WorldWideScience

Sample records for anomalous dust emission

  1. Characterizing the Dust-Correlated Anomalous Emission in LDN 1622

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Kieran; Casassus, Simon; Dickinson, Clive; Lawrence, Charles; Sakon, Itsuki

    2008-03-01

    The search for 'dust-correlated microwave emission' was started by the surprising excess correlation of COBE-DMR maps, at 31.5, 53 and 91GHz, with DIRBE dust emission at 140 microns. It was first thought to be Galactic free-free emission from the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM). However, Leitch et al. (1997) ruled out a link with free-free by comparing with Halpha templates and first confirmed the anomalous nature of this emission. Since then, this emission has been detected by a number of experiments in the frequency range 5-60 GHz. The most popular explanation is emission from ultra-small spinning dust grains (first postulated by Erickson, 1957), which is expected to have a spectrum that is highly peaked at about 20 GHz. Spinning dust models appear to be broadly consistent with microwave data at high latitudes, but the data have not been conclusive, mainly due to the difficulty of foreground separation in CMB data. LDN 1622 is a dark cloud that lies within the Orion East molecular cloud at a distance of 120 pc. Recent cm-wave observations, in combination with WMAP data, have verified the detection of anomalous dust-correlated emission in LDN 1622. This mid-IR-cm correlation in LDN 1622 is currently the only observational evidence that very small grains VSG emit at GHz frequencies. We propose a programme of spectroscopic observations of LDN 1622 with Spitzer IRS to address the following questions: (i) Are the IRAS 12 and 25 microns bands tracing VSG emission in LDN 1622? (ii) What Mid-IR features and continuum bands best correlate with the cm-wave emission? and (iii) How do the dust properties vary with the cm-wave emission? These questions have important implications for high-sensitivity CMB experiments.

  2. Anomalous Microwave Emission from Spinning Dust and its Polarization Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem

    2015-01-01

    Nearly twenty years after the discovery of anomalous microwave emission (AME) that contaminates to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, its origin remains inconclusive. Observational results from numerous experiments have revealed that AME is most consistent with spinning dust emission from rapidly spinning ultrasmall interstellar grains. In this paper, I will first review our improved model of spinning dust, which treats realistic dynamics of wobbling non-spherical grains, impulsive interactions of grains with ions in the ambient plasma, and some other important effects. I will then discuss recent progress in quantifying the polarization of spinning dust emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. I will finish with a brief discussion on remaining issues about the origins of AME.

  3. Anomalous radio emission from dust in the Helix

    CERN Document Server

    Casassus, S; Pearson, T J; Nyman, L A A; Shepherd, M C; Bronfman, L

    2004-01-01

    A byproduct of experiments designed to map the CMB is the recent detection of a new component of foreground Galactic emission. The anomalous foreground at ~ 10--30 GHz, unexplained by traditional emission mechanisms, correlates with 100um dust emission. We report that in the Helix the emission at 31 GHz and 100um are well correlated, and exhibit similar features on sky images, which are absent in H\\beta. Upper limits on the 250 GHz continuum emission in the Helix rule out cold grains as candidates for the 31 GHz emission, and provide spectroscopic evidence for an excess at 31 GHz over bremsstrahlung. We estimate that the 100um-correlated radio emission, presumably due to dust, accounts for at least 20% of the 31 GHz emission in the Helix. This result strengthens previous tentative interpretations of diffuse ISM spectra involving a new dust emission mechanism at radio frequencies. Very small grains have not been detected in the Helix, which hampers interpreting the new component in terms of spinning dust. The ...

  4. Spitzer characterisation of dust in an anomalous emission region: the Perseus cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Tibbs, C T; Paladini, R; Compiégne, M; Shenoy, S; Carey, S; Noriega-Crespo, A; Dickinson, C; Ali-Haïmoud, Y; Casassus, S; Cleary, K; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; Hirata, C M; Watson, R A

    2011-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission is known to exist in the Perseus cloud. One of the most promising candidates to explain this excess of emission is electric dipole radiation from rapidly rotating very small dust grains, commonly referred to as spinning dust. Photometric data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope have been reprocessed and used in conjunction with the dust emission model DUSTEM to characterise the properties of the dust within the cloud. This analysis has allowed us to constrain spatial variations in the strength of the interstellar radiation field ($\\chi_\\mathrm{ISRF}$), the mass abundances of the PAHs and VSGs relative to the BGs (Y$_\\mathrm{PAH}$ and Y$_\\mathrm{VSG}$), the column density of hydrogen (N$_\\mathrm{H}$) and the equilibrium dust temperature (T$_\\mathrm{dust}$). The parameter maps of Y$_\\mathrm{PAH}$, Y$_\\mathrm{VSG}$ and $\\chi_\\mathrm{ISRF}$ are the first of their kind to be produced for the Perseus cloud, and we used these maps to investigate the physical conditions in which ano...

  5. Planck Early Results: New Light on Anomalous Microwave Emission from Spinning Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J -F; Casassus, S; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Dickinson, C; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-V\\ornle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Prézeau, G; Procopio, P; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reich, W; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubi\; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, P; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Varis, J; Verstraete, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wilkinson, A; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) has been observed by numerous experiments in the frequency range ~10-60 GHz. Using Planck maps and multi-frequency ancillary data, we have constructed spectra for two known AME regions: the Perseus and Rho Ophiuchus molecular clouds. The spectra are well fitted by a combination of free-free radiation, cosmic microwave background, thermal dust, and electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The spinning dust spectra are the most precisely measured to date, and show the high frequency side clearly for the first time. The spectra have a peak in the range 20-40 GHz and are detected at high significances of 17.1sigma and 10.4sigma, respectively. In Perseus, spinning dust in the dense molecular gas can account for most of the AME; the low density neutral gas appears to play a minor role. In Rho Ophiuchus, the ~30 GHz peak is dominated by dense molecular gas, but there is an indication of an extended tail at frequencies 50-100 GHz, which can be accounted for by irra...

  6. On the Anomalous Silicate Emission Features of AGNs: A Possible Interpretation Based on Porous Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Li, M P; Li, Aigen

    2008-01-01

    The recent Spitzer detections of the 9.7 micron Si--O silicate emission in type 1 AGNs provide support for the AGN unification scheme. The properties of the silicate dust are of key importance to understanding the physical, chemical and evolutionary properties of the obscuring dusty torus around AGNs. Compared to that of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM), the 10 micron silicate emission profile of type 1 AGNs is broadened and has a clear shift of peak position to longer wavelengths. In literature this is generally interpreted as an indication of the deviations of the silicate composition, size, and degree of crystallization of AGNs from that of the Galactic ISM. In this Letter we show that the observed peak shift and profile broadening of the 9.7 micron silicate emission feature can be explained in terms of porous composite dust consisting of ordinary interstellar amorphous silicate, amorphous carbon and vacuum. Porous dust is naturally expected in the dense circumnuclear region around AGNs, as a consequ...

  7. Planck early results. XX. New light on anomalous microwave emission from spinning dust grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    by a combination of free-free radiation, cosmic microwave background, thermal dust, and electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The spinning dust spectra are the most precisely measured to date, and show the high frequency side clearly for the first time. The spectra have a peak in the range 20......-40 GHz and are detected at high significances of 17.1σ for Perseus and 8.4σ for ρ Ophiuchi. In Perseus, spinning dust in the dense molecular gas can account for most of the AME; the low density atomic gas appears to play a minor role. In ρ Ophiuchi, the ~30 GHz peak is dominated by dense molecular gas...... of the synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust. We present spectra for two of the candidates; S140 and S235 are bright Hii regions that show evidence for AME, and are well fitted by spinning dust models. © ESO, 2011....

  8. On the Limitations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission Emissivity

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Paladini; Tibbs, Christopher T.; Clive Dickinson

    2012-01-01

    Many studies of anomalous microwave emission (AME) have computed an AME emissivity to compare the strength of the AME detected in different regions. Such a value is usually defined as the ratio between the intensity of the AME at 1 cm and the thermal dust emission at 100 \\mu m. However, as studies of Galactic dust emission have shown, the intensity of the thermal dust emission at 100 \\mu m is strongly dependent on the dust temperature, which has severe implications for the AME emissivity defi...

  9. Diffuse Galactic Emission from Spinning Dust Grains

    OpenAIRE

    Draine, B. T.; Lazarian, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spinning interstellar dust grains produce detectable rotational emission in the 10-100 GHz frequency range. We calculate the emission spectrum, and show that this emission can account for the ``anomalous'' Galactic background component which correlates with 100um thermal emission from dust. Implications for cosmic background studies are discussed.

  10. On the Limitations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission Emissivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Tibbs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies of anomalous microwave emission (AME have computed an AME emissivity to compare the strength of the AME detected in different regions. Such a value is usually defined as the ratio between the intensity of the AME at 1 cm and the thermal dust emission at 100 μm. However, as studies of Galactic dust emission have shown, the intensity of the thermal dust emission at 100 μm is strongly dependent on the dust temperature, which has severe implications for the AME emissivity defined in this way. In this work, we illustrate and quantify this effect and find that the AME emissivity decreases by a factor of 11.1 between dust temperatures of 20 and 30 K. We, therefore, conclude that computing the AME emissivity relative to the 100 μm emission does not allow for accurate comparisons between the AME observed in different environments. With this in mind, we investigate the use of other tracers of the dust emission with which to compute the AME emissivity and we ultimately conclude that, despite the difficulty in deriving its value, the column density of the dust would be the most suitable quantity with which to compute the AME emissivity.

  11. Studies of Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, Clive; Beswick, Robert J; Casassus, Simon; Cleary, Kieran; Draine, Bruce T; Genova-Santos, Ricardo; Grainge, Keith; Hoang, Thiem C; Lazarian, Alex; Murphy, Eric J; Paladini, Roberta; Peel, Michael W; Perrott, Yvette; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Scaife, Anna; Tibbs, Chris T; Verstraete, Laurent; Vidal, Matias; Watson, Robert A; Ysard, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we will outline the scientific motivation for studying Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) with the SKA. AME is thought to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains, although thermal fluctuations of magnetic dust grains may also contribute. Studies of this mysterious component would shed light on the emission mechanism, which then opens up a new window onto the interstellar medium (ISM). AME is emitted mostly in the frequency range $\\sim 10$--100\\,GHz, and thus the SKA has the potential of measuring the low frequency side of the AME spectrum, particularly in band 5. Science targets include dense molecular clouds in the Milky Way, as well as extragalactic sources. We also discuss the possibility of detecting rotational line emission from Poly-cyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), which could be the main carriers of AME. Detecting PAH lines of a given spacing would allow for a definitive identification of specific PAH species.

  12. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when those small grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing the dipole moment per atom ($\\beta$) and can reach $P\\sim 20\\%$ for $\\beta\\sim 0.1$D at grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space $(\\beta,Y_{Si})$ for silicate nanoparticles in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the ob...

  13. FIR extended emission from cold gas and dust in Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies: the anomalous cases of POX 186 and UM 461

    CERN Document Server

    Doublier, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    FIR observation of BCD galaxies with Herschel has revealed a wealth of new insights in these objects which are thought to resemble high-redshift forming galaxies. Dust and cold gas showed to be colder, in more or less quantities than expected and of uncertain origin. However, not unlike in the local universe, not all the dust or the cold gas is accounted for, making it more challenging. SPICA and its factor 10 to 100 in sensitivity will allow to image the faint extended cold gas/dusty disks in BCDGs in addition to detect faint C and O lines only marginally or not at all detected by Herschel/

  14. Characterizing Extragalactic Anomalous Microwave Emission in NGC 6946 with CARMA

    CERN Document Server

    Hensley, Brandon; Staguhn, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Using 1 cm and 3 mm CARMA and 2 mm GISMO observations, we follow up the first extragalactic detection of anomalous microwave emission (AME) reported by Murphy et al. 2010 in an extranuclear region (Enuc. 4) of the nearby face-on spiral galaxy NGC 6946. We find the spectral shape and peak frequency of AME in this region to be consistent with models of spinning dust emission. However, the strength of the emission far exceeds the Galactic AME emissivity given the abundance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in that region. Using our galaxy-wide 1 cm map (21" resolution), we identify a total of eight 21"x21" regions in NGC 6946 that harbour AME at >95% significance at levels comparable to that observed in Enuc. 4. The remainder of the galaxy has 1 cm emission consistent with or below the observed Galactic AME emissivity per PAH surface density. We probe relationships between the detected AME and dust surface density, PAH emission, and radiation field, though no environmental property emerges to delineate ...

  15. A Case Against Spinning PAHs as the Source of the Anomalous Microwave Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Hensley, Brandon S

    2015-01-01

    We employ the all-sky map of the anomalous microwave emission (AME) produced by component separation of the microwave sky to study correlations between the AME and Galactic dust properties. We find that while the AME is highly correlated with all tracers of dust emission, fluctuations in the AME intensity per dust optical depth are uncorrelated with fluctuations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), casting doubt on the association between AME and PAHs. Further, we find that the best predictor of the AME strength is the dust radiance and that the AME intensity increases with increasing radiation field strength, at variance with predictions from the spinning dust hypothesis. A reconsideration of other emission mechanisms, such as magnetic dipole emission, is warranted.

  16. Planck intermediate results. XV. A study of anomalous microwave emission in Galactic clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, Marie-Helene;

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is believed to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The aim of this paper is a statistical study of the basic properties of AME regions and the environment in which they emit. We used WMAP and Planck maps, combined with ancillary ...

  17. Austrian emission inventory for dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, Austrian emissions of anthropogenic particulate matter emissions to the atmosphere have been estimated. Results have been reported as total suspended particles (TSP) as well as for the fractions of particles smaller than 10 μm or 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter (PM10, PM2.5), respectively. Base years for the inventory were 1990, 1995 and 1999. Excluded from this assessment is wind blown dust, which has been considered a natural source here. National statistics have been applied, specifically those also used previously in the Austrian air pollution inventory (OLI). Emission factors have been taken from literature compilations, only for exceptional cases specific Austrian assessments were performed or original literature on emission measurements was consulted. Resuspension of dust by road traffic emerged as the most important source. For the size fraction of PM10 this source contributed about half of the emissions, when applying the calculation scheme by the U.S. EPA. While this scheme is widely used and well documented, its validity is currently subject of intense scientific debate. As these results do not seem to coincide with ambient air measurements, resuspension of road dust is considered separately and not now included in the national total. The sum of all other sources increases from 75,000 t of TSP in 1990 and 1995 to 77,000 t in 1999, while both PM10 and PM2.5 exhibit decreasing tendency (at 45,000 t and 26,000 t in 1999, respectively). The increase in TSP derives from increasing traffic and friction related emissions (tire wear, break wear), decrease of the finer particulate matter is due to reductions in firewood consumption for domestic heating. Most important source sectors are fugitive emissions from material transfer in industry as well as the building industry and the tilling of agricultural land. Common to these sources is the high uncertainty of available data. Wood combustion is the most important of the non-fugitive emissions

  18. VSA Observations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus Region

    CERN Document Server

    Tibbs, Christopher T; Dickinson, Clive; Davies, Rodney D; Davis, Richard J; del Burgo, Carlos; Franzen, Thomas M O; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Grainge, Keith; Hobson, Michael P; Padilla-Torres, Carmen P; Rebolo, Rafael; Rubiño-Martín, Jóse Alberto; Saunders, Richard D E; Scaife, Anna M M; Scott, Paul F

    2009-01-01

    The dust feature G159.6--18.5 in the Perseus region has previously been observed with the COSMOSOMAS experiment \\citep{Watson:05} on angular scales of $\\approx$ 1$^{\\circ}$, and was found to exhibit anomalous microwave emission. We present new observations of this dust feature, performed with the Very Small Array (VSA) at 33 GHz, to help increase the understanding of the nature of this anomalous emission. On the angular scales observed with the VSA ($\\approx$ 10 -- 40$^{\\prime}$), G159.6--18.5 consists of five distinct components, each of which have been individually analysed. All five of these components are found to exhibit an excess of emission at 33 GHz, and are found to be highly correlated with far-infrared emission. We provide evidence that each of these compact components have anomalous emission that is consistent with electric dipole emission from very small, rapidly rotating dust grains. These components contribute $\\approx$ 10 % to the flux density of the diffuse extended emission detected by COSMO...

  19. An Anomalous Component of Galactic Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Leitch, E M; Pearson, T J; Myers, S

    1997-01-01

    We present results from microwave background observations at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. These observations, at 14.5 and 32 GHz, are designed to detect intrinsic anisotropy on scales of 7'. After point source removal, we detect significant emission with temperature spectral index beta ~ -2 towards the North Celestial Pole (NCP). Comparison of our data with the IRAS 100 micron map of the same fields reveals a strong correlation between this emission and the infrared dust emission. From the lack of detectable H-alpha emission, we conclude that the signals are consistent either with flat-spectrum synchrotron radiation, or with free-free emission from T_e ~ 10^6 K gas, probably associated with a large HI feature known as the NCP Loop. Assuming beta = -2.2, our data indicate a conversion T_f/I_(100 micron) = 0.075*nu(GHz)^-2.2 K/(MJy/sr). The detection of such a component suggests that we should be cautious in any assumptions made regarding foregrounds when designing experiments to map the microwave backgr...

  20. Dust Emissivity in the Far-Infrared

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, Simone; Davies, Jonathan I.; Alton, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    We have derived the dust emissivity in the Far-Infrared (FIR) using data available in the literature. We use two wavelength dependences derived from spectra of Galactic FIR emission (Reach et al. 1995). A value for the emissivity, normalised to the extinction efficiency in the V band, has been retrieved from maps of Galactic FIR emission, dust temperature and extinction (Schlegel et al. 1998). Our results are similar to other measurements in the Galaxy but only marginally consistent with the ...

  1. Planck intermediate results: XVII. Emission of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium from the far-infrared to microwave frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Delabrouille, J.;

    2014-01-01

    from 23 to 353 GHz, which separate dust and anomalous microwave emission (AME). We show that the flattening of the dust SED can be accounted for with an additional component with a blackbody spectrum. This additional component, which accounts for (26 ± 6)% of the dust emission at 100GHz, could...... represent magnetic dipole emission. Alternatively, it could account for an increasing contribution of carbon dust, or a flattening of the emissivity of amorphous silicates, at millimetre wavelengths. These interpretations make different predictions for the dust polarization SED. (4) We analyse the residuals...

  2. Dust Emissivity Variations In the Milky Way

    OpenAIRE

    Paradis, D.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Meny, C.

    2009-01-01

    Aims. Dust properties appear to vary according to the environment in which the dust evolves. Previous observational indications of these variations in the far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (submm) spectral range are scarce and limited to specific regions of the sky. To determine whether these results can be generalised to larger scales, we study the evolution in dust emissivities from the FIR to millimeter (mm) wavelengths, in the atomic and molecular interstellar medium (ISM), along the G...

  3. Is the Galactic submillimeter dust emissivity underestimated?

    OpenAIRE

    Dasyra, K. M.; Xilouris, E. M.; Misiriotis, A.; Kylafis, N. D.

    2005-01-01

    We present detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the spiral galaxies NGC 891, NGC 4013, and NGC 5907 in the far-infrared and submm wavelengths. The model takes into account the emission produced by the diffuse dust and the star forming HII complexes. The dust mass is constrained by radiative transfer simulations in the optical (Xilouris et al. 1999). We find that the submm emission predicted by our model cannot account for the observed fluxes. Two scenarios may accoun...

  4. 彗星的反常尘埃彗尾%Anomalous dust tails of comets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡中为; 史建春; 赵海斌; 林启生

    2011-01-01

    results of comet observations and researches, some basic explanations and examples of the anomalous tails have been introduced by means of the syndyname and synchrone equations derived from the mechanics theory of dust tails first; then, dynamical theories which are based on kinetic and fluid-dynamic concepts of dust tails and the anomalous tails, as well as research results have been introduced, from two to three dimensions including the theory of Finson-Probstein, neck-line theory and inverse Mont Carlo model, et al. , to explain the distribution of surface density, particle-size distribution and dust emission rate. Finally, it is introduced that the newly-discovered comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin), which is a discovery of comet hinters of China and whose peculiar anomalous tail appeared on January-February 2009. Some appearance images by preliminary computer processing and explanation of the anti-tail arc presented, and their lengths are measured and estimated.%从地球上观测到的彗尾一般是在彗核的背太阳一侧延展,但也观测到几颗彗星在某些特殊情况却呈现出从彗核朝向太阳一侧延展的扇形或长钉形的反常彗尾或向日彗尾.反常彗尾是彗核抛出的大尘粒组成的尘埃彗尾,由于受太阳辐射压斥力较小而成为其轨道面附近的太空垃圾,这些垃圾会危害空间环境和航天安全,因此,观测和研究反常彗尾对于预防这些大尘粒撞击飞船有重要意义.本文首先介绍了反常彗尾的基本解释和事例,然后阐述了反常彗尾的尘埃彗尾动力学理论及其研究成果.最后简述了我国彗旱猎人发现的新彗星C/2007 N3(Lulin),即鹿林彗星及其在2009年1-2月观测到的奇特反常尘埃彗尾情况,并给出了初步处理的一些形态图像和解释,初步测量和估算了反常彗尾长度.

  5. OT1_rpaladin_1: PACS and SPIRE observations of Galactic anomalous emission sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, R.

    2010-07-01

    Despite the increasing evidence that the anomalous emission is a new physical mechanism acting in the diffuse interstellar medium, the nature and distribution of this component remains elusive. The currently most favored models attribute the observed microwave excess to rotating very small dust grains (PAHs and VSGs). Nonetheless, the infrared properties of the sources which, to date, are known to exhibit this type of emission are very poorly known mostly due to the limited angular resolution and frequency coverage of DIRBE and IRAS data. We propose HERSCHEL PACS and SPIRE mapping of three Galactic anomalous emission sources (LDN 1780, LDN 675 and LDN 1111). This data, when combined with ancillary NIR and mid-IR data of comparable angular resolution (mainly from Spitzer), and coupled with available dust models, will allow to set tight constraints on the radiation field in the emitting sources as well as in their immediate surroundings. Such constraints, in turn, will allow to estimate the abundances of PAHs, VSGs and BGs, hence to shed light on the potential link between these dust populations and the observed microwave excess.

  6. Dust Emission from High Redshift QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Carilli, C L; Menten, K M; Rupen, M P; Kreysa, E; Fan, X; Strauss, M A; Schneider, D P; Bertarini, A; Yun, M S; Zylka, R; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2000-01-01

    We present detections of emission at 250 GHz (1.2 mm) from two high redshiftQSOs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample using the bolometer array at theIRAM 30m telescope. The sources are SDSSp 015048.83+004126.2 at z = 3.7, andSDSSp J033829.31+002156.3 at z = 5.0, which is the third highest redshift QSOknown, and the highest redshift mm emitting source yet identified. We alsopresent deep radio continuum imaging of these two sources at 1.4 GHz using theVery Large Array. The combination of cm and mm observations indicate that the250 GHz emission is most likely thermal dust emission, with implied dust massesof 1e8 M_solar. We consider possible dust heating mechanisms, including UVemission from the active nucleus (AGN), and a massive starburst concurrent withthe AGN, with implied star formation rates > 1e3 M_solar/year.

  7. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Thiem; Vinh, Nguyen Anh; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles...

  8. Lunar Dust Charging by Photoelectric Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered with a thick layer of sub-micron/micron size dust grains formed by meteoritic impact over billions of years. The fine dust grains are levitated and transported on the lunar surface, as indicated by the transient dust clouds observed over the lunar horizon during the Apollo 17 mission. Theoretical models suggest that the dust grains on the lunar surface are charged by the solar UV radiation as well as the solar wind. Even without any physical activity, the dust grains are levitated by electrostatic fields and transported away from the surface in the near vacuum environment of the Moon. The current dust charging and levitation models, however, do not fully explain the observed phenomena. Since the abundance of dust on the Moon s surface with its observed adhesive characteristics has the potential of severe impact on human habitat and operations and lifetime of a variety of equipment, it is necessary to investigate the charging properties and the lunar dust phenomena in order to develop appropriate mitigating strategies. Photoelectric emission induced by the solar UV radiation with photon energies higher than the work function of the grain materials is recognized to be the dominant process for charging of the lunar dust, and requires measurements of the photoelectric yields to determine the charging and equilibrium potentials of individual dust grains. In this paper, we present the first laboratory measurements of the photoelectric efficiencies and yields of individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains selected from sample returns of Apollo 17, and Luna 24 missions, as well as similar size dust grains from the JSC-1 simulants. The measurements were made on a laboratory facility based on an electrodynamic balance that permits a variety of experiments to be conducted on individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains in simulated space environments. The photoelectric emission measurements indicate grain size dependence with the yield

  9. Effect of Thermionic Emission on Dust-Acoustic Solitons in a Dust-Electron Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Li-Wen; WANG Zheng-Xiong; LIU Yue; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of thermionic emission on dust-acoustic solitons with a very small but finite amplitude in a dustelectron plasma are studied using the reductive perturbation technique. The self-consistent variation of dust charge is taken into account. It is shown that the thermionic emission could significantly increase the dust positive charge. The dependences of the phase velocity, amplitude, and width of such solitons on the dust temperature and the dust work function of dust material are plotted and discussed.

  10. Scientists Detect Radio Emission from Rapidly Rotating Cosmic Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    current radio astronomy research, and the idea was largely forgotten. In the 1990s this perception began to change when scientists and engineers designed sensitive instruments to detect the faint afterglow of the Big Bang, which is seen in the Universe as the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. While making detailed maps of this faint and cold radiation, scientists also detected signals at approximately the same wavelength and intensity as the background radiation, but clearly emanating from within the Milky Way's galactic plane. The researchers expected to detect some emission from the Milky Way, but what they encountered was much brighter than anticipated. This discovery caused some concern among researchers because of the need to have a very clear "window" on the Universe to study the background radiation in great detail. If there were a source of radio emission in our own galactic "back yard," then studies of the microwave background radiation would need to recognize these emissions and correct for them. "We want to be clear, however, that nothing we have found invalidates the current interpretation of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation," assured Finkbeiner. "Nobody has done anything wrong in neglecting these signals - so far." Scientists considered several plausible mechanisms for this anomalous emission, but these theories failed to explain the observed spatial distribution of this emission across the sky. This predicament prompted theorists to rethink the spinning dust idea, leading to a 1998 model by Bruce Draine (Princeton University) and Alex Lazarian (University of Wisconsin), which proposed rotational dust-grain emission as an important mechanism. Draine and Lazarian assumed that small dust grains, perhaps having no more than 100 atoms each, would populate many interstellar dust clouds in the Galaxy. Each grain would have a small electric dipole and would therefore react to the charged ions that race through the clouds at tremendous speeds. As an ion

  11. Planck intermediate results. XV. A study of anomalous microwave emission in Galactic clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Casassus, S; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chen, X; Chiang, H C; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hornstrup, A; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reich, W; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tibbs, C T; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wilkinson, A; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is believed to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The aim of this paper is a statistical study of the basic properties of AME regions and the environment in which they emit. We used WMAP and Planck maps, combined with ancillary radio and IR data, to construct a sample of 98 candidate AME sources, assembling SEDs for each source using aperture photometry on 1 deg-smoothed maps from 0.408 GHz up to 3000 GHz. Each spectrum is fitted with a simple model of free-free, synchrotron (where necessary), cosmic microwave background (CMB), thermal dust, and spinning dust components. We find that 42 of the 98 sources have significant >5sigma excess emission at frequencies between 20 and 60 GHz. An analysis of the potential contribution of optically thick free-free emission from ultra-compact HII regions, using IR colour criteria, reduces the significant AME sample to 28 regions. The spectrum of the AME is consistent with model spectra of spinning dust. P...

  12. A Tale of Three Galaxies: Deciphering the Infrared Emission of the Spectroscopically Anomalous Galaxies IRAS F10398+1455, IRAS F21013-0739 and SDSS J0808+3948

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yanxia; Hao, Lei; Nikutta, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The \\textit{Spitzer}/Infrared Spectrograph spectra of three spectroscopically anomalous galaxies (IRAS~F10398+1455, IRAS~F21013-0739 and SDSS~J0808+3948) are modeled in terms of a mixture of warm and cold silicate dust, and warm and cold carbon dust. Their unique infrared (IR) emission spectra are characterized by a steep $\\simali$5--8$\\mum$ emission continuum, strong emission bands from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, and prominent silicate emission. The steep $\\simali$5--8$\\mum$ emission continuum and strong PAH emission features suggest the dominance of starbursts, while the silicate emission is indicative of significant heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). With warm and cold silicate dust of various compositions ("astronomical silicate," amorphous olivine, or amorphous pyroxene) combined with warm and cold carbon dust (amorphous carbon, or graphite), we are able to closely reproduce the observed IR emission of these %spectroscopically anomalous galaxies. We find that the dust tempe...

  13. Planck intermediate results. XV. A study of anomalous microwave emission in Galactic clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, Marie-Helene;

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is believed to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The aim of this paper is a statistical study of the basic properties of AME regions and the environment in which they emit. We used WMAP and Planck maps, combined with ancillary...... spatially extended than regions with little or no AME. The AME intensity is strongly correlated with the sub-millimetre/IR flux densities and comparable to previous AME detections in the literature. AME emissivity, defined as the ratio of AME to dust optical depth, varies by an order of magnitude...... for the AME regions. The AME regions tend to be associated with cooler dust in the range 14−20 K and an average emissivity index, βd, of +1.8, while the non-AME regions are typically warmer, at 20−27 K. In agreement with previous studies, the AME emissivity appears to decrease with increasing column density...

  14. Dust Emission from High-Redshift QSOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carilli; Bertoldi; Menten; Rupen; Kreysa; Fan; Strauss; Schneider; Bertarini; Yun; Zylka

    2000-04-10

    We present detections of emission at 250 GHz (1.2 mm) from two high-redshift QSOs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample using the bolometer array at the IRAM 30 m telescope. The sources are SDSSp 015048.83+004126.2 at z=3.7 and SDSSp J033829.31+002156.3 at z=5.0; the latter is the third highest redshift QSO known and the highest redshift millimeter-emitting source yet identified. We also present deep radio continuum imaging of these two sources at 1.4 GHz using the Very Large Array. The combination of centimeter and millimeter observations indicate that the 250 GHz emission is most likely thermal dust emission, with implied dust masses approximately 108 M middle dot in circle. We consider possible dust heating mechanisms, including UV emission from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and a massive starburst concurrent with the AGN, with implied star formation rates greater than 103 M middle dot in circle yr-1. PMID:10727380

  15. A TALE OF THREE GALAXIES: ANOMALOUS DUST PROPERTIES IN IRAS F10398+1455, IRAS F21013–0739, AND SDSS J0808+3948

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yanxia; Hao, Lei [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Li, Aigen, E-mail: haol@shao.ac.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    On a galactic scale, the 9.7 μm silicate emission is usually only seen in type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). They usually also display a flat emission continuum at ∼5-8 μm and the absence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission bands. In contrast, starburst galaxies, luminous infrared (IR) galaxies, and ultraluminous IR galaxies exhibit a red 5-8 μm emission continuum, strong 9.7 μm and 18 μm silicate absorption features, and strong PAH emission bands. Here, we report the detection of anomalous dust properties by the Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph in three galaxies (IRAS F10398+1455, IRAS F21013-0739, and SDSS J0808+3948) which are characterized by the simultaneous detection of a red 5-8 μm emission continuum, the 9.7 and 18 μm silicate emission features, as well as strong PAH emission bands. These apparently contradictory dust IR emission properties are discussed in terms of iron-poor silicate composition, carbon dust deficit, small grain size, and low dust temperature in the young AGN phase of these three galaxies.

  16. Planck intermediate results. XV. A study of anomalous microwave emission in Galactic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casassus, S.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson; , C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tibbs, C. T.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Verstraete, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-05-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is believed to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The aim of this paper is a statistical study of the basic properties of AME regions and the environment in which they emit. We used WMAP and Planck maps, combined with ancillary radio and IR data, to construct a sample of 98 candidate AME sources, assembling SEDs for each source using aperture photometry on 1°-smoothed maps from 0.408 GHz up to 3000 GHz. Each spectrum is fitted with a simple model of free-free, synchrotron (where necessary), cosmic microwave background (CMB), thermal dust, and spinning dust components. We find that 42 of the 98 sources have significant (>5σ) excess emission at frequencies between 20 and 60 GHz. An analysis of the potential contribution of optically thick free-free emission from ultra-compact H ii regions, using IR colour criteria, reduces the significant AME sample to 27 regions. The spectrum of the AME is consistent with model spectra of spinning dust. Peak frequencies are in the range 20-35 GHz except for the California nebula (NGC 1499), which appears to have a high spinning dust peak frequency of (50 ± 17) GHz. The AME regions tend to be more spatially extended than regions with little or no AME. The AME intensity is strongly correlated with the sub-millimetre/IR flux densities and comparable to previous AME detections in the literature. AME emissivity, defined as the ratio of AME to dust optical depth, varies by an order of magnitude for the AME regions. The AME regions tend to be associated with cooler dust in the range 14-20 K and an average emissivity index, βd, of +1.8, while the non-AME regions are typically warmer, at 20-27 K. In agreement with previous studies, the AME emissivity appears to decrease with increasing column density. This supports the idea of AME originating from small grains that are known to be depleted in dense regions, probably due to coagulation onto larger grains. We also find a

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Anomalous microwave emission in Galactic clouds (Planck+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casassus, S.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; De Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Desert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Dupac, X.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihaenen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Laehteenmaeki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschenes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tibbs, C. T.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Verstraete, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-07-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is believed to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The aim of this paper is a statistical study of the basic properties of AME regions and the environment in which they emit. We used WMAP and Planck maps, combined with ancillary radio and IR data, to construct a sample of 98 candidate AME sources, assembling SEDs for each source using aperture photometry on 1°-smoothed maps from 0.408GHz up to 3000GHz. Each spectrum is fitted with a simple model of free-free, synchrotron (where necessary), cosmic microwave background (CMB), thermal dust, and spinning dust components. We find that 42 of the 98 sources have significant (>5σ) excess emission at frequencies between 20 and 60GHz. An analysis of the potential contribution of optically thick free-free emission from ultra-compact HII regions, using IR colour criteria, reduces the significant AME sample to 27 regions. The spectrum of the AME is consistent with model spectra of spinning dust. Peak frequencies are in the range 20-35GHz except for the California nebula (NGC1499), which appears to have a high spinning dust peak frequency of (50+/-17)GHz. The AME regions tend to be more spatially extended than regions with little or no AME. The AME intensity is strongly correlated with the sub-millimetre/IR flux densities and comparable to previous AME detections in the literature. AME emissivity, defined as the ratio of AME to dust optical depth, varies by an order of magnitude for the AME regions. The AME regions tend to be associated with cooler dust in the range 14-20K and an average emissivity index, βd, of +1.8, while the non-AME regions are typically warmer, at 20-27K. In agreement with previous studies, the AME emissivity appears to decrease with increasing column density. This supports the idea of AME originating from small grains that are known to be depleted in dense regions, probably due to coagulation onto larger grains. We also find a

  18. Conditions for stimulated emission in anomalous gravity-superconductors interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Modanese, G

    2009-01-01

    Several authors have studied the generation of gravitational fields by condensed-matter systems in non-extreme density conditions. General Relativity and lowest-order perturbative Quantum Gravity predict in this case an extremely small emission rate, so these phenomena can become relevant only if some strong quantum effect occurs. Quantum aspects of gravity are still poorly understood. It is believed that they could play a role in systems which exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence, like superconductors and superfluids, leading to an "anomalous" coupling between matter and field. We mention here recent work in this field by Woods, Chiao, Becker, Agop et al., Ummarino, Kiefer and Weber. New results are presented concerning anomalous stimulated gravitational emission in a layered superconductor like YBCO. We model the superconductor as an array of intrinsic Josephson junctions. The superconducting parameters are defined by our preliminary measurements with melt-textured samples. We write explicitly and solve nu...

  19. Windblown fugitive dust emissions from smelter slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, R. Steven; McKenna Neuman, Cheryl; Boulton, J. Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The waste products of mining and smelter operations contain fine particles that, when stored in stockpiles and tailings ponds, are subject to aerodynamic forces that may result in their suspension and transport within boundary layer air flows. The accuracy of atmospheric dispersion models such as AERMOD depends strongly upon suitable inputs for the emission rate that generally must be either measured or estimated from suitable analogues. Measurements of the emission rate of PM10 from smelter slag, based on wind tunnel experiments using the control volume method, are reported in this study and compared with vertical flux values obtained using a finite difference approximation. As compared to natural soils, the dust coatings on slag fragments are rapidly depleted during wind events so that the temporal aspect is important to capture in any consideration of the emission rate. At low wind speeds, vertical flux measurements underestimate the emission rate, but otherwise the agreement is excellent. Comparison with field measurements obtained at the smelter site reveals a degree of overlap with the laboratory data. As a general rule, PM10 emission from smelter slag by aerodynamic entrainment alone is several orders of magnitude lower than published fluxes of total suspended particulate (TSP) emitted from natural soil surfaces for which saltation bombardment is recognized to play a key role in the ejection of dust.

  20. Effect of thermionic emission on dust-acoustic solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of thermionic emission on dust-acoustic solitons of very small but finite amplitude in dusty plasmas is studied taking into account the self-consistent variation of the dust charge. It is shown that thermionic emission can significantly lower the amplitude of the dust negative charge and can even make the dust charge positive. Results on the dependence of the phase velocity, amplitude and width of solitons on the dust temperature and the work function of dust material were obtained and are discussed here.

  1. Dust-correlated cm wavelength continuum emission from translucent clouds ζ Oph and LDN 1780

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, M.; Casassus, S.; Dickinson, C.; Witt, A. N.; Castellanos, P.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; Cabrera, G.; Cleary, K.; Allison, J. R.; Bond, J. R.; Bronfman, L.; Bustos, R.; Jones, M. E.; Paladini, R.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reeves, R.; Sievers, J. L.; Taylor, A. C.

    2011-07-01

    The diffuse cm wave IR-correlated signal, the 'anomalous' CMB foreground, is thought to arise in the dust in cirrus clouds. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) cm wave data of two translucent clouds, ζ Oph and LDN 1780 with the aim of characterizing the anomalous emission in the translucent cloud environment. In ζ Oph, the measured brightness at 31 GHz is 2.4σ higher than an extrapolation from 5-GHz measurements assuming a free-free spectrum on 8 arcmin scales. The SED of this cloud on angular scales of 1° is dominated by free-free emission in the cm range. In LDN 1780 we detected a 3σ excess in the SED on angular scales of 1° that can be fitted using a spinning dust model. In this cloud, there is a spatial correlation between the CBI data and IR images, which trace dust. The correlation is better with near-IR templates (IRAS 12 and 25 μm) than with IRAS 100 μm, which suggests a very small grain origin for the emission at 31 GHz. We calculated the 31-GHz emissivities in both clouds. They are similar and have intermediate values between that of cirrus clouds and dark clouds. Nevertheless, we found an indication of an inverse relationship between emissivity and column density, which further supports the VSGs origin for the cm emission since the proportion of big relative to small grains is smaller in diffuse clouds.

  2. Spinning Dust Emission from Ultra-small Silicates: Emissivity and Polarization Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thiem; Vinh, Nguyen-Anh; Quynh Lan, Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of cosmic microwave background radiation. It is believed that AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we suppose that a new population of ultra-small silicate grains perhaps exists in the ISM, and quantify the rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We find that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when the tiny grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing dipole moment per atom (β) and can reach P∼ 20 % for β ∼ 0.1 {{D}} at a grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space (β ,{Y}{{Si}}), with {Y}{{Si}} being the fraction of Si abundance in nanoparticles, in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the observational constraints of ultraviolet extinction and polarization of starlight. Our results reveal that rotational emission from spinning silicate may be an important source of AME.

  3. Constraint on the polarization of electric dipole emission from spinning dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Thiem; Martin, P. G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Lazarian, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    Planck results have revealed that the electric dipole emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the most reliable explanation for the anomalous microwave emission that interferes with cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation experiments. The emerging question is to what extent this emission component contaminates the polarized CMB radiation. We present constraints on polarized dust emission for the model of grain-size distribution and grain alignment that best fits the observed extinction and polarization curves. Two stars with a prominent polarization feature at λ = 2175 Å—HD 197770 and HD 147933-4—are chosen for our study. For HD 197770, we find that the model with aligned silicate grains plus weakly aligned PAHs can successfully reproduce the 2175 Å polarization feature; in contrast, for HD 147933-4, we find that the alignment of only silicate grains can account for that feature. The alignment function of PAHs for the best-fit model to the HD 197770 data is used to constrain polarized spinning dust emission. We find that the degree of polarization of spinning dust emission is about 1.6% at frequency ν ≈ 3 GHz and declines to below 0.9% for ν > 20 GHz. We also predict the degree of polarization of thermal dust emission at 353 GHz to be P {sub em} ≈ 11% and 14% for the lines of sight to the HD 197770 and HD 147933-4 stars, respectively.

  4. Characterization of Turbulence from Submillimeter Dust Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Chitsazzadeh, Shadi; Hildebrand, Roger H; Vaillancourt, John

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we use our recent technique for estimating the turbulent component of the magnetic field to derive the structure functions of the unpolarized emission as well as that of the Stokes Q and U parameters of the polarized emission. The solutions for the structure functions to 350-um SHARP polarization data of OMC-1 allow the determination of the corresponding turbulent correlation length scales. The estimated values for these length scales are 9.4" +/- 0.1", 7.3" +/- 0.1", 12.6" +/- 0.2" (or 20.5 +/- 0.2, 16.0 +/- 0.2, and 27.5 +/- 0.4 mpc at 450 pc, the adopted distance for OMC-1) for the Stokes Q and U parameters, and for the unpolarized emission N, respectively. Our current results for Q and U are consistent with previous results obtained through other methods, and may indicate presence of anisotropy in magnetized turbulence. We infer a weak coupling between the dust component responsible for the unpolarized emission N and the magnetic field B from the significant difference between their turbulen...

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF TURBULENCE FROM SUBMILLIMETER DUST EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitsazzadeh, Shadi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Houde, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hildebrand, Roger H. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Vaillancourt, John [Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    In this paper, we use our recent technique for estimating the turbulent component of the magnetic field to derive the structure functions of the unpolarized emission as well as that of the Stokes Q and U parameters of the polarized emission. The solutions for the structure functions to 350 {mu}m SHARP polarization data of OMC-1 allow the determination of the corresponding turbulent correlation length scales. The estimated values for these length scales are 9.''4 {+-} 0.''1, 7.''3 {+-} 0.''1, 12.''6 {+-} 0.''2 (or 20.5 {+-} 0.2, 16.0 {+-} 0.2, and 27.5 {+-} 0.4 mpc at 450 pc, the adopted distance for OMC-1) for the Stokes Q and U parameters, and for the unpolarized emission N, respectively. Our current results for Q and U are consistent with previous results obtained through other methods and may indicate presence of anisotropy in magnetized turbulence. We infer a weak coupling between the dust component responsible for the unpolarized emission N and the magnetic field B from the significant difference between their turbulent correlation length scales.

  6. Anomalous radon emission as precursor of medium to strong earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, Maria

    2016-03-01

    Anomalous radon (Rn222) emissions enhanced by forthcoming earthquakes is considered to be a precursory phenomenon related to an increased geotectonic activity in seismic areas. Rock microfracturing in the Earth's crust preceding a seismic rupture may cause local surface deformation fields, rock dislocations, charged particle generation and motion, electrical conductivity changes, radon and other gases emission, fluid diffusion, electrokinetic, piezomagnetic and piezoelectric effects as well as climate fluctuations. Space-time anomalies of radon gas emitted in underground water, soil and near the ground air weeks to days in the epicentral areas can be associated with the strain stress changes that occurred before the occurrence of medium and strong earthquakes. This paper aims to investigate temporal variations of radon concentration levels in air near or in the ground by the use of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) CR-39 and LR-115 in relation with some important seismic events recorded in Vrancea region, Romania.

  7. Modeling the dust emission from PN IC418

    OpenAIRE

    Morisset, Christophe; Szczerba, Ryszard; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Garcia-Lario, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    We construct a detailed model for the IR dust emission from the PN IC 418. We succeed to reproduce the emission from 2 to 200$\\mu$m. We can determine the amount of emitting dust as well as its composition, and compare to the depletion of elements determined for the photoionized region.

  8. Detection of Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Pleiades Reflection Nebula with WMAP and the COSMOSOMAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Genova-Santos, R; Rubino-Martin, J A; Lopez-Caraballo, C H; Hildebrandt, S R

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence for anomalous microwave emission (AME) in the Pleiades reflection nebula, using data from the seven-year release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and from the COSMOSOMAS experiment. The flux integrated in a 1-degree radius around R.A.=56.24^{\\circ}, Dec.=23.78^{\\circ} (J2000) is 2.15 +/- 0.12 Jy at 22.8 GHz, where AME is dominant. COSMOSOMAS data show no significant emission, but allow to set upper limits of 0.94 and 1.58 Jy (99.7% C.L.) respectively at 10.9 and 14.7 GHz, which are crucial to pin down the AME spectrum at these frequencies, and to discard any other emission mechanisms which could have an important contribution to the signal detected at 22.8 GHz. We estimate the expected level of free-free emission from an extinction-corrected H-alpha template, while the thermal dust emission is characterized from infrared DIRBE data and extrapolated to microwave frequencies. When we deduct the contribution from these two components at 22.8 GHz the residual flux, associated...

  9. Dust emission: small-scale processes with global consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okin, Gregory S.; Bullard, Joanna E.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Ballantine, John-Andrew C.; Schepanski, Kerstin; Todd, Martin C.; Belnap, Jayne; Baddock, Matthew C.; Gill, Thomas E.; Miller, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Desert dust, both modern and ancient, is a critical component of the Earth system. Atmospheric dust has important effects on climate by changing the atmospheric radiation budget, while deposited dust influences biogeochemical cycles in the oceans and on land. Dust deposited on snow and ice decreases its albedo, allowing more light to be trapped at the surface, thus increasing the rate of melt and influencing energy budgets and river discharge. In the human realm, dust contributes to the transport of allergens and pathogens and when inhaled can cause or aggravate respiratory diseases. Dust storms also represent a significant hazard to road and air travel. Because it affects so many Earth processes, dust is studied from a variety of perspectives and at multiple scales, with various disciplines examining emissions for different purposes using disparate strategies. Thus, the range of objectives in studying dust, as well as experimental approaches and results, has not yet been systematically integrated. Key research questions surrounding the production and sources of dust could benefit from improved collaboration among different research communities. These questions involve the origins of dust, factors that influence dust production and emission, and methods through which dust can be monitored.

  10. Observations of free-free and anomalous microwave emission from LDN 1622 with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Cleary, K.

    2015-11-01

    LDN 1622 has previously been identified as a possible strong source of dust-correlated anomalous microwave emission (AME). Previous observations were limited by resolution meaning that the radio emission could not be compared with current generation high-resolution infrared data from Herschel, Spitzer or Wide-field Infrared Sky Explorer. This paper presents arcminute resolution mapping observations of LDN 1622 at 4.85 and 13.7 GHz using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The 4.85 GHz map reveals a corona of free-free emission enclosing LDN 1622 that traces the photodissociation region of the cloud. The brightest peaks of the 4.85 GHz map are found to be within ≈10 per cent agreement with the expected free-free predicted by Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas H α data of LDN 1622. At 13.7 GHz, the AME flux density was found to be 7.0 ± 1.4 mJy and evidence is presented for a rising spectrum between 13.7 and 31 GHz. The spinning dust model of AME is found to naturally account for the flux seen at 13.7 GHz. Correlations between the diffuse 13.7 GHz emission and the diffuse mid-infrared emission are used to further demonstrate that the emission originating from LDN 1622 at 13.7 GHz is described by the spinning dust model.

  11. Dust-correlated cm-wavelength continuum emission on translucent clouds {\\zeta} Oph and LDN 1780

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal, M; Dickinson, C; Witt, A N; Castellanos, P; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; Cabrera, G; Cleary, K; Allison, J R; Bond, J R; Bronfman, L; Bustos, R; Jones, M E; Paladini, R; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Reeves, R; Sievers, J L; Taylor, A C

    2011-01-01

    The diffuse cm-wave IR-correlated signal, the "anomalous" CMB foreground, is thought to arise in the dust in cirrus clouds. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) cm-wave data of two translucent clouds, {\\zeta} Oph and LDN 1780 with the aim of characterising the anomalous emission in the translucent cloud environment. In {\\zeta} Oph, the measured brightness at 31 GHz is 2.4{\\sigma} higher than an extrapolation from 5 GHz measurements assuming a free-free spectrum on 8 arcmin scales. The SED of this cloud on angular scales of 1{\\odot} is dominated by free-free emission in the cm-range. In LDN 1780 we detected a 3 {\\sigma} excess in the SED on angular scales of 1{\\odot} that can be fitted using a spinning dust model. In this cloud, there is a spatial correlation between the CBI data and IR images, which trace dust. The correlation is better with near-IR templates (IRAS 12 and 25 {\\mu}m) than with IRAS 100 {\\mu}m, which suggests a very small grain origin for the emission at 31 GHz. We calculated the 31 GHz em...

  12. Constraints on Free-Free Emission from Anomalous Microwave Emission Sources in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Tibbs, C. T.; Paladini, R.; DICKINSON, C.; Mason, B. S.; Casassus, S.; Cleary, K.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; Watson, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present observations performed with the Green Bank Telescope at 1.4 and 5 GHz of three strips coincident with the anomalous microwave emission features previously identified in the Perseus molecular cloud at 33 GHz with the Very Small Array. With these observations we determine the level of the low frequency (~1 - 5 GHz) emission. We do not detect any significant extended emission in these regions and we compute conservative 3\\sigma upper limits on the fraction of free-free emission at 33 ...

  13. Modeling Saharan dust emissions, transport, deposition, and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, Peter Richard

    We simulate Saharan dust emissions, transport, and removal with a three-dimensional aerosol transport model driven by assimilated meteorology. We explore dust distributions and optical properties for model runs over the tropical North Atlantic for time periods covering the ACE-2 (summer 1997, Canary Islands) and PRIDE (summer 2000, Puerto Rico) field experiments. Modeled dust fields are compared to ground-based, in situ, and satellite observations. Dust imaginary refractive index and single scatter albedo at UV wavelengths are inferred near source regions by computing the TOMS Aerosol Index from modeled dust fields. Our results indicate a dust aerosol that is considerably less absorbing than previous estimates. The timing of downwind dust events is generally uncorrelated with the details of the dust source process, indicating the dust exists in a persistent reservoir over source regions and the timing of its transport to remote regions is most strongly controlled by the transporting dynamics. Our model simulates the complicated vertical distributions of dust observed over Puerto Rico. The dust vertical distribution is controlled by sedimentation of dust particles and a general descending air motion over the tropical North Atlantic. Low-level dust can be transported directly from source regions, but the majority of it is efficiently eroded away in transit by wet removal processes. Our computed estimates of iron deposition fluxes into the North Atlantic are in reasonable agreement with estimates based on station data.

  14. Reduction in soil aggregation in response to dust emission processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swet, Nitzan; Katra, Itzhak

    2016-09-01

    Dust emission by aeolian (wind) soil erosion depends on the topsoil properties of the source area, especially on the nature of the aggregates where most dust particles are held. Although the key role of soil aggregates in dust emission, the response of soil aggregation to aeolian processes and its implications for dust emission remain unknown. This study focuses on aggregate size distribution (ASD) analyses before and after in-situ aeolian experiments in semiarid loess soils that are associated with dust emission. Wind tunnel simulations show that particulate matter (PM) emission and saltation rates depend on the initial ASD and shear velocity. Under all initial ASD conditions, the content of saltator-sized aggregates (63-250 μm) increased by 10-34% due to erosion of macro-aggregates (> 500 μm), resulting in a higher size ratio (SR) between the saltators and macro-aggregates following the aeolian erosion. The results revealed that the saltator production increases significantly for soils that are subjected to short-term (anthropogenic) disturbance of the topsoil. The findings highlight a decrease in soil aggregation for all initial ASD's in response to aeolian erosion, and consequently its influence on the dust emission potential. Changes in ASD should be considered as a key parameter in dust emission models of complex surfaces.

  15. Adjoint inversion modeling of Asian dust emission using lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yumimoto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var data assimilation system for a regional dust model (RAMS/CFORS-4DVAR; RC4 is applied to an adjoint inversion of a heavy dust event over eastern Asia during 20 March–4 April 2007. The vertical profiles of the dust extinction coefficients derived from NIES Lidar network are directly assimilated, with validation using observation data. Two experiments assess impacts of observation site selection: Experiment A uses five Japanese observation sites located downwind of dust source regions; Experiment B uses these and two other sites near source regions. Assimilation improves the modeled dust extinction coefficients. Experiment A and Experiment B assimilation results are mutually consistent, indicating that observations of Experiment A distributed over Japan can provide comprehensive information related to dust emission inversion. Time series data of dust AOT calculated using modeled and Lidar dust extinction coefficients improve the model results. At Seoul, Matsue, and Toyama, assimilation reduces the root mean square differences of dust AOT by 35–40%. However, at Beijing and Tsukuba, the RMS differences degrade because of fewer observations during the heavy dust event. Vertical profiles of the dust layer observed by CALIPSO are compared with assimilation results. The dense dust layer was trapped at potential temperatures (θ of 280–300 K and was higher toward the north; the model reproduces those characteristics well. Latitudinal distributions of modeled dust AOT along the CALIPSO orbit paths agree well with those of CALIPSO dust AOT, OMI AI, and MODIS coarse-mode AOT, capturing the latitude at which AOTs and AI have high values. Assimilation results show increased dust emissions over the Gobi Desert and Mongolia; especially for 29–30 March, emission flux is about 10 times greater. Strong dust uplift fluxes over the Gobi Desert and Mongolia cause the heavy dust event. Total optimized dust emissions are 57

  16. New radio observations of anomalous microwave emission in the HII region RCW175

    CERN Document Server

    Battistelli, E S; Cruciani, A; de Bernardis, P; Genova-Santos, R; Masi, S; Naldi, A; Paladini, R; Piacentini, F; Tibbs, C T; Verstraete, L; Ysard, N

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the HII region RCW175 with the 64m Parkes telescope at 8.4GHz and 13.5GHz in total intensity, and at 21.5GHz in both total intensity and polarization. High angular resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization capability enable us to perform a detailed study of the different constituents of the HII region. For the first time, we resolve three distinct regions at microwave frequencies, two of which are part of the same annular diffuse structure. Our observations enable us to confirm the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) from RCW175. Fitting the integrated flux density across the entire region with the currently available spinning dust models, using physically motivated assumptions, indicates the presence of at least two spinning dust components: a warm component with a relatively large hydrogen number density n_H=26.3/cm^3 and a cold component with a hydrogen number density of n_H=150/cm^3. The present study is an example highlighting the potential of using high angular-resolutio...

  17. Road dust emission sources and assessment of street washing effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karanasiou, A.; Amato, F.; Moreno, T.; Lumbreras, J.; Borge, R.; Linares, C.; Boldo, E.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2014-01-01

    Although previous studies report on the effect of street washing on ambient particulate matter levels, there is a lack of studies investigating the results of street washing on the emission strength of road dust. A sampling campaign was conducted in Madrid urban area during July 2009 where road dust

  18. Spatiotemporal Modelling of Dust Storm Sources Emission in West Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabandehloo, E.; Alimohamdadi, A.; Sadeghi-Niaraki, A.; Darvishi Boloorani, A.; Alesheikh, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Dust aerosol is the largest contributor to aerosol mass concentrations in the troposphere and has considerable effects on the air quality of spatial and temporal scales. Arid and semi-arid areas of the West Asia are one of the most important regional dust sources in the world. These phenomena directly or indirectly affecting almost all aspects life in almost 15 countries in the region. So an accurate estimate of dust emissions is very crucial for making a common understanding and knowledge of the problem. Because of the spatial and temporal limits of the ground-based observations, remote sensing methods have been found to be more efficient and useful for studying the West Asia dust source. The vegetation cover limits dust emission by decelerating the surface wind velocities and therefore reducing the momentum transport. While all models explicitly take into account the change of wind speed and soil moisture in calculating dust emissions, they commonly employ a "climatological" land cover data for identifying dust source locations and neglect the time variation of surface bareness. In order to compile the aforementioned model, land surface features such as soil moisture, texture, type, and vegetation and also wind speed as atmospheric parameter are used. Having used NDVI data show significant change in dust emission, The modeled dust emission with static source function in June 2008 is 17.02 % higher than static source function and similar result for Mach 2007 show the static source function is 8.91 % higher than static source function. we witness a significant improvement in accuracy of dust forecasts during the months of most soil vegetation changes (spring and winter) compared to outputs resulted from static model, in which NDVI data are neglected.

  19. SPATIOTEMPORAL MODELLING OF DUST STORM SOURCES EMISSION IN WEST ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Khodabandehloo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dust aerosol is the largest contributor to aerosol mass concentrations in the troposphere and has considerable effects on the air quality of spatial and temporal scales. Arid and semi-arid areas of the West Asia are one of the most important regional dust sources in the world. These phenomena directly or indirectly affecting almost all aspects life in almost 15 countries in the region. So an accurate estimate of dust emissions is very crucial for making a common understanding and knowledge of the problem. Because of the spatial and temporal limits of the ground-based observations, remote sensing methods have been found to be more efficient and useful for studying the West Asia dust source. The vegetation cover limits dust emission by decelerating the surface wind velocities and therefore reducing the momentum transport. While all models explicitly take into account the change of wind speed and soil moisture in calculating dust emissions, they commonly employ a "climatological" land cover data for identifying dust source locations and neglect the time variation of surface bareness. In order to compile the aforementioned model, land surface features such as soil moisture, texture, type, and vegetation and also wind speed as atmospheric parameter are used. Having used NDVI data show significant change in dust emission, The modeled dust emission with static source function in June 2008 is 17.02 % higher than static source function and similar result for Mach 2007 show the static source function is 8.91 % higher than static source function. we witness a significant improvement in accuracy of dust forecasts during the months of most soil vegetation changes (spring and winter compared to outputs resulted from static model, in which NDVI data are neglected.

  20. Constraint on the Polarization of Electric Dipole Emission from Spinning Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem; Martin, P G

    2013-01-01

    Planck results have revealed that the electric dipole emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the most likely explanation for anomalous microwave emission that interferes with cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation experiments. The emerging question is to what extent this emission component contaminates to the polarized CMB radiation. We present constraints on polarized dust emission for the model of grain size distribution and grain alignment that best fits to observed extinction and polarization data. Two stars with a prominent polarization excess at 2175 Angstrom, HD 197770 and HD 147933-4, are chosen for our study. For HD 197770, we find that the model with aligned silicate grains plus weakly aligned PAHs can reproduce the 2175 Angstrom polarization feature; whereas, for HD 147933-4, we find that the alignment by silicate grains only can account for that feature. The alignment function of PAHs for the best fit model to the HD 197770 data is employed to constrain polarized spinning du...

  1. Diffuse radio foregrounds: all-sky polarisation and anomalous microwave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Navarro, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    In this Thesis, we present work on the diffuse Galactic emission in the 23-43 GHz frequency range. We studied the polarised emission, which is dominated by synchrotron radiation at these frequencies. We also present work on the anomalous microwave emission (AME), both in total intensity and polarisation. These observations are useful to quantify the CMB foreground contribution and give us information about the ISM of our Galaxy. Polarisation observations are affected by a positive bias, particularly important in regions with low signal-to-noise ratio. We present a method to correct the bias in the case where the uncertainties in the Q, U Stokes parameters are not symmetric. We show that this method successfully corrects the polarisation maps, with a residual bias smaller than the random uncertainties on the maps, outperforming the methods that are previously described in the literature. We use the de-biasing method to set upper limits for the polarisation of AME in the ρ Ophiuchi and Perseus molecular clouds. In both clouds the AME polarisation fraction is found to be less than 2% at 23 GHz and33 GHz.We use data from the WMAP satellite at 23, 33 and 41 GHz to study the diffuse polarised emission over the entire sky. This emission is due to synchrotron radiation and it originates mostly from filamentary structures with well-ordered magnetic fields.We identify new filaments and studied their observational properties, such as polarisation spectral indices, polarisation fraction and Faraday rotation. We explore the link between the large scale filaments and the local ISM, using the model of an expanding shell in the vicinity of the Sun. We also quantify the level of contamination added by the diffuse filaments to the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra.The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) observed the polarised sky at 43 and 95 GHz, in order to measure the CMB spectra. We describe the instrument, the observations and data processing, focusing on two regions of the Galactic

  2. MAPPING DUST THROUGH EMISSION AND ABSORPTION IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreckel, Kathryn; Groves, Brent; Schinnerer, Eva; Meidt, Sharon E.; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh S. [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Johnson, Benjamin D. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, 98 bis Bvd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Aniano, Gonzalo [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS), Batiment 121, Universite Paris-Sud 11 and CNRS (UMR 8617), F-91405 Orsay (France); Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Croxall, Kevin V. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Draine, Bruce T. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Gordon, Karl D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Crocker, Alison F.; Smith, J. D. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Hunt, Leslie K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Kennicutt, Robert C., E-mail: kreckel@mpia.de [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Dust has long been identified as a barrier to measuring inherent galaxy properties. However, the link between dust and attenuation is not straightforward and depends on both the amount of dust and its distribution. Herschel imaging of nearby galaxies undertaken as part of the KINGFISH project allows us to map the dust as seen in emission with unprecedented sensitivity and {approx}1 kpc resolution. We present here new optical integral field unit spectroscopy for eight of these galaxies that provides complementary 100-200 pc scale maps of the dust attenuation through observation of the reddening in both the Balmer decrement and the stellar continuum. The stellar continuum reddening, which is systematically less than that observed in the Balmer decrement, shows no clear correlation with the dust, suggesting that the distribution of stellar reddening acts as a poor tracer of the overall dust content. The brightest H II regions are observed to be preferentially located in dusty regions, and we do find a correlation between the Balmer line reddening and the dust mass surface density for which we provide an empirical relation. Some of the high-inclination systems in our sample exhibit high extinction, but we also find evidence that unresolved variations in the dust distribution on scales smaller than 500 pc may contribute to the scatter in this relation. We caution against the use of integrated A{sub V} measures to infer global dust properties.

  3. Calculating the submillimeter emissivity of dust grains in spiral galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Xilouris, E. M.

    2005-01-01

    We use the radiation transfer simulation of Xilouris et al. (1999) to constrain the quantity of dust in three nearby spiral galaxies (NGC 4013, NGC 5907 and NGC 891). The predicted visual optical depth from the model is compared with the thermal continuum radiation detected from these galaxies at 850 microns. This comparison yields the emissivity of dust grains in the submillimeter waveband which is a factor 4 higher than the benchmark, semi-empirical model of Draine & Lee (1984). Our estimat...

  4. Aeolian dust emission, transport and deposition in Western Libya

    OpenAIRE

    Elatrash, Mokhtar Salem

    2004-01-01

    Of numerous aeolian studies around the world, few have been dedicated to dust trapping in the Saharan regions and none is known in Libya. This research aims to explore the extent of dust activities in the western part of Libya, the main factors that influence dust entrainment and deposition, the likely regional emission sources transporting aerosol to this part of the country and ultimately to establish base line information in space and time based on a study area larger than the size of the ...

  5. Dust and Stellar Emission of the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Skibba, Ramin A; Aniano, Gonzalo; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bot, Caroline; Carlson, Lynn Redding; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Gordon, Karl; Hony, Sacha; Israel, Frank; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Li, Aigen; Madden, Suzanne; Meixner, Margaret; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Okumura, Koryo; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Paradis, Deborah; Roman-Duval, Julia; Rubio, Monica; Sauvage, Marc; Seale, Jonathan; Srinivasan, Sundar; van Loon, Jacco Th

    2012-01-01

    We study the emission by dust and stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, a pair of low-metallicity nearby galaxies, as traced by their spatially resolved spectral energy distributions (SEDs). This project combines Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE far-infrared photometry with other data at infrared and optical wavelengths. We build maps of dust and stellar luminosity and mass of both Magellanic Clouds, and analyze the spatial distribution of dust/stellar luminosity and mass ratios. These ratios vary considerably throughout the galaxies, generally between the range $0.01\\leq L_{\\rm dust}/L_\\ast\\leq 0.6$ and $10^{-4}\\leq M_{\\rm dust}/M_\\ast\\leq 4\\times10^{-3}$. We observe that the dust/stellar ratios depend on the interstellar medium (ISM) environment, such as the distance from currently or previously star-forming regions, and on the intensity of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF). In addition, we construct star formation rate (SFR) maps, and find that the SFR is correlated with the dust/s...

  6. Dust emission and scattering in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvela, M.

    2015-10-01

    Dust has a crucial role in the physics of interstellar medium (ISM) and it is one of the main tracers used in studies of dense clouds. Its importance has been accentuated by the large amounts of data available from the recent fleet of infrared and submillimetre satellites. These observations are providing further insights into the properties of interstellar dust grains and the changes they undergo during the star formation process. We examine some of the evidence for dust evolution coming from submillimetre dust emission and from light scattering at near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths. Planck and Herschel satellite observations have covered the peak of large grain emission, enabling studies of large cloud areas with unprecedented sensitivity and detail. The data are confirming results from earlier studies where changes of submillimetre dust opacity and spectral index were first reported. The changes are connected to dust evolution and growth as dust moves from diffuse ISM to molecular clouds and into pre-stellar clumps. Corroborating evidence on dust growth has been obtained recently from mid-infrared where enhanced scattering, the 'coreshine' phenomenon, is attributed to the growth of up to micron-sized dust particles. We will summarise results of previous infrared and submillimetre studies. We will describe ongoing work on Herschel data, done partly in the context of the programme Galactic Cold Cores (GCC). We will also discuss recent results from the Spitzer project Hunting coreshine, where the mid-infrared scattering is investigated in a partly related sample. We will also touch on some of the problems and modelling challenges encountered in these studies.

  7. UNUSUAL DUST EMISSION FROM PLANETARY NEBULAE IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopic study of a sample of 25 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). The low-resolution modules are used to analyze the dust features present in the infrared spectra. This study complements a previous work by the same authors where the same sample was analyzed in terms of neon and sulfur abundances. Over half of the objects (14) show emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, typical of carbon-rich dust environments. We compare the hydrocarbon emission in our objects to those of Galactic H II regions and PNe, and Large Magellanic Cloud/Small Magellanic Cloud H II regions. Amorphous silicates are seen in just two objects, enforcing the now well known fact that oxygen-rich dust is less common at low metallicities. Besides these common features, some PNe show very unusual dust. Nine objects show a strong silicon carbide feature at 11 μm and 12 of them show magnesium sulfide emission starting at 25 μm. The high percentage of spectra with silicon carbide in the MCs is not common. Two objects show a broadband which may be attributed to hydrogenated amorphous carbon and weak low-excitation atomic lines. It is likely that these nebulae are very young. The spectra of the remaining eight nebulae are dominated by the emission of fine-structure lines with a weak continuum due to thermal emission of dust, although in a few cases the signal-to-noise ratio in the spectra is low, and weak dust features may not have been detected.

  8. Can we trace very cold dust from its emission alone ?

    CERN Document Server

    Pagani, Laurent; Juvela, Mika; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti; Schuller, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Context. Dust is a good tracer of cold dark clouds but its column density is difficult to quantify. Aims. We want to check whether the far-infrared and submillimeter high-resolution data from Herschel SPIRE and PACS cameras combined with ground-based telescope bolometers allow us to retrieve the whole dust content of cold dark clouds. Methods. We compare far-infrared and submillimeter emission across L183 to the 8 $\\mu$m absorption map from Spitzer data and fit modified blackbody functions towards three different positions. Results. We find that none of the Herschel SPIRE channels follow the cold dust profile seen in absorption. Even the ground-based submillimeter telescope observations, although more closely following the absorption profile, cannot help to characterize the cold dust without external information such as the dust column density itself. The difference in dust opacity can reach up to a factor of 3 in prestellar cores of high extinction. Conclusions. In dark clouds, the amount of very cold dust c...

  9. Polarized galactic synchrotron and dust emission and their correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Steve K

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the level of polarized dust and synchrotron emission using the WMAP9 and Planck data. The primary goal of this study is to inform the assessment of foreground contamination in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements below $\\ell\\sim200$ from 23 to 353 GHz. We compute angular power spectra as a function of sky cut based on the Planck 353 GHz polarization maps. Our primary findings are the following. (1) There is a spatial correlation between the dust emission as measured by Planck at 353 GHz and the synchrotron emission as measured by WMAP at 23 GHz with $\\rho\\approx0.4$ or greater for $\\ell<20$ and $f_{\\mathrm{sky}}\\geq0.5$, dropping to $\\rho\\approx0.2$ for $30<\\ell<200$. (2) A simple foreground model with dust, synchrotron, and their correlation fits well to all possible cross spectra formed with the WMAP and Planck 353 GHz data given the current uncertainties. (3) In the 50$\\%$ cleanest region of the polarized dust map, the ratio of synchrotron to dust amplitudes...

  10. Observations of Free-Free and Anomalous Microwave Emission from LDN 1622 with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Harper, S E; Cleary, K

    2015-01-01

    LDN 1622 has previously been identified as a possible strong source of dust-correlated Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME). Previous observations were limited by resolution meaning that the radio emission could not be compared with current generation high-resolution infrared data from Herschel, Spitzer or WISE. This Paper presents arcminute resolution mapping observations of LDN 1622 at 4.85 GHz and 13.7 GHz using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The 4.85 GHz map reveals a corona of free-free emission enclosing LDN 1622 that traces the photo-dissociation region of the cloud. The brightest peaks of the 4.85 GHz map are found to be within 10% agreement with the expected free-free predicted by SHASSA H{\\alpha} data of LDN 1622. At 13.7 GHz the AME flux density was found to be 7.0 $\\pm$ 1.4 mJy and evidence is presented for a rising spectrum between 13.7 GHz and 31 GHz. The spinning dust model of AME is found to naturally account for the flux seen at 13.7 GHz. Correlations between the diffuse 13.7 GH...

  11. Does the size distribution of mineral dust aerosols depend on the wind speed at emission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Kok

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The size distribution of mineral dust aerosols greatly affects their interactions with clouds, radiation, ecosystems, and other components of the Earth system. Several theoretical dust emission models predict that the dust size distribution depends on the wind speed at emission, with larger wind speeds predicted to produce smaller aerosols. The present study investigates this prediction using a compilation of published measurements of the size-resolved vertical dust flux emitted by eroding soils. Surprisingly, these measurements indicate that the size distribution of naturally emitted dust aerosols is independent of the wind speed. This finding is consistent with the recently formulated brittle fragmentation theory of dust emission, but inconsistent with other theoretical dust emission models. The independence of the emitted dust size distribution with wind speed simplifies both the parameterization of dust emission in atmospheric circulation models as well as the interpretation of geological records of dust deposition.

  12. Charge and Levitation of Grains in Plasma Sheath with Dust Thermic Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    By taking into account thermic emission current from hot dust surface, the problem involved in dust charging and levitation of dust grains in plasma sheath has been researched. The results are compared to that without including thermal emission current while the system parameters are same. It is found that the thermal emission current has played a significant role on modifying the dust charging and balance levitations. Both of the charging numbers of dust and the dust radius in balance are dramatically reduced. The stability of dust levitation is also analyzed and discussed.

  13. On the source of the dust extinction in type Ia supernovae and the discovery of anomalously strong Na I absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, Nidia; Hsiao, E. Y.; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Simon, Joshua D.; Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, Sven E.; Thompson, I. B.; Freedman, Wendy L. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cox, Nick L. J. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D bus 2401, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Karakas, Amanda I. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Patat, F. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl Schwarschild Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany); Sternberg, A. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany); Williams, R. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gal-Yam, A. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Leonard, D. C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Folatelli, Gastón, E-mail: mmp@lco.cl [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-10

    High-dispersion observations of the Na I D λλ5890, 5896 and K I λλ7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to 'Blueshifted' profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.

  14. Unusual Dust Emission from Planetary Nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard-Salas, J; Sloan, G C; Gutenkunst, S; Matsuura, M; Tielens, A G G M; Zijlstra, A A; Houck, J R

    2009-01-01

    We present a Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopic study of a sample of 25 planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds. The low-resolution modules are used to analyze the dust features present in the infrared spectra. This study complements a previous work by the same authors where the same sample was analyzed in terms of neon and sulfur abundances. Over half of the objects (14) show emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, typical of carbon-rich dust environments. We compare the hydrocarbon emission in our objects to those of Galactic HII regions and planetary nebulae, and LMC/SMC HII regions. Amorphous silicates are seen in just two objects, enforcing the now well-known-fact that oxygen-rich dust is less common at low metallicities. Besides these common features, some planetary nebulae show very unusual dust. Nine objects show a strong silicon carbide feature at 11um and twelve of them show magnesium sulfide emission starting at 25um. The high percentage of spectra with silicon carbide in the Magellanic...

  15. Modelling the dust emission from dense interstellar clouds: disentangling the effects of radiative transfer and dust properties

    CERN Document Server

    Ysard, N; Demyk, K; Guillet, V; Abergel, A; Bernard, J -P; Malinen, J; Mény, C; Montier, L; Paradis, D; Ristorcelli, I; Verstraete, L

    2012-01-01

    With Planck and Herschel, we now have the spectral coverage and angular resolution required to observe dense and cold molecular clouds. As these clouds are optically thick at short wavelength but optically thin at long wavelength, it is tricky to conclude anything about dust properties without a proper treatment of the radiative transfer (RT). Our aim is to disentangle the effects of RT and of dust properties on the variations in the dust emission to provide observers with keys to analyse the emission arising from dense clouds. We model cylindrical clouds, illuminated by the ISRF, and carry out full RT calculations. Dust temperatures are solved using DustEM for amorphous carbons and silicates, grains coated with carbon mantles, and mixed aggregates of carbon and silicate. We allow variations of the grain optical properties with wavelength and temperature. We determine observed colour temperatures, T, and emissivity spectral indices, beta, by fitting the dust emission with modified blackbodies, to compare our ...

  16. Dust emission from different sol types and geomorphic units in the Sahara - implications for modeling dust emission and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan; Enzel, Yehouda

    2014-05-01

    Mineral dust plays multiple roles in mediating physical and biogeochemical exchanges among the atmosphere, land and ocean, and thus is an active component of the global climate system. To estimate the past, current, and future impacts of dust on climate, sources of dust and their erodibility should be identified. The Sahara is the major source of dust on Earth. Based on qualitative analysis of remotely sensed data with low temporal resolution, the main sources of dust that have been identified are topographic depressions comprised of dry lake and playa deposits in hyprarid regions. Yet, recent studies cast doubts on these as the major sources and call for a search for others. Moreover, the susceptibility of soils to aeolian erosion (wind land erodibility) in the Sahara is still poorly known. In this study we identify and determine the soil types and geomorphic units most important as Saharan dust sources by correlating between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types/geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. Few dust storms originated from dry lake beds and playas. Land erodibility by wind for each soil type/geomorphic unit was estimated by a regression of the NDS and the number of days with high-speed wind events; the regression is relatively high for sand dunes and gypsisols. We use these regressions to differentiate between sources of dust that are supply-limited to those that are transport-limited. We propose that the fracturing of saltating sand and the removal of clay coatings from sand grains through eolian abrasion is the dominant dust-emission mechanism for the sand-rich areas covering large portion of the Sahara. Our results also explain the increased dustiness during the last glacial period, when sand dunes activity has been more common than during the Holocene

  17. Detection of Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Pleiades Reflection Nebula with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and the COSMOSOMAS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génova-Santos, R.; Rebolo, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; López-Caraballo, C. H.; Hildebrandt, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    We present evidence for anomalous microwave emission (AME) in the Pleiades reflection nebula, using data from the seven-year release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and from the COSMOSOMAS (Cosmological Structures on Medium Angular Scales) experiment. The flux integrated in a 1° radius around R.A. = 56fdg24, decl. = 23fdg78 (J2000) is 2.15 ± 0.12 Jy at 22.8 GHz, where AME is dominant. COSMOSOMAS data show no significant emission, but allow one to set upper limits of 0.94 and 1.58 Jy (99.7% confidence level), respectively, at 10.9 and 14.7 GHz, which are crucial to pin down the AME spectrum at these frequencies, and to discard any other emission mechanisms which could have an important contribution to the signal detected at 22.8 GHz. We estimate the expected level of free-free emission from an extinction-corrected Hα template, while the thermal dust emission is characterized from infrared DIRBE data and extrapolated to microwave frequencies. When we deduct the contribution from these two components at 22.8 GHz, the residual flux, associated with AME, is 2.12 ± 0.12 Jy (17.7σ). The spectral energy distribution from 10 to 60 GHz can be accurately fitted with a model of electric dipole emission from small spinning dust grains distributed in two separated phases of molecular and atomic gas, respectively. The dust emissivity, calculated by correlating the 22.8 GHz data with 100 μm data, is found to be 4.36 ± 0.17 μK (MJy sr-1)-1, a value considerably lower than in typical AME clouds, which present emissivities of ~20 μK (MJy sr-1)-1, although higher than the 0.2 μK (MJy sr-1)-1 of the translucent cloud LDN 1780, where AME has recently been claimed. The physical properties of the Pleiades nebula, in particular its low extinction A V ~ 0.4, indicate that this is indeed a much less opaque object than those where AME has usually been studied. This fact, together with the broad knowledge of the stellar content of this region, provides an excellent

  18. DETECTION OF ANOMALOUS MICROWAVE EMISSION IN THE PLEIADES REFLECTION NEBULA WITH WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE AND THE COSMOSOMAS EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genova-Santos, R.; Rebolo, R.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Lopez-Caraballo, C. H.; Hildebrandt, S. R. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-12-10

    We present evidence for anomalous microwave emission (AME) in the Pleiades reflection nebula, using data from the seven-year release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and from the COSMOSOMAS (Cosmological Structures on Medium Angular Scales) experiment. The flux integrated in a 1 Degree-Sign radius around R.A. = 56.{sup 0}24, decl. = 23.{sup 0}78 (J2000) is 2.15 {+-} 0.12 Jy at 22.8 GHz, where AME is dominant. COSMOSOMAS data show no significant emission, but allow one to set upper limits of 0.94 and 1.58 Jy (99.7% confidence level), respectively, at 10.9 and 14.7 GHz, which are crucial to pin down the AME spectrum at these frequencies, and to discard any other emission mechanisms which could have an important contribution to the signal detected at 22.8 GHz. We estimate the expected level of free-free emission from an extinction-corrected H{alpha} template, while the thermal dust emission is characterized from infrared DIRBE data and extrapolated to microwave frequencies. When we deduct the contribution from these two components at 22.8 GHz, the residual flux, associated with AME, is 2.12 {+-} 0.12 Jy (17.7{sigma}). The spectral energy distribution from 10 to 60 GHz can be accurately fitted with a model of electric dipole emission from small spinning dust grains distributed in two separated phases of molecular and atomic gas, respectively. The dust emissivity, calculated by correlating the 22.8 GHz data with 100 {mu}m data, is found to be 4.36 {+-} 0.17 {mu}K (MJy sr{sup -1}){sup -1}, a value considerably lower than in typical AME clouds, which present emissivities of {approx}20 {mu}K (MJy sr{sup -1}){sup -1}, although higher than the 0.2 {mu}K (MJy sr{sup -1}){sup -1} of the translucent cloud LDN 1780, where AME has recently been claimed. The physical properties of the Pleiades nebula, in particular its low extinction A{sub V} {approx} 0.4, indicate that this is indeed a much less opaque object than those where AME has usually been studied. This fact

  19. Dust emission of Comet Halley at large heliocentric distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, E.; Schwehm, G.; Massonne, L.; Fertig, J.; Graser, U.

    1985-01-01

    Comet Halley is currently approaching the inner solar system. Four spacecrafts (NASA's spacecraft, two Russian Vega probes and the Japanese MS-T5 spacecraft) have already been launched to encounter the comet in March 1986. Two additional Halley probes (the European Giotto spacecraft and another Japanese Planet-A probe) will be launched in mid-85 to join the armada. Observations of dust emissions from Halley's Comet are discussed. The evaporation of cometary ices causes the emission of particulates from the nucleus. These observations will be used to determine the fly-by strategy of the Giotto spacecraft by taking into account the distribution of dust in the vicinity of the nucleus and the associated hazard for the space mission.

  20. Does the size distribution of mineral dust aerosols depend on the wind speed at emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Jasper F

    2011-01-01

    The size distribution of mineral dust aerosols partially determines their interactions with clouds, radiation, ecosystems, and other components of the Earth system. Several theoretical models predict that the dust size distribution depends on the wind speed at emission, with larger wind speeds predicted to produce smaller aerosols. The present study investigates this prediction using a compilation of published measurements of the size-resolved vertical dust flux emitted by eroding soils. Surprisingly, these measurements indicate that the size distribution of naturally emitted dust aerosols is independent of the wind speed. The recently formulated brittle fragmentation theory of dust emission is consistent with this finding, whereas other theoretical dust emission models are not. The independence of the emitted dust size distribution with wind speed simplifies both the interpretation of geological records of dust deposition and the parameterization of dust emission in atmospheric circulation models.

  1. [The research on remote sensing dust aerosol by using split window emissivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Yu, Tao; Gu, Xing-Fa; Cheng, Tian-Hai; Xie, Dong-Hai; Liu, Qian

    2013-05-01

    Dust aerosol can cause the change in the land surface emissivity in split window by radiative forcing (RF). Firstly, the present paper explained from the microscopic point of view the extinction properties of dust aerosols in the 11 and 12 microm channels, and their influence on the land surface emissivity. Secondly, on April 29, 2011, in the northern region of Inner Mongolia a strong sandstorm outbroke, and based on the analysis of the changes in land surface emissivity, this paper proposed a dust identification method by using the variation of emissivity. At last, the dust identification result was evaluated by the dust monitoring product provided by the National Satellite Meteorological Center. The result shows that under the assumption that the 12 microm emissivity equals to 1, using 11 microm relative emissivity could identify dust cover region effectively, and the 11 microm relative emissivity to a certain extent represented the intensity information of dust aerosol.

  2. [The research on remote sensing dust aerosol by using split window emissivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Yu, Tao; Gu, Xing-Fa; Cheng, Tian-Hai; Xie, Dong-Hai; Liu, Qian

    2013-05-01

    Dust aerosol can cause the change in the land surface emissivity in split window by radiative forcing (RF). Firstly, the present paper explained from the microscopic point of view the extinction properties of dust aerosols in the 11 and 12 microm channels, and their influence on the land surface emissivity. Secondly, on April 29, 2011, in the northern region of Inner Mongolia a strong sandstorm outbroke, and based on the analysis of the changes in land surface emissivity, this paper proposed a dust identification method by using the variation of emissivity. At last, the dust identification result was evaluated by the dust monitoring product provided by the National Satellite Meteorological Center. The result shows that under the assumption that the 12 microm emissivity equals to 1, using 11 microm relative emissivity could identify dust cover region effectively, and the 11 microm relative emissivity to a certain extent represented the intensity information of dust aerosol. PMID:23905316

  3. Spatially resolved dust emission of extremely metal poor galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Luwenjia; Diaz-Santos, Taino; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Li, Aigen

    2016-01-01

    We present infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of individual star-forming regions in four extremely metal poor (EMP) galaxies with metallicity Z around Zsun/10 as observed by the Herschel Space Observatory. With the good wavelength coverage of the SED, it is found that these EMP star-forming regions show distinct SED shapes as compared to those of grand design Spirals and higher metallicity dwarfs: they have on average much higher f70um/f160um ratios at a given f160um/f250um ratio; single modified black-body (MBB) fittings to the SED at \\lambda >= 100 um still reveal higher dust temperatures and lower emissivity indices compared to that of Spirals, while two MBB fittings to the full SED with a fixed emissivity index (beta = 2) show that even at 100 um about half of the emission comes from warm (50 K) dust, in contrast to the cold (~20 K) dust component. Our spatially resolved images further reveal that the far-IR colors including f70um/f160um, f160um/f250um and f250um/f350um are all related to ...

  4. Detailed modelling of a large sample of Herschel sources in the Lockman Hole: identification of cold dust and of lensing candidates through their anomalous SEDs

    CERN Document Server

    Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Wardlow, Julie; Farrah, Duncan; Oliver, Seb; Bock, Jamie; Clarke, Charlotte; Clements, David; Ibar, Edo; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Marchetti, Lucia; Scott, Douglas; Smith, Anthony; Vaccari, Mattia; Valtchanov, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We have studied in detail a sample of 967 SPIRE sources with 5-sigma detections at 350 and 500 micron and associations with Spitzer-SWIRE 24 micron galaxies in the HerMES-Lockman survey area, fitting their mid- and far-infrared, and submillimetre, SEDs in an automatic search with a set of six infrared templates. For almost 300 galaxies we have modelled their SEDs individually to ensure the physicality of the fits. We confirm the need for the new cool and cold cirrus templates, and also of the young starburst template, introduced in earlier work. We also identify 109 lensing candidates via their anomalous SEDs and provide a set of colour-redshift constraints which allow lensing candidates to be identified from combined Herschel and Spitzer data. The picture that emerges of the submillimetre galaxy population is complex, comprising ultraluminous and hyperluminous starbursts, lower luminosity galaxies dominated by interstellar dust emission, lensed galaxies and galaxies with surprisingly cold (10-13K) dust. 11 %...

  5. Size resolved dust emission fluxes measured in Niger during 3 dust storms of the AMMA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sow

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available During the 2006 and 2007 special observing periods of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis campaign an original experimental system has been implemented in Banizoumbou (Niger for measuring the size-resolved dust emission flux in natural conditions and documenting the possible influence of wind speed on its size distribution. The instrumental set-up, associated methodology, and the quality tests applied to the data set are described before the results acquired during 2 events of the Monsoon type and 1 of the convective type are analyzed in detail. In good agreement with the theory of sandblasting, it is found in all cases that saltation must take place for a vertical emission flux to be detected. During a particular erosion event, the magnitude of the vertical flux is controlled by the surface roughness, which conditions the saltation threshold, and by the wind friction velocity. The dust flux released by the high energy convective event is also found to be much richer in very fine (<2 µm particles than those of the relatively moderate Monsoon event, which shows that aerodynamic conditions definitely influence the initial size distribution of the erosion flux as previously suggested by wind tunnel experiments. However, the size distribution of the dust released by a given event is fairly constant and insensitive to even relatively important variations of u*. This is interpreted as a possible result of the rather long duration (15 min over which wind fluctuations must be averaged for computing u*, which could make it an inadequate parameter for representing the very short response-time physical processes that are at the origin of fine dust emission at the measurement sites.

  6. Size resolved dust emission fluxes measured in Niger during 3 dust storms of the AMMA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sow

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available During the 2006 and 2007 special observing periods of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis campaign an original experimental system has been implemented in Banizoumbou (Niger for measuring the size-resolved dust emission flux in natural conditions and documenting the possible influence of wind speed on its size distribution. The instrumental set-up, associated methodology, and the quality tests applied to the data set are described before the results acquired during 2 events of the Monsoon type and 1 of the convective type are analyzed in detail. In good agreement with the theory of sandblasting, it is found in all cases that saltation must take place for a vertical emission flux to be detected. During a particular erosion event, the magnitude of the vertical flux is controlled by the surface roughness, which conditions the saltation threshold, and by the wind friction velocity. The dust flux released by the high energy convective event is also found to be much richer in very fine (<2 μm particles than those of the relatively moderate Monsoon event, which shows that aerodynamic conditions definitely influence the initial size distribution of the erosion flux as previously suggested by wind tunnel experiments. However, the size distribution of the dust released by a given event is fairly constant and insensitive to even relatively important variations of u*. This is interpreted as a possible result of the rather long duration (15' over which wind fluctuations must be averaged for computing u*, which could make it an inadequate parameter for representing the very short response-time physical processes that are at the origin of fine dust emission at the measurement sites.

  7. Spatially resolved dust emission of extremely metal-poor galaxies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luwenjia; Shi, Yong; Diaz-Santos, Taino; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Li, Aigen

    2016-05-01

    We present infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of individual star-forming regions in four extremely metal-poor (EMP) galaxies with metallicity Z ≲ Z⊙/10 as observed by the Herschel Space Observatory. With the good wavelength coverage of the SED, it is found that these EMP star-forming regions show distinct SED shapes as compared to those of grand design Spirals and higher metallicity dwarfs: they have on average much higher f70μm/f160 μm ratios at a given f160 μm/f250 μm ratio; single modified blackbody (MBB) fittings to the SED at λ ≥ 100 μm still reveal higher dust temperatures and lower emissivity indices compared to that of Spirals, while two MBB fittings to the full SED with a fixed emissivity index (β = 2) show that even at 100 μm, about half of the emission comes from warm (50 K) dust, in contrast to the cold (˜20 K) dust component. Our spatially resolved images furthermore reveal that the far-IR colours including f70 μm/f160 μm, f160 μm/f250 μm and f250 μm/f350 μm are all related to the surface densities of young stars as traced by far-UV, 24 μm and star formation rates (SFRs), but not to the stellar mass surface densities. This suggests that the dust emitting at wavelengths from 70 to 350 μm is primarily heated by radiation from young stars.

  8. Modelling the dust emission from dense interstellar clouds: disentangling the effects of radiative transfer and dust properties

    OpenAIRE

    Ysard, N.; Juvela, M.; Demyk, K.; Guillet, V.; Abergel, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Malinen, J.; Mény, C.; Montier, L.; Paradis, D.; Ristorcelli, I.; L. Verstraete

    2012-01-01

    With Planck and Herschel, we now have the spectral coverage and angular resolution required to observe dense and cold molecular clouds. As these clouds are optically thick at short wavelength but optically thin at long wavelength, it is tricky to conclude anything about dust properties without a proper treatment of the radiative transfer (RT). Our aim is to disentangle the effects of RT and of dust properties on the variations in the dust emission to provide observers with keys to analyse the...

  9. Observations of the spectrum of the interplanetary dust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Moreno, G.

    Published data from satellite (IRAS), rocket-borne (ZIP), and balloon-borne (ARGO) spectroscopic observations of interplanetary dust emission in the FIR are compiled and analyzed, extending the spatial-distribution results of Salama et al. (1986) to evaluate the possible role of silicate and graphite grains in determining the FIR spectrum. The zodiacal dust spectra in the ecliptic plane at solar elongations epsilon = 45 and 90 deg are calculated on the basis of theoretical models and compared with the observations. A model based on a flat distribution of 10-micron-diameter silicate grains is shown to reproduce the observed spectrum at epsilon = 45 deg but not at epsilon = 90 deg, where a model with a mixture of silicate and graphite grains gives a better, but still unsatisfactory fit to the observations.

  10. Numerical simulation of a dust event in northeastern Germany with a new dust emission scheme in COSMO-ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dust emission scheme of Shao (2004) has been implemented into the regional atmospheric model COSMO-ART and has been applied to a severe dust event in northeastern Germany on 8th April 2011. The model sensitivity to soil moisture and vegetation cover has been studied. Soil moisture has been found...

  11. Mineralogy of dust emissions from the Bodele Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millham, Rosemary Assunta

    Scope and method of study. This study focused on identifying the minerals in the dust emitted from the Bodele Depression in northern Chad in the Saharan Desert. Understanding the mineralogy provides the information needed to assess the effects that mineral dust has on climate and climate change relative to the energy budget and radiative forcings, and cloud characteristics and properties, and assists in providing critical information for assessing amounts of nutrients delivered to oceans and lands. There is a question of health issues related to dust emissions not addressed in this study. Using a traditional X-Ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) with chemical analysis capabilities, French geological survey maps, and a new instrument for detecting d-spacings and K-fluorescence in unprepared samples called the XRD XRF (CCDXRD) that couples a CCD with traditional X-Ray diffractometer, mineral identification is possible. Findings and conclusions. The samples from the Bodele in situ aerosol and bulk ground materials produce the dust emissions occurring from the region ˜40% of the days in a year. The results from literature review, X-Ray diffractometer data, SEM data, geological survey maps, and the CCD XRD data provided concrete identification of the Bodele minerals as typical crustal silicate minerals with small amounts of calcium carbonate, dolomite, silica, desiccated diatoms, and possible iron oxides. The silicate minerals are primarily ferromagnesian and framework silicates typical of low-lying depositional basins and the weathering processes occurring in alternating wet and dry periods. Clays minerals halloysite, kaolinite, and smectites (montmorillite) are the most common. Exotic materials were detected in two of the bulk samples. A reading of 25.75% titanium in one sample, and elevated isolated silicon data (considered cosmic silicon) provided the only anomalies in the study.

  12. Seasonal variations in dust concentration and dust emission observed over Horqin Sandy Land area in China from December 2010 to November 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolan; Zhang, Hongsheng

    2012-12-01

    Hourly mean dust concentration observations and meteorological measurements obtained from a sandstorm monitoring station in Horqin Sandy Land area in China from December 2010 to November 2011 were used to investigate the seasonal variations in dust concentration and dust emission flux as well as their relationship with meteorological parameters and soil condition. Based on 14 local dust emission events in spring 2011, the friction velocity (u*) and free convective velocity (w*) were calculated, and their correlation with dust emission flux was used to evaluate the dynamic and thermal impact on dust emission by turbulence. Results indicated that dust events occur in every season with peak dust activity in spring. The maximum dust concentration is 1654.1 μg m-3 and dust emission flux is 98.4 μg m-2 s-1. Freezing of soil in winter effectively decreases soil erodibility and suppresses dust emission. However, soil moisture does not show a significant impact on dust emission in this semi-arid Horqin Sandy Land area. Both friction velocity and free convective velocity could reflect the trend in dust emission flux, but both with obvious underestimation. The thermal impact on dust emission by turbulence is found to be far less than its dynamic impact.

  13. On the origin of M81 group extended dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, J I; Auld, R; Baes, M; Barlow, M J; Bendo, G J; Bock, J J; Boselli, A; Bradford, M; Buat, V; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Chanial, P; Charlot, S; Ciesla, L; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; Cormier, D; Cortese, L; Dwek, E; Eales, S A; Elbaz, D; Galametz, M; Galliano, F; Gear, W K; Glenn, J; Gomez, H L; Griffin, M; Hony, S; Isaak, K G; Levenson, L R; Lu, N; Madden, S; O'Halloran, B; Okumura, K; Oliver, S; Page, M J; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Parkin, T J; Perez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rangwala, N; Rigby, E E; Roussel, H; Rykala, A; Sacchi, N; Sauvage, M; Schulz, B; Schirm, M R P; Smith, M W L; Spinoglio, L; Stevens, J A; Srinivasan, S; Symeonidis, M; Trichas, M; Vaccari, M; Vigroux, L; Wozniak, H; Wright, G S; Zeilinger, W W

    2010-01-01

    Galactic cirrus emission at far-infrared wavelengths affects many extragalactic observations. Separating this emission from that associated with extragalactic objects is both important and difficult. In this paper we discuss a particular case, the M81 group, and the identification of diffuse structures prominent in the infrared, but also detected at optical wavelengths. The origin of these structures has previously been controversial, ranging from them being the result of a past interaction between M81 and M82 or due to more local Galactic emission. We show that over of order a few arcminute scales the far-infrared (Herschel 250 &\\mu&m) emission correlates spatially very well with a particular narrow velocity (2-3 km/s) component of the Galactic HI. We find no evidence that any of the far-infrared emission associated with these features actually originates in the M81 group. Thus we infer that the associated diffuse optical emission must be due to galactic light back scattered off dust in our galaxy. U...

  14. Lack of Interaction between the Dust Grains and the Anomalous Radio Jet in the Nearby Spiral Galaxy NGC 4258

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Seppo; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh S; Siopis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    We obtained Spitzer/IRAC 3.6-8 micron images of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 4258 to study possible interactions between dust and the radio jet. In our analysis we also included high-resolution radio continuum, H-alpha, CO, and X-ray data. Our data reveal that the 8 micron emission, believed to originate largely from PAH molecules and hot dust, is an excellent tracer of the normal spiral structure in NGC 4258, and hence it originates from the galactic plane. We investigated the possibility of dust destruction by the radio jet by calculating correlation coefficients between the 8 micron and radio continuum emissions along the jet in two independent ways, namely (i) from wavelet-transformed maps of the original images at different spatial scales, and (ii) from one-dimensional intensity cuts perpendicular to the projected path of the radio jet on the sky. No definitive sign of a correlation (or anticorrelation) was detected on relevant spatial scales with either approach, implying that any dust destruction must ...

  15. Hydrocarbon emission rings in protoplanetary disks induced by dust evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, Edwin A; Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Blake, Geoffrey A; Schwarz, Kamber; Visser, Ruud; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    We report observations of resolved C2H emission rings within the gas-rich protoplanetary disks of TW Hya and DM Tau using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). In each case the emission ring is found to arise at the edge of the observable disk of mm-sized grains (pebbles) traced by (sub)mm-wave continuum emission. In addition, we detect a C3H2 emission ring with an identical spatial distribution to C2H in the TW Hya disk. This suggests that these are hydrocarbon rings (i.e. not limited to C2H). Using a detailed thermo-chemical model we show that reproducing the emission from C2H requires a strong UV field and C/O > 1 in the upper disk atmosphere and outer disk, beyond the edge of the pebble disk. This naturally arises in a disk where the ice-coated dust mass is spatially stratified due to the combined effects of coagulation, gravitational settling and drift. This stratification causes the disk surface and outer disk to have a greater permeability to UV photons. Furthermore the concentration of ices that ...

  16. Spectrum of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the North Celestial Pole with WMAP 7-Year data

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaldi, Anna; 10.1155/2012/853927

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the frequency spectrum of the diffuse anomalous microwave emission (AME) on the North Celestial Pole (NCP) region of the sky with the Correlated Component Analysis (CCA) component separation method applied to WMAP 7-yr data. The NCP is a suitable region for this analysis because the AME is weakly contaminated by synchrotron and free-free emission. By modeling the AME component as a peaked spectrum we estimate the peak frequency to be $21.7\\pm0.8$\\,GHz, in agreement with previous analyses which favored $\

  17. Soil organic carbon dust emission: an omitted global source of atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P; Butler, Harry J; Strong, Craig L; McTainsh, Grant H; Leys, John F; Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A

    2013-10-01

    Soil erosion redistributes soil organic carbon (SOC) within terrestrial ecosystems, to the atmosphere and oceans. Dust export is an essential component of the carbon (C) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) budget because wind erosion contributes to the C cycle by removing selectively SOC from vast areas and transporting C dust quickly offshore; augmenting the net loss of C from terrestrial systems. However, the contribution of wind erosion to rates of C release and sequestration is poorly understood. Here, we describe how SOC dust emission is omitted from national C accounting, is an underestimated source of CO(2) and may accelerate SOC decomposition. Similarly, long dust residence times in the unshielded atmospheric environment may considerably increase CO(2) emission. We developed a first approximation to SOC enrichment for a well-established dust emission model and quantified SOC dust emission for Australia (5.83 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)) and Australian agricultural soils (0.4 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)). These amount to underestimates for CO(2) emissions of ≈10% from combined C pools in Australia (year = 2000), ≈5% from Australian Rangelands and ≈3% of Australian Agricultural Soils by Kyoto Accounting. Northern hemisphere countries with greater dust emission than Australia are also likely to have much larger SOC dust emission. Therefore, omission of SOC dust emission likely represents a considerable underestimate from those nations' C accounts. We suggest that the omission of SOC dust emission from C cycling and C accounting is a significant global source of uncertainty. Tracing the fate of wind-eroded SOC in the dust cycle is therefore essential to quantify the release of CO(2) from SOC dust to the atmosphere and the contribution of SOC deposition to downwind C sinks.

  18. Influence of emissivity on behavior of metallic dust particles in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of thermal radiation emissivity on the lifetime of a dust particle in plasmas is investigated for different fusion relevant metals (Li, Be, Mo, and W). The thermal radiation is one of main cooling mechanisms of the dust in plasmas especially for dust with evaporation temperature higher than 2500 K. In this paper, the temperature- and radius-dependent emissivity of dust particles is calculated using Mie theory and temperature-dependent optical constants for the above metallic materials. The lifetime of a dust particle in uniform plasmas is estimated with the calculated emissivity using the dust transport code DUSTT[A. Pigarov et al., Physics of Plasmas 12, 122508 (2005)], considering other dust cooling and destruction processes such as physical and chemical sputtering, melting and evaporation, electron emission etc. The use of temperature-dependent emissivity calculated with Mie theory provides a longer lifetime of the refractory metal dust particle compared with that obtained using conventional emissivity constants in the literature. The dynamics of heavy metal dust particles are also presented using the calculated emissivity in a tokamak plasma.

  19. Comparison of horizontal dust fluxes simulated with two dust emission schemes based on field experiments in Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghua; Yang, Fan; Liu, Xinchun; Huo, Wen; He, Qing; Mamtimin, Ali; Zhang, Qingyu

    2016-10-01

    Horizontal dust fluxes were simulated with two different dust emission schemes developed by Marticorena and Shao (hereinafter referred to as the M scheme, S scheme, and S scheme corrections), based on field experiments over a bare desert surface and a vegetated desert surface from May 19 to June 18, 2010 in Xinjiang, China. The M scheme produced a much higher dust emission than the S schemes over different surface conditions, with the emission being about 4 times larger than that produced by the S schemes over the bare desert, and 3 to 200 times larger over the vegetated surface. Compared to observations, the missing report rate of wind erosion events was about 30 % for the S schemes and about 10 % for the M scheme over the bare desert surface, while all schemes had a false alarm rate of wind erosion events over the vegetated desert surface. The total dust emission from the bare desert surface during the study period was 674.4, 551.5, 595.2, and 2995.8 kg/m for observation, the S scheme, S scheme correction 2, and M scheme, respectively. Total dust emission from the vegetated desert surface was 1.6, 0, 55.5, 0.9, and 227.7 kg/m for observation, the S scheme, S scheme correction 1, S scheme correction 2, and M scheme, respectively.

  20. Electrostatic Charging of Lunar Dust by UV Photoelectric Emissions and Solar Wind Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James f.; LeClair, Andre C.; Dube, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of dust in the lunar environment with its high adhesive characteristics has been recognized to be a major safety issue that must be addressed in view of its hazardous effects on robotic and human exploration of the Moon. The reported observations of a horizon glow and streamers at the lunar terminator during the Apollo missions are attributed to the sunlight scattered by the levitated lunar dust. The lunar surface and the dust grains are predominantly charged positively by the incident UV solar radiation on the dayside and negatively by the solar wind electrons on the night-side. The charged dust grains are levitated and transported over long distances by the established electric fields. A quantitative understanding of the lunar dust phenomena requires development of global dust distribution models, based on an accurate knowledge of lunar dust charging properties. Currently available data of lunar dust charging is based on bulk materials, although it is well recognized that measurements on individual dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the bulk measurements. In this paper we present laboratory measurements of charging properties of Apollo 11 & 17 dust grains by UV photoelectric emissions and by electron impact. These measurements indicate substantial differences of both qualitative and quantitative nature between dust charging properties of individual micron/submicron sized dust grains and of bulk materials. In addition, there are no viable theoretical models available as yet for calculation of dust charging properties of individual dust grains for both photoelectric emissions and electron impact. It is thus of paramount importance to conduct comprehensive measurements for charging properties of individual dust grains in order to develop realistic models of dust processes in the lunar atmosphere, and address the hazardous issues of dust on lunar robotic and human missions.

  1. Foreground Bias from Parametric Models of Far-IR Dust Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    We use simple toy models of far-IR dust emission to estimate the accuracy to which the polarization of the cosmic microwave background can be recovered using multi-frequency fits, if the parametric form chosen for the fitted dust model differs from the actual dust emission. Commonly used approximations to the far-IR dust spectrum yield CMB residuals comparable to or larger than the sensitivities expected for the next generation of CMB missions, despite fitting the combined CMB plus foreground emission to precision 0.1 percent or better. The Rayleigh-Jeans approximation to the dust spectrum biases the fitted dust spectral index by (Delta)(Beta)(sub d) = 0.2 and the inflationary B-mode amplitude by (Delta)(r) = 0.03. Fitting the dust to a modified blackbody at a single temperature biases the best-fit CMB by (Delta)(r) greater than 0.003 if the true dust spectrum contains multiple temperature components. A 13-parameter model fitting two temperature components reduces this bias by an order of magnitude if the true dust spectrum is in fact a simple superposition of emission at different temperatures, but fails at the level (Delta)(r) = 0.006 for dust whose spectral index varies with frequency. Restricting the observing frequencies to a narrow region near the foreground minimum reduces these biases for some dust spectra but can increase the bias for others. Data at THz frequencies surrounding the peak of the dust emission can mitigate these biases while providing a direct determination of the dust temperature profile.

  2. SECONDARY EMISSION FROM NON-SPHERICAL DUST GRAINS WITH ROUGH SURFACES: APPLICATION TO LUNAR DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richterova, I.; Nemecek, Z.; Beranek, M.; Safrankova, J.; Pavlu, J. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-12-20

    Electrons impinging on a target can release secondary electrons and/or they can be scattered out of the target. It is well established that the number of escaping electrons per primary electron depends on the target composition and dimensions, the energy, and incidence angle of the primary electrons, but there are suggestions that the target's shape and surface roughness also influence the secondary emission. We present a further modification of the model of secondary electron emission from dust grains which is applied to non-spherical grains and grains with defined surface roughness. It is shown that the non-spherical grains give rise to a larger secondary electron yield, whereas the surface roughness leads to a decrease in the yield. Moreover, these effects can be distinguished: the shape effect is prominent for high primary energies, whereas the surface roughness predominantly affects the yield at the low-energy range. The calculations use the Lunar Highlands Type NU-LHT-2M simulant as a grain material and the results are compared with previously published laboratory and in situ measurements.

  3. Spatial and temporal variations of spring dust emissions in northern China over the last 30 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongquan; Zhang, Kesheng; Piao, Shilong; Wan, Shiqiang

    2016-02-01

    Dust emissions caused by wind erosion have significant impacts on land degradation, air quality, and climate change. Dust from the arid and semiarid regions of China is a main contributor to atmospheric dust aerosols in East Asia, and their impacts can stretch far beyond the territory of China. Spatial-temporal patterns of dust emissions in China over the last several decades, however, are still lacking, especially during the spring season. In this study, we simulated the spatial-temporal dynamics of spring dust emissions from 1982 to 2011 in arid and semi-arid areas of China using the Integrated Wind Erosion Modeling System. Results showed that the most severe dust emission events occurred in the Taklimakan Desert, Badain Jaran Desert, Tengger Desert, and Ulan Buh Desert. Over the last three decades, the magnitude of spring dust emissions generally decreased at the regional scale, with an annual spring dust emission of ˜401.10 Tg. Among different vegetation types, the highest annual spring dust emission occurred in the desert steppes (˜163.95 Tg), followed by the deserts (˜103.26 Tg). The dust emission intensity in the desert steppes and the deserts was ˜150.83 kg km-2·yr-1 and ˜205.46 kg km-2·yr-1, respectively. The spatial patterns of the inter-decadal variation are related to climate change and human activities. Mitigation strategies such as returning farmland to grassland, fenced grazing, and adequate grass harvesting, must be taken to prevent further soil losses and grassland degradation in northern China.

  4. Optics of an individual organic molecular mesowire waveguide: directional light emission and anomalous refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ravi P. N.; Dasgupta, Arindam; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Pratim Patra, Partha; Vasista, Adarsh B.; Pavan Kumar, G. V.

    2016-06-01

    We report on experimental investigations performed on an isolated organic mesowire waveguide resting on a glass substrate. The waveguide was made of diaminoanthraquinone (DAAQ) molecular aggregates. First, we show directional emission of light from distal ends of the DAAQ waveguide. For a given mesowire geometry, operating in passive or photoluminescence regimes, we quantified the emission angles by combining multi-wavelength Fourier-plane optical microscopy and photoluminescence micro-spectroscopy. We found light emission in the photoluminescence regime to be more directional in nature compared to the passive waveguiding regime, which was supported by three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. Second, we measured the anomalous behaviour of refractive index as a function of emission wavelength using the spectra of directionally emitted light. Third, by using spatial-filtered collection optics, we observed and quantified single-excitation dual-channel directional, active emission from DAAQ mesowire. The results discussed herein has implication not only in understanding some fundamental aspects of exciton-polariton mediated directional light emission, but also in applications such as organic optical antennas and photonic couplers.

  5. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, C.; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World’s major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  6. All-Sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation Between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Z.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gold, B.

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free- model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed- models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100-240 micrometer maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-alpha model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (T(sub dust)) to be 13.7-22.7 (plus or minus 1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index (alpha) to be 1.2-3.1 (plus or minus 0.3) and the optical depth (tau) to range 0.6-46 x 10(exp -5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, we present all-sky evidence for an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, which fits the relation alpha = 1/(delta + omega (raised dot) T(sub dust) with delta = -.0.510 plus or minus 0.011 and omega = 0.059 plus or minus 0.001. This best model will be useful to cosmic microwave background experiments for removing foreground dust contamination and it can serve as an all-sky extended-frequency reference for future higher resolution dust models.

  7. Anomalous Light Emission and Wide Photoluminescence Spectra in Graphene Quantum Dot: Quantum Confinement from Edge Microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pu; Shi, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Xin-He; Zhong, Hong-Xia; Ding, Yi-Min; Cao, Xiong; Wu, Meng; Lu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The physical origin of the observed anomalous photoluminescence (PL) behavior, that is, the large-size graphene quantum dots (GQDs) exhibiting higher PL energy than the small ones and the broadening PL spectra from deep ultraviolet to near-infrared, has been debated for many years. Obviously, it is in conflict with the well-accepted quantum confinement. Here we shed new light on these two notable debates by state-of-the-art first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory. We find that quantum confinement is significant in GQDs with remarkable size-dependent exciton absorption/emission. The edge environment from alkaline to acidic conditions causes a blue shift of the PL peak. Furthermore, carbon vacancies are inclined to assemble at the GQD edge and form the tiny edge microstructures. The bound excitons, localized inside these edge microstructures, determine the anomalous PL behavior (blue and UV emission) of large-size GQDs. The bound excitons confined in the whole GQD lead to the low-energy transition. PMID:27409980

  8. Metal content in street dust as a reflection of atmospheric dust emissions from coal power plants, metal smelters, and traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žibret, Gorazd; Van Tonder, Danel; Žibret, Lea

    2013-07-01

    Resuspended street dust is a source of inhalable particles in urban environments. Despite contaminated street dust being a possible health risk factor for local population, little is known about the contribution of atmospheric dust emissions and other factors to the content of toxic metals in street dust. The impact of smelting, traffic, and power plants on metal contaminates in street dust is the focus of street dust sampling at 46 locations in the Witbank area (Republic of South Africa). This area is characterized by numerous open-pit coal mines in the Karoo coal basin, which provides a cheap source of energy to numerous metallurgical smelters and ironworks and supplies coal to the coal-fired power plants located nearby. Street dust was collected on asphalt or concrete surfaces with hard plastic brushes, avoiding collecting of possible sand, soil, or plant particles. Chemical analysis was done on the traffic which contributes to the high concentrations of Cu, Pb, Sb, and Sn, with the highest impacts detected in the town of Witbank. The second source is associated with the metal smelting industry, contributing to Fe, Co, Mn, and V emissions. The highest factor scores were observed around four metallurgical smelter operations, located in the Ferrobank, Highveld, and Clewer industrial areas. Impact of vanadium smelter to street dust composition could still be detected some 20 km away from the sources. Exceptionally high concentrations of Cr were observed in four samples collected next to the Ferrobank industrial area, despite Cr not being loaded in factor 2. The last source of the pollution is most probably fly ash associated with the coal-fired power plants and fly ash dumps. Elements which are associated with this source are Al, Sr, and Li. This factor is abundant in the coal mining part of the study area.

  9. Regional modeling of natural dust in the United State: Source emission, transport, and photochemical impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, D. Q.; Mathur, R.; Mobley, D.; Wong, D.; Yu, S.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a dust emission module to estimate the wind-blown dust emissions from dessert and agricultural land using local wind speed, threshold wind speed to initiate erosion, soil texture and moisture, land use type, and vegetation coverage. The estimated dust is then partitioned to create a fraction of the total sediment mobilized by the wind for vertical transport and subsequent regional circulation. This dust module also included detailed chemical speciation and size distribution, and a geographic filter to eliminate unrealistic emission sources (e.g., mountain peaks with dry soil and strong winds). We then couple the dust module with a regional air quality model CMAQ to: (1) study if the WRF-CMAQ national air quality forecasting system can accurately predict major dust storms occurring in the United States; 2) estimate the annual budget of natural dust emissions from agricultural and dessert lands and their relative importance for total PM2.5 over different U.S. regions; and 3) examine the effects of dust emissions on photolysis rates and consequently on levels of tropospheric O3 and atmospheric oxidants.

  10. Hydrogenated fulleranes and the anomalous microwave emission of the dark cloud LDN 1622

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Groth, Susana

    2006-06-01

    We study the rotation rates and electric dipole emission of hydrogenated icosahedral fullerenes under the physical conditions of the dark cloud (DC) LDN 1622. The abundance of fullerenes is estimated by fitting theoretical photoabsorption spectra to the characteristics of the ultraviolet (UV) bump extinction in DCs. The UV bump appears to be well reproduced by a mixture of fullerenes following a size-distribution power law, which gives progressively lower abundances as the radius of the fullerene increases. We infer abundances of the order of 0.2 × 10-6n(H 2) for C60. A significant fraction of these molecules are expected to be hydrogenated. We compute the electric dipole rotational emission from these fullerene hydrides, taking into account rotational excitation and damping processes. The recent detection of anomalous microwave emission (5-60 GHz) in LDN 1622 by Casassus et al. can be explained as the result of electric dipole radiation from hydrogenated fullerenes. The bulk of the emission (10-30 GHz) appears to be associated with 60-80 carbon atom fulleranes with a degree of hydrogenation of C:H ~ 3:1. A small contribution (~10 per cent) of these molecules residing in the surrounding cold neutral medium and/or photodissociation region of the cloud is required to fit the high-frequency tail (40-60 GHz) of the emission.

  11. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abergel, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.;

    2014-01-01

    column densities lower than 1020 cm-2 that could be the signature of dust in the warm ionized medium. In the diffuse ISM at high Galactic latitude, we report an anticorrelation between Τ353/NH and Tobs while the dust specific luminosity, i.e., the total dust emission integrated over frequency (the...... radiance) per hydrogen atom, stays about constant, confirming one of the Planck Early Results obtained on selected fields. This effect is compatible with the view that, in the diffuse ISM, Tobs responds to spatial variations of the dust opacity, due to variations of dust properties, in addition to (small......) variations of the radiation field strength. The implication is that in the di ff use high-latitude ISM Τ353 is not as reliable a tracer of dust column density as we conclude it is in molecular clouds where the correlation of Τ353 with dust extinction estimated using colour excess measurements on stars...

  12. Dust emission from comets at large heliocentric distances. I - The case of comet Bowell /1980b/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpis, H. L. F.; Mendis, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Alternative processes of dust emission from comets at large heliocentric distances are considered, in order to explain the dust coma observed in comet Bowell (1980b) at a heliocentric distance as large as 7.17 AU. It is shown that the electrostatic blow-off of dust from a charged, H2O-dominated nucleus having a layer of loose, fine dust may be the formation process of the dust coma, with the coma size expected from the process being comparable to the observed value and the dust grain size being equal to or less than 0.4 microns in size. The upper limit for the total mass in the coma is 3.9 x 10 to the 8th g, and the spatial extension less than 10,000 km. The observed activity may alternatively be due to dust entrainment by the sublimating gas from a CO2-dominated nucleus.

  13. Aeolian dust emissions in Southern Africa: field measurements of dynamics and drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David; Washington, Richard; King, James; Eckardt, Frank; Bryant, Robert; Nield, Joanna; Dansie, Andrew; Baddock, Matthew; Haustein, Karsten; Engelstaedter, Sebastian; von Holdt, Johannah; Hipondoka, Martin; Seely, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Airborne dust derived from the world's deserts is a critical component of Earth System behaviour, affecting atmospheric, oceanic, biological, and terrestrial processes as well as human health and activities. However, very few data have been collected on the factors that control dust emission from major source areas, or on the characteristics of the dust that is emitted. Such a paucity of data limits the ability of climate models to properly account for the radiative and dynamical impacts triggered by atmospheric dust. This paper presents field data from the DO4 Models (Dust Observations for Models) project that aims to understand the drivers of variability in dust emission processes from major source areas in southern Africa. Data are presented from three field campaigns undertaken between 2011 and 2015. We analysed remote sensing data to identify the key geomorphological units in southern Africa which are responsible for emission of atmospheric dust. These are the Makgadikgadi pans complex in northern Botswana, the ephemeral river valleys of western Namibia, and Etosha Pan in northern Namibia. Etosha Pan is widely recognised as perhaps the most significant source of atmospheric dust in the southern hemisphere. We deployed an array of field equipment within each source region to measure the variability in and dynamics of aeolian erosivity, as well as dust concentration and flux characteristics. This equipment included up to 11 meteorological stations measuring wind shear stress and other standard climatic parameters, Cimel sun photometers, a LiDAR, sediment transport detectors, high-frequency dust concentration monitors, and dust flux samplers. Further data were gathered at each site on the dynamics of surface characteristics and erodibility parameters that impact upon erosion thresholds. These data were augmented by use of a Pi-Swerl portable wind tunnel. Our data represent the first collected at source for these key dust emission areas and highlight the

  14. Planck intermediate results. XIX. An overview of the polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust

    OpenAIRE

    Ade, P. A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the polarized sky as seen by Planck HFI at 353 GHz, which is the most sensitive Planck channel for dust polarization. We construct and analyse maps of dust polarization fraction and polarization angle at 1° resolution, taking into account noise bias and possible systematic effects. The sensitivity of the Planck HFI polarization measurements allows for the first time a mapping of Galactic dust polarized emission on large scales, including low column density r...

  15. Foreground Bias From Parametric Models of Far-IR Dust Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A

    2016-01-01

    We use simple toy models of far-IR dust emission to estimate the accuracy to which the polarization of the cosmic microwave background can be recovered using multi-frequency fits, if the parametric form chosen for the fitted dust model differs from the actual dust emission. Commonly used approximations to the far-IR dust spectrum yield CMB residuals comparable to or larger than the sensitivities expected for the next generation of CMB missions, despite fitting the combined CMB + foreground emission to precision 0.1% or better. The Rayleigh-Jeans approximation to the dust spectrum biases the fitted dust spectral index by Delta beta_d = 0.2 and the inflationary B-mode amplitude by Delta r = 0.03. Fitting the dust to a modified blackbody at a single temperature biases the best-fit CMB by Delta r > 0.003 if the true dust spectrum contains multiple temperature components. A 13-parameter model fitting two temperature components reduces this bias by an order of magnitude if the true dust spectrum is in fact a simple...

  16. Infrared emission from tidal disruption events - probing the pc-scale dust content around galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenbin; Kumar, Pawan; Evans, Neal J.

    2016-05-01

    Recent UV-optical surveys have been successful in finding tidal disruption events (TDEs), in which a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH). These TDEs release a huge amount of radiation energy Erad ˜ 1051-1052 erg into the circum-nuclear medium. If the medium is dusty, most of the radiation energy will be absorbed by dust grains within ˜1 pc from the BH and re-radiated in the infrared. We calculate the dust emission light curve from a 1D radiative transfer model, taking into account the time-dependent heating, cooling and sublimation of dust grains. We show that the dust emission peaks at 3-10 μm and has typical luminosities between 1042 and 1043 erg s-1 (with sky covering factor of dusty clouds ranging from 0.1 to 1). This is detectable by current generation of telescopes. In the near future, James Webb Space Telescope will be able to perform photometric and spectroscopic measurements, in which silicate or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features may be found. Dust grains are non-spherical and may be aligned with the magnetic field, so the dust emission may be significantly polarized. Observations at rest-frame wavelength ≥ 2 μm have only been reported from two TDE candidates, SDSS J0952+2143 and SwiftJ1644+57. Although consistent with the dust emission from TDEs, the mid-infrared fluxes of the two events may be from other sources. Long-term monitoring is needed to draw a firm conclusion. We also point out two nearby TDE candidates (ASASSN-14ae and -14li) where the dust emission may be currently detectable. Detection of dust infrared emission from TDEs would provide information regarding the dust content and its distribution in the central pc of non-active galactic nuclei, which is hard to probe otherwise.

  17. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echániz, T. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Pérez-Sáez, R. B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es; Tello, M. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Instituto de Síntesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco, Apdo. 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2014-09-07

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ε{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ε{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, λ{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1.

  18. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak εpeak at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that εpeak increases with the emission angle but its position, λpeak, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1

  19. Workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and Analysis of Dust, Disk, and Regoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Ann L. (Editor); Lynch, David K. (Editor); Sitko, Michael (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and analysis of Dust, Disks and Regoliths, held April 28-30, 1999, in Houston Texas.

  20. Heavy metals from non-exhaust vehicle emissions in urban and motorway road dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiec, Ewa; Jarosz-Krzemińska, Elżbieta; Wieszała, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The main sources of non-exhaust vehicular emissions that contribute to road dust are tire, brake and clutch wear, road surface wear, and other vehicle and road component degradation. This study is an attempt to identify and investigate heavy metals in urban and motorway road dusts as well as in dust from brake linings and tires. Road dust was collected from sections of the A-4 motorway in Poland, which is part of European route E40, and from urban roads in Katowice, Poland. Dust from a relatively unpolluted mountain road was collected and examined as a control sample. Selected metals Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe, Se, Sr, Ba, Ti, and Pd were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-optical emission spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy on a range of size-fractionated road dust and brake lining dust (250 μm). The compositions of brake lining and tire dust were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy. To estimate the degree of potential environmental risk of non-exhaust emissions, comparison with the geochemical background and the calculations of geo-accumulation indices were performed. The finest fractions of urban and motorway dusts were significantly contaminated with all of the investigated metals, especially with Ti, Cu, and Cr, which are well-recognized key tracers of non-exhaust brake wear. Urban dust was, however, more contaminated than motorway dust. It was therefore concluded that brake lining and tire wear strongly contributed to the contamination of road dust. PMID:27226173

  1. Potential Dust Emissions from Sources in the Southern Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Okin, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Hemisphere currently exhibits low levels of atmospheric dust concentrations relative to the Northern Hemisphere. Recent research suggests that dust concentrations could, however, increase as a result of loss of vegetation cover in the Southern Kalahari and the Mallee. Disturbances resulting from grazing and agriculture are identified as such drivers of land use change in these regions. While studies on the importance of atmospheric dust in global-scale processes are abundant, little has been done to locate the potential dust sources in the Southern Hemisphere because potential new sources are by definition inactive and are undetected in satellite images. To this end, using a combination of laboratory experiments and field observations, we assess that the sediments collected from the dunefields in the Southern Kalahari and Mallee can emit substantial amount of dust, are rich in soluble iron and dust from these sources would reach the Southern Ocean. It is suggested that the supply of soluble iron through atmospheric dust deposition limits the productivity of the Southern Ocean. Thus intensification of land use can potentially make these regions an important source of iron given their proximity to the Southern Ocean. This iron-rich dust could stimulate ocean productivity in future as more areas are reactivated as a result of land-use and droughts.

  2. Polarization of Magnetic Dipole Emission and Spinning Dust Emission from Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic dipole emission (MDE) from interstellar magnetic nanoparticles is potentially an important Galactic foreground in the microwave frequencies, and its polarization level may pose great challenges for achieving reliable measurements of cosmic microwave background B-mode signal. To obtain realistic predictions for the polarization of MDE, we first compute the degree of alignment of big silicate grains incorporated with magnetic inclusions. We find that thermally rotating big grains with magnetic inclusions are weakly aligned and can achieve alignment saturation when the magnetic alignment rate becomes much faster than the rotational damping rate. We then compute the degree of alignment for free-flying magnetic nanoparticles, taking into account various interaction processes of grains with the ambient gas and radiation field, including neutral collisions, ion collisions, and infrared emission. We find that the rotational damping by infrared emission can significantly decrease the degree of alignment of small particles from the saturation level, whereas the excitation by ion collisions can enhance the alignment of ultrasmall particles. Using the computed degrees of alignment, we predict the polarization level of MDE from free-flying magnetic nanoparticles to be rather low. Such a polarization level is within the upper limits measured for anomalous microwave emission (AME), which indicates that MDE from free-flying iron particles may not be ruled out as a source of AME. We also quantify rotational emission from free-flying iron nanoparticles with permanent magnetic moments and find that its emissivity is about one order of magnitude lower than that from spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  3. POLARIZATION OF MAGNETIC DIPOLE EMISSION AND SPINNING DUST EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Thiem [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Lazarian, Alex [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic dipole emission (MDE) from interstellar magnetic nanoparticles is potentially an important Galactic foreground in the microwave frequencies, and its polarization level may pose great challenges for achieving reliable measurements of cosmic microwave background B-mode signal. To obtain realistic predictions for the polarization of MDE, we first compute the degree of alignment of big silicate grains incorporated with magnetic inclusions. We find that thermally rotating big grains with magnetic inclusions are weakly aligned and can achieve alignment saturation when the magnetic alignment rate becomes much faster than the rotational damping rate. We then compute the degree of alignment for free-flying magnetic nanoparticles, taking into account various interaction processes of grains with the ambient gas and radiation field, including neutral collisions, ion collisions, and infrared emission. We find that the rotational damping by infrared emission can significantly decrease the degree of alignment of small particles from the saturation level, whereas the excitation by ion collisions can enhance the alignment of ultrasmall particles. Using the computed degrees of alignment, we predict the polarization level of MDE from free-flying magnetic nanoparticles to be rather low. Such a polarization level is within the upper limits measured for anomalous microwave emission (AME), which indicates that MDE from free-flying iron particles may not be ruled out as a source of AME. We also quantify rotational emission from free-flying iron nanoparticles with permanent magnetic moments and find that its emissivity is about one order of magnitude lower than that from spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  4. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    Abergel, A; Aghanim, N; Alina, D; Alves, M I R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clemens, M; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Grenier, I A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Joncas, G; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 857, 545 and 353 GHz, and IRAS 100 micron data. Using a modified black-body fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a tight representation of the data at 5 arcmin. It shows variations of the order of 30 % compared with the widely-used model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel. The Planck data allow us to estimate the dust temperature uniformly over the whole sky, providing an improved estimate of the dust optical depth compared to previous all-sky dust model, especially in high-contrast molecular regions. An increase of the dust opacity at 353 GHz, tau_353/N_H, from the diffuse to the denser interstellar medium (ISM) is reported. It is associated with a decrease in the observed dust temperature, T_obs, that could be due at least in part to the increased dust opacity. We also report an excess of dust emission at HI column densities lower than...

  5. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF DUST AND STELLAR EMISSION OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Aniano, Gonzalo [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter St., University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Bot, Caroline [Universite de Strasbourg, Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Carlson, Lynn Redding; Israel, Frank [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Galametz, Maud [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Galliano, Frederic; Hony, Sacha; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Madden, Suzanne; Okumura, Koryo; Panuzzo, Pasquale [AIM, CEA/Saclay, L' Orme des Merisiers, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gordon, Karl; Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Li, Aigen, E-mail: rskibba@ucsd.edu [314 Physics Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); and others

    2012-12-10

    We study the emission by dust and stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, a pair of low-metallicity nearby galaxies, as traced by their spatially resolved spectral energy distributions. This project combines Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE far-infrared photometry with other data at infrared and optical wavelengths (the data were obtained as part of the HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution survey; PI: M. Meixner). We build maps of dust, stellar luminosity, and mass of both Magellanic Clouds, and analyze the spatial distribution of dust/stellar luminosity and mass ratios. These ratios vary considerably throughout the galaxies, generally between the range 0.01 {<=} L{sub dust}/L{sub *} {<=} 0.6 and 10{sup -4} {<=} M{sub dust}/M{sub *} {<=} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}. We observe that the dust/stellar ratios depend on the interstellar medium environment, such as the distance from currently or previously star-forming regions, and on the intensity of the interstellar radiation field. In addition, we construct star formation rate (SFR) maps, and find that the SFR is correlated with the dust/stellar luminosity and dust temperature in both galaxies, demonstrating the relation between star formation, dust emission, and heating, though these correlations exhibit substantial scatter.

  6. Dust emissivity in the Submm/Mm: SCUBA and SIMBA observations of Barnard 68

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, S.; Goncalves, J; Albrecht, M.; Caselli, P.; Chini, R.; Galli, D.; Walmsley, M

    2003-01-01

    We have observed the dark cloud Barnard 68 with SCUBA at 850 um and with SIMBA at 1.2 mm. The submillimetre and millimetre dust emission correlate well with the extinction map of Alves, Lada and Lada (2001).The A_V/850um correlation is clearly not linear and suggests lower temperatures for the dust in the inner core of the cloud. Assuming a model for the temperature gradient, we derive the cloud-averaged dust emissivities (normalised to the V-Band extinction efficiency) at 850 um and 1.2 mm. ...

  7. Natural variability versus human impact: Hydroclimate variability and the role of agriculture in changing dust emissions from Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Samuel; Kamber, Balz; McGowan, Hamish; Hooper, James; Zawadzki, Atun

    2016-04-01

    Broad-scale dust emissions play an important role in Earth systems, for example influencing oceanic productivity via phytoplankton fertilisation. Existing palaeo dust records show that dust emissions vary significantly in time, implying its impact is similarly variable. There remains, however, a paucity of records which quantify variability in dust emissions. This study presents continuous, Holocene-aged, records of dust emissions from Australia, an important global dust source. Records demonstrate that rates of dust export have varied by 8-30 times over the mid to late Holocene. This variability is largely attributed to hydroclimate variability and its associated feedbacks within dust source areas. Significantly, however, a major disruption of dust emission rates is recorded in the past 200 years when dust emissions increased by between 2-10 times rates of natural variability in dust export. This change is concomitant with the arrival of Europeans in Australia and is primarily attributed to the development of agriculture which resulted in unprecedented environmental change in Australia's arid interior. This result broadly accords with the few other existing empirical dust records which both pre-date and post-date the onset of agriculture in various arid and semi-arid regions. Collectively, these records imply the impact of dust in Earth systems has changed as a result of agricultural development.

  8. A parameterization of dust emission (PM10) fluxes of dust events observed at Naiman in Inner Mongolia using the monitored tower data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soon-Ung; Ju, Jae-Won; Lee, In-Hye; Joo, Seung Jin

    2016-09-01

    The optimal regression equations for the dust emission flux parameterized with the friction velocity (u*) only, the friction velocity with the threshold friction velocity (u*t) and the friction velocity together with the flux Richardson number (Rf) in the dust source region are derived using the sonic anemometer measured momentum and kinematic heat fluxes at 8 m height and the two-level (3 m and 15 m height) measured PM10 concentrations from a 20-m monitoring tower located at Naiman in the Asian dust source region in China for the period from March 2013 to November 2014. The analysis period is divided into three sub-periods based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) to eliminate the effect of vegetation on the dust emission flux. The dust event is identified as a peak half hourly mean dust concentration (PM10) at 3 m height exceeding the sub-period mean dust concentration plus one standard deviation of the sub-period. The total of 317 dust events is identified with the highest number of dust event of 18.8 times a month in summer. The optimal regression equations of the dust emission flux (Fc) for dust events parameterized with u* and Rf are found to simulate quite well the dust emission flux estimated by the observed data at the site for all periods especially for the unstable stratification, suggesting the potential usefulness of these equations parameterized by u* with Rf rather than those by u* only and u* together with u*t for the estimation of the dust emission flux in the Asian dust source region.

  9. A search for interstellar anthracene towards the Perseus anomalous microwave emission region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Groth, S.; Manchado, A.; Rebolo, R.; González Hernández, J. I.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Lambert, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    We report the discovery of a new broad interstellar (or circumstellar) band at 7088.8 +/- 2.0 Å coincident to within the measurement uncertainties with the strongest band of the anthracene cation (C14H10+) as measured in gas-phase laboratory spectroscopy at low temperatures. The band is detected in the line of sight of star Cernis 52, a likely member of the very young star cluster IC 348, and is probably associated with cold absorbing material in an intervening molecular cloud of the Perseus star-forming region where various experiments have recently detected anomalous microwave emission. From the measured intensity and available oscillator strength we find a column density of implying that ~0.008 per cent of the carbon in the cloud could be in the form of C14H10+. A similar abundance has been recently claimed for the naphthalene cation in this cloud. This is the first location outside the Solar system where specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are identified. We report observations of interstellar lines of CH and CH+ that support a rather high column density for these species and for molecular hydrogen. The strength ratio of the two prominent diffuse interstellar bands at 5780 and 5797 Å suggests the presence of a `zeta'-type cloud in the line of sight (consistent with steep far-ultraviolet extinction and high molecular content). The presence of PAH cations and other related hydrogenated carbon molecules which are likely to occur in this type of clouds reinforces the suggestion that electric dipole radiation from fast-spinning PAHs is responsible of the anomalous microwave emission detected towards Perseus.

  10. Spitzer observations of dust emission from H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Ian W. [Now at Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. (United States); Evans, Jessica Marie; Xue, Rui; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M., E-mail: ianws@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Massive stars can alter physical conditions and properties of their ambient interstellar dust grains via radiative heating and shocks. The H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offer ideal sites to study the stellar energy feedback effects on dust because stars can be resolved, and the galaxy's nearly face-on orientation allows us to unambiguously associate H II regions with their ionizing massive stars. The Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the LMC provides multi-wavelength (3.6-160 μm) photometric data of all H II regions. To investigate the evolution of dust properties around massive stars, we have analyzed spatially resolved IR dust emission from two classical H II regions (N63 and N180) and two simple superbubbles (N70 and N144) in the LMC. We produce photometric spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of numerous small subregions for each region based on its stellar distributions and nebular morphologies. We use DustEM dust emission model fits to characterize the dust properties. Color-color diagrams and model fits are compared with the radiation field (estimated from photometric and spectroscopic surveys). Strong radial variations of SEDs can be seen throughout the regions, reflecting the available radiative heating. Emission from very small grains drastically increases at locations where the radiation field is the highest, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appear to be destroyed. PAH emission is the strongest in the presence of molecular clouds, provided that the radiation field is low.

  11. Properties and Spatial Distribution of Dust Emission in the Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G; Gehrz, Robert D; Slane, Patrick; Roellig, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Recent infrared (IR) observations of freshly-formed dust in supernova remnants (SNRs) have yielded significantly lower dust masses than predicted by theoretical models and measured from high redshift observations. The Crab Nebula's pulsar wind is thought to be sweeping up freshly-formed supernova (SN) dust along with the ejected gas. The evidence for this dust was found in the form of an IR excess in the integrated spectrum of the Crab and in extinction against the synchrotron nebula that revealed the presence of dust in the filament cores. We present the first spatially resolved emission spectra of dust in the Crab Nebula acquired with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The IR spectra are dominated by synchrotron emission and show forbidden line emission from from S, Si, Ne, Ar, O, Fe, and Ni. We derived a synchrotron spectral map from the 3.6 and 4.5 microns images, and subtracted this contribution from our data to produce a map of the residual continuum emission from dust. The du...

  12. Charging of Individual Micron-Size Interstellar/Planetary Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with UV/X-ray radiation, as well as by electron/ion impact. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of individual dust grains is required for understanding of the physical and dynamical processes in space environments and the role of dust in formation of stellar and planetary systems. In this paper, we discuss experimental results on dust charging by electron impact, where low energy electrons are scattered or stick to the dust grains, thereby charging the dust grains negatively, and at sufficiently high energies the incident electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly by low energy electron impact. Available theoretical models based on the Sternglass equation (Sternglass, 1954) are applicable for neutral, planar, and bulk surfaces only. However, charging properties of individual micron-size dust grains are expected to be different from the values measured on bulk materials. Our recent experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance facility (at NASA-MSFC) indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (e.g. Abbas et al, 2010). Here we discuss the complex nature of SEE charging properties of individual micron-size lunar dust grains and silica microspheres.

  13. The Dust Emissivity Spectral Index in the Starless Core TMC-1C

    CERN Document Server

    Schnee, Scott; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Sayers, Jack; Terebey, Susan; Caselli, Paola; Foster, Jonathan; Goodman, Alyssa; Kauffmann, Jens; Padgett, Deborah; Rebull, Luisa; Sargent, Anneila; Shetty, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a dust emission map of the starless core TMC-1C taken at 2100 microns. Along with maps at 160, 450, 850 and 1200 microns, we study the dust emissivity spectral index from the (sub)millimeter spectral energy distribution, and find that it is close to the typically assumed value of beta = 2. We also map the dust temperature and column density in TMC-1C, and find that at the position of the dust peak (A_V ~ 50), the line-of-sight-averaged temperature is ~7 K. Employing simple Monte Carlo modeling, we show that the data are consistent with a constant value for the emissivity spectral index over the whole map of TMC-1C.

  14. Dust emission mechanisms in the central Sahara: new insights from remote field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C.; Washington, R.; Engelstaedter, S.

    2013-12-01

    North Africa is the world's largest source of mineral aerosol (dust). The Fennec Project, an international consortium led by the University of Oxford, is the first project to systematically instrument the remote central Sahara Desert. These observations have, among others, provided new insights into the atmospheric mechanisms of dust emission. Bordj Badji Mokhtar, in south-west Algeria, is within kilometres of the centre of the global mean summer dust maximum. The site, operated by Fennec partners ONM Algerie, has been heavily instrumented since summer 2011. During the Intensive Observation Period (IOP) in June 2011, four main emission mechanisms were observed and documented: cold pool outflows, low level jets (LLJs), monsoon surges and dry convective plumes. Establishing the relative importance of dust emission mechanisms has been a long-standing research goal. A detailed partitioning exercise of dust events during the IOP shows that 45% of the dust over BBM was generated by local emission in cold pool outflows, 14% by LLJs and only 2% by dry convective plumes. 27% of the dust was advected to the site rather than locally emitted and 12% of the dust was residual or ';background' dust. The work shows the primacy of cold pool outflows for dust emission in the region and also the important contribution of dust advection. In accordance with long-held ideas, the cube of wind speed is strongly correlated with dust emission. Surprisingly however, particles in long-range advection (>500km) were found to be larger than locally emitted dust. Although a clear LLJ wind structure is evident in the mean diurnal cycle during the IOP (12m/s peak winds at 935hPa between 04-05h), LLJs are only responsible for a relatively small amount of dust emission. There is significant daily variability in LLJ strength; the strongest winds are produced by a relatively small number of events. The position and strength of the Saharan Heat Low is strongly associated with the development (or

  15. The spatial distribution of mineral dust and its shortwave radiative forcing over North Africa: modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model (WRF-Chem is applied to simulate mineral dust and its shortwave (SW radiative forcing over North Africa. Two dust emission schemes (GOCART and DUSTRAN and two aerosol models (MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC are adopted in simulations to investigate the modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments. The modeled size distribution and spatial variability of mineral dust and its radiative properties are evaluated using measurements (ground-based, aircraft, and satellites during the AMMA SOP0 campaign from 6 January to 3 February of 2006 (the SOP0 period over North Africa. Two dust emission schemes generally simulate similar spatial distributions and temporal evolutions of dust emissions. Simulations using the GOCART scheme with different initial (emitted dust size distributions show that the difference of initial dust size distributions can result in significant difference (up to ~50% in simulating SW dust heating and SW dust radiative forcing at the surface over the Sahel region. The modal approach of MADE/SORGAM retains 25% more fine dust particles (radius <1.25 μm but 8% less coarse dust particles (radius >1.25 μm than the sectional approach of MOSAIC in simulations using the same size-resolved dust emissions. Consequently, MADE/SORGAM simulates 11% higher AOD, up to 13% lower SW dust heating rate, and 15% larger (more negative SW dust radiative forcing at the surface than MOSAIC over the Sahel region. In the daytime of the SOP0 period, the model simulations show that mineral dust heats the lower atmosphere (1–3 km with a maximum rate of 0.8±0.5 K day−1 below 1 km and reduces the downwelling SW radiation at the surface by up to 58 W m−2 over the Sahel region. This highlights the importance of including dust radiative impact in understanding the regional climate of North Africa. When compared to the available measurements, the WRF-Chem simulations can

  16. Quantifying the impacts of landscape heterogeneity and model resolution on dust emissions in the Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Mingjie

    2016-01-11

    This study evaluates the spatiotemporal variability of dust emission in the Arabian Peninsula and quantifies the emission sensitivity to the land-cover heterogeneity by using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM43) at three different spatial resolutions. The land-cover heterogeneity is represented by the CLM4-default plant function types (PFTs) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover types, respectively, at different grids. We area-average surface vegetation data and use the default nearest neighbor method to interpolate meteorological variables. We find that using MODIS data leads to a slightly higher coverage of vegetated land than the default PFT data; the former also gives more dust emission than the latter at 25- and 50-km grids as the default PFT data have more gridcells favoring less dust emission. The research highlights the importance of using proper data-processing methods or dust emission thresholds to preserve the dust emission accuracy in land models. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Planck intermediate results. XIV. Dust emission at millimetre wavelengths in the Galactic plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, Marie-Helene;

    2014-01-01

    We use Planck HFI data combined with ancillary radio data to study the emissivity index of the interstellar dust emission in the frequency range 100-353 GHz, or 3-0.8 mm, in the Galactic plane. We analyse the region l = 20 degrees-44 degrees and vertical bar b vertical bar...

  18. A climatology of dust emission events from northern Africa using long-term surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, S. M.; Knippertz, P.; Marsham, J. H.

    2014-08-01

    Long-term (1984-2012) surface observations from 70 stations in the Sahara and Sahel are used to explore the diurnal, seasonal and geographical variations in dust emission events and thresholds. The frequency of dust emission (FDE) is calculated using the present weather codes of SYNOP reports. Thresholds are estimated as the wind speed for which there is a 50% probability of dust emission and are then used to calculate strong wind frequency (SWF) and dust uplift potential (DUP), where the latter is an estimate of the dust-generating power of winds. Stations are grouped into six coherent geographical areas for more in-depth analysis. FDE is highest at stations in Sudan and overall peaks in spring north of 23° N. South of this, where stations are directly influenced by the summer monsoon, the annual cycle in FDE is more variable. Thresholds are highest in northern Algeria, lowest in the latitude band 16-21° N and have greatest seasonal variations in the Sahel. Spatial variability in thresholds partly explain spatial variability in frequency of dust emission events on an annual basis. However, seasonal variations in thresholds for the six grouped areas are not the main control on seasonal variations in FDE. This is demonstrated by highly correlated seasonal cycles of FDE and SWF which are not significantly changed by using a fixed, or seasonally varying, threshold. The likely meteorological mechanisms generating these patterns such as low-level jets and haboobs are discussed.

  19. Evidence for dust emission in the Warm Ionised Medium using WHAM data

    CERN Document Server

    Lagache, G; Reynolds, R J; Tufte, S L

    1999-01-01

    We have used the WHAM H_alpha survey and Leiden/Dwingeloo HI data to decompose the Far-infrared emission (from 100 to 1000 micron) at high Galactic latitude into components associated with the Warm Ionised Medium (WIM) and the Warm Neutral Medium (WNM). This decomposition is possible for the first time thanks to preliminary WHAM data that cover a significant fraction of the sky (about 10%). We confirm the first detection of dust emission from the WIM (Lagache et al. 1999) and show that the WIM dust temperature and emissivity are very similar to those in the WNM. The analysis suggests moreover that about 25% of the far-IR dust emission at high galactic latitude is uncorrelated with the HI gas. The decomposition again reveals a Cosmic Far-Infrared Background (CFIRB) which is determined for the first time from 100 to 1000 micron using two independant gas tracers.

  20. MODELING DUST EMISSION OF HL TAU DISK BASED ON PLANET–DISK INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Sheng; Ji, Jianghui [Key Laboratory of Planetary Sciences, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Shengtai; Li, Hui [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Isella, Andrea [Rice University, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-02-10

    We use extensive global two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk gas+dust simulations with embedded planets, coupled with three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations, to model the dust ring and gap structures in the HL Tau protoplanetary disk observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We include the self-gravity of disk gas and dust components and make reasonable choices of disk parameters, assuming an already settled dust distribution and no planet migration. We can obtain quite adequate fits to the observed dust emission using three planets with masses of 0.35, 0.17, and 0.26 M{sub Jup} at 13.1, 33.0, and 68.6 AU, respectively. Implications for the planet formation as well as the limitations of this scenario are discussed.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Charging Properties of Interstellar Type Silica Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging processes in astrophysical and planetary environments. Incident low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grains, leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available classical theoretical models for calculations of SEE yields are generally applicable for neutral, planar, or bulk surfaces. These models, however, are not valid for calculations of the electron impact charging properties of electrostatically charged micron/submicron-size dust grains in astrophysical environments. Rigorous quantum mechanical models are not yet available, and the SEE yields have to be determined experimentally for development of more accurate models for charging of individual dust grains. At the present time, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly for low energy electron impact. The experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated carried out by us in a unique facility at NASA-MSFC, based on an electrodynamic balance, indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (Abbas et al, 2010, 2012). In this paper, we discuss SEE charging properties of individual micron-size silica microspheres that are believed to be analogs of a class of interstellar dust grains. The measurements indicate charging of the 0.2m silica particles when exposed to 25 eV electron beams and discharging when exposed to higher energy electron beams. Relatively large size silica particles (5.2-6.82m) generally discharge to lower equilibrium potentials at both electron energies

  2. Road salt emissions: A comparison of measurements and modelling using the NORTRIP road dust emission model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denby, B. R.; Ketzel, M.; Ellermann, T.; Stojiljkovic, A.; Kupiainen, K.; Niemi, J. V.; Norman, M.; Johansson, C.; Gustafsson, M.; Blomqvist, G.; Janhäll, S.; Sundvor, I.

    2016-09-01

    De-icing of road surfaces is necessary in many countries during winter to improve vehicle traction. Large amounts of salt, most often sodium chloride, are applied every year. Most of this salt is removed through drainage or traffic spray processes but a certain amount may be suspended, after drying of the road surface, into the air and will contribute to the concentration of particulate matter. Though some measurements of salt concentrations are available near roads, the link between road maintenance salting activities and observed concentrations of salt in ambient air is yet to be quantified. In this study the NORTRIP road dust emission model, which estimates the emissions of both dust and salt from the road surface, is applied at five sites in four Nordic countries for ten separate winter periods where daily mean ambient air measurements of salt concentrations are available. The model is capable of reproducing many of the salt emission episodes, both in time and intensity, but also fails on other occasions. The observed mean concentration of salt in PM10, over all ten datasets, is 4.2 μg/m3 and the modelled mean is 2.8 μg/m3, giving a fractional bias of -0.38. The RMSE of the mean concentrations, over all 10 datasets, is 2.9 μg/m3 with an average R2 of 0.28. The mean concentration of salt is similar to the mean exhaust contribution during the winter periods of 2.6 μg/m3. The contribution of salt to the kerbside winter mean PM10 concentration is estimated to increase by 4.1 ± 3.4 μg/m3 for every kg/m2 of salt applied on the road surface during the winter season. Additional sensitivity studies showed that the accurate logging of salt applications is a prerequisite for predicting salt emissions, as well as good quality data on precipitation. It also highlights the need for more simultaneous measurements of salt loading together with ambient air concentrations to help improve model parameterisations of salt and moisture removal processes.

  3. Power electronics solution to dust emissions from thermal power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukosavić Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power stations emit significant amounts of fly ash and ultra fine particles into the atmosphere. Electrostatic precipitators (ESP or electro filters remove flying ashes and fine particles from the flue gas before passing the gas into the chimney. Maximum allowable value of dust is 50 mg/m3 and it requires that the efficiency of the ESPs better than 99 %, which calls for an increase of active surface of the electrodes, hence increasing the filter volume and the weight of steel used for the filter. In previous decades, electrostatic precipitators in thermal power plants were fed by thyristor controlled, single phase fed devices having a high degree of reliability, but with a relatively low collection efficiency, hence requiring large effective surface of the collection plates and a large weight of steel construction in order to achieve the prescribed emission limits. Collection efficiency and energy efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator can be increased by applying high frequency high voltage power supply (HF HV. Electrical engineering faculty of the University of Belgrade (ETF has developed technology and HF HV equipment for the ESP power supply. This solution was subjected to extensive experimental investigation at TE Morava from 2008 to 2010. High frequency power supply is proven to reduce emission two times in controlled conditions while increasing energy efficiency of the precipitator, compared to the conventional thyristor controlled 50Hz supply. Two high frequency high voltage unit AR70/1000 with parameters 70 kV and 1000 mA are installed at TE Morava and thoroughly testes. It was found that the HF HV power supply of the ESP at TE Morava increases collection efficiency so that emission of fine particles and flying ashes are halved, brought down to only 50 % of the emissions encountered with conventional 50 Hz thyristor driven power supplies. On the basis of this study, conclusion is drawn that the equipment comprising HF HV

  4. Dust emission from wet and dry playas in the Mojave Desert, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R.L.; Yount, J.C.; Reheis, M.; Goldstein, H.; Chavez, P., Jr.; Fulton, R.; Whitney, J.; Fuller, C.; Forester, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    The interactions between playa hydrology and playa-surface sediments are important factors that control the type and amount of dust emitted from playas as a result of wind erosion. The production of evaporite minerals during evaporative loss of near-surface ground water results in both the creation and maintenance of several centimeters or more of loose sediment on and near the surfaces of wet playas. Observations that characterize the texture, mineralogic composition and hardness of playa surfaces at Franklin Lake, Soda Lake and West Cronese Lake playas in the Mojave Desert (California), along with imaging of dust emission using automated digital photography, indicate that these kinds of surface sediment are highly susceptible to dust emission. The surfaces of wet playas are dynamic - surface texture and sediment availability to wind erosion change rapidly, primarily in response to fluctuations in water-table depth, rainfall and rates of evaporation. In contrast, dry playas are characterized by ground water at depth. Consequently, dry playas commonly have hard surfaces that produce little or no dust if undisturbed except for transient silt and clay deposited on surfaces by wind and water. Although not the dominant type of global dust, salt-rich dusts from wet playas may be important with respect to radiative properties of dust plumes, atmospheric chemistry, windborne nutrients and human health.

  5. Element and mineral characterization of dust emission from the saline land at Songnen Plain, Northeastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bing; KITAGAWA Hiroyuki; HU Ke; JIE Dongmei; YANG Junpeng; LI Jingmin

    2009-01-01

    Recent observations of Asian dust storms show an eastern expansion of the source area to degraded lands, where dust emissions have been little studied. The dust concentrations over the saline land of the western Songnen Plain (SSL), Northeastern China, are circumstantially higher than those from the northwestern Chinese deserts. These concentrations are sensitive to the surface soil conditions and wind velocity on the ground. The dust samples collected during dust storm events on the SSL contain abundant Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Fe and Ti, as well as toxic elements such as Cu, V, Zn and Ba. Individual particle analysis reveals that fine saline particles (<10 μm in diameter) on the saline land, consisting largely of carbonate, halite and sulfate together with lithogenic minerals such as SiO2 and aluminosilicate, are eventually uplifted during the interval from spring to autumn. The predominantly fine saline particles uplifted from the SSL are likely transported eastward by the winter monsoon circulation and westerlies. Recent degradation of saline lands in Northeastern China would not only increase the frequency of dust storm events in the downwind area, but also might change the chemical composition of the Asian dust emissions.

  6. Effect of secondary electron emission on the propagation of dust acoustic waves in a dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of secondary electron emission on dust acoustic wave (DA) propagation has been investigated based on orbit motion limited theory of dust grain charging. The emitted secondaries are assumed to have the same temperature as that of the ambient plasma electrons so that the plasma effectively consists of three components: the ions, electrons, and the variable charge dusts. Together with the effect of secondary emission, the effect of ion and electron capture and ionization of neutral atoms and recombination have been included in the ion and electron fluid equations. Small amplitude perturbation is considered about a charge neutral steady state. It is seen that if the dust charge is positive there may occur under certain conditions zero frequency exponentially growing perturbation about the equilibrium. The possibility of the occurrence of such purely growing mode in a dusty plasma was not noted earlier. The frequency and damping decrement of DA waves in dusty plasmas with negatively charged dust and also of DA waves with positively charged dust, when they exist, are determined. Comparisons with corresponding results of DA waves in the absence of secondary emission are exhibited graphically

  7. Light Scattering and Thermal Emission by Primitive Dust Particles in Planetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Li, Aigen; Lebreton, Jérémy

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on numerical approaches to deducing the light-scattering and thermal-emission properties of primitive dust particles in planetary systems from astronomical observations. The particles are agglomerates of small grains with sizes comparable to visible wavelength and compositions being mainly magnesium-rich silicates, iron-bearing metals, and organic refractory materials in pristine phases. These unique characteristics of primitive dust particles reflect their formation and evolution around main-sequence stars of essentially solar composition. The development of light-scattering theories has been offering powerful tools to make a thorough investigation of light scattering and thermal emission by primitive dust agglomerates in such a circumstellar environment. In particular, the discrete dipole approximation, the T-matrix method, and effective medium approximations are the most popular techniques for practical use in astronomy. Numerical simulations of light scattering and thermal emission by ...

  8. Dust Emission Induced By Friction Modifications At Tool Chip Interface In Dry Machining In MMCp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Arnaud; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between dust emission and tribological conditions at the tool-chip interface when machining Metal Matrix composite reinforced with particles (MMCp) in dry mode. Machining generates aerosols that can easily be inhaled by workers. Aerosols may be composed of oil mist, tool material or alloying elements of workpiece material. Bar turning tests were conducted on a 2009 aluminum alloy reinforced with different level of Silicon Carbide particles (15, 25 and 35% of SiCp). Variety of PCD tools and nanostructured diamond coatings were used to analyze their performances on air pollution. A spectrometer was used to detect airborne aerosol particles in the size range between 0.3μm to 20 μm and to sort them in 15 size channels in real time. It was used to compare the effects of test parameters on dust emission. Observations of tool face and chip morphology reveal the importance of friction phenomena. It was demonstrated that level of friction modifies chip curvature and dust emission. The increase of level of reinforcement increase the chip segmentation and decrease the contact length and friction area. A "running in" phenomenon with important dust emission appeared with PCD tool due to the tool rake face flatness. In addition dust generation is more sensitive to edge integrity than power consumption.

  9. The Challenge of Modelling the Meteorology of Dust Emission: Lessons Learned from the Desert Storms Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippertz, Peter; Marsham, John H.; Cowie, Sophie; Fiedler, Stephanie; Heinold, Bernd; Jemmett-Smith, Bradley; Pantillon, Florian; Schepanski, Kerstin; Roberts, Alexander; Pope, Richard; Gilkeson, Carl; Hubel, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Mineral dust plays an important role in the Earth system, but a reliable quantification of the global dust budget is still not possible due to a lack of observations and insufficient representation of relevant processes in climate and weather models. Five years ago, the Desert Storms project funded by the European Research Council set out to reduce these uncertainties. Its aims were to (1) improve the understanding of key meteorological mechanisms of peak wind generation in dust emission regions (particularly in northern Africa), (2) assess their relative importance, (3) evaluate their representation in models, (4) determine model sensitivities with respect to resolution and model physics, and (5) explore the usefulness of new approaches for model improvements. Here we give an overview of the most significant findings: (1) The morning breakdown of nocturnal low-level jets is an important emission mechanism, but details depend crucially on nighttime stability, which is often badly handled by models. (2) Convective cold pools are a key control on summertime dust emission over northern Africa, directly and through their influence on the heat low; they are severely misrepresented by models using parameterized convection. A new scheme based on downdraft mass flux has been developed that can mitigate this problem. (3) Mobile cyclones make a relatively unimportant contribution, except for northeastern Africa in spring. (4) A new global climatology of dust devils identifies local hotspots but suggests a minor contribution to the global dust budget in contrast to previous studies. A new dust-devil parameterization based on data from large-eddy simulations will be presented. (5) The lack of sufficient observations and misrepresentation of physical processes lead to a considerable uncertainty and biases in (re)analysis products. (6) Variations in vegetation-related surface roughness create small-scale wind variability and support long-term dust trends in semi-arid areas.

  10. Global Scale Attribution of Anthropogenic and Natural Dust Sources and their Emission Rates Based on MODIS Deep Blue Aerosol Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginoux, Paul; Prospero, Joseph M.; Gill, Thomas E.; Hsu, N. Christina; Zhao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the global dust cycle is limited by a dearth of information about dust sources, especially small-scale features which could account for a large fraction of global emissions. Here we present a global-scale high-resolution (0.1 deg) mapping of sources based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep Blue estimates of dust optical depth in conjunction with other data sets including land use. We ascribe dust sources to natural and anthropogenic (primarily agricultural) origins, calculate their respective contributions to emissions, and extensively compare these products against literature. Natural dust sources globally account for 75% of emissions; anthropogenic sources account for 25%. North Africa accounts for 55% of global dust emissions with only 8% being anthropogenic, mostly from the Sahel. Elsewhere, anthropogenic dust emissions can be much higher (75% in Australia). Hydrologic dust sources (e.g., ephemeral water bodies) account for 31% worldwide; 15% of them are natural while 85% are anthropogenic. Globally, 20% of emissions are from vegetated surfaces, primarily desert shrublands and agricultural lands. Since anthropogenic dust sources are associated with land use and ephemeral water bodies, both in turn linked to the hydrological cycle, their emissions are affected by climate variability. Such changes in dust emissions can impact climate, air quality, and human health. Improved dust emission estimates will require a better mapping of threshold wind velocities, vegetation dynamics, and surface conditions (soil moisture and land use) especially in the sensitive regions identified here, as well as improved ability to address small-scale convective processes producing dust via cold pool (haboob) events frequent in monsoon regimes.

  11. Sensitivities of WRF-Chem to dust emission schemes and land surface properties in simulating dust cycles during springtime over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Fung, Jimmy C. H.

    2015-11-01

    The sensitivities of Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) to the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) and Shao2011 (S11) dust emission schemes, and to various land surface properties generated from United States Geological Survey (USGS) and Beijing Normal University (BNU) soil data over East Asia for spring 2012, are examined in this study. The results show that the dust emissions generated with the S11 scheme are 2-5 times that generated with the AFWA emission scheme, with emissions ranging from 0.2-1 Tg/d over East Asia in the relevant period. The AFWA emission scheme omits almost the entire Gobi desert and produces low dust emissions, whereas large amounts of dust emission in this region are produced with the S11 emission scheme, regardless of whether USGS or BNU soil data are used. The surface particulate matter 10 (PM10) concentrations are reasonably well reproduced by the model with different configurations. However, the S11 emission scheme has better performance in simulating the surface PM10 concentrations than the AFWA scheme, especially near the Gobi desert. Comparisons with satellite-based observations suggest that WRF-Chem gives better performance with S11 emission scheme in reproducing the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties. The discrepancy between the performances of the AFWA and S11 emission schemes is mainly due to the underestimation of the dust emission over the Gobi desert by the AFWA scheme, which scales the dust emission directly based on the erodibility factor, indicating that the erodibility factor over the Gobi desert is highly underestimated and highlighting an urgent need to improve the erodibility data set.

  12. Size distributions of mineral aerosols and dust emission flux observed over Horqin Sandy Land area in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Zhang, H. S.

    2013-01-01

    Size distribution of mineral aerosols is of primary importance in determining their residence time in atmosphere, transport patterns, removal mechanisms as well as their effects on climate and human health. This study aims to obtain dust particle size distribution and size-resolved dust emission flux under different weather conditions over a sandy land area in northern China (Horqin Sandy Land, Inner Mongolia), using the observational data from Horqin sandstorm monitoring station in the spring of 2010 and 2012. Dust (PM20) mass concentration was measured by a 10-stage quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) cascade impactor. The statistical results indicate that finer dust particles (r ≤ 1.0 μm) take a large proportion of all PM20 concentration under clear-day conditions, while coarser dust particles (r ≥ 2.5 μm) concentration increased under dust-day conditions, with the peak occurring between 4-7 μm. The dust particle size distributions during the pre-dust-emission and dust-emission periods of a dust event on 7 April 2012 have similar features to the statistical results. During the dust event, the magnitude of dust emission flux of all sizes increased about one or two orders (0.1-10 μg m-2 s-1) as u* increase from 0.54 to 1.29 m s-1. The maximum total F value was about 43.0 μg m-2 s-1 and the maximum size-resolved F(Ddi) is 12.3 μg m-2 s-1 in 0.3-0.45 μm size bin when u* is 1.29 m s-1. Dust advection has effects on airborne dust size distribution, making the proportion of dust particles of different sizes more uniform, as observed in a non-local dust event on 19 April 2012.

  13. Far-IR Emission From Dust-Obscured Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Calanog, J A; Fu, Hai; Cooray, A; Assef, R J; Bock, J; Casey, C M; Conley, A; Farrah, D; Ibar, E; Kartaltepe, J; Magdis, G; Marchetti, L; Oliver, S J; Perez-Fournon, I; Riechers, D; Rigopoulou, D; Roseboom, I G; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Symeonidis, M; Vaccari, M; Viero, M; Zemcov, M

    2013-01-01

    Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) are a UV-faint, IR-bright galaxy population that reside at z~2 and are believed to be in a phase of dusty star-forming and AGN activity. We present far-IR observations of a complete sample of DOGs in the 2 deg^2 of COSMOS. The 3077 DOGs have =1.9+/-0.3 and are selected from 24 um and r+ observations using a color cut of r+ - [24] >= 7.5 (AB mag) and S24 >= 100 uJy. Based on the mid-IR SEDs, 47% are star-formation dominated and 10% are AGN-dominated. We use SPIRE far-IR photometry from HerMES to calculate the IR luminosity and characteristic dust temperature for the 1572 (51%) DOGs that are detected at 250 um (>=3sigma). For the remaining 1505 (49%) that are undetected, we perform a median stacking analysis to probe fainter luminosities. Detected and undetected DOGs have average IR luminosities of (2.8+/-0.4) x 10^12 L_Sun and (0.77+/-0.08) x 10^12L_Sun, and dust temperatures of 34+/-7 K and 31+/-3 K, respectively. Using far-IR observations, DOGs contribute 30% to the 24 um-select...

  14. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Odegard, N; Chuss, D T; Miller, N J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for CMB measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 millimeters to 100 microns and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anticorrelation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenologic...

  15. Planck intermediate results. XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Ballardini, M; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Basak, S; Benabed, K; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Carron, J; Chiang, H C; Colombo, L P L; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Di Valentino, E; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Dusini, S; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fantaye, Y; Finelli, F; Forastieri, F; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frolov, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Gerbino, M; Ghosh, T; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hivon, E; Huang, Z; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lamarre, J -M; Langer, M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Levrier, F; Lilje, P B; Lilley, M; Lindholm, V; López-Caniego, M; Ma, Y -Z; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Matarrese, S; Mauri, N; McEwen, J D; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Molinari, D; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Moss, A; Natoli, P; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Plaszczynski, S; Polastri, L; Polenta, G; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Racine, B; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Ruiz-Granados, B; Salvati, L; Sandri, M; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Sirignano, C; Sirri, G; Soler, J D; Spencer, L D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Tenti, M; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Trombetti, T; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature observations, we perform the separation of Galactic thermal dust emission and cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combination (GNILC) method. This makes use of the spatial information (angular power spectrum) to disentangle the Galactic dust emission and CIB anisotropies. A significantly improved all-sky map of the Planck thermal dust, with reduced CIB contamination, is produced at 353, 545, and 857 GHz. From the reduction of the CIB contamination in the thermal dust maps, we are able to provide a more accurate estimate of the local dust temperature and dust spectral index over the sky with reduced dispersion at high latitudes. We find that $T = (19.4 \\pm 1.3)$ K and $\\beta = 1.6 \\pm 0.1$ on the whole sky, while $T = (19.4 \\pm 1.5)$ K and $\\beta = 1.6 \\pm 0.2$ on 21 % of the sky at high latitudes, where the error b...

  16. The Emission by Dust and Stars of Nearby Galaxies in the Herschel KINGFISH Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Skibba, Ramin A; Dale, Daniel; Hinz, Joannah; Zibetti, Stefano; Crocker, Alison; Groves, Brent; Hunt, Leslie; Johnson, Benjamin D; Meidt, Sharon; Murphy, Eric J; Appleton, Philip; Armus, Lee; Bolatto, Alberto; Brandl, Bernhard; Calzetti, Daniela; Croxall, Kevin; Galametz, Maud; Gordon, Karl D; Kennicutt, Robert C; Koda, Jin; Krause, Oliver; Montiel, Edward; Rix, Hans-Walter; Roussel, Helene; Sandstrom, Karin; Sauvage, Marc; Schinnerer, Eva; Smith, J D; Walter, Fabian; Wilson, Christine D; Wolfire, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Using new far-infrared imaging from the Herschel Space Observatory with ancillary data from ultraviolet to submillimeter wavelengths, we estimate the total emission from dust and stars of 62 nearby galaxies in the KINGFISH survey in a way that is as empirical and model-independent as possible. We collect and exploit these data in order to measure from the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) precisely how much stellar radiation is intercepted and re-radiated by dust, and how this quantity varies with galaxy properties. By including SPIRE data, we are more sensitive to emission from cold dust grains than previous analyses at shorter wavelengths, allowing for more accurate estimates of dust temperatures and masses. The dust/stellar flux ratio, which we measure by integrating the SEDs, has a range of nearly three decades. The inclusion of SPIRE data shows that estimates based on data not reaching these far-IR wavelengths are biased low. We find that the dust/stellar flux ratio varies with morphology and total IR...

  17. Dust emission size distribution impact on aerosol budget and radiative forcing over the Mediterranean region: a regional climate model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Nabat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the dust emission and load over the Mediterranean basin using the coupled-chemistry-aerosol regional climate model RegCM-4. The first step of this work focuses on dust particle emission size distribution modeling. We compare a parameterization in which the emission is based on the individual kinetic energy of the aggregates striking the surface to a recent parameterization based on an analogy with the fragmentation of brittle materials. The main difference between the two dust schemes concerns the mass proportion of fine aerosol which is reduced in the case of the new dust parameterization, with consequences for optical properties. At the episodic scale, comparisons between RegCM-4 simulations, satellite and ground-based data show a clear improvement using the new dust distribution in terms of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values and geographic gradients. These results are confirmed at the seasonal scale for the investigated year 2008. A multi-annual simulation is finally carried out using the new dust distribution over the period 2000–2009. This change of dust distribution has sensitive impacts on the simulated regional dust budget, notably dry dust deposition and the regional direct aerosol radiative forcing over the Mediterranean basin. This could clearly modify the possible effects of dust aerosols on the biogeochemical activity and climate of the Mediterranean basin. In particular, we find that the new size distribution produces a higher dust deposition flux, and smaller top of atmosphere (TOA dust radiative cooling.

  18. Lunar Dust Charging by Secondary Electron Emission and its Complex Role in the Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; Dube, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered with a thick layer of micron/sub-micron size dust grains formed by billions of years of meteoritic impact. With virtually no atmosphere and exposed to the solar wind plasma and solar electromagnetic radiation, the lunar surface and the dust grains are electrostatically charged. The dominant charging processes include: photoelectric emissions (UV, X-rays), impact of solar wind electrons and ions, and secondary electron emissions (SEE) induced by energetic solar wind electrons. During the Apollo missions, the astronauts found the lunar dust to be extraordinarily high in its adhesive characteristics, sticking to the suits and the mechanical equipment. Electrostatically charged lunar dust is believed to be transported over long distances by the induced electric fields, as indicated by the observed dust streamers and the horizon glow [e.g., 1-3]. The hazardous effects of dust in the lunar environment are recognized to be one of the major issues that must be addressed in planning the forthcoming missions for robotic and human exploration of the Moon. Theoretical studies are being performed along with the development of analytical models and a variety of experimental investigations, to better understand the lunar dust phenomena. [e.g., 4-6]. The lunar dust is believed to be charged negatively on the lunar night-side by interaction With solar wind electrons. However, rigorous theoretical expressions for calculation of SEE yields and the sticking efficiencies of individual micron size dust grains are not yet available, and the information has to be obtained by experiment. On theoretical considerations, however, it is well recognized that SEE yields, similar to the photoelectric yields for small-size grains, would be totally different from the corresponding bulk values [e.g., 7-9]. Some theoretical models for charging of individual small spherical particles have been developed [e.g., 10], and some limited measurements on individual metallic dust

  19. The Microwave Thermal Emission from the Zodiacal Dust Cloud Predicted with Contemporary Meteoroid Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dikarev, Valery V

    2015-01-01

    Predictions of the microwave thermal emission from the interplanetary dust cloud are made using several contemporary meteoroid models to construct the distributions of cross-section area of dust in space, and applying the Mie light-scattering theory to estimate the temperatures and emissivities of dust particles in broad size and heliocentric distance ranges. In particular, the model of the interplanetary dust cloud by Kelsall et al. (1998, ApJ 508: 44-73), the five populations of interplanetary meteoroids of Divine (1993, JGR 98(E9): 17,029-17,048) and the Interplanetary Meteoroid Engineering Model (IMEM) by Dikarev et al. (2004, EMP 95: 109-122) are used in combination with the optical properties of olivine, carbonaceous and iron spherical particles. The Kelsall model has been widely accepted by the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) community. We show, however, that it predicts the microwave emission from interplanetary dust remarkably different from the results of application of the meteoroid engineering m...

  20. Homogeneized modeling of mineral dust emissions over Europe and Africa using the CHIMERE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Briant

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the region including Africa and Europe, the main part of mineral dust emissions is observed in Africa. The particles are thus transported towards Europe and constitute a non-negligible part of the surface aerosols measured and controlled in the framework of the European air quality legislation. The modelling of these African dust emissions fluxes and transport is widely studied and complex parameterizations are already used in regional to global model for this Sahara-Sahel region. In a lesser extent, mineral dust emissions occur locally in Europe, mainly over agricultural areas. Their modelling is generally poorly done or just ignored. But in some cases, this contribution may be important and may impact the European air quality budget. In this study, we propose an homogeneized calculations of mineral dust fluxes for Europe and Africa. For that, we extended the CHIMERE dust production model (DPM by using new soil and surface datasets, and the global aeolian roughness length dataset provided by GARLAP from microwave and visible satellite observations. This DPM is detailed along with academic tests case results and simulation on a real case results.

  1. An attempt to make an inventory of dust emissions in France; Tentative d`inventaire des emissions de poussieres en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouscaren, R. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    The various dust emissions due to combustion and industrial processes, have been quantified; data and diagrams are presented for France from 1960 to 1995: the emission contributions from the residential and commercial sectors, industrial sector, power plants and road transportation are detailed and their evolutions are compared; emission charts are also presented, according to fuel type and dust granulometry. The importance of road transportation emissions is pointed out

  2. Mineral dust aerosols over the Sahara: Meteorological controls on emission and transport and implications for modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippertz, Peter; Todd, Martin C.

    2012-02-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust has recently become an important research field in Earth system science because of its impacts on radiation, clouds, atmospheric dynamics and chemistry, air quality, and biogeochemical cycles. Studying and modeling dust emission and transport over the world's largest source region, the Sahara, is particularly challenging because of the complex meteorology and a very sparse observational network. Recent advances in satellite retrievals together with ground- and aircraft-based field campaigns have fostered our understanding of the spatiotemporal variability of the dust aerosol and its atmospheric drivers. We now have a more complete picture of the key processes in the atmosphere associated with dust emission. These cover a range of scales from (1) synoptic scale cyclones in the northern sector of the Sahara, harmattan surges and African easterly waves, through (2) low-level jets and cold pools of mesoscale convective systems (particularly over the Sahel), to (3) microscale dust devils and dusty plumes, each with its own pronounced diurnal and seasonal characteristics. This paper summarizes recent progress on monitoring and analyzing the dust distribution over the Sahara and discusses implications for numerical modeling. Among the key challenges for the future are a better quantification of the relative importance of single processes and a more realistic representation of the effects of the smaller-scale meteorological features in dust models. In particular, moist convection has been recognized as a major limitation to our understanding because of the inability of satellites to observe dust under clouds and the difficulties of numerical models to capture convective organization.

  3. Internal boundary layer devleopment over a salt pan: Measured and modelled dust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J.; Wiggs, G.; Haustein, K.; Eckardt, F. D.; Thomas, D. S. G.; Washington, R.

    2014-12-01

    A key component of a dust emission scheme is the threshold for sediment transport, which is a function of soil size distribution, soil moisture, air and soil particle density, and surface roughness. For a particular region or landform that is not vegetated the variable that controls the transport threshold the most is soil moisture. This is because it is assumed that the other components vary little (air and soil particle densities) or are kept constant (soil size distribution and surface roughness). This puts the emphasis very heavily on soil moisture and wind stress as the key drivers of dust emission for specific landforms and dust emission schemes. Dust emission measurements were undertaken in 2011 on Sua Pan in Botswana, a large, flat, unvegetated salt pan, as part of the Dust Observation for Models (DO4 Models) campaign. The observations consisted of 11 climate stations placed within a 144 km2. Out of the measured and calculated erodibility parameters responsible for predicting transport threshold within current schemes, surface soil moisture and aerodynamic roughness length varied the most over the duration of the project and spatially across the pan. In 2011, the pan was drying from extensive flooding and rainfall in the previous wet season. Within the dry winter season months of June through September the dominantly eastern winds dried the pan developing a directional increase in aerodynamic roughness length over time. This cumulated in a region of maximum roughness length with the highest potential for dust emissions. In some cases, the aerodynamic roughness length of the bare soil increased by three orders of magnitude within the three month period. This increase in roughness almost doubles the modelled threshold shear velocity required for this surface to be emissive. The temporal and spatial variability of the calculated transport threshold is explored with observed data and compared with the modelled transport threshold for this region for the

  4. Power electronics solution to dust emissions from thermal power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Vukosavić Slobodan; Popov Nikola; Despotović Željko

    2010-01-01

    Thermal power stations emit significant amounts of fly ash and ultra fine particles into the atmosphere. Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) or electro filters remove flying ashes and fine particles from the flue gas before passing the gas into the chimney. Maximum allowable value of dust is 50 mg/m3 and it requires that the efficiency of the ESPs better than 99 %, which calls for an increase of active surface of the electrodes, hence increasing the filter volume and the weight of steel used fo...

  5. The emissivity of dust grains in spiral galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Alton, P. B.; Xilouris, E. M.; Misiriotis, A.; Dasyra, K. M.; Dumke, M.

    2004-01-01

    We use the radiation transfer simulation of Xilouris et al. (1999) to constrain the quantity of dust in three nearby spiral galaxies (NGC 4013, NGC 5907 and NGC 4565). The predicted visual optical depth from the model is compared with the thermal continuum radiation detected from NGC 4013 and NGC 5907 at 850 microns and from NGC 4565 at 1.2 mm. The former is based on SCUBA images of NGC 4013 and NGC 5907, reduced and presented for the first time in this work. The comparison of visual optical ...

  6. The local dust foregrounds in the microwave sky: I. Thermal emission spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Dikarev, V; Solanki, S; Krüger, H; Krivov, A

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps made by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have revealed anomalies not predicted by the standard inflationary cosmology. In particular, the power of the quadrupole moment of the CMB fluctuations is remarkably low, and the quadrupole and octopole moments are aligned mutually and with the geometry of the Solar system. It has been suggested in the literature that microwave sky pollution by an unidentified dust cloud in the vicinity of the Solar system may be the cause for these anomalies. In this paper, we simulate the thermal emission by clouds of spherical homogeneous particles of several materials. Spectral constraints from the WMAP multi-wavelength data and earlier infrared observations on the hypothetical dust cloud are used to determine the dust cloud's physical characteristics. In order for its emissivity to demonstrate a flat, CMB-like wavelength dependence over the WMAP wavelengths (3 through 14 mm), and to be invisible in the...

  7. Global Star Formation Rates and Dust Emission Over the Galaxy Interaction Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Lanz, Lauranne; Brassington, Nicola; Smith, Howard A; Ashby, Matthew L N; da Cunha, Elisabete; Fazio, Giovanni G; Hayward, Christopher C; Hernquist, Lars; Jonsson, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    We measured and modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 28 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared (FIR) for 31 interacting galaxies in 14 systems. The sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, which probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters at multiple wavelengths with an emphasis on the infrared bands. The subset presented in this paper consists of all galaxies for which FIR Herschel SPIRE observations are publicly available. Our SEDs combine the Herschel photometry with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer, GALEX, Swift UVOT, and 2MASS. While the shapes of the SEDs are broadly similar across our sample, strongly interacting galaxies typically have more mid-infrared emission relative to their near-infrared and FIR emission than weakly or moderately interacting galaxies. We modeled the full SEDs to derive host galaxy star formation rates (SFR), specific star formation rates (sSFR), stellar masses, dust temperatures, dust luminosities, and dust masses. We find increase...

  8. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity. In this study, emission inventories for 8 elements, which are primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si were determined based on a global mineral dataset and a soils dataset. Datasets of elemental fractions were used to drive the desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions was evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically ranged from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soil sources, were consistent with observations, suggesting this ratio to be a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different that estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observational elemental aerosol concentration data from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions ranged from 0.7 to 1.6 except for 3.4 and 3.5 for Mg and Mn, respectivly. Using the soil data base improved the correspondence of the spatial hetereogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe compared to observations. Total and soluble dust associated element fluxes into different ocean basins and ice sheets regions have been estimated, based on the model results. Annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using mineral dataset were 0.28 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.

  9. Planck early results. XVII. Origin of the submillimetre excess dust emission in the Magellanic Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    The integrated spectral energy distributions (SED) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) appear significantly flatter than expected from dust models based on their far-infrared and radio emission. The still unexplained origin of this millimetre excess is investigated...

  10. Modeling infrared thermal emissions on Mars during dust storm of MY28: PFS/MEX observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Syed A.; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Giuranna, Marco; Kuroda, Takeshi; Jethwa, Masoom P.

    2016-07-01

    We have analysed thermal emission spectra obtained from Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) onboard Mars Express (MEX) for Martian Year (MY) 28 in presence and absence of dust storm at low latitude. A radiative transfer model for dusty atmosphere of Mars is developed to estimate the thermal emission spectra at latitude range 0-10oS, 10-20oS and 20-30oS. These calculations are made at Ls=240o, 280o, 300o, and 320o between wave numbers 250-1400 cm-1. We have also retrieved brightness temperatures from thermal emission spectra by inverting the Planck function. The model reproduces the observed features at wave numbers 600-750 cm-1 and 900-1200 cm-1 due to absorptions by CO2 and dust respectively. In presence of dust storm thermal emission spectra and brightness temperature are reduced by a factor of ~ 2 between wave numbers 900-1200 cm-1. The altitude profiles of dust concentration are also estimated for different aerosol particles of sizes 0.2 to 3 micron. The best fit to the PFS measurements is obtained in presence of aerosol particle of size 0.2 micron.

  11. Detecting early IR emission from dust heated by a tidal disruption flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Sjoert; Gezari, Suvi; Hung, Tiara; Cenko, Bradley; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2016-06-01

    A stellar tidal disruption flare (TDF) occurs when a star gets too close to a supermassive black hole and is shredded into streams that are accreted. New TDFs can be discovered by their transient optical or X-ray emission. We have recently made a discovery that opens a new wavelength regime for the study of these flares: transient emission at 3 micron in WISE multi-epoch imaging. This emission is best understood as originating from dust that has been heated by the intense UV and X-ray emission of the flare. However, the 6-month cadence of the WISE observations is too low to critically test this dust reprocessing model. Using optical observations of the iPTF survey, we recently discovered a very strong TDF candidate that is currenlty only a few weeks past maximum light. Since TDFs are rare, this new source provides an unique oppurtunity for Spitzer to make a very important contribution to this field. We proposed 7 Spitzer follow-up observations of this flare, which would yield the first early-time light curve of IR emission from a tidal flare. This data will be crucial to estabilish (or rule-out) dust reprocessing as the origin of IR emission from TDFs.

  12. Planck intermediate results. XVII. Emission of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium from the far-infrared to microwave frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The dust-HI correlation is used to characterize the emission properties of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. We cross-correlate sky maps from Planck, WMAP, and DIRBE, at 17 frequencies from 23 to 3000 GHz, with the Parkes survey of the 21-cm line emission of neutral atomic hydrogen, over a contiguous area of 7500 deg$^2$ centred on the southern Galactic pole. Our analysis yields four specific results. (1) The dust temperature is observed to be anti-correlated with the dust emissivity and opacity. We interpret this result as evidence for dust evolution within the diffuse ISM. The mean dust opacity is measured to be $(7.1 \\pm 0.6) 10^{-27} cm^2/H \\times (\

  13. Benchmarking the Calculation of Stochastic Heating and Emissivity of Dust Grains in the Context of Radiative Transfer Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Camps, Peter; Bianchi, Simone; Lunttila, Tuomas; Pinte, Christophe; Natale, Giovanni; Juvela, Mika; Fischera, Joerg; Fitzgerald, Michael P; Gordon, Karl; Baes, Maarten; Steinacker, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    We define an appropriate problem for benchmarking dust emissivity calculations in the context of radiative transfer (RT) simulations, specifically including the emission from stochastically heated dust grains. Our aim is to provide a self-contained guide for implementors of such functionality, and to offer insights in the effects of the various approximations and heuristics implemented by the participating codes to accelerate the calculations. The benchmark problem definition includes the optical and calorimetric material properties, and the grain size distributions, for a typical astronomical dust mixture with silicate, graphite and PAH components; a series of analytically defined radiation fields to which the dust population is to be exposed; and instructions for the desired output. We process this problem using six RT codes participating in this benchmark effort, and compare the results to a reference solution computed with the publicly available dust emission code DustEM. The participating codes implement...

  14. DUST AND GAS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS FROM THE HERITAGE HERSCHEL KEY PROJECT. I. DUST PROPERTIES AND INSIGHTS INTO THE ORIGIN OF THE SUBMILLIMETER EXCESS EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Karl D.; Roman-Duval, Julia; Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bot, Caroline [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [CESR, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse, Cedex 4 (France); Bolatto, Alberto; Jameson, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Lab for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Boyer, Martha L. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Clayton, Geoffrey C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Engelbracht, Charles [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Galametz, Maud [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching-bei-Mnchen (Germany); Galliano, Frederic; Hony, Sacha; Lebouteiller, Vianney [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hughes, Annie [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, and National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Israel, Frank P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kawamura, Akiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-20

    The dust properties in the Large and Small Magellanic clouds (LMC/SMC) are studied using the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project photometric data in five bands from 100 to 500 μm. Three simple models of dust emission were fit to the observations: a single temperature blackbody modified by a power-law emissivity (SMBB), a single temperature blackbody modified by a broken power-law emissivity (BEMBB), and two blackbodies with different temperatures, both modified by the same power-law emissivity (TTMBB). Using these models, we investigate the origin of the submillimeter excess, defined as the submillimeter emission above that expected from SMBB models fit to observations <200 μm. We find that the BEMBB model produces the lowest fit residuals with pixel-averaged 500 μm submillimeter excesses of 27% and 43% for the LMC and SMC, respectively. Adopting gas masses from previous works, the gas-to-dust ratios calculated from our fitting results show that the TTMBB fits require significantly more dust than are available even if all the metals present in the interstellar medium (ISM) were condensed into dust. This indicates that the submillimeter excess is more likely to be due to emissivity variations than a second population of colder dust. We derive integrated dust masses of (7.3 ± 1.7) × 10{sup 5} and (8.3 ± 2.1) × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} for the LMC and SMC, respectively. We find significant correlations between the submillimeter excess and other dust properties; further work is needed to determine the relative contributions of fitting noise and ISM physics to the correlations.

  15. Anomalous ULF Emissions and Their Possible Association with the Strong Earthquakes in Sumatra, Indonesia, during 2007-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suaidi Ahadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Eleven strong Sumatran earthquakes, with their epicenter less than 550 km away from the Kototabang (KTB geomagnetic station (2007-2012, were studied to examine the occurrence of anomalous ultra-low frequency emissions (ULF-EM. Anomalous ULF signals, possibly associated with the earthquake’s precursors, were determined by the Welch ratio SZ/SH at 0.06 Hz at the KTB station. These ULF anomalies were then compared with geomagnetic data observed from two reference stations in Darwin and Davao, to prevent misinterpretation of global geomagnetic disturbances as precursors. This study aims to analyze the relationship between earthquake magnitude and hypocenter radius, and seismic index against lead time during ULF-EM anomalies. We used the polarization ratio Welch method in terms of power spectrum density to evaluate the geomagnetic data by overlapping windows and applying fast Fourier transform (FFT. The results showed anomalous variations in onset and lead time, determined using the standard deviation controlling the SZ/SH power pattern. Our positive correlation between lead time of ULF emission and earthquake magnitude as well as between lead time and seismic index. It shows a negative correlation between hypocenter distances to KTB station against lead time.

  16. Quantum Suppression of Alignment in Ultrasmall Grains: Microwave Emission from Spinning Dust will be Negligibly Polarized

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T

    2016-01-01

    The quantization of energy levels in very nanoparticles suppresses dissipative processes that convert grain rotational kinetic energy into heat. For grains small enough to have GHz rotation rates, the suppression of dissipation can be extreme. As a result, alignment of such grains is suppressed. This applies both to alignment of the grain body with its angular momentum J, and to alignment of J with the local magnetic field B_0. If the anomalous microwave emission is rotational emission from spinning grains, it will be negligibly polarized at GHz frequencies, with P < 10^{-6} at frequencies above 10 GHz.

  17. The effect of dust emissions from open storage piles to particle ambient concentration and human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalvatzaki, E; Aleksandropoulou, V; Glytsos, T; Lazaridis, M

    2012-12-01

    The current study focus on the determination of dust emissions from piles in open storage yards of a municipal solid waste (MSW) composting site and the subsequent atmospheric dust dispersion. The ISC3-ST (Industrial Source Complex Version 3 - Short Term) model was used for the evaluation of the PM(10) ambient concentrations associated with the dispersion of MSW compost dust emissions in air. Dust emission rates were calculated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency proposed dust resuspension formulation from open storage piles using local meteorological data. The dispersion modelling results on the spatial distribution of PM(10) source depletion showed that the maximum concentrations were observed at a distance 25-75 m downwind of the piles in the prevailing wind direction. Sensitivity calculations were performed also to reveal the effect of the compost pile height, the friction velocity and the receptor height on the ambient PM(10) concentration. It was observed that PM(10) concentrations (downwind in the prevailing wind direction) increased with increasing the friction velocity, increasing the pile height (for distances greater than 125 m from the source) and decreasing the receptor height (for distances greater than 125 m from the source). Furthermore, the results of ISC3-ST were analysed with the ExDoM (Exposure Dose Model) human exposure model. The ExDoM is a model for calculating the human exposure and the deposition dose, clearance, and finally retention of aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract (RT). PM(10) concentration at the composting site was calculated as the sum of the concentration from compost pile dust resuspension and the background concentration. It was found that the exposure to PM(10) and deposited lung dose for an adult Caucasian male who is not working at the composting site is less by 20-74% and 29-84%, respectively, compared to those for a worker exposed to PM concentrations at the composting site.

  18. Warm Dust and Spatially Variable PAH Emission in the Dwarf Starburst Galaxy NGC 1705

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, J M; Bendo, G J; Buckalew, B A; Calzetti, D; Dale, D A; Draine, B T; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K D; Helou, G; Hollenbach, D J; Jarrett, T H; Kennicutt, R C; Leitherer, C; Li, A; Meyer, M J; Murphy, E J; Regan, M W; Rieke, G H; Rieke, M J; Roussel, H; Sheth, K; Smith, J D T; Thornley, M D; Walter, F; Armus, Lee; Bendo, George J.; Buckalew, Brent A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Cannon, John M.; Dale, Daniel A.; Draine, Bruce T.; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Gordon, Karl D.; Helou, George; Hollenbach, David J.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Leitherer, Claus; Li, Aigen; Meyer, Martin J.; Murphy, Eric J.; Regan, Michael W.; Rieke, George H.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Roussel, Helene; Sheth, Kartik; Smith, John-David T.; Thornley, Michele D.; Walter, Fabian

    2006-01-01

    We present Spitzer observations of the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 1705 obtained as part of SINGS. The galaxy morphology is very different shortward and longward of ~5 microns: short-wavelength imaging shows an underlying red stellar population, with the central super star cluster (SSC) dominating the luminosity; longer-wavelength data reveals warm dust emission arising from two off-nuclear regions offset by ~250 pc from the SSC. These regions show little extinction at optical wavelengths. The galaxy has a relatively low global dust mass (~2E5 solar masses, implying a global dust-to-gas mass ratio ~2--4 times lower than the Milky Way average). The off-nuclear dust emission appears to be powered by photons from the same stellar population responsible for the excitation of the observed H Alpha emission; these photons are unassociated with the SSC (though a contribution from embedded sources to the IR luminosity of the off-nuclear regions cannot be ruled out). Low-resolution IRS spectroscopy shows moderate-streng...

  19. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    OpenAIRE

    Planck Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 353, 545, and 857 GHz, and IRAS 100 mu m data. Using a modified blackbody fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a good representation of the IRAS and Planck data at 5 0 between 353 and 3000 GHz (850 and 100 mu m). It shows variations of the order of 30% compared with the widely-used model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlege...

  20. Methods for measuring the emission of dust in the air from the industrial objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods are used for measuring the emission of dust in the air from the industrial objects. The first is gravimetrical method, measuring of particular matter in flowing gases, using GRAVIMAT SHC 502 sampler, and the second is optoelectronic method working with the transmission light principle with extinction output, using OMD 41 in-situ dust monitor. Both methods are explained theoretically and the probe measurement is fulfilled for one of our industrial objects. The two methods are connected, because of the necessity of the implementation of the results from the first measurements in the second ones which are continual for long time. (Author)

  1. Planck early results. XVII. Origin of the submillimetre excess dust emission in the Magellanic Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    The integrated spectral energy distributions (SED) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) appear significantly flatter than expected from dust models based on their far-infrared and radio emission. The still unexplained origin of this millimetre excess is investigated...... shows the presence of a warm inner arm already found with the Spitzer data, but which also shows the existence of a previously unidentified cold outer arm. Several cold regions are found along this arm, some of which are associated with known molecular clouds. The dust optical depth maps are used...

  2. Is a change in roughness length the cause of the recent decrease in Sahelian dust emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, S.; Knippertz, P.; Marsham, J.

    2012-04-01

    The huge quantity of mineral dust emitted annually from North Africa makes this area crucial to the global dust cycle. Once in the atmosphere, dust aerosols have a significant impact on the global energy and carbon budgets and on air quality. Previous studies have documented changes in the dust output from North Africa on inter-annual to decadal time scales, but the exact reasons for this variability are still a matter of debate. This work uses long-term observations from seven Sahelian surface stations with almost continuous records and frequent dust storms between 1984 and 2010 to explore the trends in mean wind, dust uplift potential (DUP) and dust emission frequency (DEF). DEF is inferred from the present weather codes (WW) of SYNOP reports. The synchronous measurement of wind allows an estimate of a local dust-uplift threshold velocity. DUP is a novel diagnostic that takes into account the non-linear relationship between wind-speed and dust uplift assuming a constant threshold velocity. ECMWF ERA-Interim 10m winds are also used for comparison. There is little evidence in the station data that the increase in vegetation and soil moisture has significantly increased the threshold velocity for dust uplift, suggesting a dominant control by atmospheric processes. Averaged over the seven stations, there is a significant decreasing trend in mean wind over the study period for all seasons, and even more so for DUP and DEF, which are highly correlated. ERA-Interim mean wind, analysed over an area encompassing the seven stations, however, shows a much weaker downward trend, largely confined to the cooler half of the year. It is hypothesized that this cool-season signal is caused by a downward trend in the North Atlantic Oscillation, which is correlated to wind and dust activity on an inter-annual basis during this time of year. The remaining large discrepancies between ERA-Interim and the station observations are unexpected and are thought to be related to recent wetter

  3. Infrared [Fe II] and Dust Emissions from Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Bon-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are strong thermal emitters of infrared radiation. The most prominent lines in the near-infrared spectra of SNRs are [Fe II] lines. The [Fe II] lines are from shocked dense atomic gases, so they trace SNRs in dense environments. After briefly reviewing the physics of the [Fe II] emission in SNR shocks, I describe the observational results which show that there are two groups of SNRs bright in [Fe II] emission: middle-aged SNRs interacting with molecular clouds and young core-collapse SNRs in dense circumstellar medium. The SNRs belonging to the former group are also bright in near-infrared H$_2$ emission, indicating that both atomic and molecular shocks are pervasive in these SNRs. The SNRs belonging to the latter group have relatively small radii in general, implying that most of them are likely the remnants of SN IIL/b or SN IIn that had strong mass loss before the explosion. I also comment on the "[Fe II]-H$_2$ reversal" in SNRs and on using the [Fe II]-line luminosity as an indic...

  4. A Search for the Polarization of Spinning Dust in the Dark Cloud LDN 1622

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, B.; Robishaw, T.; Finkbeiner, D.

    2008-08-01

    Numerous observations have shown that the dark cloud LDN 1622 possesses an anomalous, dust-correlated spectrum of microwave emission. The microwave spectrum is consistent with anomalous spectra observed in other, more diffuse, clouds in the Galaxy and could be caused by electric-dipole emission from small, spinning dust grains. Other mechanisms that have been proposed are magnetic-dipole emission from larger, ferrous grains and hard synchrotron, both of which (unlike electric-dipole emission) would could evince significantly higher levels of polarization. We describe results from an ongoing campaign to measure the polarization of LDN 1622 with the Green Bank Telescope at 8 GHz.

  5. The DIRTY Model II Self-Consistent Treatment of Dust Heating and Emission in a 3-D Radiative Transfer Code

    CERN Document Server

    Misselt, K A; Clayton, G C; Wolff, M J

    2000-01-01

    In this paper and a companion paper we present the DIRTY model, a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, self-consistently including dust heating and emission, and accounting for the effects of the transient heating of small grains. The code is completely general; the density structure of the dust, the number and type of heating sources, and their geometric configurations can be specified arbitrarily within the model space. Source photons are tracked through the scattering and absorbing medium using Monte Carlo techniques and the effects of multiple scattering are included. The dust scattering, absorbing, and emitting properties are calculated from realistic dust models derived by fitting observed extinction curves in Local Group galaxies including the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way. The dust temperature and the emitted dust spectrum are calculated self consistently from the absorbed energy including the effects of temperature fluctuations in small grains. Dust self-absorption is also accounted for, allowi...

  6. Homogeneous dust emission and jet structure near active cometary nuclei: the case of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Tobias; Baum, Daniel; Hege, Hans-Christian; Heller, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    We compute trajectories of dust grains starting from a homogeneous surface activity-profile. Despite the homogeneous initial distribution a collimation in jet-like structures becomes visible. The fine structure is caused by topographical features with similar bundles of normal vectors. Gravitational forces are accurately determined from the triangular surface mesh. For the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, we find several areas of good agreement between the homogeneous dust emission model and Rosetta observation of dust jets.

  7. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Observations of Dust Opacity During Aerobraking and Science Phasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) arrived at Mars in September 1997 near Mars southern spring equinox and has now provided monitoring of conditions in the Mars atmosphere for more than half a Mars year. The large majority of the spectra taken by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are in a nadir geometry (downward looking mode) where Mars is observed through the atmosphere. Most of these contain the distinct spectral signature of atmospheric dust. For these nadir-geometry spectra we retrieve column-integrated infrared aerosol (dust) opacities. TES observations during the aerobraking and science-phasing portions of the MGS mission cover the seasonal range L(sub s)=184 deg - 28 deg. Excellent spatial coverage was obtained in the southern hemisphere. Northern hemisphere coverage is generally limited to narrow strips taken during the periapsis pass but is still very valuable. At the beginning of the mission the 9-(micron)meter dust opacity at midsouthern latitudes was low (0.15-0.25). As the season advanced through southern spring and into summer, TES observed several regional dust storms (including the Noachis dust storm of November 1997) where peak 9-(micron)meter dust opacities approached or exceeded unity, as well as numerous smaller local storms. Both large and small dust storms exhibited significant changes in both spatial coverage and intensity over a timescale of a day. Throughout southern spring and summer the region at the edge of the retreating southern seasonal polar ice cap was observed to be consistently more dusty than other latitudes.

  8. The dust emission law in the wind erosion process on soil surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The dust emission models to date cannot describe the relation between the transport rate of different sized grains and their grain size composition in soil surface, so Aeolian grain transport on a soil-like bed composed of fine sand and silt powder was measured in a wind tunnel. Six types of soil-like beds with different silt fractions have been tested in this experiment. The mass flux profiles of silt dust and sand grains are much different due to their different motion modes. Analysis of the vertical distribution of the powder and sand grains reveals that for a given soil bed, the ratio of the horizontal dust flux to the horizontal sand flux is directly proportional to their mass ratio in the bed. The dust flux is closely linked to the sand flux by the bombardment mechanism. For a given wind velocity and grain size of the bed, the slopes of the vertical mass flux profiles of sand grains larger than 100 μm are nearly equal in a log-linear plot and the ratio between the fraction of transport rate of each size group to the whole transport rate and the mass fraction of each size group in the bed is a constant only dependent on grain size. With this law, the transport rate of dust and different sized grains can be related with the grain size composition in the soil surface.

  9. Testing the performance of state-of-the-art dust emission schemes using DO4Models field data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Haustein

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the Dust Observations for Models (DO4Models project, the performance of three commonly used dust emissions schemes is investigated in this paper using a box model environment. We constrain the model with field data (surface and dust particle properties as well as meteorological parameters obtained from a dry lake bed with a crusted surface in Botswana during a three month period in 2011. Our box model results suggest that all schemes fail to reproduce the observed horizontal dust flux. They overestimate the magnitude of the flux by several orders of magnitude. The discrepancy is much smaller for the vertical dust emission flux, albeit still overestimated by up to an order of magnitude. The key parameter for this mismatch is the surface crusting which limits the availability of erosive material even at higher wind speeds. In contrast, direct dust entrainment was inferred to be important for several dust events, which explains the smaller gap between modelled and measured vertical dust fluxes. We conclude that both features, crusted surfaces and direct entrainment, need to be incorporated in dust emission schemes in order to represent the entire spectra of source processes. We also conclude that soil moisture exerts a key control on the shear velocity and hence the emission threshold of dust in the model. In the field, the state of the crust is the controlling mechanism for dust emission. Although the crust is related to the soil moisture content to some extent, we are not able to deduce a~robust correlation between state of crust and soil moisture.

  10. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Aniano, G; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fanciullo, L; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Magalhães, A M; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Salerno, E; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wandelt, B D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them with the Planck and WMAP data at 12 frequencies from 23 to 353 GHz, over circular patches with 10 degree radius. The cross-correlation analysis is performed for both intensity and polarization data in a consistent manner. We use a mask that focuses our analysis on the diffuse interstellar medium at intermediate Galactic latitudes. We determine the spectral indices of dust emission in intensity and polarization between 100 and 353 GHz, for each sky-patch. The mean values, $1.63\\pm0.03$ for polarization and $1.52\\pm0.02$ for intensity, for a mean dust temperature of 18.7 K, are close, but significantly different. We determine the mean spectral energy distribution (SED) of the microwave emission, correlated with the 353 GHz dust templates, by averaging the results of the correlation over all sky-p...

  11. Modeling the emission, transport and deposition of contaminated dust from a mine tailing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A; Sáez, A Eduardo; Villar, Omar Ignacio Felix; Rine, Kyle P; Russell, Mackenzie R; King, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of contaminants from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are significantly contaminated with lead and arsenic with an average soil concentration of 1616 and 1420 ppm, respectively. Similar levels of these contaminants have also been measured in soil samples taken from the area surrounding the mine tailings. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we have been able to model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes a distributed Eulerian model to simulate fine aerosol transport and a Lagrangian approach to model fate and transport of larger particles. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations.

  12. Infrared emission from tidal disruption events --- probing the pc-scale dust content around galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Wenbin; Evans, Neal J

    2015-01-01

    Recent UV-optical surveys have been successful in finding tidal disruption events (TDEs), in which a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH). These TDEs release a huge amount of radiation energy ~ 10^51-52 erg into the circum-nuclear medium. If the medium is dusty, most of the radiation energy will be absorbed by dust grains within ~ 1 pc from the BH and re-radiated in the infrared. We calculate the dust emission lightcurve from a 1-D radiative transfer model, taking into account the time-dependent heating, cooling and sublimation of dust grains. We show that the dust emission peaks at 3-10 microns and has typical luminosities ~ 10^42-43 erg/s (with sky covering factor of dusty clouds ranging from 0.1-1). This is detectable by current generation of telescopes. In the near future, James Webb Space Telescope will be able to perform photometric and spectroscopic measurements, in which silicate or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features may be found. Observations at rest-frame wavelengt...

  13. Near-infrared thermal emissivity from ground based atmospheric dust measurements at ORM

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardi, G; Ortolani, S; Melnick, J; Ghedina, A; Garcia, A; Molinari, E; Gatica, C

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the atmospheric content of aerosols measured at Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM; Canary Islands). Using a laser diode particle counter located at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) we have detected particles of 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 um size. The seasonal behavior of the dust content in the atmosphere is calculated. The Spring has been found to be dustier than the Summer, but dusty conditions may also occur in Winter. A method to estimate the contribution of the aerosols emissivity to the sky brightness in the near-infrared (NIR) is presented. The contribution of dust emission to the sky background in the NIR has been found to be negligible comparable to the airglow, with a maximum contribution of about 8-10% in the Ks band in the dusty days.

  14. Sensitivity Study of Cross-Atlantic Dust Transport to Dust Emissions, Chemical Aging and Removal Processes and Comparison with Ground and Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Mohamed; Metzger, Swen; Klingmüller, Klaus; Steil, Benedikt; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    Representing transatlantic dust transport is one of the challenges in climate modeling and of key importance, because of its large impact on the Earth's radiation budget. Desert dust, emitted from the Sahara, is regularly transported westwards across the Atlantic Ocean towards the Caribbean. The balance between emissions and removal processes, as well as the manifold chemical reactions control the impact of dust on the atmospheric composition and the interaction of dust with climate change. During transatlantic transport, dust undergoes chemical aging, which involves various heterogeneous reactions that strongly depend on the mineral composition of dust (alkalinity), the surface chemistry and the associated aerosol water uptake. In this study, different parameters affecting the long-range dust transport are studied with the atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC. We consider chemical speciation of primary sea salt and dust particles and account for major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2) and anions (Cl-, SO42-, HSO4-), calculated online with meteorology, i.e., feeding back onto precipitation and changing surface wind speed and roughness. We resolve the chemical aging of primary particles through explicit neutralization reactions of the cations and anions with major oxidation products (H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, NH3) from natural and anthropogenic air pollution sources, which can condense on the particles surface during long-range transport and undergo gas-liquid-solid aerosol partitioning, depending on the concentration level of emissions and the transport processes of the primary and secondary aerosols and their precursor gases. Comprehensive analysis of the different parameters affecting the long-range transport, which include the emission flux and particle size distributions, aging mechanism, convection scheme, wet and dry scavenging, show a strong dependence of the dust concentration and optical properties over the Caribbean mainly on the chemical aging of dust during long

  15. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.;

    2015-01-01

    of the cosmic microwave background. We use a mask that focuses our analysis on the diffuse interstellar medium at intermediate Galactic latitudes. We determine the spectral indices of dust emission in intensity and polarization between 100 and 353 GHz, for each sky patch. Both indices are found to be remarkably...... templates, by averaging the results of the correlation over all sky patches. We find that the mean SED increases for decreasing frequencies at νaccounted for by a synchrotron component correlated...

  16. Dust emission and transport over Iraq associated with the summer Shamal winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam Francis, Diana Bou; Flamant, Cyrille; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Banks, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the diurnal evolution of the summer Shamal wind (a quasi-permanent low-level northwesterly wind feature) and its role in dust emission and transport over Iraq, using ground-based and space-borne observations together with a numerical simulation performed with the mesoscale model Meso-NH. A 6-year dataset from the synoptic stations over Iraq allows establishing the prominence of the link between strong near surface winds and reduced visibility in the summer. The detailed processes at play during Shamal events are explored on the basis of a Meso-NH simulation for a given, representative case study (25 June-3 July 2010). The Shamal exhibits an out-of-phase relationship between the surface wind and winds in the lower troposphere (typically 500 m above ground level), the maximum surface wind speeds being observed during the day while in altitude the maximum wind speeds are observed at night. The daytime near surface winds, at the origin of dust emission, are associated with the downward transfer of momentum from the nocturnal low-level jet to the surface due to turbulent mixing after solar heating commences each day. For the first time, an estimate of the dust load associated with summer Shamal events over Iraq has been made using aerosol optical depths derived from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the simulation. The dust load exhibits a large diurnal variability, with a daily minimum value of 1 Tg around 0600 UTC and a daily peak of 2.5 Tg or more around 1500 UTC, and is driven by the diurnal cycle of the near surface wind speed. The daily dust load peak associated with the summer Shamal over Iraq is in the same order of magnitude as those derived from simulations downstream of the Bodélé depression in Chad, known to be the world's largest dust source. Keywords: Dust, Low Level Jet, Shamal winds, Middle East, dust sources.

  17. Dust and Gas in the Magellanic Clouds from the Heritage Herschel Key Project. I. Dust Properties and Insights into the Origin of the Submm (Submillimeter) Excess Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Karl D.; Roman-Duval, Julia; Bot, Caroline; Meixner, Margaret; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bolatto, Alberto; Boyer, Martha L.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Engelbracht, Charles; Fukui, Yasuo; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Hony, Sacha; Hughes, Annie; Indebetouw, Remy; Israel, Frank P.; Jameson, Katie; Kawamura, Akiko; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Li, Aigen; Madden, Suzanne C.; Matsuura, Mikako; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The dust properties in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are studied using the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project photometric data in five bands from 100 to 500 micromillimeters. Three simple models of dust emission were fit to the observations: a single temperature blackbody modified by a powerlaw emissivity (SMBB), a single temperature blackbody modified by a broken power-law emissivity (BEMBB), and two blackbodies with different temperatures, both modified by the same power-law emissivity (TTMBB). Using these models we investigate the origin of the submillimeter excess; defined as the submillimeter (submm) emission above that expected from SMBB models fit to observations properties; further work is needed to determine the relative contributions of fitting noise and ISM physics to the correlations.

  18. Dust in the polar region as a major contributor to the IR emission of AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Hoenig, Sebastian F; Tristram, Konrad R W; Prieto, M Almudena; Gandhi, Poshak; Asmus, Daniel; Antonucci, Robert; Burtscher, Leonard; Duschl, Wolfgang J; Weigelt, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) It is generally assumed that the distribution of dust on parsec scales forms a geometrically- and optically-thick entity in the equatorial plane around the accretion disk and broad-line region - dubbed "dust torus" - that emits the bulk of the sub-arcsecond-scale IR emission and gives rise to orientation-dependent obscuration. Here we report detailed interferometry observations of the unobscured (type 1) AGN in NGC 3783 that allow us to constrain the size, elongation, and direction of the mid-IR emission with high accuracy. The mid-IR emission is characterized by a strong elongation toward position angle PA -52 deg, closely aligned with the polar axis (PA -45 deg). We determine half-light radii along the major and minor axes at 12.5 {\\mu}m of (4.23 +/- 0.63) pc x (1.42 +/- 0.21) pc, which corresponds to intrinsically-scaled sizes of (69.4 +/- 10.8) rin x (23.3 +/- 3.5) rin for the inner dust radius of rin = 0.061 pc as inferred from near-IR reverberation mapping. This implies an axis ratio of 3:1, ...

  19. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R. A.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J. F.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; Paytan, A.; Patey, M. D.; Achterberg, E. P.; Engelbrecht, J. P.; Fomba, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity, the quantification of which could be useful in determining the magnitude and sign of the biogeochemical feedback on radiative forcing. However, the impact of elemental deposition to remote ocean regions is not well understood and is not currently included in global climate models. In this study, emission inventories for eight elements primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si are determined based on a global mineral data set and a soil data set. The resulting elemental fractions are used to drive the desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions is evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically range from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soils, are consistent with observations, suggesting that this ratio is a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different; estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observations of elemental aerosol concentrations from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions range from 0.7 to 1.6, except for Mg and Mn (3.4 and 3.5, respectively). Using the soil database improves the correspondence of the spatial heterogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust element fluxes to different ocean basins and ice sheet regions have been estimated, based on the model results. The annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using the mineral data set are 0.30 Tg

  20. Dust Emissivity in the Star-Forming Filament OMC 2/3

    OpenAIRE

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Stutz, A. M.; Schnee, S.; Mason, B. S.; Di Francesco, J.; Friesen, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    We present new measurements of the dust emissivity index, beta, for the high-mass, star-forming OMC 2/3 filament. We combine 160-500 um data from Herschel with long-wavelength observations at 2 mm and fit the spectral energy distributions across a ~ 2 pc long, continuous section of OMC 2/3 at 15000 AU (0.08 pc) resolution. With these data, we measure beta and reconstruct simultaneously the filtered-out large-scale emission at 2 mm. We implement both variable and fixed values of beta, finding ...

  1. An anomalous extinction law in the Cep OB3b young cluster: Evidence for dust processing during gas dispersal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Thomas S.; Prchlik, Jakub J.; Megeath, S. Thomas [University of Toledo, Ritter Astrophysical Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Five College Astronomy Department, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Pipher, Judith L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Naylor, Tim [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Jeffries, R. D. [Astrophysics Group, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, UK ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-10

    We determine the extinction law through Cep OB3b, a young cluster of 3000 stars undergoing gas dispersal. The extinction is measured toward 76 background K giants identified with MMT/Hectospec spectra. Color excess ratios were determined toward each of the giants using V and R photometry from the literature, g, r, i, and z photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and J, H, and K{sub s} photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. These color excess ratios were then used to construct the extinction law through the dusty material associated with Cep OB3b. The extinction law through Cep OB3b is intermediate between the R{sub V} = 3.1 and R{sub V} = 5 laws commonly used for the diffuse atomic interstellar medium and dense molecular clouds, respectively. The dependence of the extinction law on line-of-sight A{sub V} is investigated and we find the extinction law becomes shallower for regions with A{sub V} > 2.5 mag. We speculate that the intermediate dust law results from dust processing during the dispersal of the molecular cloud by the cluster.

  2. Dust aerosol emission over the Sahara during summertime from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Martin C.; Cavazos-Guerra, Carolina

    2016-03-01

    Dust aerosols are an important component of the climate system and a challenge to incorporate into weather and climate models. Information on the location and magnitude of dust emission remains a key information gap to inform model development. Inadequate surface observations ensure that satellite data remain the primary source of this information over extensive and remote desert regions. Here, we develop estimates of the relative magnitude of active dust emission over the Sahara desert based on data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Utilising the unique vertical profile of aerosol characteristics provided by CALIOP our algorithm identifies emission from aerosol extinction and lidar backscatter in the near surface layers. From the long-term CALIOP archive of day and night-time orbits over 2006-13 we construct coarse resolution maps of a new dust emission index (DEI) for the Sahara desert during the peak summer dust season (June to September). The spatial structure of DEI indicates highest emission over a broad zone focused on the border regions of Southern Algeria, Northern Mali and northwest Niger, displaced substantially (∼7°) to the east of the mean maximum in satellite-derived aerosol optical depth. In this region night-time emission exceeds that during the day. The DEI maps substantially corroborate recently derived dust source frequency count maps based on back-tracking plumes in high temporal resolution SEVIRI imagery. As such, a convergence of evidence from multiple satellite data sources using independent methods provides an increasingly robust picture of Saharan dust emission sources. Various caveats are considered. As such, quantitative estimates of dust emission may require a synergistic combined multi-sensor analysis.

  3. Size distributions of mineral aerosols and dust emission flux observed over Horqin Sandy Land area in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Size distribution of mineral aerosols is of primary importance in determining their residence time in atmosphere, transport patterns, removal mechanisms as well as their effects on climate and human health. This study aims to obtain dust particle size distribution and size-resolved dust emission flux under different weather conditions over a sandy land area in northern China (Horqin Sandy Land, Inner Mongolia, using the observational data from Horqin sandstorm monitoring station in the spring of 2010 and 2012. Dust (PM20 mass concentration was measured by a 10-stage quartz crystal microbalance (QCM cascade impactor. The statistical results indicate that finer dust particles (r ≤ 1.0 μm take a large proportion of all PM20 concentration under clear-day conditions, while coarser dust particles (r ≥ 2.5 μm concentration increased under dust-day conditions, with the peak occurring between 4–7 μm. The dust particle size distributions during the pre-dust-emission and dust-emission periods of a dust event on 7 April 2012 have similar features to the statistical results. During the dust event, the magnitude of dust emission flux of all sizes increased about one or two orders (0.1–10 μg m−2 s−1 as u* increase from 0.54 to 1.29 m s−1. The maximum total F value was about 43.0 μg m−2 s−1 and the maximum size-resolved F(Ddi is 12.3 μg m−2 s−1 in 0.3–0.45 μm size bin when u* is 1.29 m s−1. Dust advection has effects on airborne dust size distribution, making the proportion of dust particles of different sizes more uniform, as observed in a non-local dust event on 19 April 2012.

  4. Dust and Gas in the Magellanic Clouds from the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project. I. Dust Properties and Insights into the Origin of the Submm Excess Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Karl D; Bot, Caroline; Meixner, Margaret; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bolatto, Alberto; Boyer, Martha L; Clayton, Geoffrey C; Engelbracht, Charles; Fukui, Yasuo; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Hony, Sacha; Hughes, Annie; Indebetouw, Remy; Israel, Frank P; Jameson, Katie; Kawamura, Akiko; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Li, Aigen; Madden, Suzanne C; Matsuura, Mikako; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Okumura, K; Onishi, Toshikazu; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Paradis, Deborah; Rubio, Monica; Sandstrom, Karin; Sauvage, Marc; Seale, Jonathan; Sewilo, Marta; Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Skibba, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    The dust properties in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are studied using the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project photometric data in five bands from 100 to 500 micron. Three simple models of dust emission were fit to the observations: a single temperature blackbody modified by a power- law emissivity (SMBB), a single temperature blackbody modified by a broken power-law emissivity (BEMBB), and two blackbodies with different temperatures, both modified by the same power-law emissivity (TTMBB). Using these models we investigate the origin of the submm excess; defined as the submillimeter (submm) emission above that expected from SMBB models fit to observations < 200 micron. We find that the BEMBB model produces the lowest fit residuals with pixel-averaged 500 micron submm excesses of 27% and 43% for the LMC and SMC, respectively. Adopting gas masses from previous works, the gas-to-dust ratios calculated from our the fitting results shows that the TTMBB fits require significantly more dust than are available e...

  5. Echo Emission From Dust Scattering and X-Ray Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, L; Mirabal, N

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effect of X-ray echo emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We find that the echo emission can provide an alternative way of understanding X-ray shallow decays and jet breaks. In particular, a shallow decay followed by a "normal" decay and a further rapid decay of X-ray afterglows can be together explained as being due to the echo from prompt X-ray emission scattered by dust grains in a massive wind bubble around a GRB progenitor. We also introduce an extra temporal break in the X-ray echo emission. By fitting the afterglow light curves, we can measure the locations of the massive wind bubbles, which will bring us closer to finding the mass loss rate, wind velocity, and the age of the progenitors prior to the GRB explosions.

  6. WMAP 3yr data with the CCA: anomalous emission and impact of component separation on the CMB power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaldi, A; Leach, S; Stivoli, F; Baccigalupi, C; De Zotti, G

    2007-01-01

    The Correlated Component Analysis (CCA) allows us to estimate how the different diffuse emissions mix in CMB experiments, exploiting also complementary information from other surveys. It is especially useful to deal with possible additional components. An application of CCA to WMAP maps assuming that only the canonical Galactic emissions are present, highlights the widespread presence of a spectrally flat "synchrotron" component, largely uncorrelated with the synchrotron template, suggesting that an additional foreground is indeed required. We have tested various spectral shapes for such component, namely a power law as expected if it is flat synchrotron, and two spectral shapes that may fit the spinning dust emission: a parabola in the logS - log(frequency) plane, and a grey body. Quality tests applied to the reconstructed CMB maps clearly disfavour two of the models. The CMB power spectra, estimated from CMB maps reconstructed exploiting the three surviving foreground models, are generally consistent with t...

  7. Implementation of dust emission and chemistry into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system and initial application to an Asian dust storm episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ modeling system version 4.7 is further developed to enhance its capability in simulating the photochemical cycles in the presence of dust particles. The new model treatments implemented in CMAQ v4.7 in this work include two online dust emission schemes (i.e., the Zender and Westphal schemes, nine dust-related heterogeneous reactions, an updated aerosol inorganic thermodynamic module ISORROPIA II with an explicit treatment of crustal species, and the interface between ISORROPIA II and the new dust treatments. The resulting improved CMAQ (referred to as CMAQ-Dust, offline-coupled with the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF, is applied to the April 2001 dust storm episode over the trans-Pacific domain to examine the impact of new model treatments and understand associated uncertainties. WRF/CMAQ-Dust produces reasonable spatial distribution of dust emissions and captures the dust outbreak events, with the total dust emissions of ~111 and 223 Tg when using the Zender scheme with an erodible fraction of 0.5 and 1.0, respectively. The model system can reproduce well observed meteorological and chemical concentrations, with significant improvements for suspended particulate matter (PM, PM with aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm, and aerosol optical depth than the default CMAQ v4.7. The sensitivity studies show that the inclusion of crustal species reduces the concentration of PM with aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5 over polluted areas. The heterogeneous chemistry occurring on dust particles acts as a sink for some species (e.g., as a lower limit estimate, reducing O3 by up to 3.8 ppb (~9% and SO2 by up to 0.3 ppb (~27% and as a source for some others (e.g., increasing fine-mode SO42− by up to 1.1 μg m−3 (~12% and PM2.5 by up to 1.4 μg m−3 (~3% over the domain. The

  8. Model of Dust Thermal Emission of Comet 67p-Churyumov-Gerasimenko for the Rosetta-MIRO Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, Adeline; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Leyrat, Cedric; Zakharov, Vladimir; Crovisier, Jacques; Biver, Nicolas; Gulkis, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    The ESA's Rosetta spacecraft will arrive at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014. The study of gas and dust emission is primary objective of several instruments on the Rosetta spacecraft, including the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). We developed a model of dust thermal emission to estimate the detectability of dust in the vicinity of the nucleus with MIRO. Our model computes the power received by the MIRO antenna in limb viewing as a function of the geometry of the observations and the physical properties of the grains. We show that detection in the millimeter and submillimeter channels can be achieved near perihelion.

  9. Dust in the diffuse interstellar medium: Extinction, emission, linear and circular polarisation

    CERN Document Server

    Siebenmorgen, R; Bagnulo, S

    2013-01-01

    We present a model for the diffuse interstellar dust that explains the observed wavelength-dependence of extinction, emission, linear and circular polarisation of light. The model is set-up with a small number of parameters. It consists of a mixture of amorphous carbon and silicate grains with sizes from the molecular domain of 0.5 up to about 500nm. Dust grains with radii larger than 6nm are spheroids. Spheroidal dust particles have a factor 1.5 - 3 larger absorption cross section in the far IR than spherical grains of the same volume. Mass estimates derived from submillimeter observations that ignore this effect are overestimated by the same amount. In the presence of a magnetic field, spheroids may be partly aligned and polarise light. We find that polarisation spectra help to determine the upper particle radius of the otherwise rather unconstrained dust size distribution. Stochastically heated small grains of graphite, silicates and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are included. We tabulate paramet...

  10. Baseline scenario for gas, odor, dust and particulate matter emissions from swine buildings in Quebec : part 1 : emissions inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The livestock industry, particularly the swine sector, has taken measures to minimize the environmental impacts of meat production at both the local, regional and global scale. This paper reported on solutions to reduce emissions associated with animal production through animal waste management. The substances targeted by technological improvements for swine barns include carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ammonia, dust, odors and particulate matters. Stakeholders in Quebec's swine sector have taken the initiative to evaluate and compare the environmental performances of various in-barn technologies and practices. This paper also presented a project aimed at defining baseline scenarios for gaseous wastes, odor, dust and particulate matter emissions from pig barns, using 2006 as the reference year. The study considered all stages of production of a typical farrow-to-finish farm in Quebec. The paper outlined a methodology based on emissions inventory in order to define this baseline scenario. The results and key limitations of this methodology were discussed. 26 refs., 5 tabs., 1 appendix.

  11. A portable scanning lidar for real-time detection of fugitive dust emissions from multisource facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmitt, G.D. [Simpson Weather Associates, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A 400 mj, incoherent, pulsed, scanning CO{sub 2} lidar referred to as the Portable Laser for Coal Emission Mapping (PLACEM) is combined with a real-time version of EPA`s Industrial Source Complex - Short Term (ISCST) model to map TSP concentrations and dry deposition of fugitive particulate emissions from multiple sources within a coal handling complex. A Simpson Weather Associates concept, funded by Pier IX (a subsidiary of Zeigler Coal Handling Company), PLACEM was developed in response to the need for an eye-safe laser technique for (1) assessing the relative contribution of intermittent dust generating activities and sources within a coal transshipment facility, (2) evaluating the efficiency of various dust control measures, and (3) developing a means to assess compliance with pending Clean Air Act (CAA, 1990) regulations requiring Continuous Emission Monitoring (CEM). Integration of the PLACEM observations with the ISCST2 provides a means of dynamically calibrating the model for use with conventional in situ particulate monitors. Both simulated and real observations are presented to demonstrate the viability and utility of this lidar/model approach to fugitive emission monitoring.

  12. Planck Early Results: Origin of the submm excess dust emission in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bot, C; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Dobashi, K; Doerl, U; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fukui, Y; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kawamura, A; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Linden-V\\ornle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Onishi, T; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paradis, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    The integrated Spectral Energy Distributions of the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud appear significantly flatter than expected from dust models based on their FIR and radio emission. The origin of this millimetre excess is still unexplained, and is here investigated using the Planck data. The background CMB contribution is subtracted using an ILC method performed locally around the galaxies. The foreground emission from the Milky Way is subtracted. After subtraction, the emission of both galaxies correlates closely with the gas emission of the LMC and SMC. The millimetre excess in the LMC can be explained by CMB fluctuations, but a significant excess is still present in the SMC SED. The Planck and IRIS data at 100 micron are combined to produce thermal dust temperature and optical depth maps of the two galaxies. The LMC temperature map shows the presence of a warm inner arm already found with the Spitzer data, but also shows the existence of a previously unidentified cold outer arm. Several cold regions are ...

  13. Millimeter dust emission compared with other mass estimates in N11 molecular clouds in the LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, Cinthya N; Bolatto, Alberto D; Boulanger, Francois; Israel, Frank P; Rantakyro, Fredrik T

    2013-01-01

    CO and dust emission at millimeter wavelengths are independent tracers of cold interstellar matter, which have seldom been compared on the scale of GMCs in other galaxies. In this study, and for the first time in the Large Magellanic Cloud, we compute the molecular cloud masses from the mm emission of the dust and compare them with the masses derived from their CO luminosity and virial theorem. We present CO (J=1-0,2-1) and 1.2 mm continuum observations of the N11 star forming region in the LMC obtained with the SEST telescope and the SIMBA bolometer, respectively. We use the CO data to identify individual molecular clouds and measure their physical properties. The correlations between the properties of the N11 clouds are in agreement with those found in earlier studies in the LMC that sample a larger set of clouds and a larger range of cloud masses. For the N11 molecular clouds, we compare the masses estimated from the CO luminosity (Xco\\Lco), the virial theorem (Mvir) and the millimeter dust luminosity (L_d...

  14. Calculation of Stochastic Heating and Emissivity of Cosmic Dust Grains with Optimization for the Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, Troy A

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic dust particles effectively attenuate starlight. Their absorption of starlight produces emission spectra from the near- to far-infrared, which depends on the sizes and properties of the dust grains, and spectrum of the heating radiation field. The near- to mid-infrared is dominated by the emissions by very small grains. Modeling the absorption of starlight by these particles is, however, computationally expensive and a significant bottleneck for self-consistent radiation transport codes treating the heating of dust by stars. In this paper, we summarize the formalism for computing the stochastic emissivity of cosmic dust, which was developed in earlier works, and present a new library HEATCODE implementing this formalism for the calculation for arbitrary grain properties and heating radiation fields. Our library is highly optimized for general-purpose processors with multiple cores and vector instructions, with hierarchical memory cache structure. The HEATCODE library also efficiently runs on co-processo...

  15. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. IV. Anomalous behavior of the broad ultraviolet emission lines in NGC 5548

    CERN Document Server

    Goad, M R; De Rosa, G; Kriss, G A; Edelson, R; Barth, A J; Ferland, G J; Kochanek, C S; Netzer, H; Peterson, B M; Bentz, M C; Bisogni, S; Crenshaw, D M; Denney, K D; Ely, J; Fausnaugh, M M; Grier, C J; Gupta, A; Horne, K D; Kaastra, J; Pancoast, A; Pei, L; Pogge, R W; Skielboe, A; Starkey, D; Vestergaard, M; Zu, Y; Anderson, M D; Arevalo, P; Bazhaw, C; Borman, G A; Boroson, T A; Bottorff, M C; Brandt, W N; Breeveld, A A; Brewer, B J; Cackett, E M; Carini, M T; Croxall, K V; Bonta, E Dalla; de Lorenzo-Caceres, A; Dietrich, M; Efimova, N V; Evans, P A; Filippenko, A V; Flatland, K; Gehrels, N; Geier, S; Gelbord, G M; Gonzalez, L; Gorjian, V; Grupe, D; Hall, P B; Hicks, S; Horenstein, D; Hutchison, T; Im, M; Jensen, J J; Joner, M D; Jones, J; Kaspi, S; Kelly, B C; Kennea, J A; Kim, M; Kim, S C; Klimanov, S A; Larionov, V M; Lee, J C; Leonard, D C; Lira, P; MacInnis, F; Manne-Nicholas, E R; Mathur, S; McHardy, I M; Montouri, C; Musso, R; Nazarov, S V; Norris, R P; Nousek, J A; Okhmat, D N; Papadakis, I; Parks, J R; Pott, J -U; Rafter, S E; Rix, H -W; Saylor, D A; Schimoia, J S; Schnulle, K; Sergeev, S G; Siegel, M; Spencer, M; Sung, H -I; Teems, K G; Treu, T; Turner, C S; Uttley, P; Villforth, C; Weiss, Y; Woo, J -H; Yan, H; Young, S; Zheng, W -K

    2016-01-01

    During an intensive Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) UV monitoring campaign of the Seyfert~1 galaxy NGC 5548 performed from 2014 February to July, the normally highly correlated far-UV continuum and broad emission-line variations decorrelated for ~60 to 70 days, starting ~75 days after the first HST/COS observation. Following this anomalous state, the flux and variability of the broad emission lines returned to a more normal state. This transient behavior, characterised by significant deficits in flux and equivalent width of the strong broad UV emission lines, is the first of its kind to be unambiguously identified in an active galactic nucleus reverberation mapping campaign. The largest corresponding emission-line flux deficits occurred for the high-ionization collisionally excited lines, C IV and Si IV(+O IV]), and also He II(+O III]), while the anomaly in Ly-alpha was substantially smaller. This pattern of behavior indicates a depletion in the flux of photons with E_{\\rm ph} >...

  16. Measurements of the millimeter-wave spectrum of interstellar dust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M. L.; Clapp, A.; Devlin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Lange, A. E.; Lubin, P. M.; Meinhold, P. R.; Richards, P. L.; Smoot, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    We report measurements of the differential brightness of interstellar dust emission near the Galactic plane and at high Galactic latitudes. The data were obtained as part of a program to measure anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The measurements were made with a 0.5 deg beam size and a 1.3 deg sinusoidal chop, in broad bands (Delta nu/nu approximately 0.3) centered near frequencies of 6, 9, and 12 cm(exp -1). A measurement made toward the Galactic plane, at longitude 1 = 23.7 deg, is compared with the contrast observed in the 100 micrometers IRAS data. Assuming the dust emission has a brightness I(sub nu) proportional to nu(sup n)B(sub nu)(T(sub d)), where B(sub nu) is the Planck function, a best fit yields n = 1.6 +/- 0.4, T(sub d) = 24 +/- 5 K. In a region near the star mu Pegasi (mu PEG l = 91 deg, b = -31 deg), the comparison of our data with the 100 micrometers IRAS data yields n = 1.4 +/- 0.4, and T(sub d) = 18 +/- 3 K. In a second region near the star gamma Ursa Minoris (GUM l = 108 deg, b = 41 deg), an upper limit is placed on contrast in dust emission. This upper limit is consistent with spectrum measured at mu PEG and the IRAS 100 micrometer emission contrast at GUM, which is approximately 8 times lower than mu PEG.

  17. THE LOCAL DUST FOREGROUNDS IN THE MICROWAVE SKY. I. THERMAL EMISSION SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps made by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have revealed anomalies not predicted by the standard inflationary cosmology. In particular, the power of the quadrupole moment of the CMB fluctuations is remarkably low, and the quadrupole and octopole moments are aligned mutually and with the geometry of the solar system. It has been suggested in the literature that microwave sky pollution by an unidentified dust cloud in the vicinity of the solar system may be the cause for these anomalies. In this paper, we simulate the thermal emission by clouds of spherical homogeneous particles of several materials. Spectral constraints from the WMAP multi-wavelength data and earlier infrared observations on the hypothetical dust cloud are used to determine the dust cloud's physical characteristics. In order for its emissivity to demonstrate a flat, CMB-like wavelength dependence over the WMAP wavelengths (3 through 14 mm), and to be invisible in the infrared light, its particles must be macroscopic. Silicate spheres of several millimeters in size and carbonaceous particles an order of magnitude smaller will suffice. According to our estimates of the abundance of such particles in the zodiacal cloud and trans-Neptunian belt, yielding the optical depths of the order of 10-7 for each cloud, the solar system dust can well contribute 10 μK (within an order of magnitude) in the microwaves. This is not only intriguingly close to the magnitude of the anomalies (about 30 μK), but also alarmingly above the presently believed magnitude of systematic biases of the WMAP results (below 5 μK) and, to an even greater degree, of the future missions with higher sensitivities, e.g., Planck.

  18. Long-Term Variations, Signatures, Sources of Asian Dust and Role of Climate Change Versus Desertification in Asian Dust Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.Y. Zhang; S.L. Gong; T.L. Zhao; R. Arimoto; Y.Q. Wang; Z.J. Zhou

    2004-01-01

    @@ For long-term variations and elemental signatures of Asian dust aerosol, changes in mass, twenty elemental concentrations over the period 2001~2003 were assessed from five surface-based stations in western, northern, northeast deserts, the Loess Plateau and the coastal areas in China. Together with the back trajectory analyses and visibility observations, the elemental signatures of soil dust aerosol from different air-mass clusters were characterized for the dust storm (DS) and non-dust storm (N-DS)conditions, respectively.

  19. Estimation of Supraglacial Dust and Debris Geochemical Composition via Satellite Reflectance and Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kimberly Ann; Kaab, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral estimation of supraglacial dust, debris, ash and tephra geochemical composition from glaciers and ice fields in Iceland, Nepal, New Zealand and Switzerland. Surface glacier material was collected and analyzed via X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for geochemical composition and mineralogy. In situ data was used as ground truth for comparison with satellite derived geochemical results. Supraglacial debris spectral response patterns and emissivity-derived silica weight percent are presented. Qualitative spectral response patterns agreed well with XRF elemental abundances. Quantitative emissivity estimates of supraglacial SiO2 in continental areas were 67% (Switzerland) and 68% (Nepal), while volcanic supraglacial SiO2 averages were 58% (Iceland) and 56% (New Zealand), yielding general agreement. Ablation season supraglacial temperature variation due to differing dust and debris type and coverage was also investigated, with surface debris temperatures ranging from 5.9 to 26.6 C in the study regions. Applications of the supraglacial geochemical reflective and emissive characterization methods include glacier areal extent mapping, debris source identification, glacier kinematics and glacier energy balance considerations.

  20. Estimation of Supraglacial Dust and Debris Geochemical Composition via Satellite Reflectance and Emissivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Casey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate spectral estimation of supraglacial dust, debris, ash and tephra geochemical composition from glaciers and ice fields in Iceland, Nepal, New Zealand and Switzerland. Surface glacier material was collected and analyzed via X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF and X-ray diffraction (XRD for geochemical composition and mineralogy. In situ data was used as ground truth for comparison with satellite derived geochemical results. Supraglacial debris spectral response patterns and emissivity-derived silica weight percent are presented. Qualitative spectral response patterns agreed well with XRF elemental abundances. Quantitative emissivity estimates of supraglacial SiO2 in continental areas were 67% (Switzerland and 68% (Nepal, while volcanic supraglacial SiO2 averages were 58% (Iceland and 56% (New Zealand, yielding general agreement. Ablation season supraglacial temperature variation due to differing dust and debris type and coverage was also investigated, with surface debris temperatures ranging from 5.9 to 26.6 C in the study regions. Applications of the supraglacial geochemical reflective and emissive characterization methods include glacier areal extent mapping, debris source identification, glacier kinematics and glacier energy balance considerations.

  1. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, N.; Kogut, A.; Chuss, D. T.; Miller, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 mm to 100 μm and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems (TLS) model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anti-correlation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner et al. because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model that was recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenological model consisting of the sum of two graybody components. We find that the two-graybody model gives the best fit and the FDS model gives a significantly poorer fit than the other models. The Meisner and Finkbeiner model and the TLS model remain viable for use in Galactic foreground subtraction, but the FIRAS data do not have a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to provide a strong test of the predicted spectrum at millimeter wavelengths.

  2. Measurements of the Intensity and Polarization of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus molecular complex with QUIJOTE

    CERN Document Server

    Génova-Santos, R; Rebolo, R; Peláez-Santos, A; López-Caraballo, C H; Harper, S; Watson, R A; Ashdown, M; Barreiro, R B; Casaponsa, B; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Fernández-Cobos, R; Grainge, K J B; Herranz, D; Hoyland, R; Lasenby, A; López-Caniego, M; Martínez-González, E; McCulloch, M; Melhuish, S; Piccirillo, L; Perrott, Y C; Poidevin, F; Razavi-Ghods, N; Scott, P F; Titterington, D; Tramonte, D; Vielva, P; Vignaga, R

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) has been observed in numerous sky regions, in the frequency range ~10-60 GHz. One of the most scrutinized regions is G159.6-18.5, located within the Perseus molecular complex. In this paper we present further observations of this region (194 hours in total over ~250 deg^2), both in intensity and in polarization. They span four frequency channels between 10 and 20 GHz, and were gathered with QUIJOTE, a new CMB experiment with the goal of measuring the polarization of the CMB and Galactic foregrounds. When combined with other publicly-available intensity data, we achieve the most precise spectrum of the AME measured to date, with 13 independent data points being dominated by this emission. The four QUIJOTE data points provide the first independent confirmation of the downturn of the AME spectrum at low frequencies, initially unveiled by the COSMOSOMAS experiment in this region. We accomplish an accurate fit of these data using models based on electric dipole emission from spin...

  3. Anomalous temperature dependent magneto-conductance in organic light-emitting diodes with multiple emissive states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of the magneto-conductance (MC) in organic electron donor-acceptor hybrid and layer heterojunction diodes was studied. The MC value increased with temperature in layer heterojunction and in 10 wt. % hybrid devices. An anomalous decrease of the MC with temperature was observed in 25 wt. %–50 wt. % hybrid devices. Further increasing donor concentration to 75 wt. %, the MC again increased with temperature. The endothermic exciplex-exciton energy transfer and the change in electroplex/exciton ratio caused by change in charge transport with temperature may account for these phenomena. Comparative studies of the temperature evolutions of the IV curves and the electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra back our hypothesis

  4. Polarized Microwave Radiation from Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2001-01-01

    Observations of cosmic microwave background in the range 10-90 GHz have revealed an anomalous foreground component well correlated with 12 \\mum, 60 \\mum and 100 \\mum emission from interstellar dust. As the recent cross-correlation analysis of WHAM H\\alpha maps with the Tenerife 10 and 15 GHz maps supports an earlier conclusion that the emission does not arise from free-free radiation, the interstellar dust origin of it is left as the only suspect. Two competing models of this emission exist. The more favored at the moment is the spinning dust model, the other is the model that uses grains with strong magnetic response. In the spinning dust model the emission arises from rapid rotation of ultrasmall grains that have dipole moments, while in the other model magnetic grains emit due to thermal vibrations of magnetic dipoles. Both models predict the emission to be partially polarized and this emission can seriously interfere with the CMB polarization measurements. We discuss observational signatures that can be u...

  5. Definition of yearly emission factor of dust and greenhouse gases through continuous measurements in swine husbandry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Annamaria; Guarino, Marcella

    The object of this study was to develop an accurate estimation method to evaluate the contribution of the various compartments of swine husbandry to dust and GHG (greenhouse gases, CO 2, CH 4 and N 2O) emission into the atmosphere during one year of observation. A weaning, a gestation, a farrowing and a fattening room in an intensive pig house were observed in three different periods (Autumn-Winter, Springtime and Summer, monitoring at least 60% of each period (20% at the beginning, in the middle and at the end) of each cycle). During monitoring, live weight, average live weight gain, number of animals and its variation, type of feed and feeding time were taken into account to evaluate their influence on PM 10, or the fraction of suspended particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 μm [Emission Inventory Guidebook, 2007. B1100 Particle Emissions from Animal Husbandry Activities. Available from: (accessed October 2008)] and to define GHG emission. The selected piggery had a ventilation control system using a free running impeller to monitor continuously real-time environmental and management parameters with an accuracy of 5%. PM 10 concentration was monitored by a sampler (Haz Dust EPAM 5000), either continuously or through traditional gravimetric technique, and the mean value of dust amount collected on the membranes was utilized as a correction factor to be applied to continuously collected data. PM 10 concentration amount incoming from inlets was removed from PM 10 emission calculation, to estimate the real contribution of pig house dust pollution into atmosphere. Mean yearly emission factor of PM 10 was measured in 2 g d -1 LU -1 for the weaning room, 0.09 g d -1 LU -1 for the farrowing room, 2.59 g d -1 LU -1 for the fattening room and 1.23 g d -1 LU -1 for the gestation room. The highest PM 10 concentration and emission per LU was recorded in the fattening compartment while the lowest value was recorded in the farrowing room. CO

  6. Secondary electron emission from a charged spherical dust particle due to electron incidence according to OML model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Y., E-mail: tomita@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Huang, Z.H.; Pan, Y.D. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Kawamura, G. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Yan, L.W. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2015-08-15

    Effect of secondary electron emission (SEE) current to dust charging and influence to forces on a dust particle are studied according to the orbital motion limited (OML) model. As higher electron temperature increases the SEE current, the negative dust charge decreases. As a result, the ion friction force on the dust particle decreases. The critical electron temperatures without the dust charge are 75.1, 70.3 and 55.9 eV for graphite and are 31.3, 30.4 and 27.1 eV for tungsten to the temperature ratio T{sub i}/T{sub e} = 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0, respectively. At the critical electron temperature, there is no ion scattering force but the ion absorption force remains finite.

  7. Discovery of transient infrared emission from dust heated by stellar tidal disruption flares

    CERN Document Server

    van Velzen, Sjoert; Krolik, Julian H; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2016-01-01

    Stars that pass within the Roche radius of a supermassive black hole will be tidally disrupted, yielding a sudden injection of gas close to the black hole horizon which produces an electromagnetic flare. A few dozen of these flares have been discovered in recent years, but current observations provide poor constraints on the bolometric luminosity and total accreted mass of these events. Using images from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have discovered transient 3.4 micron emission from several previously known tidal disruption flares. The observations can be explained by dust heated to its sublimation temperature due to the intense radiation of the tidal flare. From the break in the infrared light curve we infer that this hot dust is located ~0.1 pc from the supermassive black hole. Since the dust has been heated by absorbing UV and (potentially) soft X-ray photons of the flare, the reprocessing light curve yields an estimate of the bolometric flare luminosity. For the flare PTF-09ge, we in...

  8. Physical Dust Models in the Light of Planck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draine, Bruce T.

    2015-08-01

    The Spitzer, Herschel, and Planck missions have provided observational data that challenge existing models of interstellar dust, and will guide us in the development of a new generation of dust models. The spectacular data from Planck now enable us to characterize the intensity of dust emission at wavelengths from 350um to 3mm, with invaluable measurements of polarized dust emission from 850um to 4mm. Models for interstellar dust are constrained by these new data, and also by many other observational constraints, such as infrared emission at shorter wavelengths, wavelength-dependent extinction and polarization of starlight, scattering of starlight, scattering and extinction of X-rays by dust, and ground-based studies of anomalous microwave emission.A physical dust model consists of dust grains with specified compositions, geometries, and sizes. The assumed physical properties of the dust should be consistent with the laws of physics, our understanding of candidate materials, and interstellar abundance constraints. I will review some contemporary dust models, and discuss how they fare when confronted with available data.

  9. The Effect of Noise in Dust Emission Maps on the Derivation of Column Density, Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    CERN Document Server

    Schnee, S; Bertoldi, A G F

    2006-01-01

    We have mapped the central 10'x10' of the dense core TMC-1C at 450, 850 and 1200 microns using SCUBA on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and MAMBO on the IRAM 30m telescope. We show that although one can, in principle, use images at these wavelengths to map the emissivity spectral index, temperature and column density independently, noise and calibration errors would have to be less than 2% to accurately derive these three quantities from a set of three emission maps. Because our data are not this free of errors, we use our emission maps to fit the dust temperature and column density assuming a constant value of the emissivity spectral index and explore the effects of noise on the derived physical parameters. We find that the derived extinction values for TMC-1C are large for a starless core (80 mag Av), and the derived temperatures are low (6 K) in the densest regions of the core, using our derived value of beta = 1.8.

  10. Spatial and temporal patterns of dust emissions (2004-2012) in semi-arid landscapes, southeastern Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagg, Cody B.; Neff, Jason C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Belnap, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Aeolian dust can influence nutrient availability, soil fertility, plant interactions, and water-holding capacity in both source and downwind environments. A network of 85 passive collectors for aeolian sediment spanning numerous plant communities, soil types, and land-use histories covering approximately 4000 square kilometers across southeastern Utah was used to sample horizontal emissions of aeolian sediment. The sample archive dates to 2004 and is currently the largest known record of field-scale dust emissions for the southwestern United States. Sediment flux peaked during the spring months in all plant communities (mean: 38.1 g m−2 d−1), related to higher, sustained wind speeds that begin in the early spring. Dust flux was lowest during the winter period (mean: 5 g m−2 d−1) when surface wind speeds are typically low. Sites dominated by blackbrush and sagebrush shrubs had higher sediment flux (mean: 19.4 g m−2 d−1) compared to grasslands (mean: 11.2 g m−2 d−1), saltbush shrublands (mean: 10.3 g m−2 d−1), and woodlands (mean: 8.1 g m−2 d−1). Contrary to other studies on dust emissions, antecedent precipitation during one, two, and three seasons prior to sample collection did not significantly influence emission rates. Physical site-scale factors controlling dust emissions were complex and varied from one vegetation type to another.

  11. Sensitivity of desert dust emission modelling to horizontal resolution: the example of the Bodélé Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, Christel; Cautenet, Guy; Marticorena, Béatrice; Bergametti, Gilles; Minvielle, Fanny; Schmechtig, Catherine; Laurent, Benoit

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to play an important role in the Earth's climate system. However, the quantification of aerosol radiative impact on the Earth's radiative budget is very complex because of the high variability in space and time of aerosol mass and particle number concentrations, and optical properties as well. In many regions, like in desert regions, dust is the largest contribution to aerosol optical thickness [Tegen et al., 1997]. Consequently, it appears fundamental to well represent mineral dust emissions to reduce uncertainties concerning aerosol radiative impact on the Earth's radiative budget. Recently, several studies (e.g. Prospero et al. [2002]) underlined that the Bodélé depression, in northern Chad, is probably the most important source of mineral dust in the world. However many models fail in simulating these large dust emissions. Indeed, dust emission is a threshold phenomenon mainly driven by the intensity of surface wind velocity. Realistic estimates of dust emissions then rely on the quality and accuracy of the surface wind fields. Koren and Kaufman [2004] showed that the reanalysis data (NCEP), which can be used as input data in numerical models, underestimates surface wind velocity in the Bodélé Depression by up to 50%. Such an uncertainty on surface wind velocity cannot allow an accurate simulation of the dust emission. In mesoscale meteorological models, global reanalysis datasets are used to initialize and laterally nudge the models that compute meteorological parameters (like wind velocity) with a finer spatial and temporal resolutions. The question arises concerning the precision of the wind speeds calculated by these models. Using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, Cotton et al. [2003]) coupled online with the dust production model developed by Marticorena and Bergametti [1995] and recently improved by Laurent et al. [2008] for Africa, the influence of the horizontal resolution of the mesoscale meteorological

  12. Self-similarity and scaling behaviour of infrared emission from radiatively heated dust - I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezic, Zeljko; Elitzur, Moshe

    1997-06-01

    Dust infrared emission possesses scaling properties that yield powerful results with far-reaching observational consequences. Scaling was first noticed by Rowan-Robinson for spherical shells and is shown here to be a general property of dust emission in arbitrary geometries. Overall luminosity is never an input parameter of the radiative transfer problem; spectral shape is the only relevant property of the heating radiation when the inner boundary of the dusty region is controlled by dust sublimation. Similarly, the absolute scales of densities and distances are irrelevant; the geometry enters only through angles, relative thicknesses and aspect ratios, and the actual magnitudes of densities and distances enter only through one independent parameter, the overall optical depth. That is, as long as the overall optical depth stays the same, the system dimensions can be scaled up or down by an arbitrary factor without any effect on the radiative transfer problem. Dust properties enter only through dimensionless, normalized distributions that describe the spatial variation of density and the wavelength dependence of scattering and absorption efficiencies. Scaling enables a systematic approach to modelling and classification of IR spectra. We develop a new, fully scale-free method for solving radiative transfer, present exact numerical results, and derive approximate analytical solutions for spherical geometry, covering the entire range of parameter space relevant to observations. For a given type of grains, the spectral energy distribution (SED) is primarily controlled by the profile of the spatial dust distribution and the optical depth - each density profile produces a family of solutions, with position within the family determined by optical depth. From the model SEDs presented here, the density distribution and optical depth can be observationally determined for various sources. Scaling implies tight correlations among the SEDs of various members of the same class

  13. Laboratory Measurements on Charging of Individual Micron-Size Apollo-11 Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Observations made during Apollo missions, as well as theoretical models indicate that the lunar surface and dust grains are electrostatically charged, levitated and transported. Lunar dust grains are charged by UV photoelectric emissions on the lunar dayside and by the impact of the solar wind electrons on the nightside. The knowledge of charging properties of individual lunar dust grains is important for developing appropriate theoretical models and mitigating strategies. Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size size lunar dust grains in particular by low energy electron impact. However, experimental results based on extensive laboratory measurements on the charging of individual 0.2-13 micron size lunar dust grains by the secondary electron emissions (SEE) have been presented in a recent publication. The SEE process of charging of micron-size dust grains, however, is found to be very complex phenomena with strong particle size dependence. In this paper we present some examples of the complex nature of the SEE properties of positively charged individual lunar dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB), and show that they remain unaffected by the variation of the AC field employed in the above mentioned measurements.

  14. Modelling road dust emission abatement measures using the NORTRIP model: Vehicle speed and studded tyre reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M.; Sundvor, I.; Denby, B. R.; Johansson, C.; Gustafsson, M.; Blomqvist, G.; Janhäll, S.

    2016-06-01

    Road dust emissions in Nordic countries still remain a significant contributor to PM10 concentrations mainly due to the use of studded tyres. A number of measures have been introduced in these countries in order to reduce road dust emissions. These include speed reductions, reductions in studded tyre use, dust binding and road cleaning. Implementation of such measures can be costly and some confidence in the impact of the measures is required to weigh the costs against the benefits. Modelling tools are thus required that can predict the impact of these measures. In this paper the NORTRIP road dust emission model is used to simulate real world abatement measures that have been carried out in Oslo and Stockholm. In Oslo both vehicle speed and studded tyre share reductions occurred over a period from 2004 to 2006 on a major arterial road, RV4. In Stockholm a studded tyre ban on Hornsgatan in 2010 saw a significant reduction in studded tyre share together with a reduction in traffic volume. The model is found to correctly simulate the impact of these measures on the PM10 concentrations when compared to available kerbside measurement data. Importantly meteorology can have a significant impact on the concentrations through both surface and dispersion conditions. The first year after the implementation of the speed reduction on RV4 was much drier than the previous year, resulting in higher mean concentrations than expected. The following year was much wetter with significant rain and snow fall leading to wet or frozen road surfaces for 83% of the four month study period. This significantly reduced the net PM10 concentrations, by 58%, compared to the expected values if meteorological conditions had been similar to the previous years. In the years following the studded tyre ban on Hornsgatan road wear production through studded tyres decreased by 72%, due to a combination of reduced traffic volume and reduced studded tyre share. However, after accounting for exhaust

  15. DUST CONTINUUM EMISSION AS A TRACER OF GAS MASS IN GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use a sample of 36 galaxies from the KINGFISH (Herschel IR), HERACLES (IRAM CO), and THINGS (Very Large Array H I) surveys to study empirical relations between Herschel infrared (IR) luminosities and the total mass of the interstellar gas (H2 + H I). Such a comparison provides a simple empirical relationship without introducing the uncertainty of dust model fitting. We find tight correlations, and provide fits to these relations, between Herschel luminosities and the total gas mass integrated over entire galaxies, with the tightest, almost linear, correlation found for the longest wavelength data (SPIRE 500). However, we find that accounting for the gas-phase metallicity (affecting the dust to gas ratio) is crucial when applying these relations to low-mass, and presumably high-redshift, galaxies. The molecular (H2) gas mass is found to be better correlated with the peak of the IR emission (e.g., PACS160), driven mostly by the correlation of stellar mass and mean dust temperature. When examining these relations as a function of galactocentric radius, we find the same correlations, albeit with a larger scatter, up to a radius of r ∼ 0.7 r 25 (containing most of a galaxy's baryonic mass). However, beyond that radius, the same correlations no longer hold, with increasing gas (predominantly H I) mass relative to the infrared emission. The tight relations found for the bulk of the galaxy's baryonic content suggest that total gas masses of disk-like (non-merging/ULIRG) galaxies can be inferred from far-infrared continuum measurements in situations where only the latter are available, e.g., in ALMA continuum observations of high-redshift galaxies

  16. DUST CONTINUUM EMISSION AS A TRACER OF GAS MASS IN GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, Brent A.; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, Adam [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Galametz, Maud [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Hunt, Leslie [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Dale, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Croxall, Kevin [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 4051 McPherson Laboratory, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert Jr., E-mail: brent@mpia.de [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-20

    We use a sample of 36 galaxies from the KINGFISH (Herschel IR), HERACLES (IRAM CO), and THINGS (Very Large Array H I) surveys to study empirical relations between Herschel infrared (IR) luminosities and the total mass of the interstellar gas (H{sub 2} + H I). Such a comparison provides a simple empirical relationship without introducing the uncertainty of dust model fitting. We find tight correlations, and provide fits to these relations, between Herschel luminosities and the total gas mass integrated over entire galaxies, with the tightest, almost linear, correlation found for the longest wavelength data (SPIRE 500). However, we find that accounting for the gas-phase metallicity (affecting the dust to gas ratio) is crucial when applying these relations to low-mass, and presumably high-redshift, galaxies. The molecular (H{sub 2}) gas mass is found to be better correlated with the peak of the IR emission (e.g., PACS160), driven mostly by the correlation of stellar mass and mean dust temperature. When examining these relations as a function of galactocentric radius, we find the same correlations, albeit with a larger scatter, up to a radius of r ∼ 0.7 r {sub 25} (containing most of a galaxy's baryonic mass). However, beyond that radius, the same correlations no longer hold, with increasing gas (predominantly H I) mass relative to the infrared emission. The tight relations found for the bulk of the galaxy's baryonic content suggest that total gas masses of disk-like (non-merging/ULIRG) galaxies can be inferred from far-infrared continuum measurements in situations where only the latter are available, e.g., in ALMA continuum observations of high-redshift galaxies.

  17. Reverberation Response Models of the Infrared Dust Emission from a Clumpy Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeyda, Triana

    2016-08-01

    The obscuring circum-nuclear dusty torus is a major component of AGN and yet, thus far, its shape, composition, and structure have not been well constrained by observations. However, using indirect methods such as reverberation mapping, the size and structure of the torus can be estimated through the time variability of the dusty torus emission in response to changes in the AGN luminosity. I will discuss the computer simulation that I have developed in order to extract structural information from the infrared light curves of 12 Type 1 AGN, obtained during a 2.5 year monitoring campaign using the Spitzer Space Telescope and several ground-based optical telescopes. Given an input optical light curve, the code computes the temporal response of the infrared emission spectrum of a 3D ensemble of dust clouds as a function of time. I will present simulations exploring the effects of various geometrical and structural properties, dust cloud orientation, and anisotropy of the illuminating radiation field on the dusty torus response at selected infrared wavelengths. I will also compare model infrared light curves to those observed for the recently discovered changing-look AGN, NGC 6418.

  18. Polarization of Magnetic Dipole Emission and Spinning Dust Emission from Magnetic Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic dipole emission (MDE) from interstellar magnetic nanoparticles is an important Galactic foreground in the microwave frequencies, and its polarization level may pose great challenges for achieving reliable measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode signal. To obtain theoretical constraints on the polarization of MDE, we first compute the degree of alignment of big silicate grains incorporated with magnetic inclusions. We find that, in realistic conditions of the interstellar medium, thermally rotating big grains with magnetic inclusions are weakly aligned and achieve {\\it alignment saturation} when the magnetic alignment rate becomes much faster than the rotational damping rate. We then compute the degree of alignment for free-flying magnetic nanoparticles, taking into account various interaction processes of grains with the ambient gas and radiation field, including neutral collisions, ion collisions, and infrared emission. We find that the rotational damping by infrared emission can si...

  19. Anomalous enhanced emission from PbS quantum dots on a photonic-crystal microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, Ting Shan; Xiong, Shisheng; Chow, Weng W.; Miao, Xiaoyu; Subramania, Ganesh; Resnick, Paul J.; Fischer, Arthur J.; Brinker, Jeffrey C.

    2011-05-09

    We report up to 75 times enhancement in emission from lithographically produced photonic crystals with postprocessing close-packed colloidal quantum-dot incorporation. In our analysis, we use the emission from a close-packed free-standing film as a reference. After discounting the angular redistribution effect, our analysis shows that the observed enhancement is larger than the combined effects of Purcell enhancement and dielectric enhancement with the microscopic local field. The additional enhancement mechanisms, which are consistent with all our observations, are thought to be spectral diffusion mediated by phonons and local polarization fluctuations that allow off-resonant excitons to emit at the cavity wavelengths.

  20. Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The polarized thermal emission from diffuse Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100 GHz. In this paper we exploit the uniqueness of the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353 GHz to measure the polarized dust angular power spectra CℓEE and CℓBB over the multipole range 40 <ℓ< 600 well away from the Galactic plane. These measurements will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and allow a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. Despite the non-Gaussian and anisotropic nature of Galactic dust, we show that general statistical properties of the emission can be characterized accurately over large fractions of the sky using angular power spectra. The polarization power spectra of the dust are well described by power laws in multipole, Cℓ ∝ ℓα, with exponents αEE,BB = -2.42 ± 0.02. The amplitudes of the polarization power spectra vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity power spectra. The frequency dependence of the dust polarization spectra is consistent with modified blackbody emission with βd = 1.59 and Td = 19.6 K down to the lowest Planck HFI frequencies. We find a systematic difference between the amplitudes of the Galactic B- and E-modes, CℓBB/CℓEE = 0.5. We verify that these general properties are preserved towards high Galactic latitudes with low dust column densities. We show that even in the faintest dust-emitting regions there are no "clean" windows in the sky where primordial CMB B-mode polarization measurements could be made without subtraction of foreground emission. Finally, we investigate the level of dust polarization in the specific field recently targeted by the BICEP2 experiment. Extrapolation of the Planck 353 GHz data to 150 GHz gives a dust power 𝒟ℓBB ≡ ℓ(ℓ+1)CℓBB/(2π) of 1.32 × 10-2 μKCMB2 over the multipole range

  1. X-Ray Emission from a prominent dust lane lenticular galaxy NGC 5866

    CERN Document Server

    Vagshette, N D; Pandey, S K; Patil, M K

    2015-01-01

    We report the multiband imagery with an emphasis on the X-ray emission properties of a prominent dust lane lenticular galaxy NGC 5866. X-ray emission from this galaxy is due to a diffuse component and a substantial contribution from the population of discrete X-ray binary sources. A total of 22 discrete sources have been detected within the optical D25 extent of the galaxy, few of which exhibit spatial association with the globular clusters hosted by this system. Composite spectrum of the diffuse emission from this galaxy was well constrained by a thermal plasma model plus a power law component to represent the emission from unresolved sources, while that of the discrete sources was well fitted by an absorbed power law component of photon index 1.82$\\pm$0.14. X-ray color-color plot for the resolved source was used to classify the detected sources. The cumulative X-ray luminosity function of the XRBs is well represented by a power law function of index of {\\Gamma} ~ 0.82$\\pm$0.12. Optical imagery of NGC 5866 r...

  2. Dust emission and star formation toward a redshift 5.5 QSO

    CERN Document Server

    Bertoldi, F

    2003-01-01

    We report observations of the low-luminosity z = 5.50 quasar RD J030117+002025 (RD0301 hereafter) at 250 GHz (1.20mm) using the Max-Planck Millimeter Bolometer (MAMBO) array at the IRAM 30-meter telescope. The quasar was detected with a 1.2mm flux density of 0.87 +-0.20 mJy. The lack of detectable 1.4 GHz radio emission indicates that the millimeter emission is of thermal nature, making RD0301 the most distant dust-emission source known. When matching a 50K grey body thermal far-infrared (FIR) spectrum to the observed millimeter flux we imply a FIR luminosity ~4x10^12 L_sun, which is comparable to the quasar's optical luminosity. If the FIR luminosity arises from massive star formation, the implied star formation rate would be ~600 M_sun/yr, comparable to that of the starburst galaxies which dominate the average star formation and FIR emission in the early Universe. The FIR luminosity of RD0301 is close to the average of that found in optically far more luminous high-redshift quasars. The comparably high mill...

  3. Restarting radio activity and dust emission in radio-loud broad absorption line quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, G; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Brienza, M; González-Serrano, J I

    2015-01-01

    Broad absorption line quasars (BAL QSOs) are objects showing absorption from relativistic outflows, with velocities up to 0.2c. These manifest, in about 15% of quasars, as absorption troughs on the blue side of UV emission lines, such as C iv and Mg ii. In this work, we complement the information collected in the cm band for our previously presented sample of radio loud BAL QSOs with new observations at m and mm bands. Our aim is to verify the presence of old, extended radio components in the MHz range, and probe the emission of dust (linked to star formation) in the mm domain. We observed 5 sources from our sample, already presenting hints of low-frequency emission, with the GMRT at 235 and 610 MHz. Other 17 sources (more than half the sample) were observed with bolometer cameras at IRAM-30m and APEX. All sources observed with the GMRT present extended emission at a scale of tens of kpc. In some cases these measurements allow us to identify a second component in the SED, at frequencies below 1.4 GHz, beyond ...

  4. Models for Dust and Molecular Emission of High-Mass Protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, Mayra

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a detailed modeling aimed to reproduce the spectral energy distribution (SED) of dust and molecular line emission of massive protostars under the hypothesis that they form via an accretion process. We model the emission originated in the infalling envelopes at scales smaller than 0.1 pc from the central protostar. To do that, we compared our model results with observational data covering a wide range of wavelengths, paying special attention to the high angular resolution mid-infrared data obtained with the Gemini Observatory and the ammonia line emission observed with the VLA at centimeter wavelengths. We have explored two kind of model envelopes. In the first kind of models, spherical symmetry is assumed and the SED as well as the ammonia emission of the infalling envelope are calculated. In this way, the temperature, density, velocity, velocity dispersion, and ammonia abundance variations along the core can be obtained. The second approach takes into account deviations from the sph...

  5. Quantifying the impact of sub-grid surface wind variability on sea salt and dust emissions in CAM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Wan, Hui; Qian, Yun; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Sakaguchi, Koichi; Liu, Xiaohong

    2016-02-12

    This paper evaluates the impact of sub-grid variability of surface wind on sea salt and dust emissions in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). The basic strategy is to calculate emission fluxes multiple times, using different wind speed samples of a Weibull probability distribution derived from model-predicted grid-box mean quantities. In order to derive the Weibull distribution, the sub-grid standard deviation of surface wind speed is estimated by taking into account four mechanisms: turbulence under neutral and stable conditions, dry convective eddies, moist convective eddies over the ocean, and air motions induced by mesoscale systems and fine-scale topography over land. The contributions of turbulence and dry convective eddy are parameterized using schemes from the literature, while the wind variabilities caused by moist convective eddies and fine-scale topography are estimated using empirical relationships derived from an operational weather analysis dataset at 15 km resolution. The estimated sub-grid standard deviations of surface wind speed agree well with reference results derived from one year of global weather analysis at 15 km resolution and from two regional model simulations with 3 km grid spacing. The wind-distribution-based emission calculations are implemented in CAM5. Simulations at 2 resolution indicate that sub-grid wind variability has relatively small impacts (about 7% increase) on the global annual mean emission of sea salt aerosols, but considerable influence on the emission of dust. Among the considered mechanisms, dry convective eddies and meso-scale flows associated with topography are major causes of dust emission enhancement. With all the four mechanisms included and without additional adjustment of uncertain parameters in the model, the simulated global and annual mean dust emission increase by about 50% compared to the default model. By tuning the globally constant dust emission scale factor, the global annual mean dust

  6. Dust emissivity in the star-forming filament OMC 2/3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Stutz, A. M.; Schnee, S.; Mason, B. S.; Di Francesco, J.; Friesen, R. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present new measurements of the dust emissivity index, β, for the high-mass, star-forming OMC 2/3 filament. We combined 160-500 μm data from Herschel with long-wavelength observations at 2 mm and fit the spectral energy distributions across a ≃2 pc long, continuous section of OMC 2/3 at 15 000 AU (0.08 pc) resolution. With these data, we measured β and reconstructed simultaneously the filtered-out large-scale emission at 2 mm. We implemented both variable and fixed values of β, finding that β = 1.7-1.8 provides the best fit across most of OMC 2/3. These β values are consistent with a similar analysis carried out with filtered Herschel data. Thus, we show that β values derived from spatial filtered emission maps agree well with those values from unfiltered data at the same resolution. Our results contradict the very low β values (~0.9) previously measured in OMC 2/3 between 1.2 mm and 3.3 mm data, which we attribute to elevated fluxes in the 3.3 mm observations. Therefore, we find no evidence of rapid, extensive dust grain growth in OMC 2/3. Future studies with Herschel data and complementary ground-based long-wavelength data can apply our technique to obtain reliable determinations of β in nearby cold molecular clouds. A FITS image for the GISMO 2 mm observations is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A30

  7. Standardization in dust emission measurement; Mesure des emissions de poussieres normalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, R. [INERIS, 60 - Verneuil-en-Halatte, (France)

    1996-12-31

    The European Standardization Committee (CEN TC 264WG5) is developing a new reference method for measuring particulate emissions, suitable for concentrations inferior to 20 mg/m{sup 3} and especially for concentrations around 5 mg/m{sup 3}; the measuring method should be applicable to waste incinerator effluents and more generally to industrial effluents. Testing protocols and data analysis have been examined and repeatability and reproducibility issues are discussed

  8. Soil Moisture Eff ects on Sand Saltation and Dust Emission Observed over the Horqin Sandy Land Area in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaolan; ZHANG Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the eff ects of soil moisture on sand saltation and dust emission over the Horqin Sandy Land area are investigated, based on observations of three dust events in 2010. The minimum friction velocity initiating the motion of surface particles, namely, the threshold friction velocity, is estimated to be 0.34, 0.40, and 0.50 m s−1 under the very dry, dry, and wet soil conditions, respectively. In comparison with the observations during the dust events under the very dry and dry soil conditions, the dust emission fl ux during the wet event is smaller, but the saltation activities of sand particles (d≧50 µm) are stronger. The size distributions of airborne dust particles (0.1≦d≦20 µm) show that concentrations of the fi ner dust particles (0.1≦d≦0.3 µm) have a secondary peak under dry soil conditions, while they are absent under wet soil conditions. This suggests that the surface soil particle size distribution can be changed by soil moisture. Under wet soil conditions, the particles appear to have a larger size, and hence more potential saltating particles are available. This explains the occurrence of stronger saltation processes observed under wet soil conditions.

  9. Diagnostic evaluation of the Community Earth System Model in simulating mineral dust emission with insight into large-scale dust storm mobilization in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad; Yang, Zong-Liang; Lawrence, David M.

    2016-06-01

    Large amounts of mineral dust are injected into the atmosphere during dust storms, which are common in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) where most of the global dust hotspots are located. In this work, we present simulations of dust emission using the Community Earth System Model Version 1.2.2 (CESM 1.2.2) and evaluate how well it captures the spatio-temporal characteristics of dust emission in the MENA region with a focus on large-scale dust storm mobilization. We explicitly focus our analysis on the model's two major input parameters that affect the vertical mass flux of dust-surface winds and the soil erodibility factor. We analyze dust emissions in simulations with both prognostic CESM winds and with CESM winds that are nudged towards ERA-Interim reanalysis values. Simulations with three existing erodibility maps and a new observation-based erodibility map are also conducted. We compare the simulated results with MODIS satellite data, MACC reanalysis data, AERONET station data, and CALIPSO 3-d aerosol profile data. The dust emission simulated by CESM, when driven by nudged reanalysis winds, compares reasonably well with observations on daily to monthly time scales despite CESM being a global General Circulation Model. However, considerable bias exists around known high dust source locations in northwest/northeast Africa and over the Arabian Peninsula where recurring large-scale dust storms are common. The new observation-based erodibility map, which can represent anthropogenic dust sources that are not directly represented by existing erodibility maps, shows improved performance in terms of the simulated dust optical depth (DOD) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) compared to existing erodibility maps although the performance of different erodibility maps varies by region.

  10. Planck intermediate results. XXI. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust at 353 GHz with interstellar polarization in the visible

    OpenAIRE

    Ade, P. A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Planck survey provides unprecedented full-sky coverage of the submillimetre polarized emission from Galactic dust. In addition to the information on the direction of the Galactic magnetic field, this also brings new constraints on the properties of dust. The dust grains that emit the radiation seen by Planck in the submillimetre also extinguish and polarize starlight in the visible. Comparison of the polarization of the emission and of the interstellar polarization on selected lines of si...

  11. Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; White, M; White, S D M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    The polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100GHz. We exploit the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353GHz to measure the dust angular power spectra $C_\\ell^{EE,BB}$ over the range $40<\\ell<600$. These will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. We show that statistical properties of the emission can be characterized over large fractions of the sky using $C_\\ell$. For the dust, they are well described by power laws in $\\ell$ with exponents $\\alpha^{EE,BB}=-2.42\\pm0.02$. The amplitudes of the polarization $C_\\ell$ vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity ones. The dust polarization frequency dependence is consistent with modified blackbody emission with $\\beta_d=1.59$ and $T_d=19.6$K. We find a systematic ratio between the amplitudes of ...

  12. A Climatology of Dust-Emission Events over North Africa Based on 27 Years of Surface Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, S.; Knippertz, P.; Schepanski, K.

    2012-04-01

    The huge quantity of mineral dust emitted annually from North Africa makes this area crucial to the global dust cycle. Once in the atmosphere, dust aerosols have a significant impact on the global radiation budget, clouds, the carbon cycle and can even act as a fertilizer to rain forests in South America. Current model estimates of dust production from North Africa are uncertain. At the heart of this problem is insufficient understanding of key dust emitting processes such as haboobs (cold pools generated through evaporation of convective precipitation), low-level jets (LLJs), and dry convection (dust devils and dust plumes). Scarce observations in this region, in particular in the Sahara, make model evaluation difficult. This work uses long-term surface observations from the MIDAS data set (~120 stations in the arid part of North Africa) to explore the diurnal, seasonal, decadal and geographical variations in dust emission events and their associated wind thresholds. The threshold values are determined from probability density functions of observed 10-minute anemomenter wind speeds. Emission events are defined using the present weather codes (WW) of SYNOP reports. These codes represent events of smaller intensity such as "Dust or sand raised by wind" to severe dust storms. During the 27-year study period (1984-2011) stations are required to have a minimum of 1000 dust observations to be included in the analysis. Dust emission frequency (DEF) is calculated for different time intervals (e.g. monthly, 3-hourly) taking into account the different number of measurements available at each station. North of 25°N a maximum during March-May is evident and relatively consistent over the whole North African region. Wind-speed thresholds for dust emission north of 25°N are higher than south of 25°N in the Sahel, where station-to-station variability is larger, and enhanced DEF activity during February-March is observed. The variability in this region is closely linked to the

  13. The Galactic Disk Distribution of Planetary Nebulae with Warm Dust Emission Features II

    CERN Document Server

    Casassus, S

    2000-01-01

    Can the distribution of warm-dust compositions in IR-bright galactic disk PNe be linked to the underlying stellar population? The PNe with warm dust emission represent a homogeneous population, which is presumably young and minimally affected by a possible dependence of PN lifetime on progenitor mass. The sample in paper I thus allows testing the predictions of single star evolution, through a comparison with synthetic distributions and under the assumption that tip-of-the-AGB and PN statistics are similar. We construct a schematic model for AGB evolution (adapted from Groenewegen & de Jong 1993), whose free-parameters are calibrated with the luminosity function (LF) of C stars in the LMC, the initial-final mass relation, and the range of PN compositions. The observed metallicity gradient and distribution of star forming regions with galactocentric radius (Bronfman et al. 2000) allow us to synthesise the galactic disk PN progenitor population. We find the fraction of O-rich PNe, f(O), is a tight constrain...

  14. Thermal emission from the dust coma of Comet Bowell and a model for the grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the physical characteristics of Comet Bowell is presented based on 10 and 20 microns emissions observed with the NASA 3 m IR telescope during 1981-82. Numerical models are defined for quantifying the number of dust particles at a given radius and at a given angular distance from the nucleus, the contribution of icy grains to the 20 microns flux and the average albedo, and the dust distribution in the coma. Large, dirty ice grains are judged to be responsible for production of OH at a rate of about 10 to the 29th mol/sec during the spring of 1981. The total surface area of the dirty ice grains is projected to be 10 to the 15th sq cm. The coma in 1982 would therefore have consisted of nonvolatile grains, i.e., old dirty ice grains. Further observations of other, similar comets are needed to identify the composition of the emitted grains and the heliocentric distance at which high water production is initiated. 24 references

  15. Parameterization of dust emissions in the global atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC: impact of nudging and soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Astitha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Airborne desert dust influences radiative transfer, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, as well as nutrient transport and deposition. It directly and indirectly affects climate on regional and global scales. Two versions of a parameterization scheme to compute desert dust emissions are incorporated into the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy2.41 Atmospheric Chemistry. One uses a globally uniform soil particle size distribution, whereas the other explicitly accounts for different soil textures worldwide. We have tested these two versions and investigated the sensitivity to input parameters, using remote sensing data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET and dust concentrations and deposition measurements from the AeroCom dust benchmark database (and others. The two versions are shown to produce similar atmospheric dust loads in the N-African region, while they deviate in the Asian, Middle Eastern and S-American regions. The dust outflow from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean is accurately simulated by both schemes, in magnitude, location and seasonality. Approximately 70% of the modelled annual deposition data and 70–75% of the modelled monthly aerosol optical depth (AOD in the Atlantic Ocean stations lay in the range 0.5 to 2 times the observations for all simulations. The two versions have similar performance, even though the total annual source differs by ~50%, which underscores the importance of transport and deposition processes (being the same for both versions. Even though the explicit soil particle size distribution is considered more realistic, the simpler scheme appears to perform better in several locations. This paper discusses the differences between the two versions of the dust emission scheme, focusing on their limitations and strengths in describing the global dust cycle and suggests possible future improvements.

  16. Dust Emissivity in the Star-Forming Filament OMC 2/3

    CERN Document Server

    Sadavoy, S I; Schnee, S; Mason, B; Di Francesco, J; Friesen, R

    2016-01-01

    We present new measurements of the dust emissivity index, beta, for the high-mass, star-forming OMC 2/3 filament. We combine 160-500 um data from Herschel with long-wavelength observations at 2 mm and fit the spectral energy distributions across a ~ 2 pc long, continuous section of OMC 2/3 at 15000 AU (0.08 pc) resolution. With these data, we measure beta and reconstruct simultaneously the filtered-out large-scale emission at 2 mm. We implement both variable and fixed values of beta, finding that beta = 1.7 - 1.8 provides the best fit across most of OMC 2/3. These beta values are consistent with a similar analysis carried out with filtered Herschel data. Thus, we show that beta values derived from spatial filtered emission maps agree well with those values from unfiltered data at the same resolution. Our results contradict the very low beta values (~ 0.9) previously measured in OMC 2/3 between 1.2 mm and 3.3 mm data, which we attribute to elevated fluxes in the 3.3 mm observations. Therefore, we find no evide...

  17. Properties of dust and detection of Halpha emission in LDN 1780

    CERN Document Server

    Burgo, C

    2006-01-01

    We present ISOPHOT observations between 60 and 200 microns and a near-infrared extinction map of LDN 1780. We have used the ISOPHOT data together with the 25, 60 and 100 microns IRIS maps to disentangle the warm and cold components of large dust grains that are observed in translucent and dense clouds. The warm and cold components in LDN 1780 have different properties and spatial distributions, with the warm component surrounding the cold component. The cold component is associated with molecular gas at densities of ~1000 cm^-3. The warm component has a uniform colour temperature of 25 K, and the colour temperature of the cold component slightly varies between 15.8 and 17.3 K (beta=2, Delta(T)=0.5 K). The ratio between the 200 microns emission of the cold component and Av is Ic(200)/Av=12.1 MJy/sr/mag and the average ratio tau(200)/Av=2.0x10^-4 mag^-1. The far-infrared emissivity of the warm component is significantly lower than that of the cold component. The Halpha emission and Av correlate very well; a rat...

  18. Dose dependence and thermal stability of the thermoluminescence emission in inorganic dust from mint and camomile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Furetta, C.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Lis, M.; Torres, A.; Monsivais, G.

    2006-10-01

    The inorganic phase extracted from mint and camomile samples obtained from commercial products in Mexico was selected according to different grain sizes and exposed to 60Co gamma radiation at different doses in the range 0.5-12 kGy. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves show a single broad peak, centred around 175 °C for prompt readouts. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the inorganic dust is mainly composed by quartz, Na,K-feldspars and amphiboles, which use to be characterized by TL emissions associated to continuous distribution of trapping centres. The high fading of the TL signal during the first days of storage at room temperature can be related to the shallowest part of the distribution while the deepest traps originate the asymptotic behaviour for longer storage times. The TL intensity also increases significatively with the grain size, being linear with the absorbed dose at least up to 10 kGy.

  19. The Covering Factor of Warm Dust in Weak Emission-Line Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    Weak emission-line active galactic nuclei (WLAGNs) are radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that have nearly featureless optical spectra. We investigate the ultraviolet to mid-infrared spectral energy distributions of 73 WLAGNs (0.4dust of these 73 WLAGNs. No significant difference is indicated by a KS test between the covering factor of WLAGNs and normal AGNs in the common range of bolometric luminosity. The implication for several models of WLAGNs is discussed. The super-Eddington accretion is unlikely the dominant reason for the featureless spectrum of a WLAGN. The present results favor the evolution scenario, i.e., WLAGNs are in a special stage of AGNs.

  20. Long Fading Mid-Infrared Emission in Transient Coronal Line Emitters: Dust Echo of Tidal Disruption Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Dou, Liming; Jiang, Ning; Yang, Chenwei; Lyu, Jianwei; Zhou, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    The sporadic accretion followed the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole leads to a bright UV and soft X-ray flare in the galactic nucleus. The gas and dust surrounding the black hole responses to such a flare with an echo in emission lines and infrared emission. In this paper, we report the detection of long fading mid-IR emission lasting up to 14 years after the flare in four TDE candidates with transient coronal lines using the WISE public data release. We estimate reprocessed mid-IR luminosities are in the range between $4\\times 10^{42}$ to $2\\times 10^{43}$ erg~s$^{-1}$ and dust temperature in the range of 570-800K when WISE first detected these sources 3-5 years after the flare. Both luminosity and dust temperature decreases with time. We interpret the mid-IR emission as the infrared echo of the tidal disruption flare. We estimate the UV luminosity at the peak flare to be one to thirty times of $10^{44}$ erg~s$^{-1}$ and warm dust mass in the range of 0.05 to 2.2 M_{\\sun} within a few...

  1. Planck intermediate results. XX. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust with simulations of MHD turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.;

    2015-01-01

    with the local spatial coherence of the polarization angle. These observations are compared to polarized emission maps computed in simulations of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamical turbulence in which we assume a uniform intrinsic polarization fraction of the dust grains. We find that an estimate...

  2. Planck intermediate results XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.;

    2016-01-01

    The polarized thermal emission from diffuse Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100 GHz. In this paper we exploit the uniqueness of the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353 GHz to me...

  3. Possibilities for observations with the infrared space observatory of emission from shock-heated dust in SNRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities for observing infrared emission from shock-heated dust in SNRs with the future Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) are illustrated with calculations of the ISOPHOT-P and ISOPHOT-C flux densities and integration times for radiation from six selected SNRs in eight wavelength bands between 4 μm and 180 μm

  4. Improving the spatio-temporal erodibility of dust emission models using MODIS data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, A.

    2013-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emission models are essential to estimate the lateral and vertical fluxes of carbon and nutrients between terrestrial and marine ecosystems and reduce uncertainty about dust radiative forcing of climate models. Wind erosion models approximate turbulent transfer of momentum by surface roughness elements using roughness density (lateral cover or the frontal area index; λ). Raupach et al. (1993) demonstrated using Marshall's (1971) wind tunnel data how the threshold friction velocity ratio Rt could be estimated as Rt(λ). Unfortunately, estimation of λ over large areas (regions etc.) is difficult and often approximated using classification of cover and vegetation type from satellite remote sensing and in the case of bare surfaces, using geometry. These approximations create surface discontinuities between classes and largely exclude heterogeneity due to mixtures of different surface types and canopies. Consequently, there is a need to reduce the uncertainty associated with the estimation of λ and develop a holistic approach common for all scales and surface mixtures of roughness types. When rough surfaces are exposed to the wind, wakes or areas of flow separation are created downwind of all obstacles. These sheltered areas reduce the area of exposed substrate and protect the erodible surface and some of the roughness elements from the wind (depending on their size and spacing). These sheltered areas have been conceptualised using shadow (Raupach, 1992) and shown to be proportional to shadow (Chappell et al., 2010). We made virtual reconstructions of Marshall's (1971) wind tunnel surfaces and applied a ray-tracer to estimate their at-nadir hemispherical ';black-sky' albedo (ωdir) and develop Rt(ωdir). In addition to that relationship being dependent on view zenith angle it is also dependent on waveband as evident by ω being influenced by soil moisture, soil colour etc. We use the ray-tracing simulations to normalise the data (Nω) and remove

  5. OT2_ctibbs_1: Exploring the role of CII in current Spinning Dust Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbs, C.

    2011-09-01

    We propose HIFI observations of the CII fine structure line at 158 micron (1.9THz) in 22 pointings distributed across four Galactic anomalous emission regions (the Perseus cloud, LDN 1780, LDN 675 and LDN 1111). The currently favoured explanation for the observed anomalous microwave emission is that of electric dipole radiation from rapidly rotating small dust grains (PAHs and/or VSGs), commonly referred to as spinning dust. Although this hypothesis predicts that the source of the excess emission is due to dust, the small dust grains are sensitive to the ionisation state of the gas, and hence the spinning dust models have a dependancy on the abundance of the major gas ions. CII observations will enable us to investigate this dependancy, and combining these observations with the available mid- to far-IR observations will permit a complete analysis of the role of both the dust and gas in regions of anomalous emission. We request a total of 14.9 hrs of HIFI observing time.

  6. CH^+ Spectrum and Diffuse Interstellar Bands Toward Herschel 36 Excited by Dust Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Julie; Oka, Takeshi; Johnson, Sean; Welty, Daniel E.; Hobbs, Lew M.; York, Donald G.

    2012-06-01

    All electronic CH^+ interstellar absorption lines so far observed had been limited to the R(0) transition starting from the J = 0 ground level; this is because of the very rapid J = 1 → 0 spontaneous emission with the life time of ˜ 140 s. We have observed the R(1) and Q(1) lines of the A^1π ← X^1Σ band from the excited J = 1 level 40.08 K (27.86 cm-1) above the J = 0 level toward Herschel 36 indicating high radiative temperature of T_r = 17.5 K. The high temperature is most likely due to far infrared dust emission from the Her 36 SE. We have also observed the R_1(3/2) line of CH starting from the excited fine structure level J = 3/2 which is 25.76 - 25.57 K above the J = 1/2 level. The effect of high radiative temperature is also noticed as unique lineshapes of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) observed toward Her 36. We have examined seven DIBs including λ 5780.5, λ 5797.1, λ 6190.0, and λ 6613.0 that are correlated with each other with correlation coefficients > 0.93. While for ordinary sightlines the lineshapes of these DIBs are more or less symmetric, those toward Her 36 show a long tail toward the red. This is due to far infrared pumping of high J rotational levels of polar carriers of the DIBs by the dust emission. We have developed a model calculation of relaxation taking into account of both radiative and collisional processes. A linear molecule with about 6 carbon atoms can explain some of the DIBs. For the DIBs we have examined, probably the carriers are of this size since we cannot explain the large difference between the DIBs toward ordinary sightlines and toward Her 36 with larger molecules. Goto, M., Stecklum, B., Linz, H., Feldt, M., Henning, Th., Pascucci, I., and Usuda, T. 2006, ApJ, {649} 299.

  7. H_2^{16}O and H_2^{18}O Maser Emission from Gas-Dust Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenok, Aleksandr; 10.1134/S1063773711070036

    2011-01-01

    The collisional pumping of H_2^{16}O and H_2^{18}O masers in hot dense gas-dust clouds has been simulated numerically. New data on the rate coefficients for collisional transitions from Faure et al. (2007) were used in the calculations. The possibility of detecting H_2^{18}O emission in 22.2-GHz H_2^{16}O maser sources is investigated. The medium is shown to become optically thick in the H_2^{16}O lines for which an inverted level population is observed at H_2O column densities of ~10^{19}-10^{20} cm^{-2}. A simultaneous observation of H_2^{18}O emission and H_2^{16}O maser emission in the same source will allow the physical conditions in the gas-dust cloud to be refined.

  8. Long Fading Mid-Infrared Emission in Transient Coronal Line Emitters: Dust Echo of Tidal Disruption Flare

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Liming; Wang, Ting-Gui; Jiang, Ning; Yang, Chenwei; Lyu, Jianwei; Zhou, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    The sporadic accretion followed the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole leads to a bright UV and soft X-ray flare in the galactic nucleus. The gas and dust surrounding the black hole responses to such a flare with an echo in emission lines and infrared emission. In this paper, we report the detection of long fading mid-IR emission lasting up to 14 years after the flare in four TDE candidates with transient coronal lines using the WISE public data release. We estimate repro...

  9. Variation in the dust emissivity index across M 33 with Herschel and Spitzer (HerM 33es)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.; Braine, J.; Xilouris, E. M.; Kramer, C.; Boquien, M.; Combes, F.; Henkel, C.; Relano, M.; Verley, S.; Gratier, P.; Israel, F.; Wiedner, M. C.; Röllig, M.; Schuster, K. F.; van der Werf, P.

    2014-01-01

    We study the wavelength dependence of the dust emission as a function of position and environment across the disk of M 33 using Spitzer and Herschel photometric data. M 33 is a Local Group spiral with slightly subsolar metallicity, which makes it an ideal stepping-stone to less regular and lower-metallicity objects such as dwarf galaxies and, probably, young-universe objects. Expressing the emissivity of the dust as a power law, the power-law exponent (β) was estimated from two independent approaches designed to properly treat the degeneracy between β and the dust temperature (T). Both β and T are higher in the inner than in the outer disk, contrary to reported β - T anti-correlations found in other sources. In the cold + warm dust model, the warm component and the ionized gas (Hα) have a very similar distribution across the galaxy, demonstrating that the model separates the components in an appropriate way. Both cold- and warm-dust column densities are high in star-forming regions and reach their maxima toward the giant star-forming complexes NGC 604 and NGC 595. β declines from close to 2 in the center to about 1.3 in the outer disk. β is positively correlated with star formation and with the molecular gas column, as traced by the Hα and CO emission. The lower dust-emissivity index in the outer parts of M 33 is most likely related to the reduced metallicity (different grain composition) and possibly to a different size distribution. It is not due to the decrease in stellar radiation field or temperature in a simple way because the far-infrared-bright regions in the outer disk also have a low β. Like most spirals, M 33 has a (decreasing) radial gradient in star formation and molecular-to-atomic gas ratio such that the regions bright in Hα or CO tend to trace the inner disk, which makes it difficult to distinguish between their effects on the dust. The assumption of a constant emissivity index β is obviously not appropriate.

  10. Relation between the structure and catalytic activity for automotive emissions. Use of x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuki, J; Tanaka, H

    2003-01-01

    The employment of the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect allows us to detect the change in structure of catalytic converters with the environment exposed. Here we show that palladium atoms in a perovskite crystal move into and out of the crystal by anomalous X-ray diffraction and absorption techniques. This movement of the precious metal plays an important role to keep the catalytic activity long-lived. (author)

  11. Properties of free-free, dust, and CO emissions in the starbursts of blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The central star-forming regions in three blue compact dwarf galaxies (He 2-10, NGC 5253, and II Zw 40) were observed in the 340 GHz (880 micron) band at 5 arcsec resolution with the Submillimetre Array (SMA). Continuum emission associated with the central star-forming complex was detected in all these galaxies. The SMA 880 micron flux is decomposed into free-free emission and dust emission by using centimetre-wavelength data in the literature. We find that free-free emission contributes half or more of the SMA 880 micron flux in the central starbursts in those three galaxies. In spite of the dominance of free-free emission at 880 micron, the radio-to-far infrared (FIR) ratios in the central star-forming regions are not significantly higher than those of the entire systems, showing the robustness of radio-FIR relation. Based on the robustness of the radio-FIR relation, we argue that the free--free fraction in the 880 micron emission is regulated by the dust temperature. We also analyze the CO (J = 3--2) emiss...

  12. THE ROLE OF THE ACCRETION DISK, DUST, AND JETS IN THE IR EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R. E. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Ramos Almeida, C. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Levenson, N. A. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Nemmen, R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Alonso-Herrero, A., E-mail: rmason@gemini.edu [Instituto de Física de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, Avenida de los Castros s/n, E-39005 Santander (Spain)

    2013-11-10

    We use recent high-resolution infrared (IR; 1-20 μm) photometry to examine the origin of the IR emission in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN). The data are compared with published model fits that describe the spectral energy distribution (SED) of LLAGN in terms of an advection-dominated accretion flow, truncated thin accretion disk, and jet. The truncated disk in these models is usually not luminous enough to explain the observed IR emission, and in all cases its spectral shape is much narrower than the broad IR peaks in the data. Synchrotron radiation from the jet appears to be important in very radio-loud nuclei, but the detection of strong silicate emission features in many objects indicates that dust must also contribute. We investigate this point by fitting the IR SED of NGC 3998 using dusty torus and optically thin (τ{sub mid-IR} ∼ 1) dust shell models. While more detailed modeling is necessary, these initial results suggest that dust may account for the nuclear mid-IR emission of many LLAGN.

  13. Convective turbulent dust emission (CTDE) observed over Horqin Sandy Land area and validation of a CTDE scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. L.; Klose, M.; Shao, Y.; Zhang, H. S.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a data set obtained from a sandstorm monitoring station located in Horqin Sandy Land area in northern China from December 2010 to November 2011 is used to investigate the seasonal variations and characteristics of convective turbulent dust emission (CTDE) and to validate a CTDE scheme. The observations show that CTDE events occur during the local daytime, with 85% of them between 08:00 and 15:00 local standard time. While a CTDE event may last for 0.5 to 8 h, the duration of 79% of the events is shorter than 3 h. CTDE occurs most frequently in summer and then in fall, less frequently in spring, and least in winter. The total CTDE flux in the year (=1.63 × 104 µg m-2 s-1) is considerable and important to the background dust concentration and dust cycles from the view of a longer time scale. The CTDE dust flux, Fobs, falls into the range of 0-30 µg m-2 s-1 and is positively correlated with the convective scaling velocity, w*, but not so much with the friction velocity, u*. A CTDE event was observed on 14 October 2011, which lasted for 7 h with a maximum of Fobs = 9.4 µg m-2 s-1. This event is used to validate the CTDE scheme. A linear relationship between the predicted and the observed CTDE dust fluxes is found, and an important model parameter is calibrated for this sandy land.

  14. Dust emission in star-forming dwarf galaxies: General properties and the nature of the sub-mm excess

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Krugel, E; Henkel, C

    2014-01-01

    We studied the global characteristics of dust emission in a large sample of emission-line star-forming galaxies. The sample consists of two subsamples. One subsample (SDSS sample) includes ~4000 compact star-forming galaxies from the SDSS, which were also detected in all four bands at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 mum of the WISE all-sky survey. The second subsample (Herschel sample) is a sample of 28 compact star-forming galaxies observed with Herschel in the FIR range. Data of the Herschel sample were supplemented by the photometric data from the Spitzer observations, GALEX, SDSS, WISE, 2MASS, NVSS, and FIRST surveys, as well as optical and Spitzer spectra and data in sub-mm and radio ranges. It is found that warm dust luminosities of galaxies from the SDSS sample and cold and warm dust luminosities of galaxies from the Herschel sample are strongly correlated with Hbeta luminosities, which implies that one of the main sources of dust heating in star-forming galaxies is ionising UV radiation of young stars. Using the...

  15. The impact of climate and composition on playa surface roughness: Investigation of atmospheric mineral dust emission mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollerud, H. J.; Fantle, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust has a wide range of impacts, including the transport of elements in geochemical cycles, health hazards from small particles, and climate forcing via the reflection of sunlight from dust particles. In particular, the mineral dust component of climate forcing is one of the most uncertain elements in the IPCC climate forcing summary. Mineral dust is also an important component of geochemical cycles. For instance, dust inputs to the ocean potentially affect the iron cycle by stimulating natural iron fertilization, which could then modify climate via the biological pump. Also dust can transport nutrients over long distances and fertilize nutrient-poor regions, such as island ecosystems or the Amazon rain forest. However, there are still many uncertainties in quantifying dust emissions from source regions. One factor that influences dust emission is surface roughness and texture, since a weak, unconsolidated surface texture is more easily ablated by wind than a strong, hard crust. We are investigating the impact of processes such as precipitation, groundwater evaporation, and wind on surface roughness in a playa dust source region. We find that water has a significant influence on surface roughness. We utilize ESA's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) instrument to measure roughness in the playa. A map of roughness indicates where the playa surface is smooth (on the scale of centimeters) and potentially very strong, and where it is rough and might be more sensitive to disturbance. We have analyzed approximately 40 ASAR observations of the Black Rock Desert from 2007-2011. In general, the playa is smoother and more variable over time relative to nearby areas. There is also considerable variation within the playa. While the playa roughness maps changed significantly between summers and between observations during the winters, over the course of each summer, the playa surface maintained essentially the same roughness pattern. This suggests that

  16. Implementation of road and soil dust emission parameterizations in the aerosol model CAMx: Applications over the greater Athens urban area affected by natural sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulou, E.; Tombrou, M.; Russell, A. G.; Karanasiou, A.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Dandou, A.

    2010-09-01

    A detailed dust emission parameterization was developed for aerosol production by human and natural activity. The road dust scheme includes tire wear, break wear, road abrasion and vehicle-induced re-suspension. The natural dust scheme includes wind (Aeolian) erosion from soil surfaces and land disturbances, and considers the effects of soil and atmospheric parameters on dust productivity. Emission rates are chemically and size-resolved and are incorporated in the CAMx aerosol model coupled with the ISORROPIA II inorganic module. Emissions and concentrations are predicted for five simulation periods, using a domain covering Greece with a fine mesh over the greater Athens area. Re-suspended mass is the main dust component, calculated 4-5 times higher than exhaust emissions. Soil dust emissions are much greater than road dust during high winds but are of less importance inside the city with maximums located at the periphery of the urban core. Comparison with observations suggests that the road dust component seems adequately estimated in traffic-affected areas and accounts for 15-40% of the total PM10. Calcium, regarded as a soil dust tracer, is calculated to be 2-4 μg m-3 in areas with high Aeolian emission rates, similar to measured values. Sodium and magnesium predictions show their marine origin, and reasonably replicate the observed mass and size distribution during well-established onshore flows. Nitrates are predicted as measured during lower winds, but are underestimated when stronger winds prevail from the west. This is caused by an overestimated industrial influence of Athens. As a result, ammonia is bound to the excess of sulfate, rather than reacting with nitric acid. Secondary species are influenced slightly by heterogeneous chemistry on dust particles.

  17. X-Ray Absorption, Nuclear Infrared Emission, and Dust Covering Factors of AGNs: Testing Unification Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Watson, M. G.; Blain, A.; Caccianiga, A.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present the distributions of the geometrical covering factors of the dusty tori (f2) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGNs drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGNs have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 1042 and 1046 erg s-1, and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work, we determined the rest-frame 1-20 μm continuum emission from the torus, which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGNs are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGNs having, on average, tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGNs. Nevertheless, ˜20% of type 1 AGNs have tori with large covering factors, while ˜23%-28% of type 2 AGNs have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGNs the effect is certainly small. f2 increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction and X-ray absorption take place in material that share an overall geometry and most likely belong to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity, and also f2 determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ˜1-20 μm nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.

  18. Planck intermediate results. XIX. An overview of the polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alina, D; Alves, M I R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Arzoumanian, D; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Magalhães, A M; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Poidevin, F; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the large-scale polarized sky as seen by Planck HFI at 353 GHz, which is the most sensitive Planck channel for dust polarization. We construct and analyse large-scale maps of dust polarization fraction and polarization direction, while taking account of noise bias and possible systematic effects. We find that the maximum observed dust polarization fraction is high (pmax > 18%), in particular in some of the intermediate dust column density (AV < 1mag) regions. There is a systematic decrease in the dust polarization fraction with increasing dust column density, and we interpret the features of this correlation in light of both radiative grain alignment predictions and fluctuations in the magnetic field orientation. We also characterize the spatial structure of the polarization angle using the angle dispersion function and find that, in nearby fields at intermediate latitudes, the polarization angle is ordered over extended areas that are separated by filamentary structures, which appear a...

  19. Background dust emission following grassland fire: a snapshot across the particle-size spectrum highlights how high-resolution measurements enhance detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Luis M [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Field, Jason P [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Villegas, Juan C [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Brehsears, David D [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Law, Darin J [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Urgeghe, Anna M [UNIV OF ARIZONA

    2009-01-01

    Dust emission rates vary temporally and with particle size. Many studies of dust emission focus on a particular temporal scale and the portion of the particle-size spectrum associated with a single instrument; fewer studies have assessed dust emission across the particle-size spectrum and associated temporal scales using multiple instruments. Particularly lacking are measurements following disturbances such as fire that are high-resolution and focused on finer particles - those with direct implications for human health and potential for long-distance biogeochemical transport - during less windy but more commonly occurring background conditions. We measured dust emissions in unburned and burned semiarid grassland using four different instruments spanning different combinations of temporal resolution and particle-size spectrum: Big Springs Number Eight (BSNE) and Sensit instruments for larger saltating particles, DustTrak instruments for smaller suspended particles, and Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) samplers for measuring the entire range of particle sizes. Unburned and burned sites differed in vegetation cover and aerodynamic roughness, yet surprisingly differences in dust emission rates were only detectable for saltation using BSNE and for smaller aerosols using DustTrak. Our results, surprising in the lack of consistently detected differences, indicate that high-resolution DustTrak measurements offered the greatest promise for detecting differences in background emission rates and that BSNE samplers, which integrate across height, were effective for longer intervals. More generally, our results suggest that interplay between particle size, temporal resolution, and integration across time and height can be complex and may need to be considered more explicitly for effective sampling for background dust emissions.

  20. ADEME incentives for dust emission reductions. Results and prospective; Les aides de l`Ademe pour reduire les emissions de poussieres bilan et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bewa, H.; Delacroix, F. [Agence de l`Environnement et de la Maitrise de l`Energie, 49 - Angers (France). Direction de l`Industrie

    1996-12-31

    Financial incentives allowed by the French Agency for Energy Conservation and Environment (ADEME) for reducing industrial atmospheric pollution are funded by taxes (polluting industries, combustion and incineration plants...) and are aimed at financing development projects for pollution abatement and monitoring and related equipment. ADEME allows also governmental budgets for related research and monitoring programs. Equipment operations that have been already financed concerned mainly bag filters, electric filters, cleaning plants (fertilizer and food industries), emission collection, de-dusting etc

  1. The Galactic disc distribution of planetary nebulae with warm dust emission features - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casassus, S.; Roche, P. F.

    2001-02-01

    We address the question of whether the distribution of warm-dust compositions in IR-bright Galactic disc PNe (Paper I, Casassus et al.) can be linked to the underlying stellar population. The PNe with warm dust emission represent a homogeneous population, which is presumably young and minimally affected by a possible dependence of PN lifetime on progenitor mass. The sample in Paper I thus allows testing of the predictions of single-star evolution, through a comparison with synthetic distributions and under the assumption that tip-of-the-AGB and PN statistics are similar. We construct a schematic model for AGB evolution (adapted from Groenewegen & de Jong), the free parameters of which are calibrated with the luminosity function (LF) of C stars in the LMC, the initial-final mass relation and the range of PN compositions. The observed metallicity gradient and distribution of star-forming regions with Galactocentric radius (Bronfman et al.) allow us to synthesize the Galactic disc PN progenitor population. We find that the fraction of O-rich PNe, f(0), is a tight constraint on AGB parameters. For our best model, a minimum PN progenitor mass Mmin=1 M⊙ predicts that about 50per cent of all young PNe should be O-rich, compared with an observed fraction of 22per cent; thus Mmin=1.2 M⊙, at a 2σ confidence level Mmin=1.3 M⊙ at 1σ). By contrast, current AGB models for single stars can account neither for the continuous range of N enrichment (Leisy & Dennefeld) nor for the observation that the majority of very C-rich PNe have Peimbert type I (Paper I). f(O) is thus an observable quantity much easier to model. The decrease in f(O) with Galactocentric radius, as reported in Paper I, is a strong property of the synthetic distribution, independent of Mmin. This trend reflects the sensitivity of the surface temperature of AGB stars and of the core mass at the first thermal pulse to the Galactic metallicity gradient.

  2. Planck intermediate results. XIX. An overview of the polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the polarized sky as seen by Planck HFI at 353 GHz, which is the most sensitive Planck channel for dust polarization. We construct and analyse maps of dust polarization fraction and polarization angle at 1° resolution, taking into account noise bias and possible...

  3. The evolution of interstellar medium mass probed by dust emission: Alma observations at z = 0.3-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of submillimeter dust continuum emission to probe the mass of interstellar dust and gas in galaxies is empirically calibrated using samples of local star-forming galaxies, Planck observations of the Milky Way, and high-redshift submillimeter galaxies. All of these objects suggest a similar calibration, strongly supporting the view that the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the dust emission can be used as an accurate and very fast probe of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. We present ALMA Cycle 0 observations of the Band 7 (350 GHz) dust emission in 107 galaxies from z = 0.2 to 2.5. Three samples of galaxies with a total of 101 galaxies were stellar-mass-selected from COSMOS to have M * ≅ 1011 M ☉: 37 at z ∼ 0.4, 33 at z ∼ 0.9, and 31 at z = 2. A fourth sample with six infrared-luminous galaxies at z = 2 was observed for comparison with the purely mass-selected samples. From the fluxes detected in the stacked images for each sample, we find that the ISM content has decreased by a factor ∼6 from 1 to 2 × 1010 M ☉ at both z = 2 and 0.9 down to ∼2 × 109 M ☉ at z = 0.4. The infrared-luminous sample at z = 2 shows a further ∼4 times increase in M ISM compared with the equivalent non-infrared-bright sample at the same redshift. The gas mass fractions are ∼2% ± 0.5%, 12% ± 3%, 14% ± 2%, and 53% ± 3% for the four subsamples (z = 0.4, 0.9, and 2 and infrared-bright galaxies).

  4. Planck intermediate results. XXI. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust at 353 GHz with optical interstellar polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alina, D; Aniano, G; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Beichman, C; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fanciullo, L; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Magalhães, A M; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Poidevin, F; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    The Planck survey provides unprecedented full-sky coverage of the submillimetre polarized emission from Galactic dust, bringing new constraints on the properties of dust. The dust grains that emit the radiation seen by Planck in the submillimetre also extinguish and polarize starlight in the optical. Using ancillary catalogues of interstellar polarization and extinction of starlight, we obtain the degree of polarization, $p_V$, and the optical depth in the $V$ band to the star, $\\tau_V$. We extract the submillimetre polarized intensity, $P_S$, and total intensity, $I_S$, measured toward these stars in the Planck 353 GHz channel. We compare the position angle measured in the optical with that measured at 353 GHz, and the column density measure $E(B - V)$ with that inferred from the Planck product map of the submillimetre dust optical depth. For those lines of sight suitable for this comparison, we measure the polarization ratios $R_{S/V} = (P_S/I_S)/(p_V/\\tau_V)$ and $R_{P/p} = P_S / p_V$ through a correlation...

  5. Inferring Sources in the Interplanetary Dust Cloud, from Observations and Simulations of Zodiacal Light and Thermal Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.

    2011-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles physical properties may be approached through observations of the solar light they scatter, specially its polarization, and of their thermal emission. Results, at least near the ecliptic plane, on polarization phase curves and on the heliocentric dependence of the local spatial density, albedo, polarization and temperature are summarized. As far as interpretations through simulations are concerned, a very good fit of the polarization phase curve near 1.5 AU is obtained for a mixture of silicates and more absorbing organics material, with a significant amount of fluffy aggregates. In the 1.5-0.5 AU solar distance range, the temperature variation suggests the presence of a large amount of absorbing organic compounds, while the decrease of the polarization with decreasing solar distance is indeed compatible with a decrease of the organics towards the Sun. Such results are in favor of the predominance of dust of cometary origin in the interplanetary dust cloud, at least below 1.5 AU. The implication of these results on the delivery of complex organic molecules on Earth during the LHB epoch, when the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was orders of magnitude greater than today, is discussed.

  6. Model development of dust emission and heterogeneous chemistry within the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system and its application over East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Dong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model has been further developed in terms of simulating natural wind-blown dust in this study, with a series of modifications aimed at improving the model's capability to predict the emission, transport, and chemical reactions of dust aerosols. The default parameterization of threshold friction velocity constants in the CMAQ are revised to avoid double counting of the impact of soil moisture based on the re-analysis of field experiment data; source-dependent speciation profiles for dust emission are derived based on local measurements for the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts in East Asia; and dust heterogeneous chemistry is implemented to simulate the reactions involving dust aerosol. The improved dust module in the CMAQ was applied over East Asia for March and April from 2006 to 2010. Evaluation against observations has demonstrated that simulation bias of PM10 and aerosol optical depth (AOD is reduced from −55.42 and −31.97 % in the original CMAQ to −16.05 and −22.1 % in the revised CMAQ, respectively. Comparison with observations at the nearby Gobi stations of Duolun and Yulin indicates that applying a source-dependent profile helps reduce simulation bias for trace metals. Implementing heterogeneous chemistry is also found to result in better agreement with observations for sulfur dioxide (SO2, sulfate (SO42-, nitric acid (HNO3, nitrous oxides (NOx, and nitrate (NO3-. Investigation of a severe dust storm episode from 19 to 21 March 2010 suggests that the revised CMAQ is capable of capturing the spatial distribution and temporal variations of dust aerosols. Model evaluation indicates potential uncertainties within the excessive soil moisture fraction used by meteorological simulation. The mass contribution of fine mode aerosol in dust emission may be underestimated by 50 %. The revised revised CMAQ provides a useful tool for future studies to investigate the emission, transport, and impact of wind

  7. Model development of dust emission and heterogeneous chemistry within the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system and its application over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X.; Fu, J. S.; Huang, K.; Tong, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model has been further developed in terms of simulating natural wind-blown dust in this study, with a series of modifications aimed at improving the model's capability to predict the emission, transport, and chemical reactions of dust aerosols. The default parameterization of threshold friction velocity constants in the CMAQ are revised to avoid double counting of the impact of soil moisture based on the re-analysis of field experiment data; source-dependent speciation profiles for dust emission are derived based on local measurements for the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts in East Asia; and dust heterogeneous chemistry is implemented to simulate the reactions involving dust aerosol. The improved dust module in the CMAQ was applied over East Asia for March and April from 2006 to 2010. Evaluation against observations has demonstrated that simulation bias of PM10 and aerosol optical depth (AOD) is reduced from -55.42 and -31.97 % in the original CMAQ to -16.05 and -22.1 % in the revised CMAQ, respectively. Comparison with observations at the nearby Gobi stations of Duolun and Yulin indicates that applying a source-dependent profile helps reduce simulation bias for trace metals. Implementing heterogeneous chemistry is also found to result in better agreement with observations for sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfate (SO42-), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous oxides (NOx), and nitrate (NO3-). Investigation of a severe dust storm episode from 19 to 21 March 2010 suggests that the revised CMAQ is capable of capturing the spatial distribution and temporal variations of dust aerosols. Model evaluation indicates potential uncertainties within the excessive soil moisture fraction used by meteorological simulation. The mass contribution of fine mode aerosol in dust emission may be underestimated by 50 %. The revised revised CMAQ provides a useful tool for future studies to investigate the emission, transport, and impact of wind-blown dust over East

  8. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-Main Sequence and Related Stars. II. Variability in the Gas and Dust Emission of the Herbig Fe Star SAO 206462

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Day, Amanda N.; Kimes, Robin L.; Beerman, Lori C.; Martus, Cameron; Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Grady, Carol A.; Schneider, Glenn; Lisse, Carey M.; Nuth, Joseph A.; Cure, Michel; Henden, Arne A.; Kraus, Stefan; Motta, Veronica; Tamura Motohide; Hornbeck, Jeremy; Williger, Gerard M.; Fugazza, Dino

    2011-01-01

    We present thirteen epochs of near-infrared (0.8-5 microns) spectroscopic observations of the pre-transitional, "gapped" disk system in SAO 206462 (=HD 135344B). In all, six gas emission lines (Br(alpha) , Br(gamma), Pa(beta), Pa(delta), Pa(epsilon), and the 0.8446 microns line of O I) along with continuum measurements made near the standard J, H, K, and L photometric bands were measured. A mass accretion rate of approximately 2 x 10(exp 8)Solar Mass/yr was derived from the Br(gamma) and Pa(beta) lines. However, the fluxes of these lines varied by a factor of over two during the course of a few months. The continuum also varied, but by only approx.30%, and even decreased at a time when the gas emission was increasing. The H I line at 1.083 microns was also found to vary in a manner inconsistent with that of either the hydrogen lines or the dust. Both the gas and dust variabilities indicate significant changes in the region of the inner gas and the inner dust belt that may be common to many young disk systems. If planets are responsible for defining the inner edge of the gap, they could interact with the material on time scales commensurate with what is observed for the variations in the dust, while other disk instabilities (thermal, magneto-rotational) would operate there on longer time scales than we observe for the inner dust belt. For SAO 206462, the orbital period would likely be 1-3 years. If the changes are being induced in the disk material closer to the star than the gap, a variety of mechanisms (disk instabilities, interactions via planets) might be responsible for the changes seen. The He I feature is most likely due to a wind whose orientation changes with respect to the observer on time scales of a day or less. To further constrain the origin of the gas and dust emission will require multiple spectroscopic and interferometric observations on both shorter and longer time scales that have been sampled so far.

  9. Emissions of road dust by winter tyres and the contributions of different road dust sources in road side particle samples; Talvirenkaiden poelypaeaestoet ja eri katupoelylaehteiden osuudet kadunvarrella keraetyissae hiukkasnaeytteissae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupiainen, K.; Pirjola, L.; Ritola, R.; Stojiljkovic, A.; Malinen, A.

    2013-09-01

    Aim of this study was to determine: (1) the relative contributions from pavement wear and traction sanding in PM{sub 10} road side air and road dust resuspension samples; (2) PM{sub 10} dust emissions from studded and studless tyres in on-road conditions. The study was conducted as part of the NASTA research program during the winter season 2011/2012. The studies were carried out in Suurmetsaentie and Viikintie in Helsinki, Finland. The results showed that dust from pavement aggregates was the largest source during spring, accounting for 40- 50 percent of the particulate matter in the air and resuspension samples. Based on studies on formation of dust, major source of the dust from pavement aggregates is the wear by studded tyres. Traction sand and road salt were used frequently during the winter 2011/2012. Sanding material explained about 25 percent of the road dust in the air and resuspension samples. Traction sanding is estimated to account for approximately few percent of the pavement dust via the sandpaper effect. Effect of road salt was few percent in the samples. The source contributions from pavement and traction sanding observed in spring 2011/2012 at Suurmetsaentie are similar to what has been estimated in previous studies conducted in the early 2000s in Finland. In a study conducted in the city of Hanko, it was estimated the contribution from traction sanding to be in average of about 10 percent. In another study in the center of Helsinki the contribution was estimated to be about half of the PM{sub 10}. The general perception in Finland has been that traction sanding is the main source of airborne road dust. Studies conducted in 2000s and the results of this study, however, indicate that traction sanding has been an important but not the main source of PM10 road dust even in winters with extensive use of gravel for traction control. Emissions of road dust by a single tyre consist of direct emissions of wear products as well as resuspension emissions of

  10. Simultaneously modelling far-infrared dust emission and its relation to CO emission in star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shetty, Rahul; Hony, Sacha; Cormier, Diane; Klessen, Ralf S; Konstandin, Lukas K; Loredo, Thomas; Pellegrini, Eric W; Ruppert, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to simultaneously model the dust far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) and the total infrared - carbon monoxide (CO) integrated intensity (SIR-ICO) relationship. The modelling employs a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) technique to estimate the dust surface density, temperature (Td), and spectral index $\\beta_{eff}$ locally at each pixel from the observed far-infrared (IR) maps, such as those provided by Herschel. Additionally, given the CO map, the method simultaneously estimates the slope and intercept between the total IR and CO intensities, which are global source properties. The model accounts for correlated and uncorrelated uncertainties, such as those present in Herschel maps. We simulate two synthetic datasets to verify the accuracy of the HB method, and contrast the results with commonly employed non-hierarchical fitting methods. As an initial application, we model the dust and gas on 100 pc scales in the Magellanic Clouds from Herschel IR and NANTEN CO observations. There is ...

  11. Linking dust emission to fundamental properties in galaxies: The low-metallicity picture

    CERN Document Server

    Rémy-Ruyer, A; Galliano, F; Lebouteiller, V; Baes, M; Bendo, G J; Boselli, A; Ciesla, L; Cormier, D; Cooray, A; Cortese, L; De Looze, I; Doublier-Pritchard, V; Galametz, M; Jones, A P; Karczewski, O Ł; Lu, N; Spinoglio, L

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we aim at providing a consistent analysis of the dust properties from metal-poor to metal-rich environments by linking them to fundamental galactic parameters. We consider two samples of galaxies: the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS) and KINGFISH, totalling 109 galaxies, spanning almost 2 dex in metallicity. We collect infrared (IR) to submillimetre (submm) data for both samples and present the complete data set for the DGS sample. We model the observed spectral energy distributions (SED) with a physically-motivated dust model to access the dust properties. Using a different SED model (modified blackbody), dust composition (amorphous carbon), or wavelength coverage at submm wavelengths results in differences in the dust mass estimate of a factor two to three, showing that this parameter is subject to non-negligible systematic modelling uncertainties. For eight galaxies in our sample, we find a rather small excess at 500 microns (< 1.5 sigma). We find that the dust SED of low-metallicity galaxies is ...

  12. Daily and hourly sourcing of metallic and mineral dust in urban air contaminated by traffic and coal-burning emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, T.; Karanasiou, A.; Amato, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Coz, E.; Artíñano, B.; Lumbreras, J.; Borge, R.; Boldo, E.; Linares, C.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2013-04-01

    A multi-analytical approach to chemical analysis of inhalable urban atmospheric particulate matter (PM), integrating particle induced X-ray emission, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry/atomic emission spectroscopy, chromatography and thermal-optical transmission methods, allows comparison between hourly (Streaker) and 24-h (High volume sampler) data and consequently improved PM chemical characterization and source identification. In a traffic hot spot monitoring site in Madrid (Spain) the hourly data reveal metallic emissions (Zn, Cu, Cr, Fe) and resuspended mineral dust (Ca, Al, Si) to be closely associated with traffic flow. These pollutants build up during the day, emphasizing evening rush hour peaks, but decrease (especially their coarser fraction PM2.5-10) after nocturnal road washing. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of a large Streaker database additionally reveals two other mineral dust components (siliceous and sodic), marine aerosol, and minor, transient events which we attribute to biomass burning (K-rich) and industrial (incinerator?) Zn, Pb plumes. Chemical data on 24-h filters allows the measurement of secondary inorganic compounds and carbon concentrations and offers PMF analysis based on a limited number of samples but using fuller range of trace elements which, in the case of Madrid, identifies the continuing minor presence of a coal combustion source traced by As, Se, Ge and Organic Carbon. This coal component is more evident in the city air after the change to the winter heating season in November. Trace element data also allow use of discrimination diagrams such as V/Rb vs. La/Ce and ternary plots to illustrate variations in atmospheric chemistry (such as the effect of Ce-emissions from catalytic converters), with Madrid being an example of a city with little industrial pollution, recently reduced coal emissions, but serious atmospheric contamination by traffic emissions.

  13. Model development of dust emission and heterogeneous chemistry within the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system and its application over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinyi; Fu, Joshua S.; Huang, Kan; Tong, Daniel; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2016-07-01

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model has been further developed in terms of simulating natural wind-blown dust in this study, with a series of modifications aimed at improving the model's capability to predict the emission, transport, and chemical reactions of dust. The default parameterization of initial threshold friction velocity constants are revised to correct the double counting of the impact of soil moisture in CMAQ by the reanalysis of field experiment data; source-dependent speciation profiles for dust emission are derived based on local measurements for the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts in East Asia; and dust heterogeneous chemistry is also implemented. The improved dust module in the CMAQ is applied over East Asia for March and April from 2006 to 2010. The model evaluation result shows that the simulation bias of PM10 and aerosol optical depth (AOD) is reduced, respectively, from -55.42 and -31.97 % by the original CMAQ to -16.05 and -22.1 % by the revised CMAQ. Comparison with observations at the nearby Gobi stations of Duolun and Yulin indicates that applying a source-dependent profile helps reduce simulation bias for trace metals. Implementing heterogeneous chemistry also results in better agreement with observations for sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfate (SO42-), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous oxides (NOx), and nitrate (NO3-). The investigation of a severe dust storm episode from 19 to 21 March 2010 suggests that the revised CMAQ is capable of capturing the spatial distribution and temporal variation of dust. The model evaluation also indicates potential uncertainty within the excessive soil moisture used by meteorological simulation. The mass contribution of fine-mode particles in dust emission may be underestimated by 50 %. The revised CMAQ model provides a useful tool for future studies to investigate the emission, transport, and impact of wind-blown dust over East Asia and elsewhere.

  14. ANOMALOUSLY STEEP REDDENING LAW IN QUASARS: AN EXCEPTIONAL EXAMPLE OBSERVED IN IRAS 14026+4341

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fraction of the heavily reddened quasars require a reddening curve that is even steeper than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. In this paper, we thoroughly characterize the anomalously steep reddening law in quasars via an exceptional example observed in IRAS 14026+4341. By comparing the observed spectrum to the quasar composite spectrum, we derive a reddening curve in the rest-frame wavelength range of 1200-10000 Å. It has a steep rise at wavelengths shorter than 3000 Å, but no significant reddening at longer wavelengths. The absence of dust reddening in the optical continuum is confirmed by the normal broad-line Balmer decrement (the Hα/Hβ ratio) in IRAS 14026+4341. The anomalous reddening curve can be satisfactorily reproduced with a dust model containing silicate grains in a power-law size distribution, dn(a)/da∝a –1.4, truncated at a maximum size of amax = 70 nm. The unusual size distribution may be caused by the destruction of large 'stardust' grains by quasar activities or a different dust formation mechanism (i.e., the in situ formation of dust grains in quasar outflows). It is also possible that the analogies of the dust grains observed near the Galactic center are responsible for the steep reddening curve. In addition, we find that IRAS 14026+4341 is a weak emission-line quasar (i.e., PHL 1811 analogies) with heavy dust reddening and blueshifted broad absorption lines.

  15. First Detection of UV emission from a Detached Dust Shell: GALEX Observations of the Carbon AGB Star U Hya

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, E; Ramstedt, S; Stassun, K G

    2014-01-01

    We present the discovery of an extended ring of ultraviolet emission surrounding the AGB star U Hya in archival observations performed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). This is the third discovery of extended UV emission from a carbon AGB star and the first from an AGB star with a detached shell. From imaging and photometric analysis of the FUV and NUV images, we determined that the ultraviolet ring has a radius of $\\sim 110^{\\prime\\prime}$, thus indicating that the emitting material is likely associated with the detached shell seen in the infrared. We find that scattering of the central point source of NUV and FUV emission by the dust shell is negligible. Moreover, we find that scattering of the interstellar radiation field by the dust shell can contribute at most $\\sim10%$ of the FUV flux. Morphological and photometric evidence suggests that shocks caused by the star's motion through space and, possibly, shock-excited H$_2$ molecules are the most likely origins of the UV flux. In contrast to previou...

  16. Investigating the Nature of the Dust Emission around Massive Protostar NGC 7538 IRS 1: Circumstellar Disk and Outflow?

    CERN Document Server

    De Buizer, J M; Buizer, James M. De; Minier, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained high resolution mid-infrared images of the high mass protostar NGC 7538 IRS 1 using Michelle on Gemini North and find that the circumstellar dust associated with this source is extended on both large and small scales. The large-scale mid-infrared emission is asymmetric about the peak of IRS 1, being more extended to the northwest than the southeast. The position angle of the mid-infrared emission is similar to the position angle of the linearly distributed methanol masers at this location which are thought to trace a circumstellar disk. However, this position angle is also very similar to that of the CO outflow in this region which appears to be centered on IRS 1. We suggest that the large-scale extended mid-infrared emission is coming from dust heated on the walls of the outflow cavities near the source. IRS 1 is also elongated in the mid-infrared on a smaller scale, and this elongation is near PERPENDICULAR to the axis of the CO outflow (and the linearly distributed methanol masers). Becaus...

  17. Simultaneously modelling far-infrared dust emission and its relation to CO emission in star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Rahul; Roman-Duval, Julia; Hony, Sacha; Cormier, Diane; Klessen, Ralf S.; Konstandin, Lukas K.; Loredo, Thomas; Pellegrini, Eric W.; Ruppert, David

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to simultaneously model the dust far-infrared (FIR) spectral energy distribution (SED) and the total infrared - carbon monoxide (CO) integrated intensity (SIR-ICO) relationship. The modelling employs a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) technique to estimate the dust surface density, temperature (Teff), and spectral index at each pixel from the observed FIR maps. Additionally, given the corresponding CO map, the method simultaneously estimates the slope and intercept between the FIR and CO intensities, which are global properties of the observed source. The model accounts for correlated and uncorrelated uncertainties, such as those present in Herschel observations. Using synthetic data sets, we demonstrate the accuracy of the HB method, and contrast the results with common non-hierarchical fitting methods. As an initial application, we model the dust and gas on 100 pc scales in the Magellanic Clouds from Herschel FIR and NANTEN CO observations. The slopes of the logSIR-logICO relationship are similar in both galaxies, falling in the range 1.1-1.7. However, in the Small Magellanic Cloud the intercept is nearly three times higher, which can be explained by its lower metallicity than the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), resulting in a larger SIR per unit ICO. The HB modelling evidences an increase in Teff in regions with the highest ICO in the LMC. This may be due to enhanced dust heating in the densest molecular regions from young stars. Such simultaneous dust and gas modelling may reveal variations in the properties of the interstellar medium and its association with other galactic characteristics, such as star formation rates and/or metallicities.

  18. Near-IR dust and line emission from the central region of Mrk1066: Constraints from Gemini NIFS

    CERN Document Server

    Riffel, Rogemar A; Nagar, Neil M

    2010-01-01

    We present integral field spectroscopy of the inner 350 pc of the Mrk1066 obtained with Gemini NIFS at a spatial resolution of 35 pc. This high spatial resolution allowed us to observe, for the first time in this galaxy, an unresolved dust concentration with mass 0.014 M_Sun, which may be part of the dusty torus. The emission-line fluxes are elongated in PA=135/315deg in agreement with the [OIII] and radio images and, except for the H lines, are brighter to the north-west than to the south-east. The H emission is stronger to the south-east, where we find a large region of star-formation. The strong correlation between the radio emission and the highest emission-line fluxes indicates that the radio jet plays a fundamental role at these intensity levels. The H2 flux is more uniformly distributed and has an excitation temperature of 2100 K. Its origin appears to be circumnuclear gas heated by X-rays from the AGN. The [FeII] emission also is consistent with X-ray heating, but with additional emission due to excit...

  19. Anomalous Magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous symmetries induce currents which can be parallel rather than orthogonal to the hypermagnetic field. Building on the analogy with charged liquids at high magnetic Reynolds numbers, the persistence of anomalous currents is scrutinized for parametrically large conductivities when the plasma approximation is accurate. Different examples in globally neutral systems suggest that the magnetic configurations minimizing the energy density with the constraint that the helicity be conserved co...

  20. The dust, nebular emission, and dependence on QSO radio properties of the associated Mg II absorption line systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, Pushpa [CSIR Emeritus Scientist, IUCAA, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Daniel, Vanden Berk [Physics Department, St. Vincent College, Latrobe, PA 15650 (United States); Rahmani, Hadi [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); York, Donald G., E-mail: pushpakhare@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We studied dust reddening and [O II] emission in 1730 Mg II associated absorption systems (AAS; relative velocity with respect to QSOs, ≤3000 km s{sup –1}; in units of velocity of light, β, ≤0.01) with 0.4 ≤z {sub abs} ≤ 2 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, focusing on their dependence on the radio and other QSO properties. We used control samples, several with matching radio properties, to show that (1) AAS in radio-detected (RD) QSOs cause 2.6 ± 0.2 times higher dust extinction than those in radio-undetected (RUD) ones, which in turn cause 2.9 ± 0.7 times the dust extinction in the intervening systems; (2) AAS in core-dominated QSOs cause 2.0 ± 0.1 times higher dust extinction than those in lobe-dominated QSOs; (3) the occurrence of AAS is 2.1 ± 0.2 times more likely in RD QSOs than in RUD QSOs and 1.8 ± 0.1 time more likely in QSOs having black holes with masses larger than 1.23 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} than in those with lower-mass black holes; and (4) there is excess flux in [O II]λ3727 emission in the composite spectra of the AAS samples compared with those of the control samples, which is at the emission redshift. The presence of AAS enhances the O II emission from the active galactic nucleus and/or the host galaxy. This excess is similar for both RD and RUD samples and is 2.5 ± 0.4 times higher in lobe-dominated samples than in core-dominated samples. The excess depends on the black hole mass and Eddington ratio. All these point to the intrinsic nature of the AAS except for the systems with z {sub abs} > z {sub em}, which could be infalling galaxies.

  1. Occupational Exposure to Respirable Dust, Respirable Crystalline Silica and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions in the London Tunnelling Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Karen S; Mair, Craig; Alexander, Carla; de Vocht, Frank; van Tongeren, Martie

    2016-03-01

    Personal 8-h shift exposure to respirable dust, diesel engine exhaust emissions (DEEE) (as respirable elemental carbon), and respirable crystalline silica of workers involved in constructing an underground metro railway tunnel was assessed. Black carbon (BC) concentrations were also assessed using a MicroAeth AE51. During sprayed concrete lining (SCL) activities in the tunnel, the geometric mean (GM) respirable dust exposure level was 0.91mg m(-3), with the highest exposure measured on a back-up sprayer (3.20mg m(-3)). The GM respirable crystalline silica concentration for SCL workers was 0.03mg m(-3), with the highest measurement also for the back-up sprayer (0.24mg m(-3)). During tunnel boring machine (TBM) activities, the GM respirable dust concentration was 0.54mg m(-3). The GM respirable elemental carbon concentration for all the TBM operators was 18 µg m(-3); with the highest concentration measured on a segment lifter. The BC concentrations were higher in the SCL environment in comparison to the TBM environment (daily GM 18-54 µg m(-3) versus 3-6 µg m(-3)). This small-scale monitoring campaign provides additional personal data on exposures experienced by underground tunnel construction workers. PMID:26403363

  2. Nebular and Stellar Dust Extinction Across the Disk of Emission-Line Galaxies on Small (KPC) Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Darvish, Behnam; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Sobral, David; Miller, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    We investigate resolved kpc-scale stellar and nebular dust distribution in eight star-forming galaxies at z~0.4 in the GOODS fields. Constructing the observed Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) per pixel, based on seven bands photometric data from HST/ACS and WFC3, we performed pixel-by-pixel SED fits to population synthesis models and estimated small-scale distribution of stellar dust extinction. We use Halpha / Hbeta nebular emission line ratios from Keck/DEIMOS high resolution spectra at each spatial resolution element to measure the amount of attenuation faced by ionized gas at different radii from the center of galaxies. We find a good agreement between the integrated and median of resolved color excess measurements in our galaxies. The ratio of integrated nebular to stellar dust extinction is always greater than unity, but does not show any trend with stellar mass or star formation rate. We find that inclination plays an important role in the variation of the nebular to stellar excess ratio. The stell...

  3. On the nature of diffuse ionized gas in galaxies -- I The contribution of dust scattering to diffuse line emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ascasibar, Y; Casado, J; Scannapieco, C; Díaz, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the contribution of dust scattering to the diffuse H-alpha emission observed in nearby galaxies. As initial conditions for the spatial distribution of HII regions, gas, and dust, we take three Milky Way-like galaxies from state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that implement different prescriptions for star formation, feedback, and chemical enrichment. Radiative transfer has been solved a posteriori, using the publicly-available Monte Carlo code Sunrise to take into account dust absorption and scattering of the H-alpha photons, originating exclusively from the HII regions. No contribution from recombinations in the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) component is explicitly or implicitly included in our model. Our main result is that the flux arising from scattered light is of the order of 1-2 per cent of the H-alpha flux coming directly from the HII regions. Building upon previous studies, we conclude that the DIG contributes lass than 50 per cent of the total H-alpha emi...

  4. Preliminary results of long term correlation analysis among earthquakes (M>4) occurrence and anomalous transients in Radon emission and Earth's emitted TIR radiation in Northeastern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Anna; Capobianco, Stefano; Genzano, Nicola; Lisi, Mariano; Tamaro, Alberto; Santulin, Marco; Sileo, Giancanio; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Looking toward the assessment of a multi-parametric system for dynamically updating seismic hazard estimates and earthquake short term (from days to weeks) forecast, a preliminary step is to identify those parameters (chemical, physical, biological, etc.) whose anomalous variations can be, to some extent, associated to the complex process of earthquake preparation. Among the other parameters claimed as possible indicators of an impending seismic activity, the anomalous variations of radon emissions and of Earth's thermally emitted infrared radiation (TIR), have been proposed, since long time, as potential earthquake precursors. In this paper the added value of a multi-parametric approach is evaluated by applying a similar statistical analysis (based on the general RST approach) to long-term time series of Radon and TIR data collected in Northern Italy. Preliminary results of the correlation analysis performed with earthquakes (M>4) clearly show a strong reduction of false positive (up to zero) as soon as the number of considered parameter pass from one (just Radon) to two (Radon & TIR anomalies) (contemporary) considered parameters.

  5. The Effect of Simulated Lunar Dust on the Absorptivity, Emissivity, and Operating Temperature on AZ-93 and Ag/FEP Thermal Control Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Panko, Scott R.; Rogers, Kerry J.; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2008-01-01

    JSC-1AF lunar simulant has been applied to AZ-93 and AgFEP thermal control surfaces on aluminum or composite substrates in a simulated lunar environment. The temperature of these surfaces was monitored as they were heated with a solar simulator and cooled in a 30 K coldbox. Thermal modeling was used to determine the absorptivity ( ) and emissivity ( ) of the thermal control surfaces in both their clean and dusted states. Then, a known amount of power was applied to the samples while in the coldbox and the steady state temperatures measured. It was found that even a submonolayer of simulated lunar dust can significantly degrade the performance of both white paint and second-surface mirror type thermal control surfaces under these conditions. Contrary to earlier studies, dust was found to affect as well as . Dust lowered the emissivity by as much as 16 percent in the case of AZ-93, and raised it by as much as 11 percent in the case of AgFEP. The degradation of thermal control surface by dust as measured by / rose linearly regardless of the thermal control coating or substrate, and extrapolated to degradation by a factor 3 at full coverage by dust. Submonolayer coatings of dust were found to not significantly change the steady state temperature at which a shadowed thermal control surface will radiate.

  6. Matching dust emission structures and magnetic field in high-latitude cloud L1642: comparing Herschel and Planck maps

    CERN Document Server

    Malinen, J; Montillaud, J; Juvela, M; Ristorcelli, I; Clark, S E; Berné, O; Bernard, J -Ph; Pelkonen, V -M; Collins, D C

    2015-01-01

    The nearby cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. It is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g., of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642. The high-resolution (~18-40") Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central blob with elongated extensions, low density striations, "fishbone" like structures with a spine and perpendicular striations, and a spiraling "tail". The Planck polarization data (at 10' resolution) reveal an ordered magnetic field pervading the cloud and aligned with the surrounding striations. There is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large scale magnetic field. This suggests that magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. CO rotational emission confirm...

  7. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Misawa, R; Ade, P; Andre, Y; deBernardis, P; Bouzit, M; Charra, M; Crane, B; Dubois, J P; Engel, C; Griffin, M; Hargrave, P; Leriche, B; Longval, Y; Maes, S; Marty, C; Marty, W; Masi, S; Mot, B; Narbonne, J; Pajot, F; Pisano, G; Ponthieu, N; Ristorcelli, I; Rodriguez, L; Roudil, G; Salatino, M; Savini, G; Tucker, C

    2014-01-01

    Future cosmology space missions will concentrate on measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, which potentially carries invaluable information about the earliest phases of the evolution of our universe. Such ambitious projects will ultimately be limited by the sensitivity of the instrument and by the accuracy at which polarized foreground emission from our own Galaxy can be subtracted out. We present the PILOT balloon project which will aim at characterizing one of these foreground sources, the polarization of the dust continuum emission in the diffuse interstellar medium. The PILOT experiment will also constitute a test-bed for using multiplexed bolometer arrays for polarization measurements. We present the results of ground tests obtained just before the first flight of the instrument.

  8. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, J.-Ph.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Bautista, L.; Bray, N.; Bernardis, P. de; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P.; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Longval, Y.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Mot, B.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-08-01

    Future cosmology space missions will concentrate on measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, which potentially carries invaluable information about the earliest phases of the evolution of our universe. Such ambitious projects will ultimately be limited by the sensitivity of the instrument and by the accuracy at which polarized foreground emission from our own Galaxy can be subtracted out. We present the PILOT balloon project, which aims at characterizing one of these foreground sources, the polarized continuum emission by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The PILOT experiment also constitutes a test-bed for using multiplexed bolometer arrays for polarization measurements. This paper presents the instrument and its expected performances. Performance measured during ground calibrations of the instrument and in flight will be described in a forthcoming paper.

  9. Impact of the March 2009 dust event in Saudi Arabia on aerosol optical properties, meteorological parameters, sky temperature and emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, A.; Alharbi, B.; Tapper, N.

    2011-04-01

    On 10th March 2009 a widespread and severe dust storm event that lasted several hours struck Riyadh, and represented one of the most intense dust storms experienced in Saudi Arabia in the last two decades. This short-lived storm caused widespread and heavy dust deposition, zero visibility and total airport shutdown, as well as extensive damage to buildings, vehicles, power poles and trees across the city of Riyadh. Changes in Meteorological parameters, aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent α, infrared (IR) sky temperature and atmospheric emissivity were investigated before, during, and after the storm. The analysis showed significant changes in all of the above parameters due to this event. Shortly after the storm arrived, air pressure rapidly increased by 4 hPa, temperature decreased by 6 °C, relative humidly increased from 10% to 30%, the wind direction became northerly and the wind speed increased to a maximum of 30 m s -1. AOD at 550 nm increased from 0.396 to 1.71. The Angstrom exponent α rapidly decreased from 0.192 to -0.078. The mean AOD at 550 nm on the day of the storm was 0.953 higher than during the previous clear day, while α was -0.049 in comparison with 0.323 during the previous day. Theoretical simulations using SMART software showed remarkable changes in both spectral and broadband solar radiation components. The global and direct radiation components decreased by 42% and 68%, respectively, and the diffuse components increased by 44% in comparison with the previous clear day. IR sky temperatures and sky emissivity increased by 24 °C and 0.3, respectively, 2 h after the arrival of the storm. The effect of aerosol loading by the storm on IR atmospheric emission was investigated using MODTRAN software. It was found that the effect of aerosols caused an increase of the atmospheric emission in the atmospheric window (8-14 μm) such that the window emissions resembled those of a blackbody and the atmospheric window was almost closed.

  10. Comparison of the size-resolved dust emission fluxes measured over a Sahelian source with the Dust Production Model DPM predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sow

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is a follow up of Sow et al. (2009 who had used the gradient method to determine the size-resolved emission flux of 3 different erosion events monitored in natural conditions at the Banizoumbou (Niger supersite of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA experiment. Our aim is to compare these measured fluxes with the predictions of the Dust Production Model (DPM of Alfaro and Gomes (2001, which was derived from wind tunnel experiments. For each event, the model is run using the soil aggregate dry size-distribution, soil roughness length, and wind friction velocities derived from the field measurements as input parameters. We find that the mass emission flux is correctly predicted by the model if the binding energies of the 3 populations of fine particles released by sandblasting are reduced by a factor varying between 2.5 – for the intense convective event – and 5 – for the two less energetic events of the monsoon type. We explain this need to reduce the binding energies by an underestimation of the wind velocity due to the averaging over periods of 15' required by the calculation of the wind friction velocity. In all the studied cases the emission flux can, as already assumed in the DPM, be considered as a mixture of 3 fine particle populations the proportions of which depend on the intensity of the event. However, if the geometric mean diameter (2.0 μm of the finest population compares well to the one used in the model (1.7 μm, the values of the intermediate and coarse modes (5.0 and 10.3 μm, respectively are smaller than previously assumed (6.7 and 14.2 μm. Finally, the amplitude of the emission does not increase with wind speed for the coarsest mode, contrary what the DPM predicts. This suggests that the scheme describing the rate at which the relative proportions of the 3 populations evolve should be revised in the model.

  11. Study of the Effects of the Electric Field on Charging Measurements on Individual Micron-size Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging process in Astrophysical, Planetary, and the Lunar environments. Low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available theoretical models for the calculation of SEE yield applicable for neutral, planar or bulk surfaces are generally based on Sternglass Equation. However, viable models for charging of individual dust grains do not exist at the present time. Therefore, the SEE yields have to be obtained by some experimental methods at the present time. We have conducted experimental studies on charging of individual micron size dust grains in simulated space environments using an electrodynamic balance (EDB) facility at NASA-MSFC. The results of our extensive laboratory study of charging of individual micron-size dust grains by low energy electron impact indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a very complex process expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. It was found that the incident electrons may lead to positive or negative charging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration. In this paper we give a more elaborate discussion about the possible effects of the AC field in the EDB on dust charging measurements by comparing the secondary electron emission time-period (tau (sub em) (s/e)) with the time-period (tau (sub ac) (ms)) of the AC field cycle in the EDB that we have briefly addressed in our previous publication.

  12. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  13. Intervalence charge transfer luminescence: Interplay between anomalous and 5d − 4f emissions in Yb-doped fluorite-type crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barandiarán, Zoila, E-mail: zoila.barandiaran@uam.es; Seijo, Luis [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-21

    In this paper, we report the existence of intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) luminescence in Yb-doped fluorite-type crystals associated with Yb{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} mixed valence pairs. By means of embedded cluster, wave function theory ab initio calculations, we show that the widely studied, very broad band, anomalous emission of Yb{sup 2+}-doped CaF{sub 2} and SrF{sub 2}, usually associated with impurity-trapped excitons, is, rather, an IVCT luminescence associated with Yb{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} mixed valence pairs. The IVCT luminescence is very efficiently excited by a two-photon upconversion mechanism where each photon provokes the same strong 4f{sup 14}–1A{sub 1g}→ 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sub 7/2})5de{sub g}–1T{sub 1u} absorption in the Yb{sup 2+} part of the pair: the first one, from the pair ground state; the second one, from an excited state of the pair whose Yb{sup 3+} moiety is in the higher 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sub 5/2}) multiplet. The Yb{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} → Yb{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 2+} IVCT emission consists of an Yb{sup 2+} 5de{sub g} → Yb{sup 3+} 4f{sub 7/2} charge transfer accompanied by a 4f{sub 7/2} → 4f{sub 5/2} deexcitation within the Yb{sup 2+} 4f{sup 13} subshell: [{sup 2}F{sub 5/2}5de{sub g},{sup 2}F{sub 7/2}] → [{sup 2}F{sub 7/2},4f{sup 14}]. The IVCT vertical transition leaves the oxidized and reduced moieties of the pair after electron transfer very far from their equilibrium structures; this explains the unexpectedly large band width of the emission band and its low peak energy, because the large reorganization energies are subtracted from the normal emission. The IVCT energy diagrams resulting from the quantum mechanical calculations explain the different luminescent properties of Yb-doped CaF{sub 2}, SrF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, and SrCl{sub 2}: the presence of IVCT luminescence in Yb-doped CaF{sub 2} and SrF{sub 2}; its coexistence with regular 5d-4f emission in SrF{sub 2}; its absence in BaF{sub 2} and SrCl{sub 2}; the quenching of

  14. The local dust foregrounds in the microwave sky: I. Thermal emission spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Dikarev, V.; Preuss, O.; Solanki, S.; Krueger, H.; Krivov, A

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps made by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have revealed anomalies not predicted by the standard inflationary cosmology. In particular, the power of the quadrupole moment of the CMB fluctuations is remarkably low, and the quadrupole and octopole moments are aligned mutually and with the geometry of the Solar system. It has been suggested in the literature that microwave sky pollution by an unidentified dust cloud in...

  15. A spectroscopic study of absorption and emission features of interstellar dust components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopic properties of silicate interstellar dust grains are the subject of this thesis. The process of accretion and photolysis is simulated in the laboratory by condensing mixtures of gases onto a cold substrate (T ∼ 12 K) in a vacuum chamber and photolyzing these mixtures with a vacuum ultraviolet source. Alternatively, the gas mixtures may be passed through a microwave discharge first, before deposition. The spectroscopic properties of the ices are investigated using ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectroscopy. (Auth.)

  16. Estimation of Supraglacial Dust and Debris Geochemical Composition via Satellite Reflectance and Emissivity

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Casey; Andreas Kääb

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral estimation of supraglacial dust, debris, ash and tephra geochemical composition from glaciers and ice fields in Iceland, Nepal, New Zealand and Switzerland. Surface glacier material was collected and analyzed via X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for geochemical composition and mineralogy. In situ data was used as ground truth for comparison with satellite derived geochemical results. Supraglacial debris spectral response patterns and em...

  17. Optical/Near-IR Polarization Survey of Sh 2-29: Magnetic Fields, Dense Cloud Fragmentations and Anomalous Dust Grain Sizes

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Fábio P; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Reis, Wilson; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G

    2013-01-01

    Sh 2-29 is a conspicuous star-forming region marked by the presence of massive embedded stars as well as several notable interstellar structures. In this research, our goals were to determine the role of magnetic fields and to study the size distribution of interstellar dust particles within this turbulent environment. We have used a set of optical and near-infrared polarimetric data obtained at OPD/LNA (Brazil) and CTIO (Chile), correlated with extinction maps, 2MASS data and images from DSS and Spitzer. The region's most striking feature is a swept out interstellar cavity whose polarimetric maps indicate that magnetic field lines were dragged outwards, pilling up along its borders. This led to a higher magnetic strength value ($\\approx400\\,\\mu$G) and an abrupt increase in polarization degree, probably due to an enhancement in alignment efficiency. Furthermore, dense cloud fragmentations with peak $A_{V}$ between 20 and 37 mag were probably triggered by its expansion. The presence of $24\\,\\mu$m point-like so...

  18. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Ruka; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    Measuring precisely the faint polarization of the Far-Infrared and sub-millimetre sky is one of the next observational challenges of modern astronomy and cosmology. In particular, detection of the B-mode polarization from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may reveal the inflationary periods in the very early universe. Such measurements will require very high sensitivity and very low instrumental systematic effects. As for measurements of the CMB intensity, sensitive measurements of the CMB polarization will be made difficult by the presence of foreground emission from our own Milky Way, which is orders of magnitude stronger than the faint polarized cosmological signal. Such foreground emission will have to be understood very accurately and removed from cosmological measurements. This polarized emission is also interesting in itself, since it brings information relevant to the process of star formation, about the orientation of the magnetic field in our Galaxy through the alignment of dust grains. I will first summarize our current knowledge in this field, on the basis of extinction and emission measurements from the ground and airborne experiments and in the context of the recent measurements with the Planck satellite. I will then describe the concept and science goals of the PILOT balloon-borne experiment project (http://pilot.irap.omp.eu). This project is funded by the French space agency (CNES: “Centre National des Etudes Spatiales”) and currently under final assembly and tests. The experiment is dedicated to measuring precisely the linear polarization of the faint interstellar diffuse dust emission in the Far-Infrared in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies. It is composed of a 0.83 m diameter telescope and a Helium 4 deware accommodating the rest of the optics and 2 focal plane arrays with a total of 2048 individual bolometers cooled to 300 mK, developed for the PACS instruments on board the Hershel satellite. It will be operating in two broad photometric

  19. Far-Ultraviolet and Far-Infrared Bivariate Luminosity Function of Galaxies: Complex Relation between Stellar and Dust Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu T; Yuan, Fang-Ting; Buat, Veronique; Burgarella, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Far-ultraviolet (FUV) and far-infrared (FIR) luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies show a strong evolution from $z = 0$ to $z = 1$, but the FIR LF evolves much stronger than the FUV one. The FUV is dominantly radiated from newly formed short-lived OB stars, while the FIR is emitted by dust grains heated by the FUV radiation field. It is known that dust is always associated with star formation activity. Thus, both FUV and FIR are tightly related to the star formation in galaxies, but in a very complicated manner. In order to disentangle the relation between FUV and FIR emissions, we estimate the UV-IR bivariate LF (BLF) of galaxies with {\\sl GALEX} and {\\sl AKARI} All-Sky Survey datasets. Recently we invented a new mathematical method to construct the BLF with given marginals and prescribed correlation coefficient. This method makes use of a tool from mathematical statistics, so called "copula". The copula enables us to construct a bivariate distribution function from given marginal distributions with prescri...

  20. The near-IR shape of the big blue bump emission from quasars: under the hot dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kishimoto, M; Blaes, Omer M; Kishimoto, Makoto; Antonucci, Robert; Blaes, Omer

    2006-01-01

    One primary difficulty in understanding the nature of the putative accretion disk in the central engine of AGNs is that some of its key intrinsic spectral signatures are buried under the emissions from the surrounding regions, i.e. the broad line region (BLR) and the obscuring torus. We argue here that these signatures can be revealed by using optical and near-IR polarization. At least in some quasars, the polarization is seen only in the continuum and is not shared by emission lines. In this case, the polarized flux is considered to show the intrinsic spectrum interior to the BLR, removing off the emissions from the BLR and torus. We have used this polarization to reveal the Balmer-edge feature and near-IR spectral shape of the central engine, both of which are important for testing the fundamental aspects of the models.

  1. Determination of fugitive coal-dust emissions from rotary railcar dumping. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookman, E.T.; Carnes, D.H.; Catizone, P.A.; Kelley, K.J.

    1984-09-01

    TRC Environmental Consultants, Inc. conducted 72 field tests to determine particulate emission levels for a rotary railcar coal dumper operated by the Potomac Electric Power Company. Approximately 60 parameters were monitored as part of the testing program. These parameters related to particulate emissions, meteorology, and coal properties. The railcar dumper was situated inside of a shed. No other control devices were in operation during the test program. Emissions were measured at the entrance and exit doorways of the shed using the mass flux technique. Background levels were accounted for using the upwind/downwind technique. The amount of particulate material that deposited within the shed was also recorded. The study resulted in the determination of emission levels that were one to two orders of magnitude less than those cited in the literature. These emission levels were found to correlate the strongest with the moisture content of the coal and whether the coal was washed or unwashed.

  2. The Correlation of Dust and Gas Emission in Star-Forming Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, L K; Eden, D J; Hatchell, J; Urquhart, J S

    2012-01-01

    We present ammonia maps of portions of the W3 and Perseus molecular clouds in order to compare gas emission with continuum thermal emission. These are commonly expected to trace the same mass component in star-forming regions, often under the assumption of LTE. The star-forming regions are found to have different physical characteristics consistent with their identification as low-mass and high-mass respectively. Accounting for the distance of the W3 region does not fully reconcile these differences, suggesting that there is an underlying difference in the structure of the two regions. Peak positions of submillimetre and ammonia emission do not correlate strongly. Also, the extent of diffuse emission is only moderately matched between ammonia and thermal emission. Source sizes measured from our observations are consistent between regions, although there is a noticeable difference between the submillimeter source sizes in the two observed regions. Fractional abundance measurements of ammonia indicate a dip in ...

  3. Multi-scale Planck corrections to Herschel dust continuum emission maps: Implications for column density and temperature maps

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu-Vicente, J; Robitaille, T; Henning, Th; Keto, E

    2016-01-01

    We present a Fourier space method to combine the publicly available Herschel PACS and SPIRE data with the Planck thermal dust emission model. The method effectively combines the Planck large angular scale emission with the small scale \\herschel emission, similar to the feathering method used in interferometry and recently implemented by Csengeri et al. to correct the ground-based ATLASGAL data. This method eliminates the pervasive negative fluxes present in the PACS 160 micron archive data while preserving the structure in the background of both the PACS and SPIRE data. We generate column density and temperature maps from data calibrated with this method. We analyze the validity of our new method using star-forming regions in a range of environments: low-mass Bok Globules (B68), nearby star-forming regions (Perseus), and high-mass star forming regions in the Galactic plane (including IRDC G11 and W31). We accurately recover low column density material, comparing well to previous near-infrared extinction metho...

  4. Historic records of organic compounds from a high Alpine glacier: influences of biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions, and dust transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Tautges, C.; Eichler, A.; Schwikowski, M.; Pezzatti, G. B.; Conedera, M.; Hoffmann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Historic records of α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal, methylglyoxal), carboxylic acids (C6-C12 dicarboxylic acids, pinic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, phthalic acid, 4-methylphthalic acid), and ions (oxalate, formate, calcium) were determined with annual resolution in an ice core from Grenzgletscher in the southern Swiss Alps, covering the time period from 1942 to 1993. Chemical analysis of the organic compounds was conducted using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) for dicarbonyls and long-chain carboxylic acids and ion chromatography for short-chain carboxylates. Long-term records of the carboxylic acids and dicarbonyls, as well as their source apportionment, are reported for western Europe. This is the first study comprising long-term trends of dicarbonyls and long-chain dicarboxylic acids (C6-C12) in Alpine precipitation. Source assignment of the organic species present in the ice core was performed using principal component analysis. Our results suggest biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions, and transport of mineral dust to be the main parameters influencing the concentration of organic compounds. Ice core records of several highly correlated compounds (e.g., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, pinic acid, pimelic, and suberic acids) can be related to the forest fire history in southern Switzerland. P-hydroxybenzoic acid was found to be the best organic fire tracer in the study area, revealing the highest correlation with the burned area from fires. Historical records of methylglyoxal, phthalic acid, and dicarboxylic acids adipic acid, sebacic acid, and dodecanedioic acid are comparable with that of anthropogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The small organic acids, oxalic acid and formic acid, are both highly correlated with calcium, suggesting their records to be affected by changing mineral dust transport to the drilling site.

  5. Historic records of organic aerosols from a high Alpine glacier: implications of biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions, and dust transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Müller-Tautges

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Historic records of α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal, methylglyoxal, carboxylic acids (C6–C12 dicarboxylic acids, pinic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, phthalic acid, 4-methylphthalic acid, and major ions (oxalate, formate, calcium were determined with annual resolution in an ice core from Grenzgletscher in the southern Swiss Alps, covering the time period from 1942 to 1993. Measurements were conducted using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC coupled to electrospray ionization high resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS. For the first time, long-term records of the carboxylic acids and dicarbonyls as well as their source apportionment are reported for Western Europe. Source assignment of the organic species present in the ice core was performed using principal component analysis. Our results suggest biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions, and transport of mineral dust to be the main parameters influencing the concentration of organic compounds. Ice core records of several highly correlated compounds (e.g. p-hydroxybenzoic acid, pinic acid, C7 and C8 dicarboxylic acids can be related to the forest fire history in southern Switzerland. P-hydroxybenzoic acid was found to be the best organic fire tracer in the study area, revealing the highest correlation with the burned area from fires. Historical records of methylglyoxal, phthalic acid, and dicarboxylic acids C6, C10, and C12 are comparable with that of anthropogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The small organic acids oxalic acid and formic acid are both highly correlated with calcium, suggesting their records to be affected by changing mineral dust transport to the drilling site.

  6. The Emission Nebula Sh2-231 And Its Relation To The Dust Cloud TGU 1192 (LDN 1525)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Richard P.; Janusz, R.; Straizys, V.; Laugalys, V.

    2012-01-01

    The HII region Sh2-231 is thought to belong to the Auriga OB1 association, together with other emission nebulae, Sh2-232, Sh2-233 and Sh2-235, all within 1 square degree. The area is surrounded by a giant molecular cloud G173.7+02.7 also known as a dust cloud LDN 1525 or TGU 1192. Distances estimated from the exciting stars of the HII regions are known with low accuracy (between 1.0 and 2.3 kpc). Most authors consider that all listed HII regions are related to the association Aur OB1: the mean distance of its stars is 1.3 kpc. In our earlier paper (Straizys et al., Baltic Astronomy, 19, 169, 2010) we argued the Sh2-231 nebula might not be related to the association. More probably this nebula is in the Perseus arm seen semi-transparently through the dust cloud TGU 1192. We investigate the 12' by 12' area using the VATT telescope with a 4K CCD camera and seven filters of the Vilnius photometric system to determine spectral and luminosity classes, interstellar reddenings, extinctions and distances for the field stars down to V = 17 mag. Thus we learn the distance to the dust cloud and its relation to the nebula Sh2-231. IPHAS and MegaCam photometry provides spectral types for fainter stars. Both Vilnius and IPHAS photometric data are in agreement that the dust cloud in the direction of Sh2-231 begins at a distance of about 1.3 kpc, i.e., it is undoubtedly related to the Aur OB1 association. The extinction Av in the cloud ranges between 1.5 and 4.5 mag. However, the star ALS 8476 (O9 V, V = 10.79, Av = 3.6, d = 2.3 kpc) is too far to be related to the Aur OB1 star-forming region. Consequently, if this star is the exciting source of Sh2-231, the nebula belongs to the Perseus arm.

  7. Warm Dust around Cool Stars: Field M Dwarfs with WISE 12 or 22 Micron Excess Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Theissen, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Using the SDSS DR7 spectroscopic catalog, we searched the WISE AllWISE catalog to investigate the occurrence of warm dust, as inferred from IR excesses, around field M dwarfs (dMs). We developed SDSS/WISE color selection criteria to identify 175 dMs (from 70,841) that show IR flux greater than typical dM photosphere levels at 12 and/or 22 $\\mu$m, including seven new stars within the Orion OB1 footprint. We characterize the dust populations inferred from each IR excess, and investigate the possibility that these excesses could arise from ultracool binary companions by modeling combined SEDs. Our observed IR fluxes are greater than levels expected from ultracool companions ($>3\\sigma$). We also estimate that the probability the observed IR excesses are due to chance alignments with extragalactic sources is $<$ 0.1%. Using SDSS spectra we measure surface gravity dependent features (K, Na, and CaH 3), and find $<$ 15% of our sample indicate low surface gravities. Examining tracers of youth (H$\\alpha$, UV fl...

  8. Inhalable desert dust, urban emissions, and potentially biotoxic metals in urban Saharan-Sahelian air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Majewski, Michael S.; Konde, Lassana; Wolf, Ruth E.; Otto, Richard D.; Tsuneoka, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Saharan dust incursions and particulates emitted from human activities degrade air quality throughout West Africa, especially in the rapidly expanding urban centers in the region. Particulate matter (PM) that can be inhaled is strongly associated with increased incidence of and mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and cancer. Air samples collected in the capital of a Saharan–Sahelian country (Bamako, Mali) between September 2012 and July 2013 were found to contain inhalable PM concentrations that exceeded World Health Organization (WHO) and US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) PM2.5 and PM10 24-h limits 58 – 98% of days and European Union (EU) PM10 24-h limit 98% of days. Mean concentrations were 1.2-to-4.5 fold greater than existing limits. Inhalable PM was enriched in transition metals, known to produce reactive oxygen species and initiate the inflammatory response, and other potentially bioactive and biotoxic metals/metalloids. Eroded mineral dust composed the bulk of inhalable PM, whereas most enriched metals/metalloids were likely emitted from oil combustion, biomass burning, refuse incineration, vehicle traffic, and mining activities. Human exposure to inhalable PM and associated metals/metalloids over 24-h was estimated. The findings indicate that inhalable PM in the Sahara–Sahel region may present a threat to human health, especially in urban areas with greater inhalable PM and transition metal exposure.

  9. Determination of Vanadium, Tin and Mercury in Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Cement Dust Samples by Direct Current Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindy, Kamal T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution study applies direct current plasma atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES) to samples of total suspended particulate matter collected in two industrial areas and one residential area, and cement dust collected near major cement factories. These samples were analyzed for vanadium, tin, and mercury. The results indicate the…

  10. Wide-field Imaging Survey of Dust Continuum Emissions at λ = 1.1 mm toward the Chamaeleon and Lupus Regions with AzTEC on ASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We carried out an imaging survey of dust continuum emissions toward the Chamaeleon and Lupus regions. Observations were made with the 144-element bolometer array camera AzTEC mounted on the 10-meter sub-millimeter telescope ASTE during 2007-2008. The preliminary results of disk search and the cloud structure of Lupus III are presented.

  11. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  12. HerMES: The Far-infrared Emission from Dust-obscured Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calanog, J. A.; Wardlow, J.; Fu, Hai; Cooray, A.; Assef, R. J.; Bock, J.; Casey, C. M.; Conley, A.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Kartaltepe, J.; Magdis, G.; Marchetti, L.; Oliver, S. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Riechers, D.; Rigopoulou, D.; Roseboom, I. G.; Schulz, B.; Scott, Douglas; Symeonidis, M.; Vaccari, M.; Viero, M.; Zemcov, M.

    2013-09-01

    Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) are an ultraviolet-faint, infrared-bright galaxy population that reside at z ~ 2 and are believed to be in a phase of dusty star-forming and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We present far-infrared (far-IR) observations of a complete sample of DOGs in the 2 deg2 of the Cosmic Evolution Survey. The 3077 DOGs have langzrang = 1.9 ± 0.3 and are selected from 24 μm and r + observations using a color cut of r + - [24] >= 7.5 (AB mag) and S 24 >= 100 μJy. Based on the near-IR spectral energy distributions, 47% are bump DOGs (star formation dominated) and 10% are power-law DOGs (AGN-dominated). We use SPIRE far-IR photometry from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey to calculate the IR luminosity and characteristic dust temperature for the 1572 (51%) DOGs that are detected at 250 μm (>=3σ). For the remaining 1505 (49%) that are undetected, we perform a median stacking analysis to probe fainter luminosities. Herschel-detected and undetected DOGs have average luminosities of (2.8 ± 0.4) × 1012 L ⊙ and (0.77 ± 0.08) × 1012 L ⊙, and dust temperatures of (33 ± 7) K and (37 ± 5) K, respectively. The IR luminosity function for DOGs with S 24 >= 100 μJy is calculated, using far-IR observations and stacking. DOGs contribute 10%-30% to the total star formation rate (SFR) density of the universe at z = 1.5-2.5, dominated by 250 μm detected and bump DOGs. For comparison, DOGs contribute 30% to the SFR density for all z = 1.5-2.5 galaxies with S 24 >= 100 μJy. DOGs have a large scatter about the star formation main sequence and their specific SFRs show that the observed phase of star formation could be responsible for their total observed stellar mass at z ~ 2.

  13. HerMES: THE FAR-INFRARED EMISSION FROM DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calanog, J. A.; Wardlow, J.; Fu, Hai; Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Assef, R. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bock, J.; Riechers, D.; Schulz, B. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Casey, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Farrah, D.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Ibar, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Kartaltepe, J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Magdis, G.; Rigopoulou, D. [Department of Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Marchetti, L. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Pérez-Fournon, I. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Scott, Douglas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); and others

    2013-09-20

    Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) are an ultraviolet-faint, infrared-bright galaxy population that reside at z ∼ 2 and are believed to be in a phase of dusty star-forming and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We present far-infrared (far-IR) observations of a complete sample of DOGs in the 2 deg{sup 2} of the Cosmic Evolution Survey. The 3077 DOGs have (z) = 1.9 ± 0.3 and are selected from 24 μm and r {sup +} observations using a color cut of r {sup +} – [24] ≥ 7.5 (AB mag) and S{sub 24} ≥ 100 μJy. Based on the near-IR spectral energy distributions, 47% are bump DOGs (star formation dominated) and 10% are power-law DOGs (AGN-dominated). We use SPIRE far-IR photometry from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey to calculate the IR luminosity and characteristic dust temperature for the 1572 (51%) DOGs that are detected at 250 μm (≥3σ). For the remaining 1505 (49%) that are undetected, we perform a median stacking analysis to probe fainter luminosities. Herschel-detected and undetected DOGs have average luminosities of (2.8 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 12} L{sub ☉} and (0.77 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 12} L{sub ☉}, and dust temperatures of (33 ± 7) K and (37 ± 5) K, respectively. The IR luminosity function for DOGs with S{sub 24} ≥ 100 μJy is calculated, using far-IR observations and stacking. DOGs contribute 10%-30% to the total star formation rate (SFR) density of the universe at z = 1.5-2.5, dominated by 250 μm detected and bump DOGs. For comparison, DOGs contribute 30% to the SFR density for all z = 1.5-2.5 galaxies with S{sub 24} ≥ 100 μJy. DOGs have a large scatter about the star formation main sequence and their specific SFRs show that the observed phase of star formation could be responsible for their total observed stellar mass at z ∼ 2.

  14. Microscopic and chemical studies of metal particulates in tree bark and attic dust: evidence for historical atmospheric smelter emissions, Humberside, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, A M; Hodgkinson, E S; Rawlins, B G

    2006-09-01

    Tree barks and attic dusts were examined as historical archives of smelter emissions, with the aim of elucidating the pathways of pollution associated with a plume of Sn and Pb contamination in top soils, found close to the former Capper Pass smelter, Humberside, UK. Samples were collected from three villages within the area of the contamination plume. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and bulk chemical analyses were used to assess particle type, number and deposition patterns. SEM analysis of dusts and bark revealed that Sn and Pb particles were present in samples from all three villages along with copper, zinc and iron particles. These were almost entirely dusts demonstrated that concentrations of Sn, Pb, Cu, As, Sb and Cd diminished with increasing distance from the source. Strong positive correlations were found between Sn and Pb, As, Sb and Cd in the attic dusts. Enrichment factors (EF) were calculated for these trace elements based on topsoil element concentrations obtained from the soil survey of the study area. Decreases in these trace element concentrations and EF values with distance away from the smelter are consistent with trends found in the soil survey for Sn and Pb and are typical of deposition patterns around smelter stacks. The study demonstrates that tree bark and attic dusts can be effective archives of metal particulates deposited from large static emission sources.

  15. Planck intermediate results. XX. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust with simulations of MHD turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Aniano, G; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Arzoumanian, D; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fanciullo, L; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Pelkonen, V -M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    Polarized emission observed by Planck HFI at 353 GHz towards a sample of nearby fields is presented, focusing on the statistics of polarization fractions $p$ and angles $\\psi$. The polarization fractions and column densities in these nearby fields are representative of the range of values obtained over the whole sky. We find that: (i) the largest polarization fractions are reached in the most diffuse fields; (ii) the maximum polarization fraction $p_\\mathrm{max}$ decreases with column density $N_\\mathrm{H}$ in the more opaque fields with $N_\\mathrm{H} > 10^{21}\\,\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$; and (iii) the polarization fraction along a given line of sight is correlated with the local spatial coherence of the polarization angle. These observations are compared to polarized emission maps computed in simulations of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence in which we assume a uniform intrinsic polarization fraction of the dust grains. We find that an estimate of this parameter may be recovered from the maximum pol...

  16. Matching dust emission structures and magnetic field in high-latitude cloud L1642: comparing Herschel and Planck maps★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, J.; Montier, L.; Montillaud, J.; Juvela, M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Clark, S. E.; Berné, O.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Collins, D. C.

    2016-08-01

    The nearby cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. It is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g. of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642. The high-resolution (˜20 arcsec) Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central clump, and low-density striations. The Planck polarization data (at 10 arcmin resolution) reveal an ordered magnetic field pervading the cloud and aligned with the surrounding striations. There is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large-scale magnetic field. This suggests that the magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. CO rotational emission confirms that the striations are connected with the main clumps and likely to contain material either falling into or flowing out of the clumps. There is a clear transition from aligned to perpendicular structures approximately at a column density of NH = 1.6 × 1021 cm-2. Comparing the Herschel maps with the Planck polarization maps shows the close connection between the magnetic field and cloud structure even in the finest details of the cloud.

  17. Parametrization of convective transport in the boundary layer and its impact on the representation of diurnal cycle of wind and dust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hourdin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the impact of the representation of the boundary layer transport in a climate model on the representation of the near surface wind and dust emission, with a focus on the Sahel/Sahara region. We show that the combination of vertical turbulent diffusion with a representation of the thermal cells of the convective boundary layer by a mass flux scheme leads to a more realistic representation of the diurnal cycle of wind in spring, with a maximum near surface wind in the morning. This maximum occurs when the thermal plumes reach the low level jet that forms during the night at a few hundred meters above surface. The horizontal momentum in the jet is transported downward to the surface by compensating subsidences around thermal plumes in typically less than one hour. This leads to a rapid increase of wind speed at surface and therefore of dust emissions owing to the strong non linearity of emission laws. The numerical experiments are performed with a zoomed and nudged configuration of the LMDZ general circulation model, coupled to the emission module of the CHIMERE Chemistry Transport Model, in which winds are relaxed toward that of the ERAI reanalyzes. The new set of parameterizations leads to a strong improvement of the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind when compared to a previous version of LMDZ as well as to the reanalyzes used for nudging themselves. It also reinforces dust emissions in better agreement with observations, but the aerosol optical thickness is still significantly underestimated.

  18. DUST ATTENUATION OF THE NEBULAR REGIONS OF z ∼ 2 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: INSIGHT FROM UV, IR, AND EMISSION LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Barros, S.; Reddy, N.; Shivaei, I., E-mail: stephane.debarros@oabo.inaf.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We use a sample of 149 spectroscopically confirmed UV-selected galaxies at z ∼ 2 to investigate the relative dust attenuation of the stellar continuum and the nebular emission lines. For each galaxy in the sample, at least one rest-frame optical emission line (Hα/[N ii] λ6583 or [O iii] λ5007) measurement has been taken from the litterature, and 41 galaxies have additional Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm observations that are used to infer infrared luminosities. We use a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting code that predicts nebular line strengths when fitting the stellar populations of galaxies in our sample, and we perform comparisons between the predictions of our models and the observed/derived physical quantities. We find that on average our code is able to reproduce all the physical quantities (e.g., UV β slopes, infrared luminosities, emission line fluxes), but we need to apply a higher dust correction to the nebular emission compared to the stellar emission for the largest star formation rate (SFR) (log SFR/M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} > 1.82, Salpeter initial mass function). We find a correlation between SFR and the difference in nebular and stellar color excesses, which could resolve the discrepant results regarding nebular dust correction at z ∼ 2 from previous studies.

  19. Size-resolved dust and aerosol contaminants associated with copper and lead smelting emissions: Implications for emission management and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csavina, Janae [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Taylor, Mark P. [Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, North Ryde, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Félix, Omar [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Rine, Kyle P. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Eduardo Sáez, A., E-mail: esaez@email.arizona.edu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Betterton, Eric A., E-mail: betterton@atmo.arizona.edu [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Mining operations, including crushing, grinding, smelting, refining, and tailings management, are a significant source of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants such as As, Pb and other potentially toxic elements. In this work, we show that size-resolved concentrations of As and Pb generally follow a bimodal distribution with the majority of contaminants in the fine size fraction (< 1 μm) around mining activities that include smelting operations at various sites in Australia and Arizona. This evidence suggests that contaminated fine particles (< 1 μm) are the result of vapor condensation and coagulation from smelting operations while coarse particles are most likely the result of windblown dust from contaminated mine tailings and fugitive emissions from crushing and grinding activities. These results on the size distribution of contaminants around mining operations are reported to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of this phenomenon so that more effective emission management and practices that minimize health risks associated with metal extraction and processing can be developed. - Highlights: • Lead and copper smelting produce significant atmospheric concentrations of lead and arsenic. • Atmospheric lead and arsenic concentrations depend on particle size. • Lead isotopic analysis can be used to assess source of atmospheric contamination from smelters.

  20. Size-resolved dust and aerosol contaminants associated with copper and lead smelting emissions: Implications for emission management and human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mining operations, including crushing, grinding, smelting, refining, and tailings management, are a significant source of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants such as As, Pb and other potentially toxic elements. In this work, we show that size-resolved concentrations of As and Pb generally follow a bimodal distribution with the majority of contaminants in the fine size fraction (< 1 μm) around mining activities that include smelting operations at various sites in Australia and Arizona. This evidence suggests that contaminated fine particles (< 1 μm) are the result of vapor condensation and coagulation from smelting operations while coarse particles are most likely the result of windblown dust from contaminated mine tailings and fugitive emissions from crushing and grinding activities. These results on the size distribution of contaminants around mining operations are reported to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of this phenomenon so that more effective emission management and practices that minimize health risks associated with metal extraction and processing can be developed. - Highlights: • Lead and copper smelting produce significant atmospheric concentrations of lead and arsenic. • Atmospheric lead and arsenic concentrations depend on particle size. • Lead isotopic analysis can be used to assess source of atmospheric contamination from smelters

  1. THE DUST SUBLIMATION RADIUS AS AN OUTER ENVELOPE TO THE BULK OF THE NARROW Fe Kα LINE EMISSION IN TYPE 1 AGNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Poshak; Hönig, Sebastian F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kishimoto, Makoto [Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2015-10-20

    The Fe Kα emission line is the most ubiquitous feature in the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but the origin of its narrow core remains uncertain. Here, we investigate the connection between the sizes of the Fe Kα core emission regions and the measured sizes of the dusty tori in 13 local Type 1 AGNs. The observed Fe Kα emission radii (R{sub Fe}) are determined from spectrally resolved line widths in X-ray grating spectra, and the dust sublimation radii (R{sub dust}) are measured either from optical/near-infrared (NIR) reverberation time lags or from resolved NIR interferometric data. This direct comparison shows, on an object-by-object basis, that the dust sublimation radius forms an outer envelope to the bulk of the Fe Kα emission. R{sub Fe} matches R{sub dust} well in the AGNs, with the best constrained line widths currently. In a significant fraction of objects without a clear narrow line core, R{sub Fe} is similar to, or smaller than, the radius of the optical broad line region. These facts place important constraints on the torus geometries for our sample. Extended tori in which the solid angle of fluorescing gas peaks at well beyond the dust sublimation radius can be ruled out. We also test for luminosity scalings of R{sub Fe}, finding that the Eddington ratio is not a prime driver in determining the line location in our sample. We also discuss in detail potential caveats of data analysis and instrumental limitations, simplistic line modeling, uncertain black hole masses, and sample selection, showing that none of these is likely to bias our core result. The calorimeter on board Astro-H will soon vastly increase the parameter space over which line measurements can be made, overcoming many of these limitations.

  2. On the Anomalous Silicate Absorption Feature of the Prototypical Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The first detection of the silicate absorption feature in AGNs was made at 9.7 micrometer for the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 over 30 years ago, indicating the presence of a large column of silicate dust in the line-of-sight to the nucleus. It is now well recognized that type 2 AGNs exhibit prominent silicate absorption bands, while the silicate bands of type 1 AGNs appear in emission. More recently, using the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, Jaffe et al. (2004) by the first time spatially resolved the parsec-sized dust torus around NGC 1068 and found that the 10 micrometer silicate absorption feature of the innermost hot component exhibits an anomalous profile differing from that of the interstellar medium and that of common olivine-type silicate dust. While they ascribed the anomalous absorption profile to gehlenite (Ca_2Al_2SiO_7, a calcium aluminum silicate species), we propose a physical dust model and argue that, although the presence of gehl...

  3. Modeling dust emission response to North Atlantic millennial-scale climate variations from the perspective of East European MIS 3 loess deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sima

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available European loess sequences of the Marine Isotope Stage 3 (~60–25 kyr BP show periods of strong dust accumulation alternating with episodes of reduced sedimentation, favoring soil development. In the western part of the loess belt centered around 50° N, these variations appear to have been related to the North Atlantic rapid climate changes: the Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO and Heinrich (H events. It has been recently suggested that the North Atlantic climate signal can be detected further east, in loess deposits from Stayky (50°05.65' N, 30°53.92' E, Ukraine. Here we use climate and dust emission modeling to investigate this data interpretation. We focus on the areas north and northeast of the Carpathians, where loess deposits can be found, and the corresponding main dust sources must have been located as well. The simulations were performed with the LMDZ atmospheric general circulation model and the ORCHIDEE land surface model. They represent a reference "Greenland stadial" state and two perturbations, seen as sensitivity tests with respect to changes in the North Atlantic surface conditions between 30° and 63° N: a "Greenland interstadial" and an "H event". The main source for the loess deposits in the studied area is identified as a dust deflation band, with two very active spots located west-northwest from our reference site. Emissions only occur between February and June. Differences from one deflation spot to another, and from one climate state to another, are explained by analyzing the relevant meteorological and surface variables. Over most of the source region, the annual emission fluxes in the "interstadial" experiment are 30 to 50% lower than the "stadial" values; they would only be about 20% lower if the inhibition of dust uplift by the vegetation were not taken into account. Assuming that lower emissions result in reduced dust deposition leads us to the conclusion that the loess–paleosol stratigraphic succession in the Stayky

  4. Spatial Correlation between Dust and Hα Emission in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy; Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino; Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola; Salmon, Brett; Forrest, Ben

    2016-07-01

    Using a sample of dwarf irregular galaxies selected from the ALFALFA blind H i-survey and observed using the VIMOS IFU, we investigate the relationship between Hα emission and Balmer optical depth ({τ }{{b}}). We find a positive correlation between Hα luminosity surface density and Balmer optical depth in 8 of 11 at ≥0.8σ significance (6 of 11 at ≥1.0σ) galaxies. Our spaxels have physical scales ranging from 30 to 80 pc, demonstrating that the correlation between these two variables continues to hold down to spatial scales as low as 30 pc. Using the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient to test for correlation between {{{Σ }}}{{H}α } and {τ }{{b}} in all the galaxies combined, we find ρ =0.39, indicating a positive correlation at 4σ significance. Our low stellar-mass galaxy results are in agreement with observations of emission line regions in larger spiral galaxies, indicating that this relationship is independent of the size of the galaxy hosting the emission line region. The positive correlation between Hα luminosity and Balmer optical depth within spaxels is consistent with the hypothesis that young star-forming regions are surrounded by dusty birth-clouds. Based on VLT service mode observations (Programs 081.B-0649 and 083.B-0662) gathered at the European Southern Observatory, Chile.

  5. Quasi-Periodicities in the Anomalous Emission Events in Pulsars B1859+07 and B0919+06

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Haley M; Rankin, Joanna M; Weisberg, Joel M

    2016-01-01

    A quasi-periodicity has been identified in the strange emission shifts in pulsar B1859+07 and possibly B0919+06. These events, first investigated by Rankin, Rodriguez & Wright in 2006, originally appeared disordered or random, but further mapping as well as Fourier analysis has revealed that they occur on a fairly regular basis of approximately 150 rotation periods in B1859+07 and perhaps some 700 in B0919+06. The events-which we now refer to as "swooshes"-are not the result of any known type of mode-changing, but rather we find that they are a uniquely different effect, produced by some mechanism other than any known pulse-modulation phenomenon. Given that we have yet to find another explanation for the swooshes, we have appealed to a last resort for periodicities in astrophysics: orbital dynamics in a binary system. Such putative "companions" would then have semi-major axes comparable to the light cylinder radius for both pulsars. However, in order to resist tidal disruption their densities must be at l...

  6. Quasi-periodicities in the anomalous emission events in pulsars B1859+07 and B0919+06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Haley M.; Orfeo, Daniel J.; Rankin, Joanna M.; Weisberg, Joel M.

    2016-10-01

    A quasi-periodicity has been identified in the strange emission shifts in pulsar B1859+07 and possibly B0919+06. These events, first investigated by Rankin, Rodriguez & Wright in 2006, originally appeared disordered or random, but further mapping as well as Fourier analysis has revealed that they occur on a fairly regular basis of approximately 150 rotation periods in B1859+07 and perhaps some 700 in B0919+06. The events - which we now refer to as `swooshes' - are not the result of any known type of mode-changing, but rather we find that they are a uniquely different effect, produced by some mechanism other than any known pulse-modulation phenomenon. Given that we have yet to find another explanation for the swooshes, we have appealed to a last resort for periodicities in astrophysics: orbital dynamics in a binary system. Such putative `companions' would then have semimajor axes comparable to the light cylinder radius for both pulsars. However, in order to resist tidal disruption, their densities must be at least some 105 g cm-3 - therefore, white-dwarf cores or something even denser might be indicated.

  7. The Dust Attenuation Curve versus Stellar Mass for Emission Line Galaxies at z ~ 2

    OpenAIRE

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Bridge, Joanna; Brooks, Hunter; Fox, Derek; Gawiser, Eric; Gebhardt, Henry; Hagen, Alex; Schneider, Donald P.; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    We derive the mean wavelength dependence of stellar attenuation in a sample of 239 high redshift (1.90 < z < 2.35) galaxies selected via Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 IR grism observations of their rest-frame optical emission lines. Our analysis indicates that the average reddening law follows a form similar to that derived by Calzetti et al. for local starburst galaxies. However, over the mass range 7.2 < log M/Msolar < 10.2, the slope of the attenuation law in the UV is shallower than t...

  8. The past, present and future of African dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan, Amato T.; Flamant, Cyrille; Gaetani, Marco; Guichard, Françoise

    2016-03-01

    African dust emission and transport exhibits variability on diurnal to decadal timescales and is known to influence processes such as Amazon productivity, Atlantic climate modes, regional atmospheric composition and radiative balance and precipitation in the Sahel. To elucidate the role of African dust in the climate system, it is necessary to understand the factors governing its emission and transport. However, African dust is correlated with seemingly disparate atmospheric phenomena, including the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, the North Atlantic Oscillation, the meridional position of the intertropical convergence zone, Sahelian rainfall and surface temperatures over the Sahara Desert, all of which obfuscate the connection between dust and climate. Here we show that the surface wind field responsible for most of the variability in North African dust emission reflects the topography of the Sahara, owing to orographic acceleration of the surface flow. As such, the correlations between dust and various climate phenomena probably arise from the projection of the winds associated with these phenomena onto an orographically controlled pattern of wind variability. A 161-year time series of dust from 1851 to 2011, created by projecting this wind field pattern onto surface winds from a historical reanalysis, suggests that the highest concentrations of dust occurred from the 1910s to the 1940s and the 1970s to the 1980s, and that there have been three periods of persistent anomalously low dust concentrations—in the 1860s, 1950s and 2000s. Projections of the wind pattern onto climate models give a statistically significant downward trend in African dust emission and transport as greenhouse gas concentrations increase over the twenty-first century, potentially associated with a slow-down of the tropical circulation. Such a dust feedback, which is not represented in climate models, may be of benefit to human and ecosystem health in West Africa via improved air quality and

  9. Spatial Correlation Between Dust and H$\\alpha$ Emission in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jimmy,; Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino; Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola; Salmon, Brett; Forrest, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of dwarf irregular galaxies selected from the ALFALFA blind HI-survey and observed using the VIMOS IFU, we investigate the relationship between H$\\alpha$ emission and Balmer optical depth ($\\tau_{\\text{b}}$). We find a positive correlation between H$\\alpha$ luminosity surface density and Balmer optical depth in 8 of 11 at $\\geq$ 0.8$\\sigma$ significance (6 of 11 at $\\geq$ 1.0$\\sigma$) galaxies. Our spaxels have physical scales ranging from 30 to 80 pc, demonstrating that the correlation between these two variables continues to hold down to spatial scales as low as 30 pc. Using the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient to test for correlation between $\\Sigma_{\\text{H}\\alpha}$ and $\\tau_{\\text{b}}$ in all the galaxies combined, we find $\\rho = 0.39$, indicating a positive correlation at 4$\\sigma$ significance. Our low stellar-mass galaxy results are in agreement with observations of emission line regions in larger spiral galaxies, indicating that this relationship is independent of the size of ...

  10. Massive star formation in the GMC G345.5+1.0: Spatial distribution of the dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    López, C; Nyman, L -Å; May, J; Garay, G; 10.1051/0004-6361/201015889

    2011-01-01

    We attempt to make a complete census of massive-star formation within all of GMC G345.5+1.0. This cloud is located one degree above the galactic plane and at 1.8 kpc from the Sun, thus there is little superposition of dust along the line-of-sight, minimizing confusion effects in identifying individual clumps. We observed the 1.2 mm continuum emission across the whole GMC using the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope Imaging Bolometer Array mounted on the SEST. Observations have a spatial resolution of 0.2 pc and cover 1.8 deg\\times 2.2 deg in the sky with a noise of 20 mJy/beam. We identify 201 clumps with diameters between 0.2 and 0.6 pc, masses between 3.0 and 1.3\\times10^3 Msun, and densities between 5\\times10^3 and 4\\times10^5 cm^-3. The total mass of the clumps is 1.2\\times10^4 Msun, thus the efficiency in forming these clumps, estimated as the ratio of the total clump mass to the total GMC mass, is 0.02. The clump mass distribution for masses between 10 and 10^3 Msun is well-fitted by a power law dN/dM ...

  11. ANOMALOUSLY STEEP REDDENING LAW IN QUASARS: AN EXCEPTIONAL EXAMPLE OBSERVED IN IRAS 14026+4341

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Peng; Zhou Hongyan; Ji Tuo; Shu Xinwen; Liu Wenjuan; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Huiyuan; Wang Tinggui [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Wang Jianguo [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Bai Jinming, E-mail: jpaty@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Polar Research Institute of China, Jinqiao Road 451, Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2013-06-15

    A fraction of the heavily reddened quasars require a reddening curve that is even steeper than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. In this paper, we thoroughly characterize the anomalously steep reddening law in quasars via an exceptional example observed in IRAS 14026+4341. By comparing the observed spectrum to the quasar composite spectrum, we derive a reddening curve in the rest-frame wavelength range of 1200-10000 A. It has a steep rise at wavelengths shorter than 3000 A, but no significant reddening at longer wavelengths. The absence of dust reddening in the optical continuum is confirmed by the normal broad-line Balmer decrement (the H{alpha}/H{beta} ratio) in IRAS 14026+4341. The anomalous reddening curve can be satisfactorily reproduced with a dust model containing silicate grains in a power-law size distribution, dn(a)/da{proportional_to}a {sup -1.4}, truncated at a maximum size of a{sub max} = 70 nm. The unusual size distribution may be caused by the destruction of large 'stardust' grains by quasar activities or a different dust formation mechanism (i.e., the in situ formation of dust grains in quasar outflows). It is also possible that the analogies of the dust grains observed near the Galactic center are responsible for the steep reddening curve. In addition, we find that IRAS 14026+4341 is a weak emission-line quasar (i.e., PHL 1811 analogies) with heavy dust reddening and blueshifted broad absorption lines.

  12. Characterization of foreground emission at degree angular scale for CMB B-modes observations. Thermal Dust and Synchrotron signal from Planck and WMAP data

    CERN Document Server

    Krachmalnicoff, N; Aumont, J; Bersanelli, M; Mennella, A

    2015-01-01

    We quantify the contamination from polarized diffuse Galactic synchrotron and thermal dust emissions to the B-modes of the CMB anisotropies on the degree angular scale, using data from the Planck and WMAP satellites. We compute power spectra of foreground polarized emissions in 352 circular sky patches located at Galactic latitude |b|>20{\\deg}, each of which covering a fraction of the sky of about 1.5%. We make use of the spectral properties derived from Planck and WMAP data to extrapolate, in frequency, the amplitude of synchrotron and thermal dust B-modes spectra in the multipole bin centered at $\\ell\\simeq80$. In this way we estimate, for each analyzed region, the amplitude and frequency of the foreground minimum. We detect both dust and synchrotron signal, at degree angular scale and at 3 confidence level, in 28 regions. Here the minimum of the foreground emission is found at frequencies between 60 and 100 GHz with an amplitude,expressed in terms of the equivalent tensor-to-scalar ratio, r_FG, between ~0....

  13. Application of paste technology to mitigate the dust emissions from handling of fly and bottom ash at coal fired power plant : CGTEE in Candiota, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Marques, M.E. [Golder Associates Peru, Lima (Peru); Lima, H. [Golder Associates Brazil, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mandl, B.; Francoeur, R.; Palkovits, F. [Golder Paste Technology Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Blois, R. [Companhia de Geracao Termica de Energia Electrica, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed a method developed to reduce dust emissions generated in a fly ash handling procedure used at a thermal power plant located in the south of Brazil. The fly ash is collected in dry form at several locations in the plant and pneumatically conveyed to storage silos, where it is moistened with water in a mixer, loaded into dump trucks and deposited in a disposal area near a surface coal mine. The new solution created low density fly ash slurry in localized mixing tanks within the power plant. The low density slurry is pumped to an ash conditioning plant where the slurry is then mixed with the bottom ash, dewatered, and densified. The densified slurry is then pumped to an adjacent coal mine disposal site in order to be used as backfill in mined areas. The proposed method will significantly reduce dust emissions both inside and outside the plant, and will substantially reduce truck traffic at the mine. The method will reduce the environmental impacts associated with fly ash dust emissions in the region. 8 figs.

  14. The Dust Attenuation Curve versus Stellar Mass for Emission Line Galaxies at z ~ 2

    CERN Document Server

    Zeimann, Gregory R; Gronwall, Caryl; Bridge, Joanna; Brooks, Hunter; Fox, Derek; Gawiser, Eric; Gebhardt, Henry; Hagen, Alex; Schneider, Donald P; Trump, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    We derive the mean wavelength dependence of stellar attenuation in a sample of 239 high redshift (1.90 < z < 2.35) galaxies selected via Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 IR grism observations of their rest-frame optical emission lines. Our analysis indicates that the average reddening law follows a form similar to that derived by Calzetti et al. for local starburst galaxies. However, over the mass range 7.2 < log M/Msolar < 10.2, the slope of the attenuation law in the UV is shallower than that seen locally, and the UV slope steepens as the mass increases. These trends are in qualitative agreement with Kriek & Conroy, who found that the wavelength dependence of attenuation varies with galaxy spectral type. However, we find no evidence of an extinction "bump" at 2175 A in any of the three stellar mass bins, or in the sample as a whole. We quantify the relation between the attenuation curve and stellar mass and discuss its implications.

  15. X-ray absorption, nuclear infrared emission and dust covering factors of AGN: testing Unification Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, S; Alonso-Herrero, A; Hernán-Caballero, A; Barcons, X; Ramos, A Asensio; Watson, M G; Blain, A; Caccianiga, A; Ballo, L; Braito, V; Almeida, C Ramos

    2016-01-01

    We present the distributions of geometrical covering factors of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) dusty tori (f2) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGN drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGN have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 10^42 and 10^46 erg/s and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work we determined the rest-frame 1-20 microns continuum emission from the torus which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGN are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGN having on average tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGN. Nevertheless, ~20 per cent of type 1 AGN have tori with large covering factors while ~23-28 per cent of type 2 AGN have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGN the effect is certainly small. f2 in...

  16. Dust Deficient Palomar-Green Quasars and Their High-redshift Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jianwei; Rieke, G. H.; Shi, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The Elvis 1994 AGN template has been phenomenally successful at matching the SEDs of the vast majority of Type-1 quasars from the local Universe to z~6. Nonetheless, a population of hot-dust-poor or hot-dust-free quasars has been found both at intermediate and high-z. Estimates of the numbers of these anomalous quasars vary widely, along with speculations on their place in quasar evolution, e.g., whether they are related to the early growth of the black holes. To answer some of these questions, we have decomposed the optical-IR SEDs of 87 local Palomar-Green (PG) quasars: we find ~20% of them show only weak hot dust emission, indicating the hot dust deficient (HDD) quasars may be relatively common. Moreover, there is an intermediate population of warm dust deficient (WDD) quasars. Based on the comparison between the IR SEDs and classical torus models, the hot-dust-deficient quasars may have relatively little flaring in the dust density distribution in their circumnuclear tori. Our SED decomposition also indicates that the dust deficient quasars are more likely to show lower Eddington ratios and weaker star formation than the majority of quasars. Given these systematic differences, the HDD, WDD, and normal quasars could indicate a sequence of torus evolution around the accreting super-massive black holes.

  17. Submerged arc furnace process superior to the Waelz process in reducing PCDD/F emission during thermal treatment of electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fu-Qian; Huang, Shao-Bin; Liao, Wei-Tung; Wang, Lin-Chi; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Besides the Waelz process, the submerged arc furnace (SAF) process has also been extensively used to retain metals from ashes and scraps in the metallurgical industry. However, very little is known about the formation and depletion of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from this thermal process. In this study, an electric arc furnace (EAF) dust treatment plant adopting the SAF process was investigated and compared to the plant adopting the Waelz process. The predominant contributor of PCDD/F I-TEQ input was the EAF dusts, accounting for 98.4% of the total. The PCDD/F contents in the generated fly ashes of the SAF were extremely low, as almost all the organic compounds for PCDD/F formation were decomposed by the high operating temperatures (1500-1700 °C) of the SAF. Therefore, the PCDD/F emission factor of the SAF process (46.9 μg I-TEQ/tonne-EAF dust) was significantly lower than that of the Waelz process (840-1120 μg I-TEQ/tonne-EAF dust). Its PCDD/F output/input ratios (0.23 and 0.50 based on mass and toxicity) were also lower than those of the Waelz process plant (0.62 and 1.19). Therefore, the SAF process is superior to the Waelz process in reducing the potential of PCDD/F formation.

  18. Star-forming galaxies with hot dust emission in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a search for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) emission-line galaxies with very red 3.4mum - 4.6mum (W1-W2) colours in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) Preliminary Release Source Catalogue (PRSC) aiming to find objects with hot dust emission. For this purpose we considered a sample of ~16000 galaxies with strong emission lines selected out of a total of ~900000 SDSS spectra and identified them with the PRSC sources. We find that ~5000 sources out of the ~16000 SDSS galaxies are present in the PRSC, including ~1000 galaxies with sufficiently strong [OIII]4363 emission lines to permit reliable determinations of the oxygen abundance. No correlation of W1-W2 with metallicity is found. On the other hand, there is clear evidence for a redder W1-W2 index in galaxies with higher Hbeta luminosity and higher Hbeta equivalent width, implying that strong UV radiation from young starbursts efficiently heats interstellar dust to high temperatures. However, galaxies with very red colour...

  19. The thermal dust emission in the N158-N159-N160 (LMC) star forming complex mapped by Spitzer, Herschel and LABOCA

    CERN Document Server

    Galametz, M; Galliano, F; Madden, S C; Albrecht, M; Bot, C; Cormier, D; Engelbracht, C; Fukui, Y; Israel, F P; Kawamura, A; Lebouteiller, V; Li, A; Meixner, M; Misselt, K; Montiel, E; Okumura, K; Panuzzo, P; Duval, J Roman-; Rubio, M; Sauvage, M; Seale, J P; Sewilo, M; van Loon, J Th

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the infrared/submm emission of the LMC star forming complex N158-N159-N160. Combining observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope (3.6-70um), the Herschel Space Observatory (100-500um) and LABOCA (870um) allows us to work at the best angular resolution available now for an extragalactic source. We observe a remarkably good correlation between SPIRE and LABOCA emission and resolve the low surface brightnesses emission. We use the Spitzer and Herschel data to perform a resolved Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) modelling of the complex. Using MBB, we derive a global emissivity index beta_c of 1.47. If beta cold is fixed to 1.5, we find an average temperature of 27K. We also apply the Galliano et al. (2011) modelling technique (and amorphous carbon to model carbon dust) to derive maps of the star formation rate, the mean starlight intensity, the fraction of PAHs or the dust mass surface density of the region. We observe that the PAH fraction strongly decreases in the HII regions. This de...

  20. Parameterization of convective transport in the boundary layer and its impact on the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind and dust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hourdin

    2015-06-01

    boundary layer by a mass flux scheme leads to realistic representation of the diurnal cycle of wind in spring, with a maximum near-surface wind in the morning. This maximum occurs when the thermal plumes reach the low-level jet that forms during the night at a few hundred meters above surface. The horizontal momentum in the jet is transported downward to the surface by compensating subsidence around thermal plumes in typically less than 1 h. This leads to a rapid increase of wind speed at surface and therefore of dust emissions owing to the strong nonlinearity of emission laws. The numerical experiments are performed with a zoomed and nudged configuration of the LMDZ general circulation model coupled to the emission module of the CHIMERE chemistry transport model, in which winds are relaxed toward that of the ERA-Interim reanalyses. The new set of parameterizations leads to a strong improvement of the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind when compared to a previous version of LMDZ as well as to the reanalyses used for nudging themselves. It also generates dust emissions in better agreement with current estimates, but the aerosol optical thickness is still significantly underestimated.

  1. Detection of Strong Millimeter Emission from the Circumstellar Dust Disk Around V1094 Sco: Cold and Massive Disk around a T Tauri Star in a Quiescent Accretion Phase?

    CERN Document Server

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Momose, Munetake; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Hiramatsu, Masaaki; Ikeda, Norio; Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Wilson, Grant; Yun, Min S; Scott, Kimberly; Austermann, Jay; Perera, Thushara; Hughes, David; Aretxaga, Itziar; Mauskopf, Philip; Ezawa, Hajime; Kohno, Kotaro; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery of a cold massive dust disk around the T Tauri star V1094 Sco in the Lupus molecular cloud from the 1.1 millimeter continuum observations with AzTEC on ASTE. A compact ($r\\lesssim$320 AU) continuum emission coincides with the stellar position having a flux density of 272 mJy which is largest among T Tauri stars in Lupus. We also present the detection of molecular gas associated with the star in the five-point observations in $^{12}$CO J=3--2 and $^{13}$CO J=3--2. Since our $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO observations did not show any signature of a large-scale outflow or a massive envelope, the compact dust emission is likely to come from a disk around the star. The observed SED of V1094 Sco shows no distinct turnover from near infrared to millimeter wavelengths, which can be well described by a flattened disk for the dust component, and no clear dip feature around 10 $\\micron$ suggestive of absence of an inner hole in the disk. We fit a simple power-law disk model to the observed SED. The es...

  2. A numerical study on dust devils with implications to global dust budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estimates of the contribution of dust devils (DDs) to the global dust budget have large uncertainties because the dust emission mechanisms in DDs are not yet well understood. In this study, a large-eddy simulation model coupled with a dust scheme is used to investigate DD dust entrainment. DDs a...

  3. Smoke in the Pipe Nebula: dust emission and grain growth in the starless core FeSt 1-457

    CERN Document Server

    Forbrich, Jan; Lombardi, Marco; Roman-Zuñiga, Carlos; Alves, João

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) Methods: We derive maps of submillimeter dust optical depth and effective dust temperature from Herschel data that were calibrated against Planck. After calibration, we then fit a modified blackbody to the long-wavelength Herschel data, using the Planck-derived dust opacity spectral index beta, derived on scales of 30' (or ~1 pc). We use this model to make predictions of the submillimeter flux density at 850 micron, and we compare these in turn with APEX-Laboca observations. Results: A comparison of the submillimeter dust optical depth and near-infrared extinction data reveals evidence for an increased submillimeter dust opacity at high column densities, interpreted as an indication of grain growth in the inner parts of the core. Additionally, a comparison of the Herschel dust model and the Laboca data reveals that the frequency dependence of the submillimeter opacity, described by the spectral index beta, does not change. A single beta that is only slightly different from the Planck-derived value ...

  4. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1–4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m2) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m2) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m2) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions (206Pb/207Pb, 208Pb/207Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. - Highlights: 1.Playground soils and surface dust in a mining town have high metal concentrations. 2.Elevated levels of As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust are found on playground users′ hands. 3.Pb isotope analysis shows that the source of playground dust is ore body Pb. 4.Surface mine operations must be contained to reduce childhood lead exposure risks. 5.Mine environmental licences need to set trigger values for As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust

  5. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Mark Patrick, E-mail: mark.taylor@mq.edu.au; Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-15

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1–4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m{sup 2}) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m{sup 2}) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m{sup 2}) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. - Highlights: 1.Playground soils and surface dust in a mining town have high metal concentrations. 2.Elevated levels of As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust are found on playground users′ hands. 3.Pb isotope analysis shows that the source of playground dust is ore body Pb. 4.Surface mine operations must be contained to reduce childhood lead exposure risks. 5.Mine environmental licences need to set trigger values for As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust.

  6. Planck intermediate results. XXI. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust at 353 GHz with interstellar polarization in the visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alina, D.; Aniano, G.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Beichman, C.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fanciullo, L.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Magalhães, A. M.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Poidevin, F.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Zonca, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Planck survey provides unprecedented full-sky coverage of the submillimetre polarized emission from Galactic dust. In addition to the information on the direction of the Galactic magnetic field, this also brings new constraints on the properties of dust. The dust grains that emit the radiation seen by Planck in the submillimetre also extinguish and polarize starlight in the visible. Comparison of the polarization of the emission and of the interstellar polarization on selected lines of sight probed by stars provides unique new diagnostics of the emission and light scattering properties of dust, and therefore of the important dust model parameters, composition, size, and shape. Using ancillary catalogues of interstellar polarization and extinction of starlight, we obtain the degree of polarization, pV, and the optical depth in the V band to the star, τV. Toward these stars we measure the submillimetre polarized intensity, PS, and total intensity, IS, in the Planck 353 GHz channel. We compare the column density measure in the visible, E(B - V), with that inferred from the Planck product map of the submillimetre dust optical depth and compare the polarization direction (position angle) in the visible with that in the submillimetre. For those lines of sight through the diffuse interstellar medium with comparable values of the estimated column density and polarization directions close to orthogonal, we correlate properties in the submillimetre and visible to find two ratios, RS /V = (PS/IS) / (pV/τV) and RP/p = PS/pV, the latter focusing directly on the polarization properties of the aligned grain population alone.We find RS /V = 4.2, with statistical and systematic uncertainties 0.2 and 0.3, respectively, and RP/p = 5.4 MJy sr-1, with uncertainties 0.2 and 0.3 MJy sr-1, respectively. Our estimate of RS /V is compatible with predictions based on a range of polarizing dust models that have been developed for the diffuse interstellar medium. This estimate provides

  7. Emissions from potential Patagonian dust sources and associated biological response in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, A.; Evangelista, H.; Tilstra, L. G.; Kerr, R.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of Patagonian dust over primary producers in the Southern Ocean has long been disputed. Here we present new remote sensing evidence in favour of dust mediated biological response and postulate a hypothesis to explain the spatial relation observed. A new remote sensing definition of dust source areas based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) correlation is presented and interannual variation in AAI is evaluated within the source regions as a proxy for dust activity. Correlation of this data with annual chlorophyll concentration, phytoplankton biomass, and diatom dominance reveals a spatially coherent latitudinal band of positive correlation concentrated between the Polar Front and the Subtropical Front. This pattern is restricted to western areas in the biomass correlation and extends toward Africa for the chlorophyll and diatom correlation. This region is equivalent to the area of the Subantarctic Mode Water formation, characterized by a ratio Si : N ≪ 1 in late summer, an unfavourable condition for diatom development, especially under iron limitation. Therefore, due to Si-Fe co-limitation, the positive correlation could be the consequence of an enhanced sensibility of this area to external iron addition for diatom growth. For the Argentinean shelf-break, is not clear whether direct dust input and/or wind stress driving water masses upwelling could be responsible for the positive correlation.

  8. Emissions from potential Patagonian dust sources and associated biological response in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Castagna

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Patagonian dust over primary producers in the Southern Ocean has long been disputed. Here we present new remote sensing evidence in favour of dust mediated biological response and postulate a hypothesis to explain the spatial relation observed. A new remote sensing definition of dust source areas based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI correlation is presented and interannual variation in AAI is evaluated within the source regions as a proxy for dust activity. Correlation of this data with annual chlorophyll concentration, phytoplankton biomass, and diatom dominance reveals a spatially coherent latitudinal band of positive correlation concentrated between the Polar Front and the Subtropical Front. This pattern is restricted to western areas in the biomass correlation and extends toward Africa for the chlorophyll and diatom correlation. This region is equivalent to the area of the Subantarctic Mode Water formation, characterized by a ratio Si : N ≪ 1 in late summer, an unfavourable condition for diatom development, especially under iron limitation. Therefore, due to Si–Fe co-limitation, the positive correlation could be the consequence of an enhanced sensibility of this area to external iron addition for diatom growth. For the Argentinean shelf-break, is not clear whether direct dust input and/or wind stress driving water masses upwelling could be responsible for the positive correlation.

  9. Correcting for variable laser-target distances of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements with ChemCam using emission lines of Martian dust spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A. [Optical Science Center for Applied Research, Delaware State University, Dover, DE (United States); Cousin, A.; Lanza, N.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lasue, J. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Clegg, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berger, G. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Wiens, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maurice, S. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Tokar, R.L.; Bender, S. [Planetary Science Institute, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Forni, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Breves, E.A.; Dyar, M.D. [Dept. of Astronomy, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA (United States); Frydenvang, J. [The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Delapp, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gasnault, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.M. [Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Alburquerque, NM (United States); Lewin, E. [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Universite Grenoble l-CNRS, Grenoble (France); and others

    2014-06-01

    As part of the Mars Science Laboratory, the ChemCam instrument acquires remote laser induced breakdown spectra at distances that vary between 1.56 m and 7 m. This variation in distance affects the intensities of the measured LIBS emission lines in non-trivial ways. To determine the behavior of a LIBS emission line with distance, it is necessary to separate the effects of many parameters such as laser energy, laser spot size, target homogeneity, and optical collection efficiency. These parameters may be controlled in a laboratory on Earth but for field applications or in space this is a challenge. In this paper, we show that carefully selected ChemCam LIBS emission lines acquired from the Martian dust can be used to build an internal proxy spectroscopic standard. This in turn, allows for a direct measurement of the effects of the distance of various LIBS emission lines and hence can be used to correct ChemCam LIBS spectra for distance variations. When tested on pre-launch LIBS calibration data acquired under Martian-like conditions and with controlled and well-calibrated targets, this approach yields much improved agreement between targets observed at various distances. This work lays the foundation for future implementation of automated routines to correct ChemCam spectra for differences caused by variable distance. - Highlights: • Selected Martian dust emission lines are used to correct for variable laser-target distances. • The correction model yields improved agreement between targets observed at various distances. • The impact of the model reduces the bias between predicted and actual compositions by as much as 70%. • When implemented, the model will yield spectral corrections for various ChemCam measurements. • This work is a foundation to perform novel stand-off LIBS measurements on Earth and other planets.

  10. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark Patrick; Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-01

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1-4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m(2)) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m(2)) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m(2)) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. PMID:25462679

  11. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark Patrick; Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-01

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1-4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m(2)) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m(2)) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m(2)) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children.

  12. Millimetre Continuum Observations of Southern Massive Star Formation Regions II. SCUBA observations of cold cores and the dust grain emissivity index $\\beta$

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, T; Cunningham, M R; Minier, V; Pierce-Price, D; Thompson, M A; Walsh, A J

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of a submillimetre continuum emission survey targeted toward 78 star formation regions, 72 of which are devoid of methanol maser and UC HII regions, identified in the SEST/SIMBA millimetre continuum survey of Hill et al. (2005). At least 45 per cent of the latter sources, dubbed `mm-only', detected in this survey are also devoid of mid infrared MSX, emission. The 450 and 850micron, continuum emission was mapped using the Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Emission is detected toward 97 per cent of the 78 sources targeted as well as towards 28 other SIMBA sources lying in the SCUBA fields. We concatenate the results from four (sub)millimetre continuum surveys of massive star formation [Walsh et al. (2003), Hill et al. (2005), Thompson et al. (2006); as well as this work], together with the Galactic Plane map of Pierce-Price et al. (2000) in order to determine the dust grain emissivity index $\\beta$ for each of the sour...

  13. Smooth and Clumpy Dust Distribution in AGN: a Direct Comparison of two Commonly Explored Infrared Emission Models

    CERN Document Server

    Feltre, A; Fritz, J; Franceschini, A

    2012-01-01

    The geometry of the dust distribution within the inner regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is still a debated issue and relates directly with the AGN unified scheme. Traditionally, models discussed in the literature assume one of two distinct dust distributions in what is believed to be a toroidal region around the Supermassive Black Holes: a continuous distribution, customarily referred to as smooth, and a concentration of dust in clumps or clouds, referred to as clumpy. In this paper we perform a thorough comparison between two of the most popular models in the literature, namely the smooth models by Fritz. et al. 2006 and the clumpy models by Nenkova et al. 2008a, in their common parameters space. Particular attention is paid to the silicate features at ~9.7 and ~18 micron, the width of the infrared bump, the near-infrared index and the luminosity at 12.3 micron, all previously reported as possible diagnostic tools to distinguish between the two dust distributions. We find that, due to the different du...

  14. Early Science with the Large Millimeter Telescope: Observations of dust continuum and CO emission lines of cluster-lensed submillimetre galaxies at z=2.0-4.7

    CERN Document Server

    Zavala, J A; Aretxaga, I; Hughes, D H; Wilson, G W; Geach, J E; Egami, E; Gurwell, M A; Wilner, D J; Smail, Ian; Blain, A W; Chapman, S C; Coppin, K E K; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M; Edge, A C; Montana, A; Nakajima, K; Rawle, T D; Sanchez-Arguelles, D; Swinbank, A M; Webb, T M A; Zeballos, M

    2015-01-01

    We present Early Science observations with the Large Millimeter Telescope, AzTEC 1.1 mm continuum images and wide bandwidth spectra (73-111 GHz) acquired with the Redshift Search Receiver (RSR), towards four bright lensed submillimetre galaxies identified through the Herschel Lensing Survey-snapshot and the SCUBA-2 Cluster Snapshot Survey. This pilot project studies the star formation history and the physical properties of the molecular gas and dust content of the highest redshift galaxies identified through the benefits of gravitational magnification. We robustly detect dust continuum emission for the full sample and CO emission lines for three of the targets. We find that one source shows spectroscopic multiplicity and is a blend of three galaxies at different redshifts (z=2.040, 3.252 and 4.680), reminiscent of previous high-resolution imaging follow-up of unlensed submillimetre galaxies, but with a completely different search method, that confirm recent theoretical predictions of physically unassociated b...

  15. Daily and hourly sourcing of metallic and mineral dust in urban air contaminated by traffic and coal-burning emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, T.; Karanasiou, A.; Amato, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Coz, E.; Artíñano, B.; Lumbreras, J.; Borge, R.; Boldo, E.; Linares, C.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-analytical approach to chemical analysis of inhalable urban atmospheric particulate matter (PM), integrating particle induced X-ray emission, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry/atomic emission spectroscopy, chromatography and thermal-optical transmission methods, allows comparison

  16. Some like it cold: molecular emission and effective dust temperatures of dense cores in the Pipe Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Forbrich, Jan; Lada, Charles J; Lombardi, Marco; Hacar, Alvaro; Alves, João; Rathborne, Jill M

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) [...] Methods: In a continued study of the molecular core population of the Pipe Nebula, we present a molecular-line survey of 52 cores. Previous research has shown a variety of different chemical evolutionary stages among the cores. Using the Mopra radio telescope, we observed the ground rotational transitions of HCO+, H13CO+, HCN, H13CN, HNC, and N2H+. These data are complemented with near-infrared extinction maps to constrain the column densities, effective dust temperatures derived from Herschel data, and NH3-based gas kinetic temperatures. Results: The target cores are located across the nebula, span visual extinctions between 5 and 67 mag, and effective dust temperatures (averaged along the lines of sight) between 13 and 19 K. The extinction-normalized integrated line intensities, a proxy for the abundance in constant excitation conditions of optically thin lines, vary within an order of magnitude for a given molecule. The effective dust temperatures and gas kinetic temperatures are correlate...

  17. Desert Dust Outbreaks over Mediterranean Basin: A Modeling, Observational, and Synoptic Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Calastrini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dust intrusions from African desert regions have an impact on the Mediterranean Basin (MB, as they cause an anomalous increase of aerosol concentrations in the tropospheric column and often an increase of particulate matter at the ground level. To estimate the Saharan dust contribution to PM10, a significant dust intrusion event that occurred in June 2006 is investigated, joining numerical simulations and specific measurements. As a first step, a synoptic analysis of this episode is performed. Such analysis, based only on meteorological and aerosol optical thickness observations, does not allow the assessment of exhaustive informations. In fact, it is not possible to distinguish dust outbreaks transported above the boundary layer without any impact at the ground level from those causing deposition. The approach proposed in this work applies an ad hoc model chain to describe emission, transport and deposition dynamics. Furthermore, physical and chemical analyses (PIXE analysis and ion chromatography were used to measure the concentration of all soil-related elements to quantify the contribution of dust particles to PM10. The comparison between simulation results and in-situ measurements show a satisfying agreement, and supports the effectiveness of the model chain to estimate the Saharan dust contribution at ground level.

  18. Environmental factors controlling the seasonal variability in particle size distribution of modern Saharan dust deposited off Cape Blanc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Carmen A.; van der Does, Michèlle; Merkel, Ute; Iversen, Morten H.; Fischer, Gerhard; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2016-09-01

    The particle sizes of Saharan dust in marine sediment core records have been used frequently as a proxy for trade-wind speed. However, there are still large uncertainties with respect to the seasonality of the particle sizes of deposited Saharan dust off northwestern Africa and the factors influencing this seasonality. We investigated a three-year time-series of grain-size data from two sediment-trap moorings off Cape Blanc, Mauritania and compared them to observed wind-speed and precipitation as well as satellite images. Our results indicate a clear seasonality in the grain-size distributions: during summer the modal grain sizes were generally larger and the sorting was generally less pronounced compared to the winter season. Gravitational settling was the major deposition process during winter. We conclude that the following two mechanisms control the modal grain size of the collected dust during summer: (1) wet deposition causes increased deposition fluxes resulting in coarser modal grain sizes and (2) the development of cold fronts favors the emission and transport of coarse particles off Cape Blanc. Individual dust-storm events throughout the year could be recognized in the traps as anomalously coarse-grained samples. During winter and spring, intense cyclonic dust-storm events in the dust-source region explained the enhanced emission and transport of a larger component of coarse particles off Cape Blanc. The outcome of our study provides important implications for climate modellers and paleo-climatologists.

  19. The global atmospheric loading of dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. F.; Ridley, D. A.; Haustein, K.; Miller, R. L.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust is one of the most ubiquitous aerosols in the atmosphere, with important effects on human health and the climate system. But despite its importance, the global atmospheric loading of dust has remained uncertain, with model results spanning about a factor of five. Here we constrain the particle size-resolved atmospheric dust loading and global emission rate, using a novel theoretical framework that uses experimental constraints on the optical properties and size distribution of dust to eliminate climate model errors due to assumed dust properties. We find that most climate models underestimate the global atmospheric loading and emission rate of dust aerosols.

  20. OISTER optical and near-infrared observations of the super-Chandrasekhar supernova candidate SN 2012dn: Dust emission from the circumstellar shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Maeda, Keiichi; Tanaka, Masaomi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Kawabata, Koji S.; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Kawabata, Miho; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Ueno, Issei; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Takahiro; Takahashi, Jun; Honda, Satoshi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Miyanoshita, Ryo; Nagao, Takashi; Watanabe, Makoto; Isogai, Mizuki; Arai, Akira; Itoh, Ryosuke; Ui, Takahiro; Uemura, Makoto; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ukita, Nobuharu; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Masumoto, Kazunari; Ono, Rikako; Noguchi, Ryo; Matsumoto, Katsura; Nogami, Daisaku; Morokuma, Tomoki; Oasa, Yumiko; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    We present extensively dense observations of the super-Chandrasekhar supernova (SC SN) candidate SN 2012dn from -11 to +140 d after the date of its B-band maximum in the optical and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths conducted through the OISTER ToO (Optical and Infrared Synergetic Telescopes for Education and Research Target of Opportunity) program. The NIR light curves and color evolutions up to 35 days after the B-band maximum provided an excellent match with those of another SC SN 2009dc, providing further support to the nature of SN 2012dn as an SC SN. We found that SN 2012dn exhibited strong excesses in the NIR wavelengths from 30 d after the B-band maximum. The H- and Ks-band light curves exhibited much later maximum dates at 40 and 70 d after the B-band maximum, respectively, compared with those of normal SNe Ia. The H- and Ks-band light curves subtracted by those of SN 2009dc displayed plateaued evolutions, indicating an NIR echo from the surrounding dust. The distance to the inner boundary of the dust shell is limited to 4.8-6.4 × 10-2 pc. No emission lines were found in its early phase spectra, suggesting that the ejecta-circumstellar material interaction could not occur. On the other hand, we found no signature that strongly supports the scenario of dust formation. The mass-loss rate of the pre-explosion system is estimated to be 10-6-10-5 M⊙ yr-1, assuming that the wind velocity of the system is 10-100 km s-1, which suggests that the progenitor of SN 2012dn could be a recurrent nova system. We conclude that the progenitor of this SC SN could be explained by the single-degenerate scenario.

  1. Dust processing in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Villaume, Alexa; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain grow...

  2. ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Search for [CII] line and dust emission in $6

    CERN Document Server

    Aravena, Manuel; Walter, Fabian; Bouwens, Rychard; Oesch, Pascal; Carilli, Christopher; Bauer, Franz E; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Daddi, Emanuele; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Ivison, R J; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian R; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Anguita, Timo; Bacon, Roland; Bell, Eric; Bertoldi, Frank; Cortes, Paulo; Cox, Pierre; Hodge, Jacqueline; Ibar, Eduardo; Inami, Hanae; Infante, Leopoldo; Karim, Alexander; Magnelli, Benjamin; Ota, Kauzuaki; Popping, Gergö; van der Werf, Paul; Wagg, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    We present a search for [CII] line and dust continuum emission from optical dropout galaxies at $z>6$ using ASPECS, our ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF). Our observations, which cover the frequency range $212-272$ GHz, encompass approximately the range $6$4.5 $\\sigma$, two of which correspond to blind detections with no optical counterparts. At this significance level, our statistical analysis shows that about 60\\% of our candidates are expected to be spurious. For one of our blindly selected [CII] line candidates, we tentatively detect the CO(6-5) line in our parallel 3-mm line scan. None of the line candidates are individually detected in the 1.2 mm continuum. A stack of all [CII] candidates results in a tentative detection with $S_{1.2mm}=14\\pm5\\mu$Jy. This implies a dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) of $(3\\pm1)$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. We find that the two highest--SFR objects have candidate [CII] lines with luminosities that are consistent with the low-redshift $L_{\\rm [C...

  3. X-ray to NIR emission from AA Tauri during the dim state - Occultation of the inner disk and gas-to-dust ratio of the absorber

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, P C; Günther, H M; Herczeg, G J; Robrade, J; Bouvier, J; McJunkin, M; Schmitt, J H M M

    2015-01-01

    AA Tau is a well-studied, nearby classical T Tauri star, which is viewed almost edge-on. A warp in its inner disk periodically eclipses the central star, causing a clear modulation of its optical light curve. The system underwent a major dimming event beginning in 2011 caused by an extra absorber, which is most likely associated with additional disk material in the line of sight toward the central source. We present new XMM-Newton X-ray, Hubble Space Telescope FUV, and ground based optical and near-infrared data of the system obtained in 2013 during the long-lasting dim phase. The line width decrease of the fluorescent H$_2$ disk emission shows that the extra absorber is located at $r>1\\,$au. Comparison of X-ray absorption ($N_H$) with dust extinction ($A_V$), as derived from measurements obtained one inner disk orbit (eight days) after the X-ray measurement, indicates that the gas-to-dust ratio as probed by the $N_H$ to $A_V$ ratio of the extra absorber is compatible with the ISM ratio. Combining both result...

  4. Determination of fugitive coal-dust emissions from rotary railcar dumping. Volume 2. Appendices A-H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookman, E.T.; Carnes, D.H.; Catizone, P.A.; Kelley, K.J.

    1984-09-01

    TRC Environmental Consultants, Inc. conducted 72 field tests to determine particulate emission levels for a rotary railcar coal dumper operated by the Potomac Electric Power Company. Approximately 60 parameters were monitored as part of the testing program. These parameters related to particulate emissions, meteorology, and coal properties. The railcar dumper was situated inside of a shed. No other control devices were in operation during the test program. Emissions were measured at the entrance and exit doorways of the shed using the mass flux technique. Background levels were accounted for using the upwind/downwind technique. The amount of particulate material that deposited within the shed was also recorded. The study resulted in the determination of emission levels that were one to two orders of magnitude less than those cited in the literature. These emission levels were found to correlate the strongest with the moisture content of the coal and whether the coal was washed or unwashed.

  5. Slow Evolution of the Specific Star Formation Rate at z > 2: The Impact of Dust, Emission Lines, and a Rising Star Formation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Valentino; Bouwens, Rychard; Illingworth, Garth; Labbé, Ivo; Oesch, Pascal; Franx, Marijn; Magee, Dan

    2014-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M stellar) between redshift 4 and 6 to assess the reported "constant" sSFR at z > 2. We derive stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) for a large sample of 750 z ~ 4-6 galaxies in the GOODS-S field by fitting stellar population models to their spectral energy distributions. Dust extinction is derived from the observed UV colors. We evaluate different star formation histories (SFHs, constant and rising with time) and the impact of optical emission lines. The SFR and M stellar values are insensitive to whether the SFH is constant or rising. The derived sSFR is very similar (within 0.1 dex) in two M stellar bins centered at 1 and 5 × 109 M ⊙. The effect of emission lines was, however, quite pronounced. Assuming no contribution from emission lines, the sSFR for galaxies at 5 × 109 M ⊙ evolves weakly at z > 2 (sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)0.6 ± 0.1), consistent with previous results. When emission lines are included in the rest-frame optical bands, consistent with the observed Infrared Array Camera [3.6] and [4.5] fluxes, the sSFR shows higher values at high redshift following sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)1.0 ± 0.1, i.e., the best-fit evolution shows a sSFR ~2.3 × higher at z ~ 6 than at z ~ 2. This is, however, a substantially weaker trend than that found at z 2 (sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)2.5). Even accounting for emission lines, the observed sSFR(z) trends at z > 2 are still in tension with theoretical expectations.

  6. Slow evolution of the specific star formation rate at z > 2: the impact of dust, emission lines, and a rising star formation history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measure the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M stellar) between redshift 4 and 6 to assess the reported 'constant' sSFR at z > 2. We derive stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) for a large sample of 750 z ∼ 4-6 galaxies in the GOODS-S field by fitting stellar population models to their spectral energy distributions. Dust extinction is derived from the observed UV colors. We evaluate different star formation histories (SFHs, constant and rising with time) and the impact of optical emission lines. The SFR and M stellar values are insensitive to whether the SFH is constant or rising. The derived sSFR is very similar (within 0.1 dex) in two M stellar bins centered at 1 and 5 × 109 M ☉. The effect of emission lines was, however, quite pronounced. Assuming no contribution from emission lines, the sSFR for galaxies at 5 × 109 M ☉ evolves weakly at z > 2 (sSFR(z)∝(1 + z)0.6 ± 0.1), consistent with previous results. When emission lines are included in the rest-frame optical bands, consistent with the observed Infrared Array Camera [3.6] and [4.5] fluxes, the sSFR shows higher values at high redshift following sSFR(z)∝(1 + z)1.0 ± 0.1, i.e., the best-fit evolution shows a sSFR ∼2.3 × higher at z ∼ 6 than at z ∼ 2. This is, however, a substantially weaker trend than that found at z < 2 and even than that expected from current models for z > 2 (sSFR(z)∝(1 + z)2.5). Even accounting for emission lines, the observed sSFR(z) trends at z > 2 are still in tension with theoretical expectations.

  7. Saltation Sandblasting behavior during mineral dust aerosol production

    OpenAIRE

    Grini, Alf; Zender, C. S.; P. Colarco

    2002-01-01

    The dominant process in producing fine dust aerosols during saltation is thought to be sandblasting. Recent studies claim that due to competing physical processes, emission efficiencies of dust aerosols oscillate with increasing wind friction speed. These oscillations can result in order of magnitude changes in dust mass emissions. Our work shows that emission efficiencies, and hence emissions of dust aerosols are smooth functions of the wind friction speed for natural soil size distributions...

  8. Advanced measures in dust control from surface sources in mines

    OpenAIRE

    Atanasov, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The base of this master work is analyzing the existing methodologies for fugitive dust emission estimation fro mine and surface sources in mine industries and defining the most appropriate methodology for fugitive dust emission estimation from line and surface sources in Rek-Bitola, which in fact is a base for developing an appropriate methodologies for fugitive dust emission measuring fro the main dust sources. The purpose is to analyze the specifics for all fugitive emission sources aris...

  9. Warm dust around cool stars: field M dwarfs with Wise 12 or 22 μm excess emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theissen, Christopher A.; West, Andrew A., E-mail: ctheisse@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) spectroscopic catalog, we searched the WISE AllWISE catalog to investigate the occurrence of warm dust, as inferred from IR excesses, around field M dwarfs (dMs). We developed SDSS/WISE color selection criteria to identify 175 dMs (from 70,841) that show IR flux greater than the typical dM photosphere levels at 12 and/or 22 μm, including seven new stars within the Orion OB1 footprint. We characterize the dust populations inferred from each IR excess and investigate the possibility that these excesses could arise from ultracool binary companions by modeling combined spectral energy distributions. Our observed IR fluxes are greater than levels expected from ultracool companions (>3σ). We also estimate that the probability the observed IR excesses are due to chance alignments with extragalactic sources is <0.1%. Using SDSS spectra we measure surface gravity-dependent features (K, Na, and CaH 3) and find <15% of our sample indicates low surface gravities. Examining tracers of youth (Hα, UV fluxes, and Li absorption), we find <3% of our sample appear young, indicating we are observing a population of field stars ≳1 Gyr, likely harboring circumstellar material. We investigate age-dependent properties probed by this sample, studying the disk fraction as a function of Galactic height. The fraction remains small and constant to |Z| ∼ 700 pc and then drops, indicating little to no trend with age. Possible explanations for disks around field dMs include (1) collisions of planetary bodies, (2) tidal disruption of planetary bodies, or (3) failed planet formation.

  10. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  11. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  12. Impacts of the East Asian Monsoon on springtime dust concentrations over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Sijia; Russell, Lynn M.; Yang, Yang; Xu, Li; Lamjiri, Maryam A.; DeFlorio, Michael J.; Miller, Arthur J.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Ying; Singh, Balwinder

    2016-07-01

    We use 150 year preindustrial simulations of the Community Earth System Model to quantify the impacts of the East Asian Monsoon strength on interannual variations of springtime dust concentrations over China. The simulated interannual variations in March-April-May (MAM) dust column concentrations range between 20-40% and 10-60% over eastern and western China, respectively. The dust concentrations over eastern China correlate negatively with the East Asian Monsoon (EAM) index, which represents the strength of monsoon, with a regionally averaged correlation coefficient of -0.64. Relative to the strongest EAM years, MAM dust concentrations in the weakest EAM years are higher over China, with regional relative differences of 55.6%, 29.6%, and 13.9% in the run with emissions calculated interactively and of 33.8%, 10.3%, and 8.2% over eastern, central, and western China, respectively, in the run with prescribed emissions. Both interactive run and prescribed emission run show the similar pattern of climate change between the weakest and strongest EAM years. Strong anomalous northwesterly and westerly winds over the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts during the weakest EAM years result in larger transport fluxes, and thereby increase the dust concentrations over China. These differences in dust concentrations between the weakest and strongest EAM years (weakest-strongest) lead to the change in the net radiative forcing by up to -8 and -3 W m-2 at the surface, compared to -2.4 and +1.2 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere over eastern and western China, respectively.

  13. Cold Dust Emission from X-ray AGN in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: Dependence on Luminosity, Obscuration & AGN Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Banerji, Manda; Willott, C J; Geach, J E; Harrison, C M; Alaghband-Zadeh, S; Alexander, D M; Bourne, N; Coppin, K E K; Dunlop, J S; Farrah, D; Jarvis, M; Michalowski, M J; Page, M; Smith, D J B; Swinbank, A M; Symeonidis, M; Van der Werf, P P

    2015-01-01

    We study the 850um emission in X-ray selected AGN in the 2 sq-deg COSMOS field using new data from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We find 19 850um bright X-ray AGN in a high-sensitivity region covering 0.89 sq-deg with flux densities of S850=4-10 mJy. The 19 AGN span the full range in redshift and hard X-ray luminosity covered by the sample - 0.71 X-ray AGN - S850=0.71+/-0.08mJy. We explore trends in the stacked 850um flux densities with redshift, finding no evolution in the average cold dust emission over the redshift range probed. For Type 1 AGN, there is no significant correlation between the stacked 850um flux and hard X-ray luminosity. However, in Type 2 AGN the stacked submm flux is a factor of 2 higher at high luminosities. When averaging over all X-ray luminosities, no significant differences are found in the stacked submm fluxes of Type 1 and Type 2 AGN as well as AGN separated on the basis of X-ray hardness ratios and optical-to-infrared colours. However, at log10(LX) >44.4, dependences in ave...

  14. Astrophysics of Dust in Cold Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T

    2003-01-01

    Nine lectures reviewing the astrophysics of dust in interstellar clouds. Topics include: (1) Summary of observational evidence concerning interstellar dust: broadband extinction, scattering of starlight, polarization of starlight, spectroscopy of dust, IR and FIR emission, and depletions of grain-forming elements. (2) Optics of interstellar dust grains: dielectric functions of nonconducting and conducting materials, calculational techniques, formulae valid in the Rayleigh limit, Kramers-Kronig relations, microwave emission mechanisms, and X-ray scattering. (3) IR and FIR emission: heating of interstellar dust, including single-photon heating, and resulting IR emission spectrum. (4) Charging of dust grains: collisional charging, photoelectric emission, and resulting charge distribution functions. (5) Dynamics: gas drag, Lorentz force, forces due to anisotropic radiation, and resulting drift velocities. (6) Rotational dynamics: brownian rotation, suprathermal rotation, and effects of starlight torques. (7) Alig...

  15. A search for pulsed radio emission from anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U 0142+61 at the frequency of 111 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Ershov, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    We have searched for pulsed radio emission from magnetar 4U 0142+61 at the frequency of 111 MHz. No pulsed signal was detected from this source. Upper limits for mean flux density are 0.9 - 9 mJy depending on assumed duty cycle (.05 - .5) of the pulsar.

  16. Evaluation of Local Exhaust Ventilation Efficiency to Control Emissions of Fe2O3 Dust in Ambient Air of the Oxide Screen Unit in steel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jamshidi Rastani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are numerous strategies to reduce of workers' exposure to chemical pollutants and control of emitted pollutants. Local exhaust ventilation (LEV is most common equipment for engineering controls that is more preferred than other control methods. The aim of this study was to determine efficiency of LEV to control emissions dust in ambient air of a screen unit of steel industry. Methods: This is a descriptive study and in order evaluate efficiency of LEV, the screen unit divided into four parts including: ground floor, floor screen, hood 1 floor and platform hoods 15, 16, 17. The 36 air samples collected with the method of NIOSH -600 (cyclone samplers were used to conduct both respirable and total dust sampling in the ON & OFF mode of ventilation system. Results: The results showed that the first floor had highest concentration with an average and range of 271.3 (118.1-434.47 mg/m3 (Approximately 18.2 times the PEL-OSHA and its control efficiency was 3.9%. The lowest concentration was found at the screen floor with the average and range of 20.77 (8.95-31.51mg/m3 (Approximately1.4 times the PEL-OSHA and also its efficiency for ventilation in ''ON'' mode was 29.35 %. The average and range of concentration and overall efficiency in whole of the unit were found to be 127.6 (20.77-234.63 mg/m3 and 7.96 %, respectively. (TLV-ACGIH:10mg/m3, PEL-OSHA: 15mg/m3 Conclusion: In this study the efficiency of the system was different in different parts and LEV had not appropriate efficiency, which could be attributable to lack of regular and scheduled system for maintenance and monitoring of LEV and also change of production rates.

  17. Lichen elemental composition distinguishes anthropogenic emissions from dust storm inputs and differs among species: Evidence from Xilinhot, Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Jie; Fang, Shi-Bo; Liu, Si-Wa; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Guo, Xiu-Ping; Jiang, Yun-Jun; Hu, Jian-Sen; Liu, Xiao-Di; Xia, Yu; Wang, Yi-Dan; Wu, Qing-Feng

    2016-01-01

    To test the applicability of lichens in the biomonitoring of atmospheric elemental deposition in a typical steppe zone of Inner Mongolia, China, six foliose lichens (Physcia aipolia, PA; P. tribacia, PT; Xanthoria elegans, XE; X. mandschurica, XM; Xanthoparmelia camtschadalis, XPC; and Xp. tinctina, XPT) were sampled from the Xilin River Basin, Xilinhot, Inner Mongolia, China. Twenty-five elements (Al, Ba, Cd, Ce, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Tb, Th, Ti, Tl, V and Zn) in the lichens were analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results show that Cd, Pb and Zn were mainly atmospheric in origin, whereas the other elements were predominantly of crustal origin. Compared with other studies, our data were higher in crustal element concentrations and lower in atmospheric element concentrations, matching with the frequent, severe dust storms and road traffic in the area. The elemental concentrations in lichens are both species- and element-specific, highlighting the importance of species selection for biomonitoring air pollution using lichens. We recommend PT, XE, XM and XPT for monitoring atmospheric deposition of crustal elements; XPC and XPT for Cd and Pb; PA for Cd and Zn; and PT for Cd. PMID:27698382

  18. Do MODIS-defined dust sources have a geomorphological signature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddock, Matthew C.; Ginoux, Paul; Bullard, Joanna E.; Gill, Thomas E.

    2016-03-01

    The preferential dust source (PDS) scheme enables large-scale mapping of geomorphology in terms of importance for dust emissions but has not been independently tested other than at local scales. We examine the PDS qualitative conceptual model of surface emissivity alongside a quantitative measurement of dust loading from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep Blue Collection 6 for the Chihuahuan Desert. The predicted ranked importance of each geomorphic type for dust emissions is compared with the actual ranked importance as determined from the satellite-derived dust loading. For this region, the predicted variability and magnitude of dust emissions from most surface types present coincides with the observed characteristics demonstrating the significance of geomorphological controls on emission. The exception is for areas of low magnitude but persistent emissions such as alluvial surfaces where PDS overpredicts dustiness. As PDS is a good predictor of emissions and incorporates surface dynamics it could improve models of future dust emissions.

  19. Anomalous Chiral Superfluidity

    OpenAIRE

    Lublinsky, Michael(Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel); Zahed, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    We discuss both the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor in a left chiral theory with flavour anomalies as an effective theory for flavored chiral phonons in a chiral superfluid with the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the mean-field (leading tadpole) approximation the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy momentum tensor take the form of constitutive currents in the chiral superfluid state. The pertinence of higher order corrections and the Adler-Bardeen theorem is ...

  20. A Comparison between Anomalous 6-cm H$_2$CO Absorption and CO(1-0) Emission in the L1204/S140

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Monica Ivette; Allen, Ronald J; Escalante, Vladimir; Loinard, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    We report observations of the dust cloud L1204 with the Onsala 25-m telescope in the 6 cm (1$_{11}-1_{10}$) transition of \\htco. The observed region includes the S140 H${\\alpha}$ arc. This spectral line is seen here in absorption against the cosmic microwave background, indicating the presence of widespread warm molecular gas at intermediate densities. Overall, the distributions of H$_2$CO and CO (taken from the literature) are fairly similar, though significant differences exist at small scales. Most notably, while the CO peak is nearly coincident with the S140 H${\\alpha}$ arc, the maximum H$_2$CO absorption is clearly separated from it by a full 10$'$ beam ($\\sim$ 3 pc). We argue that these differences result from differing abundances and excitation requirements. The CO(1-0) line is more optically thick and more biased towards warm gas than the H$_2$CO 6 cm line. On the other hand, formaldehyde is more easily photodissociated and is, therefore, a poorer tracer of the molecular gas located immediately behind...

  1. The global distribution of mineral dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dust aerosol particles produced by wind erosion in arid and semi arid regions affect climate and air quality, but the magnitude of these effects is largely unquantified. The major dust source regions include the Sahara, the Arabian and Asian deserts; global annual dust emissions are currently estimated to range between 1000 and 3000 Mt/yr. Dust aerosol can be transported over long distances of thousands of kilometers, e.g. from source regions in the Saharan desert over the North Atlantic, or from the Asian deserts towards the Pacific Ocean. The atmospheric dust load varies considerably on different timescales. While dust aerosol distribution and dust effects are important on global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales.

  2. Bright [CII] and dust emission in three z>6.6 quasar host galaxies observed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Venemans, B P; Zschaechner, L; Decarli, R; De Rosa, G; Findlay, J R; McMahon, R G; Sutherland, W J

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA detections of the [CII] 158 micron emission line and the underlying far-infrared continuum of three quasars at 6.6~6 quasar hosts correlate with the quasar's bolometric luminosity. In one quasar, the [CII] line is significantly redshifted by ~1700 km/s with respect to the MgII broad emission line. Comparing to values in the literature, we find that, on average, the MgII is blueshifted by 480 km/s (with a standard deviation of 630 km/s) with respect to the host galaxy redshift, i.e. one of our quasars is an extreme outlier. Through modeling we can rule out a flat rotation curve for our brightest [CII] emitter. Finally, we find that the ratio of black hole mass to host galaxy (dynamical) mass is higher by a factor 3-4 (with significant scatter) than local relations.

  3. Planck intermediate results. XX. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust with simulations of MHD turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    The Planck Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Polarized emission observed by Planck HFI at 353 GHz towards a sample of nearby fields is presented, focusing on the statistics of polarization fractions p and angles ψ. The polarization fractions and column densities in these nearby fields are representative of the range of values obtained over the whole sky. We find that: (i) the largest polarization fractions are reached in the most diffuse fields; (ii) the maximum polarization fraction pmax decreases with column density NH in the more opa...

  4. Slow evolution of the specific star formation rate at z > 2: the impact of dust, emission lines, and a rising star formation history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Valentino; Illingworth, Garth; Oesch, Pascal; Magee, Dan [Astronomy Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bouwens, Rychard; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-01-20

    We measure the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M {sub stellar}) between redshift 4 and 6 to assess the reported 'constant' sSFR at z > 2. We derive stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) for a large sample of 750 z ∼ 4-6 galaxies in the GOODS-S field by fitting stellar population models to their spectral energy distributions. Dust extinction is derived from the observed UV colors. We evaluate different star formation histories (SFHs, constant and rising with time) and the impact of optical emission lines. The SFR and M {sub stellar} values are insensitive to whether the SFH is constant or rising. The derived sSFR is very similar (within 0.1 dex) in two M {sub stellar} bins centered at 1 and 5 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. The effect of emission lines was, however, quite pronounced. Assuming no contribution from emission lines, the sSFR for galaxies at 5 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} evolves weakly at z > 2 (sSFR(z)∝(1 + z){sup 0.6} {sup ±} {sup 0.1}), consistent with previous results. When emission lines are included in the rest-frame optical bands, consistent with the observed Infrared Array Camera [3.6] and [4.5] fluxes, the sSFR shows higher values at high redshift following sSFR(z)∝(1 + z){sup 1.0} {sup ±} {sup 0.1}, i.e., the best-fit evolution shows a sSFR ∼2.3 × higher at z ∼ 6 than at z ∼ 2. This is, however, a substantially weaker trend than that found at z < 2 and even than that expected from current models for z > 2 (sSFR(z)∝(1 + z){sup 2.5}). Even accounting for emission lines, the observed sSFR(z) trends at z > 2 are still in tension with theoretical expectations.

  5. Measurement of Anomalously Strong Emission from the 1s-9p Transition in the Spectrum of H-like Phosphorus Following Charge Exchange with Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with approx.6 eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high-end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of two for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements.

  6. Strong optical and UV intermediate-width emission lines in the quasar SDSS J232444.80-094600.3: dust-free and intermediate-density gas at the skin of dusty torus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Zhen; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Hao, Lei; Wang, Shu-Fen; Ji, Tuo; Liu, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Emission lines from the broad emission line region (BELR) and the narrow emission line region (NELR) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been extensively studied. However, emission lines are rarely detected between these two regions. We present a detailed analysis of quasar SDSS J232444.80-094600.3 (SDSS J2324-0946), which is remarkable for its strong intermediate-width emission lines (IELs) with FWHM ≈ 1800 km s-1. The IEL component is present in different emission lines, including the permitted lines Lyα λ1216, CIV λ1549, semiforbidden line [CIII] λ1909, and forbidden lines [OIII] λλ4959, 5007. With the aid of photo-ionization models, we found that the IELs are produced by gas with a hydrogen density of nH ˜ 106.2 ˜ 106.3 cm-3, a distance from the central ionizing source of R ˜ 35 - 50 pc, a covering factor of ˜ 6%, and a dust-to-gas ratio of ≤ 4% that of the SMC. We suggest that the strong IELs of this quasar are produced by nearly dust-free and intermediate-density gas located at the skin of the dusty torus. Such strong IELs, which serve as a useful diagnostic, can provide an avenue to study the properties of gas between the BELR and the NELR.

  7. Dust properties and disk structure of evolved protoplanetary disks in Cep OB2: Grain growth, settling, gas and dust mass, and inside-out evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Dullemond, Cornelis P; Patel, Nimesh; Juhász, Attila; Bouwman, Jeroen; Sturm, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer/IRS spectra of 31 TTS and IRAM/1.3mm observations for 34 low- and intermediate-mass stars in the Cep OB2 region. Including our previously published data, we analyze 56 TTS and the 3 intermediate-mass stars with silicate features in Tr 37 (~4 Myr) and NGC 7160 (~12 Myr). The silicate emission features are well reproduced with a mixture of amorphous (with olivine, forsterite, and silica stoichiometry) and crystalline grains (forsterite, enstatite). We explore grain size and disk structure using radiative transfer disk models, finding that most objects have suffered substantial evolution (grain growth, settling). About half of the disks show inside-out evolution, with either dust-cleared inner holes or a radially-dependent dust distribution, typically with larger grains and more settling in the innermost disk. The typical strong silicate features require nevertheless the presence of small dust grains, and could be explained by differential settling according to grain size, anomalous dust distr...

  8. Consistent response of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust in observations and simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Q.

    2015-09-02

    © Author(s) 2015. The response of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) circulation and precipitation to Middle East dust aerosols on sub-seasonal timescales is studied using observations and the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with online chemistry (WRF-Chem). Satellite data show that the ISM rainfall in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and Pakistan is closely associated with the Middle East dust aerosols. The physical mechanism behind this dust-ISM rainfall connection is examined through ensemble simulations with and without dust emissions. Each ensemble includes 16 members with various physical and chemical schemes to consider the model uncertainties in parameterizing short-wave radiation, the planetary boundary layer, and aerosol chemical mixing rules. Experiments show that dust aerosols increase rainfall by about 0.44 mm day-1 (∼10 % of the climatology) in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and north Pakistan, a pattern consistent with the observed relationship. The ensemble mean rainfall response over India shows a much stronger spatial correlation with the observed rainfall response than any other ensemble members. The largest modeling uncertainties are from the boundary layer schemes, followed by short-wave radiation schemes. In WRF-Chem, the dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Middle East shows the strongest correlation with the ISM rainfall response when dust AOD leads rainfall response by about 11 days. Further analyses show that increased ISM rainfall is related to enhanced southwesterly monsoon flow and moisture transport from the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, which are associated with the development of an anomalous low-pressure system over the Arabian Sea, the southern Arabian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau due to dust-induced heating in the troposphere. The dust-induced heating in the mid-upper troposphere is mainly located in the Iranian Plateau rather than the Tibetan

  9. Consistent response of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust in observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Q.; Wei, J.; Yang, Z.-L.; Pu, B.; Huang, J.

    2015-09-01

    The response of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) circulation and precipitation to Middle East dust aerosols on sub-seasonal timescales is studied using observations and the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with online chemistry (WRF-Chem). Satellite data show that the ISM rainfall in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and Pakistan is closely associated with the Middle East dust aerosols. The physical mechanism behind this dust-ISM rainfall connection is examined through ensemble simulations with and without dust emissions. Each ensemble includes 16 members with various physical and chemical schemes to consider the model uncertainties in parameterizing short-wave radiation, the planetary boundary layer, and aerosol chemical mixing rules. Experiments show that dust aerosols increase rainfall by about 0.44 mm day-1 (~10 % of the climatology) in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and north Pakistan, a pattern consistent with the observed relationship. The ensemble mean rainfall response over India shows a much stronger spatial correlation with the observed rainfall response than any other ensemble members. The largest modeling uncertainties are from the boundary layer schemes, followed by short-wave radiation schemes. In WRF-Chem, the dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Middle East shows the strongest correlation with the ISM rainfall response when dust AOD leads rainfall response by about 11 days. Further analyses show that increased ISM rainfall is related to enhanced southwesterly monsoon flow and moisture transport from the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, which are associated with the development of an anomalous low-pressure system over the Arabian Sea, the southern Arabian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau due to dust-induced heating in the troposphere. The dust-induced heating in the mid-upper troposphere is mainly located in the Iranian Plateau rather than the Tibetan Plateau. This study

  10. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-01-01

    SWift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18 - 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 1038 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in IE 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  11. Anomalous Higgs couplings

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción

    1999-01-01

    We review the effects of new effective interactions on Higgs-boson phenomenology. New physics in the electroweak bosonic sector is expected to induce additional interactions between the Higgs doublet field and the electroweak gauge bosons, leading to anomalous Higgs couplings as well as anomalous gauge-boson self-interactions. Using a linearly realized SU(2)/sub L/*U(1)/sub Y/ invariant effective Lagrangian to describe the bosonic sector of the Standard Model, we review the effects of the new effective interactions on the Higgs- boson production rates and decay modes. We summarize the results from searches for the new Higgs signatures induced by the anomalous interactions in order to constrain the scale of new physics, in particular at CERN LEP and Fermilab Tevatron colliders. (43 refs).

  12. Mathematical model of dust cleaning process in centrifugal-inertial dust collector

    OpenAIRE

    Batluk, V.; Paranyak, N.; Makarchuk, V.

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of providing air cleaning from dust in various industries, using highly efficient apparatus, with the aim of bringing the volume of harmful emissions to the sanitary standards. The article presents new directions in creating of dust cleaning apparatus, based on the usage of centrifugal, inertial forces, by which the efficiency of dust collection could be significantly increased.

  13. Anomalous law of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  14. Anomalous law of cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics

  15. Anomalous law of cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapas, Luciano C., E-mail: luciano.lapas@unila.edu.br [Universidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana, Caixa Postal 2067, 85867-970 Foz do Iguaçu, Paraná (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogelma M. S., E-mail: rogelma.maria@gmail.com [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia, 44380-000 Cruz das Almas, Bahia (Brazil); Rubí, J. Miguel, E-mail: mrubi@ub.edu [Departament de Física Fonamental, Facultat de Física, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Oliveira, Fernando A., E-mail: fernando.oliveira@pq.cnpq.br [Instituto de Física and Centro Internacional de Física da Matéria Condensada, Universidade de Brasília, Caixa Postal 04513, 70919-970 Brasília, Distrito Federal (Brazil)

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  16. Anomalous chiral superfluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lublinsky, Michael, E-mail: lublinsky@phys.uconn.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Zahed, Ismail [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2010-02-08

    We discuss both the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor in a left chiral theory with flavor anomalies as an effective theory for flavored chiral phonons in a chiral superfluid with the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the mean-field (leading tadpole) approximation the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor take the form of constitutive currents in the chiral superfluid state. The pertinence of higher order corrections and the Adler-Bardeen theorem is briefly noted.

  17. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    fraction that arrives at another continent [2]. At the deposition end of the chain, it is still unclear how the limited minerals in the dust such as iron are released for uptake by organisms either on land or in the ocean. Not all dust deposited into oceans results in a phytoplankton bloom. The process requires a chemical pathway that mobilizes a fraction of the iron into soluble form. Meskhidze et al [3] show that phytoplankton blooms following dust transport from the Gobi desert in Asia into the Pacific ocean result in a phytoplankton bloom only if the dust is accompanied by high initial SO2-to-dust ratios, suggesting that sulfuric acid coatings on the dust particle mobilize the embedded iron in the dust for phytoplankton uptake. Quantifying transport, deposition and nutrient availability are the latter ends of a puzzle that must begin by identifying and quantifying dust emission at the sources. The emission process is complex at the microscale requiring the right conditions for saltation and bombardment, which makes identification and inclusion of sources in global transport models very difficult. The result is that estimates of annual global dust emissions range from 1000 to 3000 Tg per year [4]. Even as global estimates of dust emissions are uncertain, localizing the sources brings even greater uncertainty. It has been recognized for several years that dust sources are not uniformly distributed over the arid regions of the Earth, but are regulated to topographic lows associated with dried lake deposits [5]. Using aerosol information from satellites, a comprehensive map of the world's source regions shows sources localized to specific areas of the Earth's arid regions [6]. Still these maps suggest broad emission sources covering several degrees of latitude and longitude. In the paper by Koren and co-authors [7] appearing in this issue, one particular dust source, the Bodélé depression in Chad, is analyzed in detail. They find that the specific topography of the

  18. COS FUV Recovery after Anomalous Shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal consists of the steps for turning on and ramping up the COS FUV high voltage in a safe and conservative manner after a HV anomalous shutdown by executing a "reduced set" of visits from Cycle 19 Proposal 12810. The nature of the shutdown, i.e., over-light, HV current transient {"crackle"}, ion feedback {induced by a high energy particle}, or field emission {possibly caused by dust or other particulate on the QE grid or other close-by structure or hardware}, and the value of the commanded HV at the time of the shutdown will determine what visits are executed. Because of gain sag, commanded HV settings updates may be required. First, prior to execution of this proposal or selected visits from this proposal, all preliminary steps should be exercised to gather the necessary diagnostic data, e.g., science data evaluation {if a science exposure was in progress and the science data is available}, memory dumps {DCE, EXEC RAM, and possibly the CS BUFFER}, engineering telemetry, or other information that might provide insight as to the nature of the shutdown and estimated count rate. The complete step-by-step procedure is detailed in the Observing Description, but in summary, the following is done:Day 01 activities, visits 01-07, contain both QE grid off and on HV ramping to HVLow {100/100} with diagnostics {DCE dumps} and darks to exclude QE grid involvement in the shutdown. Subsequent to day 01, all HV ramping will be with the QE grid on with the same diagnostics and exposures. All days end with the setting of COS event flag 3 to prevent any FUV HV commanding.Time is allotted for cognizant detector and COS instrument scientist and engineers to examine data dumps, science exposures, and engineering telemetry. If all is well, the go-ahead will be given to clear flag 3 for the next day's visits.This proposal is modeled after the Cycle 20 Proposal 13129.

  19. IR-correlated 31 GHz radio emission from Orion East

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, C; Davies, R D; Allison, J R; Bustos, R; Cleary, K; Davis, R J; Jones, M E; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Reeves, R; Taylor, A C; Tibbs, C T; Watson, R A

    2010-01-01

    Lynds dark cloud LDN1622 represents one of the best examples of anomalous dust emission, possibly originating from small spinning dust grains. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) 31 GHz data of LDN1621, a diffuse dark cloud to the north of LDN1622 in a region known as Orion East. A broken ring with diameter g\\approx 20 arcmin of diffuse emission is detected at 31 GHz, at \\approx 20-30 mJy beam$^{-1}$ with an angular resolution of \\approx 5 arcmin. The ring-like structure is highly correlated with Far Infra-Red emission at $12-100 \\mu$m with correlation coefficients of r \\approx 0.7-0.8, significant at $\\sim10\\sigma$. Multi-frequency data are used to place constraints on other components of emission that could be contributing to the 31 GHz flux. An analysis of the GB6 survey maps at 4.85 GHz yields a $3\\sigma$ upper limit on free-free emission of 7.2 mJy beam$^{-1}$ ($\\la 30 per cent of the observed flux) at the CBI resolution. The bulk of the 31 GHz flux therefore appears to be mostly due to dust radiat...

  20. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  1. Anomalous pion decay revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Battistel, O A; Nemes, M C; Hiller, B

    1999-01-01

    An implicit four dimensional regularization is applied to calculate the axial-vector-vector anomalous amplitude. The present technique always complies with results of Dimensional Regularization and can be easily applied to processes involving odd numbers of $\\gamma_5$ matrices. This is illustrated explicitely in the example of this letter.

  2. Saharan dust transport and deposition towards the Tropical Northern Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schepanski

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of Saharan dust export towards the tropical North Atlantic using the regional dust emission, transport and deposition model LM-MUSCAT. Horizontal and vertical distribution of dust optical thickness, concentration, and dry and wet deposition rates are used to describe seasonality of dust export and deposition towards the eastern Atlantic for three exemplary months in different seasons. Deposition rates strongly depend on the vertical dust distribution, which differs with seasons. Furthermore the contribution of dust originating from the Bodélé Depression to Saharan dust over the Atlantic is investigated. A maximum contribution of Bodélé dust transported towards the Cape Verde Islands is evident in winter when the Bodélé source area is most active and dominant with regard activation frequency and dust emission. Limitations of using satellite retrievals to estimate dust deposition are highlighted.

  3. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalous...

  4. Dust cyclone technology for gins – A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dust cyclone research leading to more efficient designs has helped the cotton ginning industry to comply with increasingly stringent air quality regulations governing fine particulate emissions. Future changes in regulations may require additional improvements in dust cyclone efficacy. This inter-...

  5. Consistent response of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust in observations and simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Q.

    2015-06-11

    The response of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) circulation and precipitation to Middle East dust aerosols on sub-seasonal timescales is studied using observations and the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with online chemistry (WRF-Chem). Satellite data show that the ISM rainfall in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and Pakistan is closely associated with the Middle East dust aerosols. The physical mechanism behind this dust–ISM rainfall connection is examined through ensemble simulations with and without dust emissions. Each ensemble includes 16 members with various physical and chemical schemes to consider the model uncertainties in parameterizing short-wave radiation, the planetary boundary layer, and aerosol chemical mixing rules. Experiments show that dust aerosols increase rainfall by about 0.44mmday1 ( 10% of the climatology) in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and north Pakistan, a pattern consistent with the observed relationship. The ensemble mean rainfall response over India shows a much stronger spatial correlation with the observed rainfall response than any other ensemble members. The largest modeling uncertainties are from the boundary layer schemes, followed by short-wave radiation schemes. In WRF-Chem, the dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Middle East shows the strongest correlation with the ISM rainfall response when dust AOD leads rainfall response by about 11 days. Further analyses show that increased ISM rainfall is related to enhanced southwesterly monsoon flow and moisture transport from the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, which are associated with the development of an anomalous low-pressure system over the Arabian Sea, the southern Arabian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau due to dust-induced heating in the troposphere. The dust-induced heating in the mid-upper troposphere is mainly located in the Iranian Plateau rather than the Tibetan Plateau. This study demonstrates

  6. How Efficient is Vegetation in Reducing Wind Erosion and Emission of Health-Threatening Fine Dust PM10? - A Wind Tunnel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, K.; Graf, F.

    2009-04-01

    World wide, wind erosion and desertification are most alarming processes of environmental degradation. Not only do they cause tremendous losses of fertile soil, but they also seriously affect human health. Pulmonary tuberculosis (silicosis) is one of the major diseases that have been linked to mineral fine dust (PM10) in the atmosphere. It is widely accepted that the re-establishment of an intact vegetation cover is the most effective measure against wind erosion. However, despite numerous investigations, the mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of vegetation are still not completely understood. Since the phenomenon involves highly variable interactions between soil, plants and atmosphere, it is particularly difficult to quantify the efficiency of vegetation in reducing wind erosion. As an alternative to field investigations, wind tunnel experiments offer the advantage to control specific parameters within this highly complex system. In this study, a series of wind tunnel experiments was performed including measurements of sediment transport and PM10 emission in differently dense grass canopies of Lolium perenne (91, 24, 5 and 0 plants per square meter). The novelty of the present wind tunnel study is the use of living plants instead of artificial imitations or dead plant parts. Although more and more sophisticated imitations of vegetation have been used in recent studies, the behaviour of living plants is likely to differ significantly. Coloured quartz sand was used for visualizing sand erosion and deposition patterns. The vertical profiles of aeolian sediment flux were analysed with a stackable sediment sampler composed of 60 collecting boxes, each with a height of 1 cm. The results of this study confirm that both sediment transport and PM10 emission strongly decrease with increasing plant cover. The protective effect of the plants was found to be linked to characteristic changes in the vertical profile of aeolian sediment flux and to specific spatial

  7. GAS EMISSIONS IN PLANCK COLD DUST CLUMPS—A SURVEY OF THE J = 1-0 TRANSITIONS OF 12CO, 13CO, AND C18O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey toward 674 Planck cold clumps of the Early Cold Core Catalogue (ECC) in the J = 1-0 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O has been carried out using the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope. Six hundred seventy-three clumps were detected with 12CO and 13CO emission, and 68% of the sample has C18O emission. Additional velocity components were also identified. A close consistency of the three line peak velocities was revealed for the first time. Kinematic distances are given for all the velocity components, and half of the clumps are located within 0.5 and 1.5 kpc. Excitation temperatures range from 4 to 27 K, slightly larger than those of Td . Line width analysis shows that the majority of ECC clumps are low-mass clumps. Column densities NH2 span from 1020 to 4.5 × 1022 cm–2 with an average value of (4.4 ± 3.6) × 1021 cm–2. NH2 cumulative fraction distribution deviates from the lognormal distribution, which is attributed to optical depth. The average abundance ratio of the 13CO to C18O in these clumps is 7.0 ± 3.8, higher than the terrestrial value. Dust and gas are well coupled in 95% of the clumps. Blue profile asymmetry, red profile asymmetry, and total line asymmetry were found in less than 10% of the clumps, generally indicating that star formation is not yet developed. Ten clumps were mapped. Twelve velocity components and 22 cores were obtained. Their morphologies include extended diffuse, dense, isolated, cometary, and filament, of which the last is the majority. Twenty cores are starless, and only seven cores seem to be in a gravitationally bound state. Planck cold clumps are the most quiescent among the samples of weak red IRAS, infrared dark clouds, UC H II candidates, extended green objects, and methanol maser sources, suggesting that Planck cold clumps have expanded the horizon of cold astronomy.

  8. Suspended dust in Norwegian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to calculations, at least 80 000 people in Oslo and 8 000 in Trondheim were annoyed by too much suspended dust in 2000. The dust concentration is greatest in the spring, presumably because dust is swirling up from melting snow and ice on the streets. Car traffic is the main source of the dust, except for some of the most highly exposed regions where wood-firing from old stoves contributes up to 70 percent of the dust. National targets for air quality include suspended dust, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and benzene. Calculations show that nitrogen dioxide emissions exceeding the limit affected 4 000 people in Oslo and 1 000 people in Trondheim. The sulphur dioxide emissions in the major cities did non exceed the national quality limit; they did exceed the limit in some of the smaller industrial centres. In Trondheim, measurements show that the national limit for benzene was exceeded. Most of the emission of nitrogen dioxide comes from the road traffic. Local air pollution at times causes considerable health- and well-being problems in the larger cities and industrial centres, where a great part of the population may be at risk of early death, infection of the respiratory passage, heart- and lung diseases and cancer

  9. Planck intermediate results. XXI. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust at 353 GHz with interstellar polarization in the visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J.F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.;

    2015-01-01

    of RS/V is compatible with predictions based on a range of polarizing dust models that have been developed for the diffuse interstellar medium. This estimate provides new empirical validation of many of the common underlying assumptions of the models, but is not yet very discriminating among them...... of dust, and therefore of the important dust model parameters, composition, size, and shape. Using ancillary catalogues of interstellar polarization and extinction of starlight, we obtain the degree of polarization, pV, and the optical depth in the V band to the star, τV. Toward these stars we measure...... the submillimetre polarized intensity, PS, and total intensity, IS, in the Planck 353 GHz channel. We compare the column density measure in the visible, E(B - V), with that inferred from the Planck product map of the submillimetre dust optical depth and compare the polarization direction (position angle...

  10. Anomalous diffusion of epicentres

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Posadas, A; Luzon, F

    2007-01-01

    The classification of earthquakes in main shocks and aftershocks by a method recently proposed by M. Baiesi and M. Paczuski allows to the generation of a complex network composed of clusters that group the most correlated events. The spatial distribution of epicentres inside these structures corresponding to the catalogue of earthquakes in the eastern region of Cuba shows anomalous anti-diffusive behaviour evidencing the attractive nature of the main shock and the possible description in terms of fractional kinetics.

  11. Anomalous law of cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergo a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature ma...

  12. The physics of wind-blown sand and dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jasper F; Parteli, Eric J R; Michaels, Timothy I; Karam, Diana Bou

    2012-10-01

    The transport of sand and dust by wind is a potent erosional force, creates sand dunes and ripples, and loads the atmosphere with suspended dust aerosols. This paper presents an extensive review of the physics of wind-blown sand and dust on Earth and Mars. Specifically, we review the physics of aeolian saltation, the formation and development of sand dunes and ripples, the physics of dust aerosol emission, the weather phenomena that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus and Titan.

  13. The physics of wind-blown sand and dust

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Jasper F; Michaels, Timothy I; Karam, Diana Bou

    2012-01-01

    The transport of dust and sand by wind is a potent erosional force, creates sand dunes and ripples, and loads the atmosphere with suspended dust aerosols. This article presents an extensive review of the physics of wind-blown sand and dust on Earth and Mars. Specifically, we review the physics of aeolian saltation, the formation and development of sand dunes and ripples, the physics of dust aerosol emission, the weather phenomena that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus and Titan.

  14. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  15. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  16. Interactive Soil Dust Aerosol Model in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Sensitivity of the Soil Dust Cycle to Radiative Properties of Soil Dust Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Tegen, Ina; Miller, Ron L.

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity of the soil dust aerosol cycle to the radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols is studied. Four experiments with the NASA/GISS atmospheric general circulation model, which includes a soil dust aerosol model, are compared, all using a prescribed climatological sea surface temperature as lower boundary condition. In one experiment, dust is included as dynamic tracer only (without interacting with radiation), whereas dust interacts with radiation in the other simulations. Although the single scattering albedo of dust particles is prescribed to be globally uniform in the experiments with radiatively active dust, a different single scattering albedo is used in those experiments to estimate whether regional variations in dust optical properties, corresponding to variations in mineralogical composition among different source regions, are important for the soil dust cycle and the climate state. On a global scale, the radiative forcing by dust generally causes a reduction in the atmospheric dust load corresponding to a decreased dust source flux. That is, there is a negative feedback in the climate system due to the radiative effect of dust. The dust source flux and its changes were analyzed in more detail for the main dust source regions. This analysis shows that the reduction varies both with the season and with the single scattering albedo of the dust particles. By examining the correlation with the surface wind, it was found that the dust emission from the Saharan/Sahelian source region and from the Arabian peninsula, along with the sensitivity of the emission to the single scattering albedo of dust particles, are related to large scale circulation patterns, in particular to the trade winds during Northern Hemisphere winter and to the Indian monsoon circulation during summer. In the other regions, such relations to the large scale circulation were not found. There, the dependence of dust deflation to radiative forcing by dust particles is probably

  17. 锅炉烟尘监测主要技术环节探讨%Study on Technology Process of Monitoring of Smoke and Dust Emission From boiler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王福伟; 邢巍巍; 姜峰; 刘顺; 孟书旭

    2016-01-01

    本文针对锅炉烟尘监测过程存在的主要问题进行探讨分析,并提出相应的对策和建议。研究表明,锅炉烟尘监测是一项复杂艰苦的工作,不但要求现场监测人员具有端正的工作态度、吃苦耐劳的工作精神,还要具备较高的技术水平和业务能力。加强对仪器设备检定及维护、采样断面的选择、现场采样的规范性、采样滤筒的处理、采样过程中的质量控制等环节的把控,显得尤为重要。只有控制好锅炉烟尘监测过程中的每一个环节,才能保证测出真实准确的数据,为环境管理决策提供强有力的技术支撑。%This paper discusses the main problems existing in the process of monitoring of smoke and dust emission from boiler, and puts forward some countermeasures and suggestions. Research shows that the boiler soot monitoring is a complex of hard work, not only for field monitoring personnel has good work attitude, work spirit which bears hardships and stands hard work, but also a higher level of technology and business skills� Strengthen the equipment calibration and maintenance, the choice of sampling section, the standardization of the field sampling, the sampling filter tube processing, the quality control of the control in the process of sampling, is particularly important� Only good control every link in the process of boiler smoke monitoring, to ensure that the measured data, truthful and accurate decision-making to provide strong technical support for environmental management.

  18. Are All Active Galactic Nuclei Born Equal? The Silicate Dust Mineralogy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aigen

    Dust is the cornerstone of the unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This theory proposes that all AGNs are essentially the same object or "born equal" but viewed from different lines of sight; much of the observed diversity arises from different viewing angles toward the central engine and a dusty toroidal structure around it. When the dusty torus is viewed face-on, both the central engine and the broad-line regions can be seen directly causing objects to appear as type 1 AGNs; when the dusty torus is viewed edge- on, the anisotropic obscuration created by the torus causes objects to appear as type 2 AGNs. It is this crucial role played by dust in the unified model of AGNs that makes understanding dust properties very important in understanding AGNs. Little is known about the dust in the circumnuclear torus of AGNs. There is evidence suggesting that the size and composition of the dust in AGNs may differ substantially from that of the Galactic interstellar dust, as reflected by the flat or "gray" extinction, and the anomalous silicate emission or absorption features observed respectively in type 1 and type 2 AGNs. The silicate feature profiles of AGNs are rather diverse in peak wavelengths, widths, strengths, and band ratios of the 18 micrometer O--Si--O feature to the 9.7 micrometer Si--O feature, suggesting that the AGN silicate grains are diverse in composition and size (or probably not "born equal"). We propose a two-year project to study the size and composition of the dust in AGNs, with special attention paid to the silicate mineralogy. We will obtain constraints on the silicate composition and size by modeling the Spitzer IRS spectra of >100 AGNs of various types. We will examine whether (and how) the silicate composition and size properties vary with the properties of an AGN (e.g. type, luminosity). This research will improve our understanding of the physical properties of the dust torus and the origin of the observed silicate emission

  19. Strong Optical and UV Intermediate-Width Emission Lines in the Quasar SDSS J232444.80-094600.3: Dust-Free and Intermediate-Density Gas at the Skin of Dusty Torus ?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhenzhen; Hao, Lei; Wang, Shufen; Ji, Tuo; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Emission lines from the broad emission line region (BELR) and the narrow emission line region (NELR) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are extensively studied. However, between these two regions emission lines are rarely detected. We present a detailed analysis of a quasar SDSS J232444.80-094600.3 (SDSS J2324$-$0946), which is remarkable for its strong intermediate-width emission lines (IELs) with FWHM $\\approx$ 1800 \\kmps. The IEL component is presented in different emission lines, including the permitted lines \\lya\\ $\\lambda$1216, \\civ\\ $\\lambda$1549, semiforbidden line \\ciii\\ $\\lambda$1909, and forbidden lines \\oiii\\ $\\lambda\\lambda$4959, 5007. With the aid of photo-ionization models, we found that the IELs are produced by gas with a hydrogen density of $n_{\\rm H} \\sim 10^{6.2}-10^{6.3}~\\rm cm^{-3}$, a distance to the central ionizing source of $R \\sim 35-50$ pc, a covering factor of CF $\\sim$ 6\\%, and a dust-to-gas ratio of $\\leq 4\\%$ times of SMC. We suggest that the strong IELs of this quasar are produce...

  20. Particle dispersion at road building using fly ash - model review, investigation of influence of humidity content for dust emission and fly ash particle characterisation; Partikelspriding vid byggnation av vaeg med aska - modelloeversikt, undersoekning av fuktighetsgradens betydelse foer damning och karaktaerisering av partiklar fraan flygaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Mats; Wik, Ola; Frogner-Kockum, Paul

    2009-03-15

    Ashes from incineration may have very good properties, such as building materials in roads. This use assumes that the ashes do not have serious environmental and health effects. Since ash might generate large amounts of dust in handling the issue on the extent of dusting and dust properties has proved to be important to assess the risks of environmental impacts during use. Inhalable particles in the ambient air are a problem that has attracted much attention and is regarded as one of the most serious health related air pollutants. The present project has aimed to: describe appropriate models for calculating the emission and dispersion of dust in the air during the construction of ash containing roads, evaluate a new method to examine the importance of moisture for dusting from fly ash and investigate the properties of fly ash, making it possible to identify ash in samples of airborne particles. The target audience is ash manufacturers, contractors and consultants with a need for knowledge of ash dusting. Project modules have included: a literature review to identify appropriate modelling tools to describe the emission and dispersion of dust from road building with ash a method study in which a piece of equipment called Duster, have been evaluated for assessing the significance of the ash humidity to dusting, and an electron microscope study where morphology and composition of some ashes, cement and Merit have been studied to find ways to identify ash particles in dust samples. The results show that there is a lack of overall model tools that can describe the emissions from all the management operations of ashes at road building and that existing models sometimes lack key variables. Also, because of high silt content of ashes, some models are deemed inferior compared to when used for ordinary mineral material. Furthermore, attempts with the Duster shows that the method works, but with limited precision, and that dusting from the ash samples was reduced significantly

  1. Andromeda's dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, Robert [CSIRO—Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NWS 1710 (Australia); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  2. The quantum anomalous Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, CHAO-XING; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is defined as a quantized Hall effect realized in a system without external magnetic field. Quantum anomalous Hall effect is a novel manifestation of topological structure in many-electron systems, and may have potential applications in future electronic devices. In recent years, quantum anomalous Hall effect has been proposed theoretically and realized experimentally. In this review article, we provide a systematic overview of the theoretical and experimenta...

  3. Anomalous radiative transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenzo; Tobita, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transitions involving photons derived by many-body interaction of the form, $\\partial_{\\mu} G^{\\mu}$, in the standard model are studied. This does not affect the equation of motion in the bulk, but makes wave functions modified, and causes the unusual transition characterized by the time-independent probability. In the transition probability at a time-interval T expressed generally in the form $P=T \\Gamma_0 +P^{(d)}$, now with $\\Gamma_0=0, P^{(d)} \

  4. A Tale of Three Galaxies: A "Clumpy" View of the Spectroscopically Anomalous Galaxies IRAS F10398+1455, IRAS F21013-0739 and SDSS J0808+3948

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yanxia; Hao, Lei; Li, Aigen

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the dust properties in three spectroscopically anomalous galaxies (IRAS F10398+1455, IRAS F21013-0739 and SDSS J0808+3948). Their Spitzer/IRS spectra are characterized by a steep ~5-8 micron emission continuum, strong emission bands from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, and prominent 10 micron silicate emission. The steep ~5-8 micron continuum and strong PAH emission features suggest the presence of starbursts, while the silicate emission is indicative of significant heating from AGNs. The simultaneous detection of these two observational properties has rarely been reported on galactic scale. We employ the PAHFIT software to estimate their starlight contributions, and the CLUMPY model for the components contributed by the AGN tori. We find that the CLUMPY model is generally successful in explaining the overall dust infrared emission, although it appears to emit too flat at the ~5-8 micron continuum to be consistent with that observed in IRAS F10398+1455 and IRAS F21013-0739. The...

  5. Wormhole shadows in rotating dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which investigated the shadows of the Ellis wormhole surrounded by nonrotating dust, in this paper we study wormhole shadows in a rotating dust flow. First, we derive steady-state solutions of slowly rotating dust surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. Solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady-state solutions. Because the Ellis wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. The bright ring looks distorted due to rotation. Aside from the bright ring, there appear weakly luminous complex patterns by the emission from the other side of the throat. These structure could be detected by high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  6. Optical Detection of Anomalous Nitrogen in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    . Introducing instead the terrestrial ratio for nitrogen-15 (1/272) significantly degrades the fit and thus that ratio can clearly be ruled out in Comet LINEAR. At the time of the VLT observations, the comet was of 9th magnitude, i.e. about 15 times fainter than what can be perceived with the unaided eye. The distance from the Sun was about 180 million km; the distance from the Earth was 186 million km. The observations included calibration spectra of sunlight reflected from the lunar surface; they were used to "subtract" the solar signatures in the comet's spectrum, caused by reflection of sunlight from the dust particles around the comet. As expected, in addition to emission from "normal" CN-molecules ( 12 C 14 N), the UVES data also show emission lines of the 13 C 14 N-molecule that contains the rare isotope carbon-13. The derived 12 C/ 13 C isotopic ratio is 115 ± 20, quite similar to the "standard" solar system value of 89. However, there is also a series of weak features that are positioned exactly at the theoretical wavelengths of emission lines from 12 C 15 N-molecules, cf. PR Photo 28c/03 . The excellent fit that is evident in this diagram proves beyond any doubt the presence of nitrogen-15 in Comet LINEAR and allows a quite accurate determination of the isotopic ratio. The "anomalous" nitrogen isotope ratio in comets In 1997, the same group of astronomers obtained spectra of the (at that time) much brighter Comet Hale-Bopp with the 2.6-m NOT telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain) in order to investigate the isotopic ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13. Claude Arpigny remembers: " Interestingly, our spectra of Hale-Bopp showed a number of weak and unidentified emission lines. We later realised that they were positioned close to the theoretical wavelengths of some lines from the 12 C 15 N-molecule. This was a pleasant surprise, as lines from that molecular species were previously believed to be so faint that they would not be

  7. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  8. Comment on "The dust sublimation radius as an outer envelope to the bulk of the narrow Fe K$\\alpha$ line emission in Type 1 AGN"

    CERN Document Server

    Minezaki, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Gandhi, H\\"onig, and Kishimoto submitted a manuscript to the arXiv e-print service on the location of the emitting region of the narrow FeK$\\alpha $ line that appears in the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) compared with the inner radius of the dust torus (arXiv:1502.02661). Prior to their manuscript, a similar discussion had already been presented in a section of Minezaki & Matsushita (2015), which had been accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. Because Gandhi et al. made no reference to Minezaki & Matsushita (2015) apart from improperly citing it merely as an application of the dust reverberation of AGNs, we present a brief comparison of both papers. Gandhi et al. compared the location of the FeK$\\alpha$ emitting region with the individually measured radius of the dust torus for type 1 AGNs, whereas Minezaki & Matsushita (2015) examined it based on the scaling relation of the dust reverberation radius for both type 1 and type 2 AGNs. Nevertheless, Gandhi e...

  9. Ninth wood energy symposium - Reduction of fine-dust emissions and power generation as part of a future power supply system; 9. Holzenergie-Symposium - Feinstaubminderung und Stromerzeugung im Rahmen der zukuenftigen Energieversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T. (ed.)

    2006-07-01

    This comprehensive report is published by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). A total of fourteen papers were presented at the symposium on the following subjects: Federal Action-Plan in the wood-firing area and emission limits, Fair-Firing - an Action Plan for the prevention of increased emissions and illegal incineration of wastes, fine-dust from wood-fired systems in comparison with diesel soot from the health point of view, practical experience with low-particle, pellets-fired systems, basics and technologies for the precipitation of fine-dust and the influence of particle characteristics and mode of operation as well as two papers on the development of electrical precipitators for wood-fired systems from 200 kW upwards and the practical experience gained with them. Further, papers are presented that deal with small-size electrostatic precipitators, flameless combustion for NO{sub x} reduction and modern pellets technology. The potential and economic viability of wood fuels for the generation of electricity are discussed and a 7 MW{sub e} wood-fired power station is looked at. Finally, the options open for providing a secure supply of energy in Europe are discussed and the role to be played by biomass is examined.

  10. The pros and cons of the inversion method approach to derive 3D dust emission properties of the ISM: the Hi-GAL field centred on (l,b)=(30$^{\\circ}$,0$^{\\circ}$)

    CERN Document Server

    Traficante, Alessio; Compiegne, Mathieu; Alves, Marta I R; Cambresy, Laurent; Gibson, Steven J; Tibbs, Christopher T; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Molinari, Sergio; Carey, Sean J; Ingalls, Jim G; Natoli, Paolo; Davies, Rod D; Davis, Richard J; Dickinson, Clive; Fuller, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    Herschel FIR continuum data obtained as part of the Hi-GAL survey have been used, together with the GLIMPSE 8 $\\mu$m and MIPSGAL 24 $\\mu$m data, to attempt the first 3D-decomposition of dust emission associated with atomic, molecular and ionized gas at 15 arcmin angular resolution. Our initial test case is a 2$\\times$2 square degrees region centred on (l,b)=(30$^{\\circ}$,0$^{\\circ}$), a direction that encompasses the origin point of the Scutum-Crux Arm at the tip of the Galactic Bar. Coupling the IR maps with velocity maps specific for different gas phases (HI 21cm, $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO, and RRLs), we estimate the properties of dust blended with each of the gas components and at different Galactocentric distances along the LOS. A statistical Pearson's coefficients analysis is used to study the correlation between the column densities and the intensity of the IR emission. This analysis provides evidence that the 2$\\times$2 square degree field under consideration is characterized by the presence of a gas com...

  11. Dicarboxylic acids, metals and isotopic compositions of C and N in atmospheric aerosols from inland China: implications for dust and coal burning emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dicarboxylic acids (C2–C10, metals, elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, and stable isotopic compositions of total carbon (TC and total nitrogen (TN were determined for PM10 samples collected at three urban and one suburban sites of Baoji, an inland city of China, during winter and spring 2008. Oxalic acid (C2 was the dominant diacid, followed by succinic (C4 and malonic (C3 acids. Total diacids in the urban and suburban areas were 1546±203 and 1728±495 ng m−3 during winter and 1236±335 and 1028±193 ng m−3 during spring. EC in the urban and the suburban atmospheres were 17±3.8 and 8.0±2.1 μg m−3 during winter and 20±5.9 and 7.1±2.7 μg m−3 during spring, while OC at the urban and suburban sites were 74±14 and 51±7.9 μg m−3 in winter and 51±20 and 23±6.1 μg m−3 in spring. Secondary organic carbon (SOC accounted for 38±16% of OC in winter and 28±18% of OC in spring, suggesting an enhanced photochemical production of secondary organic aerosols in winter under an inversion layer development. Total metal elements in winter and spring were 34±10 and 61±27 μg m−3 in the urban air and 18±7 and 32±23 μg m−3 in the suburban air. A linear correlation (r2>0.8 in winter and r2>0.6 in spring was found between primary organic carbon (POC and Ca2+/Fe, together with a strong dependence of pH value of sample extracts on water-soluble inorganic carbon, suggesting fugitive dust as an important source of the airborne particles. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, sulfate, and Pb in the samples well correlated each other (r2>0.6 in winter, indicating an importance of emissions from coal burning for house heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of TC (δ13C became higher with an increase

  12. Dicarboxylic acids, metals and isotopic compositions of C and N in atmospheric aerosols from inland China: implications for dust and coal burning emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10, metals, elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, and stable isotopic compositions of total carbon (TC and total nitrogen (TN were determined for PM10 samples collected at three urban and one suburban sites of Baoji, an inland city of China, during winter and spring 2008. Oxalic acid (C2 was the dominant diacid, followed by succinic (C4 and malonic (C3 acids. Total diacids in the urban and suburban areas are 1546±203 and 1728±495 ng m−3 during winter and 1236±335 and 1028±193 ng m−3 during spring. EC in the urban and the suburban atmospheres are 17±3.8 and 8.0±2.1 μg m−3 during winter and 20±5.9 and 7.1±2.7 μg m−3 during spring whereas OC at the urban and suburban sites are 74±14 and 51±7.9 μg m−3 in winter and 51±20 and 23±6.1 μg m−3 in spring. Secondary organic carbon (SOC accounted for 38±16% of OC in winter and 28±18% of OC in spring, suggesting an enhanced photochemical production of secondary organic aerosols in winter under an inversion layer development. Total metal elements in winter and spring are 34±10 and 61±27 μg m−3 in the urban air and 18±7 and 32±23 μg m−3 in the suburban air. A linear correlation (r2>0.8 in winter and r2>0.6 in spring was found between primary organic carbon (POC and Ca2+/Fe, together with a strong dependence of pH value on water-soluble inorganic carbon, suggesting fugitive dust as a major source of the airborne particles. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, sulfate, and Pb in the samples well correlated each other (r2>0.6 in winter samples, suggesting an importance of emissions from coal burning for house heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of TC (δ13C became higher with an increase in the concentration

  13. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  14. Identification of an anomalous phase in Ni–W electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizushima, Io; Tang, Peter Torben; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    In the present work Ni–W layers electrodeposited from electrolytes based on NiSO4, Na2WO4, citrate, glycine and triethanolamine are characterized with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). XRD showed the occurrence of an anomalous phase...

  15. Spectrum of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics describe an Abelian plasma where conduction and chiral currents are simultaneously present and constrained by the second law of thermodynamics. At high frequencies the magnetic currents play the leading role, and the spectrum is dominated by two-fluid effects. The system behaves instead as a single fluid in the low-frequency regime where the vortical currents induce potentially large hypermagnetic fields. After deriving the physical solutions of the generalized Appleton-Hartree equation, the corresponding dispersion relations are scrutinized and compared with the results valid for cold plasmas. Hypermagnetic knots and fluid vortices can be concurrently present at very low frequencies and suggest a qualitatively different dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities.

  16. Detection of anomalous events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  17. Optically Anomalous Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Optical anomalies in crystals are puzzles that collectively constituted the greatest unsolved problems in crystallography in the 19th Century. The most common anomaly is a discrepancy between a crystal’s symmetry as determined by its shape or by X-ray analysis, and that determined by monitoring the polarization state of traversing light. These discrepancies were perceived as a great impediment to the development of the sciences of crystals on the basis of Curie’s Symmetry Principle, the grand organizing idea in the physical sciences to emerge in the latter half of the 19th Century. Optically Anomalous Crystals begins with an historical introduction covering the contributions of Brewster, Biot, Mallard, Brauns, Tamman, and many other distinguished crystallographers. From this follows a tutorial in crystal optics. Further chapters discuss the two main mechanisms of optical dissymmetry: 1. the piezo-optic effect, and 2. the kinetic ordering of atoms. The text then tackles complex, inhomogeneous crystals, and...

  18. Modelling Dust Scattering in our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    I have used a Monte Carlo model for dust scattering in our Galaxy with multiple scattering to study the diffuse emission seen by the \\galex\\ mission. I find that the emission at low and mid latitudes is fit well by scattering from dust grains with an albedo of 0.4 and $g = 0$ (isotropically scattering grains). However, only about 30\\%\\ of the diffuse radiation at high Galactic latitudes is due to dust scattering. There is an additional component of 500 - 600 photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ sr$^{-1}$ \\AA$^{-1}$ at all latitudes of an unknown origin.

  19. Cold dust clumps in dynamically hot gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S; Madden, S C; Meixner, M; Hony, S; Panuzzo, P; Sauvage, M; Roman-Duval, J; Gordon, K D; Engelbracht, C; Israel, F P; Misselt, K; Okumura, K; Li, A; Bolatto, A; Skibba, R; Galliano, F; Matsuura, M; Bernard, J -P; Bot, C; Galametz, M; Hughes, A; Kawamura, A; Onishi, T; Paradis, D; Poglitsch, A; Reach, W T; Robitaille, T; Rubio, M; Tielens, A G G M

    2010-01-01

    We present clumps of dust emission from Herschel observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and their physical and statistical properties. We catalog cloud features seen in the dust emission from Herschel observations of the LMC, the Magellanic type irregular galaxy closest to the Milky Way, and compare these features with HI catalogs from the ATCA+Parkes HI survey. Using an automated cloud-finding algorithm, we identify clouds and clumps of dust emission and examine the cumulative mass distribution of the detected dust clouds. The mass of cold dust is determined from physical parameters that we derive by performing spectral energy distribution fits to 250, 350, and 500 micronm emission from SPIRE observations using DUSTY and GRASIL radiative transfer calculation with dust grain size distributions for graphite/silicate in low-metallicity extragalactic environments. The dust cloud mass spectrum follows a power law distribution with an exponent of gamma=-1.8 for clumps larger than 400 solar mass and is si...

  20. Stellar dust production and composition in the Magellanic Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Kemper, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust reservoir in the interstellar medium of a galaxy is constantly being replenished by dust formed in the stellar winds of evolved stars. Due to their vicinity, nearby irregular dwarf galaxies the Magellanic Clouds provide an opportunity to obtain a global picture of the dust production in galaxies. The Small and Large Magellanic Clouds have been mapped with the Spitzer Space Telescope from 3.6 to 160 {\\mu}m, and these wavelengths are especially suitable to study thermal dust emission. ...

  1. Compacting of fly dusts from cupola and electric arc furnace

    OpenAIRE

    D. Baricová; P. Futáš; A. Pribulová; G. Fedorko; P. Demeter

    2012-01-01

    Recycling and utilization of dust waste is important not only from the point of view of its usage as an alternative source of raw materials, but regarding the environmental problems also. Dust emissions arise from thermal and chemical or physical processes and mechanical actions. Two kinds of fl y dusts from cupola furnaces (hot and cold blast cupola furnace) and fl y dust from electric arc furnace were used by experiments. They were pelletized only with addition of water and briquetted with ...

  2. Detection of anthropogenic dust using CALIPSO lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J. P.; Liu, J. J.; Chen, B.; Nasiri, S. L.

    2015-10-01

    Anthropogenic dusts are those produced by human activities on disturbed soils, which are mainly cropland, pastureland, and urbanized regions, and are a subset of the total dust load which includes natural sources from desert regions. Our knowledge of anthropogenic dusts is still very limited due to a lack of data. To understand the contribution of anthropogenic dust to the total global dust load, it is important to identify it apart from total dust. In this study, a new technique for distinguishing anthropogenic dust from natural dust is proposed by using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) dust and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrievals along with a land use data set. Using this technique, the global distribution of dust is analyzed and the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural dust sources to regional and global emissions are estimated. Results reveal that local anthropogenic dust aerosol due to human activity, such as agriculture, industrial activity, transportation, and overgrazing, accounts for about 25 % of the global continental dust load. Of these anthropogenic dust aerosols, more than 53 % come from semi-arid and semi-wet regions. Annual mean anthropogenic dust column burden (DCB) values range from 0.42 g m-2, with a maximum in India, to 0.12 g m-2, with a minimum in North America. A better understanding of anthropogenic dust emission will enable us to focus on human activities in these critical regions and with such knowledge we will be more able to improve global dust models and to explore the effects of anthropogenic emission on radiative forcing, climate change, and air quality in the future.

  3. Characterization of Settled Atmospheric Dust by the DART Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Baraona, Cosmo

    1999-01-01

    The DART ("Dust Accumulation and Removal Test") package is an experiment which will fly as part of the MIP experiment on the Mars-2001 Surveyor Lander. Dust deposition could be a significant problem for photovoltaic array operation for long duration emissions on the surface of Mars. Measurements made by Pathfinder showed 0.3% loss of solar array performance per day due to dust obscuration. The DART experiment is designed to quantify dust deposition from the Mars atmosphere, measure the properties of settled dust, measure the effect of dust deposition on the array performance, and test several methods of mitigating the effect of settled dust on a solar array. Although the purpose of DART (along with its sister experiment, MATE) is to gather information critical to the design of future power systems on the surface of Mars, the dust characterization instrumentation on DART will also provide significant scientific data on the properties of settled atmospheric dust.

  4. The Dust & Gas Properties of M83

    CERN Document Server

    Foyle, K; Mentuch, E; Bendo, G; Dariush, A; Parkin, T; Pohlen, M; Sauvage, M; Smith, M W L; Roussel, H; Baes, M; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; Davies, J I; Eales, S A; Madden, S; Page, M J; Spinoglio,

    2012-01-01

    We examine the dust and gas properties of the nearby, barred galaxy M83, which is part of the Very Nearby Galaxy Survey. Using images from the PACS and SPIRE instruments of Herschel, we examine the dust temperature and dust mass surface density distribution. We find that the nuclear, bar and spiral arm regions exhibit higher dust temperatures and masses compared to interarm regions. However, the distribution of dust temperature and mass are not spatially coincident. Assuming a trailing spiral structure, the dust temperature peaks in the spiral arms lie ahead of the dust surface density peaks. The dust mass surface density correlates well with the distribution of molecular gas as traced by CO (J=3-2) images (JCMT) and the star formation rate as traced by H?2 with a correction for obscured star formation using 24 micron emission. Using HI images from THINGS to trace the atomic gas component, we make total gas mass surface density maps and calculate the gas-to-dust ratio. We find a mean gas-to-dust ratio of 84 \\...

  5. Dust-air pollution dynamics over the eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, M.; Metzger, S.; Mamouri, R. E.; Astitha, M.; Barrie, L.; Levin, Z.; Lelieveld, J.

    2015-08-01

    Interactions of desert dust and air pollution over the eastern Mediterranean (EM) have been studied, focusing on two distinct dust transport events on 22 and 28 September 2011. The atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC has been used at about 50 km grid spacing, applying an online dust emission scheme and calcium as a proxy for dust reactivity. EMAC includes a detailed tropospheric chemistry mechanism, aerosol microphysics and thermodynamics schemes to describe dust "aging". The model is evaluated using ground-based observations for aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) as well as satellite observations. Simulation results and back trajectory analysis show that the development of synoptic disturbances over the EM can enhance dust transport from the Sahara and Arabian deserts in frontal systems that also carry air pollution to the EM. The frontal systems are associated with precipitation that controls the dust removal. Our results show the importance of chemical aging of dust, which increases particle size, dust deposition and scavenging efficiency during transport, overall reducing the lifetime relative to non-aged dust particles. The relatively long travel periods of Saharan dust result in more sustained aging compared to Arabian dust. Sensitivity simulations indicate 3 times more dust deposition of aged relative to pristine dust, which significantly decreases the dust lifetime and loading.

  6. Evolution of the dust emission of massive galaxies up to z=4 and constraints on their dominant mode of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Béthermin, Matthieu; Magdis, Georgios; Lagos, Claudia; Sargent, Mark; Albrecht, Marcus; Aussel, Hervé; Bertoldi, Frank; Buat, Véronique; Galametz, Maud; Heinis, Sébastien; Karim, Alexander; Koekemoer, Anton; Lacey, Cedric; Floc'h, Emeric Le; Navarrete, Felipe; Pannella, Maurilio; Schreiber, Corentin; Symeonidis, Myrto; Viero, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We aim to measure the average dust and molecular gas content of massive star-forming galaxies ($\\rm > 3 \\times 10^{10}\\,M_\\odot$) up to z=4 in the COSMOS field to determine if the intense star formation observed at high redshift is induced by major mergers or caused by large gas reservoirs. Firstly, we measured the evolution of the average spectral energy distributions as a function of redshift using a stacking analysis of Spitzer, Herschel, LABOCA, and AzTEC data for two samples of galaxies: normal star-forming objects and strong starbursts, as defined by their distance to the main sequence. We found that the mean intensity of the radiation field $\\langle U \\rangle$ heating the dust (strongly correlated with dust temperature) increases with increasing redshift up to z$\\sim$4 in main-sequence galaxies. We can reproduce this evolution with simple models that account for the decrease of the gas metallicity with redshift. No evolution of $\\langle U \\rangle$ with redshift is found in strong starbursts. We then de...

  7. Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from both of point and area sources of an electric-arc furnace-dust treatment plant and their impacts to the vicinity environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kuei-Min; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Fang, Kenneth; Lin, Mark

    2010-08-01

    This study was set out to investigate emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from both the stack (i.e., point source) and plant fugitives (i.e., area source) of an electric-arc furnace-dust treatment plant (EAFDTP) and their impact to the vicinity environments. The emission rate of the point source (2,360 ng I-TEQh(-1)) was determined directly by measuring PCDD/F concentrations of the stack flue gas. The emission rate of the area source (1,080 ng I-TEQ m(-2)h(-1)) was estimated by using the Industrial Sources Complex Short-Term (ISCST3) model based on concentrations measured at the downwind side of the plant. The mean emission factors of 785 and 893 ng I-TEQ ton(-1) ZnO were found for the point and area source, respectively. The above results suggest that the area source accounted for more than 50% of total PCDD/F emissions for the selected EAFDTP. The contribution of the point source to the atmospheric PCDD/F concentrations of the upwind site and downwind site of the EAFDTP were 0 and 0.27 fg I-TEQ Nm(-3), respectively. The contributions of the area source were 0.020 and 3.3 fg I-TEQ Nm(-3), respectively. The total contribution of the selected EAFDTP (including both the point and area sources) to the concentrations in both upwind and downwind side vicinities were all less than 10%. Finally, the impact of PCDD/F emissions from the selected EAFDTP to the vicinity atmospheric environments was discussed in the present study.

  8. Porous and Fluffy Grains in the Regions of Anomalous Extinction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. B. Vaidya; B. G. Anandarao; J. N. Desai; R. Gupta

    2000-06-01

    It has long been established that the ratio of total to selective extinction is anomalously large (≥ 5) in certain regions of the interstellar medium. In these regions of anomalous extinction the dust grains are likely to be irregular in shape and fluffy in structure. Using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) we calculate the extinction for porous and fluffy grains. We apply DDA first to solid spheroidal particles assumed to be made of a certain (large) number of dipoles. Then we systematically reduce the number of dipoles to model the porous grains. The aggregates of these particles are suggested to form the fluffy grains. We study the extinction for these particles as a function of grain size, porosity and wavelength. We apply these calculations to interpret the observed extinction data in the regions of star formation (e.g. the Orion complex).

  9. Anomalous radiative transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous transitions involving photons derived by many-body interaction of the form ∂μGμ in the standard model are studied for the first time. This does not affect the equation of motion in the bulk, but modifies the wavefunctions, and causes an unusual transition characterized by a time-independent probability. In the transition probability at a time interval T expressed generally in the form P=TΓ0+P(d), now with P(d)≠0. The diffractive term P(d) has its origin in the overlap of waves of the initial and final states, and reveals the characteristics of waves. In particular, the processes of the neutrino–photon interaction ordinarily forbidden by the Landau–Yang theorem (Γ0=0) manifest themselves through the boundary interaction. The new term leads physical processes over a wide energy range to have finite probabilities. New methods of detecting neutrinos using lasers are proposed, based on this diffractive term; these would enhance the detectability of neutrinos by many orders of magnitude

  10. Dust acoustic shock wave generation due to dust charge variation in a dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Gupta; S Sarkar; M Khan; Samiran Ghosh

    2003-12-01

    In a dusty plasma, the non-adiabaticity of the charge variation on a dust grain surface results in an anomalous dissipation. Analytical investigation shows that this results in a small but finite amplitude dust acoustic (DA) wave propagation which is described by the Korteweg–de Vries–Burger equation. Results of the numerical investigation of the propagation of large-amplitude dust acoustic stationary shock wave are presented here using the complete set of non-linear dust fluid equations coupled with the dust charging equation and Poisson equation. The DA waves are of compressional type showing considerable increase of dust density, which is of significant importance in astrophysical context as it leads to enhanced gravitational attraction considered as a viable process for star formation. The DA shock transition to its far downstream amplitude is oscillatory in nature due to dust charge fluctuations, the oscillation amplitude and shock width depending on the ratio pd/ch and other plasma parameters.

  11. Numerical simulation of the October 2002 dust event in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yaping; Leys, John F.; McTainsh, Grant H.; Tews, Kenn

    2007-04-01

    In comparison to the major dust sources in the Northern Hemisphere, Australia is a relatively minor contributor to the global