL. There are some real choices to be made, between (a) the classical-style machine (like IN16), (b) a phase-space-transforming machine (as at NIST or FRM-II), and (c) a time-of-flight machine. The choice is strongly coupled to guide options, and in the next few months, the NBI2 team will examine and assess all three guide-instrument combinations. Neutron Radiography/lmaging/Tomography at OPAL will open up the study of engineering, cultural heritage, fossils, energy extraction and other technologies in which one wants to see hydrogenous materials like water, oils or plastics inside metallic or ceramic objects, or need the penetration that neutrons give. The preferred location will be in OPAL's Reactor Beam Hall on HB-1 or HB-2. The machine will have extremely high intensity, and will likely give ANSTO the opportunity to excel in dynamic imaging with neutrons. Regarding sample-environment apparatus, the workshop came up with a prioritised list of magnets, cryogenic devices, furnaces, pressure cells, stress rigs and so on. In the spirit of the existing naming convention at OPAL, the following names were suggested for the three new instruments: GOANNA (2nd SANS), EMU (Backscattering) and DINGO (Radiography).

  10. AREVA Back-End Possibilities for the Used Fuel of Research Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major issues faced by the Research and Test Reactor (RTR) operators is the back end management of the used fuel elements. RTR used fuel for both HEU and LEU types are problematic for storing and disposal as their Aluminium cladding degrades leading to activity release, possible loss of containment and criticality concerns. Thus, direct disposal of RTR used fuel, (without prior treatment and conditioning) is in this respect hardly suitable. In the same manner, long term interim storage of RTR used fuel has to take into account the issue of fuel corrosion. Treating RTR used fuel allows separating the content into recyclable materials and residues. It offers many advantages as compared to direct disposal such as the retrieval of valuable fissile material, the reduction of radio-toxicity and a very significant reduction of the volume of the ultimate waste package (reduction factor between 30 and 50). In addition, the vitrification of the residues provides a package that has been specifically designed to ensure long term durability for long term interim storage as well as final disposal (99% of the activity is encapsulated into a stable matrix). RTR fuel treatment process was developed several decades ago by AREVA with now thirty years of experience at an industrial level. The treatment process consists in dissolving the whole assembly (including the Al cladding) in nitric acid and then diluting it with standard Uranium Oxide fuel dissolution liquor prior to treatment with the nominal Tributylphosphate solvent extraction process. A wide range of RTR spent fuel has already been treated in the AREVA facilities. First, at the Marcoule plant over 18 tons of U-Al type RTR fuel from 21 reactors in 11 countries was processed. The treatment activities are now undertaken at the La Hague plant where 17 tons of RTR used fuel from Australia Belgium, and France aligned for treatment. In June 2005, AREVA started to treat at La Hague ANSTO's Australian RTR used fuel from

  11. Pu-239 organ specific dosimetric model applied to non-human biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Matthew Jason

    There are few locations throughout the world, like the Maralinga nuclear test site located in south western Australia, where sufficient plutonium contaminate concentration levels exist that they can be utilized for studies of the long-term radionuclide accumulation in non-human biota. The information obtained will be useful for the potential human users of the site while also keeping with international efforts to better understand doses to non-human biota. In particular, this study focuses primarily on a rabbit sample set collected from the population located within the site. Our approach is intended to employ the same dose and dose rate methods selected by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and adapted by the scientific community for similar research questions. These models rely on a series of simplifying assumptions on biota and their geometry; in particular; organisms are treated as spherical and ellipsoidal representations displaying the animal mass and volume. These simplifications assume homogeneity of all animal tissues. In collaborative efforts between Colorado State University and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), we are expanding current knowledge on radionuclide accumulation in specific organs causing organ-specific dose rates, such as Pu-239 accumulating in bone, liver, and lungs. Organ-specific dose models have been developed for humans; however, little has been developed for the dose assessment to biota, in particular rabbits. This study will determine if it is scientifically valid to use standard software, in particular ERICA Tool, as a means to determine organ-specific dosimetry due to Pu-239 accumulation in organs. ERICA Tool is normally applied to whole organisms as a means to determine radiological risk to whole ecosystems. We will focus on the aquatic model within ERICA Tool, as animal organs, like aquatic organisms, can be assumed to lie within an infinite uniform medium. This model would

  12. Progress report of Applications of Nuclear Physics. July 1994 - June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the Applications of Nuclear Physics Program Area are: The development and promotion of research programs on national nuclear science facilities such as charged particle accelerators and neutron beam instruments thereby encouraging strategic research in nuclear science and technology at ANSTO, in tertiary institutions and industrial research and development laboratories; Participation in and management of Australian use of international neutron scattering, synchrotron radiation and high energy physics facilities to assist graduate training in the Universities and to foster Australian benefits ,from developments in high technology; The maintenance of expertise in fundamental nuclear and atomic processes relevant to nuclear science and technology including neutron physics, ion interactions, radiation standards, dosimetry and laser enrichment; Expansion of the use of accelerator mass spectromety both nationally and internationally to make major contributions in the understanding and remediation of severe environmental problems such as the greenhouse effect; The application of charged particle beams and ionizing radiation to industrial. biological nad environmental problems; The exploitation of neutron scattering techniques in the development of new materials, drugs, biological substances and complex chemicals. The research activities of the Applications of Nuclear Physics Pro-ram Area are organized into several large projects: Accelerator Applications, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Neutron Scattering, International Science (incorporating High Energy Physics and Synchrotron Radiation Research), Radiation Technology and Standards. In addition, there were a number of other supporting projects. An important aspect of the activities of the Program Area, as will be clear from the objectives listed above, is the development and improvement of the larger experimental facilities within the Program Area. Considerable progress has been made in the development