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Sample records for anomalous skin effect

  1. Anomalous Skin Effect for Anisotropic Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Gennady Shvets

    2004-02-19

    The anomalous skin effect in a plasma with a highly anisotropic electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) is very different from skin effect in a plasma with the isotropic EVDF. An analytical solution was derived for the electric field penetrated into plasma with the EVDF described as a Maxwellian with two temperatures Tx >> Tz, where x is the direction along the plasma boundary and z is the direction perpendicular to the plasma boundary. The skin layer was found to consist of two distinctive regions of width of order nTx/w and nTz/w, where nTx,z/w = (Tx,z/m)1/2 is the thermal electron velocity and w is the incident wave frequency.

  2. Temperature correction to the Casimir force in cryogenic range and anomalous skin effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature correction to the Casimir force is considered for real metals at low temperatures. With the temperature decrease, the mean free path for electrons becomes larger than the field penetration depth. In this condition, description of metals with the impedance of anomalous skin effect is shown to be more appropriate than with the permittivity. The effect is crucial for the temperature correction. It is demonstrated that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflection coefficients should coincide with those of ideal metal if we demand the entropy to be zero at T=0. All the other prescriptions discussed in the literature for the n=0 term in the Lifshitz formula give negative entropy. It is shown that the temperature correction in the region of anomalous skin effect is not suppressed as it happens in the plasma model. This correction will be important in the future cryogenic measurements of the Casimir force

  3. Surface impedance in the anomalous skin effect regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, Janusz; Kirkiewicz, Józef

    2008-12-01

    An analytical solution of the surface impedance is obtained using the kinetic equation with the collision integral that takes into account the Fermi liquid effects. It is assumed that the reflection of electrons is purely diffusive. Particular attention is paid to the influence of external magnetic field and polarization of the incident wave on the real and imagine part of the surface impedance.

  4. Predicting molecular scale skin-effect in electrochemical impedance due to anomalous subdiffusion mediated adsorption phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushagra, Arindam

    2016-02-01

    Anomalous subdiffusion governs the processes which are not energetically driven, on a molecular scale. This paper proposes a model to predict the response of electrochemical impedance due to such diffusion process. Previous works considered the use of fractional calculus to predict the impedance behaviour in response to the anomalous diffusion. Here, we have developed an expression which predicts the skin-effect, marked by an increase in the impedance with increasing frequency, in this regime. Negative inductances have also been predicted as a consequence of the inertial response of adsorbed species upon application of frequency-mediated perturbations. It might help the researchers in the fields of impedimetric sensors to choose the working frequency and those working in the field of batteries to choose the parameters, likewise. This work would shed some light into the molecular mechanisms governing the impedance when exposed to frequency-based perturbations like electromagnetic waves (microwaves to ionizing radiations) and in charge storage devices like batteries etc.

  5. Anomalous skin effects in relativistic parallel propagating weakly magnetized electron plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized electron plasma is presented and general expressions for longitudinal and transverse permittivites are derived. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves increases as we move from non-relativistic to highly relativistic regime. The ambient magnetic field reduces/enhances the skin effects for R-wave/L-wave as the strength of the field is increased. In general, the weak magnetic field effects are pronounced for the weakly relativistic regime as compared with other relativistic cases. The results are also graphically illustrated. On switching off the magnetic field, previous results for field free case are retrieved [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Priniples of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1984), Vol. 9, p. 106].

  6. Correction to the Casimir force due to the anomalous skin effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface impedance approach is discussed in connection with the precise calculation of the Casimir force between metallic plates. It allows us to take into account the nonlocal connection between the current density and electric field inside of metals. In general, a material has to be described by two impedances Zs(ω,q) and Zp(ω,q) corresponding to two different polarization states. In contrast with the approximate Leontovich impedance they depend not only on frequency ω but also on the wave vector along the plate q. In this paper only the nonlocal effects happening at frequencies ωp (plasma frequency) are analyzed. We refer to all of them as the anomalous skin effect. The impedances are calculated for the propagating and evanescent fields in the Boltzmann approximation. It is found that Zp significantly deviates from the local impedance as a result of the Thomas-Fermi screening. The nonlocal correction to the Casimir force is calculated at zero temperature. This correction is small but observable at small separations between bodies. The same theory can be used to find more significant nonlocal contribution at ω∼ωp due to the plasmon excitation

  7. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echániz, T. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Pérez-Sáez, R. B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es; Tello, M. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Instituto de Síntesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco, Apdo. 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2014-09-07

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ε{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ε{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, λ{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1.

  8. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak εpeak at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that εpeak increases with the emission angle but its position, λpeak, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1

  9. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern

  10. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Z. F., E-mail: zfding@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, B. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Xi' an Aerospace Propulsion Institute, China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, Xi' an 710100 (China); Huo, W. G. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Technology, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116029 (China)

    2015-06-15

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  11. Anomalous Hall effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagaosa, N.; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, S.; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), s. 1539-1592. ISSN 0034-6861 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anomalous Hall effect * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 51.695, year: 2010

  12. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  13. The quantum anomalous Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, CHAO-XING; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is defined as a quantized Hall effect realized in a system without external magnetic field. Quantum anomalous Hall effect is a novel manifestation of topological structure in many-electron systems, and may have potential applications in future electronic devices. In recent years, quantum anomalous Hall effect has been proposed theoretically and realized experimentally. In this review article, we provide a systematic overview of the theoretical and experimenta...

  14. Effective actions for anomalous hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We argue that an effective field theory of local fluid elements captures the constraints on hydrodynamic transport stemming from the presence of quantum anomalies in the underlying microscopic theory. Focussing on global current anomalies for an arbitrary flavour group, we derive the anomalous constitutive relations in arbitrary even dimensions. We demonstrate that our results agree with the constraints on anomaly governed transport derived hitherto using a local version of the second law of thermodynamics. The construction crucially uses the anomaly inflow mechanism and involves a novel thermofield double construction. In particular, we show that the anomalous Ward identities necessitate non-trivial interaction between the two parts of the Schwinger-Keldysh contour

  15. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anomalous Hall effect for semiclassical chiral fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengming, E-mail: zhpm@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Horváthy, P.A., E-mail: horvathy@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Laboratoire de Mathématiques et de Physique Théorique, Université de Tours (France)

    2015-03-06

    Semiclassical chiral fermions manifest the anomalous spin-Hall effect: when put into a pure electric field they suffer a side jump, analogous to what happens to their massive counterparts in non-commutative mechanics. The transverse shift is consistent with the conservation of the angular momentum. In a pure magnetic field, instead, spiraling motion is found. Motion in Hall-type perpendicular electric and magnetic fields is also studied. - Highlights: • Chiral fermions exhibit an anomalous spin-Hall effect. • Transverse shift appears in a pure electric field. • In a pure magnetic field spiraling motion is found.

  17. Anomalous Hall Effect for chiral fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P -M

    2014-01-01

    Semiclassical chiral fermions manifest the anomalous spin-Hall effect: when put into a pure electric field, they suffer a side jump, analogous to what happens to their massive counterparts in non-commutative mechanics. The transverse shift is consistent with the conservation of the angular momentum. In a pure magnetic field a cork-screw-like, spiraling motion is found.

  18. Anomalous Hall effect in disordered multiband metals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovalev, A.A.; Sinova, Jairo; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2010), 036601/1-036601/4. ISSN 0031-9007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anomalous Hall effect * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.621, year: 2010

  19. Anomalous Hall effect in Weyl superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednik, G.; Zyuzin, A. A.; Burkov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a theory of the anomalous Hall effect in a topological Weyl superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. Specifically, we consider a ferromagnetic Weyl metal with two Weyl nodes of opposite chirality near the Fermi energy. In the presence of inversion symmetry, such a metal experiences a weak-coupling Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer instability, with pairing of parity-related eigenstates. Due to the nonzero topological charge, carried by the Weyl nodes, such a superconductor is necessarily topologically nontrivial, with Majorana surface states coexisting with the Fermi arcs of the normal Weyl metal. We demonstrate that, surprisingly, the anomalous Hall conductivity of such a superconducting Weyl metal coincides with that of a nonsuperconducting one, under certain conditions, in spite of the nonconservation of charge in a superconductor. We relate this to the existence of an extra (nearly) conserved quantity in a Weyl metal, the chiral charge.

  20. Anomalous Josephson Hall effect in magnet/triplet superconductor junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Takehito

    2015-01-01

    We investigate anomalous Hall effect in a magnet coupled to a triplet superconductor under phase gradient. It is found that the anomalous Hall supercurrent arises from non-trivial structure of the magnetization. The magnetic structure manifested in the Hall supercurrent is characterized by even order terms of the exchange coupling, essentially different from that discussed in the context of anomalous Hall effect, reflecting the disspationless nature of supercurrent. We also discuss a possible...

  1. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG$|$Pt bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Sibylle; Schlitz, Richard; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2015-01-01

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet$|$platinum (YIG$|$Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall like signature in Pt, sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing ...

  2. Photoinduced Anomalous Hall Effects in Weyl Semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lee, Patrick A.; Burch, Kenneth S.; Han, Jung Hoon; Ran, Ying

    We examine theoretically the interplay between chiral photons and chiral electrons in Weyl semimetals. Owing to its monopole nature, a three-dimensional Weyl node is topologically-robust against a circularly polarized light. A driven Weyl system exhibits node shifts in the momentum space, in sharp contrast to the gap opening in a driven two-dimensional Dirac system. We show that the node shift leads to a change of the Chern vector which gives arise to a net photoinduced anomalous Hall conductivity, in the plane perpendicular to the light propagation. We shall describe the basic idea behind this generic photoinduced Hall effect, illustrate it with a concrete microscope model, and estimate its feasibility based on current optical experimental techniques.

  3. Localization corrections to the anomalous Hall effect in a ferromagnet

    OpenAIRE

    Dugaev, V. K.; Crepieux, A.; Bruno, P

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the localization corrections to the anomalous Hall conductivity related to the contribution of spin-orbit scattering into the current vertex (side-jump mechanism). We show that in contrast to the ordinary Hall effect, there exists a nonvanishing localization correction to the anomalous Hall resistivity. The correction to the anomalous Hall conductivity vanishes in the case of side-jump mechanism, but is nonzero for the skew scattering. The total correction to the nondiagonal cond...

  4. Anomalous Hall Effect in non-commutative mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Horvathy, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    The anomalous velocity term in the semiclassical model of a Bloch electron deviates the trajectory from the conventional one. When the Berry curvature (alias noncommutative parameter) is a monopole in momentum space as found recently in some ferromagnetic semiconductors while observing the anomalous Hall effect, we get a transverse shift, similar to that in the optical Hall effect.

  5. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, L. N.; Burghaus, O.; Roling, B.

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180 kV /cm . Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P6 ,6 ,6 ,14][Cl ] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models.

  6. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, L N; Burghaus, O; Roling, B

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180  kV/cm. Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P_{6,6,6,14}][Cl] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models. PMID:27203333

  7. Anomalous Nernst Effect with Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy (110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesman, Carlos; Costa Neto, Jose; Department of Physics-UFRN Team

    2014-03-01

    When a ferromagnetic material is submitted to a temperature gradient and the magnetic field generates voltage on the edges of the samples, this is called the Anomalous Nernst Effect (ANE). The Heusler alloys that currently exhibit this effect are the most promising for spintronics and spin caloritronics. In this study we perform a theoretical investigation of voltage curves associated to the ANE, when the material displays magnetocrystalline anisotropy for experimental results in two configurations, ANE versus applied magnetic field and planar angle variations of ANE. We analyzed three types of magnetocrystalline anisotropy: cubic anisotropy (100) with C4 symmetry, uniaxial anisotropy with C2 symmetry and cubic anisotropy (110). The aim was to prove that cubic anisotropy (110) is equivalent to anisotropy (100) combined with uniaxial anisotropy. Theoretical fitting of experimental ANE data demonstrates this total equivalence and that a new interpretation with the use of cubic anisotropy (110) may be due to the atomic arrangement of the so-called full-Heusler. Comparative analyses of Co2FeAl and Co2MnGe alloys will be presented. CNPq, CAPES, FAPERN.

  8. A classical picture of anomalous effects in a Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, K.

    1984-01-01

    Atomic collisions between plasma ions and a very small amount of neutral particles remaining in a hot plasma plays a very important role for plasma transports and may be an origin of anomalous effects observed in a Tokamak such as the diffusion coefficient independent of the field strength, a rapid plasma density increase during gas puffing and current penetration with anomalously high speed in the start-up phase. The Ohm's law derived by Cowling is used for the analysis.

  9. Large anomalous Nernst effect in a skyrmion crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Yo Pierre; Ishii, Fumiyuki

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric properties of a model skyrmion crystal were theoretically investigated, and it was found that its large anomalous Hall conductivity, corresponding to large Chern numbers induced by its peculiar spin structure leads to a large transverse thermoelectric voltage through the anomalous Nernst effect. This implies the possibility of finding good thermoelectric materials among skyrmion systems, and thus motivates our quests for them by means of the first-principles calculations as were employed in this study.

  10. Volume effect and skin reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume effect has been investigated about late skin necrosis. Tolerance dose of skin by single irradiation has been suggested to increase from 20∼22.5 Gy for 2.0 cm in diameter to more than 50 Gy for 1.0 cm in diameter. It is consistent with the volume effect for acute skin reaction. Similar relationship has been reported for normal tissue tolerance of central nervous system. The volume effect where a large difference in threshold dose is evident has not been explained by statistical calculation, such as critical element models. White matter necrosis rate has been simulated well using Monte Carlo calculation postulating inter-elemental migration but not by models assuming elemental independence. (author)

  11. Anomalous magnetic field effects on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Graphene exhibits anomalous properties in externally applied magnetic field. The orbital susceptibility of graphene has a singularity expressed as a delta function in Fermi energy EF, which diverges at Dirac point (EF =0) and vanishes otherwise. The singular diamagnetism is modified by various external factors such as the disorder potential [1], and the band gap opening [2,3], the finite-size effect [4] and the multilayer stacking [5], and studying those effects give deeper insights into the origin of the diamagnetic singularity of Dirac electron. The delta-function singularity is generally weakened by the electronic coupling between different graphene layers. In usual AB-stacked multilayer graphite, the interlayer coupling changes monlayer's linear band to quadratic, and then the susceptibility peak is broadened into a less singular logarithmic curve [5]. In a turbostratic (randomly-stacked) graphene multilayer, on the other hand, the diamagnetism generally becomes much stronger than in AB-stacked graphite, because the interlayer coupling is significantly reduced in misoriented lattice structure. There the external magnetic field is significantly screened inside the sample in low temperatures, and even a perfect screening is achieved at zero temperature in an ideal sample [4]. When the stacking angle between two graphene layers becomes as small as a few degree, the electronic structure is strongly modified by the long-period lattice structure with a Moire pattern. In increasing magnetic field, the spectrum gradually evolves into a fractal band structure called Hofstadter's butterfly, where the Hall conductivity exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of Fermi energy [6]. In finite-sized graphene system such as graphene ribbon and graphene nano-islands, the finite-size effect also changes the singular diamagnetism.[4] At T=0, the susceptibility χ(EF) oscillates between diamagnetism and paramagnetism in accordance with the subband structure formed

  12. Anomalous radiation effects on oxide material surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various different kind of radiation influence on surface properties, in particular, adsorptive, was revealed and at some cases the general observation regularity of the radiation adsorption is upset. So, the hydrogen photo-adsorption is not observed on silicon dioxide and on some other oxides. At the same time hydrogen adsorption takes place at the same oxides irradiation by more power nuclear particles, such as gamma-rays, protons of high energies, alpha-particles, neutrons, high-velocity electrons, and also at a X-ray irradiation. At the same time oxygen adsorption takes place on the majority of the studied oxides. So it is possible to conclude that at the irradiated adsorbents the formation of electronic centers is general regularity. The radiation adsorption of oxygen is well studied on many systems and its regularities are established on numerous experiments. On an example of such oxide systems, as silicon dioxide, oxides of rare-earth elements, beryllium oxide, aluminum oxide, the zeolites we have studied a general regularity of the oxygen and hydrogen radiation adsorption, i.e. their electron-hole properties at irradiation by protons with energy 30 MeV, alpha-particles and ions of helium-3 with energy 40 and 50 MeV, gamma-rays and ultra-violet-radiation, and also neutrons from the nuclear reactor. Parallel with adsorptive properties of oxides their paramagnetic properties and thermal desorption characteristics in a wide range of temperatures were studied. The received data have allowed to find the dependence of paramagnetic centers from adsorptive centers. It was established that the adsorptive centers do not always coincide with paramagnetic ones and vise versa. It was established that the anomalous effects in a radiation adsorption at irradiation of the oxide rare-earth elements on of scandium, lanthanum, erbium and dysprosium oxides are observed. It was found out that radiation adsorption of hydrogen is absent on oxides of a lanthanum, erbium and

  13. Phenomenological Spin Transport Theory Driven by Anomalous Nernst Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Several experimental efforts such as material investigation and structure improvement have been made recently to find a large anomalous Nernst effect in ferromagnetic metals. Here, we develop a theory of spin transport driven by the anomalous Nernst effect in a diffusive ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic multilayer. Starting from a phenomenological formula of a spin-dependent electric current, the theoretical formulas of electric voltage and spin torque generated by the anomalous Nernst effect are derived. The magnitude of the electric voltage generated from the spin current via the inverse spin Hall effect is on the order of 0.1 µV for currently available experimental parameter values. The temperature gradient necessary to switch the magnetization is quite larger than the typical experimental value. The separation of the contributions of the Seebeck and transverse spin Seebeck effects is also discussed.

  14. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance Gi plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in Gi between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures

  15. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Sibylle, E-mail: sibylle.meyer@wmi.badw.de; Schlitz, Richard [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich, 80799 München (Germany); Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich, 80799 München (Germany)

    2015-03-30

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance G{sub i} plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in G{sub i} between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures.

  16. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Insulator Heterostructure

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Gang; Jing WANG; FELSER, CLAUDIA; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Based on ab initio calculations, we predict that a monolayer of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 and GdI2 heterostructure is a quantum anomalous Hall insulator with a non-trivial band gap up to 38 meV. The principle behind our prediction is that the band inversion between two topologically trivial ferromagnetic insulators can result in a non-zero Chern number, which offers a better way to realize the quantum anomalous Hall state without random magnetic doping. In addition, a simple effective model is pre...

  17. Anomalous Hall Effect in a 2D Rashba Ferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ado, I A; Dmitriev, I A; Ostrovsky, P M; Titov, M

    2016-07-22

    Skew scattering on rare impurity configurations is shown to dominate the anomalous Hall effect in a 2D Rashba ferromagnet. The mechanism originates in scattering on rare impurity pairs separated by distances of the order of the Fermi wavelength. The corresponding theoretical description goes beyond the conventional noncrossing approximation. The mechanism provides the only contribution to the anomalous Hall conductivity in the most relevant metallic regime and strongly modifies previously obtained results for lower energies in the leading order with respect to impurity strength. PMID:27494487

  18. Anomalous Doppler effects in bulk phononic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler effects in simple cubic phononic crystal are studied theoretically and numerically. In addition to observing Doppler shifts from a moving source's frequencies inside the gap, we find that Doppler shifts can be multi-order, anisotropic, and the dominant order of shift depends on the band index that the source's frequency is in.

  19. Pharmacological effects of medicinal plants on skin

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Bakhtiyari, MSc; Mohammadreza Radan, MD

    2013-01-01

    Skin is one of the most sensitive parts of the body and is important to maintain the beauty of man. Herbal products have fewer side effects than chemicals and have pharmacological effects on the skin, so are used in cosmetic preparations. Books, articles and electronic databases including ISI Web of Science, PubMed, Magiran and IranMedex were searched to identify plants with positive effects on the skin, regardless of adverse effects and their interactions. A number of plants which were...

  20. Effects of Anomalous Propagation Conditions on Weather Radar Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Bech, Joan; Magaldi, Adolfo; Codina, Bernat; Lorente, Jeroni

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter our objective is to provide an overview of the effects of anomalous propagation conditions on weather radar observations, based mostly on studies performed by the authors during the last decade, summarizing results from recent publications, presentations, or unpublished material. We believe this chapter may be useful as an introductory text for graduate students, or researchers and practitioners dealing with this topic. Throughout the text a spherical symmetric atmosphere is a...

  1. Anomalous Hall Effect in Geometrically Frustrated Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Boldrin

    2012-01-01

    space mechanism based on spin chirality that was originally applied to the pyrochlore Nd2Mo2O7 appears unsatisfactory. Recently, an orbital description based on the Aharonov-Bohm effect has been proposed and applied to both the ferromagnetic pyrochlores Nd2Mo2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7; the first of which features long-ranged magnetic order while the latter is a chiral spin liquid. Two further examples of geometrically frustrated conducting magnets are presented in this paper—the kagome-like Fe3Sn2 and the triangular PdCrO2. These possess very different electronic structures to the 3-dimensional heavy-metal pyrochlores and provide new opportunities to explore the different origins of the AHE. This paper summarises the experimental findings in these materials in an attempt to unite the conflicting theoretical arguments.

  2. Effects of surface and interface scattering on anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Z. B.

    2012-09-27

    In this paper, we report the results of surface and interface scattering on anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The surface scattering effect has been extracted from the total anomalous Hall effect. By scaling surface scattering contribution with ρAHs∼ργss, the exponent γ has been found to decrease with the increase of surface scattering resistivity, which could account for the thickness-dependent anomalous Hall effect. Interface diffusion induced by rapid thermal annealing modifies not only the magnetization and longitudinal resistivity but also the anomalous Hall effect; a large exponent γ ∼ 5.7 has been attributed to interface scattering-dominated anomalous Hall effect.

  3. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    OpenAIRE

    Jing WANG; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimension (2D) and three-dimension (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magn...

  4. Quantized Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Rui

    2011-01-01

    The Hall effect, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and the spin Hall effect are thndamental transport processes in solids arising from the Lorentz force and the spin-orbit coupling respectively. The AHE, in which a voltage transverse to the electric current appears even in the absence of an external magnetic field, was first detected in ferromagnetic (FM) metals in 1881 and later found to arise from the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) between the current and magnetic moments.

  5. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Feromagnetic Rare-Earth Cobalite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Rare-Earth manganites and cobalites with the perovskite structure have been a subject of great recent interest because their electrical resistance changes significantly when a magnetic field is applied...we have studied the Hall effect in thin film La(sub 0.5)Ca(sub 0.5)CoO(sub 3) material and have obtained convincing evidence fo the so called anomalous Hall effect, typical for magnetic metals...Our results suggest that near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the spin fluctuation.

  6. Quantized Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Rui

    2011-01-01

    @@ The Hall effect, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and the spin Hall effect are fundamental transport processes in solids arising from the Lorentz force and the spin-orbit coupling respectively.The AHE, in which a voltage transverse to the electric current appears even in the absence of an external magnetic field, was first detected in ferromagnetic (FM) metals in 1881 and later found to arise from the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) between the current and magnetic moments.Recent progress on the mechanism of AHE has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall current by adopting the Berry-phase concepts in close analogy to the intrinsic spin Hall effect.Given the experimental discovery of the quantum Hall and the quantum spin Hall effects, it is natural to ask whether the AHE can also be quantized.In a quantized anomalous Hall (QAH) insulator, spontaneous magnetic moments and spin-orbit coupling combine to give rise to a topologically non-trivial electronic structure, leading to the quantized Hall effect without any external magnetic field.

  7. Measurement of the velocity skin effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurmond, L.E.; Ahrens, B.K.; Barber, J.P. (SEDI-MET, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The velocity skin effect is a maldistribution of current in a moving slider and substrate due to diffusion effects in the substrate material. This effect is important in armature design. The effect causes most of the current to flow through the rear of the armature. This may result in structural failure of the armature due to heating and nonuniform pressure on the armature. In this paper, the authors describe a series of experiments that we performed to measure the velocity skin effect directly. The authors used a rotating disk device to simulate railgun conditions up to 50 m/s. The authors observed the velocity skin effect under our experimental conditions.

  8. Urbanization effects on natural radiation in anomalous areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The urbanization effects and their possible causes on the environmental gamma radiation levels, in an anomalous area, were studied. The field work was accomplished in Guarapari, located in the seacoast of the Brazilian state of Espirito Santo, which is rich in monazite sands, with thorium and uranium contents. The results show clearly that there was a reduction in the levels of external exposition in the streets and squares of Guarapari. It was ascertained that the reduction was due to the materials used in the urbanization. (L.C.J.A.)

  9. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A., E-mail: elembaj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Tan, S. G. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Siu, Z. B. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  10. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σxy of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σxy and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σxy as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs

  11. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d’Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Solange Guidolin CANNIATTI-BRAZACA

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to...

  12. Anomalous Hall effect in Fe/Au multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Q.

    2016-07-22

    To understand the interfacial scattering effect on the anomalous Hall effect (AHE), we prepared multilayers of (Fe(36/n)nm/Au(12/n)nm)n using an e-beam evaporator. This structure design allowed us to investigate the effect of interfacial scattering on the AHE, while keeping the samples\\' thickness and composition unchanged. We measured the (magneto)transport properties of the samples in a wide temperature range (10–310 K) with magnetic fields up to 50 kOe. We found that the scaling between the anomalous Hall resistivity (ρAHE) and longitudinal resistivity (ρxx) can be roughly described by ρAHE∼ργxx with γ=2.65±0.10 and 1.90 ± 0.04 for samples from n=1 to n=4 and samples from n=4 to n=12, respectively. Our quantitative analysis results showed that the interfacial scattering suppresses the contribution of the intrinsic mechanism and gives rise to a side-jump contribution.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics.

  14. Correlations and anomalous transport effects related to stochastic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we analyse turbulent transport in the framework of the correlation approach to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient and characteristic increment in the scaling form. Such factors as anisotropy, seed diffusion mechanisms and reconstruction of flow topology significantly have an impact on the effective diffusivity. We consider the different aspects of stochastic instability such as the decorrelation mechanism to estimate characteristic correlation times and correlation scales in the framework of the scaling approach. The topics to be discussed include the Rechester-Rosenbluth correlation scalings, percolation transport in time dependent flows, anisotropic MHD spectra and a multi-scale approach to the analysis of anomalous transport. To treat long-range correlation effects, the percolation renormalization is analysed in time-dependent regimes. In the framework of the multiscale approach, a scaling for an increment of the stochastic instability in two-dimensional random flow is suggested

  15. Correlations and anomalous transport effects related to stochastic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakunin, O G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Malott Hall, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66044 (United States); Nuclear Fusion Institute, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , pl. Kurchatova 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica ' Rijnhuizen' , Associate Euroatom-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2005-11-15

    In this paper, we analyse turbulent transport in the framework of the correlation approach to obtain the effective diffusion coefficient and characteristic increment in the scaling form. Such factors as anisotropy, seed diffusion mechanisms and reconstruction of flow topology significantly have an impact on the effective diffusivity. We consider the different aspects of stochastic instability such as the decorrelation mechanism to estimate characteristic correlation times and correlation scales in the framework of the scaling approach. The topics to be discussed include the Rechester-Rosenbluth correlation scalings, percolation transport in time dependent flows, anisotropic MHD spectra and a multi-scale approach to the analysis of anomalous transport. To treat long-range correlation effects, the percolation renormalization is analysed in time-dependent regimes. In the framework of the multiscale approach, a scaling for an increment of the stochastic instability in two-dimensional random flow is suggested.

  16. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bestwick, A. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fox, E. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kou, Xufeng [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pan, Lei [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wang, Kang L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  17. Anomalous transport effects in magnetically-confined plasma columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of density structure in a magnetized plasma column is analyzed accounting for anomalous diffusion due to the lower hybrid drift instability. The plasma column is found to be divided into regions of classical, anomalous, and intermediate diffusivity. The bulk behavior, described in terms of radial confinement time, depends most sensitively upon the particle line density (ion/cm). For broad plasmas (large line density), the transport is characteristic of classical diffusion, and for slender plasmas (small line density) the transport is characteristic of anomalous diffusion. For intermediate line densities, the transport undertakes a rapid transition from classical to anomalous. Correlations between the theoretical results and past experiments are described

  18. Skin Exposures & Effects in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Workplace Safety & Health Topics Skin Exposures and Effects Recommendations ... Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact ...

  19. Eczema's Effects More Than Skin Deep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of eczema and its effect on the skin's appearance may contribute to a greater risk of mental health disorders, such as anxiety and depression, Silverberg said. Controlling flare-ups of eczema symptoms ...

  20. Anomalous Nernst Effect of Perpendicularly Magnetic Anisotropy TbFeCo Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Ryo; Komine, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) of perpendicularly magnetized TbFeCo thin films with various Tb content, and especially studied the relation between ANE and anomalous Hall effect. As a result, the hysteresis of anomalous Nernst coefficient showed the same behavior as that of anomalous Hall resistivity, and the sign of anomalous Nernst coefficient was consistent with that of anomalous Hall voltage in any Tb content, whereas the Seebeck coefficient and the resistivity were almost constant even if the applied magnetic field was varied. Taking into account of thermoelectric coefficient tensor, it was revealed that the off-diagonal thermopower corresponding to the ANE in TbFeCo thin films is the product of Hall angle and Seebeck coefficient.

  1. Anomalous supercurrent switching in graphene under proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Alex; Coskun, U. C.; Brenner, M.; Hymel, T.; Vakaryuk, V.; Bezryadin, A.

    2012-02-01

    We report a study of hysteretic current-voltage characteristics in superconductor-graphene-superconductor (SGS) junctions. The stochastic nature of the phase slips is characterized by measuring the distribution of the switching currents. We find that in SGS junctions the dispersion of the switching current scales with temperature as σIT^αG with αG 1/3. This observation is in sharp contrast with the known Josephson junction behavior where σIT^αJ with αJ=2/3. We propose an explanation using a modified version of Kurkijarvi's theory for the flux stability in rf-SQUID and attribute this anomalous effect to the temperature dependence of the critical current which persists down to low temperatures.

  2. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite reg-sign and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone

  3. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We present the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. We discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.

  4. Origin of anomalous inverse notch effect in bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J.; Zhou, H. F.; Wang, Z. T.; Li, Y.; Gao, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding notch-related failure is crucial for the design of reliable engineering structures. However, substantial controversies exist in the literature on the notch effect in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), and the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the apparent confusion is still poorly understood. Here we investigate the physical origin of an inverse notch effect in a Zr-based metallic glass, where the tensile strength of the material is dramatically enhanced, rather than decreased (as expected from the stress concentration point of view), by introduction of a notch. Our experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that the seemingly anomalous inverse notch effect is in fact caused by a transition in failure mechanism from shear banding at the notch tip to cavitation and void coalescence. Based on our theoretical analysis, the transition occurs as the stress triaxiality in the notched sample exceeds a material-dependent threshold value. Our results fill the gap in the current understanding of BMG strength and failure mechanism by resolving the conflicts on notch effects and may inspire re-interpretation of previous reports on BMG fracture toughness where pre-existing notches were routinely adopted.

  5. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Costa de Camargo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ. Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h, measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  6. Effect of anomalous resistivity on the dynamics of plasma switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the conditions for electron MHD are recollected, and it is shown how this leads to anomalous resistivity which may play an important role in the dynamics of POS. It has been shown that not only the order of value of the resistance of the plasma-filled diode but rather basic scalings have to be changed in the regime of essential anomalous resistivity. (author). 11 refs

  7. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a 60Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  8. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Adriano Costa de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d' Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia, E-mail: sgcbraza@usp.b, E-mail: tvieira@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: mabra@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: macdomin@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2011-07-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a {sup 60}Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  9. Field-effect modulation of anomalous Hall effect in diluted ferromagnetic topological insulator epitaxial films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, CuiZu; Liu, MinHao; Zhang, ZuoCheng; Wang, YaYu; He, Ke; Xue, QiKun

    2016-03-01

    High quality chromium (Cr) doped three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) Sb2Te3 films are grown via molecular beam epitaxy on heat-treated insulating SrTiO3 (111) substrates. We report that the Dirac surface states are insensitive to Cr doping, and a perfect robust long-range ferromagnetic order is unveiled in epitaxial Sb2- x Cr x Te3 films. The anomalous Hall effect is modulated by applying a bottom gate, contrary to the ferromagnetism in conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs), here the coercivity field is not significantly changed with decreasing carrier density. Carrier-independent ferromagnetism heralds Sb2- x Cr x Te3 films as the base candidate TI material to realize the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. These results also indicate the potential of controlling anomalous Hall voltage in future TI-based magneto-electronics and spintronics.

  10. Effects of climate changes on skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balato, Nicola; Megna, Matteo; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Anna; Napolitano, Maddalena; Patruno, Cataldo

    2014-02-01

    Global climate is changing at an extraordinary rate. Climate change (CC) can be caused by several factors including variations in solar radiation, oceanic processes, and also human activities. The degree of this change and its impact on ecological, social, and economical systems have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing CC as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Moreover, studies based on observations and predictive models show how CC could affect human health. On the other hand, only a few studies focus on how this change may affect human skin. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, it is not surprising that cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. The current review focuses on the effects of CC on skin diseases showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence, clinical pattern and natural course of some dermatoses. PMID:24404995

  11. Carrier-independent ferromagnetism and giant anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulator

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Zhang, Jin-song; Liu, Min-Hao; Zhang, Zuo-Cheng; Feng, Xiao; Li, Kang; Wang, Li-Li; Chen, Xi; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun

    2011-01-01

    Breaking the time-reversal symmetry of a topological insulator (TI) by ferromagnetism can induce exotic magnetoelectric phenomena such as quantized anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. Experimental observation of QAH effect in a magnetically doped TI requires ferromagnetism not relying on the charge carriers. We have realized the ferromagnetism independent of both polarity and density of carriers in Cr-doped BixSb2-xTe3 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Meanwhile, the anomalous Hall effect ...

  12. Localization correction to the anomalous Hall effect in amorphous CoFeB thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁进军; 吴少兵; 杨晓非; 朱涛

    2015-01-01

    An obvious weak localization correction to anomalous Hall conductance (AHC) in very thin CoFeB film is reported. We find that both the weak localization to AHC and the mechanism of anomalous Hall effect are related to the CoFeB thickness. When the film is thicker than 3 nm, the side jump mechanism dominates and the weak localization to AHC vanishes. For very thin CoFeB films, both the side jump and skew scattering mechanisms contribute to the anomalous Hall effect, and the weak localization correction to AHC is observed.

  13. Effect of Ethanol Pretreatment on Skin Permeation of Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    堀田,大介; 藤堂, 浩明; 杉林, 堅次

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that ethanol (EtOH) can enhance skin permeation of drugs when simultaneously applied with drugs. However, only a few studies have reported on the pretreatment effect of EtOH on skin permeations. In this study, the pretreatment effects of EtOH on skin permeation of drugs were investigated by measuring changes in skin permeation and electrical skin resistance. Permeabilities of deuterium oxide (D2O), isosorbide mononitrate (ISMN), isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN), calcein so...

  14. Magnetic Topological Insulators and Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xufeng

    The engineering of topological surface states is a key to realize applicable devices based on topological insulators (TIs). Among various proposals, introducing magnetic impurities into TIs has been proven to be an effective way to open a surface gap and integrate additional ferromagnetism with the original topological order. In this Dissertation, we study both the intrinsic electrical and magnetic properties of the magnetic TI thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. By doping transition element Cr into the host tetradymite-type V-VI semiconductors, we achieve robust ferromagnetic order with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. With additional top-gating capability, we realize the electric-field-controlled ferromagnetism in the magnetic TI systems, and demonstrate such magneto-electric effects can be effectively manipulated, depending on the interplays between the band topology, magnetic exchange coupling, and structural engineering. Most significantly, we report the observation of quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the Cr-doped (BiSb)2Te3 samples where dissipationless chiral edge conduction is realized in the macroscopic millimeter-size devices without the presence of any external magnetic field, and the stability of the quantized Hall conductance of e2/h is well-maintained as the film thickness varies across the 2D hybridization limit. With additional quantum confinement, we discover the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE states, and reveal the universal QAHE phase diagram in the thin magnetic TI samples. In addition to the uniform magnetic TIs, we further investigate the TI/Cr-doped TI bilayer structures prepared by the modulation-doped growth method. By controlling the magnetic interaction profile, we observe the Dirac hole-mediated ferromagnetism and develop an effective way to manipulate its strength. Besides, the giant spin-orbit torque in such magnetic TI-based heterostructures enables us to demonstrate the current

  15. Shark skin effect in creeping films

    CERN Document Server

    Scholle, M

    2006-01-01

    If a body in a stream is provided with small ridges aligned in the local flow direction, a remarkable drag reduction can be reached under turbulent flow conditions. This surprising phenomenon is called the 'shark skin effect'. We demonstrate, that a reduction of resistance can also be reached in creeping flows if the ridges are aligned perpendicular to the flow direction. We especially consider in gravity-driven film flows the effect of the bottom topography on the mean transport velocity.

  16. Thickness Dependence of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulator Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Jing; Ou, Yunbo; Hao, Zhenqi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhang, Liguo; Lin, Chaojing; Liao, Jian; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Li-Li; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the quantum anomalous Hall effect with the thickness of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 magnetic topological insulator films is studied, revealing how the effect is caused by the interplay of the surface states, band-bending, and ferromagnetic exchange energy. Homogeneity in ferromagnetism is found to be the key to high-temperature quantum anomalous Hall material. PMID:27166762

  17. Anomalous effects due to the inertial anti-gravitational potential of the sun

    OpenAIRE

    Khokhlov, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    It is introduced inertial anti-gravitational potential into the theory of gravity to stop gravitational collapse at the nuclear density and thus prevent singularities. It is considered effective gravity which includes Newtonian potential and inertial anti-gravitational potential. It is investigated footprints of the effective gravity in the solar system. The inertial anti-gravitational potential of the sun allows to explain the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11, the anomalous increa...

  18. Effect of interstitial low level laser stimulation in skin density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seulki; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Yu, Sungkon; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Hwang, Dong Hyun; Lee, Han A.; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    As the interest in skin was increased, number of studies on skin care also have been increased. The reduction of skin density is one of the symptoms of skin aging. It reduces elasticity of skin and becomes the reason of wrinkle formation. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as one of the effective therapeutic methods for skin aging as in hasten to change skin density. This study presents the effect of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) (wavelength: 660nm, power: 20mW) in skin density. Rabbits were divided into three groups. Group 1 didn't receive any laser stimulation as a control group. Group 2 and 3 as test groups were exposed to MILNS with energy of 8J and 6J on rabbits' dorsal side once a week, respectively. Skin density of rabbits was measured every 12 hours by using an ultrasound skin scanner.

  19. Sun’s effect on skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The skin uses sunlight to help manufacture vitamin D, which is important for normal bone formation. But sometimes its ultraviolet light can be ... the pigment melanin. Melanin protects skin from the sun's ultraviolet rays, which can burn the skin, and ...

  20. Anomalous Hall effect on the surface of topological Kondo insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, E. J.; Ostrovsky, P. M.; Dzero, M.; Levchenko, A.

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the anomalous Hall conductivity σx y of the surface states in cubic topological Kondo insulators. We consider a generic model for the surface states with three Dirac cones on the (001) surface. The Fermi velocity, the Fermi momentum, and the Zeeman energy in different Dirac pockets may be unequal. The microscopic impurity potential mediates mixed intra- and interband extrinsic scattering processes. Our calculation of σx y is based on the Kubo-Streda diagrammatic approach. It includes diffractive skew scattering contributions originating from the rare two-impurity complexes. Remarkably, these contributions yield anomalous Hall conductivity that is independent of impurity concentration, and thus is of the same order as other known extrinsic side jump and skew scattering terms. We discuss various special cases of our results and the experimental relevance of our study in the context of the recent hysteretic magnetotransport data in SmB6 samples.

  1. Anomalous $tqZ$ coupling effects in rare B- and K-meson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xin-Qiang; Yuan, Xing-Bo

    2011-01-01

    As a top-factory, the LHC is performing a direct study of top-quark anomalous FCNC couplings, which are, however, correlated closely with the rare B- and K-meson decays. In this paper, we study the effects of anomalous $tqZ$ (with $q=u,c$) couplings in the rare decays $B_{s,d}\\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$, $B\\to X_s \

  2. Theory of the anomalous Hall effect from the Kubo formula and the Dirac equation

    OpenAIRE

    Crépieux, A.; Bruno, P

    2001-01-01

    A model to treat the anomalous Hall effect is developed. Based on the Kubo formalism and on the Dirac equation, this model allows the simultaneous calculation of the skew-scattering and side-jump contributions to the anomalous Hall conductivity. The continuity and the consistency with the weak-relativistic limit described by the Pauli Hamiltonian is shown. For both approaches, Dirac and Pauli, the Feynman diagrams, which lead to the skew-scattering and the side-jump contributions, are underli...

  3. The effect of interfacial intermixing on magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2015-05-01

    The effect of interfacial intermixing on magnetization and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in Co/Pd multilayers is studied by using rapid thermal annealing to enhance the interfacial diffusion. The dependence of saturation magnetization and coercivity on the temperature of rapid thermal annealing at 5 K is discussed. It is found that AHE is closely related to the relative thickness of the Co and Pd layers. Localized paramagnetism has been observed which destroys AHE, while AHE can be enhanced by annealing.

  4. Unconventional scaling of the anomalous Hall effect accompanying electron localization correction in the dirty regime

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Y. M.

    2013-03-05

    Scaling of the anomalous Hall conductivity to longitudinal conductivity σAH∝σ2xx has been observed in the dirty regime of two-dimensional weak and strong localization regions in ultrathin, polycrystalline, chemically disordered, ferromagnetic FePt films. The relationship between electron transport and temperature reveals a quantitatively insignificant Coulomb interaction in these films, while the temperature dependent anomalous Hall conductivity experiences quantum correction from electron localization. At the onset of this correction, the low-temperature anomalous Hall resistivity begins to be saturated when the thickness of the FePt film is reduced, and the corresponding Hall conductivity scaling exponent becomes 2, which is above the recent unified theory of 1.6 (σAH∝σ1.6xx). Our results strongly suggest that the correction of the electron localization modulates the scaling exponent of the anomalous Hall effect.

  5. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields. PMID:26524519

  6. Anomalous Hall effect in Fe/Gd bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    Non-monotonic dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on temperature and magnetization, including a sign change, was observed in Fe/Gd bilayers. To understand the intriguing observations, we fabricated the Fe/Gd bilayers and single layers of Fe and Gd simultaneously. The temperature and field dependences of longitudinal resistivity, Hall resistivity and magnetization in these films have also been carefully measured. The analysis of these data reveals that these intriguing features are due to the opposite signs of Hall resistivity/or spin polarization and different Curie temperatures of Fe and Gd single-layer films. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2010

  7. Anomalous transport effects and possible environmental symmetry 'violation' in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jinfeng Liao

    2015-05-01

    The heavy-ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a sense allow environmental symmetry 'violation' phenomena. For example, certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible in such domains. We briefly review recent progress in both the theoretical understanding and experimental search of various anomalous transport effects (such as the chiral magnetic effect, chiral separation effect, chiral electric separation effect, chiral electric/magnetic waves, etc.) in the hot QCD fluid formed by such collisions.

  8. Anomalous transport effects and possible environmental symmetry violation in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy-ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a sense allow environmental symmetry 'violation' phenomena. For example, certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible in such domains. We briefly review recent progress in both the theoretical understanding and experimental search of various anomalous transport effects (such as the chiral magnetic effect, chiral separation effect, chiral electric separation effect, chiral electric/magnetic waves, etc.) in the hot QCD fluid formed by such collisions. (author)

  9. Understanding Engineered Nanomaterial Skin Interactions and the Modulatory Effects of UVR Skin Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Jatana, Samreen; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of engineered nanomaterials for the development of technological applications, nanomedicine, and nano-enabled consumer products is an ever expanding discipline as is the concern over the impact of nanotechnology on human environmental health and safety. In this review we discuss the current state of understanding of nanomaterial skin interactions with a specific emphasis on the effects of ultra-violet radiation (UVR) skin exposure. Skin is the largest organ of the body and is typica...

  10. Skin and bulk temperature difference at Lake Tahoe: A case study on lake skin effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. Chris; Hook, Simon J.; Schneider, Philipp; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2013-09-01

    water, infrared radiometers on satellites measure radiation leaving from the surface skin layer and therefore the retrieved temperature is representative of the skin layer. This is slightly different from the bulk layer deeper in the water where various floating thermometers take temperature measurements to validate satellite measurements. The difference between the bulk and skin temperature (skin effect) must be understood to properly validate schemes that use surface skin temperature to infer bulk temperatures. Further skin temperatures retrieved over inland waters may show different patterns to those retrieved over oceans due to differences in conditions such as wind speed, aerosols, and elevation. We have analyzed the differences between the skin and bulk temperatures at four permanent monitoring stations (buoys) located on Lake Tahoe since 1999 and compared the results with similar studies over the ocean typically obtained from boat cruises. Skin effect distributions were found to be consistent across the buoys; however, the diurnal behavior of the skin effect was slightly different and shown to be related to wind speed measured at an individual buoy. When wind speed was less than 2 m s-1, the skin temperature osclillated and greatly increased the uncertainty in the skin effect reported over Lake Tahoe. When downwelling sky radiation was increased from clouds or high humidity, this led to nighttime skin temperatures that were warmer than bulk temperatures by as much as 0.5 K. The size of the warm skin effect is larger than other ocean studies that observed warm nighttime skin values around 0.1 K. The nighttime skin effect was seen to be more consistent with a smaller standard deviation compared to the daytime skin effect. The nighttime skin behavior had a mean and standard deviation that ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 K and between 0.3 and 0.4 K, respectively. In contrast, daytime skin effect was strongly influenced by direct solar illumination and typically had a

  11. Absence of anomalous Nernst effect in spin Seebeck effect of Pt/YIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pt/YIG structure has been widely used to study spin Seebeck effect (SSE), inverse spin Hall effect, and other pure spin current phenomena. However, the magnetic proximity effect in Pt when in contact with YIG, and the potential anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) may compromise the spin current phenomena in Pt/YIG. By inserting a Cu layer of various thicknesses between Pt and YIG, we have separated the signals from the SSE and that of the ANE. It is demonstrated that the thermal voltage in Pt/YIG mainly comes from spin current due to the longitudinal SSE with negligible contribution from the ANE

  12. Absence of anomalous Nernst effect in spin Seebeck effect of Pt/YIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, B. F., E-mail: bfmiao@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Huang, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Qu, D.; Chien, C. L., E-mail: clchien@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The Pt/YIG structure has been widely used to study spin Seebeck effect (SSE), inverse spin Hall effect, and other pure spin current phenomena. However, the magnetic proximity effect in Pt when in contact with YIG, and the potential anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) may compromise the spin current phenomena in Pt/YIG. By inserting a Cu layer of various thicknesses between Pt and YIG, we have separated the signals from the SSE and that of the ANE. It is demonstrated that the thermal voltage in Pt/YIG mainly comes from spin current due to the longitudinal SSE with negligible contribution from the ANE.

  13. Absence of anomalous Nernst effect in spin Seebeck effect of Pt/YIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, B. F.; Huang, S. Y.; Qu, D.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Pt/YIG structure has been widely used to study spin Seebeck effect (SSE), inverse spin Hall effect, and other pure spin current phenomena. However, the magnetic proximity effect in Pt when in contact with YIG, and the potential anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) may compromise the spin current phenomena in Pt/YIG. By inserting a Cu layer of various thicknesses between Pt and YIG, we have separated the signals from the SSE and that of the ANE. It is demonstrated that the thermal voltage in Pt/YIG mainly comes from spin current due to the longitudinal SSE with negligible contribution from the ANE.

  14. Absence of anomalous Nernst effect in spin Seebeck effect of Pt/YIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. F. Miao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pt/YIG structure has been widely used to study spin Seebeck effect (SSE, inverse spin Hall effect, and other pure spin current phenomena. However, the magnetic proximity effect in Pt when in contact with YIG, and the potential anomalous Nernst effect (ANE may compromise the spin current phenomena in Pt/YIG. By inserting a Cu layer of various thicknesses between Pt and YIG, we have separated the signals from the SSE and that of the ANE. It is demonstrated that the thermal voltage in Pt/YIG mainly comes from spin current due to the longitudinal SSE with negligible contribution from the ANE.

  15. Anomalous Hall effect from vortex motion in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the unusual Seebeck effect is taken into consideration in explaining the possible origin of the anomalous Hall effect for high-Tc superconductors. Combining Maki's theory of transport entropy and Tinkham's theory of resistive transition, we explain why the anomalous Hall effect can be observed in high-Tc superconductors, but is absent in most conventional superconductors. The behavior of ρxy(H,T) in our theory is qualitatively consistent with experiments. In addition, our theory not only predicts that ρxy will become positive from ρxyxy|∝ρxx2 in the region of ρxyxy will diminish with increasing defect concentration

  16. Anomalous effects of moderation in transportation and storage arrays - revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of anomalies have been observed for fissile material arrays. This paper will review anomalous behavior associated with interstitial array moderation and correct one previously-mis-identified anomaly. Most arrays show a maximum keff with low-density water moderation. An earlier study, however, did not show this maximum for unreflected 5x5x5 and 10x10x10 arrays of 15-kg 235U spheres. Our present calculations with MCNP and KENO V.a, however, show low-density maximums for both unreflected and reflected arrays of these units. We conclude that the earlier calculations for unreflected arrays were in error -- perhaps due to problem setup or code errors. The reactivity enhancement due to fissile material density reductions, however, still exits and is now seen to occur for both unreflected and water-reflected arrays

  17. Sun’s effect on skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The skin uses sunlight to help manufacture vitamin D, which is important for normal bone formation. But sometimes its ultraviolet light can be ... the pigment melanin. Melanin protects skin from the sun’s ultraviolet rays, which can burn the skin, and ...

  18. Adverse and beneficial effects of plant extracts on skin and skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, D; Gok, M A; Lennard, T W

    2001-06-01

    Plants are of relevance to dermatology for both their adverse and beneficial effects on skin and skin disorders respectively. Virtually all cultures worldwide have relied historically, or continue to rely on medicinal plants for primary health care. Approximately one-third of all traditional medicines are for treatment of wounds or skin disorders, compared to only 1-3% of modern drugs. The use of such medicinal plant extracts for the treatment of skin disorders arguably has been based largely on historical/anecdotal evidence, since there has been relatively little data available in the scientific literature, particularly with regard to the efficacy of plant extracts in controlled clinical trials. In this article therefore, adverse and beneficial aspects of medicinal plants relating to skin and skin disorders have been reviewed, based on recently available information from the peer-reviewed scientific literature. Beneficial aspects of medicinal plants on skin include: healing of wounds and burn injuries (especially Aloe vera); antifungal, antiviral, antibacterial and acaricidal activity against skin infections such as acne, herpes and scabies (especially tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil); activity against inflammatory/immune disorders affecting skin (e.g. psoriasis); and anti-tumour promoting activity against skin cancer (identified using chemically-induced two-stage carcinogenesis in mice). Adverse effects of plants on skin reviewed include: irritant contact dermatitis caused mechanically (spines, irritant hairs) or by irritant chemicals in plant sap (especially members of the Ranunculaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Compositae plant families); phytophotodermatitis resulting from skin contamination by plants containing furocoumarins, and subsequent exposure to UV light (notably members of the Umbelliferae and Rutaceae plant families); and immediate (type I) or delayed hypersensitivity contact reactions mediated by the immune system in individuals sensitized to plants

  19. Inverse Spin Hall Effect and Anomalous Hall Effect in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Peter; Raimondi, Roberto; Gorini, Cosimo

    2010-01-01

    We study the coupled dynamics of spin and charge currents in a two-dimensional electron gas in the transport diffusive regime. For systems with inversion symmetry there are established relations between the spin Hall effect, the anomalous Hall effect and the inverse spin Hall effect. However, in two-dimensional electron gases of semiconductors like GaAs, inversion symmetry is broken so that the standard arguments do not apply. We demonstrate that in the presence of a Rashba type of spin-orbit...

  20. Effects of surface charge on the anomalous light extinction from metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijercic, Edin; Leung, P. T.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of extraneous surface charges on the anomalous extinction from metallic nanoparticles are studied via an application of the extended Mie theory by Bohren and Hunt. Due to the sensitivity of the higher multipolar resonance on the surface charges, it is found that quenching of the anomalous resonance can be observed with presence of only a modest amount of charges on these particles. The observed effects thus provide a rather sensitive mechanism for the monitoring of the neutrality of these nanoparticles using far field scattering approaches.

  1. Spontaneous magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in an emergent Dice lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Przysiężna, Anna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-06-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices serve as a tool to model different physical phenomena appearing originally in condensed matter. To study magnetic phenomena one needs to engineer synthetic fields as atoms are neutral. Appropriately shaped optical potentials force atoms to mimic charged particles moving in a given field. We present the realization of artificial gauge fields for the observation of anomalous Hall effect. Two species of attractively interacting ultracold fermions are considered to be trapped in a shaken two dimensional triangular lattice. A combination of interaction induced tunneling and shaking can result in an emergent Dice lattice. In such a lattice the staggered synthetic magnetic flux appears and it can be controlled with external parameters. The obtained synthetic fields are non-Abelian. Depending on the tuning of the staggered flux we can obtain either anomalous Hall effect or its quantized version. Our results are reminiscent of Anomalous Hall conductivity in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets.

  2. Scaling of anomalous hall effect in amorphous CoFeB Films with accompanying quantum correction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yan

    2015-05-08

    Scaling of anomalous Hall effect in amorphous CoFeB films with thickness ranging from 2 to 160 nm have been investigated. We have found that the scaling relationship between longitudinal (ρxx) and anomalous Hall (ρAH) resistivity is distinctly different in the Bloch and localization regions. For ultrathin CoFeB films, the sheet resistance (Rxx) and anomalous Hall conductance (GAH) received quantum correction from electron localization showing two different scaling relationships at different temperature regions. In contrast, the thicker films show a metallic conductance, which have only one scaling relationship in the entire temperature range. Furthermore, in the dirty regime of localization regions, an unconventional scaling relationship View the MathML sourceσAH∝σxxα with α=1.99 is found, rather than α=1.60 predicted by the unified theory.

  3. Skin Firming, Skin Smoothing, Skin Blemishes Elimination and Anti-aging Effects of Increased Protein Intake in the Form of Voandzeia hypogeal Seed Meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utoh-Nedosa U. Anastasia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the effect of excess calorie intake on the human body showed that it resulted in accumulation of excess body fat; the darkening of the skin colour and the development of a bumpy skin. Problem statement: The present study investigated the effects of increased protein intake on the human skin and on body fat. The skin firming, skin smoothing and skin colour lightening effects of Vernonia amygdalina leaf extract has already been established. The anti-obesity, body calming and anti-aging effects of VA leaf extract have also been established. Approach: The effects of increased protein intake (in the form of eating of 100 gm Voandzeia hypogeal seed paste meal two times daily, was tested on the skin, anti-obesity and anti-aging effects of VA leaf extract. The study was done for 10 days. Results: The results of the study showed that Voandzeia subterranean (hypogea cooked potentiated the skin tightening, skin smoothing, skin colour lightening and the anti-obesity/anti-aging effects of VA. Leaf extract. These results show that increased Voandezia hypogeal seed paste meal [increased protein intake has skin tightening/clearing/lightening/smoothing and anti-obesity/anti-aging effects]. They also show that cooked Voandzeia hypogeal seed paste meal has a potentiating effect on the skin and body effects of VA leaf extract. Conclusion: From the findings of this study the author to concludes that increased protein intake potentiated the skin firming/skin smoothing/skin colour lightening; body calming; anti-obesity and anti-aging effects of Vernonia amygdalina leaf extract. The study also concludes that Voandzeia hypogeal seed meal has skin firming/skin smoothing/skin colour lightening (clearing; body calming; anti-obesity and anti-aging effects.

  4. Antibacterial effect of glycerol as preservative on donor skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glycerolised cadavetic allografts have been used widely since 1984 in the treatment of bum wounds. Rejections reaction to glycerolised skin were reported to be attenuated. Structural integrity of the skin was maintained and antiviral and antibacterial effects were noted. The Euro Skin Bank has gathered approximately 2000 data since 1987 concerning bacteriology cultures of glycerolised skin. These data are presented. Bacteriological data from skin donors were examined from 1987 till 1995 (1927 data). Donor skin sent to the laboratory and found to be positive for bacteria was quarantined and another container with skin samples was sent to the laboratory at a later time point. This was repeated until all cultures were negative. In 1987, 25 donors were processed without using antibiotics. These results were compared with donor skin treated with antibiotics. The average day for first culture was 19.7 ? 17.2. The average percentage of contaminated skin was 10.1? 3.7%. Antibiotics reduced contamination of glycerolised skin from 80% to 10.1%. Glycerol treatment also showed an antibacterial effect as all contaminated skin eventually became negative. Of the contaminated skin Staphylococcus epidermidis was found most frequently: in 70.7 ? 10.8% of the cases. Not all bacteria are equally sensitive to glycerol: Staphylococcus epidennidis contaminated skin became sterile after 48?24 days, whereas for Bacillus species it took 195? 1 37.9 days. We show that glycerol preservation of donor skin has important advantages over conservative methods such as cryopreservation. Initial contamination of the skin is no longer a reason to discard the material. Prolonged storage in glycerol will eliminate bacterial contamination. This allows an increase in yield of at least 10%

  5. Switching field distribution of arrays of Co-Pt Nanodots determined by anomalous hall effect measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delalande, M.; Engelen, J.B.C.; Febre, le A.J.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) measurements have previously been used to measure the magnetization of L10-FePt [1] and Co/Pt multilayer nanodots [2]. The high sensitivity allows us to measure the magnetization reversal behaviour of sub-100-nm dots. In this work, we investigate the magnetization reversa

  6. Anomalous Hall effects in pseudo-single-crystal γ'-Fe4N thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Kokado, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effects (AHE) were investigated at various temperatures for the pseudo-single-crystal Fe4N films, deposited on MgO substrates with changing the degree of order (S) of the nitrogen site. Both the anomalous Hall resistivity and the longitudinal resistivity simply decrease with lowering temperature for all the specimens. The AHE of the Fe4N films is presumed to arise from an intrinsic mechanism because of the relationship between the anomalous Hall resistivity and longitudinal resistivity. The anomalous Hall conductivity, σAH, exhibits a specific behavior at low temperature. In the case of the film with S = 0.93, the σAH drastically drops below 50 K, while it simply increases with lowering temperature in the range of 50-300 K. This low-temperature anomaly decays with decreasing S of the film and nearly vanishes in the films with low S. The threshold temperature and the dependence on S of the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH well correspond to those of the anisotropic magnetoresistance effects in the Fe4N films, reported in the literatures. From these results, it is suggested that the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH originates from the crystal field effect which reflects the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry below 50 K and provides a modulation of the orbital angular momentum of the 3d orbitals at the Fermi level.

  7. Skin Firming, Skin Smoothing, Skin Blemishes Elimination and Anti-aging Effects of Increased Protein Intake in the Form of Voandzeia hypogeal Seed Meal

    OpenAIRE

    Utoh-Nedosa U. Anastasia

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the effect of excess calorie intake on the human body showed that it resulted in accumulation of excess body fat; the darkening of the skin colour and the development of a bumpy skin. Problem statement: The present study investigated the effects of increased protein intake on the human skin and on body fat. The skin firming, skin smoothing and skin colour lightening effects of Vernonia amygdalina leaf extract has already been established. The anti-obesity, body calming and anti-agi...

  8. Quantized topological magnetoelectric effect of the zero-plateau quantum anomalous Hall state

    OpenAIRE

    Jing WANG; Lian, Biao; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Topological magnetoelectric effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator is a novel phenomenon, where an electric field induces a magnetic field in the same direction, with a universal coefficient of proportionality quantized in units of $e^2/2h$. Here we propose that the topological magnetoelectric effect can be realized in the zero-plateau quantum anomalous Hall state of magnetic topological insulators or ferromagnet-topological insulator heterostructure. The finite-size effect is al...

  9. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Guterding; Jeschke, Harald O.; Roser Valentí

    2015-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice M...

  10. Artificial ferroelectricity due to anomalous Hall effect in magnetic tunnel junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Vedyayev, A.; Ryzhanova, N.; Strelkov, N.; Dieny, B

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigated Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) and Spin Hall Effect (SHE) transversally to the insulating spacer O, in magnetic tunnel junctions of the form F/O/F where F are ferromagnetic layers and O represents a tunnel barrier. We considered the case of purely ballistic (quantum mechanical) transport, taking into account the assymetric scattering due to spin-orbit interaction in the tunnel barrier. AHE and SHE in the considered case have a surface nature due to proximity effect....

  11. Skin moisturizing effects of panthenol-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Flávio B; Gaspar, Lorena R; Maia Campos, Patrícia M B G

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the skin moisturizing efficacy of formulations containing different concentrations of panthenol. Formulations supplemented with or without 0.5%, 1.0%, or 5.0% panthenol were applied daily to the forearms of healthy subjects. Skin conditions in terms of moisture and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were analyzed before and after 15- and 30-day periods of application. The formulations were also applied after skin washing with sodium laureth sulphate (SLES) to evaluate the immediate effects on TEWL and skin moisture. Panthenol-containing formulations (1.0% and 5.0%) produced significant decreases in TEWL after 30-day applications. In skin washed with SLES, significant reduction of TEWL was evident two hours after application of formulations loaded with panthenol when compared with control and vehicle. It is concluded that skin integrity is maintained by the improved protective effect of 1.0% panthenol added to the formulation. PMID:21982351

  12. Effect of anomalous plasma transport on radial electric field in torsatron/heliotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous cross field plasma fluxes induced by the electric field fluctuations has been evaluated in a rotating plasma with shear flow in a helical system. The plasma rotation frequency due to the radial electric field makes the Doppler frequency shift which does not explicitly affect the cross field flux. The anomalous ion flux is evaluated by the ion curvature drift resonance continuum in the test particle model. The curvature drift resonance induces a new force term '/ which did not make large influence in the ion flux. The shear flow term in the anomalous flux combined with the electric field in neoclassical flux reduces to a first order differential equation which governs the radial profile of the electric field. A general exact analytical solution for the differential equation is derived and a simple approximate solution for the radial electric field is also given. Numerical results indicate that the shear flow effect is important for the anomalous cross field flux and for determination of the radial electric field particularly in the peripheral region. (author)

  13. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  14. The framing effect and skin conductance responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Ring

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals often rely on simple heuristics when they face complex choice situations under uncertainty. Traditionally, it has been proposed that cognitive processes are the main driver to evaluate different choice options and finally to reach a decision. Growing evidence, however, highlights a strong interrelation between judgment and decision-making (JDM on the one hand, and emotional processes on the other hand. This also seems to apply to judgmental heuristics, i.e. decision-processes that are typically considered to be fast and intuitive. In this study, participants are exposed to different probabilities of receiving an unpleasant electric shock. Information about electric shock probabilities is either positively or negatively framed. Integrated skin conductance responses (ISCRs while waiting for electric shock realization are used as an indicator for participants' emotional arousal. This measure is compared to objective probabilities. I find evidence for a relation between emotional body reactions measured by ISCRs and the framing effect. Under negative frames, participants show significantly higher ISCRs while waiting for an electric shock to be delivered than under positive frames. This result might contribute to a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying JDM. Further studies are necessary to reveal the causality underlying this finding, i.e. whether emotional processes influence JDM or vice versa.

  15. Weak localization and Anomalous Hall Effect in Chemically Disordered L10-Mn1.5Ga

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, L. J.; Pan, D.; J. H. Zhao

    2013-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in perpendicularly magnetized L10-Mn1.5Ga single-crystalline films is investigated as a function of degree of long-range chemical ordering and temperature. Our results provide firm evidence that weak localization, phonons and magnons have negligibly smaller effect on skew scattering contributions to AHE resistivity than defects, the overlook of which in conventional scaling laws results in significant discrepancies and exponent n beyond 2 when fitting the data....

  16. Charge transport in manganites: Hopping conduction, the anomalous Hall effect, and universal scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-temperature Hall resistivity ρxy of La2/3A1/3MnO3 single crystals (where A stands for Ca, Pb, and Ca, or Sr) can be separated into ordinary and anomalous contributions, giving rise to ordinary and anomalous Hall effects, respectively. However, no such decomposition is possible near the Curie temperature which, in these systems, is close to metal-to-insulator transition. Rather, for all of these compounds and to a good approximation, the ρxy data at various temperatures and magnetic fields collapse (up to an overall scale), on to a single function of the reduced magnetization m(equivalent to)M/Msat, the extremum of this function lying at m∼0.4. A mechanism for the anomalous Hall effect in the inelastic hopping regime, which reproduces these scaling curves, is identified. This mechanism, which is an extension of Holstein's model for the ordinary Hall effect in the hopping regime, arises from the combined effects of the double-exchange-induced quantal phase in triads of Mn ions and spin-orbit interactions. We identify processes that lead to the anomalous Hall effect for localized carriers and, along the way, analyze issues of quantum interference in the presence of phonon-assisted hopping. Our results suggest that, near the ferromagnet-to-paramagnet transition, it is appropriate to describe transport in manganites in terms of carrier hopping between states that are localized due to the combined effect of magnetic and nonmagnetic disorder. We attribute the qualitative variations in resistivity characteristics across manganite compounds to the differing strengths of their carrier self-trapping, and conclude that both disorder-induced localization and self-trapping effects are important for transport

  17. Numerical study of effective optical nonlinear properties in composites with anomalous distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the nonlinear optical response of random composites consisting of nonlinear conductors and linear conductors with an anomalous distribution. Random resistor-capacitor networks are used to simulate our model, in which the nonlinear component with the fraction p is taken as i=g1ν+χ1 vertical ν vertical bar2v and the linear component with the fraction 1-p obeys an anomalous distribution h(g2)∼g2-α, where 02<1. We find that the distribution exponent α plays an important role in the effective linear and nonlinear optical response. As α decreases, the enhancement of optical nonlinear χe can be achieved. Moreover, the effective nonlinear optical response exhibits a sharp peak at a moderate volume fraction, dependent on α. The effective medium approximation is found to be in good agreement with linear response of numerical simulation, and describes nonlinear response of our numerical results qualitatively

  18. Finite-volume effects in the muon anomalous magnetic moment on the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Christopher; Blum, Thomas; Chau, Peter; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago; Tu, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    We investigate finite-volume effects in the hadronic vacuum polarization, with an eye toward the corresponding systematic error in the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We consider both recent lattice data as well as lowest-order, finite-volume chiral perturbation theory, in order to get a quantitative understanding. Even though leading-order chiral perturbation theory does not provide a good description of the hadronic vacuum polarization, it turns out that it gives a good representation of finite-volume effects. We find that finite-volume effects cannot be ignored when the aim is a few percent level accuracy for the leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment, even when using ensembles with mπL ≳4 and mπ˜200 MeV .

  19. Finite-volume effects in the muon anomalous magnetic moment on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, Christopher; Chau, Peter; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago; Tu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate finite-volume effects in the hadronic vacuum polarization, with an eye toward the corresponding systematic error in the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We consider both recent lattice data as well as lowest-order, finite-volume chiral perturbation theory, in order to get a quantitative understanding. Even though leading-order chiral perturbation theory does not provide a good description of the hadronic vacuum polarization, it turns out that it gives a reasonably good representation of finite-volume effects. We find that finite-volume effects cannot be ignored when the aim is a few percent level accuracy for the leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment, even when using ensembles with $m_\\pi L> 4$ and $m_\\pi \\sim 200$ MeV.

  20. Anomalous effective charges and far-IR optical absorption of Al2Ru from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the orthorhombic intermetallic semiconductor Al2Ru, the band structure, valence charge density, zone-center optical-phonon frequencies, and Born effective-charge and electronic dielectric tensors are calculated using variational density-functional perturbation theory with ab initio pseudopotentials and a plane-wave basis set. Good agreement is obtained with recent measurements on polycrystalline samples, which showed anomalously strong far-IR absorption by optical phonons, while analysis of the valence charge density shows that the static ionic charges of Al and Ru are negligible. Hybridization is proposed as the single origin both of the semiconducting gap and the anomalous Born effective charges. Analogous behavior is expected in related compounds such as NiSnZr, PbTe, skutterudites, and Al-transition-metal quasicrystals. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Effecting skin renewal: a multifaceted approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widgerow, Alan D; Grekin, Steven K

    2011-06-01

    The skin undergoes intrinsic aging as a normal course, but exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light results in major cumulative damage that manifests as the typical aged photodamaged skin. UV irradiation produces a sequence of changes within the skin layers starting with signaling processes following DNA damage and culminating in nonabsorbed fragmentation of collagen and other proteins within the extracellular matrix. These fragments promote the synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that further aggravate the damage to the ground substance and add to fragment accumulation. This study describes a unique sequential approach to controlling this photodamage - inhibition of signaling, inhibition of MMPs, proteasome stimulation and mopping up of fragments, stimulation of procollagen and collagen production, and uniform packaging of new collagen fibers. Thus, a multifaceted approach is introduced with presentation of a unique product formulation based on these research principles. PMID:21649818

  2. FALLOUT RADIATION: EFFECTS ON THE SKIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R. A.; Cronkite, E. P.; Bond, V. P.

    1963-02-06

    Until recently it has been generally assumed that injury to the skin from ionizing radiation was not a serious hazard associated with the detonation of nuclear dcvices. However, in 1954 the importance of this hazard became apparent when widespread lesions of the skin developed in a large group of people accidentally exposed to fallout radiation in the Marshall Islands following the experimental detonation of a large nuclear device. The accident in the Marshall Islands affords an example of large numbers of lesions of the skin in human beings from the fallout. Studies have been documented and will be referred to frequently in this chapter. The possibility of such accidents must be considered seriously in view of the increasingly widespread use of radioisotopes.

  3. CONVECTIVE DRYING OF CHERRY TOMATO: STUDY OF SKIN EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. KHAMA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A whole single cherry tomato was dried in a forced convective micro-dryer. The experiments were carried out at constant air velocity and humidity and temperatures of 50, 60, 70 °C. In order to study the effect of the skin, two sets of experiments were performed using a tomato with and without skin (easily removed. Shorter drying times were obtained when increasing drying temperatures as well as when removing sample skin. X-ray microtomography, a non-destructive 3D imaging technique was used to follow shrinkage of the samples. This phenomenon was introduced in the modelling part of this study. Analytical solutions of the Fick’law were used to determine the diffusion coefficient at the three temperatures studied, and then the activation energy was obtained through fitting the Arrhenius equation. The skin effect was clearly evidenced by showing that the mass transfer parameter values of an original tomato with skin were largely smaller than the one without skin. Indeed, the moisture effective diffusivity ranged from 2.56×10-11 to 7.67×10-11 m2·s-1 with activation energy of 50430 J·mol-1 for tomato with skin an ranged from 4.59×10-10 m2·s-1 to 6.73×10-10 m2·s-1 with activation energy of 17640 J.mol-1 for tomato without skin.

  4. Revisiting the Anomalous rf Field Penetration into a Warm Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-frequency [rf] waves do not penetrate into a plasma and are damped within it. The electric field of the wave and plasma current are concentrated near the plasma boundary in a skin layer. Electrons can transport the plasma current away from the skin layer due to their thermal motion. As a result, the width of the skin layer increases when electron temperature effects are taken into account. This phenomenon is called anomalous skin effect. The anomalous penetration of the rf electric field occurs not only for transversely propagating to the plasma boundary wave (inductively coupled plasmas) but also for the wave propagating along the plasma boundary (capacitively coupled plasmas). Such anomalous penetration of the rf field modifies the structure of the capacitive sheath. Recent advances in the nonlinear, non-local theory of the capacitive sheath are reported. It is shown that separating the electric field profile into exponential and non-exponential parts yields an efficient qualitative and quantitative description of the anomalous skin effect in both inductively and capacitively coupled plasma

  5. Critical Review of Theoretical Models for Anomalous Effects (Cold Fusion) in Deuterated Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Chechin, V. A.; Tsarev, V. A.; Rabinowitz, M; Kim, Y. E.

    2003-01-01

    We briefly summarize the reported anomalous effects in deuterated metals at ambient temperature, commonly known as "Cold Fusion" (CF), with an emphasis on important experiments as well as the theoretical basis for the opposition to interpreting them as cold fusion. Then we critically examine more than 25 theoretical models for CF, including unusual nuclear and exotic chemical hypotheses. We conclude that they do not explain the data.

  6. Critical Review of Theoretical Models for Anomalous Effects (Cold Fusion) in Deuterated Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Chechin, V A; Rabinowitz, M; Kim, Y E

    1994-01-01

    We briefly summarize the reported anomalous effects in deuterated metals at ambient temperature, commonly known as "Cold Fusion" (CF), with an emphasis on important experiments as well as the theoretical basis for the opposition to interpreting them as cold fusion. Then we critically examine more than 25 theoretical models for CF, including unusual nuclear and exotic chemical hypotheses. We conclude that they do not explain the data.

  7. Semiclassical origin of anomalous shell effect for tetrahedral deformation in radial power-law potential model

    CERN Document Server

    Arita, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Shell structures in single-particle energy spectra are investigated against regular tetrahedral type deformation using radial power-law potential model. Employing a natural way of shape parametrization which interpolate sphere and regular tetrahedron, we find prominent shell effects at rather large tetrahedral deformations, which bring about shell energies much larger than the cases of spherical and quadrupole type shapes. We discuss the semiclassical origin of these anomalous shell structures using periodic orbit theory.

  8. 3d Transition Metal Adsorption Induced Vally-polarized Anomalous Hall Effect in Germanene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, P; Sun, L. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Based on DFT+U and Berry curvature calculations, we study the electronic structures and topological properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atom (from Ti to Co) adsorbed germanene (TM-germanene). We find that valley-polarized anomalous hall effect (VAHE) can be realized in germanene by adsorbing Cr, Mn, or Co atom on its surface. A finite valley hall voltage can be easily detected in its nanoribbon, which is important for valleytronics devices. Moreover, different valley-polarized current and ...

  9. Nonadiabatic Effects in Ultracold Molecules via Anomalous Linear and Quadratic Zeeman Shifts

    OpenAIRE

    McGuyer, B. H.; Osborn, C. B.; McDonald, M.; Reinaudi, G.; Skomorowski, W.; Moszynski, R.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2013-01-01

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold $^{88}$Sr$_2$ molecules near the intercombination-line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to nearby opposite $f$-parity states and exhibit fourth...

  10. Anomalous effective action, Noether current, Virasoro algebra and Horizon entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several investigations show that in a very small length scale there exist corrections to the entropy of black hole horizon. Due to fluctuations of the background metric and the external fields the action incorporates corrections. In the low energy regime, the one-loop effective action in four dimensions leads to trace anomaly. We start from the Noether current corresponding to the Einstein-Hilbert plus the one-loop effective action to calculate the charge for the diffeomorphisms which preserve the Killing horizon structure. Then a bracket for the charges is calculated. We show that the Fourier modes of the bracket are exactly similar to the Virasoro algebra. Then using the Cardy formula the entropy is evaluated. Finally, the explicit terms of the entropy expression is calculated for a classical background. It turns out that the usual expression for the entropy; i.e. the Bekenstein-Hawking form, is not modified. (orig.)

  11. Anomalously increased effective thermal conductivities of ethylene glycol-based nanofluids containing copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that a ''nanofluid'' consisting of copper nanometer-sized particles dispersed in ethylene glycol has a much higher effective thermal conductivity than either pure ethylene glycol or ethylene glycol containing the same volume fraction of dispersed oxide nanoparticles. The effective thermal conductivity of ethylene glycol is shown to be increased by up to 40% for a nanofluid consisting of ethylene glycol containing approximately 0.3 vol% Cu nanoparticles of mean diameter <10 nm. The results are anomalous based on previous theoretical calculations that had predicted a strong effect of particle shape on effective nanofluid thermal conductivity, but no effect of either particle size or particle thermal conductivity

  12. Evidence for Anomalous Effects on the Current Evolution in Tokamak Operating Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casper, T; Jayakumar, R; Allen, S; Holcomb, C; Makowski, M; Pearlstein, L; Berk, H; Greenfield, C; Luce, T; Petty, C; Politzer, P; Wade, M; Murakami, M; Kessel, C

    2006-10-03

    Alternatives to the usual picture of advanced tokamak (AT) discharges are those that form when anomalous effects alter the plasma current and pressure profiles and those that achieve stationary characteristics through mechanisms so that a measure of desired AT features is maintained without external current-profile control. Regimes exhibiting these characteristics are those where the safety factor (q) evolves to a stationary profile with the on-axis and minimum q {approx} 1 and those with a deeply hollow current channel and high values of q. Operating scenarios with high fusion performance at low current and where the inductively driven current density achieves a stationary configuration with either small or non-existing sawteeth may enhance the neutron fluence per pulse on ITER and future burning plasmas. Hollow current profile discharges exhibit high confinement and a strong ''box-like'' internal transport barrier (ITB). We present results providing evidence for current profile formation and evolution exhibiting features consistent with anomalous effects or with self-organizing mechanisms. Determination of the underlying physical processes leading to these anomalous effects is important for scaling of current experiments for application in future burning plasmas.

  13. Giant Anomalous Hall Effect in the Chiral Antiferromagnet Mn3Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, Naoki; Tomita, Takahiro; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    The external field control of antiferromagnetism is a significant subject both for basic science and technological applications. As a useful macroscopic response to detect magnetic states, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is known for ferromagnets, but it has never been observed in antiferromagnets until the recent discovery in Mn3Sn . Here we report another example of the AHE in a related antiferromagnet, namely, in the hexagonal chiral antiferromagnet Mn3Ge . Our single-crystal study reveals that Mn3Ge exhibits a giant anomalous Hall conductivity |σx z|˜60 Ω-1 cm-1 at room temperature and approximately 380 Ω-1 cm-1 at 5 K in zero field, reaching nearly half of the value expected for the quantum Hall effect per atomic layer with Chern number of unity. Our detailed analyses on the anisotropic Hall conductivity indicate that in comparison with the in-plane-field components |σx z| and |σz y|, which are very large and nearly comparable in size, we find |σy x| obtained in the field along the c axis to be much smaller. The anomalous Hall effect shows a sign reversal with the rotation of a small magnetic field less than 0.1 T. The soft response of the AHE to magnetic field should be useful for applications, for example, to develop switching and memory devices based on antiferromagnets.

  14. Anomalous piezoelectric effects, found in the laboratory and reconstructed by numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Teisseyre

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Various rocks and minerals, which are not piezoelectric in the common sense, exhibit transient electric polarization in response to sudden changes in stress load. This anomalous piezoelectric effect differs from the regular, static piezoelectric response, in which electric charges appear as a result of crystal lattice deformation. The anomalous piezoelectricity is dynamic decaying in a few seconds or a few tens of seconds. However, in some materials different polarization properties are discovered. To explain certain aspects of the polarization signal increase and decay, some complicated mechanisms of electric charge generation and relaxation need to be assumed in their number ? concurrence of two or three relaxation processes. The hypothetical mechanisms are only mentioned, as the purpose of this work is to construct numerical models, behaving like the rocks investigated. Examples of experimental plots are shown together with the results of the numerical simulation of these experiments.

  15. Anomalous x-ray scattering: Relativistic effects in x-ray dispersion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayleigh scattering by bound electrons is reduced from the free-electron Thomson value at x-ray wavelengths by relativistic effects. To first order this arises from the relativistic increase in mass of the core electrons. The reduction is overestimated by more than a factor of 2 by the commonly used dipole approximation. Inclusion of higher multipole and retardation terms in dispersion analysis resolves reported conflicts between values of the anomalous scattering factor as measured interferometrically and as calculated from attenuation measurements. These considerations further imply that several scattering-factor tabulations in current use for diffraction studies require revision to take relativity fully into account. This correction is particularly significant in regions of anomalous dispersion and at low energies, where the scattering factor is small relative to the atomic number

  16. Origin of enhanced anomalous Hall effect in ultrathin Pt/permalloy bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Q. Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There are two mechanisms which could enhance spin-dependent scattering in a low dimensional Pt/Ferromagnetic metal structure. One is magnetic proximity effect. The other is spin orbit coupling proximity effect which was suggested recently. This work demonstrates that, through a series of experiments on anomalous Hall effect, the spin orbit coupling proximity effect dominates the enhancement in very thin Pt/Permalloy bilayers. It may help to find a way to optimize magnetic transport property of spintronics devices in which the spin orbit coupling is deeply involved.

  17. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  18. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ajaya K; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)(-1) at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)(-1) at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)(-1), comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect-based data storage devices. PMID:27152355

  19. Effects of Neutron Skin Thickness in Peripheral Nuclear Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG De-Qing; MA Yu-Gang; CAI Xiang-Zhou; TIAN Wen-Dong; WANG Hong-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Effects of neutron skin thickness in peripheral nuclear collisions are investigated using the statistical abrasion ablation (SAA) model. The reaction cross section, neutron (proton) removal cross section, one-neutron (proton) removal cross section as well as their ratios for nuclei with different neutron skin thickness are studied. It is demonstrated that there are good linear correlations between these observables and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. The ratio between the (one-)neutron and proton removal cross section is found to be the most sensitive observable of neutron skin thickness. Analysis shows that the relative increase of this ratio could be used to determine the neutron skin size in neutron-rich nuclei.%Effects of neutron skin thickness in peripheral nuclear collisions are investigated using the statistical abrasion ablation (SAA ) model.The reaction cross section,neutron (proton) removal cross section,one-neutron (proton) removal cross section as well as their ratios for nuclei with different neutron skin thickness are studied.It is demonstrated that there are good linear correlations between these observables and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei.The ratio between the (one-)neutron and proton removal cross section is found to be the most sensitive observable of neutron skin thickness.Analysis shows that the relative increase of this ratio could be used to determine the neutron skin size in neutron-rich nuclei.Determining the size and shape of a nucleus is one of the most important subjects since the discovery of atomic nuclei.The rms radii of the neutron (rn) and proton (rp) density distributions are among the most prominent observables for this purpose.Studies for stable nuclei have shown that the nuclear radii are proportional to A1/3,with A being the nuclear mass number.Meanwhile,the density distributions of neutrons and protons in stable nuclei are very similar.

  20. Effect of Terpenes on the Skin Permeation of Ketoprofen through Shed Snake Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Hilal Bilek; Nanthida Wonglertnirant; Tanasait Ngawhirunpat; Praneet Opanasopit; Mont Kumpugdee -Vollrath

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of hydrocarbon (α-pinene and limonene) and oxygen containing monoterpenes (carvone and terpineole) at 5%w/v in hydroalcoholic mixtures (50% ethanol) on the permeation of ketoprofen across shed snake skin of Python molurus bivittatus. The amount of KP retained in the skin after 8 h of diffusion was determined. It was found that the percutaneous absorption of ketoprofen was enhanced in the presence of the enhancers. The rank order of enha...

  1. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg$_{1-y}$Mn$_{y}$Te Quantum Wells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg$_{1-y}$Mn$_{y}$Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the $Mn$ atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predi...

  2. When effective theories predict: the inevitability of Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, James D

    2012-01-01

    If the concepts underlying Effective Theory were appreciated from the earliest days of Newtonian gravity, Le Verrier's announcement in 1845 of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury would have been no surprise. Furthermore, the size of the effect could have been anticipated through "naturalness" arguments well before the definitive computation in General Relativity. Thus, we have an illustration of how Effective Theory concepts can guide us in extending our knowledge to "new physics", and not just in how to reduce larger theories to restricted (e.g., lower energy) domains.

  3. Anomalous coupling, top-mass and parton-shower effects in W + W - production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellm, J.; Gieseke, S.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.; Plätzer, S.; Reuschle, C.; von Soden-Fraunhofen, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the process ppto {W}+{W}-to {e}+{ν}_e{μ}-{overline{ν}}_{μ } at NLO QCD, including also effective field theory (EFT) operators mediating the ggW + W - interaction, which first occur at dimension eight. We further combine the NLO and EFT matrix elements produced by G oS am with the H erwig7/M atchbox framework, which offers the possibility to study the impact of a parton shower. We assess the effects of the anomalous couplings by comparing them to top-mass effects as well as uncertainties related to variations of the renormalisation, factorisation and hard shower scales.

  4. Polarization of free electrons by means of resonance microwave pumping using normal and anomalous doppler effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of electron polarization by pumping the electron spin resonance (ESR), using a running wave with a phase velocity close to the electron beam velocity,is proposed. Repeatedly alternating pumping by the following wave and by the counter wave, it is possible to realize nearly full electron polarization. Similar,and even more effective, this method can make electron polarization using alternation of a normal Doppler effect on the following wave (thus the wave phase velocity exceeds the velocity of the beam) and an anomalous Doppler effect on the following wave too (when, on the contrary, the velocity of the beam exceeds the phase velocity of the wave)

  5. Ice Ih anomalies: Thermal contraction, anomalous volume isotope effect, and pressure-induced amorphization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Michael A.; Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Hirata, So

    2016-05-01

    Ice Ih displays several anomalous thermodynamic properties such as thermal contraction at low temperatures, an anomalous volume isotope effect (VIE) rendering the volume of D2O ice greater than that of H2O ice, and a pressure-induced transition to the high-density amorphous (HDA) phase. Furthermore, the anomalous VIE increases with temperature, despite its quantum-mechanical origin. Here, embedded-fragment ab initio second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theory in the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) is applied to the Gibbs energy of an infinite, proton-disordered crystal of ice Ih at wide ranges of temperatures and pressures. The quantum effect of nuclei moving in anharmonic potentials is taken into account from first principles without any empirical or nonsystematic approximation to either the electronic or vibrational Hamiltonian. MP2 predicts quantitatively correctly the thermal contraction at low temperatures, which is confirmed to originate from the volume-contracting hydrogen-bond bending modes (acoustic phonons). It qualitatively reproduces (but underestimates) the thermal expansion at higher temperatures, caused by the volume-expanding hydrogen-bond stretching (and to a lesser extent librational) modes. The anomalous VIE is found to be the result of subtle cancellations among closely competing isotope effects on volume from all modes. Consequently, even ab initio MP2 with the aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets has difficulty reproducing this anomaly, yielding qualitatively varied predictions of the sign of the VIE depending on such computational details as the choice of the embedding field. However, the temperature growth of the anomalous VIE is reproduced robustly and is ascribed to the librational modes. These solid-state MP2 calculations, as well as MP2 Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, find a volume collapse and a loss of symmetry and long-range order in ice Ih upon pressure loading of 2.35 GPa or higher. Concomitantly, rapid softening of

  6. Spin Seebeck Effect vs. Anomalous Nernst Effect in Ta/CoFeB /Ta Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bowen; Xu, Yadong; Schneider, Mike; Shi, Jing; Univ of California-Riverside Team; Everspin Technologies Inc. Team

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) in a vertical trilayer structure under a vertical temperature gradient. The structure consists of a 3nm CoFeB layer sandwiched by β-phase tantalum (Ta) layers. The samples are deposited by magnetron sputtering. The existence of Ta β-phase is verified by the resistivity and its negative temperature coefficient of resistance(TCR). Under a fixed vertical temperature gradient, the measured transverse thermoelectric voltage is linearly proportional to the total sample resistance when the Ta thickness exceeds 2 nm, which can be explained by a shunting resistor model. When the Ta thickness is below 2 nm, the voltage deviates from the linear resistance dependence and merges to the ANE voltage of the CoFeB single layer, due to a weakened inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in Ta thinner than the spin diffusion length. In the linear regime, the slope contains both a varying SSE and a fixed ANE responses, thus the SSE contribution could be quantitatively separated out from the ANE of CoFeB. Our results indicate a large SSE from the β-phase Ta due to its large Spin Hall Angle. This work was supported by CNN/DMEA and DOE.

  7. Measurement of the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in a 2D hole system with Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anomalous Hall effect of two-dimensional holes in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure was measured under a slightly tilted-from-parallel magnetic field (B). In addition to the dominant ordinary Hall resistivity, which is linear in B, there is a small anomalous Hall resistivity correlated with the perpendicular spin magnetization of the holes due to the subband depopulation. When the anomalous Hall conductivity (σAxy) is extracted from the experimental data, it exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on B, a behavior expected for the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in the 2D Rashba model. If σAxy is plotted as a function of the longitudinal conductivity (σxx), an intrinsic region in which σAxy is almost constant and is several tenths of e2/h for σxx of several tens of e2/h is identified.

  8. Anomalous Josephson Effect in Junctions with Rashba Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, Konstantin; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia

    2015-03-01

    We study two-dimensional double-barrier SINIS Josephson junctions in which the inversion symmetry in the normal part is broken by Rashba spin-orbit coupling. In the presence of a suitably oriented Zeeman field in the normal part, the system displays the anomalous Josephson effect: the current is nonzero even at zero phase difference between two superconductors. We investigate this effect by means of the Ginzburg-Landau formalism and microscopic Green's functions approach in the clean limit. This work was supported in part by the Grants No. ANR-12-BS04-0016-03 and an EU-FP7 Marie Curie IRG.

  9. Anomalous acoustic effect during martensitic transformations in titanium nickelide base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One carried out experiments to determine effect of external static stress on martensitic transformations and acoustic emission, Martensitic transformations in titanium nickelide base alloys under mechanical stress were determined to change nature of acoustic emission to anomalous one - cycling of transformations under gradual increase of mechanical stress during direct martensitic transformation was followed by increase of acoustic emission energy instead of reduction. The mentioned nature of acoustic emission is indicative of essential effect of external stress on martensitic transformations and energy dissipation during transformations

  10. Inverted effective SUSY with combined Z' and gravity mediation, and muon anomalous magnetic moment

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jihn E.

    2012-01-01

    Effective supersymmetry(SUSY) where stop is the lightest squark may run into a two-loop tachyonic problem in some Z' mediation models. In addition, a large A term or/and a large stop mass are needed to have about a 126 GeV Higgs boson with three families of quarks and leptons. Thus, we suggest an inverted effective SUSY(IeffSUSY) where stop mass is larger compared to those of the first two families. In this case, it is possible to have a significant correction to the anomalous magnetic moment...

  11. The effect of skin thermistor fixation method on weighted mean skin temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of three different skin thermistor attachment methods on weighted mean skin temperature (WMTsk) at three different ambient temperatures (∼24 °C (TEMP); ∼30 °C (WARM); ∼35 °C (HOT)) compared to uncovered thermistors. Eleven, non-acclimated, volunteers completed three 5 min bouts of submaximal cycling (∼70 W mechanical work)—one at each environmental condition in sequential order (TEMP, WARM, HOT). One thermistor was fixed to the sternal notch whilst four skin thermistors were spaced at 3 cm intervals on each of the sites on the limbs as per the formula of Ramanathan (1964 J. Appl. Physiol. 19 531–3). Each thermistor was either held against the skin uncovered (UC) or attached with surgical acrylic film dressing (T); surgical acrylic film dressing and hypoallergenic surgical tape (TT) or surgical acrylic film dressing, hypoallergenic surgical tape and surgical bandage (TTC). The WMTsk calculated was significantly lower in UC compared to T, TT and TTC (p < 0.001, d = 0.46), in T compared to TT and TTC (p < 0.001, d = 0.33) and in TT compared to TTC (p < 0.001; d = 0.25). The mean differences (across the three temperatures) were + 0.27 ±0.34 °C, + 0.52 ± 0.35 °C and + 0.82 ± 0.34 °C for T, TT and TTC, respectively. The results demonstrate that the method of skin thermistor attachment can result in the significant over-estimation of weighted mean skin temperature

  12. Relation between the structure and catalytic activity for automotive emissions. Use of x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuki, J; Tanaka, H

    2003-01-01

    The employment of the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect allows us to detect the change in structure of catalytic converters with the environment exposed. Here we show that palladium atoms in a perovskite crystal move into and out of the crystal by anomalous X-ray diffraction and absorption techniques. This movement of the precious metal plays an important role to keep the catalytic activity long-lived. (author)

  13. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young, E-mail: parksy@kbsi.re.kr [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  14. Effect of Surfactant Mixtures on Skin Structure and Barrier Properties

    OpenAIRE

    James-Smith, Monica A.; Hellner, Brittney; Annunziato, Nancy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of two commonly studied surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (C12TAB), on skin barrier properties. Using skin conductivity, FT-IR of stratum corneum samples, and penetration of radiolabelled SDS, we determined that addition of C12TAB lowers the ability of SDS to perturb skin’s barrier properties. Ultrafiltration experiments revealed that addition of C12TAB serves to decrease the concentration of monomers and sub-micellar ag...

  15. Effect of Skin Removal from Spherical Fruits and Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, F. A.; Abbas, K A; D. Mat Hashim; S. M. Sapuan

    2007-01-01

    Apple, orange and potato samples were exposed to chilled air blast, first with their natural skin and then after removal of the skin and transient temperature-time variations were recorded at the center. This data record was used to determine the thermal diffusivity of each produce sample by the empirical approach of the first author and his co-workers. Thermal diffusivity was found to be higher than the literature value. This is due to additional cooling effect resulting from desiccation of ...

  16. Effect of radiation on reconstitution of skin equivalent (dermal alterations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermal equivalents have been treated by single doses of gamma irradiation of 10, 20, 30 and 50 Gray. Numerations at different times show a dose and time dependant diminution of cellular population. This diminution is histologically observed in dermal part of reconstituted skin, in association with cellular and functional alterations of fibroblast cells. Modifications of epidermal epithelia are also noted in some reconstituted skin. This model would be useful to apprehend the effect of a dermal irradiation lesion on the later epidermization. (author)

  17. Effects of uranium compounds on skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following uranium compounds were topically applied to the dorsal skin of 35 day-old Wistar rats (60 g, male): uranium dioxide, uranyl nitrate, uranyl acetate, ammonium uranyl tricarbonate and ammonium diuranate. Percutaneous absorption was mediated with the aid of a vehicle and known quantities of various particle-sized batches of uranium compounds were directly implanted in the subcutaneous tissue. Animals were sacrificed 3, 6, 24 and 48 hours after implantation. Subcutaneous tissue and muscle underneath the implantation site were anlaysed by light and electron microscopy. A Cameca 322 X-ray microanalyzer was used to analyze uranium traces in calcified tissue (bones and teeth) and kidneys. A steady loss in body weight was observed in animals given high concentration of uranyl nitrate and ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. All animals died five days after the onset of the experiment due to renal failure. Slightly soluble compounds, ammonium diuranate and uranyl acetate, caused only a slight decrease in body weight. Uranium dioxide, the most insoluble compound used, induced only a transitory slight body weight decrease. Histopathological study revealed damages to the tissues of topicated skin, hair follicles and adnexal glands. High concentration of uranium was indicated in bone, teeth and kidneys by X-ray scanning

  18. Effect of anomalous vertex on decay-lepton distributions in + -→ t\\overline{t}$ and CP-violating asymmetries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurabh D Rindani

    2000-06-01

    We obtain analytic expressions for the energy and polar-angle double differential distributions of a secondary lepton +(-) arising from the decay of ($\\overline{t}$) in + - → $t\\overline{t}$ with an anomalous decay vertex. We also obtain analytic expressions for the various differential cross-sections with the lepton energy integrat ed over. In this case, we find that the angular distributions of the secondary lepton do not depend on the anomalous coupling in the decay, regardless of possible anomalous couplings occurring in the production amplitude for + - → $t\\overline{t}$. Our study includes the effect of longitudinal - and + beam polarization. We also study the lepton energy and beam polarization dependence of certain CP-violating lepton angular asymmetries arising from an anomalous decay vertex and compare them with the asymmetries arising due to CP-violation in the production process due to the top electric or weak dipole moment.

  19. From magnetically doped topological insulator to the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ke; Ma Xu-Cun; Chen Xi; Lü Li; Wang Ya-Yu; Xue Qi-Kun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE),as a class of quantum phenomena that occur in macroscopic scale,is one of the most important topics in condensed matter physics.It has long been expected that QHE may occur without Landau levels so that neither extemal magnetic field nor high sample mobility is required for its study and application.Such a QHE free of Landau levels,can appear in topological insulators (TIs) with ferromagnetism as the quantized version of the anomalous Hall effect,i.e.,quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect.Here we review our recent work on experimental realization of the QAH effect in magnetically doped TIs.With molecular beam epitaxy,we prepare thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 TIs with wellcontrolled chemical potential and long-range ferromagnetic order that can survive the insulating phase.In such thin films,we eventually observed the quantization of the Hall resistance at h/e2 at zero field,accompanied by a considerable drop in the longitudinal resistance.Under a strong magnetic field,the longitudinal resistance vanishes,whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value.The realization of the QAH effect provides a foundation for many other novel quantum phenomena predicted in TIs,and opens a route to practical applications of quantum Hall physics in low-power-consumption electronics.

  20. Experimental research of electron beam instability on the Doppler anomalous effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam instability caused by the Doppler anomalous effect (DAE) at electron beam interaction with the decelerating electrodynamic system (a resonator with a single-thread spiral and a resonator with a space-periodic structure) placed in the external homogeneous field are studied experimentally to investigate main mechanisms of instability of charged particle beams. Such general properties of DAE as resonance conditions for instability excitation, increase of the internal energy of oscillators (Larmor and Langmuir) during radiation, energy ratios for slow cyclotron and plasma waves of an electron beam are studied. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical results is obtained

  1. 3d Transition Metal Adsorption Induced the valley-polarized Anomalous Hall Effect in Germanene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P.; Sun, L. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Based on DFT + U and Berry curvature calculations, we study the electronic structures and topological properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atom (from Ti to Co) adsorbed germanene (TM-germanene). We find that valley-polarized anomalous Hall effect (VAHE) can be realized in germanene by adsorbing Cr, Mn, or Co atoms on its surface. A finite valley Hall voltage can be easily detected in their nanoribbon, which is important for valleytronics devices. Moreover, different valley-polarized current and even reversible valley Hall voltage can be archived by shifting the Fermi energy of the systems. Such versatile features of the systems show potential in next generation electronics devices.

  2. Evidence of local effects in anomalous refraction and focusing properties of dodecagonal photonic quasicrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Di Gennaro, Emiliano; Savo, Salvatore; Andreone, Antonello; Morello, Davide; Galdi, Vincenzo; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    We present the key results from a comprehensive study of the refraction and focusing properties of a two-dimensional dodecagonal photonic ``quasicrystal'' (PQC), carried out via both full-wave numerical simulations and microwave measurements on a slab made of alumina rods inserted in a parallel-plate waveguide. We observe anomalous refraction and focusing in several frequency regions, confirming some recently published results. However, our interpretation, based on numerical and experimental evidence, differs substantially from the one in terms of ``effective negative refractive-index'' that was originally proposed. Instead, our study highlights the critical role played by short-range interactions associated with local order and symmetry.

  3. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-01

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. We propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  4. Global Constraints on Anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings in the Effective Field Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Adam; González-Alonso, Martín; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of LHC Higgs data (signal strengths) together with LEP-2 W W production measurements. To characterize possible deviations from the standard model (SM) predictions, we employ the framework of an effective field theory (EFT) where the SM is extended by higher-dimensional operators suppressed by the mass scale of new physics Λ . The analysis is performed consistently at the order Λ-2 in the EFT expansion keeping all the relevant operators. While the two data sets suffer from flat directions, together they impose stringent model-independent constraints on the anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  5. Anomalous transport model study of chiral magnetic effects in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yifeng; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Using an anomalous transport model for massless quarks, we study the effect of magnetic field on the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks in relativistic heavy ion collisions. With initial conditions from a blast wave model and assuming that the strong magnetic field produced in non-central heavy ion collisions can last for a sufficiently long time, we obtain an appreciable electric quadrupole moment in the transverse plane of a heavy ion collision, which subsequently leads to a splitting between the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks as expected from the chiral magnetic wave formed in the produced QGP and observed in experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  6. Anomalous Hall effect of heavy holes in Ⅲ-Ⅴ semiconductor quantum wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Gang; Zhang Ping

    2007-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect of heavy holes in semiconductor quantum wells is studied in the intrinsic transport regime, where the Berry curvature governs the Hall current properties. Based on the first-order perturbation of wave function the expression of the Hall conductivity the same as that from the semiclassical equation of motion of the Bloch particles is derived. The dependence of Hall conductivity on the system parameters is shown. The amplitude of Hall conductivity is found to be balanced by a competition between the Zeeman splitting and the spin-orbit splitting.

  7. Nonadiabatic effects in ultracold molecules via anomalous linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuyer, B H; Osborn, C B; McDonald, M; Reinaudi, G; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2013-12-13

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold 88Sr2 molecules near the intercombination-line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to nearby opposite f-parity states and exhibit fourth-order corrections, providing a stringent test of a state-of-the-art ab initio model. PMID:24483652

  8. Measurement of Nonadiabatic Effects in Ultracold Molecules via Anomalous Linear and Quadratic Zeeman Shifts

    CERN Document Server

    McGuyer, B H; McDonald, M; Reinaudi, G; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2013-01-01

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold $^{88}$Sr$_2$ molecules near the intercombination line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to fourth-order contributions and to nearby opposite $f$-parity states, and provide a stringent test of a state-of-the-art ab initio model.

  9. Characterization of ionizing radiation effects on human skin allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The skin has a fundamental role in the viability of the human body. In the cases of extensive wounds, allograft skin provides an alternative to cover temporarily the damaged areas. After donor screening and preservation in glycerol (above 85%), the skin can be stored in the Skin Banks. The glycerol at this concentration has a bacteriostatic effect after certain time of preservation. On the other hand, skin sterilization by ionizing radiation may reduces the quarantine period for transplantation in patients and its safety is considered excellent. The objectives of this work were to establish procedures using two sources of ionizing radiation for sterilization of human skin allograft, and to evaluate the skin after gamma and electron beam irradiation. The analysis of stress-strain intended to verify possible effects of the radiation on the structure of preserved grafts. Skin samples were submitted to doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy in an irradiator of 60Co and in an electron beam accelerator. Morphology and ultra-structure studies were also accomplished. The samples irradiated with a dose of 25 kGy seemed to maintain the bio mechanic characteristics. The gamma irradiated samples with a dose of 50 kGy and submitted to an electron beam at doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy presented significant differences in the values of the elasticity modulus, in relation to the control. The analysis of the ultramicrographies revealed modifications in the structure and alterations in the pattern of collagen fibrils periodicity of the irradiated samples. (author)

  10. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M W [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range {approx}66 {mu}m) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range {approx}44 {mu}m). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 {mu}m. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is restricted to the

  11. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range ∼66 μm) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range ∼44 μm). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 μm. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is restricted to the epidermis does not

  12. Skin Effect in Electromagnetism and Asymptotic Behaviour of Skin Depth for High Conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Péron, Victor; Caloz, Gabriel; Dauge, Monique; Faou, Erwan

    2010-01-01

    International audience We study a three-dimensional model for the skin effect in electromagnetism. The 3-D case of the Maxwell equations in harmonic regime on a domain composed of a dielectric and of a highly conducting material is considered. We derive an asymptotic expansion with respect to a small parameter related to high conductivity. This expansion is theoretically justified at any order. The asymptotic expansion and numerical simulations in axisymmetric geometry exhibit the influenc...

  13. Large anomalous Hall effect in Pt interfaced with perpendicular anisotropy ferrimagnetic insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi; Sellappan, Pathikumar; Liu, Yawen; Garay, Javier; Shi, Jing; Shines Team

    We demonstrate the strain induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a ferrimagnetic insulator (FMI), Tm3Fe5O12 (TIG) and the first observation of large anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in TIG/Pt bilayers. Atomically flat TIG films were deposited by a laser molecular beam epitaxy system on (111)-orientated substituted gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. The strength of PMA could be effectively tuned by controlling the oxygen pressure during deposition. Sharp squared anomalous Hall hysteresis loops were observed in bilayers of TIG/Pt over a range of thicknesses of Pt, with the maximum AHE conductivity reaching 1 S/cm at room temperature. The AHE vanishes when a 5 nm Cu layer was inserted between Pt and TIG, strongly indicating the proximity-induced ferromagnetism in Pt. The large AHE in the bilayer structures demonstrates a potential use of PMA-FMI related heterostructures in spintronics. This work was supported as part of the SHINES, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # SC0012670.

  14. Effect of glove occlusion on the skin barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedemann, Daniel; Clausen, Maja Lisa; John, Swen Malthe;

    2016-01-01

    that the negative effect of occlusion in itself is limited, and that only extensive and long-term occlusion will cause barrier impairment. However, studies investigating combined effect of occlusion and exposure to soaps/detergents indicate that occlusion significantly enhances the skin barrier damage...... caused by detergents/soaps in a dose-response fashion....

  15. Anomalous Hall effect in the prospective spintronic material Eu1‑x Gd x O integrated with Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, Oleg E.; Averyanov, Dmitry V.; Tokmachev, Andrey M.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Storchak, Vyacheslav G.

    2016-06-01

    Remarkable properties of EuO make it a versatile spintronic material. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies of EuO, little is known about the anomalous Hall effect in this ferromagnet. So far, the effect has not been observed in bulk EuO, though has been detected in EuO films with uncontrolled distribution of defects. In the present work doping is taken under control: epitaxial films of Gd-doped EuO are synthesized integrated with Si using molecular beam epitaxy and characterized with x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Nanoscale transport studies reveal the anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnetic region for samples with different Gd concentration. The saturated anomalous Hall effect conductivity value of 5.0 S·cm‑1 in Gd-doped EuO is more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported so far for Eu chalcogenides doped with anion vacancies.

  16. Anomalous Hall effect in the prospective spintronic material Eu1-x Gd x O integrated with Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, Oleg E; Averyanov, Dmitry V; Tokmachev, Andrey M; Taldenkov, Alexander N; Storchak, Vyacheslav G

    2016-06-01

    Remarkable properties of EuO make it a versatile spintronic material. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies of EuO, little is known about the anomalous Hall effect in this ferromagnet. So far, the effect has not been observed in bulk EuO, though has been detected in EuO films with uncontrolled distribution of defects. In the present work doping is taken under control: epitaxial films of Gd-doped EuO are synthesized integrated with Si using molecular beam epitaxy and characterized with x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Nanoscale transport studies reveal the anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnetic region for samples with different Gd concentration. The saturated anomalous Hall effect conductivity value of 5.0 S·cm(-1) in Gd-doped EuO is more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported so far for Eu chalcogenides doped with anion vacancies. PMID:27165844

  17. Effects of UV irradiation on a living skin equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Living Skin Equivalent is an organotypic coculture composed of human dermal fibroblasts interspersed in a collagen-containing matrix and overlaid with human keratinocytes forming a stratified epidermis. The LSE has a dry, air-exposed epidermal surface suitable for the application of oils, creams and emulsions. The protective effects of an 8% homosylate standard and of five UV-A sunscreens, topically applied to the LSE, were determined and compared with their reported protection factors in human skin. Morphological changes and the release of proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-1-''alpha, tumor necrosis factor-α and prostaglandin E2) implicated in UV-induced erythema were also demonstrated in the LSE exposed to UV-A or UV-B. The data suggest that the LSE can be used for studying the effects of UV radiation on skin and may have utility for assessing the efficacy of certain sunscreens against UV-B and UV-A. (Author)

  18. The effect of grape-skin extract on oxidative status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, J. F.; Dragsted, L. O.; Daneshvar, B.;

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that moderate alcohol consumption, particularly wine, reduce the risk of CHD. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of grape-skin extract on markers of oxidative status. The study was designed as a randomised crossover. A diet with a low content...... of flavonoids was served with strict control of intake in two consecutive 1-week intervention periods to fifteen subjects (nine women, six men) divided randomly into two groups. During one of the weeks the subjects from either group consumed 200 ml grape-skin extract in water (1 mg extract/ml) at...... each of three daily meals (31.3 mg total phenolics, including 9.0 mg catechin). An increased activity of glutathione reductase and a borderline increase of glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes were observed after grape-skin intervention, while the intervention had no significant effect on...

  19. Anomalous scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Effects of anisotropy and compressibility in the kinematic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N. V.; Kostenko, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to the model of passive vector (magnetic) field advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝δ (t -t') k4 -d -y , where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. From physics viewpoints, the model describes magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the so-called kinematic approximation, where the effects of the magnetic field on the dynamics of the fluid are neglected. The original stochastic problem is reformulated as a multiplicatively renormalizable field-theoretic model; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess an infrared attractive fixed point. It is shown that various correlation functions of the magnetic field and its powers demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y . The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y . The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant.

  20. Anomalous scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Effects of anisotropy and compressibility in the kinematic approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N V; Kostenko, M M

    2015-11-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to the model of passive vector (magnetic) field advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝ δ(t-t')k(4-d-y), where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. From physics viewpoints, the model describes magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the so-called kinematic approximation, where the effects of the magnetic field on the dynamics of the fluid are neglected. The original stochastic problem is reformulated as a multiplicatively renormalizable field-theoretic model; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess an infrared attractive fixed point. It is shown that various correlation functions of the magnetic field and its powers demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y. The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant. PMID:26651785

  1. Anomalous memory effect in the breakdown of low-pressure argon in a long discharge tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of breakdown of argon in a long tube (with a gap length of 75 cm and diameter of 2.8 cm) at pressures of 1 and 5 Torr and stationary discharge currents of 5–40 mA were studied experimentally. The breakdown was initiated by paired positive voltage pulses with a rise rate of ∼108–109 V/s and duration of ∼1–10 ms. The time interval between pairs was varied in the range of Τ ∼ 0.1–1 s, and that between pulses in a pair was varied from τ = 0.4 ms to ≈Τ/2. The aim of this work was to detect and study the so-called “anomalous memory effect” earlier observed in breakdown in nitrogen. The effect consists in the dynamic breakdown voltage in the second pulse in a pair being higher than in the first pulse (in contrast to the “normal” memory effect, in which the relation between the breakdown voltages is opposite). It is found that this effect is observed when the time interval between pairs of pulses is such that the first pulse in a pair is in the range of the normal memory effect of the preceding pair (under the given conditions, Τ ≈ 0.1–0.4 s). In this case, at τ ∼ 10 ms, the breakdown voltage of the second pulse is higher than the reduced breakdown voltage of the first pulse. Optical observations of the ionization wave preceding breakdown in a long tube show that, in the range of the anomalous memory effect and at smaller values of τ, no ionization wave is detected before breakdown in the second pulse. A qualitative interpretation of the experimental results is given

  2. UV-radiation and skin cancer dose effect curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwegian skin cancer data were used in an attempt to arrive at the dose effect relationship for UV-carcinogenesis. The Norwegian population is relatively homogenous with regard to skin type and live in a country where the annual effective UV-dose varies by approximately 40 percent. Four different regions of the country, each with a broadness of 1o in latitude (approximately 111 km), were selected . The annual effective UV-doses for these regions were calculated assuming normal ozone conditions throughout the year. The incidence of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (mainly basal cell carcinoma) in these regions were considered and compared to the annual UV-doses. For both these types of cancer a quadratic dose effect curve seems to be valid. Depletions of the ozone layer results in larger UV-doses which in turn may yield more skin cancer. The dose effect curves suggest that the incidence rate will increase by an ''amplification factor'' of approximately 2

  3. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE011 and TE102 cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE011 and TE102 cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE011 cavity was larger than that in the TE102 cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE011 cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE011 cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE102 cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE011 cavity to decentering problem

  4. Structure investigation of metal ions clustering in dehydrated gel using x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Soejima, Y; Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Nakamura, A; Hiramatsu, N; Hara, K

    2003-01-01

    The structure of copper ion clusters in dehydrated N-isopropylacrylamide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gel has been studied by means of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. In order to distinguish the intensity scattered by Cu ions, the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect around the Cu K absorption edge has been coupled with SAXS. It is found that the dispersion effect dependent on the incident X-ray energy is remarkable only at the momentum transfer q = 0.031 A sup - sup 1 , where a SAXS peak is observed. The results indicate that copper ions form clusters in the dehydrated gel, and that the mean size of clusters is the same as that of SA clusters produced by microphase separation. It is therefore naturally presumed that copper ions are adsorbed into the SA molecules. On the basis of the presumption, a mechanism is proposed for microphase-separation and clustering of Cu ions.

  5. Anomalous finite-size effects for the mean-squared gyration radius of Gaussian random knots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalously strong finite-size effects have been observed for the mean square radius of gyration R2K of Gaussian random polygons with a fixed knot K as a function of the number N of polygonal nodes. Through computer simulations with N2K can be approximated by a power law, R2K∼N2νKeff, for several knots, where the effective exponents νKeff are larger than 0.5 and less than 0.6. Furthermore, a crossover occurs for the gyration radius of the trivial knot, when N is roughly equal to the characteristic length Nc of random knotting. Assuming an asymptotic fitting formula, we also discuss possible asymptotic behaviours for RK2 of Gaussian random polygons. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  6. Scaling of Anomalous Hall Effects in Facing-Target Reactively Sputtered Fe4N Films

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yan

    2015-05-13

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the reactively sputtered epitaxial and polycrystalline γ′-Fe4N films is investigated systematically. The Hall resistivity is positive in the entire temperature range. The magnetization, carrier density and grain boundaries scattering have a major impact on the AHE scaling law. The scaling exponent γ in the conventional scaling of is larger than 2 in both the epitaxial and polycrystalline γ′-Fe4N films. Although γ>2 has been found in heterogeneous systems due to the effects of the surface and interface scattering on AHE, γ>2 is not expected in homogenous epitaxial systems. We demonstrated that γ>2 results from residual resistivity (ρxx0) in γ′-Fe4N films. Furthermore, the side-jump and intrinsic mechanisms are dominant in both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples according to the proper scaling relation.

  7. Vascular effects of leukotriene D4 in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    1987-01-01

    Leukotriene D4 (LTD4) increased the blood flow rate in human skin, equipotent to histamine in the dose range of 3.1-200 pmol. The vasodilatation lasted for up to 60 min, and no late reactions occurred. Indomethacin did not affect the LTD4-induced blood flow rate. H1 and H2 antagonists reduced the...... as a mediator of the axon reflex, and show that LTD4 causes a direct vasodilatory effect that is not mediated via histamine or cyclooxygenase products. The laser-Doppler flowmeter was applied for dynamic studies of the vasopressor response in the skin during a Valsalva maneuver, and the relative...

  8. The effect of nedocromil on weal reactions in human skin.

    OpenAIRE

    Humphreys, F; Shuster, S

    1987-01-01

    1. Nedocromil 2% iontophoresed into human skin had no effect on wealing produced by intradermal histamine, 48/80 or house dust mite antigen. 2. Iontophoresis of 0.002-2% nedocromil itself resulted in dose-related wealing. 3. This wealing was reduced by 62 +/- 8% s.e. mean by the H1-receptor antagonist terfenadine which decreased histamine wealing by 68 +/- 2% s.e. mean. 4. Nedocromil may therefore act as a weak agonist on a skin mast cell receptor concerned with histamine release.

  9. In Vivo Skin Penetration of Quantum Dot Nanoparticles in the Murine Model: the Effect of UVR

    OpenAIRE

    Mortensen, Luke; Oberdörster, Gunter; Pentland, Alice P.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has widespread effects on the biology and integrity of the skin barrier. Research on the mechanisms that drive these changes, as well as their effect on skin barrier function has been ongoing since the 1980s. However, no studies have examined the impact of UVR on nanoparticle skin penetration. Nanoparticles (NP) are commonly used in sunscreens and other cosmetics, and since consumer use of sunscreen is often applied to sun damaged skin, the effect of UVR on NP skin...

  10. Effective Architectural Design Decisions in Double Skin Facades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba İnan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In architectural discourse, it is possible to notice a rising interest in building skin configurations which promise to help minimizing the loss of energy while maximizing its gain. In parallel, it is possible to see that the use of double-skin glass facades globally pervades. All over the world double-skin facade applications multiply day by day. This technology is still quite new in Turkey and it is not possible to find many applications or researches done on this subject. For this reason, architects and engineers should be focused on the designs solutions providing energy savings. The design of DSF depends on various architectural decisions. In this study, effective design decision parameters on energy performance of DSF systems will be discussed in a comprehensive way in architectural perspective by reviewing previous studies.

  11. Pretreatment Effects of Moxibustion on the Skin Permeation and the Skin and Muscle Concentration of Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    曹, 殿秀

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the ln vlvo pretreatment effects of moxibustion on the ln vitro skin permeation ef weak ionized macromolecular compound FITC-dextran (mean molecular weight of 4 kDa, FD-4 ) and ion compound sodium salicylate, and on ln vivodistribution of ion drug sodium salicylate. The direct and indirect moxibustion or indirect aromatic incense (0.10 g moxa or aromatic cylinder) were pretreated consecutive four times once every 5 minutes on the abdominal surface of hairl...

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Corn Silk on Skin Pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Yoon Choi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the inhibitory effect of corn silk on melanin production was evaluated. This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effect of corn silk on melanin production in Melan-A cells by measuring melanin production and protein expression. The corn silk extract applied on Melan-A cells at a concentration of 100 ppm decreased melanin production by 37.2% without cytotoxicity. This was a better result than arbutin, a positive whitening agent, which exhibited a 26.8% melanin production inhibitory effect at the same concentration. The corn silk extract did not suppress tyrosinase activity but greatly reduced the expression of tyrosinase in Melan-A cells. In addition, corn silk extract was applied to the human face with hyperpigmentation, and skin color was measured to examine the degree of skin pigment reduction. The application of corn silk extract on faces with hyperpigmentation significantly reduced skin pigmentation without abnormal reactions. Based on the results above, corn silk has good prospects for use as a material for suppressing skin pigmentation.

  13. Anomalous Hall effect and magnetoresistance behavior in Co/Pd1−xAgx multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Z. B.

    2013-02-13

    In this paper, we report anomalous Hall effect (AHE) correlated with the magnetoresistance behavior in [Co/Pd1-xAg x]n multilayers. For the multilayers with n = 6, the increase in Ag content from x = 0 to 0.52 induces the change in AHE sign from negative surface scattering-dominated AHE to positive interface scattering-dominated AHE, which is accompanied with the transition from anisotropy magnetoresistance (AMR) dominated transport to giant magnetoresistance (GMR) dominated transport. For n = 80, scaling analysis with Rs ∝ρ xx γ yields γ ∼ 3.44 for x = 0.52 which presents GMR-type transport, in contrast to γ ∼ 5.7 for x = 0 which presents AMR-type transport. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. II. Kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    In Paper I [T. Lafleur et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 053502 (2016)], we demonstrated (using particle-in-cell simulations) the definite correlation between an anomalously high cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs), and the presence of azimuthal electrostatic instabilities leading to enhanced electron scattering. Here, we present a kinetic theory that predicts the enhanced scattering rate and provides an electron cross-field mobility that is in good agreement with experiment. The large azimuthal electron drift velocity in HETs drives a strong instability that quickly saturates due to a combination of ion-wave trapping and wave-convection, leading to an enhanced mobility many orders of magnitude larger than that expected from classical diffusion theory. In addition to the magnetic field strength, B0, this enhanced mobility is a strong function of the plasma properties (such as the plasma density) and therefore does not, in general, follow simple 1 /B02 or 1 /B0 scaling laws.

  15. Global constraints on anomalous triple gauge couplings in effective field theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    Falkowski, Adam; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of LHC Higgs data (signal strengths) together with LEP-2 WW production measurements. To characterize possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions, we employ the framework of an Effective Field Theory (EFT) where the SM is extended by higher-dimensional operators suppressed by the mass scale of new physics $\\Lambda$. The analysis is performed consistently at the order $\\Lambda^{-2}$ in the EFT expansion keeping all the relevant operators. While the two data sets suffer from flat directions, together they impose stringent model-independent constraints on the anomalous triple gauge couplings. As a side product, we provide the results of the combined fit in different EFT bases.

  16. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect. PMID:27418293

  17. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect. PMID:27418293

  18. Evidence of local effects in anomalous refraction and focusing properties of dodecagonal photonic quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Gennaro, Emiliano; Miletto, Carlo; Savo, Salvatore; Andreone, Antonello; Morello, Davide; Galdi, Vincenzo; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    We present the key results from a comprehensive study of the refraction and focusing properties of a two-dimensional dodecagonal photonic “quasicrystal” (PQC), which was carried out via both full-wave numerical simulations and microwave measurements on a slab made of alumina rods inserted in a parallel-plate waveguide. We observe an anomalous refraction and focusing in several frequency regions, which confirm some recently published results. However, our interpretation, which is based on numerical and experimental evidence, substantially differs from the one in terms of “effective negative refractive index” that was originally proposed. Instead, our study highlights the critical role played by short-range interactions associated with local order and symmetry.

  19. Anomalous Brownian motion of colloidal particle in a nematic environment: effect of the director fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Turiv

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As recently reported [Turiv T. et al., Science, 2013, Vol. 342, 1351], fluctuations in the orientation of the liquid crystal (LC director can transfer momentum from the LC to a colloid, such that the diffusion of the colloid becomes anomalous on a short time scale. Using video microscopy and single particle tracking, we investigate random thermal motion of colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal for the time scales shorter than the expected time of director fluctuations. At long times, compared to the characteristic time of the nematic director relaxation we observe typical anisotropic Brownian motion with the mean square displacement (MSD linear in time τ and inversly proportional to the effective viscosity of the nematic medium. At shorter times, however, the dynamics is markedly nonlinear with MSD growing more slowly (subdiffusion or faster (superdiffusion than τ. These results are discussed in the context of coupling of colloidal particle's dynamics to the director fluctuation dynamics.

  20. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in atomic crystal layers from in-plane magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yafei; Zeng, Junjie; Deng, Xinzhou; Yang, Fei; Pan, Hui; Qiao, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that with in-plane magnetization, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) can be realized in two-dimensional atomic crystal layers with preserved inversion symmetry but broken out-of-plane mirror reflection symmetry. By taking the honeycomb lattice system as an example, we find that the low-buckled structure satisfying the symmetry criteria is crucial to induce QAHE. The topologically nontrivial bulk gap carrying a Chern number of C =±1 opens in the vicinity of the saddle points M , where the band dispersion exhibits strong anisotropy. We further show that the QAHE with electrically tunable Chern number can be achieved in Bernal-stacked multilayer systems, and the applied interlayer potential differences can dramatically decrease the critical magnetization to make the QAHE experimentally feasible.

  1. 3d Transition Metal Adsorption Induced the valley-polarized Anomalous Hall Effect in Germanene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P; Sun, L Z

    2016-01-01

    Based on DFT + U and Berry curvature calculations, we study the electronic structures and topological properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atom (from Ti to Co) adsorbed germanene (TM-germanene). We find that valley-polarized anomalous Hall effect (VAHE) can be realized in germanene by adsorbing Cr, Mn, or Co atoms on its surface. A finite valley Hall voltage can be easily detected in their nanoribbon, which is important for valleytronics devices. Moreover, different valley-polarized current and even reversible valley Hall voltage can be archived by shifting the Fermi energy of the systems. Such versatile features of the systems show potential in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27312176

  2. Extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Mn{sub 4}N films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X., E-mail: wushx3@mail.sysu.edu.cn; Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W., E-mail: stslsw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-01-19

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated. The longitudinal conductivity σ{sub xx} is within the superclean regime, indicating Mn{sub 4}N is a highly conducting material. We further demonstrate that the AHE signal in 40-nm-thick films is mainly due to the extrinsic contributions based on the analysis fitted by ρ{sub AH}=a′ρ{sub xx0}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} and σ{sub AH}∝σ{sub xx}. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on antiperovskite manganese nitrides but also shed promising light on utilizing their extrinsic AHE to fabricate spintronic devices.

  3. Anomalous finite-size effects in the Battle of the Sexes

    CERN Document Server

    Cremer, Jonas; Frey, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The Battle of the Sexes describes asymmetric conflicts in mating behavior of males and females. Males can be philanderer or faithful, while females are either fast or coy, leading to a cyclic dynamics. The adjusted replicator equation predicts stable coexistence of all four strategies. In this situation, we consider the effects of fluctuations stemming from a finite population size. We show that they unavoidably lead to extinction of two strategies in the population. However, the typical time until extinction occurs strongly prolongs with increasing system size. In the meantime, a quasi-stationary probability distribution forms that is anomalously flat in the vicinity of the coexistence state. This behavior originates in a vanishing linear deterministic drift near the fixed point. We provide numerical data as well as an analytical approach to the mean extinction time and the quasi-stationary probability distribution.

  4. The temperature dependent anomalous Hall effect in La-Ca-Mn-O films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The colossal magnetoresistance of La1-xCaxMnO3 has been reported in many experiments. The authors present their study of the anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 thin films. They have measured the temperature dependence of resistivity, magnetization and AHE coefficients between 300K and 5K for the samples grown on different substrates. From these studies, the relation between the resistivity and AHE coefficient as well as the temperature dependence of AHE coefficient are explored. The results show that the direction of AHE is reversed below approximately 100K. This sign reversal is discussed in term of the change of band structure and the co-existence of hole-like and electron-like conduction

  5. The Thermal Effects of Therapeutic Lasers with 810 and 904nm Wavelengths on Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Joensen, Jon; Demmink, Jan Hendrik; Johnson, Mark I; Iversen, Vegard Vereide; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of therapeutic infrared class 3B laser irradiation on skin temperature in healthy participants of differing skin color, age, and gender. Background: Little is known about the potential thermal effects of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) irradiation on human skin. Methods: Skin temperature was measured in 40 healthy volunteers with a thermographic camera at laser irradiated and control (non-irradiated) areas on the skin. Six irradiation doses (2–1...

  6. Sensory neuropeptide effects in human skin.

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, R W; Conradson, T. B.; Dixon, C M; Crossman, D C; Barnes, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    1 Neuropeptides released from sensory nerves may account for cutaneous flare and wheal following local trauma. In 28 normal subjects we have studied the effects of four sensory neuropeptides given by intradermal injection on the forearm or back. 2 All peptides caused a flare distant from the site of injection, presumably due to an axon reflex. Substance P (SP) was the most potent (geometric mean dose causing 50% of maximum flare, 4.2 pmol). Neurokinin A (NKA) was the next most potent with neu...

  7. Anomalous Magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous symmetries induce currents which can be parallel rather than orthogonal to the hypermagnetic field. Building on the analogy with charged liquids at high magnetic Reynolds numbers, the persistence of anomalous currents is scrutinized for parametrically large conductivities when the plasma approximation is accurate. Different examples in globally neutral systems suggest that the magnetic configurations minimizing the energy density with the constraint that the helicity be conserved co...

  8. Effect of Age on Tooth Shade, Skin Color and Skin-Tooth Color Interrelationship in Saudi Arabian Subpopulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental restoration or prosthesis in harmony with adjacent natural teeth color is indispensable part for the successful esthetic outcome. The studies indicate is existence of correlation between teeth and skin color. Teeth and skin color are changed over the aging process. The aim of the study was to explore the role of age on the tooth and skin color parameters, and to investigate the effect of ageing on teeth-skin color correlation. Materials and Methods: Total of 225 Saudi Arabian ethnic subjects was divided into three groups of 75 each. The groups were divided according to participant’s age. The participant’s age for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 18-29 years, 30-50 years, and above 50 years, respectively. The tooth color was identified by spectrophotometer in CIE Lab parameters. The skin color was registered with skin surface photography. The data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and correlation tests with SPSS 18 software. Results: The Group I had the highest ‘L’ value of 80.26, Group III recorded the least value of 76.66. The Group III had highest yellow value ‘b’ at 22.72, while Group I had 19.19. The skin ‘L’ value was highest in the young population; the elder population had the increased red value ‘a’ in comparison to younger subjects. The ‘L’ tooth color parameter had a strong positive linear correlation with skin color in young and adult subjects. While Group III teeth showed the strong positive correlation with ‘b’ parameter at malar region. Conclusion: The elder subjects had darker and yellow teeth in comparison with younger subjects. The reddening of the skin was observed as age-related skin color change. The age had a strong influence on the teeth-skin color correlation. PMID:26464536

  9. Testing dependence of anomalous Hall effect on resistivity in SrRuO3 by its increase with electron irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haham, N.; Konczykowski, M.; Kuiper, B.; Koster, G.; Klein, L.

    2013-01-01

    We measure the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in several patterns of the itinerant ferromagnet SrRuO 3 before and after the patterns are irradiated with electrons. The irradiation increases the resistivity of the patterns due to the introduction of point defects and we find that the AHE coefficient R

  10. Vacuum effects in magnetic field with with account for fermion anomalous magnetic moment and axial-vector interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubnov, Andrey; Gubina, Nadezda; Zhukovsky, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We study vacuum polarization effects in the model of Dirac fermions with additional interaction of an anomalous magnetic moment with an external magnetic field and fermion interaction with an axial-vector condensate. The proper time method is used to calculate the one-loop vacuum corrections with consideration for different configurations of the characteristic parameters of these interactions.

  11. Effect of Skin Removal from Spherical Fruits and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Ansari

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Apple, orange and potato samples were exposed to chilled air blast, first with their natural skin and then after removal of the skin and transient temperature-time variations were recorded at the center. This data record was used to determine the thermal diffusivity of each produce sample by the empirical approach of the first author and his co-workers. Thermal diffusivity was found to be higher than the literature value. This is due to additional cooling effect resulting from desiccation of the exposed samples. The value decreased with the amount of cooling of the produce. The rate of reduction was fast in the beginning and later it had slowed down. The rate of decrease of thermal diffusivity was slow in case of produce samples with natural skin. In case of peeled off samples, this rate in the decrease was more pronounced. This must be due to the removal of natural moisture barrier; the skin. The variations of thermal diffusivity have been plotted and correlations developed. Temperature calculations with these variable thermal diffusivity values agreed well with the measured temperatures.

  12. Toxic effects of ultraviolet radiation on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation present in sunlight is an environmental human carcinogen. The toxic effects of UV from natural sunlight and therapeutic artificial lamps are a major concern for human health. The major acute effects of UV irradiation on normal human skin comprise sunburn inflammation (erythema), tanning, and local or systemic immunosuppression. At the molecular level, UV irradiation causes DNA damage such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts, which are usually repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER). Chronic exposure to UV irradiation leads to photoaging, immunosuppression, and ultimately photocarcinogenesis. Photocarcinogenesis involves the accumulation of genetic changes, as well as immune system modulation, and ultimately leads to the development of skin cancers. In the clinic, artificial lamps emitting UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) radiation in combination with chemical drugs are used in the therapy of many skin diseases including psoriasis and vitiligo. Although such therapy is beneficial, it is accompanied with undesirable side effects. Thus, UV radiation is like two sides of the same coin--on one side, it has detrimental effects, and on the other side, it has beneficial effects

  13. Anomalous Chiral Superfluidity

    OpenAIRE

    Lublinsky, Michael(Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel); Zahed, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    We discuss both the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor in a left chiral theory with flavour anomalies as an effective theory for flavored chiral phonons in a chiral superfluid with the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the mean-field (leading tadpole) approximation the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy momentum tensor take the form of constitutive currents in the chiral superfluid state. The pertinence of higher order corrections and the Adler-Bardeen theorem is ...

  14. Effect of Skin to Skin Contact on Maternal State Anxiety in a Cesarean Section Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Haghani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed at investigating the effect of skin to skin contact (SSC on maternal state anxiety (MSA in cesarean section unit in Akbarabadi Hospital in Tehran. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 60 Iranian mothers with at least one record of cesarean section delivery were assigned to two intervention (SSC and control groups. In the morning shift and two hours after the operation, as a routine postoperative care, pain-killers were given to all mothers. Then the mothers’ pain scores were measured using visual analog scale (VAS. If VAS was≤3, MSA was measured by using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI Scale (Spiel Berger. Thirty minutes of SSC intervention was done for mothers in the intervention group. Six hours later, in case VAS was ≤ 3, MSA was re-measured by using the Spiel Berger Scale for all mothers. Results: Six hours after implementing the intervention, there were no meaningful statistical differences between the MSA mean scores of the two groups, but severity of MSA in intervention group was less than that of the control group (P=0.037. Six hours after the intervention, there was a significant decrease in the MSA mean score in SSC group (P=0.002. Conclusion: As regards the important role of constant anxiety in developing postpartum depression, and as the results of this study indicate, SSC is recommended in postpartum and especially cesarean section wards.

  15. Local effects of immunosuppressants in the skin and impact on UV carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Voskamp, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancer is a serious problem for many organ transplant recipients. Half of them develop skin cancer within 20 years after the transplantation. The main cause of this increased skin cancer risk is thought to be suppression of the immune system, a necessity to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ. This thesis focuses on the effects of immunosuppressive drugs on the responses of skin cells to UV irradiation and how these altered responses would affect UV-induced skin cancer developmen...

  16. Evaluation of skin viability effect on ethosome and liposome-mediated psoralen delivery via cell uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of skin viability on its permeability to psoralen delivered by ethosomes, as compared with liposomes. With decreasing skin viability, the amount of liposome-delivered psoralen that penetrated through the skin increased, whereas skin deposition of psoralen from both ethosomes and liposomes reduced. Psoralen delivery to human-immortalized epidermal cells was more effective using liposomes, whereas delivery to human embryonic skin fibroblast cells was more effective when ethosomes were used. These findings agreed with those of in vivo studies showing that skin psoralen deposition from ethosomes and liposomes first increased and then plateaued overtime, which may indicate gradual saturation of intracellular drug delivery. It also suggested that the reduced deposition of ethosome- or liposome-delivered psoralen in skin with reduced viability may relate to reduced cellular uptake. This work indicated that the effects of skin viability should be taken into account when evaluating nanocarrier-mediated drug skin permeation. PMID:25070929

  17. Study of an anomalous pinch effect in the T-11M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peaked density profiles ne(r) are typical for tokamaks with ohmic heating. This contradicts to the fact that the sources of plasma - gas puffing and hydrogen recycling are localized in plasma periphery. Usually one try to resolve this contradiction by assumption of impurity accumulation or development of neoclassical Ware pinch or by supposition of its version - turbulence-driven particle pinch. In the T-11M experiments with Li-limiter, where impurity effects were excluded and plasma collisionality was rather high (ν*∼0.5), the peaked density profiles ne(r) have been observed also and this seems to be an evidence of plasma density accumulation (anomalous pinch effect). The measurements of ne(r) were carried out with help of five-channel jump-free Cotton-Mouton interferometer (polarimeter) using the conventional Abel-procedure. The ne(r) profiles can be approximated by set of parabolas: ne(r) = ne (0)·(1-r2/a2)α. The alpha parameter was an indicator of profile peaking and varied in range from 0.3 to ∼1.5. The analysis of experimental results showed that the formation of bell-shaped profile ne(r) with α∼1.5 in condition of internal gas puffing can take place only under strong plasma influx from the periphery to the plasma center (along the gradient of ne(r)) with velocity about of 3-4 m/s, which is 3-5 times more than assumed velocity of neoclassical Ware pinch. This effect does not depend on plasma purity and it is observed both with lithium and graphite limiters. Visible anomalous pinch effect increased following the growth of ne. Any assumptions about influence of direct flux of neutral atoms on creation of ne(r) profile are eliminated thereby. The development of convective transport processes from the periphery to the plasma core seems to be the most probable reason of peaked profiles ne(r) generated in conditions of a peripheral source. (author)

  18. Application of focused-beam flat-sample method to synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction with anomalous scattering effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M.; Katsuya, Y.; Matsushita, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM), which is a method for high-resolution and rapid synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements by combination of beam focusing optics, a flat shape sample and an area detector, was applied for diffraction experiments with anomalous scattering effect. The advantages of FFM for anomalous diffraction were absorption correction without approximation, rapid data collection by an area detector and good signal-to-noise ratio data by focusing optics. In the X-ray diffraction experiments of CoFe2O4 and Fe3O4 (By FFM) using X-rays near the Fe K absorption edge, the anomalous scattering effect between Fe/Co or Fe2+/Fe3+ can be clearly detected, due to the change of diffraction intensity. The change of observed diffraction intensity as the incident X-ray energy was consistent with the calculation. The FFM is expected to be a method for anomalous powder diffraction.

  19. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in time-reversal-symmetry breaking topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Li, Mingda

    2016-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), the last member of Hall family, was predicted to exhibit quantized Hall conductivity {σyx}=\\frac{{{e}2}}{h} without any external magnetic field. The QAHE shares a similar physical phenomenon with the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE), whereas its physical origin relies on the intrinsic topological inverted band structure and ferromagnetism. Since the QAHE does not require external energy input in the form of magnetic field, it is believed that this effect has unique potential for applications in future electronic devices with low-power consumption. More recently, the QAHE has been experimentally observed in thin films of the time-reversal symmetry breaking ferromagnetic (FM) topological insulators (TI), Cr- and V- doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. In this topical review, we review the history of TI based QAHE, the route to the experimental observation of the QAHE in the above two systems, the current status of the research of the QAHE, and finally the prospects for future studies.

  20. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in time-reversal-symmetry breaking topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Li, Mingda

    2016-03-31

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), the last member of Hall family, was predicted to exhibit quantized Hall conductivity σ(yx) = e2/h without any external magnetic field. The QAHE shares a similar physical phenomenon with the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE), whereas its physical origin relies on the intrinsic topological inverted band structure and ferromagnetism. Since the QAHE does not require external energy input in the form of magnetic field, it is believed that this effect has unique potential for applications in future electronic devices with low-power consumption. More recently, the QAHE has been experimentally observed in thin films of the time-reversal symmetry breaking ferromagnetic (FM) topological insulators (TI), Cr- and V- doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. In this topical review, we review the history of TI based QAHE, the route to the experimental observation of the QAHE in the above two systems, the current status of the research of the QAHE, and finally the prospects for future studies. PMID:26934535

  1. Thermal effects of X-band microwaves on skin tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyo D.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Lee, Kunik; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-04-01

    Microwave can be used as a power carrier to implanted medical devices wirelessly, which is regarded as one of the attractive features for medical applications. The loss mechanism of microwave transmission through lossy media often appears as a thermal effect due to the absorption of microwave. Such a thermal effect on human tissue has not rigorously studied yet. The thermal effect on living tissues was experimentally tested with animal skins to understand the absorption characteristics of microwave. In this paper, the frequency range of microwave used for the tests was from 6 GHz to 13 GHz.

  2. Biological effects of irradiation on skin and recommended dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The range of radiation responses of the skin are reviewed in terms of the time course over which damage is expressed and the likely underlying pathogenesis. Responses of specific concern in radiological protection have been identified; these include acute necrosis/ulceration after exposure to radioactive 'hot' particles, and moist desquamation, late dermal atrophy or telangiectasia after more generalised exposures from intermediate and high energy β emitters. Acute epidermal necrosis is the only endpoint of concern after exposure to low energy β emitters. Dose-effect relationships have been established for each of these responses and on this basis recommendations for dose limitation for the skin can be made along with proposals for the depths at which dose should be assessed in routine monitoring procedures. (author)

  3. Anomalous refractive effects in honeycomb lattice photonic crystals formed by holographic lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, G Y; Yang, X L; Cai, L Z

    2010-08-01

    We have investigated for the first time the anomalous refractive effects of a photonic crystal (PhC) formed by holographic lithography (HL) with triangular rods arranged in a honeycomb lattice in air. Possibilities of left-handed negative refraction and superlens are discussed for the case of TM2 band with the index contrast n = 3.4:1. In contrast to the conventional honeycomb PhC made of regular rods in air, the HL PhCs show left-handed negative refraction over a wider and higher frequency range with high transmissivity (>90%), and the effective indices quite close to -1 for a wide range of incident angles with a larger all-angle left-handed negative refraction (AALNR) frequency range (Deltaomega/omega approximately 14.8%). Calculations and FDTD simulations demonstrate the high-performance negative refraction properties can happen in the holographic structures for a wide filling ratio and can be modulated by changing the filling ratio easily. PMID:20721016

  4. Strong and Anomalous Thermal Expansion Precedes the Thermosalient Effect in Dynamic Molecular Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Manas K; Centore, Roberto; Causà, Mauro; Tuzi, Angela; Borbone, Fabio; Naumov, Panče

    2016-01-01

    The ability of thermosalient solids, organic analogues of inorganic martensites, to move by rapid mechanical reconfiguration or ballistic event remains visually appealing and potentially useful, yet mechanistically elusive phenomenon. Here, with a material that undergoes both thermosalient and non-thermosalient phase transitions, we demonstrate that the thermosalient effect is preceded by anomalous thermal expansion of the unit cell. The crystal explosion occurs as sudden release of the latent strain accumulated during the anisotropic, exceedingly strong expansion of the unit cell with αa = 225.9 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 238.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) and αc = -290.0 × 10(-6) K(-1), the latter being the largest negative thermal expansivity observed for an organic compound thus far. The results point out to the occurence of the thermosalient effect in phase transitions as means to identify new molecular materials with strong positive and/or negative thermal expansion which prior to this work could only be discovered serendipitously. PMID:27403616

  5. Clustering effects for explaining an anomalous JLab result on the Be-9 structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M; Saito, K; Watanabe, T

    2011-01-01

    An anomalous nuclear modification was reported by JLab measurements on the beryllium-9 structure function F_2. It is unexpected in the sense that a nuclear modification slope is too large to be expected from its average nuclear density. We investigated whether it is explained by a nuclear clustering configuration in Be-9 with two \\alpha nuclei and surrounding neutron clouds. Such clustering aspects are studied by using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) and also by a simple shell model for comparison. We consider that nuclear structure functions F_2^A consist of a mean conventional part and a remaining one depending on the maximum local density. The first mean part does not show a significant cluster effect on F_2. However, we propose that the remaining one could explain the anonymous JLab slope, and it is associated with high densities created by the cluster formation in Be-9. The JLab measurement is possibly the first signature of clustering effects in high-energy nuclear reactions. A responsible phys...

  6. Strong and Anomalous Thermal Expansion Precedes the Thermosalient Effect in Dynamic Molecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Manas K.; Centore, Roberto; Causà, Mauro; Tuzi, Angela; Borbone, Fabio; Naumov, Panče

    2016-01-01

    The ability of thermosalient solids, organic analogues of inorganic martensites, to move by rapid mechanical reconfiguration or ballistic event remains visually appealing and potentially useful, yet mechanistically elusive phenomenon. Here, with a material that undergoes both thermosalient and non-thermosalient phase transitions, we demonstrate that the thermosalient effect is preceded by anomalous thermal expansion of the unit cell. The crystal explosion occurs as sudden release of the latent strain accumulated during the anisotropic, exceedingly strong expansion of the unit cell with αa = 225.9 × 10−6 K−1, αb = 238.8 × 10−6 K−1 and αc = −290.0 × 10−6 K−1, the latter being the largest negative thermal expansivity observed for an organic compound thus far. The results point out to the occurence of the thermosalient effect in phase transitions as means to identify new molecular materials with strong positive and/or negative thermal expansion which prior to this work could only be discovered serendipitously. PMID:27403616

  7. Shell effects and α particle anomalous yield in reactions With nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the spectra and cross section calculations for nucleons, alpha-particle and gamma-emission are discussed. The calculations were performed in the framework of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions for the nucleons interacting with 208Pb nuclei at energies up to 50 MeV. It is shown that the use for the level density of Fermi gas model and of systematics based on the neutron resonance density data results in an anomalously big alpha-yield at the first evaporation step if the incident nucleon energy exceeds 30 MeV. The shell effect damping leads to the decrease in difference between level density in competing channels. Alpha-particle yield strongly diminishes as compared to neutron one. Therefore the relative value of neutron and alpha-particle emission cross sections could indicate to the conservation of the shell structure at high excitation energies. The comparison with experiment confirms the conclusions concerning the shell effects damping at high excitation energies

  8. Magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall effect of reactive sputtered polycrystalline Ti1 - XCrxN films

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaofei

    2013-09-01

    The reactive-sputtered polycrystalline Ti1 - xCrxN films with 0.17 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 are ferromagnetic and at x = 0.47 the Curie temperature TC shows a maximum of ~ 120 K. The films are metallic at 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.47, while the films with x = 0.51 and 0.78 are semiconducting-like. The upturn of resistivity below 70 K observed in the films with 0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.47 is from the effects of the electron-electron interaction and weak localization. The negative magnetoresistance (MR) of the films with 0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 is dominated by the double-exchange interaction, while at x = 0.78, MR is related to the localized magnetic moment scattering at the grain boundaries. The scaling ρxyA/n ∝ ρxx2.19 suggests that the anomalous Hall effect in the polycrystalline Ti1 - xCrxN films is scattering-independent. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Anomalous Higgs couplings

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción

    1999-01-01

    We review the effects of new effective interactions on Higgs-boson phenomenology. New physics in the electroweak bosonic sector is expected to induce additional interactions between the Higgs doublet field and the electroweak gauge bosons, leading to anomalous Higgs couplings as well as anomalous gauge-boson self-interactions. Using a linearly realized SU(2)/sub L/*U(1)/sub Y/ invariant effective Lagrangian to describe the bosonic sector of the Standard Model, we review the effects of the new effective interactions on the Higgs- boson production rates and decay modes. We summarize the results from searches for the new Higgs signatures induced by the anomalous interactions in order to constrain the scale of new physics, in particular at CERN LEP and Fermilab Tevatron colliders. (43 refs).

  10. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogi, M., E-mail: mogi@cmr.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tsukazaki, A. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Takahashi, K. S. [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  11. Neutral cloud theory of the Jovian nebula: Anomalous ionization effect of superthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1994-01-01

    The standard model of the Jovian nebula postulates that its particle source is the extended cloud of neutral sulfur and oxygen atoms that escape from the satellite Io and become ionized through electron impact from the corotating plasma. Its energy source is the gyroenergy acquired by newly formed pickup ions as they are swept up to corotation velocity by the planetary magnetic field. Elastic collisions between plasma ions and electrons cool the ions and heat the electrons, while inelastic collisions cool the electrons and excite the ions to radiate intense line emission, which is the primary energy-loss mechanism for the plasma. This neutral cloud theory of the Io plasma torus, as it has come to be known, has been the subject of recent critcism which asserts that the theory cannot account for the observed charge state of the plasma which features O(+) and S(2+) as the dominant ions. It is shown in this work that the inclusion of a small population of super-thermal electrons is required to achieve the correct ion partitioning among various charge states. It is also argued that the anomalous ionization effect of the superthermal electrons is responsible for the overall spatial bifurcation of the nebula into a hot multiply charged plasma region outside of 5.7 Jovian radii and a cool singly ionized plasma inside this distance.

  12. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb)2Te3 films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction

  13. Air pollution and skin diseases: Adverse effects of airborne particulate matter on various skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2016-05-01

    Environmental air pollution encompasses various particulate matters (PMs). The increased ambient PM from industrialization and urbanization is highly associated with morbidity and mortality worldwide, presenting one of the most severe environmental pollution problems. This article focuses on the correlation between PM and skin diseases, along with related immunological mechanisms. Recent epidemiological studies on the cutaneous impacts of PM showed that PM affects the development and exacerbation of skin diseases. PM induces oxidative stress via production of reactive oxygen species and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-8. In addition, the increased production of ROS such as superoxide and hydroxyl radical by PM exposure increases MMPs including MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9, resulting in the degradation of collagen. These processes lead to the increased inflammatory skin diseases and skin aging. In addition, environmental cigarette smoke, which is well known as an oxidizing agent, is closely related with androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Also, ultrafine particles (UFPs) including black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the incidence of skin cancer. Overall, increased PM levels are highly associated with the development of various skin diseases via the regulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful for treating PM-induced skin diseases. PMID:27018067

  14. Note on anomalous Higgs-boson couplings in effective field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Buchalla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a parametrization of anomalous Higgs-boson couplings that is both systematic and practical. It is based on the electroweak chiral Lagrangian, including a light Higgs boson, as the effective field theory (EFT at the electroweak scale v. This is the appropriate framework for the case of sizeable deviations in the Higgs couplings of order 10% from the Standard Model, considered to be parametrically larger than new-physics effects in the sector of electroweak gauge interactions. The role of power counting in identifying the relevant parameters is emphasized. The three relevant scales, v, the scale of new Higgs dynamics f, and the cut-off Λ=4πf, admit expansions in ξ=v2/f2 and f2/Λ2. The former corresponds to an organization of operators by their canonical dimension, the latter by their loop order or chiral dimension. In full generality the EFT is thus organized as a double expansion. However, as long as ξ≫1/16π2 the EFT systematics is closer to the chiral counting. The leading effects in the consistent approximation provided by the EFT, relevant for the presently most important processes of Higgs production and decay, are given by a few (typically six couplings. These parameters allow us to describe the properties of the Higgs boson in a general and systematic way, and with a precision adequate for the measurements to be performed at the LHC. The framework can be systematically extended to include loop corrections and higher-order terms in the EFT.

  15. Note on anomalous Higgs-boson couplings in effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, G.; Catà, O.; Celis, A.; Krause, C.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a parametrization of anomalous Higgs-boson couplings that is both systematic and practical. It is based on the electroweak chiral Lagrangian, including a light Higgs boson, as the effective field theory (EFT) at the electroweak scale v. This is the appropriate framework for the case of sizeable deviations in the Higgs couplings of order 10% from the Standard Model, considered to be parametrically larger than new-physics effects in the sector of electroweak gauge interactions. The role of power counting in identifying the relevant parameters is emphasized. The three relevant scales, v, the scale of new Higgs dynamics f, and the cut-off Λ = 4 πf, admit expansions in ξ =v2 /f2 and f2 /Λ2. The former corresponds to an organization of operators by their canonical dimension, the latter by their loop order or chiral dimension. In full generality the EFT is thus organized as a double expansion. However, as long as ξ ≫ 1 / 16π2 the EFT systematics is closer to the chiral counting. The leading effects in the consistent approximation provided by the EFT, relevant for the presently most important processes of Higgs production and decay, are given by a few (typically six) couplings. These parameters allow us to describe the properties of the Higgs boson in a general and systematic way, and with a precision adequate for the measurements to be performed at the LHC. The framework can be systematically extended to include loop corrections and higher-order terms in the EFT.

  16. Effect of band filling on anomalous Hall conductivity and magneto-crystalline anisotropy in NiFe epitaxial thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and magneto-crystalline anisotropy (MCA) are investigated in epitaxial NixFe1−x thin films grown on MgO (001) substrates. The scattering independent term b of anomalous Hall conductivity shows obvious correlation with cubic magneto-crystalline anisotropy K1. When nickel content x decreasing, both b and K1 vary continuously from negative to positive, changing sign at about x = 0.85. Ab initio calculations indicate NixFe1−x has more abundant band structures than pure Ni due to the tuning of valence electrons (band fillings), resulting in the increased b and K1. This remarkable correlation between b and K1 can be attributed to the effect of band filling near the Fermi surface

  17. Room-temperature anomalous Hall effect and magnetroresistance in (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO diluted magnetic semiconductor films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xue-Chao; Chen Zhi-Zhan; Shi Er-Wei; Liao Da-Qian; Zhou Ke-Jin

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports that the (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO thin films have been grown by inductively coupled plasma enhanced physical vapour deposition. Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed for the as-grown thin films. The x-ray absorption fine structure characterization reveals that Co2+ and Ga3+ ions substitute for Zn2+ ions in the ZnO lattice and exclude the possibility of extrinsic ferromagnetism origin. The ferromagnetic (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO thin films exhibit carrier concentration dependent anomalous Hall effect and positive magnetoresistance at room temperature. The mechanism of anomalous Hall effect and magneto-transport in ferromagnetic ZnO-based diluted magnetic semiconductors is discussed.

  18. Effect of band filling on anomalous Hall conductivity and magneto-crystalline anisotropy in NiFe epitaxial thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhong; Jiang, Hang-Yu; Zhou, Shi-Ming, E-mail: shiming@tongji.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology & Pohl Institute of Solid State Physics, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Hou, Yan-Liang; Ye, Quan-Lin [Department of Physics, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Su Si, Ming [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and magneto-crystalline anisotropy (MCA) are investigated in epitaxial Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x} thin films grown on MgO (001) substrates. The scattering independent term b of anomalous Hall conductivity shows obvious correlation with cubic magneto-crystalline anisotropy K{sub 1}. When nickel content x decreasing, both b and K{sub 1} vary continuously from negative to positive, changing sign at about x = 0.85. Ab initio calculations indicate Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x} has more abundant band structures than pure Ni due to the tuning of valence electrons (band fillings), resulting in the increased b and K{sub 1}. This remarkable correlation between b and K{sub 1} can be attributed to the effect of band filling near the Fermi surface.

  19. Effect of band filling on anomalous Hall conductivity and magneto-crystalline anisotropy in NiFe epitaxial thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anomalous Hall effect (AHE and magneto-crystalline anisotropy (MCA are investigated in epitaxial NixFe1−x thin films grown on MgO (001 substrates. The scattering independent term b of anomalous Hall conductivity shows obvious correlation with cubic magneto-crystalline anisotropy K1. When nickel content x decreasing, both b and K1 vary continuously from negative to positive, changing sign at about x = 0.85. Ab initio calculations indicate NixFe1−x has more abundant band structures than pure Ni due to the tuning of valence electrons (band fillings, resulting in the increased b and K1. This remarkable correlation between b and K1 can be attributed to the effect of band filling near the Fermi surface.

  20. Biological dosimetry by the radiation effects on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cases of partial body over-exposure, the dose estimation with personal monitors or with reconstruction of exposed conditions is often impossible without considerable error. Clinical signs of irradiated skin, such as epilation or moist desquamation have been used as the indicators of doses in the radiological accidents, because each sign has the threshold dose. As hair growth is known to be sensitive to radiation, the dose-effect relationship of the delay of hair regrowth and the reduction in hair length of mice after irradiation were examined to investigate if they can be used as biological dosimeters. Hairs on the dorsal skin of 290 ICR mice (8 weeks old) were shaved and irradiated with a Sr-90/Y-90 β-ray source in the early anagen and the midanagen stages of the hair cycle. Skin doses were from 0.5 to 10 Gy. The time of hair regrowth and the hair length were examined with the scaling loupe. Dose-effect relationship of the delay of hair regrowth and reduction in hair length were both clearly dose dependent, fitting the L-Q or L function depending on the stage. Dose estimation functions were derived from the dose-effect relationship curves. The histological observations suggested that hair growth retardation caused by irradiation in midanagen might be due to the cell death and the depression of mitosis in the hair matrix cells. This dose estimation method was applied to the case who was over-exposed to X-ray on his hand and fingers. The findings showed that hair regrowth delay was a sensitive biological dosimeter in the case of partial body over-exposure, which could be applied as early as a few days after over-exposure. The method was simple and non-invasive to the exposed patient. (author)

  1. Analysis of effect of different construction methods of piles on the end effect on skin friction of piles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hongbo; CHEN Zhuchang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the comparative analysis of end effect on skin friction of displacement-pile (driven pile),the end effect on skin friction of bored pile is studied.The end effect on skin friction between driven pile and bored pile is different and the end effect on skin friction of bored pile is reduce of skin friction in the soil layer adjacent to the pile end.The degradation degree of skin friction is deduced with the increase of the distance from pile end.The concept of additional mud cake formed by the effect of cushion at the bottom of borehole during pouring concrete is introduced to explain the mechanism of end effect on skin friction of the bored pile.The test results of post-grouting piles indicate that the post-grouting technique is an effective way to improve the end effect on skin friction of bored pile.

  2. Protective effect of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate from salmon skin on UV irradiation-induced photoaging of mice skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tiejun; Hou, Hu; Lu, Jiaohan; Zhang, Kai; Li, Bafang

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of gelatin (SG) isolated from salmon skin and its hydrolysate (SGH) on photoaging skin, and the mechanism responsible for anti-photoaging. The average molecular weights of SG and SGH were 65 kDa and 873 Da, respectively. The amino acid compositions of SG and SGH were similar. Both of them were abundant in hydrophobic amino acids. Twenty-five peptides were identified from SGH. SG and SGH could improve UV irradiation-induced pathological changes of macroscopical tissue texture and skin morphology. Hydroxyproline content is an indicator of matrix collagen content, SG and SGH could inhibit the decrease of hydroxyproline content in photoaging skin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, SG and SGH could alleviate UV irradiation-induced oxidative damages to skin by increasing the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), increasing the content of glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA). Moreover, SG and SGH could enhance immune regulation system by increasing the thymus index. Thus, the anti-photoaging mechanisms of SG and SGH were by inhibiting the depletion of antioxidant defense components, involving in the synthesis of collagen and enhancing the function of immune system. Besides, SGH showed a better result in protecting skin from photoaging than SG.

  3. Protective effect of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate from salmon skin on UV irradiation-induced photoaging of mice skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tiejun; Hou, Hu; Lu, Jiaohan; Zhang, Kai; Li, Bafang

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of gelatin (SG) isolated from salmon skin and its hydrolysate (SGH) on photoaging skin, and the mechanism responsible for anti-photoaging. The average molecular weights of SG and SGH were 65 kDa and 873 Da, respectively. The amino acid compositions of SG and SGH were similar. Both of them were abundant in hydrophobic amino acids. Twenty-five peptides were identified from SGH. SG and SGH could improve UV irradiation-induced pathological changes of macroscopical tissue texture and skin morphology. Hydroxyproline content is an indicator of matrix collagen content, SG and SGH could inhibit the decrease of hydroxyproline content in photoaging skin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, SG and SGH could alleviate UV irradiation-induced oxidative damages to skin by increasing the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), increasing the content of glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA). Moreover, SG and SGH could enhance immune regulation system by increasing the thymus index. Thus, the anti-photoaging mechanisms of SG and SGH were by inhibiting the depletion of antioxidant defense components, involving in the synthesis of collagen and enhancing the function of immune system. Besides, SGH showed a better result in protecting skin from photoaging than SG.

  4. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  5. Anomalous Hall Effect in SnMnEuTe and SnMnErTe mixed crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Racka, K.; Kuryliszyn, I.; Arciszewska, M.; Dobrowolski, W.; Broto, J. -M.; Goiran, M.; Portugall, O.; Rakoto, H.; Raquet, B.; Dugaev, V.; Slynko, E. I.; Slynko, V. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Anomalous Hall Effect was investigated in IV-VI ferromagnetic semimagnetic semiconductors of Sn1-xMnxTe codoped with either Eu or Er. The analysis of experimental data: Hall resisitivity and magnetization showed that AHE coefficient RS depends on temperature, its value decreases with the temperature increase. We observe that above ferromagnet-paramagnet transition temperature RS changes sign. We discuss the possible physical mechanisms responsible for observed temperature dependence of RS...

  6. Local orbitals approach to the anomalous Hall and Nernst effects in itinerant ferromagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Středa Pavel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Linear response of the orbital momentum to the gradient of the chemical potential is used to obtain anomalous Hall conductivity. Transition from the ideal Bloch system for which the conductivity is determined by the Berry phase curvatures to the case of strong disorder for which the conductivity becomes dependent on the relaxation time is analysed. Presented tight-binding model reproduces experimentally observed qualitative features of the anomalous Hall conductivity and the transverse Peltier coefficient in the so called bad-metal and scattering-independent regimes.

  7. Investigation on the effect of developed product and new food for radiation-induced skin damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo evaluation of the developed pilot product on the skin protection against UV irradiation and screening of new candidate materials. Project Results are Establishment of experimental methods for 3 morphological indices of UV-induced skin damages -Establishment of experimental methods for whitening effect evaluation -Evaluation of HemoHIM administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 1 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 2 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 3 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the TNBS-induced colitis -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the anti-wrinkle effects in the skin -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tissue (epidermal thickening, dermal cellularity, dermal cyst) -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tumor development

  8. Investigation on the effect of developed product and new food for radiation-induced skin damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Chun; Bae, Chun Sik; Kim, Se Ra; Lee, Hae Jun; Bang, Dae Won; Lee, Jin Hee; Kim, Joong Sun; Ki, Sun Ah; Song, Myung Seop [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    In vivo evaluation of the developed pilot product on the skin protection against UV irradiation and screening of new candidate materials. Project Results are Establishment of experimental methods for 3 morphological indices of UV-induced skin damages -Establishment of experimental methods for whitening effect evaluation -Evaluation of HemoHIM administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 1 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 2 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 3 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the TNBS-induced colitis -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the anti-wrinkle effects in the skin -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tissue (epidermal thickening, dermal cellularity, dermal cyst) -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tumor development

  9. Effect of estrogens on skin aging and the potential role of SERMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Stevenson

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Susan Stevenson1, Julie Thornton21Burns & Plastic Surgery Research Unit, 2Cutaneous Research, Medical Biosciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, UKAbstract: In humans, structural and functional changes attributable to aging are more visibly evident in the skin than in any other organ. Estrogens have significant effects on skin physiology and modulate epidermal keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts and melanocytes, in addition to skin appendages including the hair follicle and the sebaceous gland. Importantly, skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews the effects of estrogens on skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging that occur in human skin. The relevance of estrogen replacement therapy (HRT in postmenopausal women and the potential value of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs as a therapy for diminishing skin aging are also highlighted.Keywords: estrogen receptors, skin, menopause, SERMs, HRT

  10. Effects of the solar wind termination shock and heliosheath on theheliospheric modulation of galactic and anomalous Helium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. W. Langner

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the role of the solar wind termination shock and heliosheath in cosmic ray modulation studies has increased significantly as the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft approach the estimated position of the solar wind termination shock. The effect of the solar wind termination shock on charge-sign dependent modulation, as is experienced by galactic cosmic ray Helium (He++ and anomalous Helium (He+, is the main topic of this work, and is complementary to the previous work on protons, anti-protons, electrons, and positrons. The modulation of galactic and anomalous Helium is studied with a numerical model including a more fundamental and comprehensive set of diffusion coefficients, a solar wind termination shock with diffusive shock acceleration, a heliosheath and particle drifts. The model allows a comparison of modulation with and without a solar wind termination shock and is applicable to a number of cosmic ray species during both magnetic polarity cycles of the Sun. The modulation of Helium, including an anomalous component, is also done to establish charge-sign dependence at low energies. We found that the heliosheath is important for cosmic ray modulation and that its effect on modulation is very similar for protons and Helium. The local Helium interstellar spectrum may not be known at energies <~1GeV until a spacecraft actually approaches the heliopause because of the strong modulation that occurs in the heliosheath, the effect of the solar wind termination shock and the presence of anomalous Helium.

  11. The effect of dietary and/or cosmetic argan oil on postmenopausal skin elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Qiraouani Boucetta, Kenza; Charrouf, Zoubida; Aguenaou, Hassan; Derouiche, Abdelfattah; Bensouda, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Background During menopause, the decrease of estrogenic secretion induces the disruption of skin functioning, thus causing the decline in skin elasticity characteristic of skin aging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of daily consumption and/or application of argan oil on skin elasticity. Materials and methods Sixty postmenopausal women consumed butter during the stabilization period and were randomly divided into two groups for the intervention per...

  12. The effect of pimecrolimus on expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzanka, Alicja; Zebracka-Gala, Jadwiga; Rachowska, Regina; Bozek, Andrzej; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Jarzab, Jerzy

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of action of pimecrolimus (PIM) on atopic lesions is still under consideration. Thus far, we have evidence of its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity, and recent papers focus on its effect on epidermal barrier function. This study analysed changes in the expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis (AD) skin lesions after 2 weeks of exposure to PIM 1% cream. A real-time quantitative PCR analysis of selected epidermal differentiation complex genes and three alternative pathway keratins was performed in skin biopsies from 11 individuals with AD before and after PIM exposure. The real-time quantitative PCR analysis was compared to non-lesional skin in the same patients. Involucrin, a small proline-rich region (SPRR) 2C gene, and alternative pathway keratin 16 showed significant over-expression in lesional skin followed by significant decrease after PIM therapy. The SPRR1A gene, S100A9, and keratin 6A were also increased; however, the decrease after PIM treatment was not significant. The changes in S100 A2, A7 and A8 followed a similar course with borderline significance. SPRR4 had a significant decrease in expression in lesional versus non-lesional skin, which persisted after PIM treatment. No significant changes were detected in mRNA expression levels of filaggrin and loricrin. Our results suggest that PIM can be effective in restoring the epidermal barrier in patients with AD at least in part by its impact on expression of genes, which are important for the normal barrier function of skin. PMID:22142393

  13. Effects of Ginsenoside Rb1 on Skin Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng roots (Panax ginseng CA Meyer have been used traditionally for the treatment, especially prevention, of various diseases in China, Korea, and Japan. Both experimental and clinical studies suggest ginseng roots to have pharmacological effects in patients with life-style-related diseases such as non-insulin-dependent diabetic mellitus, atherosclerosis, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. The topical use of ginseng roots to treat skin complaints including atopic suppurative dermatitis, wounds, and inflammation is also described in ancient Chinese texts; however, there have been relatively few studies in this area. In the present paper, we describe introduce the biological and pharmacological effects of ginsenoside Rb1 isolated from Red ginseng roots on skin damage caused by burn-wounds using male Balb/c mice (in vivo and by ultraviolet B irradiation using male C57BL/6J and albino hairless (HR-1 mice (in vivo. Furthermore, to clarify the mechanisms behind these pharmacological actions, human primary keratinocytes and the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT were used in experiments in vitro.

  14. Improved treatment of radiation effects on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment concept developed by K.H. Kaercher was extended by a therapy using Elasten S cream. In the course of a highvoltage therapy using fast electrons or cobalt-60, interesting aspects in the treatment and progression of the radiation reactions of the skin were established. The dermato-therapeutic principles layed down by K.H. Kaercher with the treatment palette used hitherto, have without doubt invariably proven their value. The exclusive powder treatment, however, may be made more practical by application of the new treatment cream in accordance with the intervals in radiation treatment or as a basic treatment towards the end of therapy. Furthermore it is ideally suited for the care and after-treatment of skin, strained by radiation. It reduces considerably the remaining visible radiation reactions. The treatment with powder and emulsion has for more than 10 years proven effective. After the excellent results of the new cream during radiation treatment, additional positive effects are expected in a long-term trial which will be reported on separately. (orig.)

  15. The Photoprotective Effect of S-Methylmethionine Sulfonium in Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Serk Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available S-Methylmethionine sulfonium (SMMS was reported to have wound-healing effects; we therefore have investigated the photoprotective effect of SMMS in the present study. SMMS increased the viability of keratinocyte progenitor cells (KPCs and human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs following ultraviolet B (UVB irradiation, and reduced the UVB-induced apoptosis in these cells. SMMS increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK, and the inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly decreased the SMMS-induced viability of KPCs and hDFs. In addition, SMMS attenuated the UVB-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in KPCs and hDFs. SMMS induced the collagen synthesis and reduced the matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in UVB-irradiated hDFs. In animal studies, application of 5% and 10% SMMS before and after UVB-irradiation significantly decreased the UVB-induced erythema index and depletion of Langerhans cells. In summary, SMMS protects KPCs and hDFs from UVB irradiation, and reduces UVB-induced skin erythema and immune suppression. Therefore, SMMS can be used as a cosmetic raw material, and protect skin from UVB.

  16. Anomalous polymer dynamics is non-Markovian: memory effects and the generalized Langevin equation formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Any first course on polymer physics teaches that the dynamics of a tagged monomer of a polymer is anomalously subdiffusive, i.e., the mean-square displacement of a tagged monomer increases as tα for some α < 1 until the terminal relaxation time τ of the polymer. Beyond time τ the motion of the tagged monomer becomes diffusive. Classical examples of anomalous dynamics in polymer physics are single polymeric systems, such as phantom Rouse, self-avoiding Rouse, self-avoiding Zimm, reptation, translocation through a narrow pore in a membrane, and many-polymeric systems such as polymer melts. In this pedagogical paper I report that all these instances of anomalous dynamics in polymeric systems are robustly characterized by power-law memory kernels within a unified generalized Langevin equation (GLE) scheme, and therefore are non-Markovian. The exponents of the power-law memory kernels are related to the relaxation response of the polymers to local strains, and are derived from the equilibrium statistical physics of polymers. The anomalous dynamics of a tagged monomer of a polymer in these systems is then reproduced from the power-law memory kernels of the GLE via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). Using this GLE formulation I further show that the characteristics of the drifts caused by a (weak) applied field on these polymeric systems are also obtained from the corresponding memory kernels

  17. Magnetoresistance and Anomalous Hall Effect of InSb Doped with Mn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Kochura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Transport properties of polycrystalline (In, MnSb samples are investigated. Behavior of the temperature and magnetic field dependencies of the resistivity, anomalous Hall coefficient and magnetoresistivity at low temperatures points out the influence of Mn complexes, Mn ions and nano- and microsizes MnSb precipitates on charge transport.

  18. Anomalous polymer dynamics is non-Markovian: memory effects and the generalized Langevin equation formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Panja

    2010-01-01

    Any first course on polymer physics teaches that the dynamics of a tagged monomer of a polymer is anomalously subdiffusive, i.e., the mean-square displacement of a tagged monomer increases as tα for some α < 1 until the terminal relaxation time τ of the polymer. Beyond time τ the motion of the tagge

  19. Effects of anomalous magnetic moment in the quantum motion of neutral particle in magnetic and conical spacetime electric fields produced by a linear source in a conical spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we analyse the effect of the anomalous magnetic moment on the non-relativistic quantum motion of a neutral particle in magnetic and electric fields produced by linear sources of constant current and charge density, respectively. (author)

  20. Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties of semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Y.; Shimazu, T.; Shiozaki, M.

    1999-09-01

    Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties and directionality in semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets produced by skin-pass rolling process was studied. Skin-pass rolling direction greatly affects magnetic properties and directionality. By control of skin-pass rolling direction, the value of B{sub 50} in the required directions such as 0{degree}, 90{degree} and circumferential direction can be adjusted and the value of B{sub 50} is higher than that of the usual skin-pass rolling direction of 0{degree}. The textures of the steel sheets developed after batch annealing varied with the skin-pass rolling directions and this result indicates that the residual strain energy by skin-pass rolling varies with skin-pass rolling directions.

  1. Influence of defects and disorder on anomalous Hall effect and spin Seebeck effect on permalloy and Heusler compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova Vidal, Enrique

    2012-09-19

    In this work Heusler thin films have been prepared and their transport properties have been studied. Of particularly interest is the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The effect is a long known but still not fully understood transport effect. Most theory papers focus on the influence of one particular contribution to the AHE. Actual measured experimental data, however, often are not in accordance with idealized assumptions. This thesis discusses the data analysis for materials with low residual resistivity ratios. As prototypical materials, half metallic Heusler compounds are studied. Here, the influence of defects and disorder is apparent in a material with a complex topology of the Fermi surface. Using films with different degrees of disorder, the different scattering mechanisms can be separated. For Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 0.6}Al{sub 0.4} and Co{sub 2}FeGa{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}, the AHE induced by B2-type disorder and temperature-dependent scattering is positive, while DO{sub 3}-type disorder and possible intrinsic contributions possess a negative sign. For these compounds, magneto-optical Kerr effects (MOKE) are investigated. First order contributions as a function of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters are qualitatively analyzed. The relation between the crystalline ordering and the second order contributions to the MOKE signal is studied. In addition, sets of the Heusler compound Co{sub 2}MnAl thin films were grown on MgO(100) and Si(100) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Composition, magnetic and transport properties were studied systematically for samples deposited at different conditions. In particular, the anomalous Hall effect resistivity presents an extraordinarily temperature independent behavior in a moderate magnetic field range from 0 to 0.6 T. The off-diagonal transport at temperatures up to 300 C was analyzed. The data show the suitability of the material for Hall sensors working well above room temperature. Recently, the spin Seebeck effect

  2. EFFECT OF PRE-EVISCERATION, SKIN-ON CARCASS DECONTAMINATION SANITATION STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF BEEF DURING SKINNING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of pre-evisceration, skin-on carcass sanitation on reducing bacterial contamination of beef carcasses was tested using 3 cattle per treatment and 3 cattle as controls at each of 3 abattoirs in southern Wisconsin. The sanitation procedure included stunning, bleeding, tying off the e...

  3. Effect of olive and sunflower seed oil on the adult skin barrier: implications for neonatal skin care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danby, Simon G; AlEnezi, Tareq; Sultan, Amani; Lavender, Tina; Chittock, John; Brown, Kirsty; Cork, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Natural oils are advocated and used throughout the world as part of neonatal skin care, but there is an absence of evidence to support this practice. The goal of the current study was to ascertain the effect of olive oil and sunflower seed oil on the biophysical properties of the skin. Nineteen adult volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis were recruited into two randomized forearm-controlled mechanistic studies. The first cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm twice daily for 5 weeks. The second cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm and six drops of sunflower seed oil to the other twice daily for 4 weeks. The effect of the treatments was evaluated by determining stratum corneum integrity and cohesion, intercorneocyte cohesion, moisturization, skin-surface pH, and erythema. Topical application of olive oil for 4 weeks caused a significant reduction in stratum corneum integrity and induced mild erythema in volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis. Sunflower seed oil preserved stratum corneum integrity, did not cause erythema, and improved hydration in the same volunteers. In contrast to sunflower seed oil, topical treatment with olive oil significantly damages the skin barrier, and therefore has the potential to promote the development of, and exacerbate existing, atopic dermatitis. The use of olive oil for the treatment of dry skin and infant massage should therefore be discouraged. These findings challenge the unfounded belief that all natural oils are beneficial for the skin and highlight the need for further research. PMID:22995032

  4. Anomalous polymer dynamics is non-Markovian: memory effects and the generalized Langevin equation formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Debabrata

    2010-06-01

    Any first course on polymer physics teaches that the dynamics of a tagged monomer of a polymer is anomalously subdiffusive, i.e., the mean-square displacement of a tagged monomer increases as tα for some α kernels within a unified generalized Langevin equation (GLE) scheme, and therefore are non-Markovian. The exponents of the power-law memory kernels are related to the relaxation response of the polymers to local strains, and are derived from the equilibrium statistical physics of polymers. The anomalous dynamics of a tagged monomer of a polymer in these systems is then reproduced from the power-law memory kernels of the GLE via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). Using this GLE formulation I further show that the characteristics of the drifts caused by a (weak) applied field on these polymeric systems are also obtained from the corresponding memory kernels.

  5. Anomalous Nernst-effect and spin fluctuations in LaFeAsO1-xFx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Nernst-effect investigations on LaFeAsO1-xFx. In the parent compound the formation of a SDW state leads to a huge enhancement of the Nernst coefficient at TN. Despite the absence of SDW order at underdoped superconducting doping levels, a similar anomalous behavior is also observed (with smaller magnitude), which is suggestive of a spin-fluctuation enhanced Nernst-effect. Interestingly, at optimal doping level the Nernst coefficient is only weakly temperature dependent and appears more conventional.

  6. Anomalous Doppler effect at interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron beams: experimental researches and opportunities for application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anomalous Doppler effect (ADE) in systems consisting of an electron beam and slow wave structure in longitudinal magnetic field is considered. Resonance condition for amplifiers and generators based on ADE enables resonance maintaining in case of wave phase velocity or beam velocity changing (acceleration of ions at ADE, reception of high efficiency at microwave generation). Essential advantages can be reached at combination of ADE and normal Doppler effect. The review of experimental studies of ADE is presented: amplification and generation of microwaves, energetic relations, excitation of accelerating IH-structures, development of ion acceleration

  7. On estimating the effect of control element relative vibrations during anomalous motions of the reactor barrel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the motivation by a theoretical paper, the fraction δ arising additionally in ex-core neutron flux fluctuations synchronously to the barrel motion due to the control element motion relative to the core is estimated from experimental data on anomalous core barrel motions at the WWER-440 type reactor. The experimental result of δ ∼ 0.25 confirms the numerical values obtained by theoretical estimation. (author)

  8. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaqub Khan, M., E-mail: myaqubsultani@gmail.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Riphah International University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Iqbal, J. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ul Haq, A. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Physics, Riphah International University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  9. Transmission of phototherapy through human skin: dosimetry adjustment for effects of skin color, body composition, wavelength, and light coupling to skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Ethne L.; Van Zuylen, Jeff

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To examine factors that affect penetration of phototherapy. Methods: Age, sex, height, and weight were recorded; skin color, skinfold thickness, and light transmission through a skinfold were measured over biceps and triceps muscles, and at the anterior waistline. Light was generated using two 23-diode LED arrays at 840 nm and 660 nm with surface area of 7 cm2. Photon irradiation was measured using an Optical Power Meter consisting of a 1x1-cm2 light detector placed in the centre of the illuminated 7 cm2 spot. Transmission was measured using three skin-diode coupling conditions. Results: Penetration of LED irradiation increased when diodes were coupled to skin with pressure. Red light attenuated more rapidly than infrared light and the attenuation of red light increased as skin color darkened. Penetration of red and infrared light decreased as the amount of subcutaneous fat increased. There were gender effects on penetration of infrared light at normal and low BMI values. Conclusions: When using divergent light sources for phototherapy, radiant exposure should take into account individual physical characteristics, irradiation wavelength and diode configuration of the laser therapy system.

  10. Effect of CO2 laser on skin lymphatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a CO2 laser on lymphatics and small blood vessels were studied by electron microscopy. Laser incisions were made on white rats at different sites of the skin and of the mucous membranes. Electron microscopically, three zones of the lased tissue were observed: the first superficial layer consisted of a carbonized skeletal residue; the second layer was an area of coagulative necrosis; the third and deepest layer was characterized by edema of varying degrees. Small blood vessels were completely filled with erythrocyte fragments leading to an apparent occlusion of the vessels. On the other hand, lymphatic vessels of comparable size seemed to be less damaged and their lumina appeared to be open and not occluded. Our results indicate that in tumor surgery with the laser scalpel, the propagation of cellular material, e.g. tumor cells, cannot be excluded with certainty. (orig.)

  11. Skin Effect of Reversely Switched Dynistor in Short Pulse Discharge Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Liang; Yue-Hui Yu

    2009-01-01

    The skin effect in the reversely switched dynistor (RSD) devices is investigated in this paper. Based on the plasma bipolar drift model of the RSD, the current density distributions on the chip are simulated with considering the skin effect. The results indicate that the current density on the border can be several hundred to a thousand A/cm2 higher than that in the center of the chip. The skin effect becomes more prominent as the voltage increases and the inductance decreases in the main circuit. The phenomenon that most of a certain group of chips break over on the border has proved the existence of the skin effect.

  12. The adverse effects of the sun on the skin : a review

    OpenAIRE

    Scerri, Lawrence; Keefe, M.

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation causes a variety of biologic effects in the skin which are predominantly harmful. The only recognised beneficial effect is that of endogenous photosynthesis of vitamin D from its precursors in the skin, the importance of which is greatly diminished by a well balanced diet. Acute excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) causes sunburn, whereas chronic overexposure is responsible for the process of photo ageing and skin cancer. This sun related degenerative process and ...

  13. Anomalous temperature effect on the hydrogen bond strength and phase transition in 2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium pentachlorophenolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerz, Irena; Jakubas, Ryszard

    2004-06-01

    The phase transition in 2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium pentachlorophenolate has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dielectric method as well as theoretical calculations. The crystal undergoes a first order phase transition of order-disorder type at 376 K. The transition to the high temperature phase causes anomalous hydrogen-bond shortening. Experimental and theoretical results show that the change in the mutual orientation of the phenol and pyridine rings is connected with the change of the hydrogen bond. Such an effect, which appears in the present simple hydrogen-bond complex, may be common also for the other hydrogen-bond complexes.

  14. Antioxidant, antimelanogenic, and skin-protective effect of sesamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisayam, Montra; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida; Barusrux, Sahapat; Kanokmedhakul, Kwanjai

    2014-01-01

    Sesame contains high nutritional value and important bioactive lignans which are good for health-promoting effects including sesamol. Sesamol is found in trace amounts in sesame. The biological action from the trace amounts of sesamol found might indicate its efficacy. This paper presents a systematic study of the antimelanogenic and skin-protective effects (antioxidant) of sesamol and positive compounds. The results showed that sesamol had the most scavenging 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH·) radical with an IC50 value < 14.48 µM. The antioxidant power (Ferric reducing antioxidant power value) of sesamol at a concentration of 0.1129 µM was 189.88 ± 17.56 µM FeSO4. Sesamol inhibited lipid peroxidation with an IC50 value of 6.15 ± 0.2 µM. Moreover, sesamol possessed a whitening effect by inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase at an IC50 value of 1.6 µM and an inhibition of cellular tyrosinase with 23.55 ± 8.25% inhibition at a concentration of 217.2 µM. Sesamol exhibited high antioxidant and anti-tyrosinase activity compared to the positive control, kojic acid and β-arbutin. Sesamol from edible sesame seed could therefore have an alternative cosmeceutical purpose. PMID:24797023

  15. X-ray imaging and the skin: Radiation biology, patient dosimetry and observed effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of radiation-induced deterministic skin effects have been observed after X-ray guided interventions ranging from mild effects, such as transient erythema or temporary epilation, to severe effects, such as desquamation and necrosis. Radiation biologists have identified, in addition to absorbed dose to the skin, other factors that strongly influence the type and severity of a skin reaction, including exposure-related factors (dose rate, fractionation, the size of the exposed area and its site), biological factors (age, oxygen status, capillary density, hormonal status and genetic factors) and ethnic differences. A peak entrance skin dose of 2 Gy is an arbitrary, but pragmatic, threshold for radiation-induced skin effects after X-ray guided interventions. Transient skin injury originating in the epidermis is not expected in the average patient population at peak entrance skin doses up to 6 Gy. Serious skin effects are not likely to occur in clinical practice when optimised X-ray equipment is used in combination with good techniques for fluoroscopy and imaging. However, this might not be true for patients with biological factors that are associated with an increased sensitivity for radiation-induced skin reactions. (authors)

  16. Anomalous-Magnetic-Moment Effects in a Strongly Magnetized and Dense Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer, E J; Paret, D Manreza; Martínez, A Pérez

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the quantum corrections of the anomalous magnetic moment (AMM) for fermions in the presence of a strong magnetic field using the Ritus's approach. At strong fields the particles get different AMM's depending on the LL's. This result is different from what is obtained with the Schwinger's approximation at weak field where the AMM is independent of the LL. We analyze the significance of the AMM contribution to the Equation of State (EoS) of the magnetized system, in the weak and strong field approximations.

  17. Effect of mother-infant early skin-to-skin contact on breast feeding status: a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of mother-infant early skin-to-skin contact on breast feeding behavior of infants. Study Design: A randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics of Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, from November to December 2009. Methodology: Eligible mothers were assessed for the successful breast feeding by using IBFAT tool. The time to initiate the first feed, time to effective breast feeding, maternal satisfaction with the care provided, preference for the same care in future and level of exclusive breast feeding at the age of one month were also noted. The data was compared by using X2 and t-test. Significant p-value was taken as < 0.05. Results: A total of 183 mother-infant pairs (92 in skin-to-skin care [SSC] group and 91 in conventional care [CC] group) were analyzed for breast feeding behavior of the infants. The first breast feed was 26.25% more successful in SSC group (58.8% in SSC group as compared to 32.5% in CC group with p-value of 0.001). In SSC group, the mean time to initiate first breast feed was 61.6 minutes shorter than CC group (40.62 vs. 101.88; p < 0.001). Mean time to achieve effective breast feeding was 207 minutes earlier in SSC group (149.69 vs. 357.50; p < 0.001). The level of satisfaction in the mothers of SSC group was significantly high as compared to controls (56% vs. 6.2%). Similarly, 53.8% mothers of SSC group showed reference for similar care in future as compared to 5% in CC group. In SSC group 85.3% infants were exclusively breast fed at one month as compared to 65.7% in CC group (p=0.025). Conclusion: Maternal-infant early skin-to-skin contact significantly enhanced the success of first breast feed and continuation of exclusive breast feeding till one month of age. It also reduced the time to initiate first feed and time to effective breast feeding. (author)

  18. The effect of skin aging on the percutaneous penetration of chemicals through human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite much research into the mechanisms of cutaneous aging and the identification of significant age-associated biological and biophysical changes within the skin, the question how does aging affect percutaneous absorption (PA) in vivo remains unanswered. The author has made in vivo measurements of PA in young (18-40 years) and old (> 65 years) subjects. Standard radiotracer methodology was employed and PA was quantified from the urinary excretion profiles of 14C radiolabel (corrected for incomplete renal elimination). Testosterone (TST), estradiol (EST), hydrocortisone (HC), benzoic acid (BA), acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and caffeine (CAFF) have been studied. Penetration of HC, BA, ASA, and CAFF were significantly lower in aged subjects whereas TST and EST absorption were not distinguishable from the young controls. Thus it appears that aging can affect PA in vivo and that relatively hydrophilic compounds may be most sensitive. Work was done to elucidate whether the observations were related to documented skin aging changes. Cutaneous microcirculation efficiency suspected to decline with increasing age, could not be correlated with the observed penetration changes. However, in vivo infrared spectroscopic studies of aged stratum corneum (SC) reveal a decreased amount of epidermal lipid. The diminished lipid content implies a diminished dissolution medium for compounds administered to the skin surface. They hypothesize that the compounds most affected by a loss of SC lipids would be those compounds whose overall solubility is lowest (compounds with lower octanol-water partition coefficients, eg., HC, BA, ASA and CAFF). Conversely, a diminished lipid content may not affect dissolution into the SC of highly lipophilic compounds (e.g., TST and EST)

  19. Giant gap quantum spin Hall effect and valley-polarized quantum anomalous Hall effect in cyanided bismuth bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei-xiao; Zhang, Chang-wen; Ding, Meng; Zhang, Bao-min; Li, Ping; Li, Feng; Ren, Miao-juan; Wang, Pei-ji; Zhang, Run-wu; Hu, Shu-jun; Yan, Shi-shen

    2016-08-01

    Bismuth (Bi) has attracted a great deal of attention for its strongest spin–orbit coupling (SOC) strength among main group elements. Although quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is predicted in half-hydrogenated Bi honeycomb monolayers Bi2H, the experimental results are still missing. Halogen atoms (X = F, Cl and Br) were also frequently used as modifications, but Bi2X films show a frustrating metallic character that masks the QAH effects. Here, first-principle calculations are performed to predict the full-cyanided bismuthene (Bi2(CN)2) as 2D topological insulator supporting quantum spin Hall state with a record large gap up to 1.10 eV, and more importantly, half-cyanogen saturated bismuthene (Bi2(CN)) as a Chern insulator supporting a valley-polarized QAH state, with a Curie temperature to be 164 K, as well as a large gap reaching 0.348 eV which could be further tuned by bi-axial strain and SOC strength. Our findings provide an appropriate and flexible material family candidate for spintronic and valleytronic devices.

  20. Effect of microplasma irradiation on skin barrier function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Tran, An N.; Blajan, Marius

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce the feasibility of atmospheric-pressure argon microplasma irradiation (AAMI) to promote percutaneous absorption. A hairless Yucatan micropig skin was used for this ex vivo study. After AAMI, the disturbance in the stratum corneum (SC) lipids was observed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also, an increase in transepidermal water loss and no physical damage on pig skins were confirmed by microscopic observation. These results of AAMI were compared with those of a plasma jet irradiation (PJI) and a tape stripping test (TST) leading to the conclusion that AAMI reduces the barrier function of the skin and could also enhance the transdermal absorption of drugs.

  1. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates. PMID:26952406

  2. Antioxidant effect of an ozonized theobroma oil formulation on damaged-inflammatory rat skin

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Yaima; Maritza F. Díaz; Hernández, Frank; Gil, Dayana; García, Gastón

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a cosmetic formulation elaborated with ozonized theobroma oil may exert beneficial effects in the restoring of the antioxidant activity on the skin of rats previously irradiated with ultraviolet light. 0.5 g of the formulation was applied on the skin of rats for five days. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) activity were determined in a homogenate of rat skin. Malondialdehyde (MDA), conjugated dienes (CD) ...

  3. Effect of estrogens on skin aging and the potential role of SERMs

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Stevenson; Julie Thornton

    2007-01-01

    Susan Stevenson1, Julie Thornton21Burns & Plastic Surgery Research Unit, 2Cutaneous Research, Medical Biosciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, UKAbstract: In humans, structural and functional changes attributable to aging are more visibly evident in the skin than in any other organ. Estrogens have significant effects on skin physiology and modulate epidermal keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts and melanocytes, in addition to skin appendages including the h...

  4. Fractional Laser Photothermolysis in the Treatment of Skin Defects: Possibilities and Effectiveness (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    М.М. Karabut; N.D. Gladkova; F.I. Feldchtein

    2016-01-01

    For skin defect treatment and rejuvenation the ablative laser skin resurfacing with a CO2 laser is widely applied in cosmetology and dermatology. However this treatment can result in the risk of undesirable side effects and requires a long-term recovery after the procedure. When non-ablative laser skin rejuvenation is used as an alternative, the level of safety is increased, however the efficacy of the procedure is considerably reduced. The use of fractional laser photothermolysis is a partic...

  5. Effects of hair removal alexandrite laser on biometric parameters of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Shiva; Abolhasani, Ehsan; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammadali

    2016-04-01

    The effects of alexandrite laser (AL) on skin parameters such as melanin content, skin layer depth, elasticity, and density have not been investigated through biometric methods. We aim to assess the effect of AL on the skin parameters through biometric devices to determine whether it has positive effects on treated region. In this pretest-posttest study, we recruited patients who attended Laser Clinic of Skin and Stem Cell Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, from January through December 2014. Patients had to be free of any dermatologic conditions and lesion at the site of treatment or any contraindication to laser therapy. Baseline measurements were performed and patients received four sessions of AL therapy (spot size, 12 mm; fluence, 12 J/cm(2); and pulse width, 5 Hz) with 4-week intervals. Four weeks after the last treatment session, the same parameters were assessed that included skin color, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), dermis and epidermis density and depth (through skin ultrasonography), melanin content, erythema intensity, and skin elasticity. Biometric parameters of 33 patients (27 females [81.8%]), with mean (SD) age of 35.7 (9.5) years were evaluated. The mean percent changes of skin parameters were as follows: skin color, 5.88% through Visioface and by 56.8% through Colorimeter devices (became lighter); melanin content, -15.95%; TEWL, -2.96%; elasticity, +14.88%; dermis depth -19.01%; and dermis density, +1580.11% (P melanin content of the skin and make the skin thinner while it could increase elasticity and density of epidermis and dermis, which might indicate increased collagen content of skin. PMID:26861986

  6. Proinflammatory Effects of Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticles on Scleroderma Skin Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mastrofrancesco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of unknown etiology thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. We aimed to verify whether environmental pollution from diesel engine exhaust nanoparticulate (DEP of actually operating vehicles could play a role in the development of a rare immune-mediated disease, systemic sclerosis (SSc, in which the pathogenetic role of environment has been highlighted. The effects of carbon-based nanoparticulate collected at the exhaust of newer (Euro 5 and older (Euro 4 diesel engines on SSc skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts were evaluated in vitro by assessing the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α and fibroblast chemical mediators (metalloproteases 2, 3, 7, 9, and 12; collagen types I and III; VEGF. DEP was shown to stimulate cytokine gene expression at a higher extent in SSc keratinocytes versus normal cells. Moreover, the mRNA gene expression of all MMPs, collagen types, and VEGF genes was significantly higher in untreated SSc fibroblasts versus controls. Euro 5 particle exposure increased the mRNA expression of MMP-2, -7, and -9 in SSc fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner and only at the highest concentration in normal cells. We suggest that environmental DEP could trigger the development of SSc acting on genetically hyperreactive cell systems.

  7. Degenerative alterations of dermal collagen fiber bundles in photodamaged human skin and UV-irradiated hairless mouse skin: possible effect on decreasing skin mechanical properties and appearance of wrinkles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimori, Y; Edwards, C; Pearse, A; Matsumoto, K; Kawai, M; Marks, R

    2001-12-01

    Dermal collagen fiber bundles (DCFB) are the major constructional element in the dermis. Although degenerative alterations of DCFB have been reported in chronologically aged skin, changes in photodamaged skin have not been fully investigated. We report ultrastructural alterations of DCFB, and their relation to skin elasticity using photodamaged human skin and UV-irradiated hairless mouse skin. The degree to which DCFB were intact and closely packed was evaluated and scored blindly. Exposed skin (outer forearm) exhibited marked ultrastructural degeneration. In UV-irradiated hairless mouse skin, the intact ultrastructural appearance of DCFB was gradually lost with increasing UV dosage; however, marked alterations in DCFB ultrastructure were absent in either human inner upper arm (unexposed) skin or nonirradiated age-matched control mouse skin. Skin mechanical properties were measured using a Cutometer SEM 474 suction extensometer, recording Ue* immediate deformation, Uv* viscous deformation, Uf* final deformation, and Ur* immediate contraction, all normalized for skin thickness. Uf*, Ue*, Uv*, and Ur/Uf were significantly decreased in exposed compared with unexposed skin. Significant positive correlations between degenerative alterations of DCFB and the decrease in Uf*, Ue*, and Uv* were seen. Changes of "% area of wrinkles" in UV-irradiated mouse skin was significantly correlated with degenerative changes of DCFB. Based on these results, we confirm observations made by others that chronic photodamage may have more severe effects on degeneration of DCFB than that of chronologic aging alone. Furthermore, degeneration of DCFB as detected ultrastructurally may, by its effect on skin elasticity, result in an increase in the appearance of wrinkles. PMID:11886509

  8. Anomalous hydrodynamical dispersion and the Coats-Smith equation: the finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate a family of probability distributions that shows anomalous hydrodynamics dispersion, by solving a particular class of coupled generalized master equations. The Fourier-Laplace solution is obtained analytically in terms of the matrix Green function method; then the Coats-Smith concentration profile is revisited in a particular case. Two models of disorder are worked out explicitly, and the mean current is asymptotically calculated. We present an approximation method to calculate the first passage time distribution for this stochastic transport process, and as an example an exact Markovian result is worked out; scaling results are also shown. We discuss the comparison with other different methods to work out complex diffusion phenomena in the presence of disordered multiple transport paths. Extensions when the models are non diffusive can also be solved in the Fourier-Laplace representation. (author)

  9. Hall effects on anomalous heat, particle and helicity transports through tearing-mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The helicity transport in a current-carrying plasma results in heat and particle transports in the direction opposite to the helicity flux. Tearing-mode turbulence produces helicity flux that is proportional to the gradient of equilibrium parallel current. The helicity flux is a consequence of a fluctuating electric field with a circularly polarized component, which also causes a nonlinear parallel current (primarily an electron flux) and a nonlinear polarization current (primarily an ion flux). Such anomalous heat and particle fluxes are driven by the free-energy associated with the perturbed magnetic field in the tearing-mode turbulence, and are typically directed inward to the plasma. Both fluxes becomes large when the gradient of the equilibrium current is large. 12 refs

  10. The role of the skin barrier in modulating the effects of common skin microbial species on the inflammation, differentiation and proliferation status of epidermal keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Duckney, Patrick; Wong, Heng Kuan; Serrano, José; Yaradou, Diaraf; Oddos, Thierry; Stamatas, Georgios N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin resident microbial species are often thought of either as pathogenic or commensal. However, little is known about the role of the skin barrier in modulating their potential for causing disease. To investigate this question we measured the effects of three microbial species commonly found on the skin (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Propionibacterium acnes) on a reconstructed human epidermal model by either applying the bacteria on the model surface (inta...

  11. The immune stimulatory effect of cyanacrylate skin surface stripping on the activation and migration of langerhans cells in human skin in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Deckert, Iliane

    2010-01-01

    Transcutanous immunization (TCI) is a promising alternative to conventional injections, because in contrast to muscle and fat tissue, the skin is especially rich in antigen-presenting cells, e.g. Langerhans cells (LC). Different techniques have been proposed to overcome the barrier function of the skin. Recently, a newly developed protocol based on cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS), which facilitates penetration via hair follicles, has been shown to be safe and effective in inducing...

  12. Excitation wavelength dependence of the anomalous circular photogalvanic effect in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excitation wavelength dependence of the anomalous circular photogalvanic effect (ACPGE) current arising from the reciprocal spin Hall effect (RSHE) in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells is measured under normal incidence of circularly polarized light at room temperature. We found that the spot location with the maximum ACPGE current is wavelength independent. And the normalized ACPGE current decreases at smaller wavelengths, which can be attributed to the sharp decrease of the spin relaxation time (τs) and the hot electron relaxation time (τ1) at smaller wavelengths. The study of the excitation wavelength dependence of ACPGE current is a good supplement to the in-depth investigation of RSHE

  13. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1+/−) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1+/− and Cx43+/− mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1+/− mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases

  14. Novel Inhibitory Effect of N-(2-Hydroxycyclohexylvaliolamine on Melanin Production in a Human Skin Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bum-Ho Bin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyper-pigmentation causes skin darkness and medical disorders, such as post-inflammatory melanoderma and melasma. Therefore, the development of anti-melanogenic agents is important for treating these conditions and for cosmetic production. In our previous paper, we demonstrated that the anti-diabetic drug voglibose, a valiolamine derivative, is a potent anti-melanogenic agent. In addition, we proposed an alternative screening strategy to identify valiolamine derivatives with high skin permeability that act as anti-melanogenic agents when applied topically. In this study, we synthesized several valiolamine derivatives with enhanced lipophilicity and examined their inhibitory effects in a human skin model. N-(2-hydroxycyclohexylvaliolamine (HV possesses a stronger inhibitory effect on melanin production than voglibose in a human skin model, suggesting that HV is a more potent anti-melanogenic agent for the skin.

  15. Electrical measurement of moisturizing effect on skin hydration and barrier function in psoriasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, J H; Jo, S J; Park, J Y; Park, B D; Youn, J I

    2005-07-01

    Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in psoriatic skin lesions seems to be related to the severity of the psoriasis, and the electrical capacitance and conductance of the skin are indicators of the hydration level of the stratum corneum. We compared the characteristics of these electrical measurements, in assessing the persistent effect of a moisturizing cream on skin hydration and barrier function in psoriasis patients. Seventeen Korean psoriasis patients were recruited. Their right leg was treated with the moisturizer twice daily for 6 weeks, while their left leg was used as the control site. For each patient, one psoriatic plaque on each leg was selected as the involved psoriatic lesion. Uninvolved psoriatic skin was regarded as the apparently healthy looking skin 4-5 cm away from the periphery of the psoriatic lesion. The TEWL, electrical capacitance and conductance were measured, in order to evaluate the barrier function and hydration level of the stratum corneum. The clinical and biophysical data for each patient were recorded at the start of the study and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks. The degree of skin dryness at the applied area improved progressively. The electrical capacitance at the treated psoriatic lesion increased significantly after 2 weeks, and this improvement was maintained during the entire study period. However, no noticeable change was observed in the electrical conductance. The TEWL showed an inverse pattern to that of the skin capacitance, decreasing during the study period. The skin capacitance and TEWL exhibited good correlation with the visual assessment of skin dryness, but the skin conductance did not. Our data suggest that electrical capacitance and TEWL may be useful in the evaluation of the effect of a moisturizer on the hydration status and barrier function of psoriatic skin. PMID:15953083

  16. Effects of dielectric permittivities on skin heating due to millimeter wave exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata Akimasa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the possibility of millimeter wave (MMW exposure has increased, public concern about the health issues due to electromagnetic radiation has also increased. While many studies have been conducted for MMW exposure, the effect of dielectric permittivities on skin heating in multilayer/heterogeneous human-body models have not been adequately investigated. This is partly due to the fact that a detailed investigation of skin heating in a multilayer model by computational methods is difficult since many parameters are involved. In the present study, therefore, theoretical analyses were conducted to investigate the relationship between dielectric permittivities and MMW-induced skin heating in a one-dimensional three-layer model (skin, fat, and muscle. Methods Approximate expressions were derived for the temperature elevation and temperature difference in the skin due to MMW exposure from analytical solutions for the temperature distribution. First, the power absorption distribution was approximated from the analytical solution for a one-layer model (skin only. Then, the analytical expression of the temperature in the three-layer model was simplified on the basis of the proposal in our previous study. By examining the approximate expressions, the dominant term influencing skin heating was clarified to identify the effects of the dielectric permittivities. Finally, the effects of dielectric permittivities were clarified by applying partial differentiation to the derived dominant term. Results Skin heating can be characterized by the parameters associated with the dielectric permittivities, independently of morphological and thermal parameters. With the derived expressions, it was first clarified that skin heating correlates with the total power absorbed in the skin rather than the specific absorption rate (SAR at the skin surface or the incident power density. Using Debye-type expression we next investigated the effect of

  17. The effects of mucopolysaccharide polysulphate on hydration and elasticity of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Eimpunth, Sasima; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2011-01-01

    Background. Mucopolysaccharide polysulphate (MPS) has been used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic agent for over 50 years. Its chemical structure permits considerable hydrogen bonding with adjacent water molecules, which effectively leads to hydration of the surrounding tissue. In addition, it stimulates endogenous hyaluronate synthesis, resulting in an increase in water-binding capacity and viscoelasticity of the skin. Objective. To study the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on hydration and elasticity of human skin. Methods. The first part of this study was a randomized double blind placebo-controlled study which included 60 female volunteers aged 30-45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825. The volunteers were treated with either 0.1% MPS or vehicle control. All subjects were asked to apply 1 g of cream to their face twice daily for a total period of 4 weeks. Skin hydration and elasticity were measured at baseline and week 4 with Corneometer CM 825 and cutometer MPA 580, respectively, at forehead and both cheeks. The second part of this study focused on the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on skin hydration after single application. 20 female volunteers aged 30-45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825, were recruited to the study. All subjects were asked to apply 2 g of 0.1% MPS cream on entirely randomly selected forearm. Skin hydration at the middle of both forearms was measured at baseline, immediately after application, and every 1 hour after application for a period of 10 hours. Results. 57 subjects (28 in vehicle control group, 29 in MPS) completed treatment protocol. The baseline skin hydration of both groups was not significantly different (P = 0.47). Hower, there was a statistically significant difference in skin hydration at 4 weeks between MPS and placebo group (P = 0.01). Skin elasticity was significantly improved at week 4 in both groups (vehicle-control, P < 0.01, and MPS, P < 0.01). However, no significant

  18. The Effects of Mucopolysaccharide Polysulphate on Hydration and Elasticity of Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rungsima Wanitphakdeedecha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mucopolysaccharide polysulphate (MPS has been used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic agent for over 50 years. Its chemical structure permits considerable hydrogen bonding with adjacent water molecules, which effectively leads to hydration of the surrounding tissue. In addition, it stimulates endogenous hyaluronate synthesis, resulting in an increase in water-binding capacity and viscoelasticity of the skin. Objective. To study the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on hydration and elasticity of human skin. Methods. The first part of this study was a randomized double blind placebo-controlled study which included 60 female volunteers aged 30–45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825. The volunteers were treated with either 0.1% MPS or vehicle control. All subjects were asked to apply 1 g of cream to their face twice daily for a total period of 4 weeks. Skin hydration and elasticity were measured at baseline and week 4 with Corneometer CM 825 and cutometer MPA 580, respectively, at forehead and both cheeks. The second part of this study focused on the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on skin hydration after single application. 20 female volunteers aged 30–45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825, were recruited to the study. All subjects were asked to apply 2 g of 0.1% MPS cream on entirely randomly selected forearm. Skin hydration at the middle of both forearms was measured at baseline, immediately after application, and every 1 hour after application for a period of 10 hours. Results. 57 subjects (28 in vehicle control group, 29 in MPS completed treatment protocol. The baseline skin hydration of both groups was not significantly different (P=0.47. Hower, there was a statistically significant difference in skin hydration at 4 weeks between MPS and placebo group (P=0.01. Skin elasticity was significantly improved at week 4 in both groups (vehicle-control, P<0.01, and MPS, P<0.01. However, no

  19. Anomalous effect in Schumann resonance phenomena observed in Japan, possibly associated with the Chi-chi earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Schumann resonance phenomenon has been monitored at Nakatsugawa (near Nagoya in Japan since the beginning of 1999, and due to the occurance of a severe earthquake (so-called Chi-chi earthquake on 21 September 1999 in Taiwan we have examined our Schumann resonance data at Nakatsugawa during the entire year of 1999. We have found a very anomalous effect in the Schumann resonance, possibly associated with two large land earthquakes (one is the Chi-chi earthquake and another one on 2 November 1999 (Chia-yi earthquake with a magnitude again greater than 6.0. Conspicuous effects are observed for the larger Chi-chi earthquake, so that we summarize the characteristics for this event. The anomaly is characterized mainly by the unusual increase in amplitude of the fourth Schumann resonance mode and a significant frequency shift of its peak frequency (~1.0Hz from the conventional value on the By magnetic field component which is sensitive to the waves propagating in the NS meridian plane. Anomalous Schumann resonance signals appeared from about one week to a few days before the main shock. Secondly, the goniometric estimation of the arrival angle of the anomalous signal is found to coincide with the Taiwan azimuth (the unresolved dual direction indicates toward South America. Also, the pulsed signals, such as the Q-bursts, were simultaneously observed with the "carrier" frequency around the peak frequency of the fourth Schumann resonance mode. The anomaly for the second event for the Chia-yi earthquake on 2 November had much in common. But, most likely due to a small magnitude, the anomaly appears one day before and lasts until one day after the main shock, with the enhancement at the fourth Schumann resonance mode being smaller in amplitude than the case of the Chi-chi earthquake. Yet, the other characteristics, including the goniometric direction finding result, frequency shift, etc., are nearly the same. Although the emphasis of

  20. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the biological characteristics of human skin fibroblasts and hypertrophic scar tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongming; Hu, Chao; Li, Fengyu; Liang, Liming; Liu, Lingying

    2013-06-01

    Burn injury-mediated destruction of the skin barrier normally induces microbial invasion, in turn leading to the development of systemic infection and occasional septic shock by the release of endotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the biological characteristics of normal skin fibroblasts and to elucidate the influence of LPS in the initial stage of skin wound healing. Twenty patients with hypertrophic scar in proliferative stage were selected randomly and primary cultures were established from fibroblasts derived from their hypertrophic scar tissue and normal skin. Normal skin fibroblasts of passage 3 were stimulated with different concentrations of LPS. LPS stimulated the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts within a certain extent of concentrations (0.005-0.5 μg/mL) (P effect on normal skin fibroblasts-continuous passage of these fibroblasts resulted in ultrastructural pattern similar to fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar tissue, and the findings was substantiated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry detection of proliferation cell nuclear antigen, type I procollagen and α-smooth muscle actin. Our results suggest that LPS might convert normal skin fibroblasts to hypertrophic scar tissue fibroblasts and participate in the formation of hypertrophic scar; hence, appropriate concentration of LPS may have no effect or be beneficial to skin wound healing, whereas excessive concentration of LPS may delay the time of wound healing. PMID:23653386

  1. The moisturizing effects of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, such as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced by different yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma and have been attracting much attention as new cosmetic ingredients owing to their unique liquid-crystal-forming and moisturizing properties. In this study, the effects of different MEL derivatives on the skin were evaluated in detail using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model and an in vivo human study. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were evaluated on the basis of cell viability. Most MEL derivatives efficiently recovered the viability of the cells and showed high recovery rates (over 80%) comparable with that of natural ceramide. It is interesting that the recovery rate with MEL-A prepared from olive oil was significantly higher than that of MEL-A prepared from soybean oil. The water retention properties of MEL-B were further investigated on human forearm skin in a preliminary study. Compared with the control, the aqueous solution of MEL-B (5 wt%) was estimated to considerably increase the stratum corneum water content in the skin. Moreover, perspiration on the skin surface was clearly suppressed by treatment with the MEL-B solution. These results suggest that MELs are likely to exhibit a high moisturizing action, by assisting the barrier function of the skin. Accordingly, the yeast glycolipids have a strong potential as a new ingredient for skin care products. PMID:22790172

  2. dermaOXY skin assay: effect and evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menov, Lasse; Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2015-01-01

    This text is a videnkupon report supported by the Danish Innovation Fonds and conducted by L.M. and B.K. for dermaOXY (by MedicTinedic ApS, Varde, Denmark). It involves two dermaOXY products: dermaOXY HYALURON SERUM and dermaOXY SYN SERUM. These are applied to the facial skin in combination with a...

  3. Anomalous transport phenomena in px+i py superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songci; Andreev, A. V.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry in superconductors with the px+i py symmetry of the order parameter allows for a class of effects which are analogous to the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets. These effects exist below the critical temperature, T effects. In particular, we consider anomalous Hall thermal conductivity, the polar Kerr effect, the anomalous Hall effect, and the anomalous photo- and acousto-galvanic effects.

  4. Micro-instabilities and anomalous transport effects in collisionless guide field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio Alejandro; Büchner, Jörg; Kilian, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    It is often the case that magnetic reconnection takes place in collisionless plasmas with a current aligned guide magnetic field, such as in the Solar corona. The general characteristics of this process have been exhaustively analyzed with theory and numerical simulations, under different approximations, since some time ago. However, some consequences and properties of the secondary instabilities arising spontaneously -other than tearing instability-, and their dependence on the guide field strength, have not been completely understood yet. For this sake, we use the results of fully kinetic 2D PIC numerical simulations of guide field reconnection. By using a mean field approach for the Generalized Ohm's law that explains the balance of the reconnected electric field, we find that some of the cross-streaming and gradient driven instabilities -in the guide field case- produce an additional anomalous transport term. The latter can be interpreted as a result of the enhanced correlated electromagnetic fluctuations, leading to a slow down of the current carriers and kinetic scale turbulence. We characterize these processes on dependence on the guide field strength, and explore the causal relation with the source of free energy driving the mentioned instabilities. Finally, we show the main consequences that a fully 3D approach have on all those phenomena in contrast to the reduced 2D description.

  5. Ferromagnetism, variable range hopping, and the anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Co:ZnO thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Hong-Liang; Chen Yan-Xue; Mei Liang-Mo; He Shu-Min; Xu Tong-Shuai; Liu Guo-Lei; Yan Shi-Shen; Zhu Da-Peng; Dai Zheng-Kun; Yang Feng-Fan; Dai You-Yong

    2012-01-01

    A series of high quality single crystalline epitaxial Zn0.95Co0.05O thin films is prepared by molecular beam epitaxy.Superparamagnetism and ferromagnetism are observed when the donor density is manipulated in a range of 1018 cm-3- 1020 cm-3 by changing the oxygen partial pressure during film growth.The conduction shows variable range hopping at low temperature and thermal activation conduction at high temperature.The ferromagnetism can be maintained up to room temperature.However,the anomalous Hall effect is observed only at low temperature and disappears above 160 K.This phenomenon can be attributed to the local ferromagnetism and the decreased optimal hopping distance at high temperatures.

  6. Anomalous Hall effect in the Co-based Heusler compounds Co2FeSi and Co2FeAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imort, I.-M.; Thomas, P.; Reiss, G.; Thomas, A.

    2012-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the Heusler compounds Co2FeSi and Co2FeAl is studied in dependence of the annealing temperature to achieve a general comprehension of its origin. We have demonstrated that the crystal quality affected by annealing processes is a significant control parameter to tune the electrical resistivity ρxx as well as the anomalous Hall resistivity ρahe. Analyzing the scaling behavior of ρahe in terms of ρxx points to a temperature-dependent skew scattering as the dominant mechanism in both Heusler compounds.

  7. Evaluation of sunscreen safety by in vitro skin permeation studies: effects of vehicle composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, L; Puglisi, G

    2013-01-01

    For sunscreens to be safe and effective, the lowest possible UV-filter percutaneous absorption should be achieved. In this paper, we evaluated in vitro release and permeation through human skin of two UV-filters, octyl methoxycinnammate (OMC) and butyl methoxydibenzoyl methane (BMBM) from six commercial O/W emulsions and we estimated their margin of safety (MoS). OMC and BMBM in vitro release and skin permeation were investigated in Franz-type diffusion cells and permeation data were used to calculate MoS. OMC in vitro skin permeation depended on both its concentration and vehicle composition while BMBM skin permeation depended on its release from the vehicle. MoS values were well beyond the lowest limit accepted for safe products. Although sunscreen skin permeation may depend on many factors, the commercial products investigated are safe under normal "in use" conditions. PMID:23444778

  8. Effects of industrial detergents on the barrier function of human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G D; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Andersen, Klaus Ejner;

    2000-01-01

    nickel was examined in an in-vitro model using human skin. Twenty-four of the most widely used detergents were studied. After a two-hour exposure to an aqueous detergent solution, penetration of labeled model compounds was followed for 66 hours. Interindividual variation was substantial, but 12 of the......Detergents are involved in the causation of contact dermatitis and in promoting percutaneous absorption of toxic chemicals, but limited information is available to allow an assessment of their relative effects on the skin barrier function. The effect of detergents on skin permeability to water and...

  9. Symmetry energy, neutron skin, and neutron star radius from chiral effective field theory interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hebeler, K.; Schwenk, A.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss neutron matter calculations based on chiral effective field theory interactions and their predictions for the symmetry energy, the neutron skin of 208 Pb, and for the radius of neutron stars.

  10. The effect of dietary and/or cosmetic argan oil on postmenopausal skin elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiraouani Boucetta K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenza Qiraouani Boucetta,1 Zoubida Charrouf,2 Hassan Aguenaou,3 Abdelfattah Derouiche,4 Yahya Bensouda1 1Research Team on Formulation and Biopharmacy, Research Center for Drug, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco; 2Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco; 3Mixed Unit of Research in Nutrition, ITU / CNESTEN, Ibn Tofail University, Kenitra, Morocco; 4Faculty of Sciences, Hassan II University, Casablanca, Morocco Background: During menopause, the decrease of estrogenic secretion induces the disruption of skin functioning, thus causing the decline in skin elasticity characteristic of skin aging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of daily consumption and/or application of argan oil on skin elasticity.Materials and methods: Sixty postmenopausal women consumed butter during the stabilization period and were randomly divided into two groups for the intervention period: the treatment group of 30 participants received dietary argan oil, the control group of 30 participants received olive oil, and both groups applied cosmetic argan oil in the left volar forearm during a 60-day period. Assessments of skin elasticity parameters, ie, the three R-parameters (R2 or gross-elasticity of the skin, R5 or net elasticity of the skin, and R7 or biological elasticity, and the resonance running time (RRT at both volar forearms of the two groups were performed during three visits: before starting oils consumption and application, after 30 days of oils consumption and application, and after 60 days of oils consumption and application.Results: The consumption of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2 (P<0.001, net elasticity of the skin (R5 (P<0.001, biological elasticity (R7 (P<0.001, and a significant decrease of RRT (P=0.002. The application of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2 (P<0.001, net

  11. Effects of a cellulose mask synthesized by a bacterium on facial skin characteristics and user satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnuaikit T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanaporn Amnuaikit, Toon Chusuit, Panithi Raknam, Prapaporn BoonmeDepartment of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, ThailandBackground: Cellulose masks obtained from natural sources such as bacteria are of interest as cosmetic devices for the treatment of dry skin because they not only improve hydration of the skin, but have low toxicity and are biodegradable. The aims of this study were to determine the in vivo effects of a cellulose mask obtained from Acetobacter xylinum on skin characteristics and to evaluate user satisfaction with the product.Methods: Thirty healthy Thai volunteers aged 21–40 years participated in the study. The volunteers were randomly separated into a control group and an experimental group. For the control group, volunteers were assigned to apply moist towels to the face for 25 minutes. For the experimental group, the volunteers were assigned to apply the masks, ie, translucent patches which could be fitted onto the face for the same period. The following week, the groups were changed over to the alternative treatment. Skin moisture, sebum, elasticity, texture, dullness, and desquamation levels were assessed using a system used for routine skin counseling before applying the trial product and five minutes after its removal. Degree of satisfaction with use of the cellulose mask was investigated using a five-point rating scale.Results: The cellulose mask increased moisture levels in the skin significantly more than moist towels (P < 0.05 after a single application. No obvious effects on other skin characteristics were found. The cellulose mask product rated around 4/5 on the satisfaction rating scale.Conclusions: A single application of the trial cellulose mask enhanced moisture uptake by facial skin. Users also reported being satisfied with the trial product.Keywords: bacterial cellulose, facial mask, skin characteristics, skin hydration, user

  12. Analysis of anomalous electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability effects using a frequency domain controlled-source electromagnetic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Kyubo; Oh, Seokmin; Seol, Soon Jee; Lee, Ki Ha; Byun, Joongmoo

    2016-03-01

    We present a series of processes for understanding and analysing controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) responses for a conductive and permeable earth. To realize the CSEM response, a new 3-D CSEM forward modelling algorithm based on an edge finite element method for both electrically conductive and magnetically permeable heterogeneities is developed. The algorithm shows highly accurate results in validation tests against a semi-analytic solution for stratified earth and an integral form of the scattered field. We describe the vector behaviour of an anomalous magnetic field originating from a conductive and permeable anomaly when the loop sources are deployed over a conductive half-space. The CSEM response of the conductive and permeable anomaly is classified into three effects originating from: conductivity perturbations, permeability perturbations and the coupling of these two effects. The separated individual results and the corresponding integral equation form of the anomalous field help to better understand the physical behaviour. We confirm the characteristic features of the CSEM response from the conductive and permeable anomaly, for example, (1) the general dominance of the induction effect in the out-of-phase response accompanied by a non-negligible magnetization effect from the magnetic anomaly in a conductive half-space and (2) the dominance of near frequency-independent magnetization effects in the in-phase response at relatively low frequencies and change in ruling part of the in-phase response into the induction effect as the frequency increases. We also demonstrate the effect of coupling mode and show that its maximum contribution is limited to a few per cent level of other two modes, induction and magnetization mode, even when the heterogeneity of our model is strong. In our synthetic survey, using examples of land-based profiling surveys of low induction number and intermediate regime, we find that the effect of magnetization can be used as an

  13. Effects of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin on Revascularization of Full Thickness Skin Grafts in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Emami, Abol Hasan; Ghiasi, Sina; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza; MOHAMMADI, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autologous skin graft is frequently used in the field of plastic, and reconstructive surgery. The engraftment is dependent upon revascularization and angiogenesis, which can be regulated by different factors. In addition to its hematopoietic effects, erythropoietin is shown to positively affect the wound healing process. Objectives: We studied effects of human erythropoietin on revascularization of full thickness skin grafts in rat. Materials and Methods: Forty adult Albino male r...

  14. Meloxicam transdermal delivery: effect of eutectic point on the rate and extent of skin permeation

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman Mohammadi-Samani; Gholamhossein Yousefi; Farhad Mohammadi; Fatemeh Ahmadi

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Drug delivery through the skin can transfer therapeutic levels of drugs for pharmacological effects. Analgesics such as NSAIDs have gastrointestinal side effects and topical dosage forms of these drugs are mainly preferred, especially for local pains. Meloxicam is one of NSAIDs with no topical form in the market. In this research, we attempted to quantify the skin permeation of a meloxicam topical preparation and to show how permeation would be increased by using thymol as an en...

  15. The effect of saline iontophoresis on skin integrity in human volunteers. I. Methodology and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camel, E; O'Connell, M; Sage, B; Gross, M; Maibach, H

    1996-08-01

    This study, conducted in 36 human volunteers, was an evaluation of the effects of saline iontophoresis on skin temperature, irritation, and barrier function. The major objectives were to assess the effects of low-level ionic currents, to validate the proposed methodology of assessment, and to establish reproducibility in repeated saline iontophoresis applications. This was the first of a multistage study designed to assess the safety of 24-hr saline iontophoresis episodes at selected currents and current densities. Since an iontophoresis patch challenges the skin barrier both by occluding the skin surface and by passing ionic current through the skin, the experimental protocol was designed to permit measurement of the contribution of each of these processes to the overall response. In this first stage we investigated the effect of 10 min of current delivery, at 0.1 mA/cm2 on a 1-cm2 area patch and 0.2 mA/cm2 on a 6.5-cm2 area patch compared to unpowered control patches. Twelve subjects were tested under each condition on two separate occasions to examine reproducibility of the response variable measurements. A further 12 subjects were tested once under the 0.2 mA/cm2, 6.5-cm2 condition. Skin irritation was evaluated via repeated measurements of transepidermal water loss, capacitance, skin temperature, skin color, and a visual scoring system, before the iontophoresis episode and after patch removal. No damage to skin barrier function in terms of skin-water loss or skin-water content was detected. Slight, subclinical, short-lasting erythema was observed for both conditions. Assessment of correlation coefficients showed highly statistically significant indications of reproducibility for all five response variables measured. The experimental design, in combination with a repeated measures analysis, provided clear separation of the occlusion and ionic current components of the iontophoretic patch challenge. Further, the repeated measures analysis gave a highly sensitive

  16. Protective effects of oleum curcumae wenchowensis on skin damage due to UVB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the protective effects of oleum curcumae wenchowensis on skin damage exposed to UVB and its mechanism, and to provide the experimental basis for the protection of skin damage exposed to UVB. Methods: The skin of guinea pigs was exposed to UVB (28.38 J/cm2 · 30 d) to establish the oxidative damage model. The skin erythema and the rough were observed during the experiment; the thickness of epiderm and the number of fibroblast were observed under light microscope after the experiment. The activities of GSH-Px, SOD, CAT and T-AOC and the contain of MDA in the supernate of skin homogenate were detected with biochemical methods. Results: The epiderm in UVB exposure group and blank group thickened, but that in protective group weren't observed; the number of fibroblast in UVB exposure group and blank group decreased, while that in protective group increased, but that in control group didn't. The content of MDA in the supemate of skin homogenate in UVB exposure group and blank group increased, but that in protective group deceased, and the activities of GSH-Px, SOD, CAT and T-AOC in UVB exposure group and blank group decreased, but those in protective group increased, and control group had no change. Conclusions: Oleum curcumae wenchowensis has the protective effects on skin damage exposed to UVB, which may be mediated by increasing the contain of antioxidases and eliminating the flee radical. (authors)

  17. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Orlicky, David J. [Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Agarwal, Chapla [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); White, Carl W. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045USA (United States); Agarwal, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.Agarwal@UCDenver.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. - Highlights: • Silibinin treatment attenuated nitrogen mustard (NM)-induced skin injury. • Silibinin affects pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation and vesication. • The efficacy of silibinin could also be associated with oxidative stress. • These results support testing and optimization of

  18. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. - Highlights: • Silibinin treatment attenuated nitrogen mustard (NM)-induced skin injury. • Silibinin affects pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation and vesication. • The efficacy of silibinin could also be associated with oxidative stress. • These results support testing and optimization of

  19. Landau Damping and Anomalous Skin Effect in Low-pressure Gas Discharges: Self-consistent Treatment of Collisionless Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Oleg V. Polomarov; Constantine E. Theodosiou

    2004-01-30

    In low-pressure discharges, where the electron mean free path is larger or comparable with the discharge length, the electron dynamics is essentially nonlocal. Moreover, the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) deviates considerably from a Maxwellian. Therefore, an accurate kinetic description of the low-pressure discharges requires knowledge of the nonlocal conductivity operator and calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. The previous treatments made use of simplifying assumptions: a uniform density profile and a Maxwellian EEDF. In the present study a self-consistent system of equations for the kinetic description of nonlocal, nonuniform, nearly collisionless plasmas of low-pressure discharges is reported. It consists of the nonlocal conductivity operator and the averaged kinetic equation for calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. This system was applied to the calculation of collisionless heating in capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas. In particular, the importance of accounting for the nonuniform plasma density profile for computing the current density profile and the EEDF is demonstrated. The enhancement of collisionless heating due to the bounce resonance between the electron motion in the potential well and the external radio-frequency electric field is investigated. It is shown that a nonlinear and self-consistent treatment is necessary for the correct description of collisionless heating.

  20. Effect of perorally administered pivmecillinam on the normal oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, A; Edlund, C; Svenungsson, B; Emtestam, L; Nord, C E

    2001-06-01

    To study the ecological effects of pivmecillinam on the human oropharyngeal, intestinal and skin microflora, 15 healthy volunteers were given pivmecillinam tablets 400 mg twice daily for 7 days. Saliva, stool and skin specimens were taken before (days -3 and 0) and on the 2nd, 4th and 7th days during the administration period and 14 and 21 days after the start of administration. Mecillinam caused no major changes in the aerobic or anaerobic oropharyngeal microflora. In the aerobic intestinal microflora there was a decrease in the numbers of Escherichia coli while no changes occurred in the anaerobic microflora. In the skin microflora there was a transient decrease in the numbers of Propionibacterium spp. underneath the wing of the nose. The major effect of pivmecillinam was seen on E. coli and to some extent on Propionibacterium spp. No further ecological disturbances were noticed in the oropharyngeal, intestinal or skin microflora. PMID:11450889

  1. Experimental investigation of system effects in stressed-skin elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela Stang, B.; Isaksson, T.; Hansson, M.

    What kind of behaviour can be expected from stressed-skin elements at failure? To answer this question was a primary objective of the experimental investigation presented in this report. Systems of 3 roof units, each made of 5 parallel beams, have been tested for load-carrying capacity and...... behaviour at failure. Test results are compared with analytical calculations estimating the load-bearing capacity from predicted bending strength of each beam used in the system. The test results show that failure of one beam does not necessarily lead to failure of the whole system. This is an important...

  2. Effect of skin hydration on the dynamics of fingertip gripping contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, T.; Lévesque, V.; Hayward, V.; Lefèvre, P.; Thonnard, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of fingertip contact manifest themselves in the complex skin movements observed during the transition from a stuck state to a fully developed slip. While investigating this transition, we found that it depended on skin hydration. To quantify this dependency, we asked subjects to slide their index fingertip on a glass surface while keeping the normal component of the interaction force constant with the help of visual feedback. Skin deformation inside the contact region was imaged with an optical apparatus that allowed us to quantify the relative sizes of the slipping and sticking regions. The ratio of the stuck skin area to the total contact area decreased linearly from 1 to 0 when the tangential force component increased from 0 to a maximum. The slope of this relationship was inversely correlated to the normal force component. The skin hydration level dramatically affected the dynamics of the contact encapsulated in the course of evolution from sticking to slipping. The specific effect was to reduce the tendency of a contact to slip, regardless of the variations of the coefficient of friction. Since grips were more unstable under dry skin conditions, our results suggest that the nervous system responds to dry skin by exaggerated grip forces that cannot be simply explained by a change in the coefficient of friction. PMID:21490002

  3. Effect of heme oxygenase-1 on radiation-induced skin injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on the acute radiation-induced skin injury by gene transfer. Methods: Thirty-three male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups as PBS-injected group, Ad-EGFP-injected group and Ad-HO-1-injected group (n=11). In each group, three rats were used for determining the expression of target gene and the other rats were irradiated on the buttock skin with 40 Gy electron beam generated by a linear accelerator. Immediately after irradiation, rats were administered with a subcutaneous injection of PBS, Ad-EGFP or Ad-HO-1, respectively. Subsequently, the skin reactions were measured twice a week using the semi-quantitative skin injury scale. Results: The strong positive expression of HO-1 was observed in subcutaneous dermal tissue after injection of Ad-HO-1. Compared to the PBS-injected group or the Ad-EGFP-injected group, a significant mitigation of skin injury was observed in Ad-HO-1-injected mice 14 d after irradiation (q=0.000-0.030, P<0.05). Conclusions: HO-1 could significantly mitigate radiation-induced acute skin injury and Ad-HO-1 could be used to treat radiation-induced skin injury. (authors)

  4. Effects of some terpenes on the in vitro permeation of LHRH through newborn pig skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songkro, S; Rades, T; Becket, G

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of oxygen containing terpenes (carvacrol, menthol and carvone) at 5%w/v in hydroalcoholic mixtures (40% ethanol) on the permeation of LHRH across newborn pig skin in vitro. In addition, the amount of LHRH retained in the skin after 24 h of diffusion was determined. It was found that the passive permeation of LHRH was very limited. Although percutaneous absorption of LHRH improved in the presence of the enhancers, a significant enhancement was observed only with carvacrol, an aromatic terpene. The rank order of enhancement ratio for skin permeation was found to be carvacrol > carvone > menthol. The enhancers also affected the retention of LHRH in the skin. The rank order of enhancement ratio for skin retention was carvone > carvacrol > menthol. The results of the in vitro skin metabolism study of LHRH using fresh newborn pig skin showed that the degradation products were detected and the amount of the degraded LHRH increased with increasing duration of incubation time. PMID:19320284

  5. Suppressing the neoclassical tearing modes in tokamaks during anomalous transverse transport owing to predomination of the magnetic well effect over the bootstrap drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppression of neoclassical tearing modes in tokamaks under anomalous transverse transport conditions when the magnetic well effect predominates over the bootstrap drive is studied. Reduced equations of transfer are used in the description. Geodetic effects are considered during the magnetic well calculation. A criterion for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by the compound effect at an arbitrary level of the transverse heat transport by electrons and ions is derived

  6. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and a nontrivial spin-texture in ultra-thin films of magnetic topological insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duong, Le Quy; Das, Tanmoy; Feng, Y. P.; Lin, Hsin, E-mail: nilnish@gmail.com [Graphene Research Centre and Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117546 (Singapore)

    2015-05-07

    We study the evolution of quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect for a Z{sub 2} topological insulator (TI) thin films in a proximity induced magnetic phase by a realistic layered k·p model with interlayer coupling. We examine three different magnetic configurations in which ferromagnetic (FM) layer(s) is added either from one side (FM-TI), from both sides (FM-TI-FM), or homogeneously distributed (magnetically doped) in a TI slab. We map out the thickness-dependent topological phase diagram under various experimental conditions. The critical magnetic exchange energy for the emergence of QAH effect in the latter two cases decreases monotonically with increasing number of quintuple layers (QLs), while it becomes surprisingly independent of the film thickness in the former case. The gap size of the emergent QAH insulator depends on the non-magnetic “parent” gap of the TI thin film and is tuned by the FM exchange energy, opening a versatile possibility to achieve room-temperature QAH insulator in various topological nanomaterials. Finally, we find that the emergent spin-texture in the QAH effect is very unconventional, non-“hedgehog” type; and it exhibits a chiral out-of-plane spin-flip texture within the same valence band which is reminiscent of dynamical “skyrmion” pattern, except our results are in the momentum space.

  7. Anti-microbial effect of Nigella sativa seed extract against staphylococcal skin Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Rafati, Shiva; Niakan, Mohammad; Naseri, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The development of microbial resistance to the existing anti-microbial agents has become a real challenge and a serious problem facing patients suffering from skin infections. Seeds of Nigella sativa have been used for a long time in folk medicine for the treatment of skin infections. Production of new potent agents is urgently needed, especially for hospitals and health care centers. This study is designed to explore anti-microbial effect of extract from the Nigella sativa seeds ...

  8. The Effect of Enoxaparin and Clopidogrel on Survival of Random Skin Flap in Rat Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; S Forootan, Kamal; S Jalali, Seyed Ziaaddin; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Pedram, Mir Sepehr

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrosis of skin flaps is considered as an important complication in reconstructive surgery. We conducted an experimental study to investigate the efficacy of low-molecular weight heparin, clopidogrel and their combination to improve the flap survival. METHODS Forty male, adult Sprague-Dawlay rats were divided randomly into 4 groups. Standard rectangular, distally based dorsal random pattern skin flap was elevated. To prevent the graft effect, a sterile sheet was put under the flap...

  9. Effects of nebivolol on skin flap survival: A randomized experimental study in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gideroglu, Kaan; Alagoz, Sahin; Uygur, Fatih; Evinc, Rahmi; Celikoz, Bahattin; Bugdayci, Guler

    2008-01-01

    Background: Skin flaps are among the basic treatment options in the reconstruction of soft tissue defects. To improve skin flap survival, a variety of methods, including pharmacologic agents, have been investigated. The effectiveness of anticoagulants, antioxidants, anti-inflammatory drugs, and vasodilatory drugs in improving flap survival has been studied. Nebivolol is a new-generation selective β1-adrenoreceptor blocking agent that has vasodilatory, antithrombotic, antioxidative, and anti- ...

  10. Skin penetration and antioxidant effect of cosmeto-textiles with gallic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Cristina; Marti, Meritxell; Barba, Clara; Lis Arias, Manuel José; Rubio, Laia; Coderch, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the antioxidant gallic acid (GA) has been encapsulated in microspheres prepared with poly-e-caprolactone (PCL) and incorporated into polyamide (PA) obtaining the cosmeto-textile. The topical application of the cosmeto-textile provides a reservoir effect in the skin delivery of GA. The close contact of the cosmeto-textile, containing microsphere-encapsulated GA (ME-GA), with the skin and their corresponding occlusion, may be the main reasons that explain the crossing of active pr...

  11. The epilatory effects of trypsin on human skin, applied via lecithin reverse micelles

    OpenAIRE

    Protopapa, E. E.; Xenakis, Aristotelis; Avramiotis, S.; Prodromou, E.V.; Koukaki, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    A method of epilation using reverse micelles containing the proteolytic enzyme, trypsin, is described based on previous experimental findings on degenerative effects of proteolytic enzymes on hair follicles and follicle stem cells of guinea pigs and mice. The method involves rubbing of the preparation on wax epilated skin and leads to removal of hair from various skin regions, such as face, shoulders, arms and legs. The many advantages of this method renders it the method of choice for hai...

  12. Neutron Skin Thickness of Nuclei and Effective Nucleon-Nucleon Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Min; WANG Ning; LI Zhu-Xia; WU Xi-Zhen

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Skyrme energy density functional is applied to study the ground state properties of a series of finite nuclei.The charge rms radii, neutron rms radii, and the neutron skin thickness for some nuclei are calculated and compared with the experimental data. The constraint on the effective interactions, especially, the density dependence of the isospin-dependent part of Skyrme interactions is extracted by the data of neutron skin thicknesses of 208 pb and isotopes of Sn.

  13. Cytotoxic Effects of the Ethanol Bane Skin Extract in Human Prostate Cancer Pc3 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Maryam; Kazerouni, Faranak; Namaki, Saeed; Darbandi Tamijani, Hassan; Rahimipour, Hooman; Boroumand, Nasrin; Barghi, Siyamak; Ebrahimi, Nazanin; Gheibi Hayat, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is extensively supposed that vegetarian diet could affect cancer progress and increase the influence of formal chemotherapy. Objectives: The present study was designed to determine the effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract against chemo resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells. Materials and Methods: PC3 and L929 cells were cultivated and then incubated in the ethanol Bane skin extract with various concentrations of 0.78, 1.5, 3.13, 6.25, 12.5 mg/mL in 3 times 24, 48, 72 hours. Cytotoxic effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract on PC3 and L929 cells was examined by MTT assay after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Morphology of PC3 cells was evaluated by Gimsa staining. Results: The ethanol Bane skin extract inhibited proliferation and caused cell death with IC50 values of 2.8 mg/mL on PC3 cells and the IC50 was 6.1 mg/mL on l929 cells. Morphological changes and apoptotic bodies were observed in PC3 cells faced with the ethanol Bane skin extract by staining with Gimsa. Conclusions: The ethanol Bane skin extract could repress the growth of PC3 cell line. This inhibitory effect of the Bane extract depended on the dose and the time on PC3. The result of this study shows that the ethanol Bane skin extract includes photochemical and inhibitory function against proliferation and inducer of apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC3 cells and also has less cytotoxic effect on l929 than PC3 cells. The ethanol Bane skin extract might be a good candidate for the new herbal anticancer drug. PMID:27482333

  14. A Simple Data Analysis Method for a Pumping Test with Skin and Wellbore Storage Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Shyun Chen and Chuan-Gui Lan

    2009-01-01

    In a pumping test conducted in a con fined aquifer in northern Taiwan, drawdown in the observation well was subject to wellbore storage of its own and the combined effect of wellbore storage and skin of the nearby pumping well. For such a complicated pumping test condition, the appropriate well hydraulics solutions are complicated in mathematics and involve five unknown a priori parameters; namely, the aquifer transmissivity, the aquifer storage coefficient, the skin factor of the pumping wel...

  15. A comparison of the effects of captopril and enalapril on skin responses to intradermal bradykinin and skin blood flow in the human forearm.

    OpenAIRE

    LI KAM WA, T. C.; Cooke, E D; Turner, P

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of captopril and enalapril on skin responses to intradermal injections of bradykinin and skin blood flow in the forearm were investigated in this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. 2. Intradermal injections of 0, 1, 2.5 and 5 micrograms of bradykinin in 0.9% sodium chloride were made into the forearm of twelve healthy volunteers before and at 2, 6 and 24 h after single oral doses of 25 mg captopril, 10 mg enalapril or placebo. Forearm skin blood flo...

  16. Magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall effect of reactive sputtered polycrystalline Ti1−xCrxN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactive-sputtered polycrystalline Ti1−xCrxN films with 0.17 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 are ferromagnetic and at x = 0.47 the Curie temperature TC shows a maximum of ∼ 120 K. The films are metallic at 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.47, while the films with x = 0.51 and 0.78 are semiconducting-like. The upturn of resistivity below 70 K observed in the films with 0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.47 is from the effects of the electron–electron interaction and weak localization. The negative magnetoresistance (MR) of the films with 0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 is dominated by the double-exchange interaction, while at x = 0.78, MR is related to the localized magnetic moment scattering at the grain boundaries. The scaling ρxyA/n ∝ ρxx2.19 suggests that the anomalous Hall effect in the polycrystalline Ti1−xCrxN films is scattering-independent. - Highlights: • The reactive-sputtered polycrystalline Ti1−xCrxN films are ferromagnetic. • The highest Curie temperature TC of ∼ 120 K appears at x = 0.47. • The negative magnetoresistance is dominated by the double-exchange interaction. • The scaling ρxyA/n ∝ ρxx2.19 was observed

  17. Anomalous x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of tunable synchrotron radiation has made it possible systematically to perform x-ray diffraction studies in regions of anomalous scattering near absorption edges, e.g. in order to derive phase information for crystal structure determination. An overview is given of recent experimental and theoretical work and discuss the properties of the anomalous atomic scattering factor, with emphasis on threshold resonances and damping effects. The results are applied to a discussion of the very strong anomalous dispersion recently observed near the L3 edge in a cesium complex. Also given is an overview of elements and levels where similar behavior can be expected. Finally, the influence of solid state and chemical effects on the absorption edge structure is discussed. 64 references

  18. French Maritime Pine Bark Extract (Pycnogenol®) Effects on Human Skin: Clinical and Molecular Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional strategies to benefit skin health are of growing importance. Current approaches mainly involve nutritional supplements containing antioxidants which were initially designed to protect human skin against ultraviolet radiation-induced damage. Within recent years, however, a growing number of studies suggests that the beneficial effects of these products clearly extend beyond photoprotection. In this review we take the nutritional supplement Pycnogenol®, which is based on an extract prepared from French marine pine bark extract, as an example to illustrate this development. Accordingly, the existing data provide compelling evidence that Pycnogenol® intake does not only provide photoprotection, but may be used to (i) reduce hyperpigmentation of human skin and (ii) improve skin barrier function and extracellular matrix homeostasis. PMID:26492562

  19. Antioxidant effects of an ozonized theobroma oil formulation on damaged-inflammatory rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a cosmetic formulation elaborated with ozonized theobroma oil may exert beneficial effects in the restoring of the antioxidant activity on the skin of rats previously irradiated with ultraviolet light. 0.5 g of the formulation was applied on the skin of rats for five days. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) activity were determined in a homogenate of rat skin. Malondialdehyde (MDA), conjugated dienes (CD) and total hydroperoxide (THP) content were determined as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Using these parameters, antioxidant and oxidant activity, redox index and oxidative stress grade were determined. The total antioxidant activity was significantly increased while the redox index, total oxidant activity and oxidative stress grade decreased significantly in damaged rats treated with the formulation. These results show the antioxidant properties of the cosmetic formulation due to the stimulation of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and GPx, preventing skin injury induced by ultraviolet irradiation. (Author).

  20. Antioxidant effects of an ozonized theobroma oil formulation on damaged-inflammatory rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Y.; Diaz, M.F.; Hernandez, F.; Gila, D.; Ga, G.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a cosmetic formulation elaborated with ozonized theobroma oil may exert beneficial effects in the restoring of the antioxidant activity on the skin of rats previously irradiated with ultraviolet light. 0.5 g of the formulation was applied on the skin of rats for five days. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) activity were determined in a homogenate of rat skin. Malondialdehyde (MDA), conjugated dienes (CD) and total hydroperoxide (THP) content were determined as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Using these parameters, antioxidant and oxidant activity, redox index and oxidative stress grade were determined. The total antioxidant activity was significantly increased while the redox index, total oxidant activity and oxidative stress grade decreased significantly in damaged rats treated with the formulation. These results show the antioxidant properties of the cosmetic formulation due to the stimulation of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and GPx, preventing skin injury induced by ultraviolet irradiation. (Author).

  1. Synchronization of skin ablation and microjet injection for an effective transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hun-jae; Yeo, Seonggu; Yoh, Jack J.

    2016-04-01

    An Er:YAG laser with 2940-nm wavelength and 150-µs pulse duration was built for the purpose of combined ablation and microjet injection. A shorter pulse duration compared to common erbium lasers in dentistry is desirable for a synchronization of skin ablation and subsequent microjet injection into target skin for transdermal injection of liquid dose. A single laser beam is split into two for an optimal energy of pre-ablation of skin and the residual energy allocated to a microjet ejection. A newly designed injector consists of an L-shaped chamber and a parabolic mirror in a single unit, and the handheld laser is a part of an integrated system requiring no optical fiber. Through various injection tests using the porcine skin, the effectiveness of the new delivery system is herein evaluated.

  2. Effects of whole body cryotherapy and cold water immersion on knee skin temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, J T; Donnelly, A E; Karki, A; Selfe, J

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to (a) compare and contrast the effect of 2 commonly used cryotherapy treatments, 4 min of -110 °C whole body cryotherapy and 8 °C cold water immersion, on knee skin temperature and (b) establish whether either protocol was capable of achieving a skin temperature (body fat; mean±SD) participated in this randomised controlled crossover study. Skin temperature around the patellar region was assessed in both knees via non-contact, infrared thermal imaging and recorded pre-, immediately post-treatment and every 10 min thereafter for 60 min. Compared to baseline, average, minimum and maximum skin temperatures were significantly reduced (pwhole body cryotherapy (19.0±0.9 °C) compared to cold water immersion (20.5±0.6 °C). However, from 10 to 60 min post, the average, minimum and maximum skin temperatures were lower (p<0.05) following the cold water treatment. Finally, neither protocol achieved a skin temperature believed to be required to elicit an analgesic effect. PMID:23780900

  3. Histomorphometric study on the effects of Artemisia sieberi extract in mice skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaboutari Jahangir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Skin as the biggest single body organ is always exposing to various injuries, therefore health and healing of its injuries is vital. Artemisia sieberi is a valuable medicinal plant with a long history of indication in folk and modern medicine. Due to different chemical components and antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and cytoprotective properties of Artemisia, this study was conducted to study the histomorphometric effects of Artemisia sieberi (A. sieberi extract on mice skin. Methods: Ninety adult mice were randomly divided in 3 groups. In the treatment group A. sieberi extract dissolved in ethanol & distilled water, in the positive control ethanol & distilled water, and in negative control only distilled water were applied on the shaved dorsum twice daily for 21 days. Mean thickness of epidermis, hypodermis & dermis layers, percentage of collagen fibers and histological evaluation of skin layers were studied in 1, 3, 5, 14 and 21days post treatment. Data were presented as mean± SD and analyzed using one way ANOVA and LSD post hoc tests. The P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: A. sieberi extract significantly increased epidermis thickness in day 1, hypodermis, dermis and percentage of collagen fibers in day 3 in comparison to positive and negative control groups. Histology study revealed normal structure of skin and no abnormality was seen. Conclusion: A. sieberi extract can be effective for health and healing of skin injuries by increasing thickness of the skin layers and amount of collagen fibers.

  4. Fractional Laser Photothermolysis in the Treatment of Skin Defects: Possibilities and Effectiveness (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.М. Karabut

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For skin defect treatment and rejuvenation the ablative laser skin resurfacing with a CO2 laser is widely applied in cosmetology and dermatology. However this treatment can result in the risk of undesirable side effects and requires a long-term recovery after the procedure. When non-ablative laser skin rejuvenation is used as an alternative, the level of safety is increased, however the efficacy of the procedure is considerably reduced. The use of fractional laser photothermolysis is a particularly important step in the development of laser technology for cosmetology and dermatology. Due to the creation of only microscopic areas of thermal damage under the laser exposure, this method results in safe, quick healing and complete recovery of the skin without any undesirable side effects. The review presented here illustrate the high efficacy of the application of both ablative and non-ablative fractional laser photothermolysis for wrinkles reduction, for general improvement of the skin appearance, for the abnormal pigmentation treatment, and the removal or appearance improvement of atrophic scars from acne as well as in areas of skin stretching (striae.

  5. Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Baum, J.W.; Schaefer, C.W. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small (< 0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles as produced in the work environments of nuclear reactors. Hanford mini-pigs were exposed, both on a slightly off the skin, to localized replicate doses from 0.31 to 64 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70 {mu}m depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC{sub 2} isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs.

  6. Anomalous Hall effect suppression in anatase Co:TiO2 by the insertion of an interfacial TiO2 buffer layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Y.J.; Jong, de M.P.; Wiel, van der W.G.; Kim, Y.; Brock, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    We present the effect of introducing a TiO2 buffer layer at the SrTiO3/Co:TiO2 interface on the magnetic and structural properties of anatase Co:TiO2 (1.4 at. % Co). Inserting the buffer layer leads to suppression of the room-temperature anomalous Hall effect, accompanied by a reduced density of Co

  7. Surgical treatment of delayed radiation effects in the skin and its indication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1960 a total of 1200 patients with skin disease as delayed radiation effects were treated at the Hornheide special clinic, 40% of whom received plastic surgery. This requires knowledge of the type of radiation applied and when it was applied, additional harmful influences, exposure, differentiation in cases of ulcers between primary, cumulative, and combination effect, early radiation effects, and late radiation effects. Secondary factors leading possibly to necrosis may be: recidivation of the primary tumours, benign or malignant neoplasms, traumatic injuries such as injections, sampling, tight clothing, chemical factors like therapeuticals for local application, allergies, infections of the skin with bacteria or fungi, osteomyelitis, non-infections skin disease, and internal disease. A precondition for successful dermatological and surgical treatment are a careful review of the previous case history and exact diagnosis. Some clinical cases serve to illustrate the theoretical explanations and point out possibilities for surgical treatment. (TRV)

  8. Theory of the Dirac half metal and quantum anomalous Hall effect in Mn-intercalated epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanchang; West, Damien; Huang, Huaqing; Li, Jia; Zhang, S. B.; Duan, Wenhui

    2015-11-01

    The prospect of a Dirac half metal, a material which is characterized by a band structure with a gap in one spin channel but a Dirac cone in the other, is of both fundamental interest and a natural candidate for use in spin-polarized current applications. However, while the possibility of such a material has been reported based on model calculations [H. Ishizuka and Y. Motome, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.237207], it remains unclear what material system might realize such an exotic state. Using first-principles calculations, we show that the experimentally accessible Mn-intercalated epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) transits to a Dirac half metal when the coverage is >1 /3 monolayer. This transition results from an orbital-selective breaking of quasi-two-dimensional inversion symmetry, leading to symmetry breaking in a single spin channel which is robust against randomness in the distribution of Mn intercalates. Furthermore, the inclusion of spin-orbit interaction naturally drives the system into the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state. Our results thus not only demonstrate the practicality of realizing the Dirac half metal beyond a toy model, but also open up an avenue to the realization of the QAH effect.

  9. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. I. Insights from particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    Using a 1D particle-in-cell simulation with perpendicular electric, E0, and magnetic, B0, fields, and modelling the azimuthal direction (i.e., the E0 × B0 direction), we study the cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs). For low plasma densities, the electron transport is found to be well described by classical electron-neutral collision theory, but at sufficiently high densities (representative of typical HETs), a strong instability is observed to significantly enhance the electron mobility, even in the absence of electron-neutral collisions. This instability is associated with correlated high-frequency (of the order of MHz) and short-wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and the plasma density, which are shown to be the cause of the anomalous transport. Saturation of the instability is observed to occur due to a combination of ion-wave trapping in the E0 × B0 direction, and convection in the E0 direction.

  10. Anomalous enhancement and suppression of ionization induced by an effective few-cycle pulse in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, David; Lin, Yingda; Hill, Wendell T., III

    2015-05-01

    In a recent set of coherent control experiments, an anomalous sinusoidal variation of the ionization yield was observed in Xe when ionized by a pairs of phase-locked, many-cycle 800 nm pulses. Compared with the signal of a single transform limited pulse, both enhancement and suppression was possible, which depended on the temporal separation and relative phase of the pulses. In the time domain, the control can be viewed as a temporal Young's double slit experiment - two coherent electron wavepackets interfering. In the frequency domain, the photoelectron spectrum is given by the modulus squared of the Fourier transform of the field, which is a few-cycle squared sinusodial function. In analogy to a few-cycle pulse where the carrier phase dictates the ejection direction of rescattered electrons, enhancement (suppression) occurs when the effective carrier waveform is cos[w-w0]2 (sin[w-w0]2). The contrast decreased with increasing pulse separation and decreasing multiphoton order. Detailed results and a model simulation will be presented.

  11. The effect of N-acetylcysteine on photodynamic induced skin damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major side effect of PhotoDynamic Therapy with Photofrin II is enhanced skin sensitivity for (sun)light. This is due to prolonged retention of PII in skin and can lead to severe edema and desquamation if patients do not avoid exposure to direct light. Formation of singlet oxygen and radicals to be the basic mechanism of inducing skin damage. Reducing this side effect would make PDT more acceptable. A mouse skin model was developed, in which the effect of exposure to increasing light doses could be evaluated. Hair was manually removed (plucked under anaesthesia) from a 5cm2 area of the dorsum of mice. PII (10 mg/kg) was injected i.p. 24 hours before illumination. Light from a halogen lamp was transmitted through a fiber optic to illuminate a field of 2.5 cm2. Using a fluence rate of 200 mW/cm2 there was no rise in skin temperature. A dose response relationship was established for PDT alone using energies of 0, 50, 100, 150 Joule/cm2. In an attempt to reduce skin damage, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an aminothiol and precursor of gluthathione known to scavenge radicals in vivo and in vitro, was administered i.p. (2000 mg/kg) at 1 hour before illumination. NAC produced a significant decrease in skin damage (redness and scab formation) at all light doses. Clinical studies to evaluate the protective effect of NAC in patients treated with PII-PDT are warranted. (author). 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Anomalous Earth flybys of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2015-07-01

    A small deviation from the potential is expected for the gravitational interaction of extended bodies. It is explained as a consequence of a recently proposed gravitational impact model (Wilhelm et al. in Astrophys. Space Sci. 343:135-144, 2013) and has been applied to anomalous perihelion advances by Wilhelm and Dwivedi (New Astron. 31:51-55, 2014). The effect—an offset of the effective gravitational centre from the geometric centre of a spherical symmetric body—might also be responsible for the observed anomalous orbital energy gains and speed increases during Earth flybys of several spacecraft. However, close flybys would require detailed considerations of the orbit geometry. In this study, an attempt is made to explain the anomalous Earth flybys of the Galileo, NEAR Shoemaker and Rosetta spacecraft.

  13. Measurement and effects of MOSKIN detectors on skin dose during high energy radiotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During in vivo dosimetry for megavoltage X-ray beams, detectors such as diodes, Thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLD's) and MOSFET devices are placed on the patient's skin. This of course will affect the skin dose delivered during that fraction of the treatment. Whilst the overall impact on increasing skin dose would be minimal, little has been quantified concerning the level of increase in absorbed dose, in vivo dosimeters produce when placed in the beams path. To this extent, measurements have been made and analysis performed on dose changes caused by MOSKIN, MOSFET, skin dose detectors. Maximum increases in skin dose were measured as 15 % for 6 MV X-rays and 10 % for 10 MV X-rays at the active crystal of the MOSKIN device which is the thickest part of the detector. This is compared to 32 and 26 % for a standard 1 mm thick LiF TLD at 10 × 10 cm2 field size for 6 and 10 MV X-rays respectively. Radiochromic film, EBT2 has been shown to provide a high resolution 2 dimensional map of skin dose from these detectors and measures the effects of in vivo dosimeters used for radiotherapy dose assessment.

  14. Effect of Colorspace Transformation, the Illuminance Component, and Color Modeling on Skin Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaram, S; Schmugge, S; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-03-22

    Skin detection is an important preliminary process in human motion analysis. It is commonly performed in three steps: transforming the pixel color to a non-RGB colorspace, dropping the illumination component of skin color, and classifying by modeling the skin color distribution. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of these three steps on the skin detection performance. The importance of this study is a new comprehensive colorspace and color modeling testing methodology that would allow for making the best choices for skin detection. Combinations of nine colorspaces, the presence of the absence of the illuminance component, and the two color modeling approaches are compared. The performance is measured by using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve on a large dataset of 805 images with manual ground truth. The results reveal that (1) the absence of the illuminance component decreases performance, (2) skin color modeling has a greater impact than colorspace transformation, and (3) colorspace transformations can improve performance in certain instances. We found that the best performance was obtained by transforming the pixel color to the SCT, HSI, or CIELAB colorspaces, keeping the illuminance component, and modeling the color with the histogram approach.

  15. Effect of Acupuncture Manipulations at LI4 or LI11 on Blood Flow and Skin Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weihui; Ahn, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture induces physiological changes, and patients have reported warm or cool sensations with "Burning Fire" (BF) or "Penetrating Cool" (PC) manipulations. This study aimed to evaluate whether these techniques had distinct effects on skin temperature and blood flow and to examine whether skin temperature correlated with blood flow. The participants were 25 healthy volunteers, each receiving acupuncture manipulations on points LI4 and LI11 bilaterally. Skin temperatures and blood flow were recorded continuously on both arms. The study found that acupuncture significantly increased skin temperature on the needling arm by 0.3514°C on average, but decreased it on the contralateral arm by 0.2201°C on average. Blood flow decreased significantly in both arms during needling (-3.4% and -5.97% for the ipsilateral and the contralateral sides, respectively), but the changes in skin temperature did not correlate with the changes in blood flow. Furthermore, these changes were not significantly different between acupuncture techniques and acupuncture points. In conclusion, acupuncture changes local skin temperature and blood flow independent of the manipulation technique. Moreover, blood flow may not be affected by the increased temperature on the needling arm. These results help to verify traditional Chinese medicine concepts and may help in establishing standards for acupuncture treatments. PMID:27342886

  16. Insights into bacterial colonization of intensive care patients' skin: the effect of chlorhexidine daily bathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassir, N; Papazian, L; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D; La Scola, B

    2015-05-01

    Skin is a major reservoir of bacterial pathogens in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this study was to assess the skin bacterial richness and diversity in ICU patients and the effect of CHG daily bathing on skin microbiota. Twenty ICU patients were included during an interventional period with CHG daily bathing (n = 10) and a control period (n = 10). At day seven of hospitalization, eight skin swab samples (nares, axillary vaults, inguinal creases, manubrium and back) were taken from each patient. The bacterial identification was performed by microbial culturomics. We used the Shannon index to compare the diversity. We obtained 5,000 colonies that yielded 61 bacterial species (9.15 ± 3.7 per patient), including 15 (24.5 %) that had never been cultured from non-pathological human skin before, and three (4.9 %) that had never been cultured from human samples before. Notably, Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from all sites. In the water-and-soap group, there was a higher risk of colonization with Gram-negative bacteria (OR = 6.05, 95 % CI [1.67-21.90]; P = 0.006). In the CHG group, we observed more patients colonized by sporulating bacteria (9/10 vs. 3/10; P = 0.019) with a reduced skin bacterial richness (P = 0.004) and lower diversity (0.37, 95 % CI [0.33; 0.42] vs. 0.50, 95 % CI [0.48; 0.52]). Gram-negative bacteria are frequent and disseminated components of the transient skin flora in ICU patients. CHG daily bathing is associated with a reduction in Gram-negative bacteria colonization together with substantial skin microbiota shifts. PMID:25604707

  17. Using MODIS Skin Temperature to Assess Urban Heat Island Effect and Biosphere-Atmosphere-Land Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M. S.; Dickinson, R.; Shepherd, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Two surface temperatures have been used in global change studies - 2-m surface air temperature (Tair) and skin temperature (Tskin). Skin temperature provides additional new information about the Earth surface because its physical meaning and magnitude differ from Tair. We will present two examples to reveal the advantages of using Tskin in studying land-atmosphere-biosphere interactions: an urban system and a Tibetan system. Ten-years of NASA MODIS skin temperature observations reveal new features related to the urban heat island effect (UHI). For example, the UHI is evident in both daytime and nighttime instead of being a nocturnal phenomenon traditionally referred from Tair. UHI is partially due to both albedo and emissivity reduction and partially due to soil moisture modification by urban surfaces (i.e., a change in Bowen ratio). Furthermore, urban aerosols affect surface insloation, which leads to a reduction in surface skin temperature. In summary, clearly the UHI is a result of land-atmosphere-biosphere interactions. Skin temperatures also provide detailed information for remote regions that are difficult to access, in particular, the Tibetan Plateau. Tskin shows a slight increase during 2000-2010, nevertheless, such an increase is only statistically significant for summer urban regions. Different land covers have varying patterns and seasonality of skin temperature. In particular, skin temperature and vegetation index (NDVI) have close relationships for their extremes. Such extremes are also a function of season and land cover. In conclusion, skin temperature is very useful in our understanding on biosphere-land-and atmosphere interactions. Further work is needed to examine the implications of these finding for scientific research and societal applications.

  18. Intrinsic quantum spin Hall and anomalous Hall effects in h-Sb/Bi epitaxial growth on a ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2016-05-01

    Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large band gap quantum spin Hall state and a nearly quantized anomalous Hall state which can be tuned by adjusting the Fermi level. Our findings provide an efficient way to realize both quantized intrinsic spin Hall conductivity and anomalous Hall conductivity in a single material.Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large

  19. Skin graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin transplant; Skin autografting; FTSG; STSG; Split thickness skin graft; Full thickness skin graft ... site. Most people who are having a skin graft have a split-thickness skin graft. This takes ...

  20. The vasorelaxant effect of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide and amylin in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Eskesen, Karen; Lind, Peter Henrik;

    2006-01-01

    In this study we aimed to assess in vivo, the vasodilator effects of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) and amylin in human skin vasculature and compare the responses to the effects mediated by the endogenous neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and...... substance P and to examine the mRNA expression of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL-R) and receptor-activity modifying proteins, RAMP1, RAMP 2 and RAMP3 in human subcutaneous arteries. Changes in skin blood flow of the forearm were measured using a Laser Doppler Imager after intradermal injection of the...... injection of CGRP, adrenomedullin and amylin induces long lasting dilatation of human skin vasculature by activation of CGRP1 receptors. PAMP induces transient vasodilatation. PAMP but not CGRP, adrenomedullin and amylin causes itch sensation and local erythema. The transient effect on vasodilatation as...

  1. New derivation method and simulation of skin effect in biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoli; Zhou, Qianxiang; Liu, Zhongqi; Xie, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Based on the electrical properties of biological tissues, bioimpedance measurement technology can be employed to collect physiologic and pathologic information by measuring changes in human bioimpedance. When an alternating current (AC) is applied as a detection signal to a tissue, the current field distribution, which is affected by skin effect, is related to both the bioimpedance of the tissue and the AC frequency. These relations would possibly reduce the accuracy and reliability of the measurement. In this study, an electromagnetic theory-based method, in which cylindrical conductor were divided into layers, was used to obtain current field distribution models of human limbs. Model simulations were conducted in MATLAB. The skin effect phenomenon and its characteristics in human tissues at different frequencies were observed, thus providing essential data on skin effect, which are useful in the development of bioimpedance measurement technology. PMID:26406033

  2. Effects of Cosmetic Formulations Containing Hydroxyacids on Sun-Exposed Skin: Current Applications and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Kornhauser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes recent data on the effects of various skin formulations containing hydroxyacids (HAs and related products on sun-exposed skin. The most frequently used classes of these products, such as α- and β-hydroxyacids, polyhydroxy acids, and bionic acids, are reviewed, and their application in cosmetic formulations is described. Special emphasis is devoted to the safety evaluation of these formulations, particularly on the effects of their prolonged use on sun-exposed skin. We also discuss the important contribution of cosmetic vehicles in these types of studies. Data on the effects of HAs on melanogenesis and tanning are also included. Up-to-date methods and techniques used in those explorations, as well as selected future developments in the cosmetic area, are presented.

  3. Skin effect mitigation in laser processed multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, laser-processed multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Cu conductors are introduced as potential passive components to mitigate the skin effect of Cu at high frequencies (0–10 MHz). Suppressed skin effect is observed in the MWCNT/Cu conductors compared to primitive Cu. At an AC frequency of 10 MHz, a maximum AC resistance reduction of 94% was observed in a MWCNT/Cu conductor after being irradiated at a laser power density of 189 W/cm2. The reduced skin effect in the MWCNT/Cu conductors is ascribed to the presence of MWCNT channels which are insensitive to AC frequencies. The laser irradiation process is observed to play a crucial role in reducing contact resistance at the MWCNT-Cu interfaces, removing impurities in MWCNTs, and densifying MWCNT films

  4. Skin effect mitigation in laser processed multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keramatnejad, K.; Zhou, Y. S.; Gao, Y.; Rabiee Golgir, H.; Wang, M.; Lu, Y. F., E-mail: ylu2@unl.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States); Jiang, L. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Silvain, J.-F. [Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB-CNRS) 87, Avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer F-33608 Pessac Cedex (France)

    2015-10-21

    In this study, laser-processed multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Cu conductors are introduced as potential passive components to mitigate the skin effect of Cu at high frequencies (0–10 MHz). Suppressed skin effect is observed in the MWCNT/Cu conductors compared to primitive Cu. At an AC frequency of 10 MHz, a maximum AC resistance reduction of 94% was observed in a MWCNT/Cu conductor after being irradiated at a laser power density of 189 W/cm{sup 2}. The reduced skin effect in the MWCNT/Cu conductors is ascribed to the presence of MWCNT channels which are insensitive to AC frequencies. The laser irradiation process is observed to play a crucial role in reducing contact resistance at the MWCNT-Cu interfaces, removing impurities in MWCNTs, and densifying MWCNT films.

  5. Effects of radioactive hot particles on pig skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the incidence and severity of lesions resulting from very localized deposition of dose to skin from small (2 at 70 μm depth unless noted otherwise) using Sc-46, Yb-175, Tm-170, and fissioned UC2 isotopes having maximum beta-particle energies from about 0.3 to 3 MeV. Erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored for up to 71 days post-irradiation. The responses followed normal cumulative probability distributions, and therefore, no true threshold could be defined. Hence, 10 and 50% scab incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. The lowest dose which produced 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for Yb-175 (0.5 MeV maximum energy) beta particle exposures, and about 3 to 9 Gy for other isotopes. The histopathology of lesions was determined at several doses. Single exposures to doses as large as 1,790 Gy were also given, and results were observed for up to 144 days post-exposure. Severity of detriment was estimated by analyzing the results in terms of lesion diameter, persistence, and infection. Over 1,100 sites were exposed. Only two exposed sites became infected after doses near 5000 Gy; the lesions healed quickly on treatment. 105 refs., 145 figs., 47 tabs

  6. Skin-whitening and skin-condition-improving effects of topical oxidized glutathione: a double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial in healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe F

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fumiko Watanabe,1 Erika Hashizume,1 Gertrude P Chan,2 Ayako Kamimura11Healthcare Products Development Center, KYOWA HAKKO BIO CO., LTD., Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 2Clinical Trial Management and Testing Associates, Inc., Filinvest Corporate City, Alabang, Muntinlupa City, PhilippinesPurpose: Glutathione is a tripeptide consisting of cysteine, glycine, and glutamate and functions as a major antioxidant. It is synthesized endogenously in humans. Glutathione protects thiol protein groups from oxidation and is involved in cellular detoxification for maintenance of the cell environment. Reduced glutathione (GSH has a skin-whitening effect in humans through its tyrosinase inhibitory activity, but in the case of oxidized glutathione (GSSG this effect is unclear. We examined the skin-whitening and skin-condition effects of topical GSSG in healthy women.Subjects and methods: The subjects were 30 healthy adult women aged 30 to 50 years. The study design was a randomized, double-blind, matched-pair, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Subjects applied GSSG 2% (weight/weight [w/w] lotion to one side of the face and a placebo lotion to the other side twice daily for 10 weeks. We objectively measured changes in melanin index values, moisture content of the stratum corneum, smoothness, wrinkle formation, and elasticity of the skin. The principal investigator and each subject also used subjective scores to investigate skin whitening, wrinkle reduction, and smoothness. Analysis of variance was used to evaluate differences between groups.Results: The skin melanin index was significantly lower with GSSG treatment than with placebo from the early weeks after the start of the trial through to the end of the study period (at 10 weeks, P<0.001. In addition, in the latter half of the study period GSSG-treated sites had significant increases in moisture content of the stratum corneum, suppression of wrinkle formation, and improvement in skin smoothness. There were no

  7. Effects of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) on Skin Health: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Branum, Amy; Sivamani, Raja K

    2016-08-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a commonly used spice throughout the world, has been shown to exhibit antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-neoplastic properties. Growing evidence shows that an active component of turmeric, curcumin, may be used medically to treat a variety of dermatologic diseases. This systematic review was conducted to examine the evidence for the use of both topical and ingested turmeric/curcumin to modulate skin health and function. The PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched for clinical studies involving humans that examined the relationship between products containing turmeric, curcumin, and skin health. A total of 234 articles were uncovered, and a total of 18 studies met inclusion criteria. Nine studies evaluated the effects of ingestion, eight studies evaluated the effects of topical, and one study evaluated the effects of both ingested and topical application of turmeric/curcumin. Skin conditions examined include acne, alopecia, atopic dermatitis, facial photoaging, oral lichen planus, pruritus, psoriasis, radiodermatitis, and vitiligo. Ten studies noted statistically significant improvement in skin disease severity in the turmeric/curcumin treatment groups compared with control groups. Overall, there is early evidence that turmeric/curcumin products and supplements, both oral and topical, may provide therapeutic benefits for skin health. However, currently published studies are limited and further studies will be essential to better evaluate efficacy and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27213821

  8. Effect of local allergen priming on early, late, delayed-phase, and epicutaneous skin reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weller, FR; Weller, MS; Jansen, HM; deMonchy, JGR

    1996-01-01

    Allergic disease is renected in a chronic inflammatory response to an allergen. It is thought that local allergen priming underlies this chronicity. To assess the effect of allergen priming on the amplitude and histologic effect of the allergic reaction, four sequential, intracutaneous skin tests we

  9. On the theory of the anomalous photoelectric effect stemming from a substructure of matter waves

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnoholovets, V

    1999-01-01

    The two opposite concepts - multiphoton and effective photon - readily describing the photoelectric effect under strong irradiation in the case that the energy of the incident light is essentially smaller than the ionisation potential of gas atoms and the work function of the metal are treated. Based on the submicroscopic construction of quantum mechanics developed in the previous papers by the author [Phys. Essays vol. 6, 554 (1993); vol. 10, 407 (1997)] the analysis of the reasons of the two concepts discrepancies is led. Taking into account the main hypothesis of those works, i.e. that the electron is an extended object that is not point-like, the study of the interaction between the electron and a photon flux is carried out in detail. A comparison with numerous experiments is performed.

  10. Theory for a cylindrical pillbox accelerator cavity using layered structures for reducing skin-effect losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that for a cylindrical pillbox accelerator cavity operating in a TM0n0 mode, the use of laminated conductors for the flat walls in conjunction with a multilayered dielectric structure for the round walls can decrease skin-effect losses by an order of magnitude over that of a copper cavity having the same accelerating field. The layered dielectric structure for the round walls works in a fashion similar to a quarter-wave interferometer. The laminated conductor on the flat walls reduces the ohmic losses by effectively increasing the skin depth

  11. The Skindex instruments to measure the effects of skin disease on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chren, Mary-Margaret

    2012-04-01

    Skindex-29 and Skindex-16 are validated measures of the effects of skin diseases on patients' quality of life. This article reviews the development of both versions of Skindex, discusses their measurement properties and interpretability, and gives examples of how they have been used and adapted for dermatologic research internationally. Studies of quality of life in patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer are described to illustrate the use of Skindex to understand quality of life and to compare effectiveness of different treatments for this highly prevalent condition. PMID:22284137

  12. Anomalous Hall effect in anatase Co:TiO2 ferromagnetic semiconductor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaneti, R.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of modification of the SrTiO3 /Co interface as well as the SrTiO3 barrier on the tunnel magnetoresistance TMR of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 /SrTiO3 /Co junctions. Modification was realized by the introduction of one atomic layer of either TiO2 or SrO at the SrTiO3 /Co interfac

  13. Barrier widths, barrier heights, and the origins of anomalous kinetic H/D isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton transfer between MeO- and HOMe has been studied using ab initio molecular orbital theory. At the highest level employed (MP2/6-31+G(d)//6-31G(d)+ZPE), -ΔH298 and -ΔG298 for the formation of the ion-molecule complex MeO-hor-ellipsis HOMe from the separated reactants are 26.3 and 15.2 kcal/mol, respectively. At the 6-31G(d)//6-31G(d) level of theory, the (MeO-H-OMe)- transition structure is 2.19 kcal/mol higher in energy than the ion-molecule complex (ΔEdouble-dagger = 2.19), but this barrier disappears when zero-point energies are taken into account. The performance of AM1 on this system is quantitatively different (-ΔH298 = 13.3; -ΔG298 = 6.9; ΔEdouble-dagger = 4.91; kH/kD = 5.13, increasing to 5.79 when quantum mechanical tunneling is invoked) but appears to be acceptable for the research envisaged in the title. The effect of an enforced separation of the heavy atoms upon proton transfer barriers and isotope effects (which simulates steric effects) has been studied briefly at the 6-31G(d) level and in some detail using AM1

  14. Efimov effect and anomalous transport properties of a quantum Lorentz gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lorentz gas is one of the simplest many-body systems which admits a detailed theoretical analysis still having a meaningful physical interpretation. The author studies a complication for the description of the equilibrium state of a gas due to the so called Efimov effect, being an anomaly of the quantum mechanical three-body system. In statistical mechanical studies concerning the thermodynamic properties of gases it is usually assumed that the constituents interact via short-range potentials, which excludes for instance the Coulomb gas. The author investigates the consequences of the effective long-range behaviour due to the Efimov effect in the three-body sub-systems for a binary gas mixture. In particular problems arise in the cluster expansion of the quantum mechanical partition function where it can readily be shown that the bound-state part of the three-particle contribution diverges logarithmically at the Efimov point. The question is whether this implies the divergence of the complete three particle contribution or not. Some aspects of the non-equilibrium behaviour of the quantum Lorentz gas are studied. (Auth.)

  15. Transport theory for disordered multiple-band systems: Anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovalev, A.A.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Výborný, Karel; Sinova, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 19 (2009), 19529/1-19529/19. ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR KJB100100802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : ferromagnetic materials * Hall effect * magnetoresistance * quasiparticles * spin-orbit interactions * two-dimensional electron gas Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009 http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevB.79.195129

  16. Chiral magnetic effect and anomalous transport from real-time lattice simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Niklas; Sharma, Sayantan

    2016-01-01

    We present a first-principle study of anomaly induced transport phenomena by performing real-time lattice simulations with dynamical fermions coupled simultaneously to non-Abelian $SU(N_c)$ and Abelian $U(1)$ gauge fields. Investigating the behavior of vector and axial currents during a sphaleron transition in the presence of an external magnetic field, we demonstrate how the interplay of the Chiral magnetic (CME) and Chiral separation effect (CSE) lead to the formation of a propagating wave. We further analyze the dependence of the magnitude of the induced vector current and the propagation of the wave on the amount of explicit chiral symmetry breaking due to finite quark mass.

  17. Transcriptomic analysis of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) skin biopsies to assess the effects of emerging contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Denise; Abelli, Luigi; Panti, Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Mancia, Annalaura

    2016-03-01

    Chemicals discovered in water at levels that may be significantly different than expected are referred to as contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) because the risk to environmental health posed by their occurrence/frequency is still unknown. The worldwide distributed compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and bisphenol A (BPA) may fall into this category due to effects on endocrine receptors. We applied an ex vivo assay using small slices of bioptic skin from the bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, cultured and treated for 24 h with different PFOA or BPA concentrations to analyze global gene expression. RNA was labeled and hybridized to a species-specific oligomicroarray. The skin transcriptome held information on the contaminant exposure, potentially predictive about long-term effects on health, being the genes affected involved in immunity modulation, response to stress, lipid homeostasis, and development. The transcriptomic signature of dolphin skin could be therefore relevant as classifier for a specific contaminant. PMID:26794494

  18. The inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of a nitric oxide releasing cream on normal skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, A D; Copeland, P; Hay, I; Husain, A; Ewen, S W

    1999-09-01

    We describe the pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of nitric oxide in vivo in human skin. Nitrite and ascorbic acid were mixed on the skin of 12 normal volunteers, three times daily, to release nitric oxide. Exposure to nitric oxide was varied by randomizing the concentration of nitrite and duration of application. Nitric oxide treated skin showed significant increases in cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, neutrophil elastase, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, nitrosotyrosine, p53, and apoptotic cells compared with skin treated with ascorbic acid alone. There was no significant increase in mast cells. Following application of nitric oxide there were significantly fewer CD1a positive Langerhans cells in the epidermis. These appeared to lose dendritic morphology and migrate from the epidermis. There was no significant difference in staining for Ki-67, a marker related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen, between active and control skin but staining was greater after exposure to higher dose nitric oxide than the low dose. Apoptosis, cytotoxicity, and p53 staining were relatively greater after 48 h exposure than after 24 h. These results suggest that nitric oxide is pro-inflammatory and is toxic to DNA, leading to the accumulation of p53 and subsequent apoptosis. High-dose nitric oxide paradoxically led to a smaller increase in macrophages and T cells than low dose suggesting an immunosuppressive effect of higher levels. PMID:10469339

  19. Anomalous quantum and isotope effects in water clusters: Physical phenomenon, model artifact, or bad approximation?

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Free energy differences $\\Delta F:=F-F_{\\text{prism}}$ are computed for several isomers of water hexamer relative to the "prism" isomer using the self-consistent phonons method. %$\\Delta F:=F-F({prism})$ We consider the isotope effect defined by the quantity $\\delta F_{D_2O}:=\\Delta F_{\\rm D_2O}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and the quantum effect, $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}:=\\Delta F_{\\hbar=0}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and evaluate them using different flexible water models. While both $\\delta F_{D_2O}$ and $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}$ are found to be rather small for all of the potentials, they are especially small for two of the empirical models, q-TIP4P/F and TTM3-F, compared to q-SPC/Fw and the two {\\it abinitio}-based models, WHBB and HBB2-pol. This qualitative difference in the properties of different water models cannot be explained by one being "more accurate" than the other. We speculate as to whether the observed anomalies are caused by the special properties of water systems, or are an artifact of either the potential energ...

  20. Application of the Aqueous Porous Pathway Model to Quantify the Effect of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate on Ultrasound-Induced Skin Structural Perturbation

    OpenAIRE

    Polat, Baris E.; Seto, Jennifer E.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) on skin structural perturbation when utilized simultaneously with low-frequency sonophoresis (LFS). Pig full-thickness skin (FTS) and pig split-thickness skin (STS) treated with LFS/SLS and LFS were analyzed in the context of the aqueous porous pathway model to quantify skin perturbation through changes in skin pore radius and porosity-to-tortuosity ratio (ε/τ). In addition, skin treatment times required to attain specific leve...

  1. Effect of compositions in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC on skin hydration and occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loo CH

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CH Loo,1,2 M Basri,2 R Ismail,1 HLN Lau,1 BA Tejo,2 MS Kanthimathi,3 HA Hassan,1 YM Choo11Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Bandar Baru Bangi, 2Department of Chemistry, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, 3Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaPurpose: To study the effects of varying lipid concentrations, lipid and oil ratio, and the addition of propylene glycol and lecithin on the long-term physical stability of nanostructured lipid nanocarriers (NLC, skin hydration, and transepidermal water loss.Methods: The various NLC formulations (A1–A5 were prepared and their particle size, zeta potential, viscosity, and stability were analyzed. The formulations were applied on the forearms of the 20 female volunteers (one forearm of each volunteer was left untreated as a control. The subjects stayed for 30 minutes in a conditioned room with their forearms uncovered to let the skin adapt to the temperature (22°C ± 2°C and humidity (50% ± 2% of the room. Skin hydration and skin occlusion were recorded at day one (before treatment and day seven (after treatment. Three measurements for skin hydration and skin occlusion were performed in each testing area.Results: NLC formulations with the highest lipid concentration, highest solid lipid concentration, and additional propylene glycol (formulations A1, A2, and A5 showed higher physical stability than other formulations. The addition of propylene glycol into an NLC system helped to reduce the particle size of the NLC and enhanced its long-term physical stability. All the NLC formulations were found to significantly increase skin hydration compared to the untreated controls within 7 days. All NLC formulations exhibited occlusive properties as they reduced the transepidermal water loss within 7 days. This effect was more pronounced with the addition of propylene glycol or lecithin into an NLC formulation, whereby at least 60% reduction in transepidermal water loss was observed

  2. Possible anomalous doppler shift effect in superconductor Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Y; Tanuma, Y; Kashiwaya, S

    2003-01-01

    The effect of Doppler shift is studied in a model for the alpha-beta bands of Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4 consisting of two hybridized one-dimensional (1D) bands. Assuming a superconducting gap with nodes in a diagonal direction, we examine the oscillation of surface density of states and thermal conductivity under a rotating magnetic field. Upon varying the strength of hybridization, the oscillation of these quantities is found to exhibit 2D to 1D crossover. In the crossover regime, which corresponds to the actual Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4 , the thermal conductivity exhibits a two-fold-symmetry oscillation, while a four-fold-symmetry component in the oscillation is barely detectable.

  3. Possible anomalous doppler shift effect in superconductor Sr2RuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of Doppler shift is studied in a model for the α-β bands of Sr2RuO4 consisting of two hybridized one-dimensional (1D) bands. Assuming a superconducting gap with nodes in a diagonal direction, we examine the oscillation of surface density of states and thermal conductivity under a rotating magnetic field. Upon varying the strength of hybridization, the oscillation of these quantities is found to exhibit 2D to 1D crossover. In the crossover regime, which corresponds to the actual Sr2RuO4, the thermal conductivity exhibits a two-fold-symmetry oscillation, while a four-fold-symmetry component in the oscillation is barely detectable. (author)

  4. Skin cooling aids cerebrovascular function more effectively under severe than moderate heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rebekah A I; Ainslie, Philip N; Fan, Jui-Lin; Wilson, Luke C; Thomas, Kate N; Cotter, James D

    2010-05-01

    Skin surface cooling has been shown to improve orthostatic tolerance; however, the influence of severe heat stress on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to skin cooling remains unknown. Nine healthy males, resting supine in a water-perfusion suit, were heated to +1.0 and +2.0 degrees C elevation in body core temperature (T (c)). Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial pressure (MAP; photoplethysmography), stroke volume (SV; Modelflow), total peripheral resistance (TPR; Modelflow), heart rate (HR; ECG) and the partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) were measured continuously during 1-min baseline and 3-min lower body negative pressure (LBNP, -15 mm Hg) when heated without and again with skin surface cooling. Nine participants tolerated +1 degrees C and six participants reached +2 degrees C. Skin cooling elevated (P = 0.004) MAP ~4% during baseline and LBNP at +1 degrees C T (c). During LBNP, skin cooling increased SV (9%; P = 0.010) and TPR (0.9 mm Hg L(-1) min, P = 0.013) and lowered HR (13 b min(-1), P = 0.012) at +1 degrees C T (c) and +2 degrees C T (c) collectively. At +2 degrees C T (c), skin cooling elevated P(ET)CO(2) ~4.3 mm Hg (P = 0.011) and therefore reduced cerebral vascular resistance ~0.1 mm Hg cm(-1) s at baseline and LBNP (P = 0.012). In conclusion, skin cooling under severe heating and mild orthostatic stress maintained cerebral blood flow more effectively than it did under moderate heating, in conjunction with elevated carbon dioxide pressure, SV and arterial resistance. PMID:19946700

  5. CHIRAL MULTIPHOTON ABSORPTION AND INVERSE SKIN EFFECT IN WLAN SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Torres Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A model formed by chiral bioplasma with a set of macromolecules of DNA, which represents the human head inner structure, makes possible to analyze its behavior, when it is radiated by a microwave electromagnetic field from cellular phones and WLAN's at frequencies of 2.4 and 5.2 GHz is presented. The finite difference time domain, FDTD, numeric technique is used under multiphoton regime deduced from Maxwell equations. The numerical results of the Specific Absorption Rate, SAR, show the SAR behavior in function of input power and the chirality factor. The main conclusions of our work are: a the microwave absorption from cellular phones or WLAN's is enhanced, compared with classical models, when values of the normalized chiral factor are of order of one which appear under multiphoton regime ; b a phenomena like an “inverse skin effect” in 5.2 GHz, with respect to a 2.4 GHz source, was observed. c In the metamaterial region we show that the absorption rate always is positive.Un modelo formado por bioplasma quiral con un conjunto de macromoléculas de ADN, que representa la estructura interna de la cabeza humana, hace posible analizar su comportamiento, cuando es irradiada por campos electromagnéticos de microondas de teléfonos celulares o sistemas WLAN a frecuencias de 2.4 y 5.2 GHz. El método de diferencias finitas en el dominio del tiempo, FDTD, en régimen de multifotones deducido de las ecuaciones de Maxwell es usado. Los resultados numéricos de la taza de absorción específica SAR, muestran el comportamiento de la SAR en función de la potencia de entrada y del factor quiral. Las principales conclusiones de nuestro trabajo son: a la absorción de microondas es aumentada comparada con modelos clásicos, cuando valores del factor quiral normalizado son del orden de la unidad, que aparecen bajo régimen multifotónico; b Un fenómeno de efecto pelicular inverso en 5.2 GHz con respecto a una fuente de 2.4 GHz fue observado; c En la regi

  6. Effects of magnolol on UVB-induced skin cancer development in mice and its possible mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Chilampalli Chandeshwari; Guillermo Ruth; Zhang Xiaoying; Kaushik Radhey S; Young Alan; Zeman David; Hildreth Michael B; Fahmy Hesham; Dwivedi Chandradhar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Magnolol, a plant lignan isolated from the bark and seed cones of Magnolia officinalis, has been shown to have chemopreventive effects on chemically-induced skin cancer development. The objectives of this investigation are to study the anticarcinogenic effects of magnolol on UVB-induced skin tumor development in SKH-1 mice, a model relevant to humans, and determine the possible role of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest involved in the skin tumor development. Methods UVB-indu...

  7. Anti-obesity effect of resveratrol-amplified grape skin extracts on 3T3-L1 adipocytes differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xian-Hua; Huang, Bo; Choi, Soo-Kyong; Seo, Jung-Sook

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,4,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a phytoalexin found in grape skin, grape products, and peanuts as well as red wine, has been reported to have various biological and pharmacological properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-obesity effect of resveratrol-amplified grape skin extracts on adipocytes. The anti-obesity effects of grape skin extracts were investigated by measuring proliferation and differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. The effect of grape skin ethan...

  8. Observation of anomalous linear photogalvanic effect and its dependence on wavelength in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Laipan; Liu, Yu; Gao, Hansong; Qin, Xudong; Li, Yuan; Wu, Qing; Chen, Yonghai

    2014-01-01

    We observed an anomalous linear photogalvanic effect (ALPGE) in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well and studied its wavelength dependence in details. This effect is believed to originate from the optical momentum alignment effect and the inhomogeneity of light intensity. We find that the spot location with the maximum ALPGE current is wavelength independent. And the normalized ALPGE current decreasing at smaller wavelengths is attributed to the sharp decrease of the momentum and energy relaxation time. The electrical measurement of the spectra dependence of ALPGE is highly sensitive proving to be an effective method for detecting the momentum anisotropy of photoinduced carriers and band coupling. PMID:25258612

  9. Hot electron production, anomalous absorption, and effect of intense electromagnetic fields on inverse bremsstrahlung absorption near the electron plasma frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous heating was studied on a well-controlled low-density plasma subjected to short microwave pulses. Absorption measurements along with parametric instabilities are described. The influence of intense ac electric fields on the electron-ion collision rate in the plasma is also discussed

  10. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Crosera

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue® and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm2 while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm2. Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10−4 M (MTT assay, 3.8 × 10−5 M (AlamarBlue® assay, and 7.6 × 10−4 M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death. Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure.

  11. The effects of sulfur mustard exposure and freezing on transdermal penetration of tritiated water through ex vivo pig skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, O J; Graham, S J; Dalton, C H; Spencer, P M; Mansson, R; Jenner, J; Azeke, J; Braue, E

    2013-02-01

    The percutaneous absorption of tritiated water ((3)H(2)O) through sulfur mustard (SM) exposed abdominal pig skin was measured using in vitro Franz-type static diffusion cells. The barrier function to water permeation following exposure to liquid SM for 8 min and excision 3h later did not change significantly. A small, but statistically significant difference (P<0.05) in steady state penetration (Jss), permeability coefficient (Kp) and lag time (t(L)) of (3)H(2)O was observed between fresh skin and skin stored frozen (-20 °C) for up to two weeks. Steady-state penetration and Kp values were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in skin stored frozen compared with fresh skin. Fresh naïve skin had an average Kp of 1.65 × 10(-3) cm h(-1), whereas frozen naïve skin was 2.04 × 10(-3) cm h(-1). Fresh SM exposed skin had a mean Kp of 1.72 × 10(-3) cm h(-1), whereas frozen SM exposed skin was 2.31 × 10(-3) cm h(-1). Lag times were also shorter (P<0.05) in skin that had been stored frozen. Frozen, SM-exposed porcine abdominal skin may be used for in vitro penetration studies, but effects of treatment and storage on the barrier layer should be taken into account. PMID:23041075

  12. Development of effective skin cancer treatment and prevention in xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, W Clark; Lambert, Muriel W

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, recessively transmitted genetic disease characterized by increasingly marked dyspigmentation and xerosis (dryness) of sun-exposed tissues, especially skin. Skin cancers characteristically develop in sun-exposed sites at very much earlier ages than in the general population; these are often multiple and hundreds or even thousands may develop. Eight complementation groups have been identified. Seven groups, XP-A…G, are associated with defective genes encoding proteins involved in the nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) pathway that recognizes and excises mutagenic changes induced in DNA by sunlight; the eighth group, XP-V, is associated with defective translesion synthesis (TLS) bypassing such alterations. The dyspigmentation, xerosis and eventually carcinogenesis in XP patients appear to be due to their cells' failure to respond properly to these mutagenic DNA alterations, leading to mutations in skin cells. A subset of cases, especially those in some complementation groups, may develop neurological degeneration, which may be severe. However, in most XP patients, in the past the multiple skin cancers have led to death at an early age due to either metastases or sepsis. Using either topical 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod, we have developed a protocol that effectively prevents most skin cancer development in XP patients. PMID:25382223

  13. Effects of niacin restriction on sirtuin and PARP responses to photodamage in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Claudia A; Schnell, Stephanie A; Jacobson, Elaine L

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins (SIRTs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), NAD(+)-dependent enzymes, link cellular energy status with responses to environmental stresses. Skin is frequently exposed to the DNA damaging effects of UV irradiation, a known etiology in skin cancer. Thus, understanding the defense mechanisms in response to UV, including the role of SIRTs and PARPs, may be important in developing skin cancer prevention strategies. Here, we report expression of the seven SIRT family members in human skin. SIRTs gene expressions are progressively upregulated in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells (SIRTs1 and 3), actinic keratoses (SIRTs 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7) and squamous cell carcinoma (SIRTs 1-7). Photodamage induces dynamic changes in SIRT expression with upregulation of both SIRT1 and SIRT4 mRNAs. Specific losses of SIRT proteins occur early after photodamage followed by accumulation later, especially for SIRT4. Niacin restriction, which decreases NAD(+), the sirtuin substrate, results in an increase in acetylated proteins, upregulation of SIRTs 2 and 4, increased inherent DNA damage, alterations in SIRT responses to photodamage, abrogation of PARP activation following photodamage, and increased sensitivity to photodamage that is completely reversed by repleting niacin. These data support the hypothesis that SIRTs and PARPs play important roles in resistance to photodamage and identify specific SIRTs that respond to photodamage and may be targets for skin cancer prevention. PMID:22860104

  14. Spectrum of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics describe an Abelian plasma where conduction and chiral currents are simultaneously present and constrained by the second law of thermodynamics. At high frequencies the magnetic currents play the leading role, and the spectrum is dominated by two-fluid effects. The system behaves instead as a single fluid in the low-frequency regime where the vortical currents induce potentially large hypermagnetic fields. After deriving the physical solutions of the generalized Appleton-Hartree equation, the corresponding dispersion relations are scrutinized and compared with the results valid for cold plasmas. Hypermagnetic knots and fluid vortices can be concurrently present at very low frequencies and suggest a qualitatively different dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities.

  15. Optically Anomalous Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Optical anomalies in crystals are puzzles that collectively constituted the greatest unsolved problems in crystallography in the 19th Century. The most common anomaly is a discrepancy between a crystal’s symmetry as determined by its shape or by X-ray analysis, and that determined by monitoring the polarization state of traversing light. These discrepancies were perceived as a great impediment to the development of the sciences of crystals on the basis of Curie’s Symmetry Principle, the grand organizing idea in the physical sciences to emerge in the latter half of the 19th Century. Optically Anomalous Crystals begins with an historical introduction covering the contributions of Brewster, Biot, Mallard, Brauns, Tamman, and many other distinguished crystallographers. From this follows a tutorial in crystal optics. Further chapters discuss the two main mechanisms of optical dissymmetry: 1. the piezo-optic effect, and 2. the kinetic ordering of atoms. The text then tackles complex, inhomogeneous crystals, and...

  16. The effect of environmental humidity and temperature on skin barrier function and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, K A; Johansen, J D; Kezic, S;

    2016-01-01

    existing dermatoses. We searched the literature for studies that evaluated the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Commonly used meteorological terms such as absolute humidity, relative humidity and dew point are explained. Furthermore, we review the negative effect of low humidity, low temperatures and...... different seasons on the skin barrier and on the risk of dermatitis. We conclude that low humidity and low temperatures lead to a general decrease in skin barrier function and increased susceptible towards mechanical stress. Since pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol are released by keratinocytes, and...

  17. THERAPEUTIC EFFECT OF SOLASODINE RHAMNOSYL GLYCOSIDES FOR LARGE SKIN CANCERS: TWO CLINICAL CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill E. Cham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solasodine rhamnosyl glycosides (BEC are a new class of antineoplastics, the efficiency of which administered via intravenous, intraperitoneal, and intratumoral routes is higher than that of many other antitumor agents. Early investigations have established the efficiency of topical BEC applications as a treatment option for non-melanoma skin cancers. There have recently been two clinical cases that count in favor of the fact that the cream formulation Curaderm containing BEC has a very high efficacy in the treatment of large non-melanoma skin cancers that are incurable by other existing methods. Also, Curaderm treatment shows a splendid cosmetic effect

  18. Effects of Topical Emu Oil on Burn Wounds in the Skin of Balb/c Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Afshar; Reza Ghaderi; Mahmoud Zardast; Parvin Delshad

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effect of topical Emu oil on the healing of burn wounds and hair follicle restoration in superficial II-degree burns in the skin of Balb/c mice. Thirty-two male Balb/c mice with burns on the back of the neck were divided into two groups: The Emu oil group received topical Emu oil twice daily, whereas the control was left untreated. Skin biopsies were obtained on days 4, 7, 10, and 14 of the experiment. Then the specimens were viewed with Olympus SZX...

  19. Effects of all-trans retinoic acid and Ca++ on human skin in organ culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Varani, J.; Fligiel, S. E.; Schuger, L; Perone, P.; Inman, D.; Griffiths, C E; Voorhees, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we have established an organ culture model of human skin and examined the effects of both all-trans retinoic acid (RA) and extracellular Ca++ on the epidermal and dermal components of the organ-cultured skin. Our data show that while organ cultures maintained in serum-free, growth factor-free culture medium containing 0.15 mM Ca++ degenerated rapidly, those treated with concentrations of RA that have been shown previously to stimulate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation i...

  20. Observation of the skin-depth effect on the Casimir force between metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Iannuzzi, Davide; Capasso, Federico

    2005-08-23

    We have performed measurements of the Casimir force between a metallic plate and a transparent sphere coated with metallic films of different thicknesses. We have observed that, if the thickness of the coating is less than the skin-depth of the electromagnetic modes that mostly contribute to the interaction, the force is significantly smaller than that measured with a thick bulk-like film. Our results provide direct evidence of the skin-depth effect on the Casimir force between metallic surfaces. PMID:16091459

  1. The expression of KRT2 and its effect on melanogenesis in alpaca skins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yucong; Song, Yajun; Geng, Qingling; Ding, Zengfeng; Qin, Yilong; Fan, Ruiwen; Dong, Changsheng; Geng, Jianjun

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate the effects of the keratin 2 (KRT2) on alpaca melanocyte in vivo and vitro, the immunohistochemistry (IHC), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), Western blot, and alpaca melanocytes transfection methods were used. The results showed that mRNA and protein expression of KRT2 was highly expressed in brown skin in comparison with that in white skin. Moreover, we found that KRT2 was expressed in alpaca melanocytes in vitro by immunocytochemistry. After transfection with KRT2 in alpaca melanocytes, the relative mRNA and protein expression of KRT2, microphthalmia-associtated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase (TYR) and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1) in alpaca skin melanocytes was increased with significant differences; a further result was the increase of melanin production. The results suggested that KRT2 functions in alpaca hair color formation, which offered an essential theoretical basis for further exploration of the role of melanogenesis. PMID:27265811

  2. The effects of epinephrine and dobutamine on skin flap viability in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krammer, Caspar W; Ibrahim, Rami Mossad; Hansen, Tom G;

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate the effects of the intraoperative administration of epinephrine and dobutamine on axial-pattern skin flap survival in rats. METHODS: Fifty-four Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into three groups (n = 18). A tubed axial-pattern skin flap was performed. Animals were randomized to receive......BACKGROUND: Intraoperative reduction in arterial pressure may cause hypoperfusion of skin flaps, which may increase the risk of flap failure. There is no international consensus regarding the use of vasoactive or inotropic agents to restore or maintain flap perfusion. The purpose of this study was...... an intraperitoneal injection of epinephrine 0.1 mg/kg, dobutamine 0.3 mg/kg, or saline (0.5 ml). The rats were euthanized after 7 days and the viable area of the flap was compared between the groups using a digital imaging and computer software. RESULTS: Seven rats/flaps were excluded from the study...

  3. The effects of sodium oxybate on core body and skin temperature regulation in narcolepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, A. van der; Donjacour, C.E.; Pijl, H.; Reijntjes, R.H.; Overeem, S.; Lammers, G.J.; Someren, E.J.W. van; Fronczek, R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering from narcolepsy type 1 show altered skin temperatures, resembling the profile that is related to sleep onset in healthy controls. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of sodium oxybate, a widely used drug to treat narcolepsy, on the 24-h profiles of temperatu

  4. High School Students' Perceptions of How Major Global Environmental Effects Might Cause Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Quantifies beliefs of high school students about links between skin cancer and global environmental effects. Some students confused the action of heat rays with that of ultraviolet rays and also thought that raised temperatures are culpable. Only one in 10 held the scientifically correct model: that ozone depletion via higher penetration of…

  5. Pulse testing in the presence of wellbore storage and skin effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogbe, D.O.; Brigham, W.E.

    1984-08-01

    A pulse test is conducted by creating a series of short-time pressure transients in an active (pulsing) well and recording the observed pressure response at an observation (responding) well. Using the pressure response and flow rate data, the transmissivity and storativity of the tested formation can be determined. Like any other pressure transient data, the pulse-test response is significantly influenced by wellbore storage and skin effects. The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of wellbore storage and skin effects on interference testing in general and on pulse-testing in particular, and to present the type curves and procedures for designing and analyzing pulse-test data when wellbore storage and skin effects are active at either the responding well or the pulsing well. A mathematical model for interference testing was developed by solving the diffusivity equation for radial flow of a single-phase, slightly compressible fluid in an infinitely large, homogeneous reservoir. When wellbore storage and skin effects are present in a pulse test, the observed response amplitude is attenuated and the time lag is inflated. Consequently, neglecting wellbore storage and skin effects in a pulse test causes the calculated storativity to be over-estimated and the transmissivity to be under-estimated. The error can be as high as 30%. New correlations and procedures are developed for correcting the pulse response amplitude and time lag for wellbore storage effects. Using these correlations, it is possible to correct the wellbore storage-dominated response amplitude and time lag to within 3% of their expected values without wellbore storage, and in turn to calculate the corresponding transmissivity and storativity. Worked examples are presented to illustrate how to use the new correction techniques. 45 references.

  6. Therapeutic effect of ethyl acetate extract from Asparagus cochinchinensis on phthalic anhydride-induced skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ji-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Ji-Eun; Go, Jun; Seo, Eun-Ji; Yun, Woo-Bin; Kim, Dong-Seob; Son, Hong-Joo; Lee, Chung-Yeoul; Lee, Hee-Seob; Hwang, Dae-Youn

    2016-03-01

    Asparagus cochinchinensis has been used to treat various diseases including fever, cough, kidney disease, breast cancer, inflammatory disease and brain disease, while IL-4 cytokine has been considered as key regulator on the skin homeostasis and the predisposition toward allergic skin inflammation. However, few studies have investigated its effects and IL-4 correlation on skin inflammation to date. To quantitatively evaluate the suppressive effects of ethyl acetate extracts of A. cochinchinensis (EaEAC) on phthalic anhydride (PA)-induced skin inflammation and investigate the role of IL-4 during their action mechanism, alterations in general phenotype biomarkers and luciferase-derived signals were measured in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic (Tg) mice with PA-induced skin inflammation after treatment with EaEAC for 2 weeks. Key phenotype markers including lymph node weight, immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentration, epidermis thickness and number of infiltrated mast cells were significantly decreased in the PA+EaEAC treated group compared with the PA+Vehicle treated group. In addition, expression of IL-1β and TNF-α was also decreased in the PA+EaEAC cotreated group, compared to PA+Vehicle treated group. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the luciferase signal derived from IL-4 promoter was detected in the abdominal region, submandibular lymph node and mesenteric lymph node of the PA+EaEAC treated group, compared to PA+Vehicle treated group. Taken together, these results suggest that EaEAC treatment could successfully improve PA-induced skin inflammation of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice, and that IL-4 cytokine plays a key role in the therapeutic process of EaEAC. PMID:27051441

  7. Study on the effectiveness of some decontamination agents against skin contamination of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chon, Je Keun; Ji, Pyung Kook; Kwak, Sang Soo; Kim, Byung Tae; Park, Chong Mook [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of some decontamination agents against skin contamination of {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs, the experiments were carried out in this study. In the experiments, pig skin was used instead of human skin, {sup 60}CoCl{sub 2} and {sup 137}CsCl were used the liquid sources of skin contamination. To examine the effectiveness of decontamination agents, skin decontamination was tried using soup, EDTA, DAERICON which was developed for decontamination of radionuclides on the surface of building structure, and new decontamination agents such as IOCON, TRICON, and CHARCON, which were developed in this study. The absorption of radionuclides through the skin was evaluated by the gamma-ray detection on the surface of sample skin after radionuclides were penetrated into the skin during 16 hour soiling time. The results of this absorption experiment indicated that 11.5% and 3.2% of initial amounts of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co, respectively, were penetrated into the skin. In the experiment to remove the residual radioactivity fixed on the skin, KAERICON showed the decontamination rates up to 52.1%(decontamination factor of 2.1) and IOCON showed the equivalent decontamination rate (decontamination factor 1.9) for {sup 137}Cs. However, IOCON and CHARCON showed the poor decontamination rates of less than 20%(decontamination factor of 1.2) for {sup 60}Co, and KAERICON showed the poor decontamination rate (decontamination factor 1.1) for {sup 60}Co.

  8. Study on the effectiveness of some decontamination agents against skin contamination of 137Cs and 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of some decontamination agents against skin contamination of 60Co and 137Cs, the experiments were carried out in this study. In the experiments, pig skin was used instead of human skin, 60CoCl2 and 137CsCl were used the liquid sources of skin contamination. To examine the effectiveness of decontamination agents, skin decontamination was tried using soup, EDTA, DAERICON which was developed for decontamination of radionuclides on the surface of building structure, and new decontamination agents such as IOCON, TRICON, and CHARCON, which were developed in this study. The absorption of radionuclides through the skin was evaluated by the gamma-ray detection on the surface of sample skin after radionuclides were penetrated into the skin during 16 hour soiling time. The results of this absorption experiment indicated that 11.5% and 3.2% of initial amounts of 137Cs and 60Co, respectively, were penetrated into the skin. In the experiment to remove the residual radioactivity fixed on the skin, KAERICON showed the decontamination rates up to 52.1%(decontamination factor of 2.1) and IOCON showed the equivalent decontamination rate (decontamination factor 1.9) for 137Cs. However, IOCON and CHARCON showed the poor decontamination rates of less than 20%(decontamination factor of 1.2) for 60Co, and KAERICON showed the poor decontamination rate (decontamination factor 1.1) for 60Co

  9. Standing wave and skin effects in large-area, high-frequency capacitive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-area capacitive discharges driven at frequencies higher than the usual industrial frequency of 13.56 MHz have attracted recent interest for materials etching and thin film deposition on large-area substrates. Standing wave and skin effects can be important limitations for plasma processing uniformity, which cannot be described by conventional electrostatic theory. An electromagnetic theory is developed for a discharge having two plates of radius R and separation 2l, which accounts for the propagation of surface and evanescent waves from the discharge edge into the centre and the role of capacitive and inductive fields in driving the power absorption. Examples of discharge fields are given having substantial standing wave and/or skin effects. The conditions for a uniform discharge without significant standing wave and skin effects are found to be, respectively, λ0>>2.6(l/s)1/2R and δ>>0.45(dR)1/2, where λ0 is the free space wavelength, s is the sheath width, δ = c/ωp is the collisionless skin depth, with c the speed of light and ωp the plasma frequency, and d = l-s is the plasma half-width. Taking the equality for these conditions for a discharge radius of 50 cm, plate separation of 4 cm, and sheath width of 2 mm, there is a substantial skin effect for plasma densities ∼>1010 cm-3, and there is a substantial standing wave effect for frequencies f∼>70 MHz

  10. Skin penetration and antioxidant effect of cosmeto-textiles with gallic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, C; Martí, M; Barba, C; Lis, M; Rubio, L; Coderch, L

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the antioxidant gallic acid (GA) has been encapsulated in microspheres prepared with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) and incorporated into polyamide (PA) obtaining the cosmeto-textile. The topical application of the cosmeto-textile provides a reservoir effect in the skin delivery of GA. The close contact of the cosmeto-textile, containing microsphere-encapsulated GA (ME-GA), with the skin and their corresponding occlusion, may be the main reasons that explain the crossing of active principle (GA) through the skin barrier, located in the stratum corneum, and its penetration into the different compartments of the skin, epidermis and dermis. An ex vivo assessment was performed to evaluate the antioxidant effect of the ME-GA on the stratum corneum (SC) using the thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) test. The test is based on a non-invasive ex vivo methodology that evaluates lipid peroxides formed in the outermost layers of the SC from human volunteers after UV radiation to determine the effectiveness of an antioxidant. In this case, a ME-GA cosmeto-textile or ME-GA formulation were applied to the skin in vivo and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the horny layer were determined after UV irradiation. This methodology may be used as a quality control tool to determine ex vivo the percentage of LPO inhibition on human SC for a variety of antioxidants that are topically applied, in this case GA. Results show that LPO formation was inhibited in human SC when GA was applied directly or embedded in the cosmeto-textile, demonstrating the effectiveness of both applications. The percentage of LPO inhibition obtained after both topical applications was approximately 10% for the cosmeto-textile and 41% for the direct application of microspheres containing GA. This methodology could be used to determine the effectiveness of topically applied antioxidants encapsulated in cosmeto-textiles on human SC. PMID:26848532

  11. Studies on the protection effects of functional foods for skin immune system from radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the protective effects of pilot products (HemoHIM and HemoTonic) on the UV-induced skin immune damages as the following. · Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic against UV using contact hypersensitivity model - Protection against depression of contact hypersensitivity by administration and skin application of HemoHIM and HemoTonic - Induction of dendritic cell differentiation and maturation by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment - Improvement of antigen-presenting activity of dedritic cells by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment · Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic on skin immune system against UV-irradiation - Protection of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells under UV-irradiation - In vivo protection of antigen-presenting activity of Langerhans cells in UV-irradiated mice · Protective effects of HemoHIM on UV-induced apoptosis of dendritic cells - Inhibition of cell membrane change, mitochondrial potential change, SubG1 cell population, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation in UV-irradiated dendritic cells · Anti-allergic effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic in human adipocyte HMC-1 cells - Inhibition of allergic histamine release from adipocytes - Inhibition of secretion of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF) - Inhibition of c-kit, tryptase, FcεRI mRNA expression From these results, the developed functional food products (HemoHIM, HemoTonic) showed the protection and recovery of the immune functions in the UV-irradiated skin. It is suggested that these products may be used as a new functional food or cosmetic material for the protection of skin damage and the promotion of recovery

  12. Studies on the protection effects of functional foods for skin immune system from radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Sung Tae; Shin, Seong Hae; Kim, Do Sun; Heo, Ji Yun; Kang, Hye In [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    We evaluated the protective effects of pilot products (HemoHIM and HemoTonic) on the UV-induced skin immune damages as the following. centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic against UV using contact hypersensitivity model - Protection against depression of contact hypersensitivity by administration and skin application of HemoHIM and HemoTonic - Induction of dendritic cell differentiation and maturation by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment - Improvement of antigen-presenting activity of dedritic cells by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic on skin immune system against UV-irradiation - Protection of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells under UV-irradiation - In vivo protection of antigen-presenting activity of Langerhans cells in UV-irradiated mice centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM on UV-induced apoptosis of dendritic cells - Inhibition of cell membrane change, mitochondrial potential change, SubG1 cell population, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation in UV-irradiated dendritic cells centre dot Anti-allergic effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic in human adipocyte HMC-1 cells - Inhibition of allergic histamine release from adipocytes - Inhibition of secretion of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, GM-CSF) - Inhibition of c-kit, tryptase, FcepsilonRI mRNA expression From these results, the developed functional food products (HemoHIM, HemoTonic) showed the protection and recovery of the immune functions in the UV-irradiated skin. It is suggested that these products may be used as a new functional food or cosmetic material for the protection of skin damage and the promotion of recovery

  13. Effect of cyclic aromatics on sodium active transport in frog skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankemeyer, J.T.; Bowerman, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

    1993-01-01

    A modified glass Ussing-chamber was used to mount the skin. The electrical potential difference (PD) was measured by two 3% agar-frog Ringer's bridges. Current (i.e. short-circuit current, or ISC) was passed by Ag-AgCl electrodes placed so that current density was uniform across the skin. Ringer's solution, bathing each side of the frog skin, was stirred and aerated by gas-lift pumps. The effect of toxicants on the ISC was determined by using the 15 min prior to toxicant administration as a control period, then calculating the change in ISC during the toxicant period as a percent of the control ISC. Phenol and benzene are components of crude oil and crude oil waste. These hydrocarbons and phenanthrene were tested for their effect on frog skin. The results show that the effect of organics on sodium active transport of an epithelium is to alter the active transport of sodium ions. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effects of wall temperature on skin-friction measurements by oil-film interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wind-tunnel skin-friction measurements with thin-oil-film interferometry have been taken on an aluminum sample to investigate the effects of wall temperature on the accuracy of the technique. The sample has been flush-mounted onto a flat plate with an electric heater at its bottom and mirror-smooth temperature-sensitive paint sprayed on its top. The heater has varied the sample temperature from ambient to 328 K, and the paint has permitted wall temperature measurements on the same area of the skin-friction measurements and during the same test. The measured wall temperatures have been used to calculate the correct oil viscosities, and these viscosities and the constant nominal viscosity at 298 K have been used to calculate two different sets of skin-friction coefficients. These sets have been compared to each other and with theoretical values. This comparison shows that the effects of wall temperature on the accuracy of skin-friction measurements are sensible, and more so as wall temperature differs from 298 K. Nonetheless, they are effectively neutralized by the use of wall temperature measurements in combination with the correct oil viscosity–temperature law. In this regard, the special temperature-sensitive paint developed for this study shows advantages with respect to more traditional wall temperature measurement techniques. (paper)

  15. Suppression of the Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks under Anomalous Transverse Transport Conditions when the Magnetic Well Effect Predominates over the Bootstrap Drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the suppression of neoclassical tearing modes in tokamaks under anomalous transverse transport conditions when the magnetic well effect predominates over the bootstrap drive. It is stressed that the corresponding effect, which is called the compound suppression effect, depends strongly on the profiles of the electron and ion temperature perturbations. Account is taken of the fact that the temperature profile can be established as a result of the competition between anomalous transverse heat transport, on the one hand, and longitudinal collisional heat transport, longitudinal heat convection, longitudinal inertial transport, and transport due to the rotation of magnetic islands, on the other hand. The role of geodesic effects is discussed. The cases of competition just mentioned are described by the model sets of reduced transport equations, which are called, respectively, collisional, convective, inertial, and rotational plasmophysical models. The magnetic well is calculated with allowance for geodesic effects. It is shown that, for strong anomalous heat transport conditions, the contribution of the magnetic well to the generalized Rutherford equation for the island width W is independent of W not only in the collisional model (which has been investigated earlier) but also in the convective and inertial models and depends very weakly (logarithmically) on W in the rotational model. It is this weak dependence that gives rise to the compound effect, which is the subject of the present study. A criterion for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by the compound effect at an arbitrary level of the transverse heat transport by electrons and ions is derived and is analyzed for two cases: when the electron heat transport and ion heat transport are both strong, and when the electron heat transport is strong and the ion heat transport is weak

  16. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  17. Hydrodynamic function of biomimetic shark skin: effect of denticle pattern and spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Weaver, James C; Thornycroft, Patrick J M; Lauder, George V

    2015-12-01

    The structure of shark skin has been the subject of numerous studies and recently biomimetic shark skin has been fabricated with rigid denticles (scales) on a flexible substrate. This artificial skin can bend and generate thrust when attached to a mechanical controller. The ability to control the manufacture of biomimetic shark skin facilitates manipulation of surface parameters and understanding the effects of changing denticle patterns on locomotion. In this paper we investigate the effect of changing the spacing and arrangement of denticles on the surface of biomimetic shark skin on both static and dynamic locomotor performance. We designed 3D-printed flexible membranes with different denticle patterns and spacings: (1) staggered-overlapped, (2) linear-overlapped, and (3) linear-non-overlapped, and compared these to a 3D-printed smooth-surfaced control. These 3D printed shark skin models were then tested in a flow tank with a mechanical flapping device that allowed us to either hold the models in a stationary position or move them dynamically. We swam the membranes at a frequency of 1 Hz with different heave amplitudes (from ±1 cm to ±3 cm) while measuring forces, torques, self-propelled swimming speed, and cost of transport (COT). Static tests revealed drag reduction of denticle patterns compared to a smooth control at low speeds, but increased drag at speeds above 25 cm s(-1). However, during dynamic (swimming) tests, the staggered-overlapped pattern produced the fastest swimming speeds with no significant increase in the COT at lower heave values. For instance, at a heave frequency of 1 Hz and amplitude of ±1 cm, swimming speed of the staggered-overlapped pattern increased by 25.2% over the smooth control. At higher heave amplitudes, significantly faster self-propelled swimming speeds were achieved by the staggered-overlapped pattern, but with higher COT. Only the staggered-overlapped pattern provides a significant swimming performance advantage over the

  18. Effects of 70 MeV proton beam on a murine tumor and skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological effectiveness of 70 MeV proton beam generated from the NIRS cyclotron was studied. Seventh generation of a squamous cell carcinoma which arose spontaneously in a C3H/f female mouse was monodispersed by trypsin, and 1.2 x 105 cells were transplanted s.c. into right hind legs of syngeneic male mice. Five days after transplantation, legs with tumors were irradiated under nembutal anaesthesia. Tumor sizes were measured periodically up to 60 days. Time required for a tumor to grow 12.0 mm in diameter was obtained from culculations by use of computer, and termed as TG (tumor growth) time. TGD (Tumor growth deley) time, a difference of TG time between experimental and control groups, was used as an endpoint for tumor. For measurement of skin reaction, hair on right hind legs were depilated by depilatory 7 days before irradiation. Skin reaction was scored every other day up to 35 days, and mean skin reactions were employed as another endpoint. 30 mm spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) in water was used in proton irradiation, and its dose rate was about 90 Gy/min. The reference beam used here was 200 kVp X-ray with dose rate of 2.4 Gy/min. In the first experiment, biological effect of modulated proton beam was examined as a function of penetration depth. Depth was varied by applying various thickness of lucite plates. Tumor and skin effects were found to be very similar to the physical depth-dose distribution. Secondly, we examined relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beam in the spread out Bragg peak, being at 15 mm depth in Lucite. RBEs were 0.82 for skin and 0.79 for tumor. Thereby, therapeutic gain factor (TGF) of 0.96 was obtained in our system. (author)

  19. Effect of Step-up and Step-down Hyperthermia on Skin of Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of hypertemie for cancer therapy have well been established. The purpose of the present investigation was to access the effect of step-up (42 .deg. C → 44 .deg. C sequence ) and step-down (44 .deg. C → 42 .deg. C sequence ) heating on the skin of the hind foot of the mouse. Hyperthermic treatments were given by immersion the hind foot of the mouse in circulating water baths. Skin response was studied by the leg reaction, which was scored according to a numerical scoring system proposed by Urano et al (1980). The results were as follows 1. The sking damage of 44 .deg. C control GROUP was more severe than 42 .deg. C control GROUP (p<0.0.5) ), except for 15min. heating group. 2. The skin damage of step-down GROUP was more severe than step-up GROUP (p<0.0.5). 3. The skin damage of 44 .deg. C control GROUP was more severe than step-up GROUP when there is no difference in 44 .deg. C heating time of step-up GROUP FROM 44 .deg. C control GROUP (p<0.0.5). 4. In step-down group, the skin damage was more severe than 44 control GROUP after preheating 45 min at 44 .deg. C (p<0.0.5). Therefore, the above findings suggest the normal tissue damaged by step-up heating was correlated with heating time of post step-up. The dropping of heating temperature in late phase had more severe damage of the skin than that in early phase during hyperthermia, and so continuous control of satisfactory temperature should be considered as the one of the most important factor for prognosis, complications of clinical hyperthermia

  20. Pauli isotonic oscillatorwith an anomalous magnetic moment in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect: Laplace transform approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshanzamir-Nikou, M.; Goudarzi, H.

    2016-02-01

    A strong magnetic field significantly affects the intrinsic magnetic moment of fermions. In quantum electrodynamics, it was shown that the anomalous magnetic moment of an electron arises kinematically, while it results from a dynamical interaction with an external magnetic field for hadrons (proton). Taking the anomalous magnetic moment of a fermion into account, we find an exact expression for the boundstate energy and the corresponding eigenfunctions of a two-dimensional nonrelativistic spin-1/2 harmonic oscillator with a centripetal barrier (known as the isotonic oscillator) including an Aharonov-Bohm term in the presence of a strong magnetic field. We use the Laplace transform method in the calculations. We find that the singular solution contributes to the phase of the wave function at the origin and the phase depends on the spin and magnetic flux.

  1. Sunscreens: topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against harmful effects of solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals with topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against the harmful effects of solar radiation. Two concerns about the deleterious effects of sun exposure involve: (1) acute effects (e.g., sunburn and drug-induced phototoxicity) and (2) potential long-term risks of repeated sun exposures leading to development of solar elastosis, keratoses, induction of both nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer, and alteration of immune responses and functions. Action spectra of normal and abnormal reactions of human skin to acute and chronic effects of solar radiation are presented with a view to helping the physician prescribe the appropriate sunscreens. Factors that influence acute effects of sunburn are reviewed. Various artificial methods effective in minimizing or preventing harmful effects of solar radiation, both in normal individuals and in patients with photosensitivity-related problems, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the commercially available chemical sunscreens and their properties. Sun protection factor (SPF) values of several brand-name formulations determined with a solar simulator under indoor conditions (laboratory) and with solar radiation under natural, field conditions are presented. Factors responsible for variations of SPF values observed under indoor and outdoor conditions are reviewed. Systemic photoprotective agents and their limitations are outlined. The photobiology of melanin pigmentation (the tanning reaction) is briefly discussed, with emphasis on the dangers of using quick-tanning lotions for stimulation of the tanning reaction

  2. Modeling skin effect in large magnetized iron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Incurvati, M

    2003-01-01

    The experimental problem of the calibration of magnetic field in large iron detectors is discussed. Emphasis is laid on techniques based on ballistic measurements as the ones employed by MINOS or OPERA.In particular, we provide analytical formulas to model the behavior of the apparatus in the transient regime, keeping into account eddy current effects and the finite penetration velocity of the driving fields. These formulas ease substantially the design of the calibration apparatus.Results are compared with experimental data coming from a prototype of the OPERA spectrometer.

  3. Modeling skin effect in large magnetized iron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental problem of the calibration of magnetic field in large iron detectors is discussed. Emphasis is laid on techniques based on ballistic measurements as the ones employed by MINOS or OPERA. In particular, we provide analytical formulas to model the behavior of the apparatus in the transient regime, keeping into account eddy current effects and the finite penetration velocity of the driving fields. These formulas ease substantially the design of the calibration apparatus. Results are compared with experimental data coming from a prototype of the OPERA spectrometer

  4. [The Effects of Skin Thickness on Optical Transmission Characteristics in Fruits Tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shu-ning; Tan, Zuo-jun; Xie, Jing; Lu, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Fruit quality inspection techniques play a very important role in the production and consumption of fruits. In the field of quality non-destructive inspection and grading for fruits, the light-based techniques using optical properties of fruit products were widely used as one of the most practical and the most successful techniques. Quantitative understanding of light interaction with fruits is critical to designing better optical systems for inspection of food quality. In this paper, a fruit model consisted of two layer tissues was developed using Monte Carlo simulations to explore the light transport process and properties in the pome fruits, such as apples and mandarins, which were used as the thin-skinned and thick-skinned fruits respectively. The simulation results obtained are based on the assumption that the light source is a Gaussian beam at the wavelength 808 nm. This paper reports that the effects of skin thickness on light transmission characteristics in fruit tissues, including diffuse reflectance, transmittance, absorptivity, penetration depth etc. The inspection efficiency of flesh tissues was also demonstrated. The results indicated that the transmittance and the penetration depth decreases with the fruit skin increasing. As for the absorbed energy density, the fruit skin tissues have the wider distribution at the radial distance than the fruit flesh tissues. The absorbed energy density always tended to decrease with the inside depth of the fruit tissues increasing, especially decreased more apparently at the radial direction. The diffuse reflectance at the radial distance from 0.2 to 1.2 cm decreased with the decreasing of fruit skin, however it showed the inverse relationship in the radial distance range from 1.2 to 4.0 cm, the diffuse reflectance decreases with the increasing fruit skin. This paper proposed that the interaction between light and fruits skin in transmission or reflective approach, should be considered for developing optical

  5. Effects of sarpogrelate hydrochloride on skin ulcers and quality of life in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Ikeda, Takaharu; Uede, Koji; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2012-06-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A serotonin receptor (5-HT(2A) ) is associated with the contraction of vascular smooth muscle, platelet aggregation and thrombus formation and coronary artery spasms. Sarpogrelate hydrochloride (sarpogrelate) is a selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist and was supposed to be effective for Raynaud's phenomenon with collagen disease. Sarpogrelate has not been investigated regarding the effects, safety and quality of life (QOL) in patient with skin ulcers of collagen disease. Eleven patients with skin ulcers and systemic sclerosis (SSc) were administrated sarpogrelate p.o. three times a day for 3-6 months. The area (mean ± standard error) of skin ulcer at the pretreatment, and after 3 and 6 months of sarpogrelate intake was 2.1 ± 0.8, 0.2 ± 0.1 and 0.1 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively. The reduction of skin ulcer area was significant after 3 months of sarpogrelate intake. In assessment of QOL, scores of symptoms and emotions but not of functioning were significantly improved after sarpogrelate intake. The global score (mean ± SE) of Skindex-16 at pretreatment, and after 3 and 6 months of sarpogrelate intake was 31.8 ± 8.7, 23.7 ± 8.3 and 10.9 ± 4.6, respectively. The score was significantly improved after 6 months of sarpogrelate intake. There were no obvious side-effects during this study. Sarpogrelate was considered to be a useful drug to improve skin ulcers and QOL in patients with SSc. PMID:22077618

  6. Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with porokeratosis are hypersensitive to the lethal effects of X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porokeratosis is an autosomal dominant inherited skin disorder. The lesions are characterized by localized abnormal keratinization and may develop into malignant tumors. To determine the cellular basis of the cancer susceptibility associated with this skin condition, we examined the colony-forming ability of X-ray or ultraviolet (UV) light irradiated, cultured fibroblasts derived from porokeratosis patients' normal-appearing skin. Four fibroblast strains derived from four porokeratosis patients' skin were significantly hypersensitive to the lethal effects of X-radiation. However, they all showed a similar sensitivity to strains from normal donors to 254 nm UV light. The hypersensitivity to X-ray radiation in cultured skin fibroblasts from porokeratosis patients suggests an inherent instability of cellular DNA and may prbably be associated with the cancer-prone nature of this skin condition. (author)

  7. Synergistic effects of green tea and ginkgo biloba extracts on the improvement of skin barrier function and elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Patricia M B G Maia; Gianeti, Mirela D; Mercurio, Daiane G; Gaspar, Lorena R

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of cosmetic formulations containing green tea (GT) and/or Ginkgo biloba (GB) extracts by preclinical and clinical studies. For the preclinical study, histological analysis was performed after 5 day-period of formulations application on the dorsum of hairless mice. For the clinical study, the formulations were applied on the forearm skin of 48 volunteers, and assessed before and after 3 hours and after a 15 and 30 day-period of application. Histological analysis showed that the formulation with GT (FGT) and the association of GT and GB (FBlend) significantly enhanced viable epidermis thickness and the number of cell layers, suggesting a moisturizing effect in skin deeper layers and increased cell renewal. The clinical efficacy studies showed that the extracts had a moisturizing effect and improved skin microrelief. In addition they synergistically acted on the skin elasticity and skin barrier function. In conclusion, the formulation containing a combination of green tea and Ginkgo biloba extracts effectively improved skin conditions and the effect of formulation FBlend on the improvement of skin elasticity was more pronounced. Finally, the results of the present study revealed other important clinical benefits of Ginkgo biloba and green tea extracts on the skin besides their already known antioxidant action. PMID:25226010

  8. Fermi surface versus Fermi sea contributions to intrinsic anomalous and spin Hall effects of multiorbital metals in the presence of Coulomb interaction and spin-Coulomb drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin Hall effect (SHE) are fundamental phenomena, and their potential for application is great. However, we understand the interaction effects unsatisfactorily, and should have clarified issues about the roles of the Fermi sea term and Fermi surface term of the conductivity of the intrinsic AHE or SHE of an interacting multiorbital metal and about the effects of spin-Coulomb drag on the intrinsic SHE. Here, we resolve the first issue and provide the first step about the second issue by developing a general formalism in the linear response theory with appropriate approximations and using analytic arguments. The most striking result is that even without impurities, the Fermi surface term, a non-Berry-curvature term, plays dominant roles at high or slightly low temperatures. In particular, this Fermi surface term causes the temperature dependence of the dc anomalous Hall or spin Hall conductivity due to the interaction-induced quasiparticle damping and the correction of the dc spin Hall conductivity due to the spin-Coulomb drag. Those results revise our understanding of the intrinsic AHE and SHE. We also find that the differences between the dc anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities arise from the difference in the dominant multiband excitations. This not only explains why the Fermi sea term such as the Berry-curvature term becomes important in clean and low-temperature case only for interband transports, but also provides the useful principles on treating the electron-electron interaction in an interacting multiorbital metal for general formalism of transport coefficients. Several correspondences between our results and experiments are finally discussed.

  9. Effects of Nicotinamide on Mouse Skin Tumor Development and lts Mode of Action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KRISHNA P. GUPTA

    1999-01-01

    Nicotinamide (NA), a naturally occuring vitamin and a protease inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in treating some skin ailments. It inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell differentiation. This report shows the effects of NA on mouse skin tumor development and on the critical events involved in this process. NA reduced tumor growth, inhibited the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol- 13-acetate (TPA) induced ornithine decarboxylase activity, but induced the transglutaminase activity which was inhibited by TPA under different experimental conditions.The effects of NA on ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and transglutaminase (TG) indicated that nicotinamide (NA) probably programmmed the cells for their death in the natural course of time, I.e. Programed cell death. This observation indicates that NA might be a better agent for the detailed study and for the better use in prevention of cancer alone or in combination with other drugs.

  10. Effects of Bezafibrate on the Survival of Random Skin Flaps in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bin; Lin, Yuting; Lin, Dingsheng; Cao, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Background Bezafibrate is widely used in clinics for its comparable angiogenic effect. Our research is to investigate the effect of bezafibrate on random skin flap survival. Materials and Methods The "McFarlane flap" rat models were established in 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats which were divided into two groups. The treatment group was given bezafibrate (400 mg/kg/day; gavage administration), and the control group received the vehicle. The flap surviving area was measured after 7 days, and the tissue samples were taken for histological analysis and edema measurement. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was determined using immunohistochemical methods. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were examined with kits. Results Seven days after the operation, the surviving area in the treatment group was larger than in the control group (p Bezafibrate improves the survival of random skin flaps effectively. PMID:26872027

  11. Therapeutic Effects of Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 on Imiquimod-Induced Psoriasis-Like Skin Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Eun Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a common skin disease accompanied by chronic inflammation. In previous studies, erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (ERDR1 was shown to have a negative correlation with proinflammatory cytokine IL-18. However, the role of ERDR1 in the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis has not been evaluated. In this study, to investigate the role of ERDR1 in psoriasis, recombinant ERDR1 was injected intraperitoneally into a psoriasis mouse model. Recombinant ERDR1 (rERDR1 significantly alleviated the symptoms of psoriasis-like skin inflammation and reduced the mRNA of various psoriasis-related markers, including keratin 14, S100A8, and Th17-related cytokines IL-17 and IL-22, suggesting that rERDR1 exerts therapeutic effects on psoriasis via the regulation of Th17 functions. Additionally, the expression of CCL20, a well-known Th17 attracting chemokine, was determined. CCL20 expression significantly decreased in the rERDR1-injected group compared with the vehicle (PBS-injected group. CCR6 expression in the psoriatic lesional skin was also decreased by rERDR1 administration, implying the inhibition of CCR6-expressing Th17 cell chemotaxis via the downregulation of CCL20. Taken together, this study provides the first evidence that ERDR1 may be a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis.

  12. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing-Rong; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-An; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia; Luo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  13. The Glutathione Derivative, GSH Monoethyl Ester, May Effectively Whiten Skin but GSH Does Not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bo Young; Choi, So Ra; Moon, Ik Jun; Park, Chun Wook; Kim, Young-Hoon; Chang, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione in its reduced form (GSH) is an antioxidant and also is involved in pheomelanin formation. Thus, it has been long believed that GSH has a skin whitening effect. However, its actual or direct effect is unproven. We evaluated the anti-melanogenic effects of GSH and its derivatives in vitro. We examined change of melanogenesis and its related proteins by GSH itself and its derivatives, including GSH monoethyl ester (GSH-MEE), GSH diethyl ester (GSH-DEE) and GSH monoisopropyl ester (GSH-MIPE) in Melan-A cells, Mel-Ab cells, and B16F10 cells. GSH and GSH-MEE did not display cytotoxic activity, but GSH-MIPE and GSH-DEE did. Intriguingly, GSH itself had no inhibitory effect on melanin production or intracellular tyrosinase activity. Rather, it was GSH-MEE and GSH-MIPE that profoundly reduced the amount of melanin and intracellular tyrosinase activity. Thus, GSH-MEE was selected as a suitable candidate skin-whitening agent and it did not alter melanogenesis-associated proteins such as microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein (TRP)-1, and TRP-2, but it did increase the amount of suggested pheomelanin and suggested pheomelanin/eumelanin ratio. GSH-MEE was effective for anti-melanogenesis, whereas GSH itself was not. GSH-MEE could be developed as a safe and efficient agent for the treatment of hyperpigmentation skin disorders. PMID:27128906

  14. The Glutathione Derivative, GSH Monoethyl Ester, May Effectively Whiten Skin but GSH Does Not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Chung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione in its reduced form (GSH is an antioxidant and also is involved in pheomelanin formation. Thus, it has been long believed that GSH has a skin whitening effect. However, its actual or direct effect is unproven. We evaluated the anti-melanogenic effects of GSH and its derivatives in vitro. We examined change of melanogenesis and its related proteins by GSH itself and its derivatives, including GSH monoethyl ester (GSH-MEE, GSH diethyl ester (GSH-DEE and GSH monoisopropyl ester (GSH-MIPE in Melan-A cells, Mel-Ab cells, and B16F10 cells. GSH and GSH-MEE did not display cytotoxic activity, but GSH-MIPE and GSH-DEE did. Intriguingly, GSH itself had no inhibitory effect on melanin production or intracellular tyrosinase activity. Rather, it was GSH-MEE and GSH-MIPE that profoundly reduced the amount of melanin and intracellular tyrosinase activity. Thus, GSH-MEE was selected as a suitable candidate skin-whitening agent and it did not alter melanogenesis-associated proteins such as microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF, tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein (TRP-1, and TRP-2, but it did increase the amount of suggested pheomelanin and suggested pheomelanin/eumelanin ratio. GSH-MEE was effective for anti-melanogenesis, whereas GSH itself was not. GSH-MEE could be developed as a safe and efficient agent for the treatment of hyperpigmentation skin disorders.

  15. [Effective and safe pharmacotherapy of acne vulgaris and treatment of sun-damaged skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrich, Z; Jandová, E; Finsterlová, M

    2000-03-01

    An inevitable condition for the pharmacist is a basic knowledge of dermatological changes which are prominent in acne and solar impairment of the skin to be able to recommend in a qualified manner an effective and safe treatment to the patient. However, sufferers of the more serious forms of acne should always be referred to their general practitioner, or preferentially a dermatologist. Acne vulgaris is an androgen-induced disorder, but three major mechanisms for the development of the disease have been identified: hypertrophy of the sebaceous gland, hyperkatosis of the follicular epithelium, and proliferation of microbial flora, particularly Propionibacterium acnes. The basis of all lesions is the microcomedone which is developed into the ripe comedone. Inflammatory lesions are thought to be due to proliferation of P. acnes. In the selfmedication of common acne, benzoyl peroxide, which in a 5-10% lotion exerts antimicrobial and keratolytic properties, proved to be useful. Patients appreciate a lot its instant effect which is visible after just one day of treatment. Salicylic acid is another effective drug, which, when used on the long-term basis, has comedolytic properties; it reduces the number of microcomedones and counteracts plugging of the follicles. In addition, in healthy young women who take oral contraception, a triphasic combined oral preparations of contraceptives with newer progestins, notably with norgestimmate, which is practically free of androgenic effects, are recommended with advantage for the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris without any adverse effects. Solar impairment of the skin, the so-called solar ageing, is clinically indistinguishable from biological ageing. Changes connected with solar impairment appear mostly in the dermis, where solar elastosis develops, the skin gets drier and wrinkle formation appears. For the treatment, hydroxy acids are recommended, namely salicylic acid, which is very effective, because in combination with a

  16. Skin photoprotective and antiageing effects of a combination of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Vincenzo; Michelotti, Angela; Cestone, Enza; Caturla, Nuria; Castillo, Julián; Benavente-García, Obdulio; Pérez-Sánchez, Almudena; Micol, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Background Plant polyphenols have been found to be effective in preventing ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced skin alterations. A dietary approach based of these compounds could be a safe and effective method to provide a continuous adjunctive photoprotection measure. In a previous study, a combination of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) extracts has exhibited potential photoprotective effects both in skin cell model and in a human pilot trial. Objective We investigated the efficacy of a combination of rosemary (R. officinalis) and grapefruit (C. paradisi) in decreasing the individual susceptibility to UVR exposure (redness and lipoperoxides) and in improving skin wrinkledness and elasticity. Design A randomised, parallel group study was carried out on 90 subjects. Furthermore, a pilot, randomised, crossover study was carried out on five subjects. Female subjects having skin phototype from I to III and showing mild to moderate chrono- or photoageing clinical signs were enrolled in both studies. Skin redness (a* value of CIELab colour space) after UVB exposure to 1 minimal erythemal dose (MED) was assessed in the pilot study, while MED, lipoperoxides (malondialdehyde) skin content, wrinkle depth (image analysis), and skin elasticity (suction and elongation method) were measured in the main study. Results Treated subjects showed a decrease of the UVB- and UVA-induced skin alterations (decreased skin redness and lipoperoxides) and an improvement of skin wrinkledness and elasticity. No differences were found between the 100 and 250 mg extracts doses, indicating a plateau effect starting from 100 mg extracts dose. Some of the positive effects were noted as short as 2 weeks of product consumption. Conclusions The long-term oral intake of Nutroxsun™ can be considered to be a complementary nutrition strategy to avoid the negative effects of sun exposure. The putative mechanism for these effects is most likely to take place through the

  17. Anomalous damping effects of magneto-quantum oscillations in the extremely 2D electronic system κ-(BEDT-TTF)2I3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic system of the organic superconductor κ-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 (BEDT-TTF=bis(ethylenedithiolo)tetrathi afulvalene) is identified as extremely two-dimensional (2D). The topology of the Fermi surface (FS) was investigated by means of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) as well as de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments focusing on the verification of the 2D character of the system. This two-dimensionality specially takes effect as soon as the magnetic field is oriented exactly perpendicular to the conducting planes (i.e. Θ=0 ). Under such conditions strong anomalous damping effects in the field and temperature dependence of quantum oscillation amplitudes are observed. These anomalous damping effects are discussed in terms of the occurrence of quasi-particle excitations with fractional statistics (QPFS) which may only occur in extremely 2D systems at high magnetic fields and low temperatures (i.e., only when ℎωC>>kBT). Taking up these requirements, the aim of this work is to quantify the extreme two-dimensionality of the electronic system of κ-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 and to show that the observed damping effects in fact are determined by the ratio ℎωC/kBT. These facts may support the interpretation of the observed damping effects of quantum oscillation amplitudes at high magnetic fields, low temperatures and Θ=0 as generated by the possible occurrence of such QPFS. (orig.)

  18. Effects of single and repeated exposure to biocidal active substances on the barrier function of the skin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, H.E.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Burgsteden, J.A. van; Heer, C. de

    2005-01-01

    The dermal route of exposure is important in worker exposure to biocidal products. Many biocidal active substances which are used on a daily basis may decrease the barrier function of the skin to a larger extent than current risk assessment practice addresses, due to possible skin effects of repeate

  19. Effectiveness of the Healthy Skin Clinic – a randomized clinical trial of nurse-led patient counselling in hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Annette; Veien, Niels K; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hand eczema is a common disease, and continuous preventive skin protection and skin care must be adopted to prevent a chronic course. Hand eczema is not a uniform disease, and counselling must therefore be individually tailored. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of a nurse...

  20. The amelioration effect of tranexamic acid in wrinkles induced by skin dryness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Daijiro; Takahashi, Yumi; Mafune, Eiichi

    2016-05-01

    Tranexamic acid (trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid) is a medical amino acid widely used as an anti-inflammatory and a whitening agent. This study examined the effect of tranexamic acid administration in wrinkle formation following skin dryness. We administered tranexamic acid (750mg/kg/day) orally for 20 consecutive days to Naruto Research Institute Otsuka Atrichia (NOA) mice, which naturally develop skin dryness. In these NOA mice, deterioration of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), generation of wrinkles, decrease of collagen type I, and increases in mast cell proliferation and tryptase and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1) release were observed. However, these symptoms were improved by tranexamic acid treatment. Moreover, the increase in the β-endorphin level in the blood and the expression of μ-opioid receptor on the surface of fibroblasts increased by tranexamic acid treatment. In addition, when the fibroblasts induced by tranexamic acid treatment were removed, the amelioration effect by tranexamic acid treatment was halved. On the other hand, tranexamic acid treated NOA mice and mast cell removal in tranexamic acid treated NOA mice did not result in changes in the wrinkle amelioration effect. Additionally, the amelioration effect of mast cell deficient NOA mice was half that of tranexamic acid treated NOA mice. These results indicate that tranexamic acid decreased the proliferation of mast cells and increases the proliferation of fibroblasts, subsequently improving wrinkles caused by skin dryness. PMID:27133035

  1. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    CERN Document Server

    Sadofyev, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries ``anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the ``anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the ``anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and {\\it qualitative} difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are {\\it model-dependent} and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  2. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Effects of Orally Administered Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Disodium Salt on Dry Skin Conditions in Mice and Healthy Female Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masahiko; Kamimura, Ayako; Watanabe, Fumiko; Kamiya, Toshikazu; Watanabe, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Etsushi; Fukagawa, Mitsuhiko; Hasumi, Keiji; Suzuki, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a coenzyme involved in the redox-cycling system. The supplemental use of PQQ has been examined based on its properties as an antioxidant and redox modulator. Although an animal study on deficiency of PQQ suggested that PQQ contributes to skin conditions, its efficacy in humans has not been reported. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of orally administered PQQ on skin moisture, viscoelasticity, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) both in dry skin mouse models and in healthy female subjects with a subjective symptom of dry skin. In our dry skin mouse model study, oral intake of PQQ (0.0089%, w/w, in the diet for 6 wk) significantly decreased the number of mast cells in the dermis and the number of CD3⁺ T-cells in the epidermis. In our human study, oral intake of PQQ (20 mg/d for 8 wk) significantly inhibited the increase in TEWL on the forearm. Finally, subject questionnaires showed positive impressions for the improvement of skin conditions. These results suggest that oral intake of PQQ improves skin conditions both in female subjects with dry skin and in mice with a compromised skin barrier function. PMID:26226961

  4. Large power factor and anomalous Hall effect and their correlation with observed linear magneto resistance in Co-doped Bi2Se3 3D topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Shukla, K K; Kumar, A; Okram, G S; Singh, D; Ganeshan, V; Lakhani, Archana; Ghosh, A K; Chatterjee, Sandip

    2016-09-21

    Magnetoresistance (MR), thermo power, magnetization and Hall effect measurements have been performed on Co-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulators. The undoped sample shows that the maximum MR as a destructive interference due to a π-Berry phase leads to a decrease of MR. As the Co is doped, the linearity in MR is increased. The observed MR of Bi2Se3 can be explained with the classical model. The low temperature MR behavior of Co doped samples cannot be explained with the same model, but can be explained with the quantum linear MR model. Magnetization behavior indicates the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering with Co doping. Hall effect data also supports the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering in Co-doped Bi2Se3 samples by showing the anomalous Hall effect. Furthermore, when spectral weight suppression is insignificant, Bi2Se3 behaves as a dilute magnetic semiconductor. Moreover, the maximum power factor is observed when time reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained. As the TRS is broken the power factor value is decreased, which indicates that with the rise of Dirac cone above the Fermi level the anomalous Hall effect and linearity in MR increase and the power factor decreases. PMID:27419361

  5. Large power factor and anomalous Hall effect and their correlation with observed linear magneto resistance in Co-doped Bi2Se3 3D topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Shukla, K. K.; Kumar, A.; Okram, G. S.; Singh, D.; Ganeshan, V.; Lakhani, Archana; Ghosh, A. K.; Chatterjee, Sandip

    2016-09-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR), thermo power, magnetization and Hall effect measurements have been performed on Co-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulators. The undoped sample shows that the maximum MR as a destructive interference due to a π-Berry phase leads to a decrease of MR. As the Co is doped, the linearity in MR is increased. The observed MR of Bi2Se3 can be explained with the classical model. The low temperature MR behavior of Co doped samples cannot be explained with the same model, but can be explained with the quantum linear MR model. Magnetization behavior indicates the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering with Co doping. Hall effect data also supports the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering in Co-doped Bi2Se3 samples by showing the anomalous Hall effect. Furthermore, when spectral weight suppression is insignificant, Bi2Se3 behaves as a dilute magnetic semiconductor. Moreover, the maximum power factor is observed when time reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained. As the TRS is broken the power factor value is decreased, which indicates that with the rise of Dirac cone above the Fermi level the anomalous Hall effect and linearity in MR increase and the power factor decreases.

  6. Evaluation of the effect of formalin fixation on skin specimens in dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie L. Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin and subcutaneous tissues are the origin of most common neoplasms affecting dogs, accounting for approximately one third of all tumors encountered in the species. Surgical excision is frequently the best chance for a cure; determining factors influencing the success of excision are vital for surgical management of cases. This work examined the shrinkage of skin of various lengths from three sites in formalin for both dogs and cats. Tissues were measured on the animal (initial measurement, at the time of excision (post-removal, and after formalin fixation (post-fixation. While shrinkage after tissue removal was found in samples from the thorax, abdomen, and rear leg in dogs and from the rear leg in cats, no significant shrinkage due to formalin fixation was detected in any sample except for the thoracic samples from the dog. Therefore, when determining where to make incisions to effect a surgical cure, initial measurements should take into account tissue shrinkage effects.

  7. Effect of skin contact and pressure on the composition of Sauvignon Blanc must.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggu, Manu; Winz, Robert; Kilmartin, Paul A; Trought, Michael C T; Nicolau, Laura

    2007-12-12

    Early white winemaking operations are known to affect the extraction of grape skin compounds into the juice fraction, which will dictate their concentration in the resulting wine. Grape skin contact and the amount of pressure applied during grape pressing affect the extraction of varietal aromas located in the skins. Compounds such as the polyphenols and glutathione, with antioxidant properties involved in juice oxidation processes and white wine stability, are also affected. The present study evaluates how grape skin contact and the amount of pressure applied during grape pressing affect the levels of S-(3-hexan-l-ol)cysteine (3MH-S-cys, a key grape-derived precursor to the volatile thiol 3-mercapto-hexanol (3MH), which is reminiscent of passion fruit aroma); 2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine (IBMP, with a capsicum-like descriptor); phenolic compounds; and glutathione in Sauvignon Blanc juice. The study was conducted using grapes obtained from commercial Marlborough (New Zealand) vineyards, using both commercial and laboratory grape-processing procedures. Immobilized metal ion chromatography was used to isolate the 3MH- S-cys precursor from the juices. The isolated precursor was then volatilized by trimethylsilylation and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). IBMP was analyzed by GC/MS after solvent extraction, and a high-performance liquid chromatography method was used for the quantification of phenolic compounds and glutathione. 3MH- S-cys levels were seen to increase in juice fractions obtained from a winery press operating at higher pressures. The increase was attributed to the cumulative effect of longer skin contact time and the amount of pressure applied. The highly water-soluble IBMP was less affected by the amount of pressure applied during commercial grape pressing. Additional information was generated by the specific assessment of skin contact and applied pressure during grape pressing in a laboratory trial. In this trial, a long (32

  8. Superparamagnetism, magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall effect in amorphous Mn{sub x}Si{sub 1−x} semiconductor films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ai-chun; Zhang, Kun; Yan, Shi-shen; Kang, Shi-shou [School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Qin, Yu-feng [Department of Applied Physics, School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China); Pei, Juan; He, Li-min; Li, Huan-huan; Dai, You-yong; Xiao, Shu-qin; Tian, Yu-feng [School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China)

    2015-02-25

    Graphical abstract: (a) The Hall resistivity ρ{sub xy}(H) measured at different temperatures and the M(H) hysteresis loops at 5 K for the Mn{sub 0.48}Si{sub 0.52} film with a thickness of 20 nm. (b) The relationship between ρ{sub xy} and M obtained by using the data in Figs. 4(a) and 2(a). (c) The relationship between the anomalous Hall coefficient R{sub s} and the longitudinal resistivity ρ{sub xx.} - Highlights: • Magnetic and transport properties of Mn{sub x}Si{sub 1−x} films are systematically studied. • Superparamagnetism is observed in Mn{sub 0.48}Si{sub 0.52} above 17 K. • Small negative magnetoresistance indicates that spin-dependent scattering is weak. • Remarkable anomalous Hall effect is observed in the whole temperature range. • Electron–electron and electron–phonon interactions dominate the conductivity. - Abstract: A systematic study focusing on the magnetic and transport properties of Mn{sub 0.48}Si{sub 0.52} semiconductor films is performed. The Mn{sub 0.48}Si{sub 0.52} films show superparamagnetism above 17 K. The temperature dependence of the electrical transport reveals that electron–electron and electron–phonon interactions dominate the conductivity of weakly localized carriers. Very small negative magnetoresistance suggests that spin-dependent scattering between conductive carriers and local magnetic moments of Mn atoms is rather weak. On the contrary, the anomalous Hall effect due to the skew scattering is observed in the whole temperature range, indicating the spin–orbit coupling of the conducting carriers is significantly strong.

  9. The Effects of Mucopolysaccharide Polysulphate on Hydration and Elasticity of Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Rungsima Wanitphakdeedecha; Sasima Eimpunth; Woraphong Manuskiatti

    2011-01-01

    Background. Mucopolysaccharide polysulphate (MPS) has been used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic agent for over 50 years. Its chemical structure permits considerable hydrogen bonding with adjacent water molecules, which effectively leads to hydration of the surrounding tissue. In addition, it stimulates endogenous hyaluronate synthesis, resulting in an increase in water-binding capacity and viscoelasticity of the skin. Objective. To study the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on hydr...

  10. Studies on the Effects of Deltamethrin on Sodium Net Transport Through the in vivo Amphibian Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALFREDOSALIBIAN; JOSEL.MARAZZO

    1995-01-01

    The action of micromolar concentrations of Deltamethrin on sodium net transport through the in vivo skin of the South American toad Bufo arenarum was studied.The effect or pure ethanolic insecticide solutions and commercial formulations when applied on the mucosal surface was assayed.Deltamethrin provoked a concentration-independent inhibition;the highest inhibition was found at the lowest concentrations.At highest concentrations of the insecticide the Jn Na was not altered.

  11. The effect of ginkgo biloba extract on radiosensitivity of mouse skin and jejunal crypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginkgo biloba extract(GBE) is known to increase the peripheral blood circulation. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of GBE on the acute normal tissue radiation reaction. C3H mice were divided into two groups, radiation alone and two doses GBE plus radiation, for both acute skin reaction and jejunal crypt assay. GBE was given i.p. one hour before irradiation with priming dose given one day earlier. Thirty to Fifty Gy for acute skin reaction and 11 to 14 Gy for jejunal crypt were irradiated to right hind leg and whole body, respectively. Radiation doses(RD50) for peak skin score of 2.0 were 44.2Gy(40.6-48.2Gy) for radiation alone and 44.4Gy(41.6-47.4Gy) for two doses GBE plus radiation, showing no effect of GBE on acute radiation skin damage. The numbers of regenerating jejunal crypts per circumference were also almost the same for each radiation dose level(p=0.57-0.94), and the mean lethal doses(Do) were 1.80Gy(1.57-2.09Gy) for radiation alone and 1.88Gy(1.65-2.18Gy) for two doses GBE plus radiation, indicating no effect of GBE on jejunal crypt cell survival after radiation. GBE doesn't increase acute normal tissue radiation reaction in this model system. As GBE was verified to enhance radiation effect on tumor, high therapeutic gain is expected when GBE is combined with radiation therapy

  12. Protective effect of selenium and zinc on UV-A damage in human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet A radiation participates in cytotoxicity and carcinogensis of the skin by a mechanism involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. Endogenous antiradical defense systems utilize metalloenzymes including Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase and Cu and Zn superoxide dismutase. The aim of the present work was to determine the protective effect of two trace elements, Se and Zn, on cultured human diploid fibroblasts exposed to UV-A radiation (broad-spectrum source with a maximum intensity at 375 nm). (Author)

  13. Effect of Microalgal Extracts of Tetraselmis suecica against UVB-Induced Photoaging in Human Skin Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Wol Soon; Yang, Kwang Mo; Park, Hee Sung; Kim, Gi Yong; Nam, Byung Hyouk; Jeong, Min Ho; Choi, Yoo Jin

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of cells to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation can induce production of free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which damage cellular components. In addition, these agents can stimulate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and decrease collagen synthesis in human skin cells. In this study, we examined the anti-photoaging effects of extracts of Tetraselmis suecica (W-TS). W-TS showed the strongest scavenging activity against 2,2-difenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and pero...

  14. The effect of ginkgo biloba extract on radiosensitivity of mouse skin and jejunal crypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Ha, Sung Whan [Seoul National Univ. Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract(GBE) is known to increase the peripheral blood circulation. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of GBE on the acute normal tissue radiation reaction. C3H mice were divided into two groups, radiation alone and two doses GBE plus radiation, for both acute skin reaction and jejunal crypt assay. GBE was given i.p. one hour before irradiation with priming dose given one day earlier. Thirty to Fifty Gy for acute skin reaction and 11 to 14 Gy for jejunal crypt were irradiated to right hind leg and whole body, respectively. Radiation doses(RD{sub 50}) for peak skin score of 2.0 were 44.2Gy(40.6-48.2Gy) for radiation alone and 44.4Gy(41.6-47.4Gy) for two doses GBE plus radiation, showing no effect of GBE on acute radiation skin damage. The numbers of regenerating jejunal crypts per circumference were also almost the same for each radiation dose level(p=0.57-0.94), and the mean lethal doses(D{sub o}) were 1.80Gy(1.57-2.09Gy) for radiation alone and 1.88Gy(1.65-2.18Gy) for two doses GBE plus radiation, indicating no effect of GBE on jejunal crypt cell survival after radiation. GBE doesn't increase acute normal tissue radiation reaction in this model system. As GBE was verified to enhance radiation effect on tumor, high therapeutic gain is expected when GBE is combined with radiation therapy.

  15. Fatigue while driving in a car simulator : effects on vigilance performance and autonomic skin conductance

    OpenAIRE

    Inkeri, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    In this vigilance research the effect of fatigue on driver’s voluntary reaction times (RT) and autonomic skin conductance (SC) was studied. Participants (n=17) drove approximately 3 hours in a simulator responding simultaneously on a peripheral visual vigilance task (PVVT). RTs were classified into 5 quintiles according to their latency. Also misses and misclassifications were explored. Results indicated that RTs increased linearly over time. SC amplitudes differed significantly between RT qu...

  16. The Enhancing Effect of Ion-pairing on the Skin Permeation of Glipizide

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Zhe; Zhang, Jingying; Wu, Jian; Fang, Liang; He, Zhonggui

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the permeation of glipizide (GP) and observe the effect of an interaction with amines as counter ions, including diethylamine, triethylamine, ethanolamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine, N-(2-hydroxylethyl) piperidine. Permeation experiments were performed in vitro, using rat abdominal skin as a barrier. The lipophilic donor system consisting of isopropyl myristate (IPM) and ethanol (EtOH; EI system, 8:2) produced a marked enhancement of G...

  17. Assessment of the remanent antibacterial effect of a 2% triclosan-detergent preparation on the skin.

    OpenAIRE

    Bartzokas, C A; Corkill, J E; Makin, T; Pinder, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    A method of quantifying the remanent antibacterial effect of a 2% triclosan preparation in detergent following three consecutive applications on the forearm of 20 volunteers over 2 h, is described with reference to its efficacy against a gentamicin- and multiply-resistant serotype of Klebsiella aerogenes. The relevance of the residual activity of triclosan and other skin antiseptics in surgical and hygienic hand disinfection are discussed.

  18. Effect of Surface Coating on the Toxicity of Silver Nanomaterials on Human Skin Keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Wentong; Senapati, Dulal; Wang, Shuguang; Tovmachenko, Oleg; Singh, Anant Kumar; Yu, Hongtao; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2010-01-01

    As nanotechnology field continues to develop, assessing nanoparticle toxicity is very important for advancing nanoparticles for daily life application. In this Letter, we report the effect of surface coating on cyto, geno and photo-toxicity of silver nanomaterials of different shapes on human skin HaCaT keratinocytes. We found that the citrate coated colloidal silver nanoparticles at 100 µg/mL level are not geno-, cyto- and phtotoxic. On the other hand, citrate coated powder form of the silve...

  19. Anomalous transport due to scale anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Chernodub, M N

    2016-01-01

    We show that the scale anomaly in field theories leads to new anomalous transport effects that emerge in external electromagnetic field in inhomogeneous gravitational background. In inflating geometry the QED scale anomaly generates electric current which flows in opposite direction with respect to background electric field. In static spatially inhomogeneous gravitational background the dissipationless electric current flows transversely both to the magnetic field axis and to the gradient of the inhomogeneity. The anomalous currents are proportional to the beta function of the theory.

  20. Protective effect of transparent film dressing on proton therapy induced skin reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whaley Jonathan T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Proton therapy can result in clinically significant radiation dermatitis. In some clinical scenarios, such as lung or breast cancer, the risk of severe radiation dermatitis may limit beam arrangement and prescription doses. Patients undergoing proton therapy for prostate cancer commonly develop mild radiation dermatitis. Herein, we report the outcomes of two prostate cancer patients whose radiation dermatitis appears to have been substantially diminished by transparent film dressings (Beekley stickers. Methods This is a descriptive report of the skin toxicity observed in two patients undergoing proton therapy for prostate cancer at a single institution in 2011. A phantom dosimetric study was performed to evaluate the impact of a transparent film dressing on a beam’s spread out Bragg peak (SOBP. Results Two patients with low risk prostate cancer were treated with proton therapy to a total dose of 79.2Gy (RBE in 1.8 Gy (RBE fractions using two opposed lateral beams daily. Both patients had small circular (2.5 cm diameter transparent adhesive markers placed on their skin to assist with daily alignment. Patient 1 had markers in place bilaterally for the entirety of treatment. Patient 2 had a marker in place for three weeks on one side and six weeks on the other. Over the course of therapy, both men developed typical Grade 1 radiation dermatitis (asymptomatic erythema on their hips; however, in both patients, the erythema was substantially decreased beneath the markers. Patient 2 demonstrated less attenuation and thus greater erythema in the skin covered for three weeks compared to the skin covered for six weeks. The difference in skin changes between the covered and uncovered skin persisted for at least 1 month. A phantom study of double scattered beam SOBP with and without the marker in the beam path showed no gross dosimetric effect. Conclusions Transparent adhesive markers appear to have attenuated radiation dermatitis in

  1. Protective effect of transparent film dressing on proton therapy induced skin reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton therapy can result in clinically significant radiation dermatitis. In some clinical scenarios, such as lung or breast cancer, the risk of severe radiation dermatitis may limit beam arrangement and prescription doses. Patients undergoing proton therapy for prostate cancer commonly develop mild radiation dermatitis. Herein, we report the outcomes of two prostate cancer patients whose radiation dermatitis appears to have been substantially diminished by transparent film dressings (Beekley stickers). This is a descriptive report of the skin toxicity observed in two patients undergoing proton therapy for prostate cancer at a single institution in 2011. A phantom dosimetric study was performed to evaluate the impact of a transparent film dressing on a beam’s spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). Two patients with low risk prostate cancer were treated with proton therapy to a total dose of 79.2Gy (RBE) in 1.8 Gy (RBE) fractions using two opposed lateral beams daily. Both patients had small circular (2.5 cm diameter) transparent adhesive markers placed on their skin to assist with daily alignment. Patient 1 had markers in place bilaterally for the entirety of treatment. Patient 2 had a marker in place for three weeks on one side and six weeks on the other. Over the course of therapy, both men developed typical Grade 1 radiation dermatitis (asymptomatic erythema) on their hips; however, in both patients, the erythema was substantially decreased beneath the markers. Patient 2 demonstrated less attenuation and thus greater erythema in the skin covered for three weeks compared to the skin covered for six weeks. The difference in skin changes between the covered and uncovered skin persisted for at least 1 month. A phantom study of double scattered beam SOBP with and without the marker in the beam path showed no gross dosimetric effect. Transparent adhesive markers appear to have attenuated radiation dermatitis in these two patients without affecting the SOBP. One patient may

  2. Effects of High Dose and Long Term Montelukast Treatment on Skin:An Experimental Rat Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Kükner

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of long term, high dose montelukast administration on normal rat skin by histological examination.Material and Method: Sixteen rats were randomly divided into 2 groups-the control and the montelukast treated (study group (n=8. In the control group 0.2ml of 0.9% NaCl was administered intraperitonealy (i.p. daily for 6 weeks. In the study group the same amount of solution containing 1 mg/kg montelukast was administered i.p. daily for six weeks. At the end of the 6 weeks skin biopsies were taken and histologically examined.Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding the dermal and epidermal thickness. Histologic examination of collagen fiber structure did not show difference between two groups. Toluidin blue stained specimens showed that the number of mast cells in dermis significantly decreased in montelukast treated group (p=0.001. Conclusion: Montelukast treatment has significantly decreased the number of mast cells in dermis without any effect on the dermal or epidermal thickness and collagen fiber structure. We think that with the support of further studies, high dose montelukast may have an effective role on the treatment of inflammatory skin disease. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 118-21

  3. Analysis of the Effect of Pile Skin Resistance Verses Pile Diameter Based on Experimental Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Marandi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the many recent advances in pile design and execution methods, the quantitative effects of grouted pile skin resistance and form on subsequent pile behavior remains an area for research. There are many parameters involved in the analysis of the bearing capacity of piles and descriptive method theory of the loading effect for each parameter is very complex. Many of these parameters are interrelated and investigation of the relationships leads to complex equations, which cannot be easily solved. The only reliable solution is to study the influence of each parameter by experimental model tests in equipped laboratories. This research presents the results of static compression tests on two model groups of pipe and grouted pile shafts (35mm, 50mm and 60 mm in diameters and 900 mm in length installed into beds of Yazd siliceous sand (located in southeast Iran. The findings of the experimental research were to the average ultimate loads at failure for grouted piles were approximately 12% higher than for the pipe piles. The pile skin resistance is an effective factor on pile bearing capacity, the load transfer response appears to be more plastic with increasing pile diameter in siliceous sand and the skin resistance of the pile was not linearly proportional to the pile diameter and varied with increase in pile diameter.

  4. Ultrastructural effects of ionising radiation on primary cultures of rainbow trout skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There are few reports on the comparative effects of ionising radiation on different species. Published data report the use of radiation levels far in excess of what could be considered in an environmental context and are therefore difficult to assimilate into environmental research. We are engaged in a comparative study of the cellular effects of non-lethal radiation doses on tissue explants from fish and aquatic invertebrates. The aim of the present work is to investigate the ultrastructural effects of ionising radiation on primary cultures of skin from the rainbow trout. Primary cultures were grown using tissue explants from rainbow trout skin. The cultures were irradiated with doses of cobalt 60 gamma radiation ranging from 0.5Gy to 15Gy. The cultures were fixed in glutaraldehyde, at 7 days post irradiation. They were then post-fixed in osmium tetroxide and dehydrated in ascending grades of alcohol before being embedded in Epon. Blocks of tissue were then sectioned at 1 μm, stained with toluidine blue and surveyed using light microscopy. Ultra-thin sections of particular areas were cut at 50nm and examined by electron microscopy. Nuclear aberrations and changes in cytoplasmic organelles particularly mitochondria, were observed in irradiated skin cultures. Mitochondria were also of a different shape in irradiated cultures. The occurrence of apoptotic bodies in the irradiated cultures suggests that of controlled cell death is involved in the cellular response to radiation. These results may have important considerations for environmental protection. (author)

  5. Neutron-skin effect and centrality dependence of high-$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ observables in nuclear collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Helenius, Ilkka; Eskola, Kari J

    2016-01-01

    We report on our studies of the neutron-skin effects in high-$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ observables at the LHC. We study the impact of the neutron-skin effect on the centrality dependence of inclusive direct photon, high-$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ hadron and $W^{\\pm}$ production in nuclear collisions at the LHC. The neutron-skin effect refers to the observation that in spherical heavy nuclei, the tail of the neutron distribution extends farther than the distribution of protons, which can affect observables sensitive to electroweak phenomena in very peripheral collisions. We quantify this effect for direct photons, charged hadrons and W bosons as a function of the collision centrality. In the case of direct photons we find that it will be difficult to resolve the neutron-skin effect, given the uncertainties in the nuclear PDFs and their spatial dependence. With charged hadrons and W's, however, up to 20~\\% unambiguous effects are expected for most peripheral collisions.

  6. Effect of Substance P in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis Virulence: Implication for Skin Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, Awa; Mijouin, Lily; Hillion, Mélanie; Diaz, Suraya; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Percoco, Giuseppe; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lefeuvre, Luc; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are two major skin associated bacteria, and Substance P (SP) is a major skin neuropeptide. Since bacteria are known to sense and response to many human hormones, we investigated the effects of SP on Staphylococci virulence in reconstructed human epidermis model and HaCaT keratinocytes. We show that SP is stimulating the virulence of S. aureus and S. epidermidis in a reconstructed human epidermis model. qRT-PCR array analysis of 64 genes expressed by keratinocytes in the response to bacterial infection revealed a potential link between the action of SP on Staphylococci and skin physiopathology. qRT-PCR and direct assay of cathelicidin and human β-defensin 2 secretion also provided that demonstration that the action of SP on bacteria is independent of antimicrobial peptide expression by keratinocytes. Considering an effect of SP on S. aureus and S. epidermidis, we observed that SP increases the adhesion potential of both bacteria on keratinocytes. However, SP modulates the virulence of S. aureus and S. epidermidis through different mechanisms. The response of S. aureus is associated with an increase in Staphylococcal Enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) production and a reduction of exolipase processing whereas in S. epidermidis the effect of SP appears mediated by a rise in biofilm formation activity. The Thermo unstable ribosomal Elongation factor Ef-Tu was identified as the SP-interacting protein in S. aureus and S. epidermidis. SP appears as an inter-kingdom communication factor involved in the regulation of bacterial virulence and essential for skin microflora homeostasis.

  7. A new method to evaluate the effects of shear on the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wert, Luuk A; Bader, Dan L; Oomens, Cees W J; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Poeze, Martijn; Bouvy, Nicole D

    2015-01-01

    Currently, pressure ulcer preventive strategies focus mainly on pressure redistribution. Little attention is paid to reduce the harmful effects of shear-force, because little is known about pathophysiological aspects of shear-force. Even today, no method to measure the effects of shear-force on the skin is available. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the response to shear-forces in terms of analyzing a noninvasive biomarker and reactive hyperemic parameter measured at the skin of healthy participants. A physical model was developed to produce a combination of pressure and shear or pressure alone on the skin. Ten healthy male participants were included and pressure (3.9 kPa) and a combined loading of pressure and shear (2.4 kPa + 14.5 N) was applied at the volar aspect of the forearms for 15 and 30 minutes. A Sebutape sample was used to collect IL-1α and total protein (TP) noninvasively. The reactive hyperemic parameter was derived from a laser Doppler flowmeter. The increase in IL-1α/TP-ratio after a combined loading of pressure and shear for 30 minutes of 6.2 ± 2.5 was significantly higher compared with all other test conditions (p < 0.05). The increase in cutaneous blood cell flux was already significantly higher when a combined loading of pressure and shear was applied for 15 minutes compared with pressure alone. These results shows that the IL-1α/TP-ratio and cutaneous blood cell flux can be used as robust measures of the effect of shear-force on skin in humans. Therefore, this model can be used to evaluate materials aimed at the reduction of shear. PMID:26426393

  8. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... threatening skin cancer. The "ABCD's" of what to watch for with the moles on your skin: Asymmetry : ... skin cancer has been increasing. Exposure to the sun is a major factor. In 2006, over 30 ...

  9. A Double Blind Immunohistological Study Of The Effect Of Topical Tretinoin On Photoaged Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Sumit Kumar

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen very fair women with mild to moderate photoaging in there 60’s were tested by doubled blind immunohistological study. Tretinoin 0.05% cream applied daily was compared to its vehicle with regards to epidermal, basal, spinous differentiation markers and dendritic cells (Langerhan’s and melariocyte. In comparison with the control skin, tretinoin-treated skin showed the following changes: 1. From atrophy to normalization or hyperplasia of horny and prickle cell layers,2. Granular layer was normal to hypertrophied, 3. Basal cells were well-stained and thicker, 4. Basement membrane was thicker to normal in appearance and 5. Dendritic cells were increased in number (Langerhan’s. These results demonstrated a decelerating effect of tretinoin on the time clock of photoaging.

  10. Radioprotective effects of Aloe vera leaf extract on skin of Swiss mice after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Biological effects of radiation are detrimental to life. Skin being a cell-renewal system is one of the best organ for studying radiation induced effects and their modulation by antioxidants. An attempt has been made to evaluate radioprotective efficacy of Aloe vera leaf extract on skin in Swiss mice (1g/kg body wt/day). The mice selected from inbreed colony were divided into two groups. The first group was given Aloe vera extract orally for 15th consecutive days and served as experimental group while the other group received DDW (vol. equal to Aloe extract) to serve as control group. On the 15th day, after 30 min of above treatment animals of both the groups were exposed to 2 Gy gamma irradiation and autopsied on 6h 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. DNA as well as total protein decreases in control group as compared to the normal value. Surprisingly, in experimental group, DNA and protein increases in comparison to the control group. Thus, Aloe vera were found to have positive influence against radiation induced alterations on skin of Swiss albino mice

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF A COGNITIVE SOCIAL PROGRAM TO PREVENT SKIN CANCER IN ADOLESCENT WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PABLO ALFONSO SANABRIA FERRAND

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Differential effect of three components of a social cognitive program, e.g., information, self-evaluation of risk andsubjective norms, influencing sun protective practices was established in a group of 57 female teenagers. The componentswere defined as three independent variables consisting of (i Oral information about skin cancer, (ii Self-evaluation ofthe risk of acquiring skin cancer and identification and modification of the barriers, and finally (iii Identification andrestructure of subjective norms that favor exposure and sun tanning behavior. The study design was intrasubject withmeasurements pre- and pos-test and twelve weeks of following-up after finalizing the preventive program. It wasfound that the given information about skin cancer favours negative attitudes towards sun tanning behavior, althoughcontrary to was expected, there was an increase of sunbathing and sun tanning, which just diminished after theimplementation of the preventive program’s second component. The third component was related with the decreasedof the perceived benefits of protection and the increased of severity perception towards foto-ageing. The followed-upand correlations among the psycho-social model ´s variables with protection habits reckon the effectiveness of themodel to increment the sun protection practices

  12. The acute effects of different energy beta-emitters on pig and mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute changes were studied in the skin of mice and pigs following irradiation with Sr90 (Esub(max) 2.27 MeV), Tm170 (Esub(max) 0.97 MeV) and Pm147 (Esub(max) 0.225 MeV). Sr90 irradiation in the pig and Sr90 and Tm170 exposure in the mouse resulted in a distinct field-size effect for sources of 5-22.5 mm diameter; ED50 values for moist desquamation were 22.0-27.5 Gy from the 22.5 mm source and 75-90 Gy for the 5 mm source. Tm170 irradiation in the pig produced no distinct area effect for sources of 5-19 mm diameter (ED50 approx.= 80 Gy). Acute tissue breakdown was only achieved in pig and mouse skin by very high doses (ED50 >= 140 Gy) from sources of 147 produced acute epithelial breakdown, only after high skin-surface doses (ED50 550-725 Gy). Area-and energy-related changes can, in part be explained by an hypothesis based on repopulation of the epithelium in the irradiated area by the migration of either cells from the edge of that area and/or cells surviving at the base of hair follicles. Differences in the results in pig and mouse can be explained on the basis of the distribution of target cells in the epidermis at varying depths. (author)

  13. A quantitative evaluation of the protective effect of some skin protectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of reasearch was to study and give a comparative evaluation of cystamine, mexamine, ionol, dimethyl-sulfoxide, eugenic acid, castor oil and cholesterol as skin local radioprotectors. Experiments were made on random-bred albino rats. Skin areas 90 mm2 in size on each paw were irradiated. The exposure dose rate was 5x10-3 A/kg (1160 p/min), the surface dose 6.5x10-1 and 7.7x10-1 Q/kg (2500 and 3000 P respectively). The most sensitive ''critical'' components of radiation response which are open to modification with the help of radioprotectors severe erythema and moist desquamatio(s were revealed. Mexamine, cystamine and ionol produce the most marked effect. The value of their protective effect is 48.3; 40.1 and 32.3 units respectively. Skin radioprotectors possessing not less than 50% efficacy can be introduced into practice. A search for new radioprotectors should be aimed at the investigation of agents with the efficacy of a reduction of radiation injuries by 70% and more

  14. ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF APPLICATION ANTISEPTICS IN PREVENTION OF FOOT SKIN INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzeziński Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Skin inflammation in the foot soldiers is a major problem, affecting armies around the world. Hence it is important preventive action, to prevent the development of such states. Antiseptic is the destruction of microorganisms present in the tissues by means of antiseptic.Aim: The effectiveness of the use Pigmentum Castelani and Kalium hypermanganicum in the prevention of skin inflammation in the foot soldiers.Material and methods: The study included 30 men middle-aged men 20.5 years and 60 soldiers, as a control group of men with a mean age 21.5 years. The survey was conducted over a period of 3 months. Of the 30 soldiers from the study group in 15 using liquid Pigmentum Castelani - Group I, and in another 15 people a solution of Kalium hypermanganicum - group II. Prophylactic treatment of soldiers received by a certain pattern. The control group was 60 men received no treatment. The observations were performed during clinical examination of foot skin, mycological examination and examination under Wood's lamp.Results: None of the 30 seamen (group I and II test, there was no bacterial or fungal infection of the feet. In the control group were diagnosed 11 cases of athlete's foot feet (64.71% of cases, 3 cases of fungal infection of the back foot (17.65% and 3 cases pitted keratolysis (17.65% of cases.Conclusions: Prophylactic Pigmentum Castelani and Kalium hypermanganicum effectively protects against the development of inflammatory skin feet. This is reflected in the increase in disposal and good health for the soldier.

  15. Chemopreventive effect of Lagenaria siceraria in two stages DMBA plus croton oil induced skin papillomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet; Kale, Raosaheb K; Tiku, Ashu B

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention is a dietary or therapeutic strategy to prevent, suppress, or delay carcinogenesis either at initiation or progression level with nontoxic agents. Use of natural dietary compounds has been a major chemopreventive approach to modulate tumorigenic pathways. In the present study, we have evaluated Lagenaria siceraria (bottle gourd), a common vegetable of Indian household for its chemomodulatory potential. The fruit has been used in traditional medicine for a very long time for health benefits and to cure pain, ulcers, fever, cough, asthma, and other bronchial disorders. However, despite its reported beneficial effect the chemo modulatory potential of this plant has not been reported. Therefore chemopreventive effect of bottle gourd juice (BGJ) was studied against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) plus croton oil induced skin papillomagenesis in Swiss albino mice. The effect was studied both at antiinitiation and antiinitiation/promotion level followed by histopathological study. A dose of 2.5% and 5% given in drinking water showed significant decrease in papilloma number, papilloma incidence, papilloma multiplicity, papilloma latency, papilloma volume, and papilloma size in different size range. Histopathological study showed chemopreventive effect by minimizing loss of stratification, a decrease in number of epithelial layers, reducing dermal infiltration and protection for various cytoplasmic changes. Higher dose of BGJ was found to be more effective than lower dose and the chemopreventive effect was maximum for antiinitiation/promotion treatment. Altogether, this study reports the chemopreventive effect of Lagenaria siceraria on skin papillomagenesis for the first time and suggests that its consumption may help in suppression of skin cancer. PMID:23914728

  16. Synergistic effect of bismuth subgallate and borneol, the major components of Sulbogin, on the healing of skin wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Lee-Min; Lin, Chia-Yen; Chen, Chia-Yen; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2003-08-01

    Most skin lesions heal delay and even heal efficiently within 1-2 weeks, the healed tissue is neither aesthetically nor functionally perfect. Therefore, facilitating skin healing rate and controlling healed skin quality are major aims of drug treatment for a wound event. Bismuth subgallate (BS) and Borneol (BO) are the two components of Sulbogin, a new Vaseline-based wound healing ointment, one for treating skin wounds. Although BO has antibiotic function, while BS is widely used clinically, neither has been used specifically for wound healing. The experiment described here aimed to study the effect of BS and BO on the healing of skin wounds. This study also compared the effects of BS and BO with Flamazine cream, which is currently the most popular drug for wound healing in hospitals. Full-thickness wounds (3 cm x 3 cm x 0.2 cm) were created on the back of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. BS, BO, BS+BO, and Flamazine were then evenly applied to cheesecloth and placed over the lesion areas. The drug patches were replaced every 2-3 days until the wound areas were completely covered by epidermis in any kinds of drug treatment. The combined BS and BO treatment had the best effect on healing by decreasing lesion area, while increasing granulation tissue formation, re-epithelialization, eating behavior and reconstitution of skin appendages. This investigation showed that BS and BO have a synergistic effect on the skin wound restoration. PMID:12895572

  17. Simulation study of the thermal and the thermoelastic effects induced by pulsed laser absorption in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Jang, Kyungmin; Yang, Seung-Jin; Baek, Jun-Hyeok; Park, Jong-Rak; Yeom, Dong-Il; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2016-04-01

    We studied the thermal and the mechanical effects induced by pulsed laser absorption in human skin by numerically solving the heat-transfer and the thermoelastic wave equations. The simulation of the heat-transfer equation yielded the spatiotemporal distribution of the temperature increase in the skin, which was then used in the driving term of the thermoelastic wave equation. We compared our simulation results for the temperature increase and the skin displacements with the measured and numerical results, respectively. For the comparison, we used a recent report by Jun et al. [Sci. Rep. 5, 11016 (2015)], who measured in vivo skin temperature and performed numerical simulation of the thermoelastic wave equation using a simple assumption about the temporal evolution of the temperature distribution, and found their results to be in good agreement with our results. In addition, we obtained solutions for the stresses in the human skin and analyzed their dynamic behaviors in detail.

  18. The Effect of Particle Size on the Deposition of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles in Different Skin Layers: A Histological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardhiah Adib, Zahra; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Yari Khosroshahi, Ahmad; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study the effect of particle size, as a substantial parameters in skin penetration, on the deposition depth and rate of SLNs in different layers of skin was explored. Methods: SLNs in different particle size ranges (80, 333 and 971 nm) made of Precirol as solid lipid were prepared using hot melt homogenization technique and pigmented by Rhodamine B to be able to be tracked in the skin under inspection of fluorescent microscopy. After 0.5 h, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h of SLNs administration on rat skin, animals were sacrificed and exercised skins were sliced by a freeze microtome. SLNs were monitored in the skin structure under fluorescence microscope. Results: The size of SLNs played a crucial role in the penetration to deep skin layers. The sub100 nm size range of SLNs showed the most promising skin penetration rate and depth mainly via hair follicles. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that the selection of an appropriate size of particles may be a valuable factor impacting the therapeutic outcomes of dermal drug administration. PMID:27123415

  19. Effect of Postoperative Diclofenac on Anastomotic Healing, Skin Wounds and Subcutaneous Collagen Accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, M; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Kongsbak, Mikkel; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Gögenur, I; Jorgensen, L N; Rosenberg, J

    2012-01-01

    experimental colonic anastomosis and a skin incision as well as subcutaneous collagen accumulation. Methods: This was a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled experimental study in 60 male Wistar rats treated with diclofenac 4 mg/kg/day or placebo. In each rat, a colonic anastomosis was performed and an......Background: Retrospective studies have drawn attention to possible detrimental effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the anastomotic leakage rate after colorectal resection. In this study, we examined the effects of the NSAID diclofenac on the breaking strength of an...

  20. The effect of alpha-ketoglutarate on a piscine skin model: a molecular and morphological study

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Dissertação mest., Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade do Algarve, 2009 Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) is a key intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle with important functions in glutamate and glutamine metabolism. Its effect after oral administration was studied in adult sea bream Sparus aurata skin and scales in order to evaluate the effect on collagen synthesis. Scales were removed from one side of the body and allowed to regenerate for 14 days; the control group received unt...

  1. Effect of high frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on viability of random skin flap in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebano Richard Eloin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the effect of high frequency Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS on viability of random skin flap in rats. METHODS: The sample of this study was 75 Wistar rats. The skin flap measured 10 x 4 cm and a plastic barrier was interposed between the flap and donor site. After the operative procedure, animals of all groups were maintained anesthetized one more hour with electrodes positioned in the base of the flap and submitted to treatment according of their respective group. This procedure was repeated on the two subsequent days. G1: sham stimulation (control, G2: TENS (f = 80 Hz and I = 5 mA, G3: TENS (f = 80 Hz and I = 10 mA, G4: TENS (f = 80 Hz and I = 15 mA, G5: TENS (f = 80 Hz and I = 20 mA. RESULTS: The average percentage of necrotic area was 43,11, 34,65, 49,44, 23,52, 45,10 in groups 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 respectively. CONCLUSION: The amplitude of 15 mA presented a lower necrotic area than control group and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation was efficient in increasing the random skin flap viability.

  2. Role of vascular damage in the development of late radiation effects in the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stages in the development of late radiation atrophy have been investigated in pig skin using a number of complementary assay techniques. Evidence for vascular damage was provided 10-16 weeks after irradiation by observed changes in skin colour, a fall in skin temperature and by a dose-dependent reduction in dermal blood flow. The reduction in blood flow was transient and preceded the development of tissue atrophy; blood flow returns to normal as atrophy develops. The reduction in blood flow 12 weeks after irradiation correlated well with the degree of late damage at 6-12 months. Direct histological evidence of vascular damage in the dermis, in the form of vessels occluded by endothelial cells, coincided with the timing of the blood flow changes. Studies using fractionated radiation exposures indicated that the sensitivity of the rapidly proliferating epidermis was enhanced relative to vascular damage when the number of dose fractions was increaed. These studies also showed a lack of correlation between epithelial desquamation and late damage. Many of the vascular changes observed in the dermis of the pig have also been reported in a number of other normal tissues, suggesting that it is a good model in which to investigate late effects in vascular connective tissue. (author)

  3. Effect of a neutron skin on collective dipoles modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the principal motivations for accelerated radioactive beams is to probe nuclear structure at the limits of nuclear stability. For neutron-rich nuclei, an indication of the new phenomena which may occur has already appeared, in the guise of the neutron halo discovered in very light nuclei. More generally, a steadily increasing neutron skin thickness is expected as the neutron excess increases. The presence of such a mantle of dominantly neutron matter will then particularly affect the properties of collective modes involving the out-of-phase motion of neutrons and protons. This paper explores the effect of the neutron skin thickness on the isovector M1 and E1 modes in medium and heavy mass nuclei. A simple model is used, couched in terms of classical oscillations of neutron and proton densities. The treatment includes the open-quotes pygmyclose quotes E1 mode, which corresponds to motion of the core against the loosely-bound neutrons in the mantle and predicts a significant lowering of this mode, even at relatively modest values of the skin thickness

  4. Meta-analysis of the effectiveness of surgical scalpel or diathermy in making abdominal skin incisions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, Nasir Zaheer

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgical scalpels are traditionally used to make skin incisions. Diathermy incisions on contrary are less popular among the surgeons. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the effectiveness of both techniques and address the common fallacies about diathermy incisions. METHODS: A literature search of MEDLINE and Cochrane databases was done, using the keywords diathermy, cold scalpel, and incisions. Eleven clinical trials comparing both methods of making skin incisions were selected for meta-analysis. The end points compared included postoperative wound infection, pain in first 24 hours after surgery, time taken to complete the incisions, and incision-related blood loss. RESULTS: Postoperative wound infection rate was comparable in both techniques (P = 0.147, odds ratio = 1.257 and 95% CI = 0.923-1.711). Postoperative pain was significantly less with diathermy incisions in first 24 hours (P = 0.031, weighted mean difference = 0.852 and 95% CI = 0.076-1.628). Similarly, the time taken to complete the incision and incision-related blood loss was significantly less with diathermy incisions (95% CI = 0.245-0.502 and 0.548-1.020, respectively). CONCLUSION: Diathermy incisions are equally prone to get wound infection, as do the incisions made with scalpel. Furthermore, lower incidence of early postoperative pain, swiftness of the technique, and a reduced blood loss are the encouraging facts supporting routine use of diathermy for abdominal skin incisions after taking careful precautions.

  5. THETA-pinch in an electron-hole plasma under skin effect conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equations for theta pinch in semiconductors have been integrated by a computer for the case where the skin thickness is less than the radius of a sample. Under strong skinning solitary waves of density and of magnetic field are produced in a plasma, which move towards the crystal center. The position of the front of the waves and conditions of the maximum plasma compression have been determined. It has been shown that the plasma spatial distribution under theta pinch skinning depends strongly on the shape of the magnetic field pulse and on the ratio of characteristic times (ambipolar diffusion, volume recombination, pulse duration, magnetic field diffusion). In the case where an external magnetic field obeys a harmonic law, the theta pinch has a number of interesting features associated with the capture of the magnetic field by a plasma and with the formation of a neutral layer resulting from the compensation of fields. In such a case at certain stages of the pulse a magnetic field wave arises with a very steep front, which results in an abrupt increase in the concentrational effect. The results of the theory developed have been compared with experimental data

  6. Prostaglandin and DNA synthesis in human skin: possible relationship to ultraviolet light effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on DNA synthesis in human skin was evaluated. PGE2 (1 μg) was injected intradermally into normal buttock skin of 15 volunteers followed by tritiated thymidine for autoradiographic quantitation of DNA synthesizing cells. Controls of normal saline, histamine (50 μg), and lower doses of PGE2 were also injected into 8 of the volunteers. Forty-eight hours after injection of 1 μg and 0.1 μg PGE2 there was a 264 percent and 62 percent increase, respectively, in the number of DNA synthesizing epidermal cells/high-power field as compared to saline controls. These differences were statistically significant (p is less than 0.01). Histamine (50 μg) produced a statistically significant 36 percent higher labeling index compared to its saline controls (p is less than 0.05). Many types of skin injury, including ultraviolet light (UVL) irradiation, produce an increase in the number of DNA synthesizing cells about 48 hr after the stimulus. Our findings suggest that PGE, a putative mediator of UVL-induced inflammation, may be one of the chemical mediators for the UVL-induced increase in DNA synthesizing cells. Histamine may also contribute to the increase in DNA synthesizing cells following UVL-induced inflammation

  7. Protective Effects of B Vitamins and Antioxidants on the Risk of Arsenic-Related Skin Lesions in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Lydia B Zablotska; Chen, Yu; Graziano, Joseph H.; Parvez, Faruque; van Geen, Alexander; Howe, Geoffrey R.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2008-01-01

    Background An estimated 25–40 million of the 127 million people of Bangladesh have been exposed to high levels of naturally occurring arsenic from drinking groundwater. The mitigating effects of diet on arsenic-related premalignant skin lesions are largely unknown. Objectives The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of the vitamin B group (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine, and cobalamin) and antioxidants (vitamins A, C, and E) on arsenic-related skin lesions. Methods We per...

  8. Effects of laser therapy on chronic skin ulcers healing interventions for Sudanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrazig M. Abdelbagi

    2015-12-01

    Results: Utilization of laser dosage (energy density of 40 J/cm2 and 1.6 w/cm2 power density of the wavelength 820 nm and 30 J/cm2 energy density and power density of 0.24 w/cm2 of 780 nm wavelength, in addition to energy density of 8 J/cm2 and power density of 0.24 w/cm2 and 0.40 w/cm2 and energy density of 1.6 J/cm2 for the 675 wavelength was applied. In this study, we used the bio-stimulation effect of LLLT to enhance healing through immune modulation. However, the application of low level diode laser in the treatment of diabetic wounds can be accompanied by low energy density and short wavelength to give better results in a short time and a good diagnostic accuracy for its potentiality in the field. Conclusions: Consequently, the brown skins in Sub-Saharan region for different tissues of Sudanese diabetic patients of chronic skin ulcer can be treated with different wavelengths and energy relative to tissues softening and laser parameters of that optimum values were obtained. The assessment of skin regeneration using laser therapy expose that the quality of growth, the reasonable period of healing and decreases the risk skin infection were achieved. The process of diabetic wounds curing and de-pigmentation, potential resident of decreasing pain and an efficient adjunct to a standard wound management was obtained. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(12.000: 3720-3725

  9. The effect of skin temperature on performance during a 7.5-km cycling time trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levels, Koen; de Koning, Jos J; Foster, Carl; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-09-01

    Aerobic exercise performance is seriously compromised in the heat. Possibly, a high skin temperature causes a rating of perceived exertion (RPE)-mediated decrease in exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of skin temperature on power output during a 7.5-km cycling time trial. Thirteen well-trained male subjects performed a 7.5-km cycling time trial at 15°C and 50% relative humidity (CONTROL), with radiative heat stress during the time trial, and with (PRECOOL) or without (HEAT) precooling. Heat stress was applied by infrared heaters positioned in front of the cycle ergometer between 1.5 and 6.0 km. Skin, rectal, and pill temperature, power output, heart rate, and RPE were measured during the trial. Despite the lower mean skin temperature at the start of the time trial for PRECOOL compared to HEAT (-2.1 ± 0.7°C; P heat stress period for PRECOOL (4.5 ± 1.0°C) and HEAT (3.9 ± 0.8°C) than for CONTROL (-0.3 ± 0.6°C; P HEAT (273 ± 45 W) and CONTROL (284 ± 43 W; P = 0.11) and between HEAT and PRECOOL (266 ± 50 W; P = 0.47). Power output during the time trial was greater for CONTROL than for PRECOOL (P affect the selection and modulation of exercise intensity in a 7.5-km cycling time trial. PMID:22270485

  10. Integrated Experimental and Computational Approach to Understand the Effects of Heavy Ion Radiation on Skin Homeostasis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Neubeck, Claere; Shankaran, Harish; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Robert J.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2013-08-08

    The effects of low dose high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on human health are of concern for both space and clinical exposures. As epidemiological data for such radiation exposures are scarce for making relevant predictions, we need to understand the mechanism of response especially in normal tissues. Our objective here is to understand the effects of heavy ion radiation on tissue homeostasis in a realistic model system. Towards this end, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional skin equivalent to low fluences of Neon (Ne) ions (300 MeV/u), and determined the differentiation profile as a function of time following exposure using immunohistochemistry. We found that Ne ion exposures resulted in transient increases in the tissue regions expressing the differentiation markers keratin 10, and filaggrin, and more subtle time-dependent effects on the number of basal cells in the epidermis. We analyzed the data using a mathematical model of the skin equivalent, to quantify the effect of radiation on cell proliferation and differentiation. The agent-based mathematical model for the epidermal layer treats the epidermis as a collection of heterogeneous cell types with different proliferation/differentiation properties. We obtained model parameters from the literature where available, and calibrated the unknown parameters to match the observed properties in unirradiated skin. We then used the model to rigorously examine alternate hypotheses regarding the effects of high LET radiation on the tissue. Our analysis indicates that Ne ion exposures induce rapid, but transient, changes in cell division, differentiation and proliferation. We have validated the modeling results by histology and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The integrated approach presented here can be used as a general framework to understand the responses of multicellular systems, and can be adapted to other epithelial tissues.

  11. Partial oxidation of Step-Bound Water Leads to Anomalous pH Effects on Metal Electrode Step-Edges

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Kathleen; Yan, Yushan; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2016-01-01

    The design of better heterogeneous catalysts for applications such as fuel cells and electrolyzers requires a mechanistic understanding of electrocatalytic reactions and the dependence of their activity on operating conditions such as pH. A satisfactory explanation for the unexpected pH dependence of electrochemical properties of platinum surfaces has so far remained elusive, with previous explanations resorting to complex co-adsorption of multiple species and resulting in limited predictive power. This knowledge gap suggests that the fundamental properties of these catalysts are not yet understood, limiting systematic improvement. Here, we analyze the change in charge and free energies upon adsorption using density-functional theory (DFT) to establish that water adsorbs on platinum step edges across a wide voltage range, including the double-layer region, with a loss of approximately 0.2 electrons upon adsorption. We show how the change in net surface charge due to this water explains the anomalous pH variat...

  12. General considerations of the choice of dose limits, averaging areas and weighting factors for the skin in the light of revised skin cancer risk figures and experimental data on non-stochastic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent biological data from man and pig on the non-stochastic effects following exposure with a range of β-emitters are combined with recent epidemiological analyses of skin cancer risks in man to form a basis for suggested improved protection criteria following whole- or partial-body skin exposures. Specific consideration is given to the choice of an organ weighting factor for evaluation of effective dose-equivalent. Since stochastic and non-stochastic end-points involve different cell types at different depths in the skin, the design of an ideal physical dosemeter may depend on the proportion of the body skin exposed and the radiation penetrating power. Possible choices of design parameters for skin dosemeters are discussed. Limitation of skin exposure from small radioactive sources ('hot particles') is addressed using animal data. (author)

  13. Effect of Alpinia zerumbet components on antioxidant and skin diseases-related enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chompoo Jamnian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The skin is chronically exposed to endogenous and environmental pro-oxidant agents, leading to the harmful generation of reactive oxygen species. Antioxidant is vital substances which possess the ability to protect the body from damage cause by free radicals induce oxidative stress. Alpinia zerumbet, a traditionally important economic plant in Okinawa, contains several interesting bioactive constituents and possesses health promoting properties. In this regard, we carried out to test the inhibitory effect of crude extracts and isolated compounds from A. zerumbet on antioxidant and skin diseases-related enzymes. Methods The antioxidant activities were examined by DPPH, ABTS and PMS-NADH radical scavenging. Collagenase, elastase, hyaluronidase and tyrosinase were designed for enzymatic activities to investigate the inhibitory properties of test samples using a continuous spectrophotometric assay. The inhibitory capacity of test samples was presented at half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50. Results The results showed that aqueous extract of the rhizome was found to have greater inhibitory effects than the others on both of antioxidant and skin diseases-related enzymes. Furthermore, 5,6-dehydrokawain (DK, dihydro-5,6-dehydrokawain (DDK and 8(17,12-labdadiene-15,16-dial (labdadiene, isolated from rhizome, were tested for antioxidant and enzyme inhibitions. We found that DK showed higher inhibitory activities on DPPH, ABTS and PMS-NADH scavenging (IC50 = 122.14 ± 1.40, 110.08 ± 3.34 and 127.78 ± 4.75 μg/ml, respectively. It also had stronger inhibitory activities against collagenase, elastase, hyaluronidase and tyrosinase (IC50 = 24.93 ± 0.97, 19.41 ± 0.61, 19.48 ± 0.24 and 76.67 ± 0.50 μg/ml, respectively than DDK and labdadiene. Conclusion Our results indicate that the rhizome aqueous extract proved to be the source of bioactive compounds against enzymes responsible for

  14. Anomalous law of cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapas, Luciano C., E-mail: luciano.lapas@unila.edu.br [Universidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana, Caixa Postal 2067, 85867-970 Foz do Iguaçu, Paraná (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogelma M. S., E-mail: rogelma.maria@gmail.com [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia, 44380-000 Cruz das Almas, Bahia (Brazil); Rubí, J. Miguel, E-mail: mrubi@ub.edu [Departament de Física Fonamental, Facultat de Física, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Oliveira, Fernando A., E-mail: fernando.oliveira@pq.cnpq.br [Instituto de Física and Centro Internacional de Física da Matéria Condensada, Universidade de Brasília, Caixa Postal 04513, 70919-970 Brasília, Distrito Federal (Brazil)

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  15. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is ∼ 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than Ο(10-2). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed

  16. Anomalous law of cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics

  17. Anomalous law of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  18. Stem cell recovering effect of copper-free GHK in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye-Ryung; Kang, Youn-A; Ryoo, Sun-Jong; Shin, Jung-Won; Na, Jung-Im; Huh, Chang-Hun; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2012-11-01

    The peptide Gly-His-Lys (GHK) is a naturally occurring copper(II)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In industry, GHK (with or without copper) is used to make hair and skin care products. Copper-GHK plays a physiological role in the process of wound healing and tissue repair by stimulating collagen synthesis in fibroblasts. We also reported that copper-GHK promotes the survival of basal stem cells in the skin. However, the effects of copper-free GHK (GHK) have not been investigated well. In this study, the effects of GHK were studied using cultured normal human keratinocytes and skin equivalent (SE) models. In monolayer cultured keratinocytes, GHK increased the proliferation of keratinocytes. When GHK was added during the culture of SE models, the basal cells became more cuboidal than control model. In addition, there was linear and intense staining of α6 and β1 integrin along the basement membrane. The number of p63 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen positive cells was also significantly increased in GHK-treated SEs than in control SEs. Western blot and slide culture experiment showed that GHK increased the expression of integrin by keratinocytes. All these results showed that GHK increased the stemness and proliferative potential of epidermal basal cells, which is associated with increased expression of integrin. In conclusion, copper-free GHK showed similar effects with copper-GHK. Thus, it can be said that copper-free GHK can be used in industry to obtain the effects of copper-GHK in vivo. Further study is necessary to explore the relationship between copper-free GHK and copper-GHK. PMID:23019153

  19. ttH anomalous coupling in double Higgs production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the effects of top-Higgs anomalous coupling in the production of a pair of Higgs boson via gluon fusion at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The introduction of anomalous ttH coupling can alter the hadronic double Higgs boson cross section and can lead to characteristic changes in certain kinematic distributions. We perform a global analysis based on available LHC data on the Higgs to constrain the parameters of ttH anomalous coupling. Possible overlap of the predictions due to anomalous ttH coupling with those due to anomalous trilinear Higgs coupling is also studied. We briefly discuss the effect of the anomalous ttH coupling on the HZ production via gluon fusion which is one of the main backgrounds in the HH→γγbb-macron channel

  20. Disentangling the Effects of Thickness of the Neutron Skin and Symmetry Potential in Nucleon Induced Reactions on Sn Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Li; LI Zhu-Xia; WU Xi-Zhen; SUN Wei-Li

    2009-01-01

    The effects of density dependence of symmetry energy and the thickness of the neutron skin in proton (neutron)induced reactions on Sn isotopes are investigated by means of the improved molecular dynamics model. The investigation shows that the target size dependence of the reaction cross sections for proton induced reactions on Sn isotopes is sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy and less sensitive to the thickness of the neutron skin of the target nuclei, but that, for neutron induced reactions on Sn isotopes, it is less sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy and sensitive to the thickness of the neutron skin of the target nucleus.