WorldWideScience

Sample records for ansto

  1. ANSTO at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) has world recognized capabilities in nuclear science and technology. This paper describes some of the applications of the radioisotopes produced at ANSTO, within the fields of medicine, agriculture, industry and research. Radioisotope Tracer Technology, involving Technetium 99, Copper 64, Indium 111 or Gallium 67 are becoming widely used for early diagnosis of conditions such as cancer, coronary disease, strokes and severe trauma. As a result of collaborative research between ANSTO and two Sydney hospitals, a fairly accurate measure of total body protein has been developed, based on the capture of neutrons by nitrogen nuclei. The National Medical Cyclotron, a new facility expected to be operational by 1991, will give Australian medical technologists access to a much wider variety of radioisotope tracers. Other activities involved in product or process developments briefly described include estuary siltation, soil erosion and salinity problems, the controlled doping of semiconductor silicon and Synroc process. ills

  2. Environmental Monitoring at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, J.; Harries, J.; Harrison, J.; Hoffmann, E.

    2003-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates several national facilities, including Australia's only research reactor, HIFAR, produces radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals and carries out research in nuclear science and technology. ANSTO monitors the amount of airborne emissions, the radioactive and non-radioactive contaminants released to the sewer, the quality of storm water leaving the site and the quality of ground water. The potential effective dose rates to the general public from airborne discharges and effluent release from the Lucas Heights in 2002-03 were less than 0.006 mSv/year, well below the 1mSv/year dose rate limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the Australian National Occupational Health and Safety Commission

  3. The priorities for ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    As Australia's major centre of expertise in nuclear science, technology and its applications, ANSTO's priorities take account of the stated strategic and tactical needs of its various stakeholders, which in turn are considered as the Government (as owner), industry - including the health sector, the academic and research community and the public at large. Its priorities also take account of the opportunities perceived by its own staff in the light of the organisation's strengths, the activities of the international scientific, technology and industry community and a rapidly changing socioeconomic environment where environmental management and social accountability are becoming as important as fiscal responsibility and accountability

  4. ANSTO`s radioactive waste management policy. Preliminary environmental review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levins, D.M.; Airey, P.; Breadner, B.; Bull, P.; Camilleri, A.; Dimitrovski, L.; Gorman, T.; Harries, J.; Innes, R.; Jarquin, E.; Jay, G.; Ridal, A.; Smith, A.

    1996-05-01

    For over forty years, radioactive wastes have been generated by ANSTO (and its predecessor, the AAEC) from the operation of nuclear facilities, the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial use, and from various research activities. the quantities and activities of radioactive waste currently at Lucas Heights are very small compared to many other nuclear facilities overseas, especially those in countries with nuclear power program. Nevertheless, in the absence of a repository for nuclear wastes in Australia and guidelines for waste conditioning, the waste inventory has been growing steadily. This report reviews the status of radioactive waste management at ANSTO, including spent fuel management, treatment of effluents and environmental monitoring. It gives details of: relevant legislative, regulatory and related requirements; sources and types of radioactive waste generated at ANSTO; waste quantities and activities (both cumulative and annual arisings); existing practices and procedures for waste management and environmental monitoring; recommended broad strategies for dealing with radioactive waste management issues. Detailed proposals on how the recommendations should be implemented is the subject of a companion internal document, the Radioactive Waste Management Action Plan 1996-2000 which provides details of the tasks to be undertaken, milestones and resource requirements. 44 refs., 2 tabs., 18 figs.

  5. ANSTO - Program of Research 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The report outlines the planned research and development activities for 1994-1995 in five major research units: Advanced Materials, Applications of Nuclear Physics, Biomedicine and Health, Environmental Sciences and the Safety and Reliability Centre. A list of recent publication originated from ANSTO`s scientific and engineering activities is also included. ills.

  6. ANSTO. Annual Report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Organizational highlights during the period under review could be summarised as follow: ANSTO`s mission review identified three main objectives for the organization, namely, support for the Government`s nuclear policies; contribution towards industrial competitiveness and innovation; and the development of a high quality nuclear science base through maintenance of unique facilities and expertise to which academic institutions and other scientific organizations can have access. ANSTO became full partner in the Australian Centre for mine site rehabilitation research. An innovative arsenic treatment process was developed by ANSTO scientists through the Cooperative Research Centre for waste management and Pollution Control Ltd. Record sales by Australian Radioisotopes were announced, while the National Medical Cyclotron met most of Australia`s needs for cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals, thus reducing reliance on imports. New strategies for Communications and Information Management have been developed as an essential element in supporting ANSTO`s scientific and commercial activities. The Government reaffirmed its support for the concept of Triennium Funding for ANSTO, which provided financial certainty and facilitated longer planning of resource allocations. ills., tabs.

  7. ANSTO. Annual report 1990-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The tasks and activities of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) are reviewed. Five priority areas of research have been identified which warrant the investment of resources in order to achieve national priorities: advanced ceramics, crystal and molecular structures, processing and utilisation of radioactive materials, radiopharmaceuticals waste management. The main achievements are briefly outlined. Detailed financial statements are also included. External revenues from the private sector represented 77% of the total revenue while export earnings were 6.3%. ANSTO has achieved a revenue level of 30.3% of its total appropriation, well ahead of the timetable set by Government for revenue earning by ANSTO. tabs., ills

  8. ANSTO strategic plan 1988-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This Strategic Plan outlines the development of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation in the five year period 1988/89-1992/93. Its formulation is a continuation of the corporate planning process, initiated after the promulgation of the ANSTO Act in April 1987, which culminated in the publication of the ANSTO Corporate Plan, 1987. The Plan constitutes the basis for the development of business plans for each sector of the Organisation

  9. ANSTO's future plans for nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburne, I.

    2003-01-01

    There are four key themes in ANSTO's future plans for nuclear science and technology: 1) ANSTO plans for the future - within its established 'core business areas', following a rigorous process, and incorporating extensive interaction with organisations around Australia and overseas. 2) The replacement research reactor (RRR) - a Major National Research Facility and the cornerstone of ANSTO's future activities. 3) A number of business development initiatives that have been launched by ANSTO over the past year, under the banner of Good science is good business at ANSTO. 4) ANSTO involvement in the national research priorities that the Prime Minister announced last December, in particular, by pursuing new research in the security and forensics area; its contribution to the 'Safeguarding Australia' national research priority. The Replacement Research Reactor now under construction will make an enormous difference to the work that ANSTO can undertake, and that others can perform using ANSTO's facilities

  10. Licensing of ANSTO's Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.W.; Garea, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a general description of the licensing of the 20 MW Pool-type Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) currently being built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) at their Lucas Heights site. The following aspects will be addressed: 1) The influence of ARPANSA's (the Australian regulator) Regulatory Assessment Principles and Design Criteria on the design of the RRR. 2) The Site Licence Application, including the EIS and the supporting siting documentation. 3) The Construction Licence Application, including the PSAR and associated documentation. 4) The review process, including the IAEA Peer Review and the Public Submissions as well as ARPANSA's own review. 5) The interface between ANSTO, INVAP and ARPANSA in relation to the ongoing compliance with ARPANS Regulation 51 and 54. 6) The future Operating Licence Application, including the draft FSAR and associated documentation. These aspects are all addressed from the point of view of the licensee ANSTO and the RRR Project. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and how the licensing and regulatory regime within Australia influenced the design of the RRR. In particular, the safety design features that have been incorporated as a result of the specific requirements of ANSTO and the Australian regulator will be briefly described. The paper will close with a description of how the RRR meets, and in many aspects exceeds the requirements of ANSTO and the Australian regulator. (author)

  11. ANSTO. Annual Report 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Organizational highlights during the period under review could be summarised as follow: ANSTO's mission review identified three main objectives for the organization, namely, support for the Government's nuclear policies; contribution towards industrial competitiveness and innovation; and the development of a high quality nuclear science base through maintenance of unique facilities and expertise to which academic institutions and other scientific organizations can have access. ANSTO became full partner in the Australian Centre for mine site rehabilitation research. An innovative arsenic treatment process was developed by ANSTO scientists through the Cooperative Research Centre for waste management and Pollution Control Ltd. Record sales by Australian Radioisotopes were announced, while the National Medical Cyclotron met most of Australia's needs for cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals, thus reducing reliance on imports. New strategies for Communications and Information Management have been developed as an essential element in supporting ANSTO's scientific and commercial activities. The Government reaffirmed its support for the concept of Triennium Funding for ANSTO, which provided financial certainty and facilitated longer planning of resource allocations. ills., tabs

  12. ANSTO - program of research 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The direction and priorities of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) research program are outlined. During the period under review. Many of the initiatives of previous years come to fruition, adding significant strength and dimension to the Organisation's research capabilities. The advent of Australian Supercomputing Technology, a joint venture between Fujitsu Australia and ANSTO, will enable the grand challenges of computational science to underpin Ansto research generally but specifically in environmental science. The development of the accelerator mass spectrometry facilities on the tandem accelerator supported new initiatives in environmental research and management. The National Medical Cyclotron opens a new era in radiopharmaceutical research and development. Finally, the recently commissioned hot isostatic press provides a unique national resource for the development of new ceramics and their applications. The direction and priorities of Ansto's research program are determined through a combination of external and internal review. The Program Advisory Committees provide external evaluation against national objectives. New Committees have been formed and membership reflects the national and international nature of the ANSTO research programs. ills

  13. ANSTO - Program of Research 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The report outlines the planned research and development activities for 1994-1995 in five major research units: Advanced Materials, Applications of Nuclear Physics, Biomedicine and Health, Environmental Sciences and the Safety and Reliability Centre. A list of recent publication originated from ANSTO's scientific and engineering activities is also included. ills

  14. ANSTO - Annual Report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    Highlights of achievements during 1996-1997 at the Australian Nuclear Science and technology (ANSTO) include: release of the new ANSTO Strategic Plan for the period till June 2000 and the establishment of a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Board. In accordance with the Strategic Plan, ANSTO has continued to focus its activities in six core business areas. The major outcomes and outputs of this work are outlined. The majority of ANSTO strategic research was directed at several topics launched during the year, including: international cooperative research to enhance safety of nuclear facilities and safeguards for nuclear materials, environmental dynamics, global climate change, radioactive waste management, ecological sustainability of the mining and mineral industries, radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the 21st century and the design and process of novel interfaces. During the year major upgrades were made to he National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) and the Australian National Tandem Accelerator for Applied Research (ANTARES). The Annual Report documents the uses of these facilities by universities, industry, medicine and Government. Details are also provided of the organization development and support which support the core scientific areas. The financial statement for the year under review is also included

  15. ANSTO - Annual Report 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Highlights of achievements during 1996-1997 at the Australian Nuclear Science and technology (ANSTO) include: release of the new ANSTO Strategic Plan for the period till June 2000 and the establishment of a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Board. In accordance with the Strategic Plan, ANSTO has continued to focus its activities in six core business areas. The major outcomes and outputs of this work are outlined. The majority of ANSTO strategic research was directed at several topics launched during the year, including: international cooperative research to enhance safety of nuclear facilities and safeguards for nuclear materials, environmental dynamics, global climate change, radioactive waste management, ecological sustainability of the mining and mineral industries, radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the 21st century and the design and process of novel interfaces. During the year major upgrades were made to he National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) and the Australian National Tandem Accelerator for Applied Research (ANTARES). The Annual Report documents the uses of these facilities by universities, industry, medicine and Government. Details are also provided of the organization development and support which support the core scientific areas. The financial statement for the year under review is also included tabs, ills, figs.

  16. ANSTO. Annual report 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Development and investment at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) has continued to be focussed on providing facilities that are of the world standard. The opening of the tandem accelerator and the supercomputing facility are examples of this commitment. The opening of the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) in March 1992 provides Australia with new capabilities in nuclear medicine since it produces radiopharmaceuticals which complements those produced by the HIFAR research reactor. The objectives and research projects of Advanced Materials, Application of Nuclear Physics, Biomedicine and Health, Environmental Science, Industrial Technology, the NMC, Nuclear Technology and ANSTO Engineering programs are presented. The financial statement for the year under review is also presented. tabs. ills

  17. Spent fuel storage and transportation - ANSTO experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has operated the 10 MW DIDO class High Flux Materials Test Reactor (HIFAR) since 1958. Refuelling the reactor produces about 38 spent fuel elements each year. Australia has no power reactors and only one operating research reactor so that a reprocessing plant in Australia is not an economic proposition. The HEU fuel for HIFAR is manufactured at Dounreay using UK or US origin enriched uranium. Spent fuel was originally sent to Dounreay, UK for reprocessing but this plant was shutdown in 1998. ANSTO participates in the US Foreign Research Reactor Spent Fuel Return program and also has a contract with COGEMA for the reprocessing of non-US origin fuel

  18. ANSTO - Program of Research 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Program of Research outlines ANSTO's scientific activities in four key research areas, Advanced Materials, Application of Nuclear Physics, Biomedicine and Health and Environmental Science. The effort has been channeled into applied research and development in partnership with industry and appropriate national and international institutions and into interdisciplinary strategic research projects to enhance the scientific base of the key research activities. A list of scientific publications originated from these program areas is also included. ills

  19. A new neutron reflectometer at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.; Kennedy, S.; Elcombe, M.; Sabine, T.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Neutron reflectometry is a rapidly expanding technique that is finding use in the study of interfacial regions of materials, as well as chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Examples of systems investigated using neutron reflectometry include thin-film multilayer systems (such as GMRs), Langmuir-Blodgett films, lipid bilayers, absorption and ordering of surfactant molecules. In October 1997 the Beam Facilities Consultative Group was established by ANSTO to advise on areas of research to be conducted at the new (2005) replacement research reactor and to propose a suite of neutron beam instruments. At the Group's conclusion in April 1998 they identified that neutron reflectometry and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) should share the highest priority out of the suite of cold neutron instruments at the facility. ANSTO recognised the need to develop expertise in and promote the use of neutron reflectometry in Australia prior to the building and operation of the new facility. In addition the instrument will be used for development and characterisation of neutron optical components for the new facility. Funding has been allocated by ANSTO, AINSE and an ARC RIEF grant to commence building a neutron reflectometer at HIFAR. It is to be installed on the 6HGR10 beam hole with a variable wavelength monochromator system. It is envisaged that the instrument may ultimately be transferred to the guide hall of the new facility. The basic design of the reflectometer to be installed at HIFAR will be presented along with projected instrumental specifications

  20. ANSTO. Annual Report 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Scientific highlights during 1993-1994 financial year at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) as outlined in the Annual Report include: a new Synroc facility was commissioned to provide microsphere feedstocks and confirmed the choice of the dry precursor route for the Synroc conceptual plant; joint research in plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) with the Technical University of Clausthal, Germany; the design and manufacture of a prototype ceramic knee prosthesis; international collaboration established in the use of accelerator techniques to measure aerosol pollution; the discovery of new low temperature phases of palladium deuteride which crystal structures were determined using neutron scattering; elucidate the controversial age of the Venafro Chessmen using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Achievements in the biomedical fields included: the successful clinical evaluation of 123 I-iododexetimide in patients with Alzheimer's disease or frontal lobe epilepsy and the completed clinical trial of technetium-99m 3B6/22 antibody for the diagnosis of lung cancer. ANSTO has also completed two studies on the treatment of contaminated wastes arising from the flooding of uranium mines in Germany and advised the German Ministry of Economics on treatment options, developed new processes for the production of high purity cerium compounds from monazite concentrates and a computer software to assess the likelihood of a pollution release from the failure of industrial equipment and containment or clean-up systems. Details are also given of the Corporate and Information Services activities. The financial statements for the year under review is included. ills., tabs

  1. ANSTO. Annual Report 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    Scientific highlights during 1993-1994 financial year at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) as outlined in the Annual Report include: a new Synroc facility was commissioned to provide microsphere feedstocks and confirmed the choice of the dry precursor route for the Synroc conceptual plant; joint research in plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) with the Technical University of Clausthal, Germany; the design and manufacture of a prototype ceramic knee prosthesis; international collaboration established in the use of accelerator techniques to measure aerosol pollution; the discovery of new low temperature phases of palladium deuteride which crystal structures were determined using neutron scattering; elucidate the controversial age of the Venafro Chessmen using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Achievements in the biomedical fields included: the successful clinical evaluation of {sup 123}I-iododexetimide in patients with Alzheimer`s disease or frontal lobe epilepsy and the completed clinical trial of technetium-99m 3B6/22 antibody for the diagnosis of lung cancer. ANSTO has also completed two studies on the treatment of contaminated wastes arising from the flooding of uranium mines in Germany and advised the German Ministry of Economics on treatment options, developed new processes for the production of high purity cerium compounds from monazite concentrates and a computer software to assess the likelihood of a pollution release from the failure of industrial equipment and containment or clean-up systems. Details are also given of the Corporate and Information Services activities. The financial statements for the year under review is included. ills., tabs.

  2. ANSTO Nuclear Medicine - a new opportunity, a new era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkinson, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    Over 10,000 hospitals in the world use radioistopes for diagnostic techniques, radiotherapy and palliative care in the treatment of cancers, heart disease, muscular and skeletal conditions. Eighty percent of all nuclear medicine procedures use Molybdenum-99. ANSTO is a world leader in low enriched uranium (LEU) medicine, U 235 is irradiated in the OPAL reactor and Mo-99 is separated and purified. ANSTO is responsible in Australia for ensuring a reliable supply of radioisotopes to both the domestic and export market.

  3. ANSTO Strategic Plan 2000/2001 - 2004/2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This new five-year plan outlines strategies to prepare ANSTO for the opportunities provided by the replacement research reactor, building on the successes of its predecessor plan in reforming the organisation.The Strategic Plan focuses on the innovation process itself as a driver of future prosperity. It embodies the Commonwealth Government's emphasis on an outputs and outcomes framework to deliver results, and to further strengthen accountability in light of the significant research investment at ANSTO. A balanced Scorecard approach of driving strategic and business processes through four different perspectives will ensure the efficient achievement of relevant results. ANSTO is responsible for delivering specific scientific services and products to government, industry, academia and other research organisations. Activities are grouped into five externally focused core business areas.These are the areas through which ANSTO will develop new knowledge, deliver quality services, support business opportunities and ensure that nuclear science and technology and related capabilities provide an innovative impetus to benefit society. A separate internal stream provides support for organisational development. The challenge of the next five years is to streamline the innovation process to improve delivery of results. ANSTO is a knowledge-based organisation with the major strengths being its people, a multidisciplinary approach to its operation, and its facilities.Through a collaborative effort driven by this strategic plan, ANSTO will be able to deliver new and exciting outcomes that can be put into practice by participants and clients across Australia. ANSTO's strategic direction, as presented in this plan, is owned by the Board and staff

  4. The ANSTO waste management action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levins, D.

    1997-01-01

    ANSTO's Waste Management Action Plan is a five-year program which addresses legacy issues that have arisen from the accumulation of radioactive wastes at Lucas Heights over the last forty years. Following an extensive review of waste management practices, a detailed Action Plan was prepared involving seventeen projects in the areas of solid wastes, liquid wastes, control of effluents and emissions, spent reactor fuel and organisational issues. The first year of the Waste Management Action Plan has resulted in significant achievements, especially in the areas of improved storage of solid wastes, stabilisation of uranium scrap, commissioning and operation of a scanning system for low-level waste drums, treatment of intermediate-level liquid wastes and improvements in the methods for monitoring of spent fuel storage facilities. The main goal of the Waste Management Action Plan is to achieve consistency, by the year 2000, with best practice as identified in the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards and Guidelines currently under development by the IAEA

  5. Progress on ANSTO'S OPAL reactor project and its future importance as the centrepiece of ANSTO'S facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, I.O.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: After an intensive process of analysis, the Australian government approved the construction of a multi-purpose research reactor in 1997. Following the conduct of a comprehensive tender evaluation process in 1998-2000, INVAP was contracted to construct a 20 MW open pool research reactor and associated neutron beam facilities. The construction of the reactor is now almost complete, and we have commenced cold commissioning. ANSTO has applied for an operating licence, and we hope for a decision on that application in June, following the consideration by the regulator of the results of cold commissioning. The OPAL reactor will provide neutrons to a world-class neutron beam facility, in which a number of the instruments will have the best performance available in the world to date. We intend to establish the Bragg Institute as a regional centre of excellence on neutron beam science, with a significant number of international scientists using the facility to produce cutting edge science in the fields of biology, materials science, food science and other area. The reactor also has extensive irradiation facilities within the reflector vessel. These facilities will be used to produce medical isotopes - ANSTO supplies the bulk of the Australian market and also exports into this region - and for the transmutation doping of silicon ingots for semiconductor manufacture. There are also a number of pneumatically loaded radiation facilities allowing for short term irradiation of samples for such activities as neutron activation analysis

  6. ANSTO strategic plan 1996/1997-1999/2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This Strategic Plan for ANSTO is the result of major reviews of its processes, capabilities, activities, performance and structures. It responds to the views of its stakeholders to provide Australia with the capacity to benefit from the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. Five core areas are identified. Within these areas, the quality services are being delivered and the development of knowledge has the potential for generating future economic benefits, as well as for sustaining essential nuclear-related capabilities. In addition, the strategic plan provides the framework through which ANSTO will provide specific, on demand scientific services to government, industry, academia and research organisations. The plan sets out objectives and strategies which the Board and ANSTO staff believe will ensure that the organisation will continue to fulfil its mission. The plan also identifies the planning processes and the mechanisms for performance evaluation

  7. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2005-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Emmy L.; Loosz, Tom; Ferris, John M.; Harrison, Jennifer J.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the results of ANSTO's environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) sites, from July 2005 to June 2006. Estimated effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially affected by routine airborne emissions from the LHSTC were less than 0.005 mSv/year. The maximum potential dose was 23% of the ANSTO ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv/year, much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv/year that is recommended by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). The effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially exposed to routine liquid effluent releases from the LHSTC have been realistically estimated as a quarter (or less) of the estimated doses to the critical group for airborne releases. The median tritium concentrations detected in groundwater and surface waters at the LHSTC were typically less than 2% of those set out in the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. The airborne emissions from the NMC were below the ARPANSA-approved notification levels. Results of environmental monitoring at both ANSTO sites confirm that the facilities continue to be operated well within regulatory limits. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose of -1.5 mSv/year experienced by members of the Australian public

  8. ANSTO strategic plan.. an update 1991/2-1995/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization's research priorities have been reassesed and determined within the national context. This involve a close association with industry, academia and the general community. Seventy percent of ANSTO's research is applied and is market driven, while thirty percent is longer term and basic research and addresses national economic and environmental objectives as determined by the Government. ills

  9. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2004-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Emmy L.; Loosz, Tom; Ferris, John M.; Harrison, Jennifer J.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the results of ANSTO's environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) sites, from July 2004 to June 2005. Effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially affected by routine airborne emissions from the LHSTC were less than 0.005 mSv/year. This estimated maximum potential dose is less than 24% of the ANSTO ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv/year, and much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv/year that is recommended by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). The effective doses to the critical group of members of the public potentially exposed to routine liquid effluent releases from the LHSTC have been realistically estimated as a quarter (or less) of the estimated doses to the critical group for airborne releases. The levels of tritium detected in groundwater and stormwater at the LHSTC were less than those set out in the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. The airborne and liquid effluent emissions from the NMC were below both the ARPANSA-approved notification levels and Sydney Water limits for acceptance of trade wastewater to sewer. Results of environmental monitoring at both ANSTO sites confirm that the facilities continue to be operated well within regulatory limits. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose of ∼1.5 mSv/year experienced by members of the Australian public

  10. Low enrichment Mo-99 target development program at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donlevy, Therese M.; Anderson, Peter J.; Beattie, David; Braddock, Ben; Fulton, Scott; Godfrey, Robert; Law, Russell; McNiven, Scott; Sirkka, Pertti; Storr, Greg; Wassink, David; Wong, Alan; Yeoh, Guan

    2002-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO, formerly AAEC) has been producing fission product Mo-99 in HIFAR, from the irradiation of Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) UO 2 targets, for nearly thirty years. Over this period, the U-235 enrichment has been increased in stages, from natural to 1.8% to 2.2%. The decision to provide Australia with a replacement research reactor (RRR) for HIFAR has created an ideal opportunity to review and improve the current Mo-99 production process from target design through to chemical processing and waste management options. ANSTO has entered into a collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (RERTR) to develop a target using uranium metal foil with U-235 enrichment of less than 20% The initial focus has been to demonstrate use of LEU foil targets in HIFAR, using existing irradiation methodology. The current effort focussed on designing a target assembly with optimised thermohydraulic characteristics to accommodate larger LEU foils to meet Mo-99 production needs. The ultimate goal is to produce an LEU target suitable for use in the Replacement Research Reactor when it is commissioned in 2005. This paper reports our activities on: - The regulatory approval processes required in order to undertake irradiation of this new target; -Supporting calculations (neutronics, computational fluid dynamics) for safety submission; - Design challenges and changes to prototype irradiation; - Trial irradiation of LEU foil target in HIFAR; - Future target and rig development program at ANSTO. (author)

  11. ANSTO's radioactive waste management policy. Preliminary environmental review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levins, D.M.; Airey, P.; Breadner, B.; Bull, P.; Camilleri, A.; Dimitrovski, L.; Gorman, T.; Harries, J.; Innes, R.; Jarquin, E.; Jay, G.; Ridal, A.; Smith, A.

    1996-05-01

    For over forty years, radioactive wastes have been generated by ANSTO (and its predecessor, the AAEC) from the operation of nuclear facilities, the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial use, and from various research activities. the quantities and activities of radioactive waste currently at Lucas Heights are very small compared to many other nuclear facilities overseas, especially those in countries with nuclear power program. Nevertheless, in the absence of a repository for nuclear wastes in Australia and guidelines for waste conditioning, the waste inventory has been growing steadily. This report reviews the status of radioactive waste management at ANSTO, including spent fuel management, treatment of effluents and environmental monitoring. It gives details of: relevant legislative, regulatory and related requirements; sources and types of radioactive waste generated at ANSTO; waste quantities and activities (both cumulative and annual arisings); existing practices and procedures for waste management and environmental monitoring; recommended broad strategies for dealing with radioactive waste management issues. Detailed proposals on how the recommendations should be implemented is the subject of a companion internal document, the Radioactive Waste Management Action Plan 1996-2000 which provides details of the tasks to be undertaken, milestones and resource requirements. 44 refs., 2 tabs., 18 figs

  12. Licensing of ANSTO'S OPAL reactor during construction and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.W.; Ordonez, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents a general description of the ongoing licensing activities associated with the construction and commissioning of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) Open Pool Australian Light-water (OPAL) Reactor at their Lucas Heights site. It addresses the following aspects: The Construction Licence - what it is and what impact it had on the construction of the OPAL Reactor, specifically the various Construction Licence Conditions; The interface between ANSTO, INVAP and ARPANSA during the construction of the OPAL Reactor, particularly in relation to ARPANS Regulation 54; Specific licensing issues that have arisen during the construction and commissioning process and how they have been resolved; The Operating Licence Application - what it is and how it interfaces with the construction and commissioning of the OPAL Reactor. These aspects are all addressed from the point of view of the licensee ANSTO and the RRR Project. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and the lessons learnt that may be of benefit to other licensees and regulators. Note that this paper is an update of a presentation given at IGORR10 and follows on from a paper previously presented at PNBC12 in October 2002

  13. Neutron beam facilities at the Replacement Research Reactor, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.

    2003-01-01

    The exciting development for Australia is the construction of a modern state-of-the-art 20-MW Replacement Research Reactor which is currently under construction to replace the aging reactor (HIFAR) at ANSTO in 2006. To cater for advanced scientific applications, the replacement reactor will provide not only thermal neutron beams but also a modern cold-neutron source moderated by liquid deuterium at approximately -250 deg C, complete with provision for installation of a hot-neutron source at a later stage. The latest 'supermirror' guides will be used to transport the neutrons to the Reactor Hall and its adjoining Neutron Guide Hall where a suite of neutron beam instruments will be installed. These new facilities will expand and enhance ANSTO's capabilities and performance in neutron beam science compared with what is possible with the existing HIFAR facilities, and will make ANSTO/Australia competitive with the best neutron facilities in the world. Eight 'leading-edge' neutron beam instruments are planned for the Replacement Research Reactor when it goes critical in 2006, followed by more instruments by 2010 and beyond. Up to 18 neutron beam instruments can be accommodated at the Replacement Research Reactor, however, it has the capacity for further expansion, including potential for a second Neutron Guide Hall. The first batch of eight instruments has been carefully selected in conjunction with a user group representing various scientific interests in Australia. A team of scientists, engineers, drafting officers and technicians has been assembled to carry out the Neutron Beam Instrument Project to successful completion. Today, most of the planned instruments have conceptual designs and are now being engineered in detail prior to construction and procurement. A suite of ancillary equipment will also be provided to enable scientific experiments at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields. This paper describes the Neutron Beam Instrument Project and gives

  14. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Annual Report 1997-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This is the 46th Annual Report of ANSTO or its predecessor, AAEC outlining the quality services being delivered and the development of knowledge in areas where ANSTO`s nuclear science and technology and related capabilities are of strategic and technical benefit. ANSTO is reporting against established performance indicators within the the five core scientific business areas: International strategic relevance of Nuclear Science; Core nuclear facilities operation and development; Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology to the understanding of natural processes; Treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; and Competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry. Also presented are the objectives, outcomes and activities which supports the core scientific areas by providing best practice corporate support, safety management, information and human resource management for ANSTO staff

  15. Radioactive waste management at ANSTO - Managing current and historic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harries, J.; Dimitrovski, L.; Hart, K.; Levins, D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) site at Lucas Heights has operated as a nuclear site for over 40 years and most of the waste generated is still stored at the site. The 10 MW heavy water research reactor (HIFAR) has operated at Lucas Heights for over 40 years with associated radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities. HIFAR is scheduled to shut down in 2005 and a contract has been signed for a multipurpose 20 MW research reactor which, amongst other uses, will provide continued radiopharmaceutical production and neutron beam research. In addition to these activities, a wide range of nuclear science and technology R and D is carried out at the site. In 1995, ANSTO issued its radioactive waste management policy which made a commitment to: (a) complying with all regulatory requirements; (b) ensuring that radiation dose rates were kept as low as reasonably achievable (the ALARA principle); (c) disposing of waste when appropriate disposal routes are available; and (d) being in accord with international best practice. An extensive audit was earned out of ANSTO's waste management facilities and practices. The recommendations arising from this audit became the basis for an integrated five year Waste Management Action Plan, which began in 1996. The Plan dealt with legacy issues that had arisen from the accumulation of the radioactive waste at Lucas Heights. It involved construction and operation of improved storage facilities for low- level radioactive waste, better monitoring of existing storage facilities for spent research reactor fuel and intermediate level liquid wastes, and conversion of liquid and solid wastes into more stable forms suitable for prolonged storage. Solidification of the intermediate level liquid waste has been a major priority of the Waste Management Action Plan. This acidic waste is generated during the production of molybdenum-99 for radiopharmaceutical use. A hot cell process was

  16. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2001 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC-controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2001 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2001 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This is well below the ALARA objective of 0.02 mSv per year for off-site doses that ANSTO has set and much lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv per year (above natural background and medical doses) and the natural background dose in Australia of 1.5 mSv per year (Webb et al; 1999). It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  17. ANSTO radon monitoring within the WMO global atmosphere watch programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahorowski, W.; Chambers, S.; Sisoutham, O.; Werczynski, S.

    2003-01-01

    A brief overview of results from the ANSTO radon programmes at the Cape Grim (Tasmania) and Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii), World Meteorological Organisation Global Atmosphere Watch stations it presented. At Cape Grim, a 100 mBq m 3 threshold on radon concentration observations has proven to be a suitable criterion for Baseline monitoring. Furthermore, analysis of the Cape Grim Baseline radon data has enabled the characterisation of the oceanic radon flux over the Southern Ocean Cape Grim fetch region. Radon observations at the Mauna Loa Observatory, in conjunction with back trajectory analysis, have helped to identify the source regions of the most pervasive pollution events in the atmosphere of the Pacific Basin. The seasonal variability in the strength of terrestrial influence on Pacific air masses has also been characterised

  18. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Annual Report 1997-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This is the 46th Annual Report of ANSTO or its predecessor, AAEC outlining the quality services being delivered and the development of knowledge in areas where ANSTO's nuclear science and technology and related capabilities are of strategic and technical benefit. ANSTO is reporting against established performance indicators within the the five core scientific business areas: International strategic relevance of Nuclear Science; Core nuclear facilities operation and development; Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology to the understanding of natural processes; Treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; and Competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry. Also presented are the objectives, outcomes and activities which supports the core scientific areas by providing best practice corporate support, safety management, information and human resource management for ANSTO staff

  19. ANSTO and CSIRO: supporting the medical devices and sensors industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triani, Gerry; Doe, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have provided support to the Medical Devices and Sensors Industry in Australia for many years. In particular the Institute of Materials and Engineering Science at ANSTO and CSIRO Manufacturing and Infrastructure Technology have worked independently and jointly on a number of projects to provide technical services and support to small to medium sized companies. A recent venture to capture their capabilities in the WTIA's Medical Devices and Sensors Industry Sectoral Project, part of the WTIA National Diffusion Networks Project, has produced substantial technical and financial gains for its participants. The aim of this article is to highlight the infrastructure and capabilities that ANSTO and CSIRO can provide to component manufacturers and industry clusters that offer a range of manufacturing processes needed for medical devices and sensors. Several case studies illustrate how ANSTO and CSIRO have provided support to the medical devices industry

  20. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental surveillance and effluent monitoring conducted in the calendar year 2000 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 2000 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 2000 were estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1 % of the 1 milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  1. Molybdenum-99 production at ANSTO: present and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donlevy, T.M.; Hetherington, E.; Juric, J.; Hwang, T.; La Riviere, C.; Rutherford, J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) decays to give technetium-99m ( 99 Tc m ), the most versatile diagnostic radioisotope used in approximately 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. ANSTO (formerly the AAEC) has supplied technetium generators to the medical community since 1967-68. From small-scale beginnings, 99 Tc m - generators are now also supplied to customers in New Zealand, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand, Korea and China. 99 Mo is produced in HIFAR by the fission of uranium-235 ( 235 U). Uranium (2.2% 235 U) dioxide pellets are irradiated and then chemically processed to separate and purify the 99 Mo for generator production. The current process involves alumina column separation of 99 Mo from uranium and other fission products; desorption of 99 Mo with ammonia; evaporation to dryness to remove volatile impurities; secondary purification of 99 Mo on alumina. Recent studies have sought to optimize the 99 Mo yield to meet an increasing market demand. These studies focused on two major stages of the process - alumina column separation and evaporation/ boil down. The effects of changes in pH of loading solution, rates of loading and desorption, volume of eluting solvent and temperature of evaporation have been investigated. The results of tracer and production scale experiments will be presented and the impacts upon future 99 Mo production in Australia discussed

  2. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E. L.; Loosz, T.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    2000-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the 1 millisievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron

  3. Environmental and effluent monitoring at ANSTO sites, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Mokhber-Shahin, L.

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in 1999 at the two sites owned and operated by ANSTO, at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC). All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from LHSTC controlled airborne discharges were estimated for 1999 using the PC-Cream atmospheric dispersion and dosimetry code. The potential effective doses to the public in 1999 were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for all receptor locations on the LHSTC 1.6 km buffer zone boundary or beyond. This value represents 1% of the I milli sievert (mSv) per year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the LHSTC site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year. It is concluded that there is no impact on the health of the community, staff or the environment as a consequence of operations at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre or the National Medical Cyclotron (authors)

  4. The rotamak - contributions from ANSTO and Flinders University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, I.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The investigation of plasma/field configurations of the compact torus variety is of current interest in the field of fusion research. Two configurations of this genre are the field reversed configuration (FRC), which does not have an externally applied toroidal magnetic field, and the spherical tokamak (ST) which possesses such a field. Both of these compact torus concepts, as studied outside Australia, suffer from the very serious disadvantage that they are inherently pulsed devices; the toroidal plasma current is not maintained indefinitely. The rotamak is a compact torus configuration having the unique and distinctive feature that the toroidal plasma current is driven in a steady-state, non-inductive fashion by means of the application of a rotating magnetic field. In its basic form, the rotamak is operated as an FRC. However, by means of a simple modification, a steady toroidal magnetic field can be added to the basic rotamak apparatus and the configuration then becomes that of an ST. The rotamak concept was conceived and developed in Australia and the bulk of investigations in this field, both theoretical and experimental, have been undertaken at Flinders University (1979-1998) and AAEC/ANSTO (1982-1988). This talk will cover the history of the project in this country, will dwell on the marvelous interaction which flourished between the two research groups and will finish with the news that the rotamak concept has been enthusiastically embraced by fusion research teams in the United States

  5. Identification and quantification of radionuclides in historical waste at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Bowles, C.J.; Fernando, K.; Wong, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Low level radioactive solid waste resulting arising from research and production activities at ANSTO has is currently been held in safely storage ed in 200L steel drums at Lucas Heights for over 50 years for final disposal. This waste is packaged in 200L steel drums and is held in a designated radioactive waste storage facility. All of such drums have been counted in a commercial Canberra Qx 2 low level waste assay system to radiologically characterise them. The resulting spectra in each case have been evaluated by an experienced gamma-ray spectrometrist to ensure that all significant peaks present have been correctly identified and that the quantity of each resulting radionuclide has been correctly calculated. The validation process highlighted a number of deficiencies areas for improvement in the original method used to count each drum as well as in the analysis software supplied with the gamma-ray spectrometer. Some of the problems encountered included unidentified and mis identified peaks as well as errors associated with quantifying the respective nuclides. At present, accurate and reliable gamma spectrometry results for well over 5000 drums has been produced. However the most important outcome of this the availability of validated gamma ray spectrometry results of waste has enabled decisive classification waste and subsequent processing

  6. ANSTO's waste forms for the 31. century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, E.R.; Begg, B. D.; Day, R. A.; Moricca, S.; Perera, D. S.; Stewart, M. W. A.; Carter, M. L.; McGlinn, P. J.; Smith, K. L.; Walls, P. A.; Robina, M. La

    2004-07-01

    ANSTO waste form development for high-level radioactive waste is directed towards practical applications, particularly problematic niche wastes that do not readily lend themselves to direct vitrification. Integration of waste form chemistry and processing method is emphasised. Some longstanding misconceptions about titanate ceramics are dealt with. We have a range of titanate-bearing waste form products aimed at immobilisation of tank wastes and sludges, actinide-rich wastes, INEEL calcines and Na-bearing liquid wastes, Al-rich wastes arising from reprocessing of Al-clad fuels, Mo-rich wastes arising from reprocessing of U-Mo fuels, partitioned Cs-rich wastes, and {sup 99}Tc. Waste form production techniques cover hot isostatic and uniaxial pressing, sintering, and cold-crucible melting, and these are strongly integrated into waste form design. Speciation and leach resistance of Cs and alkalis in cementitious products and geo-polymers are being studied. Recently we have embarked on studies of candidate inert matrix fuels for Pu burning. We also have a considerable program directed at basic understanding of the waste forms in regard to crystal chemistry, dissolution behaviour in aqueous media, radiation damage effects and optimum processing techniques. (authors)

  7. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Annual Report 2000-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    ANSTO's main activities and outputs during the year under review (1 July 2000- 30 June 2001) are presented in this report. Highlights include: the replacement research reactor project, to be completed in 2005, proceeded on schedule and within budget, a great deal of effort has been expended on the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the reactor, as well as the review of the detailed engineering design; the fifth shipment of spent fuel was made successfully, so that more than half of the spent fuel accumulated over the entire lifetime of HIFAR has now been shipped overseas; radiopharmaceutical sales reached $17.9 million, a $2 million increase over the previous year. Another milestone this year, not only for ANSTO but Australia as a whole, was the entry into force in January of an Integrated Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA. ANSTO, together with the Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office have led the world on the implementation of integrated safeguards, and other countries are now following. In the health sector, ANSTO's reputation and capabilities continued to grow with Therapeutic Goods Administration approval for FDGen TM , a metabolic tracer used in the diagnosis of the staging of cancer in cardiac imaging and the imaging of certain neurological conditions. In the field of strategic research, the use of neutron scattering techniques to understand the structure of a range of materials from charcoal to polymers has yielded significant results. In response to funding challenges, the organisation increased external earnings, improved efficiencies and reduced expenditure on research and development. With regard to revenue, ANSTO generated $35.8 million (1999-2000, $32.2 million) from external services, representing 29.5% of total income, excluding capital use charge. With the aim of establishing an appropriate base for the future, ANSTO undertook an output pricing review with the Department of Finance. This review concluded that the price for

  8. Reactor protection systems for the Replacement Research Reactor, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    The 20-MW Replacement Research Reactor Project which is currently under construction at ANSTO will have a combination of a state of the art triplicated computer based reactor protection system, and a fully independent, and diverse, triplicated analogue reactor protection system, that has been in use in the nuclear industry, for many decades. The First Reactor Protection System (FRPS) consists of a Triconex triplicated modular redundant system that has recently been approved by the USNRC for use in the USA?s power reactor program. The Second Reactor Protection System is a hardwired analogue system supplied by Foxboro, the Spec 200 system, which is also Class1E qualified. The FRPS is used to drop the control rods when its safety parameter setpoints have been reached. The SRPS is used to drain the reflector tank and since this operation would result in a reactor poison out due to the time it would take to refill the tank the FRPS trip setpoints are more limiting. The FRPS and SRPS have limited hardwired indications on the control panels in the main control room (MCR) and emergency control centre (ECC), however all FRPS and SRPS parameters are capable of being displayed on the reactor control and monitoring system (RCMS) video display units. The RCMS is a Foxboro Series I/A control system which is used for plant control and monitoring and as a protection system for the cold neutron source. This paper will provide technical information on both systems, their trip logics, their interconnections with each other, and their integration into the reactor control and monitoring system and control panels. (author)

  9. SIRIUS – A new 6 MV accelerator system for IBA and AMS at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastuovic, Zeljko, E-mail: zkp@ansto.gov.au; Button, David; Cohen, David; Fink, David; Garton, David; Hotchkis, Michael; Ionescu, Mihail; Long, Shane; Levchenko, Vladimir; Mann, Michael; Siegele, Rainer; Smith, Andrew; Wilcken, Klaus

    2016-03-15

    The Centre for Accelerator Science (CAS) facility at ANSTO has been expanded with a new 6 MV tandem accelerator system supplied by the National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC). The beamlines, end-stations and data acquisition software for the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were custom built by NEC for rare isotope mass spectrometry, while the beamlines with end-stations for the ion beam analysis (IBA) are largely custom designed at ANSTO. An overview of the 6 MV system and its performance during testing and commissioning phase is given with emphasis on the IBA end-stations and their applications for materials modification and characterisation.

  10. SIRIUS - A new 6 MV accelerator system for IBA and AMS at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuovic, Zeljko; Button, David; Cohen, David; Fink, David; Garton, David; Hotchkis, Michael; Ionescu, Mihail; Long, Shane; Levchenko, Vladimir; Mann, Michael; Siegele, Rainer; Smith, Andrew; Wilcken, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science (CAS) facility at ANSTO has been expanded with a new 6 MV tandem accelerator system supplied by the National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC). The beamlines, end-stations and data acquisition software for the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were custom built by NEC for rare isotope mass spectrometry, while the beamlines with end-stations for the ion beam analysis (IBA) are largely custom designed at ANSTO. An overview of the 6 MV system and its performance during testing and commissioning phase is given with emphasis on the IBA end-stations and their applications for materials modification and characterisation.

  11. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Annual Report 2001-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report details outcomes, achievements and work underway. It has been a year of significant advancement with the awarding by ARPANSA in April of the Licence to Construct the Replacement Research Reactor at Lucas Heights after almost 10 years of substantiation and approval processes. Other operational highlights during the year included: the award of several facility licences by ARPANSA under their new procedures, including a licence for the ongoing operation of the HIFAR reactor and radiopharmaceutical production; the launch by the ANSTO business unit ARI in April 2002 of LeukoScan, a technetium-99m labelled diagnostic radiopharmaceutical for imaging infection; maintenance of Australia's leading role in the development of new nuclear safeguards procedures by cooperating with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to become the first country to adopt integrated safeguards; formal accreditation of ANSTO as a member of the IAEA's Network of Analytical Laboratories, the network that supports the international nuclear safeguards program; construction of a purpose-built waste treatment and packaging facility to enable state-of-the-art processing for ANSTO's low level radioactive waste in preparation for removal to the national low-level radioactive waste repository. Scientific highlights included: ANSTO's development of two new technologies that will lead to cleaner and more environmentally sustainable operations for uranium processors; new methods for depositing ceramics coatings at low temperatures for applications ranging from fibre optic communications to corrosion and scratch resistance; ANSTO sustaining its position as a world leader in carbon dating samples following the introduction of new sample preparation procedures that dramatically reduce the influence of background levels on the result and studies that provided information relating to the management and sustainable development of fishing and mining in the marine environment. ANSTO scientists, in

  12. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Annual Report 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In August 1999, ANSTO's most important project - the Replacement Research Reactor Project received unanimous approval from the bipartisan Public Works Committee. During the year, the Replacement Research Reactor project reached the stage where the Argentine company INVAP S.E. was selected as the preferred tenderer for the design, construction, commissioning and demonstration of performance. INVAP's Australian alliance partners are John Holland Construction and Engineering Pty Ltd and Evans Deakin Industries Ltd. The tendering process was independently audited and confirmed to be of the highest standard. ANSTO's expertise in waste management extends to mine products, and it was invited to become a Research Member of the International Network for Acid Prevention (INAP) Ltd. INAP is an industry-based initiative that aims to coordinate research and development in the management of sulphidic mine wastes. ANSTO scientists were amongst the first to accurately determine the contribution of fossil fuel to the global atmospheric methane budget, methane being second in importance only to carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas.Technology developed by ANSTO, under the auspices of the CRC for Waste Management and Pollution Control, for removing arsenic from water without employing strong chemical oxidants was successfully demonstrated in the western United States, where new regulations will require dramatically lower arsenic levels in drinking water. A provisional patent was lodged for the use of sol-gel matrices for the encapsulation and controlled-release of pharmaceuticals. A research partnership involving the University of Sydney and the Sydney Cancer Centre has subsequently been established to facilitate pre-clinical studies of the suitability of the technology as a targeted delivery system for tumour treatments. A major initiative during the year was the introduction of the Learning Environment for New Strategies (LENS) Program. Phase 1 of this teamwork and cultural change

  13. From carbon to actinides: A new universal 1MV accelerator mass spectrometer at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Hotchkis, M.; Levchenko, V.; Fink, D.; Hauser, T.; Kitchen, R.

    2015-10-01

    A new 1 MV NEC pelletron AMS system at ANSTO is presented. The spectrometer comprises large radius magnets for actinide measurements. A novel feature of the system is fast switching between isotopes both at low and high energy sections allowing measurements of up to 8 isotopes within a single sequence. Technical details and layout of the spectrometer is presented. Performance data for 14C, 10Be, 26Al and actinides demonstrate the system is ready for routine AMS measurements.

  14. From carbon to actinides: A new universal 1MV accelerator mass spectrometer at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcken, K.M., E-mail: klaus.wilcken@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Hotchkis, M.; Levchenko, V.; Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Hauser, T.; Kitchen, R. [National Electrostatics Corporation, 7540 Graber Road, Middleton, WI 53562-0310 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    A new 1 MV NEC pelletron AMS system at ANSTO is presented. The spectrometer comprises large radius magnets for actinide measurements. A novel feature of the system is fast switching between isotopes both at low and high energy sections allowing measurements of up to 8 isotopes within a single sequence. Technical details and layout of the spectrometer is presented. Performance data for {sup 14}C, {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and actinides demonstrate the system is ready for routine AMS measurements.

  15. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry on SIRIUS: New 6 MV spectrometer at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C.; Garton, D.; Button, D.; Mann, M.; Kitchen, R.; Hauser, T.; O'Connor, A.

    2017-09-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science at ANSTO operates four tandem accelerator systems for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA). The latest addition to the fleet is SIRIUS, a 6 MV combined IBA and AMS system. Following initial ion beam testing, conditioning and debugging software and hardware, SIRIUS is now commissioned. Details of the instrument design and performance data for 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl are presented.

  16. The reasons why the CEO of ARPANSA issued the Licence to ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loy, J.

    2002-01-01

    After the process of assessment, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of ARPANSA has reached the conclusion that ANSTO's Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) design would result in a reactor that could be operated safely. Of fundamental importance is that its core can be shutdown by gravity operated systems. That is, it is relying on laws of nature, without any other form of intervention. The reactor also has important safety features built into it that meet international best practice in radiation protection and nuclear safety. It has two separate and diverse shutdown systems that can operate to shut down the reactor in any abnormal occurrence. The ability of these systems to achieve the necessary shutdown in a whole range of potential accident scenarios was a central focus of the safety assessment that made. In reaching this decision, consideration was given to the issues of spent fuel and radioactive waste management. These were very major issues in the public's mind as they were the subject of the great majority of public submissions received and considered. ANSTO's proposed route for dealing with spent fuel is that it will be shipped to France for reprocessing in the COGEMA facility at La Hague. The waste from this reprocessing would be returned to Australia as vitrified waste, suitable for long term storage.This is a viable and acceptably safe strategy. As a fall back option, ANSTO relies on its contract with the Argentinean company, Investigacion Aplicada (INVAP) that requires INVAP to find an alternative route for the processing of the RRR spent fuel into an acceptable waste form for its storage in Australia. The amount of spent fuel ultimately is not very large and does not need the enormous processing facilities that exist in France and the United Kingdom for the reprocessing of fuel from power reactors in Europe and Japan. The issue of the long term storage of the intermediate level waste arising from the processing of spent fuel is also debated. The

  17. Automation of the ANSTO working standard of measurement for the activity of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.M.

    1990-08-01

    The ANSTO working standard ion chamber is used routinely for the standardisation of a range of gamma emitting radio-isotopes. The ion chamber has recently been automated by replacing the AAEC type 292 Recycling Discriminator, timer module and model 43 teletype printer with the HP86B computer, HP-59501B voltage programmer and HP-6181C current source. The program 'MEASION', running on the Deltacom IBM AT clone, calculates the radioactivity, with full error statements, from the ion chamber measurements. Each of these programs is listed and discussed. 13 refs., 5 figs., tabs

  18. Neutron scattering science at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Neutron scattering science at ANSTO is integrated into a number of fields in the Australian scientific and industrial research communities. The unique properties of the neutron are being used to investigate problems in chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering and biology. The reactor HIFAR at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation research laboratories is the only neutron source in Australia suitable for neutron scattering science. A suite of instruments provides a range of opportunities for the neutron scattering community that extends throughout universities, government and industrial research laboratories. Plans to replace the present research reactor with a modern multi-purpose research reactor are well advanced. The experimental and analysis equipment associated with a modern research reactor will permit the establishment of a national centre for world class neutron science research focussed on the structure and functioning of materials, industrial irradiations and analyses in support of Australian manufacturing, minerals, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals and information science industries. A brief overview will be presented of all the instruments presently available at ANSTO with emphasis on the SANS instrument. This will be followed by a description of the replacement research reactor and its instruments. (author)

  19. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). Annual Report 1998-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The 1998/1999 Annual Report summarises ANSTO's performance and progress made on several major infrastructure projects and its research and development program. On 3 May 1999, the Government announced its support for a Replacement Research Reactor at Lucas Heights; the site licence has been granted by ARPANSA and the request for tender distributed to four pre qualified vendors. A significant effort during the year under review was directed towards the Replacement Research Reactor Project. Main objectives and achievements are also reported against established performance indicators within the the five core scientific business areas: International strategic relevance of Nuclear Science; Core nuclear facilities operation and development; Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology to the understanding of natural processes; Treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; and Competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry. Also presented are the objectives and activities which supports the core scientific areas by providing best practice corporate support, safety management, information and human resource management for ANSTO staff. The organization has developed its 1999/2000 Operational Plan predominantly on a project-based approach

  20. A high energy, heavy ion microprobe for ion beam research on the tandem accelerator at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.; Siegele, R.; Dytlewski, N.

    1996-04-01

    A comprehensive review is given on the production and use of heavy ion beams with spot sizes of a few μm. The development of a high energy, heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO and its possible applications are discussed. The microprobe is designed to focus a wide range of ion beam types, from light ions such as protons up to ions as heavy as iodine. Details of the ion beam optics, optical calculations and a description of the proposed microbeam design are given. The unique combination of high energy, heavy ions and improved detection systems will provide high sensitivity elemental composition and depth profiling information, allowing surface topography and 3D surface reconstruction to be performed on a broad range of materials

  1. A high energy, heavy ion microprobe for ion beam research on the tandem accelerator at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.D.; Siegele, R.; Dytlewski, N.

    1996-04-01

    A comprehensive review is given on the production and use of heavy ion beams with spot sizes of a few {mu}m. The development of a high energy, heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO and its possible applications are discussed. The microprobe is designed to focus a wide range of ion beam types, from light ions such as protons up to ions as heavy as iodine. Details of the ion beam optics, optical calculations and a description of the proposed microbeam design are given. The unique combination of high energy, heavy ions and improved detection systems will provide high sensitivity elemental composition and depth profiling information, allowing surface topography and 3D surface reconstruction to be performed on a broad range of materials. 86 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs.

  2. Review of the ANSTO submission on the site geological investigations for the RRR at Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) and ANSTO's Consolidated Seismic Report were reviewed by ARPANSA's Regulatory Branch, and by an IAEA consultant to ARPANSA. It included a recommendation by the IAEA Peer Review Team (June 2001) that an additional study be undertaken for the Lucas Heights site in accordance with IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-S1. In particular this related to regional and local investigations to determine whether there exists a potential for surface faulting at the site area, to formulate the investigations that should be used to determine whether or not any faults in the area should be considered capable. The CEO of ARPANSA requested ANSTO to undertake such a task. The reviews that have been undertaken by experts from Geoscience Australia and the IAEA expert contracted by ARPANSA give confidence that the seismic design of the reactor structures, systems, and components important for safety should not be affected by the fault through the excavations for the foundations of the reactor building. The basis is the conclusions reached by these experts that the fault discovered is very old and not capable under either the USNRC Criteria or the IAEA Criteria. It is not now active, has not been active in the geologically recent past and is unlikely to re-activate within the foreseeable lifespan of the proposed facility. Consequently, this pre-existing fault presents no greater risk than the surrounding unfaulted material. Thus, the replacement reactor need not be designed for such displacement. The existence of this 'incapable' fault does not impact on the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment from which the seismic design basis for the reactor was derived. Therefore, the existing design response spectrum accepted in the Regulatory Assessment Report as the basis for seismic design of structures, systems and components, and approved in the Construction Licence, has not changed and remains adequately conservative with regard to vibratory motion at the site

  3. Nuclear Safety Bureau: safety objectives and principles for the proposed ANSTO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westall, D.

    1993-01-01

    Siting criteria and safety assessment principles were previously promulgated by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC), and have been applied by ANSTO and the Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB). The NSB is revising these criteria and principles to take account of evolving nuclear safety standards and practices. The NSB Safety and Siting Assessment Principles (SSAP) are presented and it is estimated that it will provide a comprehensive basis for the safety assessment of research reactors in Australia, and be applicable to all stages of a reactor project: siting: design and construction; operation; modification; and decommissioning. The SSAP are similar to the principles promulgated by the AAEC, in that probabilistic safety criteria are set for assessment of design, however these criteria are complimentary to a deterministic design basis approach. This is a similar approach to that recently published by the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate 4 . Siting principles are now also included, where they were previously separate, and require a consideration of the consequences of severe accidents which are an extension of accidents catered for by the design of the plant. Criteria for radiation doses due to normal operations and design basis accidents are included in the principles for safety assessment. 9 refs

  4. Towards improvement of aluminium assay in quartz for in situ cosmogenic 26Al analysis at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Toshiyuki; Fink, David; Mifsud, Charles

    2015-10-01

    Accuracy and precision in the measurement of natural aluminium abundances in quartz can affect the reliability of 26Al exposure dating and 26Al/10Be burial dating. At ANSTO, aliquots extracted from the HF solutions of dissolved quartz are treated in our laboratory, whereas ICP-OES analysis is performed at a commercial laboratory. The long-term inter-run reproducibility of our in-house standards show a limiting precision in Al measurements of 3-4% (1σ), which is lower than the claimed precision of Al analysis by ICP-OES. This indicates that unaccounted random errors are incorporated during our aliquot preparation. In this study, we performed several controlled tests to investigate effects of possible inconsistencies and variances during our aliquot preparation procedure. The results indicate that our procedure is robust against any subtle change in the preparation procedure, e.g., fuming temperatures, fuming reagents, and drying conditions. We found that the density of the solutions dispatched for ICP analysis is occasionally variable due to the presence of residual fuming reagents in the solution. A comparison of the results between the calibration curve and standard addition methods show that the former results are consistently lower than the latter by up to ∼14%. Similar offsets have been reported by previous studies. The reason for these discrepancies is mostly likely matrix effect, which is not accounted for by the calibration curve method. Further tests by varying matrix with impurities such as HF, HClO4, H2SO4 and Si identified that Si could cause lower offset in Al measurements; however, our ICP solutions are confirmed to be free from Si and the cause of matrix effect remains to be investigated. Hence, care must be taken for the measurement of Al concentrations in quartz by ICP-OES, either by ensuring that matrix effect is fully accounted for or by routinely employing standard additions when required.

  5. Towards improvement of aluminium assay in quartz for in situ cosmogenic 26Al analysis at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Toshiyuki; Fink, David; Mifsud, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Accuracy and precision in the measurement of natural aluminium abundances in quartz can affect the reliability of 26 Al exposure dating and 26 Al/ 10 Be burial dating. At ANSTO, aliquots extracted from the HF solutions of dissolved quartz are treated in our laboratory, whereas ICP-OES analysis is performed at a commercial laboratory. The long-term inter-run reproducibility of our in-house standards show a limiting precision in Al measurements of 3–4% (1σ), which is lower than the claimed precision of Al analysis by ICP-OES. This indicates that unaccounted random errors are incorporated during our aliquot preparation. In this study, we performed several controlled tests to investigate effects of possible inconsistencies and variances during our aliquot preparation procedure. The results indicate that our procedure is robust against any subtle change in the preparation procedure, e.g., fuming temperatures, fuming reagents, and drying conditions. We found that the density of the solutions dispatched for ICP analysis is occasionally variable due to the presence of residual fuming reagents in the solution. A comparison of the results between the calibration curve and standard addition methods show that the former results are consistently lower than the latter by up to ∼14%. Similar offsets have been reported by previous studies. The reason for these discrepancies is mostly likely matrix effect, which is not accounted for by the calibration curve method. Further tests by varying matrix with impurities such as HF, HClO 4 , H 2 SO 4 and Si identified that Si could cause lower offset in Al measurements; however, our ICP solutions are confirmed to be free from Si and the cause of matrix effect remains to be investigated. Hence, care must be taken for the measurement of Al concentrations in quartz by ICP-OES, either by ensuring that matrix effect is fully accounted for or by routinely employing standard additions when required.

  6. Exploring the structure of biological macromolecules in solution using Quokka, the small angle neutron scattering instrument, at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Kathleen, E-mail: kw@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Jeffries, Cy M.; Knott, Robert B.; Sokolova, Anna [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Jacques, David A. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Duff, Anthony P. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2015-10-21

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is widely used to extract structural parameters, shape and other types of information from a vast array of materials. The technique is applied to biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution to reveal information often not accessible by other techniques. SANS measurements on biomolecules present some particular challenges however, one of which is suitable instrumentation. This review details SANS experiments performed on two well-characterised globular proteins (lysozyme and glucose isomerase) using Quokka, the recently commissioned SANS instrument at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The instrument configuration as well as data collection and reduction strategies for biological investigations are discussed and act as a general reference for structural biologists who use the instrument. Both model independent analysis of the two proteins and ab initio modelling illustrate that Quokka-SANS data can be used to successfully model the overall shapes of proteins in solution, providing a benchmark for users.

  7. AMS analyses at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    The major use of ANTARES is Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) with 14 C being the most commonly analysed radioisotope - presently about 35 % of the available beam time on ANTARES is used for 14 C measurements. The accelerator measurements are supported by, and dependent on, a strong sample preparation section. The ANTARES AMS facility supports a wide range of investigations into fields such as global climate change, ice cores, oceanography, dendrochronology, anthropology, and classical and Australian archaeology. Described here are some examples of the ways in which AMS has been applied to support research into the archaeology, prehistory and culture of this continent's indigenous Aboriginal peoples. (author)

  8. The new confocal heavy ion microprobe beamline at ANSTO: The first microprobe resolution tests and applications for elemental imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuovic, Z.; Siegele, R.; Cohen, D. D.; Mann, M.; Ionescu, M.; Button, D.; Long, S.

    2017-08-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science facility at ANSTO has been expanded with the new NEC 6 MV ;SIRIUS; accelerator system in 2015. In this paper we present a detailed description of the new nuclear microprobe-Confocal Heavy Ion Micro-Probe (CHIMP) together with results of the microprobe resolution testing and the elemental analysis performed on typical samples of mineral ore deposits and hyper-accumulating plants regularly measured at ANSTO. The CHIMP focusing and scanning systems are based on the OM-150 Oxford quadrupole triplet and the OM-26 separated scan-coil doublet configurations. A maximum ion rigidity of 38.9 amu-MeV was determined for the following nuclear microprobe configuration: the distance from object aperture to collimating slits of 5890 mm, the working distance of 165 mm and the lens bore diameter of 11 mm. The overall distance from the object to the image plane is 7138 mm. The CHIMP beamline has been tested with the 3 MeV H+ and 6 MeV He2+ ion beams. The settings of the object and collimating apertures have been optimized using the WinTRAX simulation code for calculation of the optimum acceptance settings in order to obtain the highest possible ion current for beam spot sizes of 1 μm and 5 μm. For optimized aperture settings of the CHIMP the beam brightness was measured to be ∼0.9 pA μm-2 mrad-2 for 3 MeV H+ ions, while the brightness of ∼0.4 pA μm-2 mrad-2 was measured for 6 MeV He2+ ions. The smallest beam sizes were achieved using a microbeam with reduced particle rate of 1000 Hz passing through the object slit apertures several micrometers wide. Under these conditions a spatial resolution of ∼0.6 μm × 1.5 μm for 3 MeV H+ and ∼1.8 μm × 1.8 μm for 6 MeV He2+ microbeams in horizontal (and vertical) dimension has been achieved. The beam sizes were verified using STIM imaging on 2000 and 1000 mesh Cu electron microscope grids.

  9. Report on the ANSTO application for a licence to construct a Replacement Research Reactor, addressing seismic analysis and seismic design accident analysis, spent fuel and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    The Report of the Nuclear Safety Committee (NSC) covers specific terms of reference as requested by the Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA. The primary issue for the Working Group(WG) consideration was whether ANSTO had demonstrated: (i) that the overall approach to seismic analysis and its implementation in the design is both conservative and consistent with the international best practice; (ii) whether the full accident analysis in the Probabilistic Safety Assesment Report (PSAR) satisfies the radiation dose/frequency criteria specified in ARPANSA's regulatory assessment principle 28 and the assumptions used in the Reference Accident for the siting assessment have been accounted for in the PSAR; and (iii) the adequacy of the strategies for managing the spent fuel as proposed to be used in the Replacement Research Reactor and other radioactive waste (including emissions, taking into account the ALARA criterion) arising from the operation of the proposed replacement reactor and radioisotope production. The report includes a series of questions that were asked of the Applicant in the course of working group deliberations, to illustrate the breadth of inquiries that were made. The Committee noted that replies to some questions remain outstanding at the date of this document. The NSC makes a number of recommendations that appear in each section of the document, which has been compiled in three parts representing the work of each group. The NSC notes some lack of clarity in what was needed to be considered at this approval stage of the project, as against information that would be required at a later stage. While not in the original work plan, recent events of September 11, 2001 also necessitated some exploration of issues relating to construction security. Copyright (2002) Commonwealth of Australia

  10. ANSTO: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization conducts or is engaged in collaborative research and development in the application of nuclear science and associated technology. Through its Australian radio-isotopes unit, it markets radioisotopes, their products and other services for nuclear medicine industry and research. It also operates national nuclear facilities ( HIFAR and Moata research reactors), promote training, provide advice and disseminates information on nuclear science and technology. The booklet briefly outlines these activities. ills

  11. ANSTO. Annual Report 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    Significant events and achievements highlighted in the Annual Reports include: the Research Reactor Review, increase of external revenues by 12.5%, sales of Australian radioisotopes amounting to $8.5 M, regulatory approval for production of thallium-201 in National Medical Cyclotron, completion of first contracts with Wismut GmbH in Germany, production of a database of content of atmospheric particulate matter in air over NSW, word-wide licence agreement signed for further commercialization of blood clot radiopharmaceuticals, collaborative agreement signed with SURPAC Int. for development of geochemical speciation software, complete design of rings in HIFAR for silicon doping. ills., tabs

  12. Plan for Moata reactor decommissioning, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.

    2003-01-01

    'Moata' is an Argonaut type 100 kW reactor that was operated by Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation for 34 years from 1961 to 1995. It was initially used as a reactor-physics research tool and a training reactor but the scope of operations was extended to include activation analysis and neutron radiography from the mid 1970s. In 1995, the Moata reactor was shutdown on the grounds that its continued operation could no longer be economically justified. All the fuel (HEU) was unloaded to temporary storage and secured in 1995, followed by drainage of the demineralised water (primary coolant) from the reactor in 1996 and complete removal of electrical cables in 1998. The Reactor Control Room has been renovated into a modern laboratory. The reactor structure is still intact and kept under safe storage. Various options for decommissioning strategies have been considered and evaluated. So far, 'Immediate Dismantling' is considered to be the most desirable option, however, the timescale for actual dismantling needs to take account of the establishment of the national radioactive repository. This paper describes the dismantling options and techniques considered along with examples of other dismantling projects overseas. (author)

  13. ANSTO program of research 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    The 1989-1990 Program of Research of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization identifies the diversity of the organisation's current activities and the role of nuclear science and technology in achieving national goals. Major program areas continue to be biomedicine and health, advanced materials, applications of nuclear physics, environmental science, isotope technology and nuclear technology. Each project in a particular program area is defined in terms of background, objectives recent work and achievements, work planned and resources. External advisory committees which provide advice on research priorities, are viewed as a fundamental part of the ongoing evaluation process of the organization activities in response to changing priorities in industry, government and the community it serves

  14. The radiation damage in silicon diodes induced by stray fast neutrons from the ANSTO Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    1996-01-01

    Intense flux of fast neutrons are produced during routine isotope production runs at the National Medical Cyclotron. These stray neutrons induce irreversible displacement damage in the semiconductor devices, the vital building blocks of the various electronic instruments used in the facility. This poster highlights the results of the radiation hardness investigation study of commercial silicon diodes undertaken at the Health Physics laboratory of the National Medical Cyclotron

  15. Australia's uranium industry, its contribution to world nuclear energy development, and the roles of ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Currently and for the near future, Australia has no proposal to use nuclear power. Nonetheless, as a result of its major uranium mineral deposits, Australia plays a substantial role in world nuclear energy development. Hence, there is a requirement for Australia to maintain an advanced level of nuclear technical expertise to ensure it can responsibly fulfil this role. The present Government has abandoned the ''three mines policy'' that limited the uranium production, and will assess new development applications on the basis of environmental impact and the adherence to strict nuclear safeguard requirements. Australia has 30% of the known low cost uranium resources in the world, but only 11% share of uranium production. In 1995, the uranium production increased for the first time. The opportunity to increase the market share and enhance its export income exists, and some existing producers plan to increase the production. The resources, production and exports, and the recent development of new mines are reported. The activities of Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization and the environmental impact assessment at uranium mine sites are described. (K.I.)

  16. Dosimetry and irradiation methods for the ANSTO gamma technology research irradiator (GATRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, M.E.

    1988-07-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's gamma technology research irradiator (GATRI) at Lucas Heights, New South Wales, has been modified for use as a research and small-scale commercial irradiation facility to be available to government agencies and private industry for the technical and economic evaluation of irradiation processing. The new source rack was designed around existing mechanical components to optimise the limited space available within the irradiation cell. Irradiation parameters investigated during commissioning included the effect of source-to-target distance on relative dose rates within targets of the same density; effect of density on dose-rate distribution within targets irradiated at the same distance from the source; and the contribution of transit dose to low absorbed doses as the source is raised and lowered. The efficiency of the irradiator was determined for various target densities and overdose ratios

  17. Applications of cosmogenic radio-isotopes, 10Be, 26Al and 36CI in the Earth Sciences using AMS at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Elliot, G.

    1997-01-01

    Production of long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides (CRN) is dominated by cosmic ray interaction in the upper atmosphere. Through atmospheric transport and precipitation, they become distributed over the Earth's surface, and participate in various geochemical and geophysical global processes. An alternate production mode of CRNs is in the Earth's lithosphere, particularly in exposed rocks and surfaces. The production rate of these in-situ produced CRNs depends primarily on the reaction mode and type of target material. Although production is small - a few tens of atoms per gram per year - the built-up in concentration even after a few thousand years of exposure can be measured using the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Concentrations of in situ nuclides in the near-surface zone allows a 'surface exposure history' to be estimated resulting in a measure of exposure ages and erosion rates. With a range in half-lives from 0.3-1.5 Ma, in-situ produced CRNs are ideally suited as geochronometers and tracers in Quaternary geomorphology related to paleoclimate change. This paper will briefly outline principles and techniques of 10 Be, 26 AI and 36 CI in-situ methods and describe Some of the above projects related to the unique geomorphology of the Australian and Antarctic continents

  18. Progress with OPAL, the new Australian research reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Progress with OPAL, the new Australian research reactor. R A ROBINSON. The Bragg Institite, ANSTO, Sydney, Australia. E-mail: rro@ansto.gov.au ... 'sister' facilities, with a common open user ethos, and a vision to play a major role in international science. Fuel was loaded into the reactor in August 2006, and full power.

  19. Nuclear Safety Bureau. Annual Report 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the year, the Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) responded to technical challenges from developments in nuclear plant operated by ANSTO, in particular, assessments of a significant upgrade of documentation for HIFAR research reactor and review of the radioactive discharges. From its monitoring and reviewing programs the NSB concluded that the safety of ANSTO's nuclear plant operations was satisfactory during the year. tabs., ills

  20. Nuclear research in the tertiary sector: the role of AINSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coster, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering is a national organisation with a 45 year track record of collaboration and facilitation of the interaction of universities and one of the major Publicly Funded Research Agencies, ANSTO. AINSE supports research and training in fields that utilise the techniques and instrumentation of nuclear physics. AINSE currently has 37 Australian university members as well as the University of Auckland and the New Zealand Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences. Income is primarily obtained from members in the form of membership fees, ANSTO and a Commonwealth government contribution (also paid through ANSTO). Each university pays in proportion to the benefit received and the aggregate university augmented by equal contributions from ANSTO and the Federal Government (through ANSTO). This is seen as an essential element of this model which allows individual researchers to access the facilities irrespective of any funding from other major funding bodies. The replacement reactor for HIFAR will bring further impetus to AINSE collaborations with ANSTO. The new Tandetron accelerator that will come on-line this year is another collaborative AINSE initiative with ANSTO. Its use as an accelerator mass-spectrometer will provide a state-of-the art facility for dating and general ion-beam analysis experiments. AINSE supports research projects over a very wide range of disciplines, ranging from biomedical science/biotechnology, environmental science, material properties and engineering, archaeology and geosciences to material structure and dynamics. AINSE currently supports over 200 active projects

  1. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation strategy review recommendations. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In May 1994 the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO)'s Board initiated a comprehensive five month review which purpose was to develop a mission for ANSTO and thus define its role both domestically and internationally. The review took into account the needs of ANSTO stakeholders, analysed ANSTO capabilities as well as available international opportunities. Outcomes of the review included an assessment of the priorities and needs of stakeholders, an understanding of how these needs can be meet, and the resulting resource implications. ANSTO's major mission objectives, as defined in the consultants's report should be: to support the Government's nuclear policies (this objective is paramount), support industrial competitiveness and innovation through technology transfer, as well as to maintain a high quality nuclear science base and to enable academic institutions and other science organizations to perform research by providing access to unique facilities and expertise. The consultants also made recommendations on appropriate management arrangements for ANSTO, an implementation plan, progress milestones and operational targets. Details of the relevance-excellence analysis, commercial customer analysis and justification for recommended activity action imperatives are presented in the appendices. 48 figs

  2. Australian Nuclear Association David Culley award for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Full text: This project follows from the school's development of the principles of stress / strain relationships in materials, Bragg's Law, and the wave and penetration properties of neutrons. It is expected to lead to a set of experiments to be carried out at the HIFAR research reactor facilities of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) using neutron diffraction to demonstrate applied stress and residual stress within examples of engineering structural component sections. Prior to the visit of the students to ANSTO, the topic of radiation safety is to be addressed by staff from ANSTO Health and Safety Division. A report will be provided covering the project's results and calculations

  3. Information for nuclear medicine researchers and practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has a major research program in nuclear medicine; this article describes the information support given to the program by the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) Library. The INIS database is a prime indicator of the information held at LHRL Library, however, other databases also cover nuclear medicine. As part of the Australian library system the ANSTO Library's resources are accessed by subscription. The ANSTO Library staff can also search INIS for a fee for external enquiries but the other databases can presently only be searched for LHRL staff and affiliates. Even so, most major library and information services can provide access to these databases

  4. Annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This First Annual Report of the Safety Review Committee describes the Committee's operations for the year ending 30 June 1988. The Committee was established on 27 April 1987 in accordance with Section 26 of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Act. The report provides an overview of ANSTO's Lucas Heights site, its facilities and resources and the potential of its operations for off-site consequences. The safety of the HIFAR and MOATA reactors, the HIFAR refurbishing program, the management of radioactive wastes, and occupational health and safety are discussed as well as the regulatory environment in which ANSTO operates

  5. The 1998 calibration of Australian secondary standards of exposure and absorbed dose at 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntley, R.B.; Van der Gaast, H.

    1998-10-01

    New calibration factors are reported for several of the ionization chambers maintained at the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) as Australian secondary standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose at 60 Co. These calibration factors supplement or replace the calibration factors given in earlier reports. Updated 90 Sr reference source data are given for the ARL chambers, and for two of the ANSTO chambers. These results confirm the stability of the secondary standards. A re-calibration of the ANSTO reference electrometer is reported. This was carried out using an improved method, which is fully described

  6. Annual report 1988-1989. Implementing strategies for change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of the research and commercial activities of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). In line with its strategic plan, ANSTO has been restructured into two major components: Scientific and Commercial areas plus small Corporate and External Affairs groups. Considerable progress was made to reorientate the research and development program to contain a 70/30 percent mixture of tactical applications oriented research and longer term strategic projects, aimed at identifying new, potentially commercial areas. Description of scientific and commercial activities relating to biomedicine and health, isotope technology, nuclear physics applications and environmental science are provided. Services such as engineering, computing, material testing ,information and ANSTO's involvement in regional and international technical co-operation programs are briefly outlined. Details are also given of the ANSTO revenue, expenditure, expenses and capital work. Ills

  7. Research achievements and commercial interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    ANSTO, in partnership with Australian and overseas organisations, continues to make significant contributions to selected fields of research and development. Major revenue for ANSTO is generated through sales of radiopharmaceuticals and radioisotopes for medical, industrial, environmental and research purposes and through neutron irradiation services. Further, ANSTO is actively trying to generate maximum value from its knowledge and know-how through protection and exploitation of its intellectual property. Strategic alliances have been developed to further the commercial utilisation of ANSTO know-how in, for example, delivery systems for tumour treatments, commercial waste remediation and applications of plasma implantation. The 2000-2001 financial year saw the establishment of an ANSTO business unit called Sulfide Solutions targeted at better management of environmental issues arising from mining operations. Overall, ANSTO's capacity to generate value from the application of its knowledge and know-how is being increasingly acknowledged, the organisation attaining credibility as an international leader in the application of nuclear science and technology in targeted areas

  8. Nuclear Safety Bureau. Annual Report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Throughout the year the Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) continued its regulatory approach to monitor and review the safety of nuclear plant operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). This included an ongoing regime of safety audits against the authorised arrangements in ANSTO's safety documentation and the bureau's expectations for nuclear plant drawn from international best practice. The NSB invited the participation of officers of the Australian Radiation Laboratory in these audits. Aspects of ANSTO's operation of nuclear plant reviewed by the NSB included training and accreditation of operations staff, abnormal occurrences, modifications to plant and emergency arrangements and exercises for the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre. Audits of HIFAR were also conducted on operating logs, radiation protection and radioactive discharges. Based on the reviews and audits conducted by the NSB, and ANSTO's actions in responding to the bureau's requests and requirements for actions, the NSB concluded that ANSTO's nuclear plant operated safely throughout the year, and that risks to on-site personnel and the public were maintained at acceptably low levels

  9. Using nuclear technology for peace and environment...with open systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, David.

    1990-01-01

    Prior to the formation of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) in 1987, research was oriented towards the long term. There were no formal project objectives and little project accountability. Under the new organization, all projects are measured on the basis of cost and timeliness, as well as on the achievement of the research objectives. To assist in the implementation of this new objectives ANSTO is introducing a new financial information management system (FIMS). In addition to its main functions, the system will serve as the vehicle for software development in areas such as artifical intelligence and in text facilities for the Ingres database, and will be vital in the development of the Business and Technology Park aimed to provide a means for emerging technology-based Australian industries to have access to the resources of ANSTO. ills

  10. Proposed replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, NSW. Statement of evidence to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    This submission demonstrates the manner in which the replacement research reactor project is to be undertaken in accordance with all relevant Commonwealth requirements and standards. Successive submissions to Government have shown that the construction and operation of the replacement reactor will result in a range of significant benefits to Australia in the areas of health care, the national interest, scientific achievement and in industrial applications. ANSTO is confident that the construction and operation of the replacement research reactor will: meet the identified needs for an ongoing neutron source for Australia into the next century in a cost-effective manner; be effectively managed to ensure that the project is delivered to the agreed schedule and budget; involve an effective community consultation process with ongoing community consultation a feature of ANSTO's approach; will have negligible environmental and public health implications taking account of the environmental management measures and commitments made by ANSTO in the Environmental Impact Statement and the stringent licensing arrangement by ARPANSA

  11. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization. Annual Report 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    The report provides an overview of the outcomes achieved and the current activities of ANSTO related to its core business activities. The core business of ANSTO were identified as follows: international strategic relevance of nuclear science; core facilities operation and development; applications of nuclear science and technology to the understanding of natural processes; treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry and organizational development and support. The report also include specific reporting against those performance indicators that were negotiated with the Government as part of the Triennium Funding Agreement and are regarded as appropriate for science agencies or for ANSTO specifically. Contains a glossary and an detailed index. tables., figures

  12. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization. Annual Report 1995-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The report provides an overview of the outcomes achieved and the current activities of ANSTO related to its core business activities. The core business of ANSTO were identified as follows: international strategic relevance of nuclear science; core facilities operation and development; applications of nuclear science and technology to the understanding of natural processes; treatment and management of man-made and naturally occurring radioactive substances; competitiveness and ecological sustainability of industry and organizational development and support. The report also include specific reporting against those performance indicators that were negotiated with the Government as part of the Triennium Funding Agreement and are regarded as appropriate for science agencies or for ANSTO specifically. Contains a glossary and an detailed index. tables., figures.

  13. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Act 1987 - No 3 of 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this Act (ANSTO Act) is to establish a successor to the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) set up under the Atomic Energy Act 1953. The Act provides for a new Organization with functions which, according to Government policy, better reflect the directions in which Australia's principal research organization should tend in that area, namely realignment of AAEC activities away from work on the nuclear fuel cycle, towards greater emphasis on applications of radioisotopes and radiation in medicine, industry, agriculture, science, commerce, etc. ANSTO is prohibited from undertaking any R and D into the design and production of nuclear weapons or nuclear explosive devices. (NEA) [fr

  14. Spent fuels transportation coming from Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Maritime transportation of spent fuels from Australia to France fits into the contract between COGEMA and ANSTO, signed in 1999. This document proposes nine information cards in this domain: HIFAR a key tool of the nuclear, scientific and technological australian program; a presentation of the ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization; the HIFAR spent fuel management problem; the COGEMA expertise in favor of the research reactor spent fuel; the spent fuel reprocessing at La Hague; the transports management; the transport safety (2 cards); the regulatory framework of the transports. (A.L.B.)

  15. Spent fuels transportation coming from Australia; Transport de combustible use en provenance d'Australie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Maritime transportation of spent fuels from Australia to France fits into the contract between COGEMA and ANSTO, signed in 1999. This document proposes nine information cards in this domain: HIFAR a key tool of the nuclear, scientific and technological australian program; a presentation of the ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization; the HIFAR spent fuel management problem; the COGEMA expertise in favor of the research reactor spent fuel; the spent fuel reprocessing at La Hague; the transports management; the transport safety (2 cards); the regulatory framework of the transports. (A.L.B.)

  16. Inter-laboratory project q calibration of SANS instruments using silver behenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, Abarrul; Gunawan; Edy Giri, Putra; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Knott, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The inter-laboratory project for q-calibration of SANS (small angle neutron scattering) using silver behenate was carried out among Indonesia National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). The standard sample of silver behenate, [CH 3 (CH 2 ) 20 COOAg](AgBE), has been assessed as an international standard for the calibration of both x-ray and neutron scattering instruments. The results indicate excellent agreement for q calibration obtained among the three laboratories, BATAN, JAERI and ANSTO. (Y. Kazumata)

  17. From Rum Jungle to Wismut - Reducing the environmental impact of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuk, W.M.; Jeffree, R.A.; Levins, D.M.; Lowson, R.T.; Ritchie, A.I.M.

    1994-01-01

    Australia has a long history of uranium mining. In the early days, little attention was given to environmental matters and considerable pollution occurred. ANSTO has been involved in rehabilitation of a number of the early uranium mining sites, from Rum Jungle in Australia's Northern Territory to Wismut in Germany, and is working with current producers to minimise the environmental impact of their operations. ANSTO's expertise in amelioration of acid mine drainage, radon measurements and control, treatment of mill wastes, management of tailings, monitoring of seepage plumes, mathematical modelling of pollutant transport and biological impacts in a tropical environment are summarized. 17 refs., 3 figs

  18. Environmental design of a uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, C.H.; Ring, R.J.; McNaughton, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    In the frame work of the Cleaner Technology Project for Uranium Mining and Milling, Australian Nuclear and Technology Organization (ANSTO), Environment Division of ANSTO has carried out a programme of research which seeks to identify, investigate and develop cleaner technologies that have the potential to minimize the environmental impact of uranium mining and milling. This paper describes three design options of a new uranium mill that can meet environmental, technical and economical objectives. The feasibility of such an approach was examined in the laboratory and in a pilot plant study. (author)

  19. The preparation of radioactive sources with radioactivities of less than 110 kilobecquerels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyllie, H.A.

    1989-03-01

    A description is given of the various radioactive sources prepared in the ANSTO Radioisotope Standards Laboratory and the procedures associated with their preparation. ANSTO is authorised by CSIRO to maintain the Commonwealth standard of activity of radionuclides. Counting sources are required for the standardisation of solutions of radionuclides. Calibration sources are required for equipment used to detect radioactivity, such as gamma-ray spectrometers, and can be supplied to clients in other organisations. The maximum radioactivity supplied is 110 kBq. 7 refs., 65 figs

  20. Applications of neutron powder diffraction in materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the applications of neutron powder diffraction in materials science. The technique is introduced with particular attention to comparison with the X-ray powder diffraction technique to which it is complementary. The diffractometers and special environment ancillaries operating around the HIFAR research reactor at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) are described. Applications of the technique which the advantage of the unique properties of thermal neutrons have been selected from recent materials studies undertaken at ANSTO

  1. Australia's new nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.

    2007-01-01

    On 19 and 20 April 2007, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) celebrated the recent commissioning of its new, world-class, OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater) research reactor at the Lucas Heights. On the 19th, scientists, business leaders and academics were introduced to the reactor and its technical capacity for the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals, its material science applications, its environmental services and its neutron scattering facilities for business applications. The formal OPAL opening function took place that evening and, on the 20th, Prime Minister John Howard visited ANSTO to be briefed about OPAL and to be shown the work being carried out at Lucas Heights

  2. Evolution of materials research within the AINSE portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jostsons, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The main materials research interactions between ANSTO/AAEC and the AINSE member universities are reviewed and linked to the main thrust of contemporary ANSTO/AAEC programs. The AINSE portfolio encompasses the previous AAEC research contracts, which represent an earlier example of public sector outsourcing, until re-discovered during the present decade, as well as AINSE studentships and Research and Training Projects. Collectively these mechanisms did much to foster the maintenance of effective materials research teams in Australian universities. Selective examples will illustrate the success of the AINSE family in training to help provide engineers and scientists of high ability for the future

  3. Program of research 1988-89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    From 1 July 1988, the research activities of ANSTO have reorganised into five programs: advanced materials; applications of nuclear physics; environmental science; applications of radioisotopes and radiation; biomedicine and health. This structure not only groups the main research activities but also identifies the underpinning of ANSTO's commercial activities. This document describes the projects to be undertaken in the 1988-89 financial year. Each project in a particular program area is defined in terms of background, objective, recent work and achievements, work planned, resources and the project manager is identified. Research is also undertaken in areas of the operational activities of the organisation and these also are detailed

  4. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  5. Changes in the excitations related to the superconducting transition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    superconducting transition in V3Si. M YETHIRAJ. Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234, Australia. E-mail: mohana.yethiraj@gmail.com. Abstract. In earlier studies of phonons in V3Si, a gradual softening of the (h h 0) branch was observed and attributed to the martensitic transition in this compound, which pre-.

  6. Animals in nuclear research: where ethics and expediency meet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, P.J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has a direct involvement in nuclear medicine, microbiological and environmental studies which utilise animals in the research work. The opposition to experiments on animals is briefly discussed. The Australia codes of practice for the care and use of animals for experimental purposes are outlined

  7. Proposed replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, NSW. Statement of evidence to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    This submission demonstrates the manner in which the replacement research reactor project is to be undertaken in accordance with all relevant Commonwealth requirements and standards. Successive submissions to Government have shown that the construction and operation of the replacement reactor will result in a range of significant benefits to Australia in the areas of health care, the national interest, scientific achievement and in industrial applications. ANSTO is confident that the construction and operation of the replacement research reactor will: meet the identified needs for an ongoing neutron source for Australia into the next century in a cost-effective manner; be effectively managed to ensure that the project is delivered to the agreed schedule and budget; involve an effective community consultation process with ongoing community consultation a feature of ANSTO`s approach; will have negligible environmental and public health implications taking account of the environmental management measures and commitments made by ANSTO in the Environmental Impact Statement and the stringent licensing arrangement by ARPANSA 24 refs., 8 tabs., 5 figs.

  8. The use of radioisotopes in human experiments: comments in response to recent media articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.E.

    1994-04-01

    Recent newspaper articles question the propriety and ethical foundation of early experimental programs in which radioisotopes were administered to human subjects. This paper describes the relevant activities of ANSTO's predecessor, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, and provides an historical background to these and subsequent events

  9. New radioactive tracers can help find cause of jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrard, G.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive tracers for the investigation of a condition known as persistent jaundice of the newborn, have been designed, prepared and tested at ANSTO. The tracers are chemical compounds of the radioactive elements gallium-67 and indium-111. They given lower radiation doses than the conventional radioactive tracer, iodine-131, used in these studies

  10. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  11. Regional cooperation to reduce the safety and security risks of Orphan radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Geoffrey; Hacker, Celia; Murray, Allan; Romallosa, Kristine; Caseria, Estrella; Africa del Castillo, Lorena

    2008-01-01

    ANSTO's Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) Project, in cooperation with the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), has initiated a program to reduce the safety and security risks of orphan radioactive sources in the Philippines. Collaborative work commenced in February 2006 during the Regional Orphan Source Search and Methods Workshop, co-hosted by ANSTO and the US National Nuclear Security Administration. Further professional development activities have occurred following requests by PNRI to ANSTO to support improvements in PNRI's capability and training programs to use a range of radiation survey equipment and on the planning and methods for conducting orphan source searches. The activities, methods and outcomes of the PNRI-ANSTO cooperative program are described, including: i.) Delivering a training workshop which incorporates use of source search and nuclide identification equipment and search methodology; and train-the-trainer techniques for effective development and delivery of custom designed training in the Philippines; ii.) Support and peer review of course work on Orphan Source Search Equipment and Methodology developed by PNRI Fellows; iii.) Supporting the delivery of the inaugural National Training Workshop on Orphan Source Search hosted by PNRI in the Philippines; iv.) Partnering in searching for orphan sources in Luzon, Philippines, in May 2007. The methods employed during these international cooperation activities are establishing a new model of regional engagement that emphasises sustainability of outcomes for safety and security of radioactive sources. (author)

  12. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (Transitional Provisions) Act 1987 - No 4 of 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Act implements certain transitional provisions consequent to the enactment of the ANSTO Act 1987. The legislation provides for the continuation of the body corporate from its present form as the Australian Atomic Energy Commission to the new body corporate, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization. (NEA) [fr

  13. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J. B.; Baldock, C.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) defines reference air kerma rate as the air kerma rate at a reference distance of one metre, after correction for air attenuation and scattering. ANSTO maintains a High-Dose-Rate (HDR) 1000 Plus ionisation chamber for the reference air kerma rate measurement of 125 I brachytherapy seeds, Amersham Model 6711. Direct measurement traceability was established to the primary standard maintained by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The calibrated chamber thus provides a measurement from which similar chambers in hospitals may be calibrated. An intercomparison was conducted between ANSTO and a number of brachytherapy centres around Australia. The reference air kerma rate of a set of loose 6711 seeds was measured using ANSTO's HDR chamber. Single seeds were distributed to several centres for the same measurement with the centre's instrumentation. Results are defined by the ratio of the reference air kerma rate measured by ANSTO to the reference air kerma rate measured at the centre. This paper reports on the results of this intercomparison

  14. AINSE-More than 20 years of ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.

    1998-01-01

    AINSE has a strong tradition in people, personalities, scientific training and research spanning over 40 years. From the late 1960's it operated a small but efficient Accelerator Group, attached to the ANSTO Physics Division. This Group assisted in the national promotion of ANSTO's accelerator based capabilities throughout all Australian Universities. It was mainly associated with research related to the use of the 3 MV positive ion Van de Graaff accelerator, the 1.3 MV Van de Graaff electron accelerator and a 3 ns pulsed electron Febetron, together with a range of γ irradiation facilities. The AINSE researchers, at ANSTO, have been involved in 20 to 30 different projects annually since 1976 related to accelerator based IBA methods. Some of these lasted only 12 months, many longer, some have been successfully producing for more than a decade. This talk will attempt to describe the range, depth and scope of AINSE's unique involvement in IBA research with its subsequent benefits to ANSTO and Australian research generally

  15. Report on polarised and inelastic cold neutron scattering at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The ANSTO's Instrument Workshop on Polarised and Inelastic Cold Neutron Scattering, was held at Lucas Heights on 27-28 January. 30 participants attended, from 6 Australian Universities, 3 ANSTO Divisions, and 5 overseas countries in Asia, Europe and North America. All participants had the opportunity to give their vision for work in 2005 and beyond. The recommendation was that ANSTO proceed with a monochromator/ shield/ polariser system and appropriate dance floor on a cold guide, in such a way that alternative secondary spectrometers (3-axis, LONGPOL-type, reflectometry) can be installed. If the National Science Council of Taiwan proceeds with its cold 3-axis project, ANSTO should then implement the LONGPOL / polarised-beam reflectometry option. If not, ANSTO should implement the cold 3-axis spectrometer. The workshop came to the following additional conclusions: There was a strong sense that any 3-axis spectrometer should have a multi-analyser/multidetector combination, or at least an upgrade path to this. At this stage, there is no case for 2 cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometers at the RRR. The desired Q-range is 0.02-5 Angstroms -1 ; with an energy transfer range of 20 μeV - 15 meV. The instrument is likely to run unpolarised for 2/3 of the time and polarised for the remainder, and the instrument(s) should be designed to allow easy changeover between polarised and unpolarised operation. We expect roughly equal interest/demand in studying single crystals, powders, surfaces/interfaces and naturally disordered systems. There was a strong sense that the facility should eventually have a cold-neutron time-of-flight spectrometer of the IN5 or IN6 type, with a polarised incident beam option, and designed in such a way that polarisation analysis could be implemented if inexpensive large-area analysers become available. This should be a high priority for the next wave of instruments that ANSTO plans to build after 2005

  16. Kookaburra - the ultra-small-angle neutron scattering instrument at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Full text: An ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument is to be built at ANSTO's new research reactor OPAL. This instrument will extend the range of experimentally measurable length scales currently accessible through the already existing SANS instrument Quokka by two orders of magnitude into the micrometre regime. Therefore, the combined USANS/SANS utilisation at ANSTO will allow the characterisation of microstructure over 4 orders of magnitude in size (1 nm to 10μm). Kookaburra is to be installed at the cold-neutron guide CG 3 , and will use the classical Bonse-Hart method. The instrument shall individually operate at two different wavelengths to optimally accommodate weakly and strongly scattering samples at one sample position. This contribution will discuss the layout and conceptual design of Kookaburra, and its expected performance is compared to that of the reactor-based USANS instrument BT-5 at NIST.

  17. Reactor casts light on nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, C.

    2002-01-01

    Chris Garvey explains how the replacement research reactor will help scientists to design better materials by understanding how macromolecules behave. Australia is making a substantial financial commitment to providing scientists with facilities to scatter neutrons. Neutron scattering is one of the core areas of science in which the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) invests its resources. His particular interest is to find out the way nature uses macromolecules, and how the shape and interaction of macromolecules with other molecules change their function. Biologists call aggregates of macromolecules, 'nanostructures'. Neutron probes are used at ANSTO for studying nanostructures, and in particular the organisation of the protein that is used to transport oxygen in the blood. Small angle neutron scattering was also allowed to understand at microscopic level, how humidity changes the mechanical properties of fibres

  18. The importance of project networking for the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitbourn, G.

    2003-01-01

    When the HIFAR research reactor was commissioned in 1958 it was both constructed and regulated by the then Australian Atomic Energy Commission. The situation now is much more complicated, with an independent regulator, The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) and oversight by national security agencies and the Australian Safeguards and Non proliferation Organisation (ASNO). In July 2000 ANSTO contracted INVAP SE a suitably qualified and experienced nuclear organisation based in Argentina to provide the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR). INVAP subcontracted an Australian entity, a joint venture between John Holland and Evans Deakin Industries (JHEDI) to provide resources in Australia. There is an international network of over 100 subcontractors providing services, products and materials to INVAP and JHEDI and a significant number of contractors providing project support services to ANSTO. The interaction of all these entities to provide the RRR is a significant networking challenge, involving a complex network of legal, contractual and functional relationships and communication processes

  19. The importance of HIFAR to nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, N.R.

    1997-01-01

    Since its official opening on 26 January 1960, the HIFAR research reactor operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) at Lucas Heights near Sydney has been used to support an expanding nuclear medicine market. HIFAR has characteristics which make it very suitable for this role and the effect has been to make ANSTO the dominant supplier of reactor-based radiopharmaceuticals in Australia and a significant exporter. While HIFAR has capacity to support limited increased production, its future requires government decisions. The author concluded that the absence of an operational research reactor in Australia and the lack of another local source of neutrons could directly affect the practice of nuclear medicine in the country and the level of presently increasing exports

  20. In situ neutron diffraction studies of a commercial, soft lead zirconate titanate ceramic: Response to electric fields and mechanical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanick, Abhijit [University of Florida; Prewitt, Anderson [University of Florida; Cottrell, Michelle [University of Florida; Lee, Wayne [ITT Corporation Acoustic Sensors; Studer, Andrew J. [Bragg Institute, ANSTO; An, Ke [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Jones, Jacob [University of Florida

    2010-01-01

    Structural changes in commercial lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics (EC-65) under the application of electric fields and mechanical stress were measured using neutron diffraction instruments at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The structural changes during electric-field application were measured on the WOMBAT beamline at ANSTO and include non-180{sup o} domain switching, lattice strains and field-induced phase transformations. Using time-resolved data acquisition capabilities, lattice strains were measured under cyclic electric fields at times as short as 30 {mu}s. Structural changes including the (002) and (200) lattice strains and non-180{sup o} domain switching were measured during uniaxial mechanical compression on the NRSF2 instrument at ORNL. Contraction of the crystallographic polarization axis, (002), and reorientation of non-180{sup o} domains occur at lowest stresses, followed by (200) elastic strains at higher stresses.

  1. Invited Article: Polarization ``Down Under'': The polarized time-of-flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saerbeck, T.; Klose, F.; Le Brun, A. P.; Füzi, J.; Brule, A.; Nelson, A.; Holt, S. A.; James, M.

    2012-08-01

    This review presents the implementation and full characterization of the polarization equipment of the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The functionality and efficiency of individual components are evaluated and found to maintain a high neutron beam polarization with a maximum of 99.3% through polarizing Fe/Si supermirrors. Neutron spin-flippers with efficiencies of 99.7% give full control over the incident and scattered neutron spin direction over the whole wavelength spectrum available in the instrument. The first scientific experiments illustrate data correction mechanisms for finite polarizations and reveal an extraordinarily high reproducibility for measuring magnetic thin film samples. The setup is now fully commissioned and available for users through the neutron beam proposal system of the Bragg Institute at ANSTO.

  2. Program of research - 1990-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1990-1991 Program of Research reflects the fundamental changes within the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) over the past three years as it has oriented itself towards being a more commercially driven organization, an organization responding to market demands and pressures. From July 1, 1990 several key projects have been linked together in the new Industrial Technology Program. The Program encompasses projects that have real potential to earn revenue for ANSTO and make measurable improvements in efficiency and productivity for Australian companies. The Isotope Technology project is researching and transferring to industry radioisotope technology for tracing the effectiveness of plant processes, the movement of materials within blast furnaces and leakages and outages in plant pipework. The two important newcomers are the Quality Technology Centre and the Safety and Reliability group. Details about project leaders, project titles and objectives are provided. ills

  3. AINSE - The years between 1988 and 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammon, R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This paper traces the history of AINSE between the years 1988 and 1998. It was a time of great change for AINSE. At the beginning of this period the Government implemented major structural reforms of the higher education system and new mechanisms for research infrastructure support followed a year later. This culminated in 1993 with a major restructuring of AINSE which had continued with little change since its inception in 1958. This was followed in 1994 with a comprehensive review and reorganisation of ANSTO, which also had a significant effect on AINSE. These events will be described and will include some of AINSE, considerable achievements and successes which saw the organisation, in partnership with ANSTO, in a strong position at the end of this ten year period

  4. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor. Supplement to Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a replacement research reactor at Lucas Heights, was available for public examination and comment for some three months during 1998. A Supplement to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Draft EIS) has been completed and was lodged with Environment Australia on 18 January 1999. The Supplement is an important step in the overall environmental assessment process. It reviews submissions received and provides the proponent`s response to issues raised in the public review period. General issues extracted from submissions and addressed in the Supplement include concern over liability issues, Chernobyl type accidents, the ozone layer and health issues. Further studies, relating to issues raised in the public submission process, were undertaken for the Supplementary EIS. These studies confirm, in ANSTO`s view, the findings of the Draft EIS and hence the findings of the Final EIS are unchanged from the Draft EIS

  5. In-situ cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl studies in the earth sciences at the ANTARES AMS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Elliott, G.; Child, D.; Misfud, C.

    1998-01-01

    In parallel with a successful 14 C AMS program, routine measurements of 10 Be (T 1/2 = 1.5 Ma), 26 Al (0.7Ma) and 36 Cl (0.3Ma) have been demonstrated at the ANTARES AMS facility. With this capability, ANSTO is coordinating and funding a comprehensive program in the application of in-situ cosmogenic radioisotopes for Southern Hemisphere Quaternary climate change. The sub-projects within the program are based on strong university collaboration in the Earth Sciences and with the Australian Antarctic Division. A fully equipped geochemistry laboratory for chemically processing rock samples for AMS studies has been completed and is fully operational. In addition a variety of analytical techniques such as NAA, ICP-MS, XRF, XRD, etc are available through the Environment Division at ANSTO. A brief description of the research projects in glacial chronology and those related to landscape geomorphology is given

  6. Neutron diffraction residual strain / stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Residual stresses affect mechancial properties of materials and prodcuts, it is essential to estimate them practically in order to esatblish acceptable limits. Knowledge of the development of residual stresses in components at the various production stages- extrusion, rolling, machining, welding and heat treating-can be used to imporve product reliability and performance. This short article gives an example relevant to the power industry using ANSTO's 'Kowari' neutron strain scanner.

  7. Nuclear materials management procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veevers, K.; Silver, J.M.; Quealy, K.J.; Steege, E. van der.

    1987-10-01

    This manual describes the procedures for the management of nuclear materials and associated materials at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories. The procedures are designed to comply with Australia's nuclear non-proliferation obligations to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), bilateral agreements with other countries and ANSTO's responsibilities under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act, 1987. The manual replaces those issued by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission in 1959, 1960 and 1969

  8. Annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    For this thirtieth year of operation, the Institute's twenty constituent organisations were eighteen Australian universities, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). Through 1987-88, AINSE's operations supported research and training in the nuclear field, assisted the application of nuclear techniques in science, engineering and industrial technology, and assisted the universities and similar organisations in using the reactors, accelerators and other special facilities within the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on vacuum arc ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.

    1996-08-01

    Topics included in the papers presented at this conference are: vacuum arc ion source development at GSI (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Germany), ITEP (Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Russia), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization); triggers for vacuum arc sources; plasma distribution of cathodic arc deposition system; high ion charge states in vacuum arc ion sources; and gas and metal ion sources. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  10. Accelerator microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Particle accelerators have been developed more than sixty years ago to investigate nuclear and atomic phenomena. A major shift toward applications of accelerators in the study of materials structure and composition in inter-disciplinary projects has been witnessed in the last two decades. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has developed advanced research programs based on the use of particle and photon beams. Atmospheric pollution problems are investigated at the 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator using ion beam analysis techniques to detect toxic elements in aerosol particles. High temperature superconductor and semiconductor materials are characterised using the recoil of iodine and other heavy ions produced at ANTARES, the 10-MV Tandem accelerator. A heavy-ion microprobe is presently being developed at ANTARES to map elemental concentrations of specific elements with micro-size resolution. An Accelerator mass Spectrometry (AMS) system has been developed at ANSTO for the ultra-sensitive detection of Carbon-14, Iodine-129 and other long-lived radioisotopes. This AMS spectrometer is a key instrument for climate change studies and international safeguards. ANSTO is also managing the Australian Synchrotron Research program based on facilities developed at the Photon Factory (Japan) and at the Advanced Photon Source (USA). Advanced projects in biology, materials chemistry, structural condensed matter and other disciplines are being promoted by a consortium involving Australian universities and research institutions. This paper will review recent advances in the use of particle accelerators, with a particular emphasis on applications developed at ANSTO and related to problems of international concern, such as global environmental change, public health and nuclear proliferation

  11. Development of the Falea Polymetallic Uranium Project, Mali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, Bob; Freeman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Falea project basics: • Project now owned by Denison Mines; • ANSTO Minerals working with owner and their consultant, DRA; • Located in south western Mali, West Africa, near the intersection of the Senegal and Guinea borders; • Established mining region (mainly gold); • Location on plateau favourable for underground operation; • Significant uranium, silver and copper mineralisation - different to other U deposits; • Excellent metallurical outcomes to date

  12. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The percentage of electricity generated by nuclear energy in each of the 26 countries that operated nuclear power plants in 1987 is given. The current policy and programs of some of these countries is described. News concerning uranium mining, enrichment, reprocessing and waste management is also included. Data in the form of a generalized status summary for all power reactors (> 30 MWEN) prepared from the nuclear power reactor data files of ANSTO is shown

  13. Nuclear wastes and its entry into the country through an unconstitutional contractual association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leserre Valsesia, Guillermo E.

    2001-01-01

    The author analyzes, vis a vis the art. 41 of the Argentine Constitution and the national law 25.108 on radioactive wastes, the contractual and commercial relation between INVAP S.E of Argentina and ANSTO of Australia for the construction of a research reactor. He concludes that the possibility of the treatment of the spent fuels in Argentina for final disposal in Australia, may violate the Argentine regulations and proposes public hearings to debate the question

  14. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    1999-01-01

    As a consequences of the government decision in September 1997. ANSTO established a replacement research reactor project to manage the procurement of the replacement reactor through the necessary approval, tendering and contract management stages This paper provides an update of the status of the project including the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. Prequalification and Public Works Committee processes. The aims of the project, management organisation, reactor type and expected capabilities are also described

  15. Application of radiotracer technology to the study of coastal processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airey, P.; Szymczak, R.; Zaw, M.; Tu, J.; Kluss, T.; Barry, J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress at ANSTO in the applications of radiotracer techniques to the study of coastal processes is reviewed. Tracers are used in detailed studies of specific components of complex environmental systems and are applied to the evaluation and extension of numerical models. Examples include studies of the aggregation of sewage particles following release from ocean outfalls. The use of tracers to study the impact of storm events on bedload transport at depth has also been demonstrated

  16. Effect of crystal shape on neutron rocking curves of perfect single crystals designed for ultra-small-angle scattering experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, A.K.; Rehm, C.

    2014-01-01

    The present study has been conducted in the framework of the channel-cut crystal design for the Kookaburra ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument to be installed at the OPAL reactor of ANSTO. This facility is based on the classical Bonse-Hart method that uses two multiple-reflection crystal systems. The dynamical theory of diffraction by perfect crystals distinguishes two cases: the Darwin case applying to infinitely thick crystals and the Ewald solution for very small absorp...

  17. The fourth conference on nuclear science and engineering in Australia, 2001. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This conference, with the theme 'New Nuclear Century' consists of invited papers supported by contributed posters on the following topics: nuclear research and ANSTO's Replacement Research Reactor; Australian uranium resources; radioactive waste management; low-level radiation, radiation protection, nuclear safety, the environment and sustainable development; application of nuclear energy in Nuclear Medicine, non-destructive testing; nuclear science and technology for the future and nuclear education

  18. Radioisotope tracers in industrial flow studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easey, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of radioisotope tracer work carried out by ANSTO has involved most sectors of Australian industry including iron and steel coal, chemical, petrochemical, natural gas, metallurgical, mineral, power generation, liquified air plant, as well as port authorities, water and sewerage instrumentalities, and environmental agencies. A major class of such studies concerns itself with flow and wear studies involving industrial equipment. Some examples are discussed which illustrate the utility of radioisotope tracer techniques in these applications

  19. Estimates of radioxenon released from Southern Hemisphere medical isotope production facilities using measured air concentrations and atmospheric transport modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslinger, Paul W; Friese, Judah I; Lowrey, Justin D; McIntyre, Justin I; Miley, Harry S; Schrom, Brian T

    2014-09-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and (133)Xe data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of (133)Xe from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8 × 10(14) Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 2.2 × 10(16) to 2.4 × 10(16) Bq, estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 9.2 × 10(13) to 3.7 × 10(14) Bq and estimates for the facility in Argentina range from 4.5 × 10(12) to 9.5 × 10(12) Bq. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The application of nuclear science technology to understanding and solving environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuk, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has for many years been involved in applying nuclear science-based and related technologies to the understanding of environmental processes and to the development and implementation of practical and effective solutions to site specific problems, for a broad spectrum of industry, government regulatory agencies, and other organisations in Australia, Europe, North and South America and South East Asia. ANSTO's environmental science program arose out of the need for research to predict, measure, evaluate and monitor the environmental impacts associated with : uranium mining and processing in Australia; the operation of the research reactor at Lucas Heights; and the safe treatment and disposal of radioactive and conventional wastes associated with these activities. The expertise developed in these activities, has found application to a much broader range of environmental concerns. This paper will present an overview of ANSTO's application of nuclear science-based techniques to, inter alia: coastal and marine studies; minesite rehabilitation; transport and geochemical modelling of radionuclides, heavy metals and organic chemicals in the geosphere; the application of naturally-occurring radionuclides and radioactive tracers to corrosion and sedimentation studies in the coastal environment; dating sediments, fish corals and archaeological samples; the understanding of the kinetics and the physiological responses of aquatic organisms to radionuclides and metals in the environment: and the use of aquatic organism as archival and 'realtime' monitors of pollutants

  1. Radionuclide separations in the nuclear fuel cycle development and application of micro and meso porous inorganic ion-exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, C.S.; Luca, V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: From the mining of uranium-containing ores to the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, separations technologies play a crucial role in determining the efficiency and viability of the nuclear fuel cycle. With respect to proposed Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles (ANFC), the integral role of separations is no different with solvent extraction and pyroelectrometalurgical processing dominating efforts to develop a sustainable and publicly acceptable roadmap for nuclear power in the next 100 years. An often forgotten or overlooked separation technology is ion-exchange, more specifically, inorganic ion-exchangers. This is despite the fact that these materials offer the potential advantages of process simplicity; exceptional selectivity against high background concentrations of competing ions; and the possibility of a simple immobilization route for the separated radionculides. ANSTO's principal interest in inorganic ion-exchange materials in recent years has been the development of an inorganic ion-exchanger for the pretreatment of acidic legacy 9 Mo production waste to simultaneously remove radiogenic cesium and strontium. Radiogenic cesium and strontium comprise the majority of activity in such waste and may offer increased ease in the downstream processing to immobilise this waste in a Synroc wasteform. With the reliance on separations technologies in all current ANFC concepts, and the recent admission of ANSTO to the European Commissions EUROPART project, the development of new inorganic ion-exchangers has also expanded within our group. This presentation will provide a background of the fundamentals of inorganic and composite inorganic-organic ion-exchange materials followed by specific discussion of some selected inorganic and composite ion-exchange materials being developed and studied at ANSTO. The detailed structural and ion-exchange chemistry of these materials will be discussed and note made of how such materials could benefit any of the

  2. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, 2000-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Some scientific achievements and advisory activities of Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), during the year are highlighted, including: development of a standardised assessment protocol for estimating the levels of radiofrequency radiation as a function of distance from mobile phone base stations; advice to Australian Customs on high energy X-ray beam facilities; advice on the health risks of naturally occurring radioactivity in relation to emissions from the BHP Sinter Plant in Wollongong; participation in the National Repository Advisory Committee and National Store Advisory Committee dealing with radioactive waste management for Australia; several publications of work associated with assessment of exposures to ultraviolet radiation. Three personal UV dosimetry projects have been organised or commenced in collaboration with health-related organisations. The licensing of the existing nuclear installations at ANSTO was a major activity during the year. There were some difficulties in obtaining and making public sufficient information to allow adequate public comment on the proposals. In the case of the HIFAR facility, the ARPANSA licence was replacing a regulatory system administered by the former Nuclear Safety Bureau, but it was still a challenge to demonstrate through a safety evaluation report that it met the statutory conditions required for issuing a licence under the ARPANS Act and ARPANS Regulations. For the other nuclear facilities, they were being brought within a formal regulatory process for the first time. The licences now issued include additional conditions requiring the licence holder to provide improved documentation and justification of safety practices. One of the roles inherited by ARPANSA from the Nuclear Safety Bureau is the monitoring of the operations of the ANSTO nuclear plant. From its monitoring over the year, ARPANSA has concluded that overall ANSTO's nuclear plant continued to be operated safely during

  3. Ion beam analysis techniques applied to large scale pollution studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.D.; Bailey, G.; Martin, J.; Garton, D.; Noorman, H.; Stelcer, E.; Johnson, P. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques are ideally suited to analyse the thousands of filter papers a year that may originate from a large scale aerosol sampling network. They are fast multi-elemental and, for the most part, non-destructive so other analytical methods such as neutron activation and ion chromatography can be performed afterwards. ANSTO in collaboration with the NSW EPA, Pacific Power and the Universities of NSW and Macquarie has established a large area fine aerosol sampling network covering nearly 80,000 square kilometres of NSW with 25 fine particle samplers. This network known as ASP was funded by the Energy Research and Development Corporation (ERDC) and commenced sampling on 1 July 1991. The cyclone sampler at each site has a 2.5 {mu}m particle diameter cut off and runs for 24 hours every Sunday and Wednesday using one Gillman 25mm diameter stretched Teflon filter for each day. These filters are ideal targets for ion beam analysis work. Currently ANSTO receives 300 filters per month from this network for analysis using its accelerator based ion beam techniques on the 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. One week a month of accelerator time is dedicated to this analysis. Four simultaneous accelerator based IBA techniques are used at ANSTO, to analyse for the following 24 elements: H, C, N, O, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn, Br and Pb. The IBA techniques were proved invaluable in identifying sources of fine particles and their spatial and seasonal variations accross the large area sampled by the ASP network. 3 figs.

  4. A simple method for the verification of clearance levels for non-radioactive solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, B.

    1997-01-01

    ANSTO's radiopharmaceutical production laboratories generate 25 m 3 of solid waste per month. Most of this waste is not radioactive. Up until recently the non-radioactive waste was cleared from the controlled area and stored for 10 halflives prior to disposal as normal solid refuse. To eliminate the storage and ''double handling'' of the large quantities of non-radioactive waste a simple clearance method was devised to allow direct disposal. This paper describes how clearance levels were determined. Here the term ''clearance level'' is used as a general term for the release of material regardless of whether it was previously subject to regulatory control. This contrasts with the IAEA definition of a clearance level and highlights a potential problem with the implementation of exemption levels to keep material out of regulatory control and the use of clearance levels to allow removal of materials from regulatory control. Several common hand held contamination monitors were tested to determine their limits of detection and ability to meet these clearance levels. The clearance method includes waste segregation and size limitation features to ensure the waste is monitored in a consistent manner, compatible with the limits of detection. The clearance levels achieved were subsequently found to be compatible with some of the unconditional clearance levels in IAEA-TECDOC-855 and the measurement method also meets the required features of that document. The ANSTO non-radioactive waste clearance system has been in operation for more than 12 months and has proved simple and effective to operate. Approximately 12m 3 of the solid waste is now been treated directly as normal solid refuse. This paper describes the ANSTO clearance system, the contamination monitor tests and details practical problems associated with the direct monitoring of solid waste, including averaging of the activity in the package. The paper also briefly highlights the potential problem with the use of

  5. Oxide research using neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.A.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Oxide materials form a large group of technologically and scientifically important materials, and research on these types of materials is on the forefront of scientific research. The important properties of these materials, such as the electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties, are related to the structure and chemical composition of those materials. As the structure is so important in the understanding of the properties, neutron scattering is playing a key role due to its advantages in characterising the role of the oxygen. We present here some examples of the latest oxide structures studied by neutron powder diffraction at ANSTO

  6. Small-Angle neutron scattering at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument is being designed as part of the initial instrument suite for the 20 MW Australian Replacement Research Reactor. The new instrument, receiving neutrons from a large liquid-D2 cold source, will be in the spirit of the world's best facilities and will greatly build upon ANSTO's existing expertise and facilities. Scheduled for completion in January 2006, it will provide Australian and international researchers with opportunities to access state-of-the-art SANS instrumentation. The conceptual details of the new SANS will be presented

  7. Applications of ion beam analysis workshop. Workshop handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    A workshop on applications of ion beam analysis was held at ANSTO, immediate prior to the IBMM-95 Conference in Canberra. It aims was to review developments and current status on use of ion beams for analysis, emphasizing the following aspects: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; material sciences, geological, life sciences, environmental and industrial applications; computing codes for use in accelerator research; high energy heavy ion scattering and recoil; recent technological development using ion beams. The handbook contains the workshop`s program, 29 abstracts and a list of participants.

  8. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor: Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Vol. 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The appendices contains additional relevant information on: Environment Australia EIS Guidelines, composition of the Study Team, Consultation Activities and Resuits, Relevant Legislation and Regulatory Requirements, Exampies of Multi-Purpose Research Reactors, Impacts of Radioactive Emissions and Wastes Generated at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, Technical Analysis of the Reference Accident, Flora and Fauna Species Lists, Summary of Environmental Commitments and an Outline of the Construction Environmental Management Plan Construction Environmental Management Plan figs., ills., refs. Prepared for Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)

  9. Charting the nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Agitation in the area of the Australian present research reactor, near Sydney is aimed against reactors, old and new. The Australian Government is trying to take the heat out of the debate by establishing a Research Reactor Review. The term of reference require the review to say if a new reactor is needed and if so where. The issues is become adversial with the local Sutherland shire council opposing the new reactor. The executive director of ANSTO explains the reasons and the advantages of replacing the Hifar reactor, which is 34 years old. The new reactor design, a swimming pool type, would permit grater productivity and even higher level of safety

  10. SIMS applications workshop. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The first ANSTO/AINSE SIMS Workshop drew together a mixture of Surface Analysis experts and Surface Analysis users with the concept that SIMS analysis has to be enfolded within the spectrum of surface analysis techniques and that the user should select the technique most applicable to the problem. With this concept in mind the program was structured as sessions on SIMS Facilities; Applications to Mineral Surfaces; Applications to Biological Systems, Applications to Surfaces as Semi- conductors, Catalysts and Surface Coatings; and Applications to Ceramics

  11. Proceedings of the 4th Australian experimental high energy physics meeting and workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The 4th Annual Meeting of the Australian High Energy Physics Consortium was held at ANSTO on the 11th and 12th of December, with a workshop on software development and applications held at the University f Sydney on the 13th. A wide range of talks on the progress of NOMAD and ATLAS experiments and related research were presented, plus talks on heavy ion physics which is also carried out in collaboration with CERN. Extended abstracts of the presentations are included in this volume

  12. Heterogeneous Catalysis under pressure - In-situ neutron diffraction under industrial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandemir, Timur; Girgsdies, Frank; Kasatkin, Igor; Kunkes, Edward; Schlögl, Robert; Behrens, Malte; Liss, Klaus-Dieter; Peterson, Vanessa K

    2012-01-01

    The present work describes the application of a tubular reactor that allows in-situ neutron diffraction on working catalysts at high pressures. The designed reactor enables the application to a sample of industrially-relevant reaction conditions, i.e., in a temperature range up to 330° C and 60 bar pressure, coupled with online gas-analysis. Application of the cell is demonstrated by ammonia synthesis over a commercial catalyst with diffraction data obtained from the high-resolution powder diffractometer, Echidna, at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO.

  13. RadCon: Parameter report focusing on Tropical and Subtropical environments in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domel, R.U.; Crawford, J; Harris, F.; Twining, J.

    2000-09-01

    Models to simulate the transfer of radionuclides through air, water and terrestrial ecosystems have been developed and used regularly over the last 20 years. RadCon was developed as a simple model to assess the radiological consequences, as dose, to humans of short-term depositions of radionuclides. Internal exposure via inhalation and ingestion are included in this model as well as external exposure from the passing cloud (cloud shine) and from radioactivity deposited on the ground (ground shine).Initially, the RadCon model will deal with the Australian and South East Asian region but flexibility has been incorporated into the design to allow application in other regions. In a manner similar to a geographic information system, the display of input and output data allows quick access to the results, both numerically and graphically. Coloured concentration gradients, stepping through time, are superimposed on the area of interest to present atmospheric and ground concentrations of the radionuclides and, after the calculations, human dose. The model has portability across computer platforms.This report summarises the parameters and some of the transfer factors underlying the calculations. While the focus was on the tropical and subtropical regions in Australia, for many parameters the values may only have been available for temperate regions, in which case this has been used as the default value. The parameter flexibility is a major aspect of this model and a report to describe the editor has been written (Crawford and Domel, ANSTO/M-129). The aim of this document is to chronologically expand on the formulae and parameter tables presented in the Technical Guide (Crawford et al., ANSTO/E-744, May 2000). The two documents should be read together with the Technical Guide presenting the mathematical computations and this report presenting some of the input values used to calculate the end-point results from the computations. A User Guide to assist in the implementation

  14. Cold rocks, hot sands: In-situ cosmogenic applications in Australia at ANTARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, David; McKelvey, B.; Hannan, D.; Newsome, D.

    2000-01-01

    The ANTARES AMS facility at ANSTO is conducting a comprehensive program in the application of in-situ cosmogenic radionuclides based on strong university collaborations in the earth sciences. The program targets two major objectives: (1) to determine and improve the Quaternary glacial chronology of the Southern Hemisphere in support of global climate change studies; (2) to characterise the processes of surface weathering and landscape evolution in semi-arid regions of the Australian continent. An overview of the program is presented with preliminary results from the first phase of these studies

  15. Monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Button, J.B.C.

    1997-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of methods of monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation together with reasons for such monitoring and maintaining dose histories of radiation occupationally exposed persons. The various Australian providers of external radiation monitoring services and the types of dosemeters they supply are briefly described together with some monitoring results. Biological monitoring methods, are used to determine internal radiation dose. Whole body monitors, used for this purpose are available at Australian Radiation Lab., ANSTO and a few hospitals. Brief mention is made of the Australian National Radiation Dose Register and its objectives

  16. The fifth conference on nuclear science and engineering in Australia, 2003. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The theme of the fifth Nuclear Science and Engineering in Australia conference was 'Building on 100 years of Nuclear Science and Technology'. During the six main sessions the following topics were presented: Nuclear research and progress on major nuclear facilities, including the ANSTO Research Replacement Reactor, the Australian synchrotron and irradiation facilities; Uranium and waste management; Radiation Protection and Nuclear safety; Safeguards and Security; Nuclear Power in the Asia/Pacific region and prospects for Australia. The opening address, given by Mr Peter McGauran, Minister for Science was followed by Dr Robin Batterham, Australian Chief Scientist's introductory address. Papers included in the handbook were separately indexed

  17. Ion beam analysis of metal ion implanted surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P.J.; Chu, J.W.; Johnson, E.P.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation is an established method for altering the surface properties of many materials. While a variety of analytical techniques are available for the characterisation of implanted surfaces, those based on particle accelerators such as Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) provide some of the most useful and powerful for this purpose. Application of the latter techniques to metal ion implantation research at ANSTO will be described with particular reference to specific examples from recent studies. Where possible, the information obtained from ion beam analysis will be compared with that derived from other techniques such as Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Auger spectroscopies. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Combining computational modelling with radioisotope technology for a more cost- effective and time-efficient method of solving industrial and medical diagnostic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, J.Y.; Easey, J.F.; Burch, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, some work on computational modelling for industrial operations and processes will be presented, for example, the modelling of fly-ash flow and the associated prediction of erosion in power utility boilers. The introduction and use of new formulations of encapsulated radioisotopes, currently being research at ANSTO, will open up further possibilities for the utilisation of radiotracer applications for a wider range of validation work not only in industrial but also in medical investigations. Applications of developed models to solving industrial problems will also be discussed in the paper

  19. Applications of ion beam analysis workshop. Workshop handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on applications of ion beam analysis was held at ANSTO, immediate prior to the IBMM-95 Conference in Canberra. It aims was to review developments and current status on use of ion beams for analysis, emphasizing the following aspects: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; material sciences, geological, life sciences, environmental and industrial applications; computing codes for use in accelerator research; high energy heavy ion scattering and recoil; recent technological development using ion beams. The handbook contains the workshop's program, 29 abstracts and a list of participants

  20. Heterogeneous Catalysis under pressure - In-situ neutron diffraction under industrial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, Timur; Girgsdies, Frank; Kasatkin, Igor; Kunkes, Edward; Liss, Klaus-Dieter; Peterson, Vanessa K.; Schlögl, Robert; Behrens, Malte

    2012-02-01

    The present work describes the application of a tubular reactor that allows in-situ neutron diffraction on working catalysts at high pressures. The designed reactor enables the application to a sample of industrially-relevant reaction conditions, i.e., in a temperature range up to 330° C and 60 bar pressure, coupled with online gas-analysis. Application of the cell is demonstrated by ammonia synthesis over a commercial catalyst with diffraction data obtained from the high-resolution powder diffractometer, Echidna, at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO.

  1. The ANTARES accelerator: a facility for environmental monitoring and materials characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical facility for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) has been under development since 1989 on the 8-MV tandem accelerator ANTARES at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre. Three beamlines are presently dedicated to the AMS analysis of long-lived radionuclides and one is used for the study of multilayered semiconductor structures by heavy ion recoil spectrometry. Having accomplished the task of transforming the old nuclear physics accelerator from Rutgers University into a world-class analytical facility, ANSTO scientists are now promoting research projects based on the capability of the ANTARES instruments. New instruments are being constructed on the ANTARES accelerator for future programs in environmental monitoring, safeguards, nuclear waste disposal and applications in advanced materials. A new AMS beamline has been designed that is expected to be capable of measuring rare heavy radionuclides, such as 236 U, 229 , 230T h and 244 Pu, in natural samples with ultra-high sensitivity. A novel, heavy ion microprobe will allow IBA of surfaces with a spatial resolution of 10 μm for high-energy ions (20-100 MeV) from chlorine to iodine. These instruments are complementary to other advanced analytical tools developed by ANSTO, such as the synchrotron radiation beamline at the Australian National Beamline Facility

  2. Radioisotopes for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, S.

    1998-01-01

    For more than 3 decades, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has been the country's main supplier of radioisotopes for medical applications. The use of radioisotopes in medicine has revolutionised the diagnosis, management and treatment of many serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke. It is also beginning to play a key role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimers disease and epilepsy. More recently there has been considerable growth in the application of nuclear medicine to treat sport-related injuries - especially wrist, ankle and knees where more common techniques do not always enable accurate diagnosis. Australia is a recognised leader in nuclear medicine. This can be partially attributed to the close relationship between ANSTO and the medical community in providing opportunities to develop and evaluate new agents to support more effective patient care. A list of commercial isotopes produced in the reactor or the cyclotron and used in medical applications is given. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in the clinical environment and the timely supply of radioisotopes is a key element. ANSTO will continue to be the premier supplier of currently available and developing isotopes to support the health and well being of the Australian community

  3. Neutron beam instrumentation at the Australian replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: ANSTO is building a nuclear reactor to replace the HIFAR research reactor at Lucas Heights by the end of 2005. Like HIFAR, the Replacement Research Reactor will be used for both neutron beam research and radioisotope production. This reactor will provide Australian scientists with a modern powerful facility for condensed matter research and medical applications well into the 21 st century. A large liquid D 2 moderator will generate intense cold neutron beams that will be transported to a suite of neutron beam instruments in a neutron guide hall by supermirror neutron guides. The contract for construction of the reactor, irradiation facilities and neutron beam-lines, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, was awarded to INVAP S.E. in July 2000. The neutron beam instruments are being developed by ANSTO in consultation with the Australian user community. Work on both fronts is progressing on schedule. The presentation will include a review the planned scientific and irradiation capabilities, a description of the facility and the key technologies employed to generate and transport the intense neutron beams and a status report on our progress to date

  4. New Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Every, E; Kulesza, J; Deyhim, A

    2016-01-01

    The design of a new Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) Instrument for use in National Institute of Standards And Technology (NIST) will be discussed. This instrument is similar to a shorter instrument we designed and delivered to ANSTO in Australia called the Bilby SANS instrument. The NIST VSANS and the ANSTO Bilby SANS instruments have very similar dimensions for length and diameter and have similar requirements for internal detector motion, top access port, walkway supports, and ports; however, the Bilby SANS instrument vacuum requirement was lower (7.5×10-5 Torr) and the entire (60,000 pound) vessel was required to move 1.5 meters on external rails with a repeatability of 100 um, which ADC achieved. The NIST VSANS length is 24 meter, internal diameter 2.3 meter with three internal carriages. The NIST VSANS instrument, which covers the usual SANS range will also allow configuration to cover the range between q ∼| 10 -4 A -1 to 10 -3 A -1 with a sample beam current of (10 4 neutrons/s). The key requirements are a second position-sensitive detector system having a 1 mm pixel size and a longer sample-detector flight path of 20 m (i.e., a 40 m instrument). (paper)

  5. Research reactor developments in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, Robert

    1998-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) operates the 10 MW research reactor, HIFAR, at the Lucas Heights site approximately 30 kilometres south of Sydney. Although recent reviews and inspections have confirmed that HIFAR operates safely by an adequate margin and has minimal impact, it was concluded that the reactor design and age places limitations on its operation and utilization, and that HIFAR is approaching the end of its economic life. In September 1997, a decision was made by the Australian Government to found ANSTO for the construction of a replacement research on the existing Lucas Heights site, subject to the requisite environmental assessment process. A draft EIS has been prepared and is currently undergoing public review. A design specification is in preparation, and a research reactor vendor pre-qualification process has been initiated. Spent fuel shipments have been made to Dounreay and to the Savannah River Site, and discussions are continuing regarding the disposition of the existing spent fuel and that arising form HIFAR's remaining operation. (author)

  6. Assessing and improving the safety culture of non-power nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastin, S.J.; Cameron, R.F.; McDonald, N.R.; Adams, A.; Williamson, A.

    2000-01-01

    The development and application of safety culture principles has understandably focused on nuclear power plant and fuel cycle facilities and has been based on studies in Europe, North America, Japan and Korea. However, most radiation injuries and deaths have resulted from the mishandling of radioactive sources, inadvertent over-exposure to X-rays and critically incidents, unrelated to nuclear power plant. Within the Forum on Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), Australia has been promoting initiatives to apply safety culture principles across all nuclear and radiation application activities and in a manner that is culturally appropriate for Asian countries. ANSTO initiated a Safety Culture Project in 1996 to develop methods for assessing and improving safety culture at nuclear and radiation installations other than power reactors and to trial these at ANSTO and in the Asian region. The project has sensibly drawn on experience from the nuclear power industry, particularly in Japan and Korea. There has been a positive response in the participating countries to addressing safety culture issues in non-power nuclear facilities. This paper reports on the main achievements of the project. Further goals of the project are also identified. (author)

  7. AINSE's future role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    AINSE (Australian Institute for Nuclear Science and Engineering) was created in 1958 as a consortium of nine universities and the then Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) to develop research projects associated with the use of atomic energy. In 1999 AINSE remains strong, but has increased its membership to include 35 Australian universities and 1 New Zealand university. AINSE's role has been to facilitate access by researchers in universities to the facilities of the ANSTO Laboratories. Over the years the emphasis of the research projects themselves has shifted from those related to nuclear physics and the solution of problems associated with the development of nuclear energy, to projects where the emphasis is on the application of nuclear and nuclear related techniques to problems in a wide range of areas, including biomedical science and the environment. AINSE has reached a 40-year milestone and is about to enter the next millennium (and the next 40 years) at a time when ANSTO will host a new and modern reactor and the application of basic sciences to the biological areas is tipped to become the major focus of scientific discovery. Increasingly the environment becomes a source of major concern for everyone and the subject of a large component of research. The challenge for AINSE is to retain existing interests and expertise, but to also develop new ways in which nuclear science can be applied to these exciting and expanding areas of research

  8. Report on the results of the safety culture survey conducted in PNRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Corazon M.; Nohay, Carl M.; Badinas, Nelson P.; Melendez, Johnylen V.; Parami, Vangeline K.

    2001-01-01

    An initial safety culture survey was conducted in the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI). Sixty six (66) questionnaires as given in A. Adams and A. Williamson's Measurement of Safety Culture in the Nuclear Industry, UNSW, July 1999 were distributed to the different units of PNRI. The number of sets of survey sheets distributed to the different units corresponded to the number of personnel in the unit based on the information obtained from them. Results were obtained from only 33 respondents. ANSTO has been requested to analyze the results of this survey. While waiting for the results from ANSTO, we attempted to proceed with this analysis in order to learn and practice applying the procedure based on the reference cited above.The respondents from the PNRI showed on the overall neutral views towards safety and their work. Although a minority showed positive responses to safety while a small minority showed negative responses. A remarkable result is that all respondents show strong concern over the welfare of the institute, indicating that there is still a good chance for safety culture to be developed positively among the employees given the proper strategies for motivation. (author)

  9. Annual Report 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    In the early years of the operation of HIFAR, restrictions on land use outside of the 1.6 km exclusion zone around the reactor were proposed to the NSW Government. Subsequently, the restrictions were considered to be unnecessary. During the year under review, the Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) reconsidered this issue, using its revised safety assessment policy, and concluded that the advice on land use provided previously was appropriate. Although the NSB is satisfied that HIFAR can be operated safely it believes that upgrading of safety systems will be necessary, for a significant extension of life, by about 2003. Legislation provides the NSB with the power to place restrictions on the operation of reactors operated by ANSTO. The NSB reports that, following a review of the issues reported and as a result of its audits, reviews and inspections, the safety of operation of ANSTO's nuclear plant was satisfactory during the year. In consultation with the Commonwealth, States and Territories, the NSB also contributes to the safety programs for visits by nuclear powered warships to Australia by analysing potential accidents and reviewing emergency plans for visits. During the year the NSB activities included the design and distribution of a computer code as an aid to emergency planning, updating port safety assessments and reviews of accident criteria in collaboration with a national committee for radiation protection. The NSB concluded that the current safety assessment methods and procedures are appropriate to ensure adequate safety standards for visits by nuclear powered warships. tabs., ills

  10. Application of sensitive and supersensitive radon detectors for radon flux density and radon concentration in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahorowski, W.; Whittlestone, S.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a review of principles and operational parameters of the latest instrumental development in sensitive and high sensitive radon detectors at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The focus is on advances in measurement technology of radon concentration in air and radon flux density. Two areas in which ANSTO is actively involved are discussed. The first area concerns radon in air monitoring at Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station. Results recorded at the Station with a supersensitive radon detector characterised by lower limit of detection down to few mBq m -3 with time resolution better than 90 minutes are presented to illustrate importance of the technique in global monitoring of airborne pollution. The second area concerns estimates of radon and thoron fluxes from large geographical areas. This is illustrated by results obtained during an Australia-wide survey of radon fluxes and from thoron flux measurements around the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. The radon flux estimates from Australia come from a coarse net of spot measurements combined with data from aerial gamma surveys. It is argued that as radon global flux and air concentration estimates improve, the data will provide progressively more stringent tests of global air transport models. (author)

  11. Transport of HIFAR spent fuel from Lucas Heights Research Establishment to the United Kingdom for reprocessing. Public Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The normal operations of HIFAR produce thirty-eight spent fuel elements annually. Since 1958, when operations began, 1,660 spent fuel elements have been accumulated and are stored in ANSTO's engineered interim storage facilities at Lucas Heights. In the light of the limited size of these storage facilities and following the Research Reactor Review (1993) and an Inter-Agency Review, the Commonwealth Government announced its decision to reduce the number of spent fuel elements stored at the site. Therefore, ANSTO has been authorised to negotiate the terms for shipment of spent fuel elements of United Kingdom (UK) origin to the Dounreay reprocessing plant in Scotland. This Public Environment Report, prepared under the Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974, describes the potential impacts and risks of a proposed initial shipment of 120 spent fuel elements to the Dounreay reprocessing plant. It describes the intended packaging and transport procedures and considers possible alternative methods of dealing with the continued production of spent fuel rods and the limited storage capacity at LHRL. The exhaustive analysis of every phase of operations involved in the shipping of a cask of spent HIFAR fuel elements from Lucas Heights to Dounreay, for reprocessing, has shown that there are no significant environmental or public health impacts from such a shipment conducted in accordance with standard, internationally established procedures. 18 refs., 12 tabs., 2 figs

  12. Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety (consequential amendments) Bill 1998. Explanatory memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Bill is to make consequential changes to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Act 1987 (the ANSTO Act) and to provide for transitional arrangements to cover the operation of controlled facilities and the handling of radiation sources while applications for licences to cover these facilities and activities are being made under the proposed Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 (the ARPANS Act) For this purpose, the Bill: (a) repeals Parts VI and VII A of the ANSTO Act under which, respectively, the Safety Review Committee and the Nuclear Safety Bureau are established, as the functions of the Committee and Bureau will be transferred to the CEO of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, established under the ARPANS Act; (b) makes transitional arrangements for the transfer of the assets and liabilities of the Nuclear Safety Bureau to the Commonwealth, and confers on the CEO of ARPANSA the powers of the Director of the Nuclear Safety Bureau in relation to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation during the transitional period before the offenses provisions commence to operate under the ARPANS Act; (c) repeals the Environment Protection (Nuclear Codes) Act 1978. That Act provides for the development and endorsement of Codes of Practice which will be undertaken under the auspices of ARPANSA; (d) provides that Commonwealth entities have a transition period of 6 months after the ARPANS Act commences to apply for a licence to authorize specified activities under that Act

  13. The third conference on nuclear science and engineering in Australia, 1999. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Association has organised this third Conference in a biennial series with the theme: 'A Nuclear Renaissance'. The theme is based on our perception that nuclear science and technology is on the threshold of a major expansion after a period which many thought was the onset of the Dark Ages after the old Australian Atomic Energy Commission was abolished in 1987. Fortunately, nuclear science and technology was not abolished and the AAEC was replaced by the government with ANSTO, which the government has continued to support strongly. The most recent expression of this support has been the approval of nearly $300 millions in investment in a major Replacement Research Reactor to be operational in about 2005, and the establishment of the new regulatory body ARPANSA. The conference aims to review all of the major nuclear issues of importance to Australia as we enter the 21st Century. These include: uranium mining and upgrading; the management of nuclear waste; the plans for the future by the government's major nuclear research laboratory, operated by ANSTO, including plans for constructing a major Replacement Research Reactor at Lucas Heights, the status of safeguards and nuclear regulation in Australia now that the government has set up the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, and the many and varied applications of nuclear science in Australia. The conference also presents the plans for nuclear research by the universities through the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, and features in particular the work at the Australian National University in Canberra

  14. Radiating gap filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: In May, corrosion on the outside wall of the over 50 year old Canadian Chalk River reactor vessel caused a heavy water leak and the reactor was shut down triggering worldwide a nuclear medicine shortage. The reactor is also a major supplier of the isotope molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), a precursor of the medically widely used technetium-99 m . To fill the gap in demand, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has now arranged with US company Lantheus Medical Imaging, Inc., a world leader in medical imaging, to supply Mo-99. Subject to pending Australian regulatory processes, the deal is expected to assist in alleviating the world's current nuclear medicine shortage. As ANSTO is currently also the only global commercial supplier that produces Mo-99 from low enriched uranium (LEU) targets, Lantheus will be the first company bringing LEU derived Tc-99 m to the US market. To date, over 95% of Mo-99 is derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets. However, there are concerns regarding proliferation risks associated with HEU targets and for commercial uses production from LEU targets would be desirable. ANSTO says that global Mo-99 supply chain is fragile and limited and it is working closely with nuclear safety and healthy regulators, both domestically and overseas, to expedite all necessary approvals to allow long-term production and export of medical isotopes.

  15. Comparison of lead isotopes with source apportionment models, including SOM, for air particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulson, Brian; Korsch, Michael; Dickson, Bruce; Cohen, David; Mizon, Karen; Michael Davis, J.

    2007-01-01

    We have measured high precision lead isotopes in PM 2.5 particulates from a highly-trafficked site (Mascot) and rural site (Richmond) in the Sydney Basin, New South Wales, Australia to compare with isotopic data from total suspended particulates (TSP) from other sites in the Sydney Basin and evaluate relationships with source fingerprints obtained from multi-element PM 2.5 data. The isotopic data for the period 1998 to 2004 show seasonal peaks and troughs that are more pronounced in the rural site for the PM 2.5 .samples but are consistent with the TSP. The Self Organising Map (SOM) method has been applied to the multi-element PM 2.5 data to evaluate its use in obtaining fingerprints for comparison with standard statistical procedures (ANSTO model). As seasonal effects are also significant for the multi-element data, the SOM modelling is reported as site and season dependent. At the Mascot site, the ANSTO model exhibits decreasing 206 Pb/ 204 Pb ratios with increasing contributions of fingerprints for 'secondary smoke' (industry), 'soil', 'smoke' and 'seaspray'. Similar patterns were shown by SOM winter fingerprints for both sites. At the rural site, there are large isotopic variations but for the majority of samples these are not associated with increased contributions from the main sources with the ANSTO model. For two winter sampling times, there are increased contributions from 'secondary industry', 'smoke', 'soil' and seaspray with one time having a source or sources of Pb similar to that of Mascot. The only positive relationship between increasing 206 Pb/ 204 Pb ratio and source contributions is found at the rural site using the SOM summer fingerprints, both of which show a significant contribution from sulphur. Several of the fingerprints using either model have significant contributions from black carbon (BC) and/or sulphur (S) that probably derive from diesel fuels and industrial sources. Increased contributions from sources with the SOM summer

  16. Proposed replacement nuclear research reactor, Lucas Heights, NSW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    On 17 February 1999, the House of Representatives referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report the proposed replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights, New South Wales. The Committee received a written submission from ANSTO and took evidence from ANSTO officials at public hearings held at Parliament House. It has also received submissions and took evidence from a number of organisations and individuals. Prior to the first day of public hearings, the Committee undertook an extensive inspection of the facilities at Lucas Heights. The Committee's main conclusion and recommendations are as follows: 1) A need exists to replace HIFAR with a modern research reactor. The need for the replacement of HIFAR arises as a consequence of national interest considerations, research and development requirements and the need to sustain the local production of radiopharmaceuticals.The comparative costs of locating the replacement research reactor at Lucas Heights or a green fields site favour the former by a considerable margin. The refurbishing HIFAR of would not provide an enhancement of its research and operational capabilities which are considered by the scientific community to be limited. Such limitations have led to a reduction in national research and development opportunities. It is estimated that the new national research reactor must be operational some time before HIFAR is decommissioned. Provided all recommendations and commitments contained in the Environment Assessment Report are implemented during construction and commissioning and for the expected life of the research reactor, the Committee believes, based on the evidence, that all known risks have been identified and their impact on public safety will be as low as technically possible. It is recommended that during the licensing, construction and commissioning phases ANSTO should provide the Committee with six-monthly reports on progress and that removal of

  17. The Australian national standard of measurement for radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    This contribution outlines the activities of the Radiation Standards Group at Ansto which is responsible, under the National Measurement Act 1960, for Australia's national standard of radioactivity measurement. The Group can make absolute measurements of radioactivity using a 4π β-γ coincidence counting system, Solutions standardised by this technique are then used to calibrate a TPA ionisation chamber, this chamber being the national working standard of activity measurement. All of the calibration factors determined for this chamber by direct measurement have been compared internationally through the Bureau International de Poids et Mesures (BIPM). These comparisons were performed either by participating in international intercomparisons organised by the BIPM or by submitting a standardised solution to the Systeme International de Reference. 11 refs

  18. Utilisation of the stray neutron field produced by a compact medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    1999-01-01

    During the routine isotope production runs at the CYCLONE 30 Medical Cyclotron operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) a thick copper substrate electroplated with specific target material (enriched isotope) is bombarded with a 30 MeV proton beam up to 350 μA and thereby resulting in the production of intense prompt evaporation neutrons in the vicinity of the target irradiation station. A novel irradiation rig has been developed to harness these stray neutrons and used in interesting scientific applications such as, thermal neutron activation analysis of archaeological artefacts including metallic and ceramic specimens, investigation of the neutron induced radiation damage in solid state electronic devices and testing of the integrity and remaining life of superconducting materials exposed to intense neutron environment. (author)

  19. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Camilleri, A.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1995-12-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) during 1994. All low level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.015 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1.5 % of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council, and 5 % of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. 27 refs., 22 tabs., 6 figs

  20. Australia's new high performance research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.; Abbate, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    A contract for the design and construction of the Replacement Research Reactor was signed in July 2000 between ANSTO and INVAP from Argentina. Since then the detailed design has been completed, a construction authorization has been obtained, and construction has commenced. The reactor design embodies modern safety thinking together with innovative solutions to ensure a highly safe and reliable plant. Also significant effort has been placed on providing the facility with diverse and ample facilities to maximize its use for irradiating material for radioisotope production as well as providing high neutron fluxes for neutron beam research. The project management organization and planing is commensurate with the complexity of the project and the number of players involved. (author)

  1. Neutron scattering for industrial and engineering research at the OPAL reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The OPAL research reactor at ANSTO has a number of neutron instruments available for science and engineering applications. The instruments have a unique non-destructive ability to determine critical aspects of a wide variety of material systems. This includes surfaces, defects, fine scale dispersions, texture and residual stresses. This information can provide a direct impact into optimization of modern manufacturing processes, improved product reliability, enhanced design performance, reduced production cost, and extended life prediction on significant engineering assets (e.g. power-station utilities, gas pipelines, aircrafts, trains, etc.). This presentation will focus on two instruments in particular: Kowari, the strain and crystallographic texture measurement system and Dingo the radiography/tomography instrument. (author)

  2. Cooperative approach to training for radiological emergency preparedness and response in Southeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bus, John; Popp, Andrew; Holland, Brian; Murray, Allan

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the collaborative and systematic approach to training for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response and the outcomes of this work with ANSTO's Southeast Asian counterparts, particularly in the Philippines. The standards and criteria being applied are discussed, along with the methods, design and conduct of workshops, table-top and field exercises. The following elements of this training will be presented: (a) identifying the priority areas for training through needs analysis;(b) strengthening individual profesional expertise through a structured approach to training; and (c) enhancing individual Agency and National nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response arrangements and capabilities. Whilst the work is motivated by nuclear security concerns, the implications for effective and sustainable emergency response to any nuclear or radiological incidents are noted. (author)

  3. Preparation of source mounts for 4π counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    The 4πβ/γ counter in the ANSTO radioisotope standards laboratory at Lucas Heights constitutes part of the Australian national standard for radioactivity. Sources to be measured in the counter must be mounted on a substrate which is strong enough to withstand careful handling and transport. The substrate must also be electrically conducting to minimise counting errors caused by charging of the source, and it must have very low superficial density so that little or none of the radiation is absorbed. The entire process of fabrication of VYNS films, coating them with gold/palladium and transferring them to source mount rings, as carried out in the radioisotope standards laboratory, is documented. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  4. Radiological Shielding Design for the Neutron High-Resolution Backscattering Spectrometer EMU at the OPAL Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersez, Tunay; Esposto, Fernando; Souza, Nicolas R. de

    2017-09-01

    The shielding for the neutron high-resolution backscattering spectrometer (EMU) located at the OPAL reactor (ANSTO) was designed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 5-1.60. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies, such as the neutron pre-monochromator bunker with sliding cylindrical block shields to accommodate a range of neutron take-off angles, and in the experimental area - shielding of neutron focusing guides, choppers, flight tube, backscattering monochromator, and additional shielding elements inside the Scattering Tank. These shielding assemblies meet safety and engineering requirements and cost constraints. The neutron dose rates around the EMU instrument were reduced to < 0.5 µSv/h and the gamma dose rates to a safe working level of ≤ 3 µSv/h.

  5. Groundwater salinization studies in south eastern New South Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochrane, P.

    1991-01-01

    Different isotopes of various elements occur naturally in the environment and their isotopic composition, or enrichment, can be used in the investigation of environmental factors such as: evaporation and transpiration rates; degree of chemical mixing in groundwaters; age of the groundwater; the geological environments. Examples of environmental isotopes used in Ansto's studies are presented. These include tritium uranium-238, uranium-234, radium-226, radium-228, chlorine-36, oxygen-18 and carbon-13. They are used to provide age information, to identify the signature of a particular water type, and identify the occurrence of mixing two or more water types as well as to provide information about travel times and groundwater velocities. Using a combination of hydrogeochemical and isotope techniques, it was possible to investigate solute concentration and flow processes, which will provide essential information to assist in designing and monitoring effective measures to reduce the salinity problem. ills

  6. Visits to Australia by nuclear powered or armed vessels: contingency planning for the accidental release of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The report refers to the adequacy of current contingency planning by the Australian Federal and Senate authorities to deal with the accidental release of ionizating radiation from visiting nuclear powered or armed vessels in Australian waters and ports. Much of the material was obtained in response to questions put in writing by the Senate Standing Committee to the Department of Defence, ANSTO and others. In addition, the report contains relevant information from Commonwealth documents as well as the Committee findings and recommendations. Issues considered include: types of visiting nuclear powered vessels, accident likelihood and consequences, differences between naval and land-based reactors, safety records. The persons or organizations who made submissions or appeared in all public hearings are listed in the appendixes, along with all visits to Australian ports by nuclear powered warships from 1976 to 1988

  7. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1997-06-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre during 1996. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by thr National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. Details of the environmental sample collection and analytical procedures are given in the appendices. (authors)

  8. Residual stress measurements in laser clad repaired low pressure turbine blades for the power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendeich, P. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: pbx@ansto.gov.au; Alam, N. [CSIRO Manufacturing Science and Technology, 32 Audley St., Woodville, SA 5011 (Australia); Brandt, M. [IRIS Swinburne University of Technology, 533-545 Burwood Rd., Hawthorne, Vic. 3122 (Australia); Carr, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Short, K. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Blevins, R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Curfs, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Kirstein, O. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Atkinson, G. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Holden, T. [Northern Stress Technologies, 20, Pine Point Rd., Deep River, Ont., K0J 1P0 (Canada); Rogge, R. [National Research Council, Neutron Program for Materials Research, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ont., KOJ 1JO (Canada)

    2006-11-10

    Low pressure turbine blades in power stations suffer from leading edge erosion damage due to water impingement. In an effort to extend the life of these blades, repair of the eroded regions has been proposed using laser cladding with Stellite material. However, the addition of Stellite results in residual stresses being generated in the parent metal due to contraction during cooling and differences in thermal expansion between the two materials. In this work test coupons and laser clad blades were examined for residual stresses using both the L3 diffractometer at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada and the TASS strain scanner at ANSTO's HIFAR reactor, Lucas Heights, Australia. In addition XRD results were used to measure residual stresses on the surface of the blade to complement the neutron measurements. An FEA model of a simplified weld was used to explain some of the results.

  9. New research reactor for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.

    1992-01-01

    HIFAR, Australia's major research reactor was commissioned in 1958 to test materials for an envisaged indigenous nuclear power industry. HIFAR is a Dido type reactor which is operated at 10 MW. With the decision in the early 1970's not to proceed to nuclear power, HIFAR was adapted to other uses and has served Australia well as a base for national nuclear competence; as a national facility for neutron scattering/beam research; as a source of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and treatment; and as a source of export revenue from the neutron transmutation doping of silicon for the semiconductor industry. However, all of HIFAR's capabilities are becoming less than optimum by world and regional standards. Neutron beam facilities have been overtaken on the world scene by research reactors with increased neutron fluxes, cold sources, and improved beams and neutron guides. Radioisotope production capabilities, while adequate to meet Australia's needs, cannot be easily expanded to tap the growing world market in radiopharmaceuticals. Similarly, neutron transmutation doped silicon production, and export income from it, is limited at a time when the world market for this material is expanding. ANSTO has therefore embarked on a program to replace HIFAR with a new multi-purpose national facility for nuclear research and technology in the form of a reactor: a) for neutron beam research, - with a peak thermal flux of the order of three times higher than that from HIFAR, - with a cold neutron source, guides and beam hall, b) that has radioisotope production facilities that are as good as, or better than, those in HIFAR, c) that maximizes the potential for commercial irradiations to offset facility operating costs, d) that maximizes flexibility to accommodate variations in user requirements during the life of the facility. ANSTO's case for the new research reactor received significant support earlier this month with the tabling in Parliament of a report by the Australian Science

  10. A flow-through hydrothermal cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, Brian; Tenailleau, Christophe; Nogthai, Yung; Studer, Andrew; Brugger, Joel; Pring, Allan

    2006-01-01

    A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in situ neutron diffraction study of crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. It is specifically designed for use on the medium-resolution powder diffractometer (MRPD) at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the Polaris beamline at ISIS and the new high-intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The cell will operate in a flow-through mode over the temperature range from 25-300 deg. C and up to pressures of 100 bar. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite (Fe,Ni) 9 S 8 to violarite (Fe,Ni) 3 S 4 under mild conditions (pH∼4) at 120 deg. C and 3 bar using in situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented

  11. Nuclear honeymoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The Australian National University (ANU) and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to collaborate across research fields including key accelerator facilities, future energy sources and nuclear non-proliferation. T he potential of this partnership demonstrates the value of Commonwealth institutions working together for the betterment of all Australians,' says ANY vice-chancellor Professor Ian Chubb who believes that both organisations have infrastructure and facilities available that if shared could bring greater benefit to the nation. The partnership will develop a national strategy to coordinate use and development of a heavy-ion accelerator and ion source technology, he says. In addition, it will undertake collaborative activities that enhance educational programs in nuclear physics, nuclear engineering and materials science.

  12. Storage, inspection and sip testing of spent nuclear fuel from the HIFAR materials test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selwyn, H.; Finlay, R.; Bull, P.; Irwin, A.

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum clad U-Al fuel used within the HIFAR MTR has been stored both in dry (underground) and wet (pond) storage facilities at the Lucas Heights site since the 1960's. As part of ANSTO's current program to send this fuel for long term storage or reprocessing, a significant level of visual inspection and water sip testing has been performed. This data has been used to demonstrate the integrity and suitability of the fuel for transport and receipt at the re processors interim storage ponds. This paper presents the key technical background-history of HIFAR fuel and its storage at Lucas Heights, presents the data obtained to date regarding its condition and discusses some observations regarding visual corrosion indicators and actual sip test results. (author)

  13. Recent progress with digital coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, K.S.A.; Watt, G.C.; Alexiev, D.

    1999-01-01

    Digital Coincidence Counting (DCC) is a new technique, based on the older method of analogue coincidence counting. It has been developed by ANSTO as a faster more reliable means of determining the activity of ionising radiation samples. The technique employs a dual channel analogue to digital converter acquisition system for collecting pulse information from a 4Π beta detector and a NaI(Tl) gamma detector. The digitised pulse information is stored on a high speed hard disk and timing information for both channels is also stored. The data may subsequently be recalled and analysed using software based algorithms. The system is operational and results are now being routinely collected and analysed. Some of the early work is presented for Co-60, Na-22 and Sm-153

  14. Accelerators for the Australian environment and heritage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    1999-01-01

    Australian researchers have access to a variety of natural systems where records of the Earth's past environment have been stored. These archives include sediment cores, Antarctic ice, Tasmanian pine trees, rock surfaces, corals, etc. Each of these media contain information on past environmental conditions but the records must be carefully deciphered and compared with one-another. The AMS analysis of long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides is essential for providing absolute time scales for these natural archives. Other analytical methods based on high-energy ion interactions are well suited to characterise environmental and archaeological samples with high sensitivity. The use of ANSTO's accelerators in research programs related to the environment in the Australian region is reviewed

  15. Estimating radiological consequences using the Java programming language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.; Hayward, M.; Harris, F.; Domel, R.

    1998-01-01

    At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) a model is being developed to determine critical parameters affecting radioactive doses to humans following a release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. Java programming language was chosen because of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) capabilities and its portability across computer platforms, which were a requirement for the application, called RadCon. The mathematical models are applied over the 2D region, performing time varying calculations of dose to humans for each grid point, according to user selected options. The information combined includes: two dimensional time varying air and ground concentrations, transfer factors from soil to plant, plant to animal, plant to humans, plant interception factors to determine amount of radionuclide on plant surfaces, dosimetric data, such as dose conversion factors and user defined parameters, e.g. soil types, lifestyle, diet of animals and humans. Details of the software requirements, pathway parameters and implementation of RadCon are given

  16. Replacement reactor to revolutionise magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, G

    2002-01-01

    Electric motors, hearing aids and magnetic resonance imaging are only some of the applications that will benefit from the first advances in magnets in a quarter of a century. Magnets achieve their characteristics when electrons align themselves to produce a unified magnetic field. Neutrons can probe these magnetic structures. The focus is not just on making more powerful magnets, but also identifying the characteristics that make magnets cheaper and easier for industry to manufacture. Staff from the ANSTO's Neutron Scattering Group have already performed a number of studies on the properties of magnets using using HIFAR, but the Replacement Research Reactor that will produce cold neutrons would allow scientists to investigate the atomic properties of materials with large molecules. A suite of equipment will enable studies at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields

  17. In situ neutron diffraction under high pressure—Providing an insight into working catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandemir, Timur; Wallacher, Dirk; Hansen, Thomas; Liss, Klaus-Dieter; Naumann d'Alnoncourt, Raoul; Schlögl, Robert; Behrens, Malte

    2012-01-01

    In the present work the construction and application of a continuous flow cell is presented, from which neutron diffraction data could be obtained during catalytic reactions at high pressure. By coupling an online gas detection system, parallel structure and activity investigations of working catalysts under industrial relevant conditions are possible. The flow cell can be operated with different feed gases in a wide range from room temperature to 603 K. Pressures from ambient up to 6 MPa are applicable. An exchangeable sample positioning system makes the flow cell suitable for several different goniomter types on a variety of instrument beam lines. Complementary operational test measurements were carried out monitoring reduction of and methanol synthesis over a Cu/ZnO/Al 2 O 3 catalyst at the high-flux powder diffraction beamline D1B at ILL and high-resolution diffraction beamline Echidna at ANSTO.

  18. Clocks for quaternary environments in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Australian continent offers a variety of natural systems where records of the Earth's past environment have been stored, including sediment cores, tree rings, rock surfaces and corals. Rock varnish, mud-wasp nests and pack-rat middens provide alternative archives for vegetation and environmental change in arid areas, where continuous sedimentary sequences or trees are not available. Each of these media contain specific information on past climatic conditions but we must determine their chronology and decipher the relevant environmental parameters. Cosmogenic radionuclides, such as 14 C, 10 Be, 26 Al and 36 Cl, analysed by accelerator mass spectrometry, provide valuable radiometric clocks to establish an absolute time scale for the environmental events of the Quaternary. U-series, potassium-argon, argonargon and optically stimulated luminescence are other dating methods used in palaeoenvironmental studies. ANSTO supports the Quaternary science community in Australia providing the analysis of long-lived radionuclides: some significant projects from this program will be illustrated. (author)

  19. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor. Supplement to Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a replacement research reactor at Lucas Heights, was available for public examination and comment for some three months during 1998. A Supplement to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Draft EIS) has been completed and was lodged with Environment Australia on 18 January 1999. The Supplement is an important step in the overall environmental assessment process. It reviews submissions received and provides the proponent's response to issues raised in the public review period. General issues extracted from submissions and addressed in the Supplement include concern over liability issues, Chernobyl type accidents, the ozone layer and health issues. Further studies, relating to issues raised in the public submission process, were undertaken for the Supplementary EIS. These studies confirm, in ANSTO's view, the findings of the Draft EIS and hence the findings of the Final EIS are unchanged from the Draft EIS

  20. Ultra-sensitive detection of nuclear signatures in support of IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkis, M.; Child, D.; Tuniz, C.; Williams, M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) applies a range of ultra-sensitive detection techniques to provide assurance that Member States are in compliance with their safeguards agreements. Environmental samples are collected which can contain minute traces of nuclear material or other evidence. Careful analysis of these samples reveals the nature of the activities undertaken in the vicinity of the sampling point. This paper reviews the analytical techniques that are being applied. To ensure that the IAEA has access to the best available methods, samples are distributed to a group of qualified laboratories around the world for analysis. The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) is part of this select group of laboratories, and is the only AMS facility currently accredited with the IAEA. AMS provides the highest sensitivity available for detection of particularly useful signature radioisotopes, including 129 I, 236 U and plutonium isotopes

  1. GaAs strip detectors: the Australian production program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, K.S.A.; Alexiev, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Australian High Energy Physics consortium (composed of the University of Melbourne, the University of Sydney and ANSTO) has been investigating the possibility of producing a large area wheel of SI GaAs detectors for the ATLAS detector array. To help assess the extent of Australia's role in this venture a few SI GaAs microstrip detectors are to be manufactured under contract by the CSIRO division of Radiophysics GaAs IC Prototyping Facility. The planned production of the devices is discussed. First, the reasons for producing the detectors here in Australia are examined, then some basic characteristics of the material are considered, and finally details are provided of the design used for the manufacture of the devices. Two sets of detectors will be produced using the standard Glasgow production recipe; SIGaAs and GaN. The Glasgow mask set is being used as a benchmark against which to compare the Australian devices

  2. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  3. Upgrade of the neutron guide system at the OPAL Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, D Martin; Kennedy, S J; Klose, F

    2010-01-01

    The new research reactor at ANSTO (OPAL) is operating with seven neutron beam instruments in the user programme and three more under construction. The reactor design provides for expansion of the facility to eighteen instruments, and much of the basic infrastructure is already in place. However, an expansion of the neutron guide system is needed for further beam instruments. For this purpose, several possibilities are under consideration, such as insertion of multi-channel neutron benders in the existing cold guides or the construction of a new elliptic cold guide. In this work Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been used to evaluate performance of these guide configurations. Results show that these configurations can be competitive with the best instruments in the world.

  4. In situ neutron diffraction under high pressure—Providing an insight into working catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, Timur; Wallacher, Dirk; Hansen, Thomas; Liss, Klaus-Dieter; Naumann d'Alnoncourt, Raoul; Schlögl, Robert; Behrens, Malte

    2012-05-01

    In the present work the construction and application of a continuous flow cell is presented, from which neutron diffraction data could be obtained during catalytic reactions at high pressure. By coupling an online gas detection system, parallel structure and activity investigations of working catalysts under industrial relevant conditions are possible. The flow cell can be operated with different feed gases in a wide range from room temperature to 603 K. Pressures from ambient up to 6 MPa are applicable. An exchangeable sample positioning system makes the flow cell suitable for several different goniomter types on a variety of instrument beam lines. Complementary operational test measurements were carried out monitoring reduction of and methanol synthesis over a Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst at the high-flux powder diffraction beamline D1B at ILL and high-resolution diffraction beamline Echidna at ANSTO.

  5. Eighth International Conference on Neutron Scattering ICNS2005. Final Programme and Abstract Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Full text: This conference encompassed a very wide range of neutron-related research. Topics addressed ranged from almost all applications of neutron scattering and diffraction like discovering magnetic ordering, magnetic properties and structural analysis, negative thermal expansion, spin states, proton dynamics, crystal structure, phase transitions and phase morphology, neutron spin echo to neutron powder diffraction studies and new generation neutron analysis methods as well as x-ray reflectivity versus neutron reflectivity, neutron resonance, cold and thermal neutron studies and spectrometers. Areas of research covered bacteria, DNA, drugs targeting, enzyme arrangement, structure of cholesterol, lung surfactant action, nanocapsules, disease, muscles, lipids, liquids, crystals, industrial gauges, metals, rare earths, shielding and geopolymers. Not all abstracts are included in this input; there exists an emphasis on Australian contributions and those from ANSTO

  6. Residual stress diffractometer KOWARI at the Australian research reactor OPAL: Status of the project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brule, Alain; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Neutron scattering using diffraction techniques is now recognized as the most precise and reliable method of mapping sub-surface residual stresses in materials or even components, which are not only of academic but also of industrial-economic relevance. The great potential of neutrons in the field of residual stresses was recognized by ANSTO and its external Beam Instrument Advisory Group for the new research reactor OPAL. The recommendation was to build the dedicated strain scanner KOWARI among the first suite of instruments available to users. We give an update on the overall project and present the current status of the diffractometer. It is anticipated that the instrument will be commissioned in mid 2006 and available to users at the end of the OPAL project.

  7. Residual stress diffractometer KOWARI at the Australian research reactor OPAL: Status of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brule, Alain; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Neutron scattering using diffraction techniques is now recognized as the most precise and reliable method of mapping sub-surface residual stresses in materials or even components, which are not only of academic but also of industrial-economic relevance. The great potential of neutrons in the field of residual stresses was recognized by ANSTO and its external Beam Instrument Advisory Group for the new research reactor OPAL. The recommendation was to build the dedicated strain scanner KOWARI among the first suite of instruments available to users. We give an update on the overall project and present the current status of the diffractometer. It is anticipated that the instrument will be commissioned in mid 2006 and available to users at the end of the OPAL project

  8. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1997-06-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre during 1996. All low-level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorizations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.010 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1% of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by thr National Health and Medical Research Council and 3.3% of the site dose constraint of 0.3mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. Details of the environmental sample collection and analytical procedures are given in the appendices. (authors). 29 refs., 26 tabs., 6 figs.

  9. 1993 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the accomplishments of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute for fiscal year 1993. The highlights of the report are the following: 1) active technology transfer and commercialization; 2) industry-responsive research and development; 3) nuclear regulations, licensing and safeguards; 4) development of strengthening of S and T; 5) infrastructure; 6) linkages were enhanced through the active participation of PNRI in the newly-formed Quezon City Science Community and the Inter-Agency Task Force on Public Acceptance of Nuclear Energy; and the 7) administrative report. List of experts/mission, foreign travel by PNRI and non-PNRI personnel, IAEA operational technical cooperation projects, research contracts, PNRI grants-in-aid, and technical papers are also included. Also in this period the signing of memorandum of understanding on mutual cooperation in the filed of nuclear energy peaceful applications between PNRI and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). (ISD). 7 tabs

  10. Ion beam analysis techniques for the elemental fingerprinting of fine particle smoke from vegetation burning in NSW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator based ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques, including PIXE, PIGME, RBS and PESA, have been used to analyse elemental compositions of airborne particles covering a 60,000 square kilometres area of Wollongong, Sydney and Newcastle. These IBA techniques provide elemental concentrations for over 20 different elements from hydrogen to lead, they include H, C, N, O, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn, Br and Pb. The four ion beam techniques are performed simultaneously on the 3MV Van de Graaff accelerator at ANSTO and have been described in detail elsewhere. They are sufficiently sensitive to analyse for many of these elements to levels around 10 ng/m{sup 3} or less in about five minutes of accelerator running time per filter. This is more than adequate for aerosol analyses as most filters contain around 150 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of material which corresponds to about 10{mu}g/m{sup 3} of fine particles in the atmosphere. For this work fine particles are those with diameters less than 2.5{mu}m. Fine particle data has been collected twice a week and analysed for each of the above elements by ANSTO since 1991 at more than 25 different sites throughout NSW. This large dataset set allows us to not only determine the composition of fine particles and to look for signature elements for particular sources but also to use multivariate statistics to define elemental source fingerprints and then to determine the percentage contributions of these fingerprints to the total fine particle mass in the atmosphere. This paper describes the application of these techniques to the study of domestic wood fires and vegetation burning in NSW over a two year period from 1992-93. It also presents, for the first time, fine particle data related to the January 1994 bushfires in NSW. 6 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  11. Environmental survey at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Looz, T.

    1994-05-01

    In common with many other nuclear facilities, ANSTO undertakes an extensive program of meteorological measurements. The prime reason for such a program is to allow estimates to be made of the downwind concentration of any airborne pollutants, particularly radionuclides, released from the site through routine operations or under accident conditions. The data collection from this program provide the necessary input to the atmospheric dispersion model called ADDCOR (ANSTO 1989) which can be used to compute the effective dose to an individual due to the routine airborne or accidental release of radionuclides from the LHRL. None of the samples taken from possible human food chains in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories contained radioactivity which could be attributed to the operation of the site. Discharges of airborne radioactive gases were within authorised limits when averaged over the year. The dose to the most sensitive members of the public from iodine-131 release, was -3 mSv/year and the calculated dose from released noble gases to the most exposed individuals was less than 0.01 mSv/year. These figures represent less than one per cent of the most restrictive limits recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. The annual average liquid effluent discharge to the Water Board Sewer during 1991 was less than 29 per cent of the permitted level. For tritium, the concentration was less than 2 per cent of the specified limit. The data presented in this report clearly shows that the environmental impact of operations at LHRL has been very low. The effective dose to residents living in the immediate neighbourhood of the reactor are very difficult to measure directly but calculated dose estimates are far lower than those due to natural background radiation and medical exposures. 24 refs., 19 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Ion beam analysis techniques for the elemental fingerprinting of fine particle smoke from vegetation burning in NSW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.

    1996-01-01

    Accelerator based ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques, including PIXE, PIGME, RBS and PESA, have been used to analyse elemental compositions of airborne particles covering a 60,000 square kilometres area of Wollongong, Sydney and Newcastle. These IBA techniques provide elemental concentrations for over 20 different elements from hydrogen to lead, they include H, C, N, O, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn, Br and Pb. The four ion beam techniques are performed simultaneously on the 3MV Van de Graaff accelerator at ANSTO and have been described in detail elsewhere. They are sufficiently sensitive to analyse for many of these elements to levels around 10 ng/m 3 or less in about five minutes of accelerator running time per filter. This is more than adequate for aerosol analyses as most filters contain around 150 μg/cm 2 of material which corresponds to about 10μg/m 3 of fine particles in the atmosphere. For this work fine particles are those with diameters less than 2.5μm. Fine particle data has been collected twice a week and analysed for each of the above elements by ANSTO since 1991 at more than 25 different sites throughout NSW. This large dataset set allows us to not only determine the composition of fine particles and to look for signature elements for particular sources but also to use multivariate statistics to define elemental source fingerprints and then to determine the percentage contributions of these fingerprints to the total fine particle mass in the atmosphere. This paper describes the application of these techniques to the study of domestic wood fires and vegetation burning in NSW over a two year period from 1992-93. It also presents, for the first time, fine particle data related to the January 1994 bushfires in NSW. 6 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  13. Metallurgical test work to support development of the Kintyre Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maley, M.; Ring, R.; Paulsen, E.; Maxton, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Kintyre uranium deposit is located in the Pilbara region of Western Australia and is jointly owned by Cameco and Mitsubishi. The current indicated resource estimate is approximately 55 million pounds of U 3 O 8 equivalent [~21,000 t U] at an average grade of 0.58% [0.49% U]. Due to the high levels of carbonate minerals in the deposit, alkaline leaching was strongly considered as an option to the usually preferred acid route. Following a detailed assessment, the acid option was chosen, with the preferred flowsheet involving an acid leach, followed by solvent extraction and precipitation. As part of the Kintyre metallurgical investigations, ANSTO Minerals performed an extensive work program, examining numerous aspects of the proposed flowsheet. This included a leach optimisation program, followed by a study determining the effects of sample variability in leaching. Settling, filtration and rheology work on slurries and tailings was performed, as well as testwork to determine the effect of neutralisation conditions on metal precipitation and radionuclide deportment. In addition, an extensive laboratory and solvent extraction mixer-settler mini-pilot plan campaign was performed to compare the performance of conventional ammonia/ammonium sulphate strip and the non-conventional strong acid strip (400 g/L H 2 SO 4 ) using leach liquor generated from Kintyre ore. The pilot plant involved two campaigns of three days continuous operation using each stripping system, with >99.5% uranium recovery achieved in each campaign. This paper will present an overview of the key results from the Kintyre leaching and neutralisation testwork undertaken at ANSTO Minerals, and will also outline the performance of the solvent extraction mini pilot plant. (author)

  14. In-situ soil composition and moisture measurement by surface neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, C.; Smith, C.; Marks, A.

    2009-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis is widely known as a laboratory technique dependent upon a nuclear reactor to provide the neutron flux and capable of precise elemental analysis. Less well known in-situ geochemical analysis is possible with isotopic (252Cf & 241Am) or compact accelerator (D-T, D-D fusion reaction) neutron sources. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) geophysical borehole logging has been applied to mining issues for >15 years (CSIRO) using isotopic neutron sources and more recently to environmental and hydro-geological applications by ANSTO. Similarly, sophisticated geophysical borehole logging equipment based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been applied in the oil and gas industry by large oilfield services companies to measure oil saturation indices (carbon/oxygen) using accelerator neutron sources. Recent advances in scintillation detector spectral performance has enabled improved precision and detection limits for elements likely to be present in soil profiles (H, Si, Al, Fe, Cl) and possible detection of many minor to trace elements if sufficiently abundant (Na, K, Mg, Ca, S, N, + ). To measure carbon an accelerator neutron source is required to provide fast neutrons above 4.8 MeV. CSIRO and ANSTO propose building a soil geochemical analysis system based on experience gained from building and applying PGNA borehole logging equipment. A soil geochemical analysis system could effectively map the 2D geochemical composition of the top 50cm of soil by dragging the 1D logging equipment across the ground surface. Substituting an isotopic neutron source for a D-T accelerator neutron source would enable the additional measurement of elemental carbon. Many potential ambiguities with other geophysical proxies for soil moisture may be resolved by direct geochemical measurement of H. Many other applications may be possible including time series in-situ measurements of soil moisture for differential drainage, hydrology, land surface

  15. AINSE's role in tertiary sector applied nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) is a collaboration between the Universities and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). Its aim is to foster research and training in areas associated with the applications of Nuclear Science and allied techniques. AINSE is now into the fifth decade of this unique association and in 2001 can claim the active membership of thirty-six of the publicly funded Universities in Australia plus the University of Auckland and its NZ government partner the Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences (IGNS). The widespread membership has brought with it a breadth of research areas and the traditional domains of fundamental nuclear science and allied engineering have found that they are now the stable platforms from which are launched environmental, archaeological, biomedical and novel-materials science. ANSTO's fifth decade will see the replacement of HIFAR with a state of the art research reactor that will bring biological applications to a sharper focus. A new accelerator-mass spectrometer will be commissioned during 2002 and is funded, in part, by a $1 M RIEF grant which itself recognises the quality and track record of all AINSE members' research. It will significantly assist a wide range of dating applications and also provide support to ion beam analysis (IBA) experiments. AINSE will continue to aid community collaboration with its conferences, workshops and participation in national conferences such as the AIP Congress, Vacuum Society, etc. On the international scene it is actively participating in major conferences to be held in Australia. The winter school is a venture into the undergraduate sphere

  16. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor: Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Vol. 1. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the replacement of the Australian Research reactor has been released. An important objective of the EIS process is to ensure that all relevant information has been collected and assessed so that the Commonwealth Government can make an informed decision on the proposal. The environmental assessment of the proposal to construct and operate a replacement reactor described in the Draft EIS has shown that the scale of environmental impacts that would occur would be acceptable, provided that the management measures and commitments made by ANSTO are adopted. Furthermore, construction and operation of the proposed replacement reactor would result in a range of benefits in health care, the national interest, scientific achievement and industrial capability. It would also result in a range of benefits derived from increased employment and economic activity. None of the alternatives to the replacement research reactor considered in the Draft EIS can meet all of the objectives of the proposal. The risk from normal operations or accidents has been shown to be well within national and internationally accepted risk parameters. The dose due to reactor operations would continue to be small and within regulatory limits. For the replacement reactor, the principle of `As Low As Reasonably Achievable` would form an integral part of the design and licensing process to ensure that doses to operators are minimized. Costs associated with the proposal are $286 million (in 1997 dollars) for design and construction. The annual operating and maintenance costs are estimated to be $12 million per year, of which a significant proportion will be covered by commercial activities. The costs include management of the spent fuel from the replacement reactor as well as the environmental management costs of waste management, safety and environmental monitoring. Decommissioning costs for the replacement reactor would arise at the end of its lifetime

  17. Regulatory review of releases from HIFAR of radioactive airborne effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westall, D.J.; Macnab, D.I.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) was set up by legislation in 1992 as an independent Commonwealth corporate body reporting to the Minister for Health and Family Services. Its functions include monitoring and reviewing the safety of nuclear plant owned or operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The NSB sets requirements for authorisation of the operation of the HIFAR research reactor, and may impose restrictions and conditions on its operation. The authorisation for the operation of HIFAR includes a requirement for arrangements for the treatment, safe storage and disposal of solid, liquid and gaseous radioactive wastes from the reactor. The objective is to establish conditions which would ensure that radiation exposure to plant personnel and the public from radioactive wastes are within acceptable limits and that releases are maintained as low as reasonably achievable. The NSB has developed expectations based on international best practice, against which to review HIFAR's arrangements for satisfying the requirement and achieving the objective. Arrangements for the release of airborne radioactive effluent from HIFAR were reviewed by the NSB as part of an overall review of the upgrade of safety documentation for HIFAR. The NSB's expectations for the review were drawn from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Basic Safety Standards (Safety Series No 115-I) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Recommendations for Limiting Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (1995). These expectations included a hierarchy of primary dose limits, stack discharge limits and reference levels for HIFAR aimed at ensuring that radiation doses to the public due to airborne effluent are less than the national dose limits and ANSTO's dose constraints, and are as low as reasonably achievable. An approach favoured by the operator is to work directly to a primary dose limit using an airborne dispersion computer program to

  18. A new radioisotope facility for Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlock, K.

    1997-01-01

    The Thai Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) is planning a new Nuclear Research Centre which will be located at Ongkharak, a greenfield site some 100 km North of Bangkok. General Atomics (GA) has submitted a bid for a turnkey contract for the core facilities comprising a Reactor to be supplied by GA, an Isotope Production Facility supplied by ANSTO and a Waste Processing and Storage Facility to be supplied by Hitachi through Marubeni. The buildings for these facilities will be provided by Raytheon, the largest constructor of nuclear facilities in the USA. The proposed Isotope Facility will consist of a 3000 m 2 building adjacent to the reactor with a pneumatic radioisotope transfer system. Hot cells, process equipment and clean rooms will be provided, as well as the usual maintenance and support services required for processing radiopharmaceutical and industrial products. To ensure the highest standards of product purity the processing areas will be supplied with clean air and operated at slightly positive pressure. The radioisotopes to be manufactured include Phosphorus 32 (S-32 [n,p]P-32), I-131(Te-130 [n,g]Te-131[p]I-131) for bulk, diagnostic capsules and therapeutic capsules, Iridium 192 (Ir-191[n,g]Ir-192) wire for radiotherapy and discs for industrial radiography sources and bulk Iodine 125 (Xe-124[n,g]Xe-125[β]I-125 for radioimmunoassay. The bid includes proposals for training OAEP staff during design and development at ANSTO's radioisotope facilities, and during construction and commissioning in Thailand. The entire project is planned to take four years with commencement anticipated in early 1997. The paper will describe the development of the design of the hot-cells, process equipment, building layout and ventilation and other services

  19. Low-risk alternative waste forms for problematic high-level and long-lived nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.W.A.; Begg, B.D.; Moricca, S.; Day, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The highest cost component the nuclear waste clean up challenge centres on high-level waste (HLW) and consequently the greatest opportunity for cost and schedule savings lies with optimising the approach to HLW cleanup. The waste form is the key component of the immobilisation process. To achieve maximum cost savings and optimum performance the selection of the waste form should be driven by the characteristics of the specific nuclear waste to be immobilised, rather than adopting a single baseline approach. This is particularly true for problematic nuclear wastes that are often not amenable to a single baseline approach. The use of tailored, high-performance, alternative waste forms that include ceramics and glass-ceramics, coupled with mature process technologies offer significant performance improvements and efficiency savings for a nuclear waste cleanup program. It is the waste form that determines how well the waste is locked up (chemical durability), and the number of repository disposal canisters required (waste loading efficiency). The use of alternative waste forms for problematic wastes also lowers the overall risk by providing high performance HLW treatment alternatives. The benefits tailored alternative waste forms bring to the HLW cleanup program will be briefly reviewed with reference to work carried out on the following: The HLW calcines at the Idaho National Laboratory; SYNROC ANSTO has developed a process utilising a glass-ceramic combined with mature hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) technology and has demonstrated this at a waste loading of 80 % and at a 30 kg HIP scale. The use of this technology has recently been estimated to result in a 70 % reduction in waste canisters, compared to the baseline borosilicate glass technology; Actinide-rich waste streams, particularly the work being done by SYNROC ANSTO with Nexia Solutions on the Plutonium-residues wastes at Sellafield in the UK, which if implemented is forecast to result in substantial

  20. The neutron beam facility at the Australian replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Australian federal government gave ANSTO final approval to build a research reactor to replace HIFAR on August 25th 1999. The replacement reactor is to be a multipurpose reactor with a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and having improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The replacement reactor will commence operation in 2005 and will cater for Australian scientific, industrial and medical needs well into the 21st century. The scientific capabilities of the neutron beams at the replacement reactor are being developed in consultation with representatives from academia, industry and government research laboratories to provide a facility for condensed matter research in physics, chemistry, materials science, life sciences, engineering and earth sciences. Cold, thermal and hot neutron sources are to be installed, and neutron guides will be used to position most of the neutron beam instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. Eight instruments are planned for 2005, with a further three to be developed by 2010. A conceptual layout for the neutron beam facility is presented including the location of the planned suite of neutron beam instruments. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by an accredited reactor builder in a turnkey contract. Tenders have been called for December 1999, with selection of contractor planned by June 2000. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations in consultation with the user community and interested overseas scientists. The facility will be based, as far as possible, around a neutron guide hall that is be served by three thermal and three cold neutron guides. Efficient transportation of thermal and cold neutrons to the guide hall requires the use of modern super

  1. A REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON RADIOLOGICAL SECURITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Fred A.; Murray, A.; Dickerson, S.; Tynan, Douglas M.; Rawl, Richard R.; Hoo, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, Australia, through the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) created the Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) project and partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to form the Southeast Asian Regional Radiological Security Partnership (RRSP). The intent of the RRSP/RSRS partnership is to cooperate with regional neighbors in Southeast Asia to improve the security of their radioactive sources. This Southeast Asian Partnership supports NNSA and IAEA objectives to improve the security of high risk radioactive sources by raising awareness of the need, and developing national programs, to: protect and control such materials; improve the security of such materials and recover and condition the materials no longer in use. To date, agreed upon joint activities have included assistance with the improvement of regulatory infrastructure for the control of radioactive sources, training on the physical protection of radioactive sources, training and assistance with the search, location, identification and securing of orphan radioactive sources and overall assistance with implementing the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. Since the inception of the partnership, ten Southeast Asian nations have participated in a range of activities from receiving general training on the security of radioactive sources to receiving specialized equipment and training to locate orphan or abandoned radioactive sources. By having a shared vision and objectives for radioactive source security in the Southeast Asian region, ANSTO and NNSA have been able to develop a successful partnership which has effectively utilized the technical, financial and political resources of each contributing partner. An example of how this partnership works is the cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency, Indonesia (BAPETEN) to

  2. Media and Australia's replacement reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keenan, Pamela

    2001-01-01

    In September 1997, the Commonwealth Government of Australia announced a proposal to build a replacement nuclear research reactor at Lucas Heights in Sydney. Extensive public consultation, parliamentary debate and independent reports were prepared to ensure that the new facility would meet strict international requirements, national safety and environmental standards, and performance specifications servicing the needs of Australia - for decades to come. On 6 June 2000, Argentine company INVAP SE was announced as the preferred tenderer. In July 2000 contracts were signed between INVAP and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation for the construction the replacement reactor, due to be completed in 2005. In order to retain a strong local presence, INVAP undertook a joint venture with two of Australia's foremost heavy construction businesses. Briefly the new research reactor will be a replacement for the ageing Australian Reactor (HIFAR). Nuclear science and technology, in Australia, is no stranger to media controversy and misinformation. Understandably the announcement of a preferred tenderer followed by the signing of contracts, attracted significant national and international media attention. However in the minds of the media, the issue is far from resolved and is now a constant 'news story' in the Australian media. Baseless media stories have made claims that the project will cost double the original estimates; question the credibility of the contractors; and raise issues of international security. The project is currently linked with Australia's requirements for long term nuclear waste management and there has been an attempt to bring national Indigenous People's issues into play. Some of these issues have been profiled in the press internationally. So, just to set the record straight and give you an appropriate impression of what's 'really happening' I would like to highlight a few issues, how ANSTO dealt with these, and what was finally reported

  3. Australia's replacement research reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    HIFAR, a 10 MW tank type DIDO Class reactor has operated at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre for 43 years. HIFAR and the 10 kW Argonaut reactor 'Moata' which is in the Care and Maintenance phase of decommissioning are Australia's only nuclear reactors. The initial purpose for HIFAR was for materials testing to support a nuclear power program. Changing community attitude through the 1970's and a Government decision not to proceed with a planned nuclear power reactor resulted in a reduction of materials testing activities and a greater emphasis being placed on neutron beam research and the production of radioisotopes, particularly for medical purposes. HIFAR is not fully capable of satisfying the expected increase in demand for medical radiopharmaceuticals beyond the next 5 years and the radial configuration of the beam tubes severely restricts the scope and efficiency of neutron beam research. In 1997 the Australian Government decided that a replacement research reactor should be built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation at Lucas Heights subject to favourable results of an Environmental Impact Study. The Ei identified no reasons on the grounds of safety, health, hazard or risk to prevent construction on the preferred site and it was decided in May 1999 that there were no environmental reasons why construction of the facility should not proceed. In recent years ANSTO has been reviewing the operation of HIFAR and observing international developments in reactor technology. Limitations in the flexibility and efficiency achievable in operation of a tank type reactor and the higher intrinsic safety sought in fundamental design resulted in an early decision that the replacement reactor must be a pool type having cleaner and higher intensity tangential neutron beams of wider energy range than those available from HIFAR. ANSTO has chosen to use it's own resources supported by specialised external knowledge and experience to identify

  4. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    During the year under review, an important foundation was laid for promoting uniformity in the radiation protection framework amongst the Commonwealth, States and Territories when Ministers approved the idea of a National Directory for Radiation Protection and made good progress in several significant services, notably the radiofrequency (RF) measurement service.The building of the Melbourne and Perth radionuclide monitoring stations we are operating for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) was completed and planning started for stations in Townsville and Darwin. The Maralinga remediation project was completed. ARPANSA was required to provide advice to the Department of Industry, Science and Resources (DISR) about steps to complete the project. ARPANSA has also been completing the final measurements to provide the assurance that the remediation has satisfied the clean-up criteria. The building of the Melbourne and Perth radionuclide monitoring stations we are operating for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) was completed and planning started for stations in Townsville and Darwin. The Maralinga remediation project was completed. ARPANSA was required to provide advice to the Department of Industry, Science and Resources (DISR) about steps to complete the project. ARPANSA has also been completing the final measurements to provide the assurance that the remediation has satisfied the clean-up criteria. I September 1999, ARPANSA issued a licence to prepare a site for the Replacement Research Reactor . The form of this licence supported by a Safety Evaluation Report from the Regulatory Branch and covered by a formal statement of reasons for the decision set a model for the ARPANSA licensing of major facilities. One of the roles inherited by ARPANSA from the Nuclear Safety Bureau is the monitoring of the operations of the ANSTO nuclear plant. From its monitoring over the year, ARPANSA has concluded that overall ANSTO's nuclear plant

  5. The 1997 determination of the Australian standards of exposure and absorbed dose at 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntley, R.B.; Boas, J.F.; Van der Gaast, H.

    1998-05-01

    The arrangements for the maintenance of the Australian standards for 60 Co are described in detail. The primary standards are a graphite cavity chamber for exposure/air kerma and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose. These secondary standards are described and their responses in corresponding 90 Sr reference sources are reported. Accurate ratios between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO) 90 Sr reference sources are derived for use in future calibrations. The value of 28.8 years for the half-life of 90 Sr is confirmed. The usefulness of 90 Sr reference source measurements in quality assurance is discussed. The charge sensitivity and linearity of the ANSTO electrometers are reported by two different methods and are compared with previous results. Calibration factors for all the secondary standard ionization chambers are given, in terms of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to water. Calibration factors are also given for most of the chambers in terms of absorbed dose to graphite. The methods of deriving the calibration factors are explained in detail, including all the corrections applied to both the primary and secondary standard measurements. Three alternative methods of deriving the absorbed dose to water calibration factors are compared. The reported calibration factors are compared with previous results. Changes in the Australian units of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to graphite and water are derived from changes in the corresponding calibration factors. The Australian units of exposure and air kerma have not changed significantly since 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to graphite is now 1.1 % smaller than in 1993 and 1.3 % smaller than in 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to water is now 1.4 % smaller than in 1993, but is only 0.9 % smaller than in 1990. Comparisons of the Australian standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose with those of the Bureau

  6. The 1997 determination of the Australian standards of exposure and absorbed dose at {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, R.B.; Boas, J.F. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Van der Gaast, H. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1998-05-01

    The arrangements for the maintenance of the Australian standards for {sup 60}Co are described in detail. The primary standards are a graphite cavity chamber for exposure/air kerma and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose. These secondary standards are described and their responses in corresponding {sup 90}Sr reference sources are reported. Accurate ratios between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO) {sup 90}Sr reference sources are derived for use in future calibrations. The value of 28.8 years for the half-life of {sup 90}Sr is confirmed. The usefulness of {sup 90}Sr reference source measurements in quality assurance is discussed. The charge sensitivity and linearity of the ANSTO electrometers are reported by two different methods and are compared with previous results. Calibration factors for all the secondary standard ionization chambers are given, in terms of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to water. Calibration factors are also given for most of the chambers in terms of absorbed dose to graphite. The methods of deriving the calibration factors are explained in detail, including all the corrections applied to both the primary and secondary standard measurements. Three alternative methods of deriving the absorbed dose to water calibration factors are compared. The reported calibration factors are compared with previous results. Changes in the Australian units of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to graphite and water are derived from changes in the corresponding calibration factors. The Australian units of exposure and air kerma have not changed significantly since 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to graphite is now 1.1 % smaller than in 1993 and 1.3 % smaller than in 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to water is now 1.4 % smaller than in 1993, but is only 0.9 % smaller than in 1990. Comparisons of the Australian standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose with

  7. On the calibration of radiotherapy dosemeters in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntley, R.; Kotler, L.; Webb, D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Dosemeters for external beam radiotherapy are calibrated in Australia by ARPANSA, against the national primary standards of exposure and absorbed dose. The primary standards are free air chambers for exposure at low and medium energy X-rays, a graphite cavity chamber for exposure at 60 Co, and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose at 60 Co and high energy (MV) X -rays. Radiotherapy dosemeters are calibrated against these standards using a well documented formalism to provide calibration factors suitable for use with dosimetry protocols. A dosemeter usually comprises an ionization chamber connected to an independent electrometer. These are calibrated separately if possible. A combined calibration factor is reported together with the electrometer calibration factor (sensitivity). The dosimetry protocol used in radiotherapy centres in Australia and New Zealand is currently the simplified version of the IAEA TRS277 protocol, published by the New Zealand NRL and recommended by the ACPSEM. This protocol requires the use of an exposure or air kerma calibration factor at 60 Co (Nx or Nk) to evaluate the absorbed dose to air calibration factor N D . The chamber is then placed in a water phantom with its centre displaced from the reference point by p eff . ARPANSA can also supply calibration factors in absorbed dose to water (N D,w ), as required as input to the new IAEA CoP. If an absorbed dose to water calibration factor is used by the radiotherapy centre, the chamber should be placed with its centre at the reference point in the water phantom. ARPANSA has for some years coordinated the participation of Australian radiotherapy centres in the IAEA TLD Quality Audit service. Note that this service does not represent a calibration and should not be referred to as such. The only calibration is that provided by ARPANSA for a reference dosemeter at each radiotherapy centre. As soon as the ANSTO SSDL is operational, calibrations of reference dosemeters will also be

  8. Kino filmų titrai kaip kalbų mokymosi priemonė. Untertitel als Mittel zum Fremdsprachenerwerb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Baravykaitė

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Das in den letzten Jahren spürbare Bestreben der litauischen Gesetzgeber, Untertitelung von Fernsehfilmen zwecks Fremdsprachenerwerb gesetzlich anzuordnen, löste eine Auseinandersetzung in der Öffentlichkeit aus, die sich in der Presse sowie im Internet widerspiegelt und als Anstoß zum vorliegenden Beitrag dient. Diese Arbeit stellt den Versuch dar, die Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der Untertitelung als eines Mittels zum Fremdsprachenerwerb zu untersuchen. Auf Grund der fehlenden wissenschaftlichen Forschungen in diesem Bereich sollen dabei empirische Betrachtungen und die vergleichende Textanalyse von Original und Übersetzung als Hilfe dienen. Auch wenn die Relevanz der Untertitelung für den Fremdsprachenerwerb nicht bestreitbar ist, ist sie aber zugleich nicht zu überschätzen: Durch die lediglich für diese Form der audiovisuellen Übersetzung charakteristischen Merkmale (kurze Einblendezeit, kondensierte Sprache und begrenzte Übertragungsmöglichkeiten von Realia-Begriffen, Phraseologismen, Intertextualismen, dem Wortspiel etc. bleiben dem Zuschauer oft sprachliche Stilmittel vorenthalten und der in allen Übersetzungsbereichen vorkommende unausweichliche Sinn- und Wirkungsverlust des Originals wird erheblich verstärkt. Anbetracht der erwähnten Aspekte und der häufigen fehlerhaften Übersetzungen sollen Untertitel nur als Hilfsmittel beim Fremdsprachenerwerb angewendet werden, wobei herkömmliche Lehr- und Lernstrategien von Fremdsprachen in den Vordergrund treten müssen.

  9. The use of honey bees in environmental monitoring of 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkinson, A.V.; Chisari, R.; Heijnis, H.; Flood, S.

    1998-01-01

    Bees are excellent random samplers of relatively defined areas. A bee typically flies up to 1.5 km from the hive, covering an area of approximately 7 km 2 . Within this area the bee forages from many plants and collects water from various sources. Bee products, such as pollen and honey, therefore reflect the conditions of the immediate environment. In this study we were interested in the transfer of the anthropogenically produced isotope 137 Cs from environmental sinks into the bee products. 137 Cs originates principally from the atmospheric thermonuclear bomb tests conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Minute quantities could also originate from nuclear establishments (such as ANSTO in Australia) where it is used in scientific research. Once released into the environment 137 Cs is known to bind tightly with the clay component and organic fractions in soil and its distribution largely reflects the physical transport of soil. In this work we compared the 137 Cs levels from the Sydney region and other parts of NSW against Ireland (which were high as a result of the Chernobyl reactor accident)

  10. Human activity and climate variability project: annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harle, K.J.; Heijnis, H.; Henderson-Sellers, A.; Sharmeen, S.; Zahorowski, W.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the state of the Australian environment, including natural climate variability, prior to colonial settlement is vital if we are to define and understand the impact of over two hundred years of post-industrial human activity on our landscape. ANSTO, in conjunction with university partners, is leading a major research effort to provide natural archives of human activity and climate variability over the last 500 years in Australia, utilising a variety of techniques, including lead-210 and radiocarbon dating and analyses of proxy indicators (such as microfossils) as well as direct evidence (such as trace elements) of human activity and climate variability. The other major project objectives were to contribute to the understanding of the impact of human induced and natural aerosols in the East Asian region on climate through analysis and sourcing of fine particles and characterisation of air samples using radon concentrations and to contribute to the improvement of land surface parameterisation schemes and investigate the potential to use stable isotopes to improve global climate models and thus improve our understanding of future climate

  11. A large volume cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott; Pring, Allan

    2010-10-01

    A hydrothermal cell with 320 ml internal volume has been designed and constructed for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations. The cell design adopts a dumbbell configuration assembled with standard commercial stainless steel components and a zero-scattering Ti-Zr alloy sample compartment. The fluid movement and heat transfer are simply driven by natural convection due to the natural temperature gradient along the fluid path, so that the temperature at the sample compartment can be stably sustained by heating the fluid in the bottom fluid reservoir. The cell can operate at temperatures up to 300 °C and pressures up to 90 bars and is suitable for studying reactions requiring a large volume of hydrothermal fluid to damp out the negative effect from the change of fluid composition during the course of the reactions. The capability of the cell was demonstrated by a hydrothermal phase transformation investigation from leucite (KAlSi2O6) to analcime (NaAlSi2O6ṡH2O) at 210 °C on the high intensity powder diffractometer Wombat in ANSTO. The kinetics of the transformation has been resolved by collecting diffraction patterns every 10 min followed by Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. The classical Avrami/Arrhenius analysis gives an activation energy of 82.3±1.1 kJ mol-1. Estimations of the reaction rate under natural environments by extrapolations agree well with petrological observations.

  12. Development of the RRR cold neutron beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovotti, Osvaldo; Masriera, Nestor; Lecot, Carlos; Hergenreder, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes some general design issues on the neutron beam facilities (cold neutron source and neutron beam transport system) of the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The description covers different aspect of the design: the requirements that lead to an innovative design, the overall design itself, the definition of a technical approach in order to develop the necessary design solutions, and finally the organizational framework by which international expertise from five different institutions is integrated. From the technical viewpoint, the RRR-CNS is a liquid Deuterium (LD2) moderator, sub-cooled to ensure maximum moderation efficiency, flowing within a closed natural circulation thermosyphon loop. The thermosyphon is surrounded by a zirconium alloy CNS vacuum containment that provides thermal insulation and a multiple barriers scheme to prevent Deuterium from mixing with water or air. Consistent with international practice, this vessel is designed to withstand any hypothetical energy reaction should Deuterium and air mix in its interior. The 'cold' neutrons are then taken by the NBTS and transported by the neutron guide system into the reactor beam hall and neutron guide hall, where neutron scattering instruments are located. From the management viewpoint, the adopted distributed scheme is successful to manage the complex interfacing between highly specialized technologies, allowing a smooth integration within the project. (author)

  13. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Bilateral safeguards agreements; International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Agreement; The South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty Act; The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Act; The Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Health and Ageing; Minister for Foreign Affairs; Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts; Minister for, Resources, Energy and Tourism); 2. Advisory bodies (Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council; Advisory Committees); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA); Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office; Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO); Supervising Scientist)

  14. Calculation of reactivity coefficients using AUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, B.V.

    1992-01-01

    The DIDO class High-Flux Australia Reactor (HIFAR) at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) achieved initial criticality in 1958. For the first 10 yr of operation, fuel management and safety arguments were based on parameters measured during the commissioning period of the reactor augmented by additional measurements where these were thought necessary, chiefly as a consequence of changes in the type of reactor fuel element or disposition of irradiation rigs. In the early 1970s, development of the modular neutronics code AUS began, and in the intervening years, a transition from experimental to calculated data has occurred. This has been partly the result of the difficulty of gaining reactor time for experimental purposes but, perhaps more importantly, partly the result of the realization of the difficulty of obtaining adequate accuracy in measurements of space and energy-dependent data. Experience in using the code and extensive benchmark testing has led to great confidence in the correctness of calculations to the point where the reactor can be almost entirely operated and managed with the use of calculated data. This paper briefly describes the present status of the AUS code modules and specific problems that have been addressed with them

  15. Pair distribution functions of carbonaceous solids, determined using energy filtered diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, T.C.; McCulloch, D.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The structures of various carbonaceous solids were investigated using energy filtered diffraction patterns collected in two dimensions using a Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF). In order to reduce multiple scattering and eliminate inelastic scattering effects, the diffraction patterns were filtered using an energy -selecting slit around the zero-loss peak. Software has been developed for the extraction of radially averaged pair distributions functions from the diffraction data. This entails finding the position of the un-scattered beam, radially averaging the two dimensional intensity distributions, calibrating the resulting one dimensional intensity profiles and finally normalising the data to obtain structure factors. Techniques for improving and assessing data quality, pertaining to the methodology used here, have also been explored. Structure factors and radial distribution functions generated using this analysis will be discussed and, for the commercial V25 glassy carbon samples, compared to previous, work of one of the authors'. In order to answer questions regarding multiple scattering effects and structural homogeneity of the samples, neutron scattering was performed on the Medium Resolution Powder Diffractometer (MRPD), at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology's (ANSTO) facility. A critical comparison of the neutron scattering and electron diffraction generated structure factors will be presented. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  16. Development of neutron beam facilities for the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Australia is building a research reactor to replace the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights by the end of 2005. Like HIFAR, the replacement research reactor will be multipurpose with capabilities for both neutron beam research and radioisotope production. It will be a pool-type reactor with four times the neutron flux of HIFAR, a cold neutron source and large neutron guide hall. Cold and thermal neutrons will be transported to the neutron beam instruments with modern supermirror guides. INVAP SE has been contracted to build the reactor and associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments. With conceptual design complete, detailed engineering is well advanced and site preparation has commenced. ANSTO is developing an initial suite of eight neutron beam instruments in close consultation with the Australian user community. Design of six of the neutron beam instruments is progressing well. The presentation will include a review the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the neutron beam facility and a status report on progress to date on the instrument development program

  17. The national synchrotron: ray of hope or ring of fire?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, T.

    2002-01-01

    While most agree the synchrotron will be a boost for Australian science, the author reports on concerns about the cost of building and operating the project Biotech industry representatives want to know how that $100 million will be used and want to see the government's justification for pouring more than a third of its total technology budget for 2001/2 into the synchrotron. They, and the opposition, also want to know where the private money will come from to make up the balance or whether the state will ultimately have to pitch in the rest itself. Indeed, an Auditor-General's report released last week warned of the need for comprehensive financial risk management of the facility. The National Synchrotron, to be built at Monash University, will be a hollow ring of about 60 metres diameter and initially housing nine beamlines, each capable of performing independent experiments simultaneously. According to Dr Richard Garrett, director of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (http://www.ansto.gov.au/natfac/asrp.html) projection reports had indicated the local synchrotron user community would expand from about 350 researchers today to about 1200 by the time the National Synchrotron is built, with demand steadily increasing in the years following its completion

  18. Phase 2 of the Nea TDB project and some lessons learned from the use of phase 1 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahiu, K.

    2002-01-01

    As the five initial reviews of the TDB Project come to their conclusion, the negotiations for an independently funded continuation of the TDB Project through two meetings of an ad hoc group were completed in late 1997. The participating organisations are ANSTO (Australia), NIRAS/ONDRAF (Belgium), RAWRA (Czech Republic), POSIVA (Finland), ANDRA and IPSN (France), FZK (Germany), JNC/PNC (Japan), ENRESA (Spain), SKB and SKI (Sweden), HSK, NAGRA and PSI (Switzerland), BNFL and NIREX (UK) and the DOE (USA). This project is referred to as the TDB Phase II Project, or simply TDB II. The following new reviews will be performed within this project: - an update of the existing U/Am/Tc/Np/Pu reviews (one review team for all elements); - the inorganic chemistry of Ni; - the inorganic chemistry of Se; - the complexation of selected simple organic ligands (ISA, EDTA, citrate and oxalate) with U, Am, Tc, Np, Pu, Ni, Se, Zr and some selected competing cations; the inorganic chemistry of Zr. These review areas have been decided on taking into account the toxicity, mobility, radioactivity and half-lives of the commonly occurring nuclides in radioactive waste, as well as the particular areas of interest of the funding organisations. To avoid the delays that have plagued Phase I, the organisation of the TDB Project has been restructured, and the funding provided has been calculated to cover all necessary expenses for the project. (author)

  19. A twelve month study of PM2.5 and PM10 fine particle aerosol composition in the Sydney region using ion beam analysis techniques. Appendix 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, David D.; Bailey, G.M.; Kondepudi, Ramesh

    1995-01-01

    The accelerator based ion beam (IBA) analysis techniques of PIXE, PIGME, PESA, and RBS have been used to characterise fine particles at selected sites in the Sydney region. The four techniques operating simultaneously provide elemental concentrations on 24 chemical species, including H, Q N, 0, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, Br and Pb. The total mass and the elemental carbon by laser integrated plate techniques were also measured. A stacked filter system, built by the University of Gent, Belgium and supplied by the IAEA was used to provide fine particle data on PM2.5 and PM10 particles. While a cyclone sampler, built at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, was used to provide data on PM2.5 particles only. The two different types of units were operated along side each other for the whole of 1994 and the results compared. The use of the multi-elemental IBA techniques also allowed for some fine particle source fingerprinting to be performed. (author)

  20. International Nuclear Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    We are pleased to announce that the 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference (INPC2016) will take place in Adelaide (Australia) from September 11-16, 2016. The 25th INPC was held in Firenze in 2013 and the 24th INPC in Vancouver, Canada, in 2010. The Conference is organized by the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter at the University of Adelaide, together with the Australian National University and ANSTO. It is also sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by a number of organisations, including AUSHEP, BNL, CoEPP, GSI and JLab. INPC 2016 will be held in the heart of Adelaide at the Convention Centre on the banks of the River Torrens. It will consist of 5 days of conference presentations, with plenary sessions in the mornings, up to ten parallel sessions in the afternoons, poster sessions and a public lecture. The Conference will officially start in the evening of Sunday 11th September with Registration and a Reception and will end late on the afternoon of Fri...

  1. Synthesis and analysis of gold nanoclusters on silicon substrates by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.K.; Venkatachalam, D.K.; Bhargava, S.K.; Evans, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate the growth of silica nanowires on silicon substrates, two different seeding techniques: 1) ion implantation and 2) chemical deposition of as-synthesised gold colloids have been compared for the formation of catalysing gold nanoclusters. The prepared substrates of both types were analysed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at ANSTO to determine the amount of gold and its depth distribution. The topography of the substrates deposited with chemically synthesised gold nanoparticles were studied under SEM. The preliminary ion beam (RBS) analysis has shown ion implantation as a novel technique for seeding Au nanoclusters on silicon substrates facilitating growth of nanowires. This method holds a great potential for using any metal across the periodic table that can act as catalysing seed nanoclusters for nanowire growth. The use of chemical deposition as a seeding technique to deposit as-synthesised gold nanoparticles requires further investigations. RBS results show significant difference in the depth distribution of the gold nanoparticles on silicon substrates seeded by two different techniques. (author). 6 refs., 4 figs

  2. Reactor training simulator for the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etchepareborda, A; Flury, C.A; Lema, F; Maciel, F; Alegrechi, D; Damico, M; Ibarra, G; Muguiro, M; Gimenez, M; Schlamp, M; Vertullo, A

    2004-01-01

    The main features of the ANSTO Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) Reactor Training Simulator (RTS) are presented.The RTS is a full-scope and partial replica simulator.Its scope includes a complete set of plant normal evolutions and malfunctions obtained from the plant design basis accidents list.All the systems necessary to implement the operating procedures associated to these transients are included.Within these systems both the variables connected to the plant SCADA and the local variables are modelled, leading to several thousands input-output variables in the plant mathematical model (PMM).The trainee interacts with the same plant SCADA, a Foxboro I/A Series system.Control room hardware is emulated through graphical displays with touch-screen.The main system models were tested against RELAP outputs.The RTS includes several modules: a model manager (MM) that encapsulates the plant mathematical model; a simulator human machine interface, where the trainee interacts with the plant SCADA; and an instructor console (IC), where the instructor commands the simulation.The PMM is built using Matlab-Simulink with specific libraries of components designed to facilitate the development of the nuclear, hydraulic, ventilation and electrical plant systems models [es

  3. The Australian synchrotron research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The Australian Synchrotron Research Program (ASRP) was established in 1996 under a 5 year grant from the Australian Government, and is managed by ANSTO on behalf of a consortium of Australian universities and research organisations. It has taken over the operation of the Australian National Beamline Facility (ANBF) at the Photon Factory, and has joined two CATS at the Advanced Photon Source: the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation CAT (SRI-CAT) and the Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS). The ASRP thus manages a comprehensive range of synchrotron radiation research facilities for Australian science. The ANBF is a general purpose hard X-ray beamline which has been in operation at the Photon Factory since 1993. It currently caters for about 35 Australian research teams per year. The facilities available at the ANBF will be presented and the research program will be summarised. The ASRP facilities at the APS comprise the 5 sectors operated by SRI-CAT, BioCARS and ChemMatCARS. A brief description will be given of the ASRP research programs at the APS, which will considerably broaden the scope of Australian synchrotron science

  4. Report on the workshop on neutrons for engineering and its conclusions regarding the residual-stress diffractometer at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to: inform the Australian research organizations and universities of the capabilities of an engineering and materials science instrument; promote the use of neutron diffraction to map and investigate strains/stresses in materials and components for industrial applications and research; identify the future needs and opportunities in this area; present the options for a stress mapping diffractometer at the Replacement Research Reactor and receive feedback on these options; identify the ancillary equipment and facilities required. Presented papers and discussions at the workshop indicated that there are a number of important benefits to Australia in the building of a first-class instrument for materials science and engineering and many residual stress-related problems in a wide variety of fields in Australia, such as the manufacturing industries, mining, oil and gas, rail transport, defense and life extension. Stress scanning provides another tool for solving problems to complement facilities at the major research institutes, CSIRO, AMIRA, DSTO, ANSTO and the universities. It will create a regional pool of experts who may tap into the pool of expertise internationally. The turn around time for tests for Australian customers will be reduced thus avoiding having to go overseas to have the tests performed. From an educational perspective the instrument will build expertise in Australia and will help to attract graduates into engineering. A detailed list of the attendees and affiliations is in Appendix C

  5. Novel thermosyphon driven hydrothermal flow-through cell for in situ and time resolved neutron diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Etschmann, Barbara; University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Full text: A flow-through cell for hydrothermal phase transformation studies by in situ and time-resolved neutron diffraction has been designed and constructed. The cell has a large internal volume of 320 m L and can work at up to 300 degree Centigrade under autogeneous vapour pressures (-85 bar). The fluid flow is driven by thermosyphon which is realized by the proper design of temperature difference around the closed loop[1,2). The main body of the cell is made of stainless steel (316 type), but the sample compartment is constructed from non-scattering Ti/Zr alloy. We have successfully commissioned the cell on Australia's new high intensity powder diffractometer WOMBAT in ANSTO, using a simple transformation reaction from leucite (KAISi 2 O 6 ) to analcime (NaAISi 2 O 6H2O ) and then back from analcime to leucite. The demonstration proved that the cell is an excellent tool for probing hydrothermal phase transformations. By collecting diffraction data every 5 min, it was clearly seen that leucite was progressively transformed to analcime in a NaCI solution, and the produced analcime was progressively transformed back to leucite in a K 2 CO 3 solution.

  6. Neutron diffraction and oxide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide compounds form a large class of interesting materials that have a diverse range of mechanical and electronic properties. This diversity and its commercial implications has had a significant impact on physics research. This is particularly evident in the fields of superconductivity magnetoresistivity and ferroelectricity, where discoveries in the last 15 years have given rise to significant shifts in research activities. Historically, oxides have been studied for many years, but it is only recently that significant effort has been diverted to the study of oxide materials for their application to mechanical and electronic devices. An important property of such materials is the atomic structure, for the determination of which diffraction techniques are ideally suited. Recent examples of structure determinations using neutron diffraction in oxide based systems are high temperature superconductors, where oxygen defects are a key factor. Here, neutron diffraction played a major role in determining the effect of oxygen on the superconducting properties. Similarly, neutron diffraction has enjoyed much success in the determination of the structures of the manganate based colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials. In both these cases the structure plays a pivotal role in determining theoretical models of the electronic properties. The neutron scattering group at ANSTO has investigated several oxide systems using neutron powder diffraction. Two such systems are presented in this paper; the zirconia-based materials that are used as engineering materials, and the perovskite-based oxides that include the well known cuprate superconductors and the manganate CMR materials

  7. Final guidelines for an Environmental Impact Statement on the proposed construction and operation of a replacement nuclear research reactor at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    These guidelines are based on the requirements of paragraphs 4.1 and 4.3 of the Administrative Procedures under the Commonwealth Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974 (EPIP Act).The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has been designated as proponent under the EPIP Act in relation to the proposed replacement nuclear research reactor at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC). The term 'environment' refers to all aspects of the surroundings of human beings, whether affecting human beings as individuals or in social groupings. It includes the natural environment, the built environment, and social aspects of our surroundings. The definition covers such factors as air, water, soils, flora,fauna, buildings, roads, employment, hazards and risks, and safety. As set out in the guidelines, the scope of this assessment shall encompass those issues and alternatives directly related to the construction and operation of a replacement nuclear research reactor at the LHSTC. The EIS will need to make clear the site selection criteria used, and the basis, in assessing Lucas Heights as being suitable for a new reactor. While the EIS will address all aspects of the construction and operation of a replacement nuclear research reactor, it will not address issues associated with the treatment of spent nuclear fuel rods from the existing High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR facility). The EIS will also address issues associated with the eventual decommissioning of the proposed replacement reactor, and eventual decommissioning of the existing HIFAR facility

  8. Regulatory aspects of criticality control in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, Sergei

    2003-01-01

    With the creation of Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) the Australian approach to criticality safety was revisited. Consistency with international best practices is required by the Act that created ARPANSA and this was applied to practices in criticality safety adopted in other countries. This required extensive regulatory efforts both in auditing the major Australian Nuclear Operator, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), and assessing the existing in Australia criticality safety practices and implementing the required changes using the new legislative power of ARPANSA. The adopted regulatory approach is formulated through both the issued by ARPANSA licenses for nuclear installations (including reactors, fuel stores and radioactive waste stores) and the string of new regulatory documents, including the Regulatory Assessment Principles and the Regulatory Assessment Guidelines for criticality safety. The main features of the adopted regulation include the requirements of independent peer-review, ongoing refresher training coupled with annual accreditation and the reliance on the safe design rather than on an administrative control. (author)

  9. Processing of lateritic ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, D.E.; Ring, R.J. [Environment Division, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, New South Wales (Australia); McGill, J.; Russell, H. [Energy Resources of Australia Ltd., Ranger Mine, Jabiru, Northern Territory (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    Highly weathered or lateritic ores that contain high proportions of fine clay minerals present specific problems when they are processed to extract uranium. Of perhaps the greatest significance is the potential of the fine minerals to adsorb dissolved uranium (preg-robbing) from leach liquors produced by processing laterites or blends of laterite and primary ores. These losses can amount to 25% of the readily soluble uranium. The clay components can also restrict practical slurry densities to relatively low values in order to avoid rheology problems in pumping and agitation. The fine fractions also contribute to relatively poor solid-liquid separation characteristics in settling and/or filtration. Studies at ANSTO have characterised the minerals believed to be responsible for these problems and quantified the effects of the fines in these types of ores. Processing strategies were also examined, including roasting, resin-in-leach and separate leaching of the laterite fines to overcome potential problems. The incorporation of the preferred treatment option into an existing mill circuit is discussed. (author)

  10. GumTree-An integrated scientific experiment environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Tony; Hauser, Nick; Goetz, Andy; Hathaway, Paul; Franceschini, Fredi; Rayner, Hugh; Zhang, Lidia

    2006-01-01

    GumTree is an open source and multi-platform graphical user interface for performing neutron scattering and X-ray experiments. It handles the complete experiment life cycle from instrument calibration, data acquisition, and real time data analysis to results publication. The aim of the GumTree Project is to create a highly Integrated Scientific Experiment Environment (ISEE), allowing interconnectivity and data sharing between different distributed components such as motors, detectors, user proposal database and data analysis server. GumTree is being adapted to several instrument control server systems such as TANGO, EPICS and SICS, providing an easy-to-use front-end for users and simple-to-extend model for software developers. The design of GumTree is aimed to be reusable and configurable for any scientific instrument. GumTree will be adapted to six neutron beam instruments for the OPAL reactor at ANSTO. Other European institutes including ESRF, ILL and PSI have shown interest in using GumTree as their workbench for instrument control and data analysis

  11. Immobilisation of Higher Activity Wastes from Nuclear Reactor Production of 99Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin W. A. Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of intermediate- and low-level liquid and solid wastes are produced from reactor production of 99Mo using UAl alloy or UO2 targets and in principle can be collectively or individually converted into waste forms. At ANSTO, we have legacy acidic uranyl-nitrate-rich intermediate level waste (ILW from the latter, and an alkaline liquid ILW, a U-rich filter cake, plus a shorter lived liquid stream that rapidly decays to low-level waste (LLW standards, from the former. The options considered consist of cementitious products, glasses, glass-ceramics, or ceramics produced by vitrification or hot isostatic pressing for intermediate-level wastes. This paper discusses the progress in waste form development and processing to treat ANSTO’s ILW streams arising from 99Mo. The various waste forms and the reason for the process option chosen will be reviewed. We also address the concerns over adapting our chosen process for use in a hot-cell environment.

  12. A new capability for ANTARES: {sup 7}Be by AMS for ice samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.M., E-mail: ams@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 (Australia); Mokhber-Shahin, L.; Simon, K.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    ANSTO, in collaboration with Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) and the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), has an on-going program of {sup 10}Be (t{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 1.39 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} a) concentration measurement in firn and ice at Law Dome, Antarctica. In recent years snow pit samples have also been measured for {sup 7}Be (t{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 53.28 d) concentration as this isotope has the potential to give further insight into the transport and deposition of cosmogenic beryllium to Law Dome and so improve the use of {sup 10}Be as a proxy for solar activity. Early {sup 7}Be measurements were made by gamma-ray spectrometry (GRS) with typical counting times of 3 days. In 2010, we developed the capability for {sup 7}Be/{sup 9}Be measurement on the 10 MV ANTARES (Australian National Tandem Accelerator for Applied Research) accelerator using carbon foil post-stripping of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} to {sup 7}Be{sup 4+} to eliminate the {sup 7}Li isobar. We describe the method and explain the advantages of using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) over GRS for {sup 7}Be analysis.

  13. Atmospheric aerosol characterisation at Cape Grim and Global Warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.; Garton, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Australia Global Baseline monitoring station at Cape Grim in north western Tasmania is operated by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. ANSTO has been sampling, measuring and characterising fine particles of 2.5 μm diameters and less (PM2.5) at Cape Grim since the middle of 1992. Accelerator based ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques [2-41 have been used to identify over 25 different elemental species present in over 500 filters collected to date. The elements measured by PIXE, PIGME, ERDA and RBS include, H, C, N, O, F, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb. Of the measured elements not listed the majority occurred at concentrations below 10 ng/m 3 . The average monthly mass variations over the 5 year period from 1992 to 1997 are given. The average non-soil potassium was 92% of the total potassium, showing that the vast majority of fine potassium was associated with smoke from biomass burning. The highest lead value of 542 ng/m 3 occurred on 21 June 1992 and was associated with 337 ng/m 3 of bromine which, after correction for bromine in sea salt (Na was 3 ), was about the correct ratio to be associated with combustion of leaded petrol in motor vehicles

  14. Innovative industry alignment at RMIT to develop skills for uranium industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    'Full text:' RMIT University has recently introduced new teaching and research training programs on uranium processing technology at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. These programs have been implemented to improve young scientists and engineers' awareness of Australia's uranium processing industry, and to help provide future employees with improved background knowledge to the industry. The teaching program involves joint course development and lectures delivered by the leading scientists from ANSTO (Dr Suzanne Burling and Dr Chris Griffith) and Rio Tinto (Dr Stephen Grocott). This lecture series, which is offered to final year applied science and chemical engineering students, covers a range of topics and issues related to uranium processing including uranium mining, methods for chracterising uranium ores, extraction of uranium, the nuclear fuel cycle, waste and safety. The research training program involves honours and PhD students undertaking research projects on uranium mineralogy and uranium extraction. Research students are also provided with extensive training on how to conduct research safely using radioactive materials. The research programs are undertaken in RMIT's new EPA approved, low level radiation laboratory which has been dedicated to research projects on uranium processing. An extended overview of both of these new programs will be presented. This program is unique in Australia and is designed to address the issue of skill shortage in the ever growing Uranium industry world wide. International collaborators in this program will be most welcomed. (author)

  15. A flow-through hydrothermal cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of phase transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Brian [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Tenailleau, Christophe [Department of Mineralogy, South Australian Museum, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000 (Australia); Nogthai, Yung [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Studer, Andrew [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, PMB 1 Menai, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Brugger, Joel [Department of Mineralogy, South Australian Museum, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000 (Australia): Department of Geology and Geophysics, The University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Pring, Allan [Department of Mineralogy, South Australian Museum, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000 (Australia): Department of Geology and Geophysics, The University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)]. E-mail: pring.allan@saugov.sa.gov.au

    2006-11-15

    A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in situ neutron diffraction study of crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. It is specifically designed for use on the medium-resolution powder diffractometer (MRPD) at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the Polaris beamline at ISIS and the new high-intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The cell will operate in a flow-through mode over the temperature range from 25-300 deg. C and up to pressures of 100 bar. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite (Fe,Ni){sub 9}S{sub 8} to violarite (Fe,Ni){sub 3}S{sub 4} under mild conditions (pH{approx}4) at 120 deg. C and 3 bar using in situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented.

  16. An introduction to neutron powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this presentation is to provide an introduction to neutron powder diffraction. The technique has developed from humble beginnings in the first generation of nuclear reactors in the late 1940's, to become one of the most widely used and productive forms of neutron beam research. Its popularity stems from the unique properties of thermal neutrons, which make them the ideal probe for obtaining spatial and dynamic information about atomic nuclei and magnetic dipoles in condensed matter. Neutron powder diffraction is particularly useful for location of lighter elements, in magnetic structure determination, for understanding thermal motions of atoms and for in-situ studies of materials at extreme temperatures and pressures. It is commonly used for research in condensed matter physics, structural chemistry and materials science at nuclear research reactors and spallation neutron sources around the world. The basic properties of thermal neutrons that are exploited in condensed matter research will be described. The neutron powder diffraction technique will be discussed with particular attention to comparisons with the X-ray powder diffraction technique, to which it is complementary. A brief description of the neutron powder diffraction facilities at ANSTO's HIFAR research reactor will be given, along with selected examples of neutron diffraction experiments that illustrate the power of the technique. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  17. Development of the RRR Cold Neutron Source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masriera, N.; Lecot, C.; Hergenreder, D.; Lovotti, O.; Serebrov, A.; Zakharov, A.; Mityukhlyaev, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes some general design issues on the Cold Neutron Source (CNS) of the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The description covers different aspects of the design: the requirements that lead to an innovative design, the overall design itself and the definition of a technical approach in order to develop the necessary design solutions. The RRR-CNS has liquid Deuterium (LD2) moderator, sub-cooled to ensure maximum moderation efficiency, flowing within a closed natural circulation Thermosiphon loop. The Thermosiphon is surrounded by a CNS Vacuum Containment made of zirconium alloy, that provides thermal insulation and a multiple barriers scheme to prevent Deuterium from mixing with water or air. Consistent with international practice, this vessel is designed to withstand any hypothetical energy reaction should Deuterium and air mix in its interior. The applied design approach allows ensuring that the RRR-CNS, in spite of being innovative, will meet all the design, performance and quality requirements. (author)

  18. Environmental radioactivity in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twining, John [Environmental Science Division, ANSTO, Menai (Australia)

    2002-06-01

    Environmental research mainly carried out at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) related to nuclear activities in Australia such as uranium mining, transfer factor studies related to U- and Th-series radionuclides, dose assessment modelling, radiation monitoring, and nuclear waste repository, is outlined. Many aspects of radioecology, marine and freshwater geochemistry and radiochemical dating techniques; bioaccumulation including archival monitoring and kinetics, ground water studies, atmospheric issues including climate change and geomorphology are being studied with the help of a high neutron flux reactor, a cyclotron and a tandem accelerator as well as modern analytical equipment. Only a very small number of examples of radioactivity applications are presented: Microbiotic crusts covering up to 50% of the soil surface at Maralinga nuclear test site where more than 80% of the residual Am-241 was found to retain within the top 5 mm after 30 years. SIMS analysis of crocodile bones indicating that the only metal affected by U mining in Kakadu region was lead (Pb). In mineral sands such as zircon, U(VI) is more stable than U(IV) as evidenced by ion beam and SEM imaging and XANES analysis. Use of radioisotopes in atmospheric and climate studies, terrestrial studies particularly in dating techniques, and aquatic-continental and aquatic-ocean waters, and in biological studies such as biokinetics of copper metabolism in rainbow fishes living downstream of a mine are presented. (S. Ohno)

  19. Nuclear microprobe analysis of lead profile in crocodile bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlic, I. E-mail: ivo@ansto.gov.au; Siegele, R.; Hammerton, K.; Jeffree, R.A.; Cohen, D.D

    2003-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of lead were found in Australian free ranging saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) bone and flesh. Lead shots were found as potential source of lead in these animals. ANSTO's heavy ion nuclear microprobe was used to measure the distribution of Pb in a number of bones and osteoderms. The aim was to find out if elevated Pb concentration remains in growth rings and if the concentration is correlated with the blood levels recorded at the time. Results of our study show a very distinct distribution of accumulated Pb in bones and osteoderms as well as good correlation with the level of lead concentration in blood. To investigate influence of ion species on detection limits measurements of the same sample were performed by using 3 MeV protons, 9 MeV He ions and 20 MeV carbon ions. Peak to background ratios, detection limits and the overall 'quality' of obtained spectra are compared and discussed.

  20. Polarized neutrons for Australian scientific research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane J.

    2005-01-01

    Polarized neutron scattering has been a feature at ANSTO's HIFAR research reactor since the first polarization analysis (PA) spectrometer Longpol began operation over 30 years ago. Since that time, we have improved performance of Longpol and added new capabilities in several reincarnations of the instrument. Most of the polarized neutron experiments have been in the fields of magnetism and superconductivity, and most of that research has involved PA. Now as we plan our next generation neutron beam facility, at the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR), we intend to continue the tradition of PA but with a far broader scope in mind. Our new capabilities will combine PA and energy analysis with both cold and thermal neutron source spectra. We will also provide capabilities for research with polarized neutrons in small-angle neutron scattering and in neutron reflectometry. The discussion includes a brief historical account of the technical developments with a summary of past and present applications of polarized neutrons at HIFAR, and an outline of the polarized neutron capabilities that will be included in the first suite of instruments, which will begin operation at the new reactor in 2006

  1. A decade of industrial tracer applications in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The application of radiotracer technology to the solution of problems in Australian industry dates back to the 1950's and has been well chronicled elsewhere. However, it may confidently be asserted that the most significant growth in industrial applications has taken place over the last decade. This is no accident. In the last Quarter of 1989, Tracerco Australasia was established as a partnership between ICI Australia and ANSTO with the specific remit of promoting and selling radioisotope applications to industry. Effectively, this marked the commencement of the 'commercialisation' of industrial radiotracing in Australia. Though organisational and ownership changes have subsequently taken place, the business established in 1989 continues to flourish and now, one decade after its inception, it is appropriate both to review the achievements of the last ten years and to identify the challenges and opportunities of the future. Accordingly, this paper describes the growth of the radiotracer applications business, analyses its current activities both geographically and by industrial sector and examines trends in technology utilisation. The criteria which need to be met to ensure the continuing expansions and development of industrial radiotracer applications are also discussed

  2. The design and application of a radiological consequence model for tropical and subtropical regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domel, R.U.; Harris, F.F.; Crawford, J.

    1998-01-01

    The post Chernobyl era has seen the development of a plethora of radiological consequence models. The information used in these models pertains mostly to temperate and cold climate data, with these data mostly being hard-wired into the body of the model. At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), a model is being developed with a user-friendly interface which will assess the radiological consequences, after an incident, in tropical and sub-tropical climates. The model combines specific regional data (South East Asia) with transfer parameters (soil to plant, plant to animal) obtained for tropical and sub-tropical regions. Flexibility has been incorporated into the the design of the model to allow application in other regions. Where the relevant data are not available, default temperate data are used whilst specific research will be initiated to determine the information required. A Geographic Information System (GIS) is used for the display of input and output data allowing quick access to not only the results but also to the underlying assumptions

  3. AINSE - The first thirty years - 1958 -1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B.

    1998-01-01

    The original constitution adopted on the 4th of December 1958 to establish AINSE remained unchanged through three decades during which the number of member universities increased from nine to nineteen, the AAEC became ANSTO (1987), and the wording in the relevant legislation changed from uranium and atomic energy to nuclear science and technology. The agreement in 1958 by representatives of the nine universities and the AAEC to establish the Institute followed discussions initiated in 1957 by Professor J P Baxter then chairman of the AAEC and Vice Chancellor of the University of New South Wales. Adoption of the constitution created AINSE as an independent organisation governed by the Council with funds provided by annual subscriptions from the member organisations and an annual 'Contribution for Research and Training' from the Commonwealth Government. The aims were to assist research and training in disciplines relevant to the nuclear field, or requiring use of facilities at Lucas Heights. Having access to HIFAR and MOATA, no Australian academic institution found it necessary to locate a research reactor on its own campus

  4. A large volume cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott; Pring, Allan

    2010-10-01

    A hydrothermal cell with 320 ml internal volume has been designed and constructed for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations. The cell design adopts a dumbbell configuration assembled with standard commercial stainless steel components and a zero-scattering Ti-Zr alloy sample compartment. The fluid movement and heat transfer are simply driven by natural convection due to the natural temperature gradient along the fluid path, so that the temperature at the sample compartment can be stably sustained by heating the fluid in the bottom fluid reservoir. The cell can operate at temperatures up to 300 °C and pressures up to 90 bars and is suitable for studying reactions requiring a large volume of hydrothermal fluid to damp out the negative effect from the change of fluid composition during the course of the reactions. The capability of the cell was demonstrated by a hydrothermal phase transformation investigation from leucite (KAlSi(2)O(6)) to analcime (NaAlSi(2)O(6)⋅H(2)O) at 210 °C on the high intensity powder diffractometer Wombat in ANSTO. The kinetics of the transformation has been resolved by collecting diffraction patterns every 10 min followed by Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. The classical Avrami/Arrhenius analysis gives an activation energy of 82.3±1.1 kJ  mol(-1). Estimations of the reaction rate under natural environments by extrapolations agree well with petrological observations.

  5. In situ neutron powder diffraction using custom-made lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, William R; Schmid, Siegbert; Du, Guodong; Brand, Helen E A; Pang, Wei Kong; Peterson, Vanessa K; Guo, Zaiping; Sharma, Neeraj

    2014-11-10

    Li-ion batteries are widely used in portable electronic devices and are considered as promising candidates for higher-energy applications such as electric vehicles. However, many challenges, such as energy density and battery lifetimes, need to be overcome before this particular battery technology can be widely implemented in such applications. This research is challenging, and we outline a method to address these challenges using in situ NPD to probe the crystal structure of electrodes undergoing electrochemical cycling (charge/discharge) in a battery. NPD data help determine the underlying structural mechanism responsible for a range of electrode properties, and this information can direct the development of better electrodes and batteries. We briefly review six types of battery designs custom-made for NPD experiments and detail the method to construct the 'roll-over' cell that we have successfully used on the high-intensity NPD instrument, WOMBAT, at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The design considerations and materials used for cell construction are discussed in conjunction with aspects of the actual in situ NPD experiment and initial directions are presented on how to analyze such complex in situ data.

  6. The Design and Construction of Flow-through Hydrothermal Cells for in situ Neutron Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pring, A.; Tenailleau, C.; Wang, H.; Brugger, J.; Ngothai, Yung; ONeill, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in-situ neutron diffraction study of hydrothermal crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. New fundamental knowledge on the mechanisms of phase transitions can thus be determined. It is specifically designed for the use on the Medium Resolution Powder Diffractometer at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the new High intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The equipment has been initially created for the low temperature transformation study of Fe-Ni sulfide minerals. The design and use of the flow-through hydrothermal cell from 25 to 120degC are described. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite to violarite under mild conditions (pH 4) at 120degC and 3 bars using in-situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented. (authors)

  7. The Design and Construction of Flow-through Hydrothermal Cells for in situ Neutron Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pring, A.; Tenailleau, C.; Wang, H.; Brugger, J.; Ngothai, Yung; ONeill, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in-situ neutron diffraction study of hydrothermal crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. New fundamental knowledge on the mechanisms of phase transitions can thus be determined. It is specifically designed for the use on the Medium Resolution Powder Diffractometer at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the new High intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The equipment has been initially created for the low temperature transformation study of Fe-Ni sulfide minerals. The design and use of the flow-through hydrothermal cell from 25 to 120 deg C are described. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite to violarite under mild conditions (pH 4) at 120 deg C and 3 bars using in-situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented. (authors)

  8. Nuclear regulation in Australia - future possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.; Bardsley, J.

    1997-01-01

    Australia's current nuclear regulatory arrangements reflect two major factors: that we are a federation, with a constitutional division of powers between the Commonwealth and the States, and that we have no nuclear industry, other than uranium mining. Australia's only nuclear facilities are operated by a Commonwealth instrumentality, ANSTO. Current Commonwealth regulatory arrangements are a response to international treaty commitments -principally the NPT (Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons) -and to the commencement of commercial uranium mining and export in the late 1970's. Although at present no nuclear industry activities, other than mining, are in prospect, this might not always be the case, and with the establishment of ARPANSA (the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency) it is timely to give some thought to regulatory arrangements which might be appropriate to Australia's future circumstances. This paper will discuss the regulation activities relating to the nuclear fuel cycle , i e activities involved with the production and use of nuclear materials (uranium, thorium and plutonium) for the generation of energy through nuclear fission

  9. Past processes in peats : untangling the origin of dried peat in the Australian alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.P.P.; Tisdall, J.M.; Jacobsen, G.

    2005-01-01

    Peat soils form where decomposition is hindered, often by a combination of cold and wet conditions, such that production of organic matter outweighs decomposition. Such conditions are rare in the hot, dry continent of Australia. Consequently peat barely features on a map of Australian soils, though small areas are noted to occur in the alps and along the humid east coast. It is pertinent to ask several questions about the origin of peat in the alps. Is dried peat a remnant of bog peat? And if so, when did bogs drain to form dried peat? The study site, on Wellington Plains in the south-east Gippsland Alps, contains a substantial area of bog peat and extensive areas of dried peat. AMS radiocarbon dating of surface, base and, for the bog peat only, mid-profile peat samples, was carried out at ANSTO. 14 C dating enabled us to look at the initiation of peat accumulation, but the change from bog peat to dried peat is thought to have occurred more recently, since the introduction of stock to the alps. The short half-life of 210 Pb (22.6 years) and the constant supply from the upper atmosphere makes 210 Pb an appropriate technique to investigate this time frame. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. The agreement between the Argentine Republic and Australia on the cooperation for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and its fitting to the Argentine Constitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigogna, Luis F. J.; De Antoni, Mario A.

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the legal aspects of the cooperation agreement between Australia and Argentina signed in Camberra on August 8, 2001, the authors elaborate upon the following points: 1. The interpretation of the constitutional texts. Its need; 2. Facts: the development of nuclear energy in Argentina. The contract INVAP-ANSTO. The cooperation agreement Argentina-Australia; 3. The great publicity campaign. The appeal to fear; 4. The difference with the case of power reactors. Distinction between power and research reactors; 5. The difference with the Chernobyl case; 6. Shipment safety; 7. Other clarifications; 8. Factual and juridical distinction between spent fuel and radioactive waste concepts; 9. The regulatory framework of the difference; 10. The essence of the adjective 'Immediate'. Its juridical meaning; 11. The concept of 'entry'. The need to overcome an intentional literalness; 12. The harmonious interpretation of the constitution; 13. The engagement with the future generations; 14. The adaptation to the global trends. The Kyoto protocol; 15. The bases of the constitutional doctrine. They conclude that nothing in the agreement is contrary to the Argentine constitution

  11. Healthy radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    A recent study of health records of the workforce at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre, operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), has shown that radiation workers have lower mortality rates from all causes and from all cancers than the general population. The Lucas Heights data cover more than 7000 past and present employees, from 1957-1998. This study was part of a research programme being carried out in conjunction with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in France and its results add to the much larger pool of data already held by IARC. This finding of the Australian study is similar to the findings of epidemiological studies of the health of workers who have been exposed to low levels of ionising radiation in the course of their occupations elsewhere in the world, and has often been explained as the healthy worker effect. According to this argument, it is reasonable to expect that any group of workers should be more healthy than an average group (with the same age and sex distribution) from the general population. After all, they must at least be healthy enough to get out of bed regularly and go to work. The purpose of the present paper is to ask whether this is the whole story

  12. Application of FEPs analysis to identify research priorities relevant to the safety case for an Australian radioactive waste facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, T.E.; McGlinn, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has established a project to undertake research relevant to the safety case for the proposed Australian radioactive waste facility. This facility will comprise a store for intermediate level radioactive waste, and either a store or a near-surface repository for low-level waste. In order to identify the research priorities for this project, a structured analysis of the features, events and processes (FEPs) relevant to the performance of the facility was undertaken. This analysis was based on the list of 137 FEPs developed by the IAEA project on 'Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities' (ISAM). A number of key research issues were identified, and some factors which differ in significance for the store, compared to the repository concept, were highlighted. For example, FEPs related to long-term groundwater transport of radionuclides are considered to be of less significance for a store than a repository. On the other hand, structural damage from severe weather, accident or human interference is more likely for a store. The FEPs analysis has enabled the scientific research skills required for the inter-disciplinary project team to be specified. The outcomes of the research will eventually be utilised in developing the design, and assessing the performance, of the future facility. It is anticipated that a more detailed application of the FEPs methodology will be undertaken to develop the safety case for the proposed radioactive waste management facility. (authors)

  13. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of Australian Radiation Protection And Nuclear Safety Agency, 2001-200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In the period analysed ARPANSA contributed to the (then) Health and Aged Care portfolio's 'Outcome 1: Population Health and Safety'. The objective of this outcome was the promotion and protection of the health of all Australians and minimising the incidence of preventable mortality, illness, injury and disability. The main outcomes, as outlined in the reports are: regulation of Commonwealth activities involving radiation sources and nuclear facilities; progress towards the development of a National Directory for Radiation Protection; quality assurance programs in medical radiation and conduct evaluations of individual and population doses; health impact assessment of radiation exposure and methodologies for this assessment, recommendations and guidelines for limiting radiation exposure; progress towards third-party quality assurance certification for the personal radiation monitoring service, radionuclide analysis of gamma ray emitting nuclides, Ultraviolet Protection Factor; assessing radiopharmaceutical testing and the protection dosimeter calibration service; maintenance of a network for monitoring radionuclides in the atmosphere; safety standards and guidance in support of the work of the Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The major priorities for ARPANSA in the reporting year, included the assessment of an application to construct the replacement research reactor at ANSTO, implementation of a process for public consultation and participation in the licensing of nuclear facilities and the development of national standards and codes of practice, including a standard for radiofrequency radiation

  14. GumTree: Data reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayner, Hugh; Hathaway, Paul; Hauser, Nick; Fei, Yang; Franceschini, Ferdi; Lam, Tony

    2006-01-01

    Access to software tools for interactive data reduction, visualisation and analysis during a neutron scattering experiment enables instrument users to make informed decisions regarding the direction and success of their experiment. ANSTO aims to enhance the experiment experience of its facility's users by integrating these data reduction tools with the instrument control interface for immediate feedback. GumTree is a software framework and application designed to support an Integrated Scientific Experimental Environment, for concurrent access to instrument control, data acquisition, visualisation and analysis software. The Data Reduction and Analysis (DRA) module is a component of the GumTree framework that allows users to perform data reduction, correction and basic analysis within GumTree while an experiment is running. It is highly integrated with GumTree, able to pull experiment data and metadata directly from the instrument control and data acquisition components. The DRA itself uses components common to all instruments at the facility, providing a consistent interface. It features familiar ISAW-based 1D and 2D plotting, an OpenGL-based 3D plotter and peak fitting performed by fityk. This paper covers the benefits of integration, the flexibility of the DRA module, ease of use for the interface and audit trail generation

  15. Progress in converting 99Mo production from high-to-low-enriched uranium - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Wiencek, T.C.; Hofman, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    Over this past year, extraordinary progress has been made in executing our charter to assist in converting Mo-99 production worldwide from HEU to LEU. Building on the successful development of the experimental LEU-foil target, we have designed a new, economical irradiation target. We have also successfully demonstrated, in collaboration with BATAN in Indonesia, that LEU can be substituted for HEU in the Cintichem target without loss of product yield or purity; in fact, conversion may make economic sense. We are interacting with a number of commercial producers - we have begun active collaborations with the CNEA and ANSTO; we are working to define the scope of collaborations with MDS Nordion and Mallinckrodt; and IRE has offered its services to irradiate and test a target at the appropriate time. Conversion of the CNEA process is on schedule. Other papers presented at this meeting will present specific results on the demonstration of the LEU-modified Cintichem process, the development of the new target, and progress in converting the CNEA process. (author)

  16. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis of optoelectronic and semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N.; Cohen, D.D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Johnston, P.; Walker, S. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Whitlow, H.; Hult, M. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Oestling, M.; Zaring, C. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1993-12-31

    In recent years, the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil spectrometry (HIERDA) has been applied to analyse multi-phase, thin layer devices used in optoelectronics, semiconductors and solar power generation. HIERDA gives simultaneously, mass resolved elemental concentration vs depth profiles of the matrix constituents, and is particularly suited to the determination of light elements in a heavy matrix. The beam/target interaction process is similar to RBS, but has the difference that the recoiling target atoms are detected instead of the scattered projectile. High energy, heavy ions beams bombard the sample, ejecting recoil atoms which are detected at a forward angle of 45 deg. A time-of-flight and total energy detection system enables the ejected particle`s mass to be identified, and allows energy spectra to be obtained and interpreted in an analogous way to RBS, but with the important difference that the elemental spectra are separated, and not superimposed on a background as in RBS. Some of the measurements made with a HIERDA system on the ANTARES Tandem Accelerator at ANSTO are described. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Effect of residual stress on the integrity of a branch connection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.; Kirstein, O.; Luzin, V.

    2012-01-01

    A new connection to an existing gas pipeline was made by hot-tapping, welding directly onto a pressurised pipeline. The welds were not post-weld heat treated, causing significant residual stresses. The critical weld had residual stresses determined by neutron diffraction using ANSTO's residual stress diffractometer, Kowari. The maximum measured residual stress (290 MPa) was 60% of the yield strength. The magnitudes of errors from a number of sources were estimated. An integrity assessment of the welded branch connection was performed with the measured residual stress values and with residual stress distributions from the BS 7910 and API 579 analysis codes. Analysis using estimates of residual stress from API 579 overestimated the critical crack size. Highlights: ► Residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction in a thick section, non post-weld heat treated ferritic weld. ► There is little published data on these welds. ► The work compares the measured residual stresses with code-based residual stress distributions.

  18. Nuclear science and a better environment - an oxymoron?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, G.

    1998-01-01

    The Environmental Specialist Committee of AINSE is a relatively recent addition to the areas of special interest but AINSE and ANSTO have supported environmental research for many years in areas such as environmental engineering studies, insect control, sensitive analytical techniques (which are in many cases at the heart of an improved understanding of environmental processes) and environmental radioactivity and the control of radioactive waste. Such techniques make a direct contribution to the remediation of contaminated industrial and mining sites and to monitoring the continued effect of these sites on the environment. Recently the spread of quaternary studies with distinct environmental importance has increased the AINSE involvement in supporting the use of AMS techniques involving cosmogenic radionuclides, not only for studies of current processes but also for historic studies designed to reveal past climates and geomorphology. Nuclear science of this kind contributes to a better understanding of patterns of atmospheric circulation, underground water resources and climate change. Even a simple application of nuclear science, the neutron soil moisture probe, improves the efficiency of water use in agriculture and reduces the environmental impact of irrigation. The environmental impact of development in the third world will have major environmental consequences in the next twenty years. Developments in nuclear science in chemical analysis, the dynamics of environmental processes and in monitoring resources will help in controlling a sustainable and rational use of the environment

  19. Neutron beam facilities at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane; Robinson, Robert; Hunter, Brett

    2001-01-01

    Australia is building a research reactor to replace the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights by the end of 2005. Like HIFAR, the Replacement Research Reactor will be multipurpose with capabilities for both neutron beam research and radioisotope production. It will be a pool-type reactor with thermal neutron flux (unperturbed) of 4 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec and a liquid D 2 cold neutron source. Cold and thermal neutron beams for neutron beam research will be provided at the reactor face and in a large neutron guide hall. Supermirror neutron guides will transport cold and thermal neutrons to the guide hall. The reactor and the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP S.E. under contract. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO, in consultation with the Australian user community. This status report includes a review the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a summary of progress to date. (author)

  20. An overview of the NeT international round-robin programme: weld residual stress measurement and modelling in nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, M.H.; Hamelin, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    This talk provides an overview of the European Network on Neutron Techniques Standardisation for Structural Integrity (NeT). The network involves some 35 organisations from industry and academia, whose goal is to identify best practice in the application of modern experimental and numerical techniques to problems related to the structural integrity of components, mainly relevant to nuclear applications. While the programme was originally built around neutron scattering techniques for residual stress measurement, it has grown considerably to include studies of X-ray diffraction, deep-hole drilling, the contour method and other measurement techniques. Significant efforts have also been made within NeT to understand and predict weld residual stresses, often employing commercially available finite element (FE) codes. Several Task Groups have been developed to address unique challenges found in nuclear applications, from stress development in multi-pass AISI 316LN austenitic steel welds to the effects of solid-state phase transformation on residual stress development in SA508 ferritic steel, which is often used for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) construction. Some current and future work performed under the auspices of NeT are provided, with a focus on work Conducted at ANSTO. The aim is to give the audience a comprehensive overview of the work undertaken in NeT, and to shed some light on the potential present in this kind of collaborative effort. (author)

  1. Elastic recoil detection analysis of ferroelectric films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, W.B.; Johnston, P.N.; Walker, S.R.; Bubb, I.F. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Scott, J.F. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    There has been considerable progress in developing SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub O.7}Sr{sub O.3}TiO{sub 3} (BST) ferroelectric films for use as nonvolatile memory chips and for capacitors in dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). Ferroelectric materials have a very large dielectric constant ( {approx} 1000), approximately one hundred times greater than that of silicon dioxide. Devices made from these materials have been known to experience breakdown after a repeated voltage pulsing. It has been suggested that this is related to stoichiometric changes within the material. To accurately characterise these materials Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) is being developed. This technique employs a high energy heavy ion beam to eject nuclei from the target and uses a time of flight and energy dispersive (ToF-E) detector telescope to detect these nuclei. The recoil nuclei carry both energy and mass information which enables the determination of separate energy spectra for individual elements or for small groups of elements In this work ERDA employing 77 MeV {sup 127}I ions has been used to analyse Strontium Bismuth Tantalate thin films at the heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Effect of crystal shape on neutron rocking curves of perfect single crystals designed for ultra-small-angle scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, A K; Rehm, C

    2014-01-01

    The present study has been conducted in the framework of the channel-cut crystal design for the Kookaburra ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument to be installed at the OPAL reactor of ANSTO. This facility is based on the classical Bonse-Hart method that uses two multiple-reflection crystal systems. The dynamical theory of diffraction by perfect crystals distinguishes two cases: the Darwin case applying to infinitely thick crystals and the Ewald solution for very small absorption taking into account the reflection from the rear face of a plane-parallel crystal reflecting in Bragg geometry. The former is preferable because it yields narrower rocking curves. To prevent the neutrons to 'see' the rear face, grooves were machined into the backside of perfect Si test crystals for single reflection and filled with neutron absorbing material. These samples were examined at the S18 instrument of the Institut Laue-Langevin. Unexpectedly the crystals with empty slots showed an increase of the rocking curve width. When filling the slots with an absorber the widths decreased, but without reaching that of the Darwin curve. Understanding the results and achieving a successful crystal design call for the development of a theory that permits to describe neutron diffraction from crystals with a structured back face.

  3. Effect of crystal shape on neutron rocking curves of perfect single crystals designed for ultra-small-angle scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, A. K.; Rehm, C.

    2014-07-01

    The present study has been conducted in the framework of the channel-cut crystal design for the Kookaburra ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument to be installed at the OPAL reactor of ANSTO. This facility is based on the classical Bonse-Hart method that uses two multiple-reflection crystal systems. The dynamical theory of diffraction by perfect crystals distinguishes two cases: the Darwin case applying to infinitely thick crystals and the Ewald solution for very small absorption taking into account the reflection from the rear face of a plane-parallel crystal reflecting in Bragg geometry. The former is preferable because it yields narrower rocking curves. To prevent the neutrons to "see" the rear face, grooves were machined into the backside of perfect Si test crystals for single reflection and filled with neutron absorbing material. These samples were examined at the S18 instrument of the Institut Laue-Langevin. Unexpectedly the crystals with empty slots showed an increase of the rocking curve width. When filling the slots with an absorber the widths decreased, but without reaching that of the Darwin curve. Understanding the results and achieving a successful crystal design call for the development of a theory that permits to describe neutron diffraction from crystals with a structured back face.

  4. Ultra small angle neutron scattering and cement hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabine, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Waste emanating from research and from nuclear medicine is classed as low-level nuclear waste. Cement is widely used internationally to encapsulate this type of waste. These cemented wastes must comply with relevant safety requirements for interim storage, transportation and disposal. During the last 40 years Australia has produced about 3,500 m 3 of this type of waste from the medical, research and industrial use of radionuclides. ANSTO has studied the way in which cement sets, to provide information at a fundamental level on the viability of the concept of storing low-level waste in cement. The object of our current research is the determination of the size, shape and chemical composition of these precipitate particles. The shape of the particles is of primary importance since, on simple thermodynamic grounds, they should be spheres, to minimise the surface to volume ratio. This will, however, minimise the interaction and interlocking between the particles. Investigation of the reason why simple thermodynamic rules do not apply in systems of this type are being actively pursued in Australia. (author)

  5. Investigation of elemental changes in brain tissues following excitotoxic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Howell, Nicholas R.; Callaghan, Paul D.; Pastuovic, Zeljko

    2013-01-01

    Recently the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe has been used for elemental mapping of thin brain tissue sections. The fact that a very small portion of the proton energy is used for X-ray excitation combined with small variations of the major element concentrations makes μ-PIXE imaging and GeoPIXE analysis a challenging task. Excitotoxic brain injury underlies the pathology of stroke and various neurodegenerative disorders. Large fluxes in Ca +2 cytosolic concentrations are a key feature of the initiation of this pathophysiological process. In order to understand if these modifications are associated with changes in the elemental composition, several brain sections have been mapped with μ-PIXE. Increases in Ca +2 cytosolic concentrations were indicative of the pathophysiological process continuing 1 week after an initiating neural insult. We were able to measure significant variations in K and Ca concentration distribution across investigated brain tissue. These variations correlate very well with physiological changes visible in the brain tissue. Moreover, the obtained μ-PIXE results clearly demonstrate that the elemental composition changes significantly correlate with brain drauma

  6. Operational experience and recent developments at the National Medical Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, E.; Pac, B.; Arnott, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    The National Medical Cyclotron is a radioisotope production facility run by ANSTO and located on the grounds of the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney, Australia. A CYCLONE 30 (IBA) cyclotron is used in the production of short-lived PET radiopharmaceuticals required by the hospital's PET Scanner and also to produce a number of bulk radiochemicals for processing and distribution throughout Australasia. Following commissioning of the cyclotron and beam lines in October 1991, and the overcoming of a number of early open-quote teething close-quote problems especially relating to the reliability of the r.f. and solid target transport systems, a steady program of improvements has been pursued. These improvements have included development of new beam diagnostics and the design and installation of a new beam line for SPECT radioisotope production. The current operations schedule includes the production of 18 FDG, 13 NH 3 , 15 O 2 and 201 Tl, 67 Ga and 123 I. This paper will discuss the process of development of the cyclotron to ably meet the present demands on it, and the problems resolved in the pursuit of this goal

  7. Developing ceramic based technology for the immobilisation of waste on the Sellafield site - 16049

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scales, C.R.; Maddrell, E.R.; Dowson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    National Nuclear Laboratory, in collaboration with the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, is developing hot isostatic press (HIP) based ceramic technology for the immobilisation of a diverse range of wastes arising from nuclear fuel processing activities on the Sellafield site. Wasteform compositions have been identified and validated for the immobilisation of these plutonium containing wastes and residues in glass-ceramic and ceramic forms. A full scale inactive facility has been constructed at NNL's Workington Laboratory to support the demonstration of the technology. Validation of the inactive wasteform development using plutonium has been carried out at ANSTO's Lucas Heights facility. A feasibility study has been conducted to evaluate the construction and operation of a plutonium active pilot facility which would demonstrate the immobilisation of actual residues in the NNL Central Lab. This could form the basis of a facility to treat the plutonium wastes and residues in their entirety. The technology is being explored for the immobilisation of additional wastes arising on the Sellafield site taking advantage of the investment already made in skills and facilities. (authors)

  8. The national synchrotron ray of hope or ring of fire?

    CERN Document Server

    Hollis, T

    2002-01-01

    While most agree the synchrotron will be a boost for Australian science, the author reports on concerns about the cost of building and operating the project Biotech industry representatives want to know how that $100 million will be used and want to see the government's justification for pouring more than a third of its total technology budget for 2001/2 into the synchrotron. They, and the opposition, also want to know where the private money will come from to make up the balance or whether the state will ultimately have to pitch in the rest itself. Indeed, an Auditor-General's report released last week warned of the need for comprehensive financial risk management of the facility. The National Synchrotron, to be built at Monash University, will be a hollow ring of about 60 metres diameter and initially housing nine beamlines, each capable of performing independent experiments simultaneously. According to Dr Richard Garrett, director of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (http://www.ansto.gov.au/natf...

  9. Managing the risks of legacy radioactive sources from a security perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Mark; Murray, Allan

    2008-01-01

    The safety and security risk posed by highly radioactive, long-lived sources at the end of their normal use has not been consistently well-managed in previous decades. The Brazilian Cs-137 accident in 1986 and the Thailand Co-60 accident in 2000 are prime examples of the consequences that ensue from the loss of control of highly dangerous sources after their normal use. With the new international emphasis on security of radioactive sources throughout their life cycle, there is now further incentive to address the management of risks posed by legacy, highly dangerous radioactive sources. The ANSTO South-East Asia Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) Project has identified, and is addressing, a number of legacy situations that have arisen as a result of inadequate management practices in the past. Specific examples are provided of these legacy situations and the lessons learned for managing the consequent safety and security risk, and for future complete life-cycle management of highly radioactive sources. (author)

  10. Applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related analytical techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on applied research on air pollution using nuclear-related techniques is a global CRP which started in 1992, and is scheduled to run until early 1997. The purpose of this CRP is to promote the use of nuclear analytical techniques in air pollution studies, e.g. NAA, XRF, and PIXE for the analysis of toxic and other trace elements in air particulate matter. The main purposes of the core programme are i) to support the use of nuclear and nuclear-related analytical techniques for research and monitoring studies on air pollution, ii) to identify major sources of air pollution affecting each of the participating countries with particular reference to toxic heavy metals, and iii) to obtain comparative data on pollution levels in areas of high pollution (e.g. a city centre or a populated area downwind of a large pollution source) and low pollution (e.g. rural area). This document reports the discussions held during the second Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) for the CRP which took place at ANSTO in Menai, Australia. (author)

  11. Operation of the Australian Store.Synchrotron for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Grischa R.; Aragão, David; Mudie, Nathan J.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; McGowan, Sheena; Bertling, Philip J.; Groenewegen, David; Quenette, Stevan M.; Bond, Charles S.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Androulakis, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The service automatically receives and archives raw diffraction data, related metadata and preliminary results of automated data-processing workflows. Data are able to be shared with collaborators and opened to the public. In the nine months since its deployment in August 2013, the service has handled over 22.4 TB of raw data (∼1.7 million diffraction images). Several real examples from the Australian crystallographic community are described that illustrate the advantages of the approach, which include real-time online data access and fully redundant, secure storage. Discoveries in biological sciences increasingly require multidisciplinary approaches. With this in mind, Store.Synchrotron has been developed as a component within a greater service that can combine data from other instruments at the Australian Synchrotron, as well as instruments at the Australian neutron source ANSTO. It is therefore envisaged that this will serve as a model implementation of raw data archiving and dissemination within the structural biology research community

  12. Radiocarbon determinations for Chillagoe rock paintings: small sample AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armitage, R.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M. W.; Tuniz, C.; Lawson, E.; Jacobsen, G.; Hua, G.

    1997-01-01

    Indirect dating methods have been applied to the rock paintings of Chillagoe, north Queensland, revealing patterns of superimposition, depictions of items of known antiquity, the use of fragile paints such as mud, and in-situ pigment stratigraphies (David 1994). These patterns suggest that the Chillagoe rock paintings are relatively young, likely less than 3000 years old. A change in the geographical distribution of rock painting styles suggests a regionalization of the styles starting around 3000 years BP. Such regionalization implies that major cultural changes accompanied the changes in rock painting styles. This model of temporal change is now being investigated through a collaboration between the University of Queensland, ANSTO and the Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University to directly analyze radiocarbon in the charcoal pigments in several of the Chillagoe rock paintings. Samples collected from fourteen separate charcoal rock drawings at five rock shelters in the Chillagoe region were submitted to plasma chemical treatment. Though unreactive, the excited and energetic argon atoms in the plasma remove surface-absorbed CO 2 through inelastic collisions. Samples yielding less than 100 micrograms carbon required special handling for AMS analysis. An isotope dilution technique utilizing 14 C-free carbon was chosen. Radiocarbon analysis were also performed and the results will be presented

  13. Neutrons put the brakes on stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, Katynna

    2006-01-01

    Don't you hate it when you're driving along, put your foot on the brake and feel that juddering feeling through the pedal? It happens when the disc brake rotors become distorted through normal use of the brakes. To the car manufacturing industry it's called r unout , and is a multimillion dollar warranty problem each year. Not to mention a pain for drivers! Dr Maurice Ripley and Dr Oliver Kirstein from the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) wanted to figure out whether runout is caused by residual stresses from the manufacturing process or by normal use of the brake, so they decided to test and compare a used and new brake disc. 'To picture what metal looks like at the atomic level, imagine spheres stacked evenly around each other in all three dimensions,' explained Kirstein. T he spheres represent atoms in the metal and the structure is called a metallic lattice.' We're familiar with the idea that metal expands when it gets hot - the atoms get excited with the heat and have the energy to move further away from each other, so spaces between the atoms in the lattice get larger. 'When parts of the metal are heated up and cool down at different rates, you may end up with a distorted lattice with some parts expanded and others not,' explained Kirstein. 'This unevenness in the lattice creates residual stress.' While a bunch of methods were available to test the discs, Kirstein and Ripley picked neutrons from ANSTO's HIFAR (High Flux Australian Reactor) as their tool of choice. 'Neutrons allow us to look at the inside of the metal without damaging it,' said Kirstein. 'They can penetrate through the iron, so we were able to take measurements at a series of points at different depths through the brake disc.' Word around the car industry is that when residual stresses are relaxed through heating of the brake disc during use, the discs could potentially distort, causing the runout and that juddering feeling. But everyone was clueless as to what

  14. Regional Radiological Security Partnership in Southeast Asia - Increasing the Sustainability of Security Systems at the Site-Level by Using a Model Facility Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, Travis L.; Dickerson, Sarah; Ravenhill, Scott D.; Murray, Allan; Morris, Frederic A.; Herdes, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, Australia, through the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), created the Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) project and partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to form the Southeast Asian Regional Radiological Security Partnership (RRSP). The intent of the RRSP is to cooperate with countries in Southeast Asia to improve the security of their radioactive sources. This Southeast Asian Partnership supports objectives to improve the security of high risk radioactive sources by raising awareness of the need and developing national programs to protect and control such materials, improve the security of such materials, and recover and condition the materials no longer in use. The RRSP has utilized many tools to meet those objectives including: provision of physical protection upgrades, awareness training, physical protection training, regulatory development, locating and recovering orphan sources, and most recently - development of model security procedures at a model facility. This paper discusses the benefits of establishing a model facility, the methods employed by the RRSP, and three of the expected outcomes of the Model Facility approach. The first expected outcome is to increase compliance with source security guidance materials and national regulations by adding context to those materials, and illustrating their impact on a facility. Second, the effectiveness of each of the tools above is increased by making them part of an integrated system. Third, the methods used to develop the model procedures establishes a sustainable process that can ultimately be transferred to all facilities beyond the model. Overall, the RRSP has utilized the Model Facility approach as an important tool to increase the security of radioactive sources, and to position facilities and countries for the long term secure management of those sources.

  15. Application of network technology to Remote Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.S.; Sorokowski, D.L.; Veevers, K.

    1994-01-01

    The Australian Safeguards Office (ASO) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have sponsored work under a bilateral agreement to implement a Remote Monitoring System (RMS) at an Australian nuclear site operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). The RMS, designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), was installed in February 1994 at the Dry Spent Fuel Storage Facility (DSFSF) located at Lucas Heights, Australia. The RMS was designed to test a number of different concepts that would be useful for unattended remote monitoring activities. The DSFSF located in Building 27 is a very suitable test site for a RMS. The RMS uses a network of low cost nodes to collect data from a number of different sensors and security devices. Different sensors and detection devices have been installed to study how they can be used to complement each other for C/S applications. The data collected from the network will allow a comparison of how the various types of sensors perform under the same set of conditions. A video system using digital compression collects digital images and stores them on a hard drive and a digital optical disk. Data and images from the storage area are remotely monitored via telephone from Canberra, Australia and Albuquerque, NM, USA. These remote monitoring stations operated by ASO and SNL respectively, can retrieve data and images from the RMS computer at the DSFSF. The data and images are encrypted before transmission. The Remote Monitoring System field tests have been operational for six months with good test results. Sensors have performed well and the digital images have excellent resolution. The hardware and software have performed reliably without any major difficulties. This paper summarizes the highlights of the prototype system and the ongoing field tests

  16. The scientific and technical requirements for biology at Australia's Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    A Symposium and Workshop on Neutrons for Biology was held in the School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Melbourne, under the auspices of AINSE, Univ of Melbourne and ANSTO. Invited talks were given on the subjects of Genome, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a critical framework for understanding bio-molecular, neutron diffraction at high and low resolution, and the investigation of viruses and large-scale biological structures using neutrons. There were also talks from prominent NMR practitioners and X-ray protein crystallographers, with substantial discussion about how the various methods might fit together in the future. Significant progress was made on defining Australia's needs, which include a strong push to use SANS and reflectometry for the study of macromolecular complexes and model membranes, and a modest network of supporting infrastructure in Brisbane, Melbourne and the Sydney Basin. Specific recommendations were that the small-angle neutron scattering and reflectometry instruments in the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) be pursued with high priority, that there be no specific effort to provide high-resolution protein-crystallography facilities at the RRR, but that a watching brief be kept on instrumentation and sample-preparation technologies elsewhere. A watch be kept on inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering capabilities elsewhere, although these methods will not initially be pursued at the RRR and that should be input from this community into the design of the biochemistry/chemistry laboratories at the Replacement Research Reactor. It was also recommended that a small number of regional facilities be established (or enhanced) to allow users to perform deuteration of biomolecules. These facilities would be of significant value to the NMR and neutron scattering communities

  17. A computerised radioactive effluent monitoring system for a medical cyclotron complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    1997-01-01

    During the handling and chemical processing in sterile automatic chemistry cells at the Medical Cyclotron of the Radiopharmaceutical Division of ANSTO, a fraction of the radioactive inventory is released into the atmosphere through the main stack of the cyclotron facility. Hence, the installation of a suitable effluent detector for the real-time estimation of the stack discharges during entire radioisotope production and handling processes became mandatory. A smart effluent monitoring system was developed at our health Physics laboratory and installed in July 1993. The system includes a small 94.5 ml flow-through chamber attached to a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector interfaced to a single channel analyser (SCA). The analog voltage output of the SCA, proportional to instantaneous activity concentration of radioactive gas residing in the chamber is sampled by an industrial standard data logger every minute. The data logger is interfaced to a personal computer (PC) based on a 100 MHz central processing unit (CPU) and a 100 MB (Mega Byte) hard disc. The string of raw output data (mV) from the data logger is linearised and converted to equivalent activity concentration [MBqm -3 ] using dedicated calibration polynomials. A spreadsheet macro program was implemented for the data processing. Recently an anemometer, a wind-vane with optoelectronic transducers and a wind temperature indicator have been added to the existing stack monitoring system, thus enabling the datalogger to retrieve the stack release and weather data simultaneously. A Gaussian-Plume type 'Atmospheric-Dispersion-Model' was incorporated in the spreadsheet macro program. By using the atmospheric data such as wind speed, temperature, wind direction and the activity concentration of the stack emission [Mbqm -3 ] the deposited activity concentration in the immediate vicinity of the cyclotron complex are calculated and displayed on a spreadsheet with the corresponding time of the stack release. In this paper

  18. Scientific opportunities for research using neutron beams at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.

    2003-01-01

    The 20-MW Australian Replacement Research Reactor represents possibly the greatest single research infrastructure investment in Australia's history. Construction of the facility has commenced, following award of the construction contract in July 2000, and the construction licence in April 2002. The project includes a large state-of-the-art liquid deuterium cold-neutron source and supermirror guides feeding a large modern guide hall, in which most of the instruments are placed. Alongside the guide hall, there is good provision of laboratory, office and space for support activities. While the facility has 'space' for up to 18 instruments, the project has funding for an initial set of 8 instruments, which will be ready when the reactor is fully operational in January 2006. Instrument performance will be competitive with the best research-reactor facilities anywhere, and our goal is to be in the top 3 such facilities worldwide. Staff to lead the design effort and man these instruments have been hired on the international market from leading overseas facilities, and from within Australia, and 6 out of 8 instruments have been specified and costed. At present the instrumentation project carries ∼15% contingency. An extensive dialogue has taken place with the domestic user community and our international peers, via various means including a series of workshops over the last 2 years covering all 8 instruments, emerging areas of application like biology and the earth sciences, and computing infrastructure for the instruments. In December 2002, ANSTO formed the Bragg Institute, with the intent of nurturing strong external partnerships, and covering all aspects of neutron and X-ray scattering, including research using synchrotron radiation. I will discuss the present status and predicted performance of the neutron-beam facilities at the Replacement Reactor, synergies with the synchrotron in Victoria, in-house x-ray facilities that we intend to install in the Bragg Institute

  19. Archive monitoring of pollutants in the Dee River using SIMS analysis of mussels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Mt Morgan was mined for copper and gold from 1882 to 1982 and subsequent tailings re-processing ceased in 1990. Direct and accidental deposition of tailings into the adjacent Dee River and acid mine drainage from the mine site continues to impact the Dee River. The Queensland Department of Natural Resources gauging and monitoring station at Kenbula (adjacent to the mine) continuously monitors pH of around 2.8. Twenty kilometres downstream of the mine the pH improves to 3.5. Elevated sediment metal concentrations have been recorded over 50 kilometres downstream in investigations conducted by CSIRO (Jones et al. 1995, 1996) and others. Biological monitoring by Mackey (1988) and subsequently by Duivendoorden (1995,1997), confirmed significant impact on the fish, macrophyte of macro invertebrate populations downstream of the mine. The current AINSE sponsored project will investigate the use of mussels (genus Allathryia) to archive the pollutant load in the Dee River using SIMS. In 1995 ANSTO conducted similar studies on mussels (Velesunio angasi) in the Finniss River downstream of Rum Jungle NT. Preliminary analysis has commenced on mussels collected at Deeford and Calliungal Station, approximately 50 and 60 kilometres downstream of the mine. Mussels will also be collected from upstream sites on the Dee and the Dawson Rivers. Mussel searching will continue upstream of Deeford to determine whether this is the closest site to the mine that the mussels survive. At least one collection site will be located in the Dawson River, downstream of the Dee, which is a major source of water for the many surrounding agricultural and grazing properties

  20. Surface exposure history using in-situ cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl - applications to the Australian environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.

    1999-01-01

    Production of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides, 10 Be (T 1/2 =1.5Ma), 26 Al (0.7Ma) and 36 Cl (0.3Ma), is dominated by the interaction of cosmic-rays with the upper atmosphere. They are also produced in exposed surface rocks and within the first meter or so of the Earth's crust. This is called in-situ production and although only a million atoms or so of 10 Be are produced within a ten thousand year exposure period per gram of surface rock, the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be applied to measure this tell-tale signal. The build-up over time of these radionuclides can be utilised as radiometric clocks to elucidate the exposure history of geomorphic formations and surfaces that have experienced some event or process that delivers previously unexposed material to cosmic-ray irradiation. Hence the reconstruction of glacial chronologies (ie time a bedrock surface was uncovered by ice retreat, or deposition age of glacial moraines), development of raised river terraces and paleo-beach ridges, age of meteorite impact craters and volcanic eruptions have been addressed with the in-situ method. Moreover, geomorphological processes of landscape evolution such as surface erosion rates, continental weathering, sediment transport and deposition, uplift rates can also be studied. The in-situ method is described along with examples of cosmogenic dating projects at ANSTO. It is estimated that it works best over the time period from 5 ka to 5 Ma and can identify erosion rates ranging from 0.1 to 10 mm/ka

  1. Flexible process options for the immobilisation of residues and wastes containing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.W.A.; Moricca, S.A.; Day, R. A.; Begg, B. D.; Scales, C. R.; Maddrell, E. R.; Eilbeck, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Residues and waste streams containing plutonium present unique technical, safety, regulatory, security, and socio-political challenges. In the UK these streams range from lightly plutonium contaminated materials (PCM) through to residue s resulting directly from Pu processing operations. In addition there are potentially stocks of Pu oxide powders whose future designation may be either a waste or an asset, due to their levels of contamination making their reuse uneconomic, or to changes in nuclear policy. While waste management routes exist for PCM, an immobilisation process is required for streams containing higher levels of Pu. Such a process is being developed by Nexia Solutions and ANSTO to treat and immobilise Pu waste and residues currently stored on the Sellafield site. The characteristics of these Pu waste streams are highly variable. The physical form of the Pu waste ranges from liquids, sludges, powders/granules, to solid components (e.g., test fuels), with the Pu present as an ion in solution, as a salt, metal, oxide or other compound. The chemistry of the Pu waste streams also varies considerably with a variety of impurities present in many waste streams. Furthermore, with fissile isotopes present, criticality is an issue during operations and in the store or repository. Safeguards and security concerns must be assessed and controlled. The process under development, by using a combination of tailored waste form chemistry combined with flexible process technology aims to develop a process line to handle a broad range of Pu waste streams. It aims to be capable of dealing with not only current arisings but those anticipated to arise as a result of future operations or policy changes. (authors)

  2. Future Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, K.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1993-08-01

    The Research Reactor Review was set up by the Minister for Science and Technology in September 1992 to review, on the basis of benefits and costs, Australia's need for a new nuclear research reactor to replace the ageing HIFAR, which is operated by ANSTO at Lucas Heights in Sydney. The second term of reference of the Review refers to an assessment of the benefits of HIFAR, which will include an assessment of the benefits in scientific terms, of activities carried out at HIFAR. If the finding is that Australia has a need for a new nuclear research reactor, the Review was required to consider possible locations for a new reactor, its environmental impact at alternative locations, recommend a preferred location, and evaluate matters associated with regulation of the facility and organisational arrangements for reactor-based research. The Review has not provided a decisive response and in essence proposed: keep HIFAR going; commission a Probabilistic Risk Assessment to ascertain HIFAR's remaining life and refurbishment possibilities; provide an additional $2 million per year for scientists to gain access to international advanced neutron scattering facilities; commence work immediately to identify and establish a high level waste repository; accept the financial implications of the fact that neither the current nor any new reactor can be completely commercial; accept in consequence that any decision on a new reactor or other neutron source must rest primarily on the assessed benefits to science and Australia's national interests; and make a decision on a new neutron source in about five years' time when the relative arguments relating to spallation sources, cyclotrons and reactors might be clearer, and when Australia's scientific neutron scattering performance is more evident. 82 refs., 25 refs., 45 figs

  3. Replacement Nuclear Research Reactor: Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Vol. 1. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the replacement of the Australian Research reactor has been released. An important objective of the EIS process is to ensure that all relevant information has been collected and assessed so that the Commonwealth Government can make an informed decision on the proposal. The environmental assessment of the proposal to construct and operate a replacement reactor described in the Draft EIS has shown that the scale of environmental impacts that would occur would be acceptable, provided that the management measures and commitments made by ANSTO are adopted. Furthermore, construction and operation of the proposed replacement reactor would result in a range of benefits in health care, the national interest, scientific achievement and industrial capability. It would also result in a range of benefits derived from increased employment and economic activity. None of the alternatives to the replacement research reactor considered in the Draft EIS can meet all of the objectives of the proposal. The risk from normal operations or accidents has been shown to be well within national and internationally accepted risk parameters. The dose due to reactor operations would continue to be small and within regulatory limits. For the replacement reactor, the principle of 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable' would form an integral part of the design and licensing process to ensure that doses to operators are minimized. Costs associated with the proposal are $286 million (in 1997 dollars) for design and construction. The annual operating and maintenance costs are estimated to be $12 million per year, of which a significant proportion will be covered by commercial activities. The costs include management of the spent fuel from the replacement reactor as well as the environmental management costs of waste management, safety and environmental monitoring. Decommissioning costs for the replacement reactor would arise at the end of its lifetime

  4. Neutron beam facilities at Australia's replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The 20-MW Australian Replacement Research Reactor represents possibly the greatest single research infrastructure investment in Australia's history. Construction of the facility has commenced, following award of the construction contract in July 2000, and the construction licence in April 2002. The project includes a large state-of-the-art liquid deuterium cold-neutron source and supermirror guides feeding a large modern guide hall, in which most of the instruments are placed. Alongside the guide hall, there is good provision of laboratory, office and space for support activities. While the facility has 'space' for up to 18 instruments, the project has funding for an initial set of 8 instruments, which will be ready when the reactor is fully operational in January 2006. Instrument performance will be competitive with the best research-reactor facilities anywhere, and our goal is to be in the top 3 such facilities worldwide. Staff to lead the design effort and man these instruments have been hired on the international market from leading overseas facilities, and from within Australia, and 6 out of 8 instruments have been specified and costed. At present the instrumentation project carries ∼15% contingency. An extensive dialogue has taken place with the domestic user community and our international peers, via various means including a series of workshops over the last 2 years covering all 8 instruments, emerging areas of application like biology and the earth sciences, and computing infrastructure for the instruments. In December 2002, ANSTO formed the Bragg Institute, with the intent of nurturing strong external partnerships, and covering all aspects of neutron and X-ray scattering, including research using synchrotron radiation. I will discuss the present status and predicted performance of the neutron-beam facilities at the Replacement Reactor, and the opportunities that all of this presents for scientific research in Australia, with particular

  5. The contribution of AMS to geosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivas, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This presentation outlines some of the advances in AMS methods with emphasis on Australian examples and measurements using the accelerators at ANSTO and the Australian National University. Perhaps the best known of these techniques is the application of AMS 14 C dating which has the advantage of needing much smaller amounts of sample (typically 14 C determinations by β counting. AMS 14 C has been applied to dating an enormous array of materials including archaeological samples and sites, tree rings, ice cores, banding in coals and circulation and ventilation changes in the world's oceans. An exciting application of the measurement of the rare long-lived isotopes 10 Be, 26 Al and 36 Cl is in the relatively new field of cosmogenic exposure dating. Accumulation of these cosmogenically produced nuclides formed in-situ in exposed rock surfaces is used to estimate both the time of exposure of the rock surface and mean erosion rates. A large variety of landscape-related processes have been successfully addressed including weathering and sediment-transport rates and the ages of glacial retreat, tectonic uplift and lava eruptions. In the field of hydrology, 36 Cl studies of dissolved chloride have been used to successfully estimate the ages of ground waters and trace their origins. The tracing of atmospheric air masses that deliver rain and the origin of Australian salt lakes and continental salinisation using 36 Cl lead to important conclusions on the origin and residence time of chloride in the Australian landscape. The ultimate origin of the bulk of the surficial chloride in Australia is shown to be meteoric, and for the western part of the continent, a mean residence time of about 0.75 Ma pertains. The realisation of the long-term and continuing delivery of salts to the landscape needs recognition in planning strategies to combat salinisations of agricultural areas

  6. The polarized platypus polarized neutron reflectometry made possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saerbeck, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The magnetic moment of the neutron, together with it's highly penetrating non destructive manner, make polarized neutron reflectometry an excellent tool to study magnetic phenomena across surfaces and interfaces of thin films. Unlike other magnetometry techniques which ordinarily yield only average magnetization values or, in case of probes with higher spatial resolution (e.g. electron microscopy or scanning tunnelling microscopy), show a high surface sensitivity, PNR together with magnetic x-ray scattering provides the ability to spatially resolve vector magnetization well beneath the surface [1] The ability to obtain vector magnetization profiles across interfaces and surfaces of thin films and multilayers offers the intriguing possibility to study systematically magnetic configurations and magnetic exchange interactions through intervening layers. In this paper we present the performance of the new polarization system installed on the time of flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS at ANSTO's Bragg Institute. The spin state of the neutrons is polarized and analysed by spatial separation of different neutron spin states using polarizing Fe/Si supermirrors before, and after the sample stage. The supermirrors have a large wavelength acceptance bandwidth of 3 A to 12 A. To control the desired spin direction of the incoming and reflected beam from the sample, two sets of RF spin flippers are installed. In the free space between the spin flippers and the sample stage the neutron spin direction is maintained by two sets of magnetic guide field coils. The new sample environment for studies of magnetic samples includes a 1 T electromagnet and a closed cycle refrigerator which gives access to a temperature range from 4K to 3 50 K .

  7. Natural radioactivity in environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijnis, H.; Jenkinson, A.; Chisari, R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The use natural radioactivity in environmental studies has proven a very powerful tool to determine the dynamics of both natural and antrophogenic processes in our environment. The use of 14 C in archeology and past climate studies has led to many scientific discoveries (i.e. shroud of Turin and Utze 'the ice-man' from Austria). The use of the 238 U-decay series is of at least equal value to studies in archeology and past climates. Some of the Isotopes studied supplement 14 C (which is limited to 40,000 years) up to 350,000 years and others can be utilized to date very young sediments, which can't be dated by 14 C. The so-called 210 Pb dating method has been used over the past 3 decades to date recent sediment. The method uses the disequilibrium in the 238 U decay chain, caused by the escape of the intermediate daughter 222 Rn (a noble gas) from the earth's crust. In the atmosphere the 222 Rn decays via short-lived daughter isotopes to 210 Pb. This 210 Pb with a very convenient half-life of 22,3 years decays to stable 206 Pb. By measuring the surface activity of a sediment core and subsequent samples at regular intervals one can establish a chronology for the sediment core. By studying the trace metals in these cores, one could deduce a contamination history for the region. Examples of studies supported by AINSE and ANSTO will be given

  8. Study of phase development in alumina-spodumene ceramics by high temperature neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, B.K.; O'Connor, B.H.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Melting and crystallisation of minor phases are important in many material systems which contain impurities and/or grain boundary liquid phases. Grain boundary glassy phases are generally not thermodynamically stable, and can devitrify during the sintering process or from other high temperature exposure. Characterising the minor phase assemblage in these types of materials has implications in processing, microstructural design and in-service use, particularly fluctuating thermal environments. An in situ high temperature neutron diffraction (ND) technique was used to follow the phase dynamics on sintering an alumina-spodumene ceramic as well as the crystallisation kinetics of the evolving crystalline phase in real time. The main benefit of using ND analysis in the present work is that it provides bulk specimen character of the material which is important in quantitatively extracting phase composition information. Likewise, most diffraction measurements are conducted with ambient or static temperature data, collected after specimens have been heat-treated and then cooled. Such data may yield misleading information particularly in relation to non-equilibrium phases. Hence dynamic measurements are clearly preferable as a direct means of confirming sintering processes. ND measurements were performed using the High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) neutron source operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) at Lucas Heights, NSW, Australia. The ND patterns collected on heating the compacts provided relevant information for optimising materials processing and sintering protocols. Similarly, the ND patterns collected for three specific cooling schemes yielded significant details of evolution and crystallisation of the minor phase. The principal aim was to demonstrate the fundamental influence of the minor crystalline phase (and hence glassy phase) on properties and to manipulate and tailor the phase structure by controlled

  9. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering: large-scale structure determination from a bird's eye view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehma, A.; Brûlé, A.; Freund, A.; Kennedy, S.

    2012-01-01

    Both natural and synthetic materials science and engineering rely increasingly on detailed knowledge of the microstructure and interactions in soft and hard materials. Contemporary research areas in biology and the life sciences, e.g., include membrane biophysics, drug-delivery systems and pharmacology, denial and medical composites, biomaterials, fillings and implants in each of these areas large length scale measurements become necessary as model biological systems begin to approach the complexity of natural systems Porosity (void structure) and particle size need to be understood so that the processes of agglomeration and water transport can be quantified in materials such as cements, oil bearing rooks, and pewit pigments Complex fluids, containing structures and complexes in the nanometre and much larger length scales, have widely varying physical properties and are extensively used in food, cosmetic/personal care, pharmaceuticals and drug-delivery, and mining industries. In these length-scales are some of the organisational features that dictate the bulk rheological and stability properties of solutions. At ANSTO a new ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) instrument, Kookaburra (currently) under construction with an expected transition to operation in mid-2013), will advance large-scale structure determination in the size range of 0.1-10 µm. Based on the well-established Bonse-Hart method. Kookaburra will individually operate at two different wavelengths to optimally accommodate weakly and strongly scattering samples at one sample position. This contribution will present specifics of Kookaburra and also discuss a practical application of the USANS technique in polymer science. Both its versatility and estimated neutron flux suggest that this state-.of-the-art instrument will generate a major impact in the field of large-scale structure determination.

  10. The design and application of a radiological consequence model for tropical and subtropical regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domel, R.U.; Harris, F.F.; Crawford, J.

    1997-01-01

    The post Chernobyl era has seen the development of a plethora of radiological consequence models. At ANSTO, a model is being developed with a user-friendly interface which will assess the radiological consequences, after an incident, in tropical and sub-tropical climates. The model combines specific regional dispersion and deposition data to determine the dose to man via the major pathways of external and internal irradiation. The external irradiation data will need to include lifestyle information such as time spent L indoors/outdoors, the high/low activity times of the different groups of people (especially critical groups) and shielding factors for housing. The internal irradiation data requires food consumption values, effect of food processing and transfer parameters (soil to plant, plant to animal) to be obtained for tropical and sub-tropical regions. The model allows the user to specify the radionuclide of interest, the age of the person receiving l the dose, race, dietary components and lifestyle. The operator may use a number of default categories, but regional information may also be entered and incorporated into the radiological model allowing assessment of dose to critical groups using site specific data. Initially, the model will deal with the South East Asian region but flexibility has been incorporated into the design to allow application in other regions. A geographic information system is used for display of all input and output data allowing quick access to not only the results but also the underlying assumptions. The model also has portability across computer platforms. The model has been developed to provide a tool for directing future research, has application as a planing tool for emergency response operations but its priority lies in understanding the behaviour of radionuclides in the tropical and sub-tropical environments and their effect on humankind

  11. Calibration of the Capintec CRC-712M dose calibrator for 18F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, L.; Reinhard, M.I.; Davies, J.B.; Alexiev, D.; Baldock, C.

    2006-01-01

    Primary standardisation was performed on a solution of 18 F using the 4πβ-γ coincidence counting efficiency-tracing extrapolation method with 60 Co used as a tracer nuclide. The result was used to calibrate the ANSTO secondary standard ionisation chamber which is used to disseminate Australian activity standards for gamma emitters. Using the secondary activity standard for 18 F, the Capintec CRC-712M dose calibrator at the Australian National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Quality Control (QC) Section was calibrated. The dial setting number recommended by the manufacturer for the measurement of the activity of 18 F is 439. In this work, the dial setting numbers for the activity measurement of the solution of 18 F in Wheaton vials were experimentally determined to be 443+/-12, 446+/-12, 459+/-11, 473+/-15 for 0.1, 1, 4.5 and 9ml solution volumes, respectively. The uncertainties given above are expanded uncertainties (k=2) giving an estimated level of confidence of 95%. The activities determined using the manufacturer recommended setting number 439 are 0.8%, 1.4%, 4.0% and 6.5% higher than the standardised activities, respectively. It is recommended that a single dial setting number of 459 determined for 4.5ml is used for 0.1-9ml solution in Wheaton vials in order to simplify the operation procedure. With this setting the expended uncertainty (k=2) in the activity readout from the Capintec dose calibrator would be less than 6.2%

  12. Progress report of Applications of Nuclear Physics. July 1993 - June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the Applications of Nuclear Physics Program Area are: The development and promotion of research programs on national nuclear science facilities such as charged particle accelerators and neutron beam instruments thereby encouraging strategic research in nuclear science and technology at ANSTO, in tertiary institutions and industrial research and development laboratories; Participation in and management ofA ustralian use of international neutron scattering, synchrotron radiation and high energy physics facilities to assist graduate training in the universities and to foster Australian benefits from developments in high technology; The maintenance of expertise in fundamental nuclear and atomic processes relevant to nuclear science and technology including neutron physics, ion interactions, radiation standards, dosimetry and laser enrichment; Expansion of the use of the accelerator mass spectrometry service both nationally and internationally to make major contributions in the understanding and remediation of severe environmental problems such as the greenhouse effect; The application of charged particle beams and ionizing radiation to industrial, biological and environmental problems; The exploitation of neutron scattering techniques in the development of new materials, drugs, biological substances and complex chemicals. The Program Area is continuing the development of several major new facilities. These include new beam lines and a new ion source on the Tandem accelerator (ANTARES), preliminary calibration of the small angle neutron scattering instrument (AUSANS) on the HIFAR reactor, refurbishment of one of the single crystal spectrometers on HIFAR (2TANA) and further development of the Australian National Beam line Facility at the Photon Factory at Tsukuba in Japan. In addition, significant improvements were made to the two neutron powder diffractometers on HIFAR (autor)

  13. Potential for Australian involvement in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D. J.; Collins, G. A.; Hole, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Fusion, the process that powers the sun and stars, offers a solution to the world's long-term energy needs: providing large scale energy production with zero greenhouse gas emissions, short-lived radio-active waste compared to conventional nuclear fission cycles, and a virtually limitless supply of fuel. Almost three decades of fusion research has produced spectacular progress. Present-day experiments have a power gain ratio of approximately 1 (ratio of power out to power in), with a power output in the 10's of megawatts. The world's next major fusion experiment, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will be a pre-prototype power plant. Since announcement of the ITER site in June 2005, the ITER project, has gained momentum and political support. Despite Australia's foundation role in the field of fusion science, through the pioneering work of Sir Mark Oliphant, and significant contributions to the international fusion program over the succeeding years, Australia is not involved in the ITER project. In this talk, the activities of a recently formed consortium of scientists and engineers, the Australian ITER Forum will be outlined. The Forum is drawn from five Universities, ANSTO (the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation) and AINSE (the Australian Institute for Nuclear Science and Engineering), and seeks to promote fusion energy in the Australian community and negotiate a role for Australia in the ITER project. As part of this activity, the Australian government recently funded a workshop that discussed the ways and means of engaging Australia in ITER. The workshop brought the research, industrial, government and general public communities, together with the ITER partners, and forged an opportunity for ITER engagement; with scientific, industrial, and energy security rewards for Australia. We will report on the emerging scope for Australian involvement

  14. Surface exposure history using in-situ cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl - applications to the Australian environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Physics Division

    1999-11-01

    Production of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides, {sup 10}Be (T{sub 1/2}=1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma), is dominated by the interaction of cosmic-rays with the upper atmosphere. They are also produced in exposed surface rocks and within the first meter or so of the Earth`s crust. This is called in-situ production and although only a million atoms or so of {sup 10}Be are produced within a ten thousand year exposure period per gram of surface rock, the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be applied to measure this tell-tale signal. The build-up over time of these radionuclides can be utilised as radiometric clocks to elucidate the exposure history of geomorphic formations and surfaces that have experienced some event or process that delivers previously unexposed material to cosmic-ray irradiation. Hence the reconstruction of glacial chronologies (ie time a bedrock surface was uncovered by ice retreat, or deposition age of glacial moraines), development of raised river terraces and paleo-beach ridges, age of meteorite impact craters and volcanic eruptions have been addressed with the in-situ method. Moreover, geomorphological processes of landscape evolution such as surface erosion rates, continental weathering, sediment transport and deposition, uplift rates can also be studied. The in-situ method is described along with examples of cosmogenic dating projects at ANSTO. It is estimated that it works best over the time period from 5 ka to 5 Ma and can identify erosion rates ranging from 0.1 to 10 mm/ka 20 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Important radiation protection aspects of the operation of a commercial medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    1997-01-01

    Since July 1991 the Radiopharmaceutical Division of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a 30 MeV H'- ion Medical Cyclotron (Model; CYCLONE 30, Manufacturer: Ion Beam Applications, Louvain La Neuve, Belgium). During routine isotope production operations at the cyclotron a thick copper substrate plate electroplated with thin layer of selected enriched target material are bombarded with 30 MeV proton beam current up to 450 μA. The nuclear reaction of protons with the copper atoms result in the reduction of prompt evaporation neutrons with a peak energy of ∼ 1.8 MeV. These evaporation neutrons slow down via multiple collisions with the concrete shielding walls of the target cave, bounce back to the,interior space of the cave activating the cyclotron parts, beam tube components and other utilities installed in the irradiation cave. After the completion of 60 hour isotope production run, gamma dose equivalent rates of ∼10 5 μSvh -1 were measured at contact with the target irradiation stations and beam collimators. Evidently, these gamma rays emitted from the activated cyclotron components impose crucial radiation exposure hazard problems for the cyclotron maintenance technicians. Experiments had been carried out in order to identify the specific pathways of cyclotron component activation and to assess the probable personnel radiation exposure during handling of the activated cyclotron parts. The cool-down (radioactive decay) of the activated cyclotron components was estimated experimentally at different target bombardment conditions using the wall mounted gamma area monitors interfaced to the Health Physics Data Acquisition System. The gamma dose equivalent rates at contact with various locations of interest at the target irradiation station and at the typical work areas of the maintenance personnel were carefully recorded with a radiation (gamma) survey instrument during the three years operation period of the cyclotron. A

  16. Opportunities for physics research at Australia's replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The 20-MW Australian Replacement Research Reactor represents possibly the greatest single research infrastructure investment in Australia's history. Construction of the facility has commenced, following award of the construction contract in July 2000, and the construction licence in April 2002. The project includes a large state-of-the-art liquid deuterium cold-neutron source and supermirror guides feeding a large modern guide hall, in which most of the instruments are placed. Alongside the guide hall, there is good provision of laboratory, office and space for support activities. While the facility has 'space' for up to 18 instruments, the project has funding for an initial set of 8 instruments, which will be ready when the reactor is fully operational in January 2006. Instrument performance will be competitive with the best research-reactor facilities anywhere, and our goal is to be in the top 3 such facilities worldwide. Staff to lead the design effort and man these instruments have been hired on the international market from leading overseas facilities, and from within Australia, and 6 out of 8 instruments have been specified and costed. At present the instrumentation project carries ∼15% contingency. An extensive dialogue has taken place with the domestic user community and our international peers, via various means including a series of workshops over the last 2 years covering all 8 instruments, emerging areas of application like biology and the earth sciences, and computing infrastructure for the instruments. In December 2002, ANSTO formed the Bragg Institute, with the intent of nurturing strong external partnerships, and covering all aspects of neutron and X-ray scattering, including research using synchrotron radiation. I will discuss the present status and predicted performance of the neutron-beam facilities at the Replacement Reactor, synergies with the synchrotron in Victoria, in-house x-ray facilities that we intend to install in the Bragg

  17. Present status and needs of human resource development in the nuclear field in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernido, Corazon C.; Roceles, Pilar C. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman, Quezon (Philippines)

    2000-12-01

    The first nuclear power plant was nearing completion. However, due to change in political climate and support for the nuclear power program, this has been mothballed. There is a possibility for the introduction of nuclear power plant in the country's projected energy sources by the year 2020. The country has one research reactor, but at the present time it is undergoing repair and is not operational. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), an Institute under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), is the sole government agency mandated by the law to take charge of all matters pertaining to nuclear science and technology, and the regulation of nuclear energy. There is one another government agency, the Radiation Health Service (RHS) of the Department of Health, which is responsible for regulating the use and application of X-rays and non-ionizing radiation. The PNRI conducts national training courses in nuclear science and technology, and radiation protection to users of radioisotopes. Individual courses are outlined in the paper. Up to the present time, around 7,300 have participated in national training courses conducted by PNRI. Distributions of PNRI trainees are: 53 % for industrial, 12 % medical, 12 % for academe, and 23 % for others. Nuclear science and technology education in schools and universities are presented. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) training activities availed 77 % of the total foreign training from 1993 to 1998; Japan follows next at 20 %; and others comprise the remaining 3 %. An approach to training and human resources development, which could reach out to more target trainees, is Distance Learning. In 1998, as a part of a Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) and IAEA project, the Philippines participated in the trial of distance learning modules in radiation protection. The distance learning modules were developed at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). These modules will

  18. A SANS study of the adsorption of guar gum on talc surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cram, S.L.; Knott, R.; Hanley, H.

    2002-01-01

    Reagents based on guar gum are commonly used as 'gangue' depressants in the flotation of sulphides from ores containing naturally floating layer silicate minerals such as talc. Nickel sulphide ores processed by WMC Resources Ltd. at the Leinster Nickel Operations in Western Australia typically contain 1-2 % talc. Guar gum, added to the flotation cell, depresses the talc by adsorbing onto its surface, thereby reducing its hydrophobic nature. Guar gum is a long chain polysaccharide containing many hydroxyl functional groups along the length of its chain. The ratio of chain length to the number of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups causes the guar gum to be selective in depressing talc rather than nickel sulphide minerals. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) it is an excellent tool for probing structures in the nano length scale. Unlike X-rays, neutrons are sensitive to low atomic weight elements, especially hydrogen and therefore organics. Using SANS it is possible to contrast different parts of a composite sample to get information on spatial arrangements. These qualities make SANS an obvious choice for studying the adsorption of guar gum on the surface of talc in aqueous solutions. Complimentary SANS experiments were carried out in Australia at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and in the United States at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Initially talc samples were studied 'as supplied', however as experiments proceeded attempts to reduce the particle size and distribution were carried out by milling and centrifuging procedures. Contrast matching techniques were used to observed the scattering behaviour of talc with and without the presence of guar gum and vice versa, over a total q range of 0.002 - 0.1 Angstroms -1 . The size of the talc particles appears to affect the scattering behaviour not only of talc but also of guar gum in the same solutions. This implies that the structure of the guar gum is strongly

  19. Neutron beam facilities at the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: On September 3rd 1997 the Australian Federal Government announced their decision to replace the HIFAR research reactor by 2005. The proposed reactor will be a multipurpose reactor with improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The neutron beam facilities are intended to cater for Australian scientific needs well into the 21st century. In the first stage of planning the neutron Beam Facilities at the replacement reactor, a Consultative Group was formed (BFCG) to determine the scientific capabilities of the new facility. Members of the group were drawn from academia, industry and government research laboratories. The BFCG submitted their report in April 1998, outlining the scientific priorities to be addressed. Cold and hot neutron sources are to be included, and cold and thermal neutron guides will be used to position most of the instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. In 2005 it is planned to have eight instruments installed with a further three to be developed by 2010, and seven spare instrument positions for development of new instruments over the life of the reactor. A beam facilities technical group (BFTG) was then formed to prepare the engineering specifications for the tendering process. The group consisted of some members of the BFCG, several scientists and engineers from ANSTO, and scientists from leading neutron scattering centres in Europe, USA and Japan. The BFTG looked in detail at the key components of the facility such as the thermal, cold and hot neutron sources, neutron collimators, neutron beam guides and overall requirements for the neutron guide hall. The report of the BFTG, completed in August 1998, was incorporated into the draft specifications for the reactor project, which were distributed to potential reactor vendors. An assessment of the first stage of reactor vendor submissions was completed in

  20. Micro-and nanodosimetry for radiobiological planning in radiotherapy and cancer risk assessment in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    . Microdosimetric and nanodosimetric measurements of 250 MeV proton radiation fields at the proton accelerator of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) using SOI microdosimeter and gas nanodosimeter will be presented. Good agreement between GEANT Monte Carlo simulations of ionization cluster and pattern of deposited energies measured by nanodosimeter and microdosimeter have been achieved. Replacement of a gas nanodosimeter with 10 nm SV volume of a silicon detector is a challenge. However with the development of Si nanotechnology it is feasible and track structure sensitive array of 3D submicron size Si detectors will be presented. Challenges in the conversion of Si microdosimetric and nanodosimetric spectra to tissue equivalent will be discussed. This project is a large scale collaboration with ANSTO and U NSW in Australia and LLUMC, USNA, Johns Hopkins Uni and MSKCC in the USA

  1. A new research reactor? Report by the Select Committee for an inquiry into the contract for a new reactor at Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    On 15 August 2000, the Senate resolved to establish the Select Committee for an Inquiry into the Contract for a New Reactor at Lucas Heights and report to the Parliament. The Select committee majority report is divided into three parts: the need for a new reactor; the tendering process and the nature of the contract; and Australia's nuclear waste management strategy and public health and safety. There is a final chapter which brings together the major issues examined in the report. Based on the evidence presented to it, the Committee notes that some Australian scientists and engineers present a strong case for the new reactor. While the Committee is of the view that nuclear science and technology is not backward looking and does offer opportunities for researchers to keep at the forefront of important areas in scientific research and development it does not automatically follow that the best way to promote scientific and medical research in this country is by spending substantial amounts of public funds for the next forty years on a single research reactor. Nevertheless, the Committee recommends that before the Government proceeds any further with the proposed reactor, it undertake a thorough and comprehensive public review of funding for medical and scientific research in Australia with a view to assessing priorities including the role, if any, a research reactor would have in contributing to Australia's scientific, medical and industrial interests. The Committee also requested that the Australian National Audit Office consider examining the tender and contract documents for the new reactor at Lucas Heights with a view to determining: whether further investigation of the tendering process and the contract is warranted; whether, during the tendering process, ANSTO ensured that there was adequate and appropriate independent verification and validation of the tenderers claims. Two supplementary report are included: one from the Liberal and National members (minority

  2. Present status and needs of human resource development in the nuclear field in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernido, Corazon C.; Roceles, Pilar C.

    2000-01-01

    The first nuclear power plant was nearing completion. However, due to change in political climate and support for the nuclear power program, this has been mothballed. There is a possibility for the introduction of nuclear power plant in the country's projected energy sources by the year 2020. The country has one research reactor, but at the present time it is undergoing repair and is not operational. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), an Institute under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), is the sole government agency mandated by the law to take charge of all matters pertaining to nuclear science and technology, and the regulation of nuclear energy. There is one another government agency, the Radiation Health Service (RHS) of the Department of Health, which is responsible for regulating the use and application of X-rays and non-ionizing radiation. The PNRI conducts national training courses in nuclear science and technology, and radiation protection to users of radioisotopes. Individual courses are outlined in the paper. Up to the present time, around 7,300 have participated in national training courses conducted by PNRI. Distributions of PNRI trainees are: 53 % for industrial, 12 % medical, 12 % for academe, and 23 % for others. Nuclear science and technology education in schools and universities are presented. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) training activities availed 77 % of the total foreign training from 1993 to 1998; Japan follows next at 20 %; and others comprise the remaining 3 %. An approach to training and human resources development, which could reach out to more target trainees, is Distance Learning. In 1998, as a part of a Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) and IAEA project, the Philippines participated in the trial of distance learning modules in radiation protection. The distance learning modules were developed at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). These modules will be

  3. A study of the environmental impact on Australia of a nuclear accident in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, G.D.; Davidson, N.E.; Logan, W.; Mills, G.A.; Puri, K.; McDonald, N.R.; Cameron, R.F.; Clark, G.; Crawford, J.; Domel, R.U.; Hambley, D.; Harris, F.F.; Barton, R.; Manins, P.C.; Hibberd, M.F.

    1998-01-01

    This study has considered the circumstances under which radioactive material, released as a result of a severe accident in a reactor of the type that could be proposed for Indonesia, might reach Australia. This assumes the latest available technology for a pressurised water reactor, a boiling water reactor, or an 'advanced' light-water reactor, each with a modern containment building. The methodology consisted of developing detailed definitions of the accident scenarios, calculating he transport of the radioactive cloud to Australia and its dispersion by means of a numerical meteorological model, developed by ANSTO, and determining the impact on individuals in Australia by means of a radiological consequences model. A single release was considered with variations in the time of release, the meteorological situation, the height of release, its duration, the amount and the type of material released. The calculations are currently based on the ICRP Standard 70 Kg man. The major pathways considered are inhalation, groundshine, cloudshine and ingestion of plants, meet and milk. A source term was determined for radionuclides, represented by Xenon-133, Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137. Three type of weather conditions that could cause a radioactive cloud to reach Australia were considered. The calculations have shown that the active monsoonal cases impact on north-western and northern Australia, the monsoonal break-period cases impact on western and north-western Australia and that mid-tropospheric cases can impact on a wide band across central and southern Australia. The area of impact for a mid-tropospheric release can be greater than for a near-surface release. It was concluded that even with an extreme release, for actual meteorological conditions, the maximum dose would be below the 5 mSv, dose at which the National Health and Medical Research Council advises that consideration be given to control of milk and foodstuff. This study has been limited in scope, primarily

  4. Heavy metal pathways and archives in biological tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlic, I.; Siegele, R.; Menon, D.D.; Markich, S.J.; Cohen, D.D.; Jeffree, R.A.; McPhail, D.C.; Sarbutt, A.; Stelcer, E.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear milli and microprobes at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) were used to determine lead accumulation in native Australian plants and animals. Three species of eucalypt plants (Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus globulus and Eucalyptus lesouefii), one species of salt bush (Atriplex burbhanyana) and one species each of acacia (Acacia saligna) and estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) were investigated. Experimentally grown plants were subjected to a nutrient solution with a pH of 5 and spiked with a 200 μmol concentration of Pb. Lead concentrations in leaves of both E. globulus and E. camaldulensis showed an almost exponential decrease from the base of the main vein to the tip. Similarly, Pb concentrations decreased from the main vein to secondary veins. Concentrations of essential elements such as K, Fe, Zn and Br in the main and secondary veins were constant within experimental uncertainty. In contrast, the concentrations of Pb in the leaf veins of E. lesouefii were much lower and showed no systematic pattern. In stem and root samples the highest concentration of Pb was found in roots and stem of E. globulus and A. burbhanyana followed by E. camaldulensis. Some Pb was found in roots of A. saligna and only very low concentration in stem of the same plant. More detailed analysis of thin cross-sectional samples of roots and stem showed that Pb is present in much higher concentration in the growth area of the plant structure (i.e. meristemic region) and in relatively low concentration within the pith region and outer cortex. The osteoderms (dermal bones) of estuarine crocodiles, exposed to lead ammunition in food from the hunting activities of traditional Aboriginal owners, were sampled at two sites in Kakadu National Park, northern Australia. PIXE analyses showed enhanced, but relatively constant, ratios of Pb/Ca in the annual laminations. This was consistent with both their history of long term exposure to elevated

  5. A study of the environmental impact on Australia of a nuclear accident in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, G.D.; Davidson, N.E.; Logan, W.; Mills, G.A.; Puri, K. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); McDonald, N.R.; Cameron, R.F.; Clark, G.; Crawford, J.; Domel, R.U.; Hambley, D.; Harris, F.F.; Barton, R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Manins, P.C.; Hibberd, M.F. [Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation, Aspendale, VIC (Australia). Division of Atmospheric Research

    1998-12-31

    This study has considered the circumstances under which radioactive material, released as a result of a severe accident in a reactor of the type that could be proposed for Indonesia, might reach Australia. This assumes the latest available technology for a pressurised water reactor, a boiling water reactor, or an `advanced` light-water reactor, each with a modern containment building. The methodology consisted of developing detailed definitions of the accident scenarios, calculating he transport of the radioactive cloud to Australia and its dispersion by means of a numerical meteorological model, developed by ANSTO, and determining the impact on individuals in Australia by means of a radiological consequences model. A single release was considered with variations in the time of release, the meteorological situation, the height of release, its duration, the amount and the type of material released. The calculations are currently based on the ICRP Standard 70 Kg man. The major pathways considered are inhalation, groundshine, cloudshine and ingestion of plants, meet and milk. A source term was determined for radionuclides, represented by Xenon-133, Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137. Three type of weather conditions that could cause a radioactive cloud to reach Australia were considered. The calculations have shown that the active monsoonal cases impact on north-western and northern Australia, the monsoonal break-period cases impact on western and north-western Australia and that mid-tropospheric cases can impact on a wide band across central and southern Australia. The area of impact for a mid-tropospheric release can be greater than for a near-surface release. It was concluded that even with an extreme release, for actual meteorological conditions, the maximum dose would be below the 5 mSv, dose at which the National Health and Medical Research Council advises that consideration be given to control of milk and foodstuff. This study has been limited in scope, primarily

  6. Heavy metal pathways and archives in biological tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlic, I. E-mail: ivo@ansto.gov.au; Siegele, R.; Menon, D.D.; Markich, S.J.; Cohen, D.D.; Jeffree, R.A.; McPhail, D.C.; Sarbutt, A.; Stelcer, E

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear milli and microprobes at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) were used to determine lead accumulation in native Australian plants and animals. Three species of eucalypt plants (Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus globulus and Eucalyptus lesouefii), one species of salt bush (Atriplex burbhanyana) and one species each of acacia (Acacia saligna) and estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) were investigated. Experimentally grown plants were subjected to a nutrient solution with a pH of 5 and spiked with a 200 {mu}mol concentration of Pb. Lead concentrations in leaves of both E. globulus and E. camaldulensis showed an almost exponential decrease from the base of the main vein to the tip. Similarly, Pb concentrations decreased from the main vein to secondary veins. Concentrations of essential elements such as K, Fe, Zn and Br in the main and secondary veins were constant within experimental uncertainty. In contrast, the concentrations of Pb in the leaf veins of E. lesouefii were much lower and showed no systematic pattern. In stem and root samples the highest concentration of Pb was found in roots and stem of E. globulus and A. burbhanyana followed by E. camaldulensis. Some Pb was found in roots of A. saligna and only very low concentration in stem of the same plant. More detailed analysis of thin cross-sectional samples of roots and stem showed that Pb is present in much higher concentration in the growth area of the plant structure (i.e. meristemic region) and in relatively low concentration within the pith region and outer cortex. The osteoderms (dermal bones) of estuarine crocodiles, exposed to lead ammunition in food from the hunting activities of traditional Aboriginal owners, were sampled at two sites in Kakadu National Park, northern Australia. PIXE analyses showed enhanced, but relatively constant, ratios of Pb/Ca in the annual laminations. This was consistent with both their history of long term exposure to elevated

  7. Status of radionuclide monitoring stations in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ANSTO) first became involved in the monitoring of radionuclides in the environment in 1955 when assessing the effects on the Australian population of the radioactive releases associated with the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. (At that time ARPANSA was known as the Commonwealth X-ray and Radium Laboratory). The United Kingdom had tested weapons in Australia in 1952 and 1953 and in August 1954 entered into an agreement with the Australian Government to establish a test range at Maralinga in South Australia. The government established a Maralinga Safety Committee and through this Committee ARPANSA became involved in the surveillance of radioactive fallout over Australia. The primary function of this surveillance was to ensure that the nuclear trials would not adversely effect the health of the Australian population. A program was established to reliably assess the deposition of radioactive fallout over Australia so that exposure to the population could be estimated. This task was performed in conjunction with the Bureau of Meteorology and the Department of Supply. Measurements were made on daily samples of fallout dawn from 10 centres throughout Australia. A low level radiochemical facility was established in 1961 for the measurement of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in environmental samples so that the long term distribution of fallout could be tracked. In the 1960s the program was extended to measure fresh fission products reaching Australia from atmospheric testing in other countries, usually originating from test sites in the northern hemisphere. The sampling program that was established was designed so that it could be rapidly expanded when a new testing program started. At this time a permanent fallout monitoring network was established around Australia using high volume air samplers capable of sampling up to 10000 m 3 per week. Approximately six stations have been operated at any one time but the

  8. Currents trends in the application of IBA techniques to air pollution source fingerprinting and source apportionment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, David; Stelcer, Ed.; Atanacio, Armand; Crawford, Jagoda

    2013-01-01

    Full text: IBA techniques have been used for many years to characterise fine particle air pollution. This is not new the techniques are well established. Typically 2-3 MeV protons are used to bombard thin filter papers and up to four simultaneous techniques like PIXE, PIGE, RBS and ERDA will be applied to obtain (μg/g) concentrations for elements from hydrogen to lead. Generally low volume samplers are used to sample between 20-30 m 3 of air over a 24 hour period, this together with IBA's sensitivity means that concentrations down to 1 ng/m 3 of air sampled can be readily achieved with only a few minutes of proton irradiation. With these short irradiation times and low sensitivities for a broad range of elements in the periodic table, large numbers of samples can be obtained and analysed very quickly and easily. At ANSTO we have used IBA methods to acquire a database of over 50,000 filters from 85 different sites through Australia and Asia, each filter has been analysed for more than 21 different chemical species. Large databases extending over many years means that modern statistical techniques like positive matrix factorisation (PMF) can be used to define well characterised source fingerprints and source contributions for a range of different fine particle air pollutants. In this paper we will discuss these PMF techniques and show how they identify both natural sources like sea spray and windblown soils as well as anthropogenic sources like automobiles, biomass burning, coal-fired power stations and industrial emissions. These data are particularly useful for Governments, EPA's and managers of pollution to better understanding pollution sources and their relative contributions and hence to better manage air pollution. Current trends are to take these IBA and PMF techniques a step further and to combine them with wind speed and back trajectory data to better pin point and identify emission sources. We show how this is now being applied on both a local

  9. A radioactive controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, Veronica

    2002-01-01

    During 2002, the National Congress of Argentina began discussing the 'Agreement between the Republic of Argentina and Australia on cooperation in the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy'. This document has revived the debate regarding development of a national nuclear industry. The debate was spurred by a commercial contract signed in 2000 by INVAP, an Argentinean company who sold a nuclear reactor to the ANSTO, Australian Nuclear and Technology Organization. More than sixty non-governmental organizations are opposed to the ratification of the agreement, because they interpret that the text leaves the door wide open for the transport and deposit of Australian nuclear waste to Argentina, to be processed in national territory. Article 41 of the Argentinean National Constitution, explicitly prohibits the generation of any income from 'radioactive residues'. Those who support the agreement say that it does not promote the deposit of nuclear waste in Argentina, and argue that environmentalists are hampering efforts of this advanced technological industry to flourish in Argentina. The point of conflict in the agreement lies in article 12, which states that Argentina will continue the process of reactor-driven irradiated fuel outside Argentina. Once the treatment is completed, the fuel conditioned and the resulting waste must return to the country of origin for their storage. The possibility of spent fuel being sent to Argentina lies in the hypothetical case that the French company Cogema, which currently holds treatment responsibility, stops treatment sometime within the next fifteen years, when the fuel must be treated. The non-ratification of the agreement on Argentina part will not imply any sort of impediment in the realization of the reactor, it will only put on hold the possibility that the Australians spent fuels will complete treatment in Argentina. The constitutionality of the agreement lies in the question of waste, but this too is not a simple question. The

  10. EUROPART: an European integrated project on actinide partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Baron, P.; Hudson, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The EUROPART project is a scientific integrated project between 24 European partners, from 10 countries, mostly funded by the European Community within the FP6, together with CRIEPI from Japan and ANSTO from Australia. EUROPART aims at developing chemical partitioning processes for the so-called minor actinides (MA) contained in nuclear wastes, i.e. from Am to Cf. In the case of the treatment of dedicated spent fuels or targets, the actinides to be separated also include U, Pu and Np. The techniques considered for the separation of these radionuclides belong to the fields of hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy, as in the previous European FP5 programs named PARTNEW, CALIXPART and PYROREP, respectively. The two main axes of research within EUROPART are: 1/ the partitioning of MA (from Am to Cf) from wastes issuing from the reprocessing of high burn-up UOX fuels and multi-recycled MOX fuels, 2/ the partitioning of the whole actinide family of elements for recycling, as an option for advanced dedicated fuel cycles (this work will be connected to the studies to be performed within the EUROTRANS European integrated project). In hydrometallurgy, the research is organized in five Work Packages (WP). Four are dedicated to the study of partitioning methods mainly based on the use of solvent extraction methods and of solid extractants, one WP is dedicated to the development of actinide co-conversion methods for fuel or target preparations. The research in pyrometallurgy is organized into four WPs, listed hereafter: (i) study of the basic chemistry of transuranium elements and of some fission products in molten salts (chlorides, fluorides), (ii) development of actinide partitioning methods, (iii) study of the conditioning of the salt wastes, (iv) system studies. Moreover, a strong management team is concerned not only with the technical and financial issues arising from EUROPART, but also with information, communication and benefits for Europe

  11. Monitoring of reported sudden emission rate changes of major radioxenon emitters in the northern and southern hemispheres in 2008 to assess their contribution to the respective radioxenon backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Auer, M.; Becker, A.; Colmanet, S.; Hoffmann, E.; Nikkinen, M.; Schlosser, C.; Sonck, M.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric radioxenon monitoring is a key component of the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Radiopharmaceutical production facilities (RPF) have recently been identified of emitting the major part of the environmental radioxenon measured at globally distributed monitoring sites deployed to strengthen the radionuclide part of the CTBT verification regime. Efforts to raise a global radioxenon emission inventory revealed that the global total emission from RPF's is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than the respective emissions related to maintenance of all nuclear power plants (NPP). Given that situation we have seen in 2008 two peculiar hemisphere-specific situations: 1) In the northern hemisphere, a joint shutdown of the global largest four radiopharmaceutical facilities revealed the contribution of the normally 'masked' NPP related emissions. Due to an incident, the Molybdenum production at the "Institut des Radioéléments" (IRE) in Fleurus, Belgium, was shut down between Monday 25 August and 2 December 2008. IRE is the third largest global producer of medical isotopes. In the same period, but for different reasons, the other three worldwide largest producers (CRL in Canada, HFR in The Netherlands and NTP in South Africa) also had scheduled and unscheduled shutdowns. The activity concentrations of 133Xe measured at the Schauinsland Mountain station near Freiburg in Germany (situated 380 km SW of Fleurus) which have a mean of 4.8 mBq/m3 for the period February 2004 - August 2008, went down to 0.87 mBq/m3 for the period September - November 2008. 2) In the southern hemisphere, after a long break, the only radiopharmaceutical facility in Australia started up test production in late November 2008. In the period before the start-up, the background of radioxenon in Australia (Melbourne and Darwin) was below measurable quantities. During six test runs of the renewed RPF at ANSTO in Lucas Heights, up to 6 mBq/m3 of 133Xe were measured in

  12. RadCon: A radiological consequences model. Technical guide - Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J; Domel, R.U.; Harris, F.F.; Twining, J.R.

    2000-05-01

    A Radiological Consequence model (RadCon) is being developed at ANSTO to assess the radiological consequences, after an incident, in any climate, using appropriate meteorological and radiological transfer parameters. The major areas of interest to the developers are tropical and subtropical climates. This is particularly so given that it is anticipated that nuclear energy will become a mainstay for economies in these regions within the foreseeable future. Therefore, data acquisition and use of parameter values have been concentrated primarily on these climate types. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition for Australia can be modelled and supplied by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC, one of five in the world) which is part of the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC), Puri et al. (1992). RadCon combines these data (i.e. the time dependent air and ground concentration generated by the dispersion model or measured quantities in the case of an actual incident) with specific regional parameter values to determine the dose to people via the major pathways of external and internal irradiation. For the external irradiation calculations, data are needed on lifestyle information such as the time spent indoors/outdoors, the high/low physical activity rates for different groups of people (especially critical groups) and shielding factors for housing types. For the internal irradiation calculations, data are needed on food consumption, effect of food processing, transfer parameters (soil to plant, plant to animal) and interception values appropriate for the region under study. Where the relevant data are not available default temperate data are currently used. The results of a wide ranging literature search has highlighted where specific research will be initiated to determine the information required for tropical and sub-tropical regions. The user is able to initiate sensitivity analyses within RadCon. This allows the parameters to be ranked in

  13. Target preparation at the ANTARES AMS Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, G.E.; Hua, Q.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M.A.C.; Lawson, E.M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Antares Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy Centre at ANSTO has two chemistry labs dedicated to preparing targets for measurement. Target preparation encompasses a variety of activities ranging from the curation of incoming samples to the numerous steps involved in the purification and processing of dissimilar samples. One of the two laboratories is set up for the physical and chemical pretreatment of {sup 14}C samples. Treatments include cleaning by sonification, sorting, grinding and sieving, and chemical treatments such as the standard AAA treatment, and solvent extraction. Combustion and graphitization are also carried out in this laboratory. The second laboratory is a clean room and is dedicated to the combustion, hydrolysis and graphitization of {sup 14}C samples as well as the process of the targets for the other isotopes. Combustion is achieved by heating the sample to 900 deg C in the presence of CuO, the resulting gas is purified by passing over Ag and Cu wire at 600 deg C. Graphitization is carried out by reducing the CO{sub 2} with an iron catalyst (600 deg C) in the presence of zinc (400 deg C) and a small amount of hydrogen. Samples such as charcoal, shell bone, wood, sediment, seawater and groundwater, containing 0.3-1 mg or more of original carbon, are processed routinely for radiocarbon analysis. The current {sup 14}C chemistry background for 1 mg carbon is {approx} 0.3 percent of modern carbon (pMC) enabling us to date materials up to 45 000 BP. Samples of 0.5 - 3 mg carbon or more are routinely performed with a precision < 1% At present, procedures are being tested for the treatment of samples containing a minimum of 20 {mu}g original carbon. Such small samples sre more likely to be affected by contamination with modern carbon. These laboratories are also being expanded to cater for the processing of a variety of samples for the measurement of other isotopes, ie {sup 129}I, {sup 10}Be, {sup 36}CI and {sup 26}Al. Initial tests for the extraction of

  14. Advances in absorbed dose measurement standards at the australian radiation laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Hargrave, N.J.; Huntley, R.B.; Kotler, L.H.; Webb, D.V.; Wise, K.N.

    1996-01-01

    The applications of ionising radiation in the medical and industrial fields require both an accurate knowledge of the amount of ionising radiation absorbed by the medium in question and the capability of relating this to National and International standards. The most useful measure of the amount of radiation is the absorbed dose which is defined as the energy absorbed per unit mass. For radiotherapy, the reference medium is water, even though the measurement of the absorbed dose to water is not straightforward. Two methods are commonly used to provide calibrations in absorbed dose to water. The first is the calibration of the chamber in terms of exposure in a Cobalt-60 beam, followed by the conversion by a protocol into dose to water in this and higher energy beams. The other route is via the use of a graphite calorimeter as a primary standard device, where the conversion from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose in water is performed either by theoretical means making use of cavity ionisation theory, or by experiment where the graphite calorimeter and secondary standard ionisation chamber are placed at scaled distances from the source of the radiation beam (known as the Dose-Ratio method). Extensive measurements have been made at Cobalt-60 at ARL using both the exposure and absorbed dose to graphite routes. Agreement between the ARL measurements and those based on standards maintained by ANSTO and NPL is within ± 0.3%. Absorbed dose measurements have also been performed at ARL with photon beams of nominal energy 16 and 19 MeV obtained from the ARL linac. The validity of the protocols at high photon energies, the validity of the methods used to convert from absorbed dose in graphite to absorbed dose in water and the validity of the indices used to specify the beams are discussed. Brief mention will also be made of the establishment of a calibration facility for neutron monitors at ARL and of progress in the development of ERP dosimetry

  15. Convolution based profile fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, A.; Coelho, A.A.; Cheary, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In convolution based profile fitting, profiles are generated by convoluting functions together to form the observed profile shape. For a convolution of 'n' functions this process can be written as, Y(2θ)=F 1 (2θ)x F 2 (2θ)x... x F i (2θ)x....xF n (2θ). In powder diffractometry the functions F i (2θ) can be interpreted as the aberration functions of the diffractometer, but in general any combination of appropriate functions for F i (2θ) may be used in this context. Most direct convolution fitting methods are restricted to combinations of F i (2θ) that can be convoluted analytically (e.g. GSAS) such as Lorentzians, Gaussians, the hat (impulse) function and the exponential function. However, software such as TOPAS is now available that can accurately convolute and refine a wide variety of profile shapes numerically, including user defined profiles, without the need to convolute analytically. Some of the most important advantages of modern convolution based profile fitting are: 1) virtually any peak shape and angle dependence can normally be described using minimal profile parameters in laboratory and synchrotron X-ray data as well as in CW and TOF neutron data. This is possible because numerical convolution and numerical differentiation is used within the refinement procedure so that a wide range of functions can easily be incorporated into the convolution equation; 2) it can use physically based diffractometer models by convoluting the instrument aberration functions. This can be done for most laboratory based X-ray powder diffractometer configurations including conventional divergent beam instruments, parallel beam instruments, and diffractometers used for asymmetric diffraction. It can also accommodate various optical elements (e.g. multilayers and monochromators) and detector systems (e.g. point and position sensitive detectors) and has already been applied to neutron powder diffraction systems (e.g. ANSTO) as well as synchrotron based

  16. Einführung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Dilcher

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Das Zustandekommen der hier vorgelegten Beiträge zum Thema »Rechtsgewohnheiten« bedarf einer kurzen Erläuterung. Von dem Buch(1 Martin Pilchs, dessen – nun hier ausgearbeitet vorliegender – Vortrag(2 die ebenfalls in überarbeiteter Form wiedergegebene Diskussion einleitete, ging ein unerwarteter und ungewöhnlicher Anstoß für die Zunft der Rechtshistoriker und Historiker aus. Ein österreichischer Ministerialbeamter mit rechtstheoretischer Schulung, der aber auch Physiker und Mathematiker ist, wendet sich einer normtheoretischen Studie zu. In ihr spielt die mittelalterliche ungelehrte, weitgehend orale Rechtstradition als Forschungsfeld eine wichtige Rolle als Gegenbild zu einem einseitigen modernen Normverständnis. Innerhalb dieser Diskussion setzt sich Pilch intensiv, und von der Seite der Theorie kommend kritisch, mit einer rechtshistorischen Diskussion der letzten Jahrzehnte um den Begriff der Rechtsgewohnheit auseinander; er bezieht aber auch neue Erklärungsmodelle der Mittelalterhistoriker zu den Formen ritueller Konfliktbeilegung in der politischen Führungsschicht von Adel und Königtum (Gerd Althoff, sowie Erklärungsversuche vom Konzept der Ordnungskonfigurationen her (Stefan Weinfurter, Bernd Schneidmüller in seine Überlegungen mit ein. Dem provozierenden Stichwort »Rechtsgewohnheiten« im Titel des Buches von Martin Pilch ist es wohl zu verdanken, dass alle drei angesprochenen Forschungsrichtungen sehr bald den Kontakt mit dem Autor aufnahmen. Von Seiten der Rechtshistoriker führte dies im Januar 2010 zu einer Tagung in Frankfurt im Rahmen der International Max Planck Research School of Comparative Legal History / Internationales Forschungskolleg für vergleichende Rechtsgeschichte. Das Leitungsgremium, die Professoren der Rechtsgeschichte der Universität und des Max-Planck-Instituts, hatte meinen Vorschlag sogleich aufgenommen, die Kollegiaten haben die Tagung sorgfältig vorbereitet. Vor allem gelang es, alle von

  17. Medizinbibliotheken 20XX. Zuverlässig, Zukunftsweisend, Unverzichtbar [Medical Libraries 20XX. Reliable, forward-looking, indispensible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    ür interdisziplinäre Wissenschaft – eine Anforderungsanalyse aus Anwendersicht, Annette Kustos (Die neue Hochschulbibliothek für Gesundheitswissenschaften der Hochschule für Gesundheit (hsg Bochum, Christoph Poley (Mit MEDPILOT auf dem Weg ins Semantic Web, Henriette Senst & Jens Erling (Neue Arbeitsfelder in der Bibliothek des Robert Koch-Instituts: Open Access und institutionelles Repositorium, Matti Stöhr („Mich interessierten kostengünstige Alternativen zu Citavi“: Über den Fortbildungsworkshop „Literaturverwaltung im Fokus“ im Rahmen der AGMB-Tagung 2012, Martin Zangl (Qualitätsmanagement für Kunst- und Museumsbibliotheken – ein Anstoß für Krankenhausbibliotheken?! und Ulf Paepcke & Gabriele Menzel (Medizinbibliotheken 20XX. Zuverlässig, Zukunftsweisend, Unverzichtbar. Jahrestagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Medizinisches Bibliothekswesen (AGMB e.V. vom 24. bis 26.09.2012 in Aachen.

  18. Challenges and opportunities for plasma processing of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Plasma processing of materials is in many ways at a turning point in its development. On the one hand, there are new opportunities arising from the environmental concerns associated with conventional materials processing methods such as electroplating. On the other hand, there are challenges associated with the large capital cost of plant and the demonstration that the new techniques can deliver the quality and quantity required in the market place. An example of such a challenge is file replacement of electroplated chromium by sputtered alternatives in the solar absorber coatings industry. Cathodic arc based processes also offer opportunities for advanced materials processing to displace electroplating. The use of cathodic arcs to coat gold look-alike finishes for architectural applications is well advanced. The challenges for other coatings are essentially dependent on the quality of the adhesion. The combination of the cathodic arc with Plasma Immersion Ion implantation (PI 3 ) technology gives significant improvements in film adhesion. The energy of the incident ions from the cathodic arc may be readily increased to 20 KeV or so without serious difficulties. We have been carrying out trials of a PI 3 type power supply developed by ANSTO, coupled to a continuous type cathodic arc fitted with a magnetic sector filter. The power supply provides short pulses with an adjustable repetition rate and duty cycle. The pulses provide bursts of energetic ions which can be used for assisting the deposition of coatings or for implantation without coating, depending on the location and orientation of the substrate. The results for film adhesion are promising on a number of substrates. The adhesion of metal films on polyimide substrates for example is definitely improved. The modification of polymers to improve their scratch resistance is becoming an important opportunity for plasma processing. Polymers have some valuable properties such as strength to weight ratio

  19. Calendar of Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    78712. Tel +1-512-471-1322, E-mail stewart@hagar.ph.utexas.edu. 17 - 18 February 1997 Plasma '97: 21st Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering Plasma Science and Technology Conference Sydney, Australia Contact: Margaret Lanigan, Conference Manager, PMB 1, MENAI NSW 2234, Australia. Fax +61-(0)2-439-6561, E-mail ainse@ansto.gov.au. 6 - 11 April 1997 10th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating Ameland, The Netherlands Contact: J Hamers-Smit, FOM - Instituut voor Plasmafysica 'Rijnhuizen', Postbus 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein. Tel +31-30-6096999, Fax +31-30-6031204, E-mail ec10@rijnh.nl. Application and abstract deadline: 17 January 1997. 8 - 12 September 1997 12th International Conference on Gas Discharges and their Applications Greifswald, Germany Contact: Dr G Babucke, Inst. f. Niedertemperatur-Plasmaphysik, Robert-Blum-Str. 8 - 10, 17489 Greifswald, Germany. Tel +49-3834-554411, Fax +49-3834-554301, E-mail gd97@public.inp.uni-greifswald.de.

  20. Pu-239 organ specific dosimetric model applied to non-human biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Matthew Jason

    There are few locations throughout the world, like the Maralinga nuclear test site located in south western Australia, where sufficient plutonium contaminate concentration levels exist that they can be utilized for studies of the long-term radionuclide accumulation in non-human biota. The information obtained will be useful for the potential human users of the site while also keeping with international efforts to better understand doses to non-human biota. In particular, this study focuses primarily on a rabbit sample set collected from the population located within the site. Our approach is intended to employ the same dose and dose rate methods selected by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and adapted by the scientific community for similar research questions. These models rely on a series of simplifying assumptions on biota and their geometry; in particular; organisms are treated as spherical and ellipsoidal representations displaying the animal mass and volume. These simplifications assume homogeneity of all animal tissues. In collaborative efforts between Colorado State University and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), we are expanding current knowledge on radionuclide accumulation in specific organs causing organ-specific dose rates, such as Pu-239 accumulating in bone, liver, and lungs. Organ-specific dose models have been developed for humans; however, little has been developed for the dose assessment to biota, in particular rabbits. This study will determine if it is scientifically valid to use standard software, in particular ERICA Tool, as a means to determine organ-specific dosimetry due to Pu-239 accumulation in organs. ERICA Tool is normally applied to whole organisms as a means to determine radiological risk to whole ecosystems. We will focus on the aquatic model within ERICA Tool, as animal organs, like aquatic organisms, can be assumed to lie within an infinite uniform medium. This model would

  1. The 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    It was a pleasure to welcome all delegates and accompanying persons to Adelaide for the 26th International Conference in Nuclear Physics, INPC2016. As the major meeting in our field, it was a wonderful opportunity to catch up with colleagues from around the world, learn about the very latest developments and share ideas. We were grateful for the support of the Commission on Nuclear Physics, C12, of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), which chose Adelaide to host this meeting. We were also honoured that the President of IUPAP, Prof. Bruce McKellar was present at the meeting to welcome delegates and participate in the proceedings. We acknowledge the financial support for the conference which was made available by a number of organisations. We were especially grateful to the major sponsors, the Adelaide Convention Bureau, the University of Adelaide, the Australian National University and ANSTO, as well as IUPAP, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale (CoEPP) and several of the world's major nuclear physics laboratories, BNL, GSI, JLab and TRIUMF. As a result of these contributions we were able to offer support to attend the conference to more than 50 international students. Not only did we have a superb scientific program but, consistent with IUPAP guidelines, more than 40% of the invited plenary talks were presented by women. In order to reach out to the local community, Cynthia Keppel (from JLab) presented a public lecture on Hadron Beam Therapy on Tuesday evening, September 13th. As presenting a talk is now often a condition for financial support to attend an international conference, there were 11 simultaneous parallel sessions with more than 350 presentations. We are especially grateful to the International Advisory Committee, the Program Committee and the Conveners whose advice and hard work made it possible for all this to come together. I would also like to acknowledge the work of the Local Organising

  2. Progress report of Applications of Nuclear Physics. July 1994 - June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the Applications of Nuclear Physics Program Area are: The development and promotion of research programs on national nuclear science facilities such as charged particle accelerators and neutron beam instruments thereby encouraging strategic research in nuclear science and technology at ANSTO, in tertiary institutions and industrial research and development laboratories; Participation in and management of Australian use of international neutron scattering, synchrotron radiation and high energy physics facilities to assist graduate training in the Universities and to foster Australian benefits ,from developments in high technology; The maintenance of expertise in fundamental nuclear and atomic processes relevant to nuclear science and technology including neutron physics, ion interactions, radiation standards, dosimetry and laser enrichment; Expansion of the use of accelerator mass spectromety both nationally and internationally to make major contributions in the understanding and remediation of severe environmental problems such as the greenhouse effect; The application of charged particle beams and ionizing radiation to industrial. biological nad environmental problems; The exploitation of neutron scattering techniques in the development of new materials, drugs, biological substances and complex chemicals. The research activities of the Applications of Nuclear Physics Pro-ram Area are organized into several large projects: Accelerator Applications, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Neutron Scattering, International Science (incorporating High Energy Physics and Synchrotron Radiation Research), Radiation Technology and Standards. In addition, there were a number of other supporting projects. An important aspect of the activities of the Program Area, as will be clear from the objectives listed above, is the development and improvement of the larger experimental facilities within the Program Area. Considerable progress has been made in the development

  3. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    ) Ronald White (JCU, Townsville)C Beling (Hong Kong) Jim Williams (UWA, Perth)R Brusa (Italy) Suzanne Smith (ANSTO, Sydney)P Coleman (UK) Igor Bray (Curtin U., Perth)C Corbel (France) Casten Makochekanwa (ANU, Canberra)M Fujinami (Japan) Michael Went (ANU, Canberra)R Krause-Rehberg (Germany) Adric Jones (ANU, Canberra)K Lynn (USA) Peter Caradonna (ANU, Canberra)H Schut (Netherlands) Ryan Weed (ANU, Canberra)P Simpson (Canada) Jason Roberts (ANU, Canberra)R Suzuki (Japan) Josh Machacek (ANU, Canberra)F Tuomisto (Finland) A Weiss (USA) SLOPOS photo SLOPOS-12 Delegates, 1-6 August 2010, Magnetic Island, Australia SPONSORS SLOPOS sponsors

  4. Status and progress of the RERTR program in the year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, Armando

    2003-01-01

    define the feasibility of converting each Russian-designed research and test reactor to either fuel type. The plan for the Accelerated RERTR Program is structured to achieve LEU conversion of all HEU research reactors supplied by the United States and Russia during the next nine years. This effort will address, in addition to the fuel development and qualification, the analyses and performance/economic/safety evaluations needed to implement the conversions. In combination with this over-arching goal, the RERTR program plans to achieve at the earliest possible date qualification of LEU U-Mo dispersion fuels with uranium densities of 6 g/cm 3 and 7 g/cm 3 . Reactors currently using or planning to use LEU silicide fuel will rely on this fuel after termination of the FRRSNFA program, because it is acceptable to COGEMA for reprocessing. Qualification of LEU U-Mo dispersion fuels has suffered some unavoidable delays but, to accelerate it as much as possible, the RERTR program, the French CEA, and the Australian ANSTO have agreed to jointly pursue a two-element qualification test of LEU U-Mo dispersion fuel with uranium density of 7.0 g/cm 3 to be performed in the Osiris reactor during 2004. The RERTR program also intends to eliminate all obstacles to the utilization of LEU in targets for isotope production, so that this important function can be performed without the need for weapons-grade materials. All of us, working together as we have for many years, can ensure that all these goals will be achieved. By promoting the efficiency and safety of research reactors while eliminating the traffic in weapons-grade uranium, we can prevent the possibility that some of this material might fall in the wrong hands. Few causes can be more deserving of our joint efforts. (author)