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Sample records for annelid lumbricus rubellus

  1. Transcriptome profiling of developmental and xenobiotic responses in a keystone soil animal, the oligochaete annelid Lumbricus rubellus

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    Morgan A John

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural contamination and anthropogenic pollution of soils are likely to be major determinants of functioning and survival of keystone invertebrate taxa. Soil animals will have both evolutionary adaptation and genetically programmed responses to these toxic chemicals, but mechanistic understanding of such is sparse. The clitellate annelid Lumbricus rubellus is a model organism for soil health testing, but genetic data have been lacking. Results We generated a 17,000 sequence expressed sequence tag dataset, defining ~8,100 different putative genes, and built an 8,000-element transcriptome microarray for L. rubellus. Strikingly, less than half the putative genes (43% were assigned annotations from the gene ontology (GO system; this reflects the phylogenetic uniqueness of earthworms compared to the well-annotated model animals. The microarray was used to identify adult- and juvenile-specific transcript profiles in untreated animals and to determine dose-response transcription profiles following exposure to three xenobiotics from different chemical classes: inorganic (the metal cadmium, organic (the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fluoranthene, and agrochemical (the herbicide atrazine. Analysis of these profiles revealed compound-specific fingerprints which identify the molecular responses of this annelid to each contaminant. The data and analyses are available in an integrated database, LumbriBASE. Conclusion L. rubellus has a complex response to contaminant exposure, but this can be efficiently analysed using molecular methods, revealing unique response profiles for different classes of effector. These profiles may assist in the development of novel monitoring or bioremediation protocols, as well as in understanding the ecosystem effects of exposure.

  2. [Study of genetic diversity of earthworm Lumbricus rubellus Hoff. (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae)].

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    Zhukovskaia, E A; Kodolova, O P; Pravduchina, O Iu; Barne, A Zh; Bolotetskiĭ, N M

    2005-01-01

    A polymorphism of the total protein (MY) and nonspecific esterase (EST) patterns was revealed in the musculocutaneous sac of earthworm Lumbricus rubellus by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The revealed polymorphism is attributed to genetically determined codominant systems, each of which is controlled by the corresponding locus, My and Est, represented by two and four alleles, respectively. The allelic frequency distribution of both loci demonstrated genetic heterogeneity of four L. rubellus samples from Moscow and Moscow Region (311 individuals in total). Allelic frequencies of the revealed loci are proposed as genetic markers for monitoring L. rubellus generations in vermiculture.

  3. Synergism of Lumbricus rubellus and Pseudomonas putida Pf-20 in Inducing Resistance to Cucumber Mosaic Virus

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    WIWIEK SRI WAHYUNI

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Both Lumbricus rubellus and Pseudomonas putida decompose soil organic matters. The population of P. putida Pf-20 increased if L. rubellus was introduced to the cucumber growth medium. The process of organic decomposition was much better if the medium was introduced with both L. rubellus and P. putida Pf-20, compared to the medium contained only either one of those organisms. The activity of L. rubellus may serve to provide nutrients for both the cucumber and P. putida. The role of P. putida to reduce disease severity was increased if L. rubellus was introduced to the growth medium. The synergism of these two organisms, reduced either the level of disease severity to CMV-48 and C/N ratio of medium, but increased the content of available phosphor and potassium.

  4. Bioavailability pathways underlying zinc-induced avoidance behavior and reproduction toxicity in Lumbricus rubellus earthworms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, W.C.; Bonten, L.T.C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated possible bioavailability pathways underlying zinc-induced avoidance behavior and sublethal reproduction impairment in Lumbricus rubellus. Clay-loam (pH 7.3) and sandy soil (three pH values of 4.3–6.0) were amended with zinc sulfate at six soil concentrations of total Zn ranging from

  5. Effects of C60 nanoparticle exposure on earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus) and implications for population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der M.J.C.; Baveco, J.M.; Hout, van der A.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Brink, van den N.W.

    2011-01-01

    Effects of C60 nanoparticles (nominal concentrations 0, 15.4 and 154 mg/kg soil) on mortality, growth and reproduction of Lumbricus rubellus earthworms were assessed. C60 exposure had a significant effect on cocoon production, juvenile growth rate and mortality. These endpoints were used to model ef

  6. Organic Fertilizer Production From Cattle Waste Vermicomposting Assisted By Lumbricus Rubellus

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    Siswo Sumardiono; R.P. Djoko Murwono; Amin Nugroho

    2011-01-01

    Composting is decomposition of compound in organic waste by specific treatment using microorganism aerobically. Natural composting for producing organic fertilizer from manure and market waste utilize long time processing and less equal to the market demand. Vermicomposting is a technique to produce high quality compos fertilizer from biodegradable garbage and mixture of red worm (Lumbricus Rubellus). In conventional compos production took 8 weeks of processing time, in vermicomposting only t...

  7. The potential of Lumbricus rubellus as a bioaccumulator of excess Pb and Cd in organic media

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    M. Arifin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb and cadmium (Cd are sources of serious problems in the environment due to their reactivity and toxicity. Lumbricus rubellus is an earthworm reared by people is expected to reduce Pb and Cd concentrations in the environments. The aim of this study was to explore the ability of Lumbricus rubellus in reducing excess of Pb and Cd in organic media generated from urban waste. Sixteen treatments (four levels of Pb concentration and four levels of Cd concentration were arranged in a completely randomized design with three replications. Each treatment was placed in a wooden pot of 20 cm x 20 cm x 25 cm, and supplied with 40 Lumbricus rubellus for 30 days. Results of this study showed that 20 and 40% of the earthworm could survive until day 30 in organic media contaminated with Pb and Cd, respectively. Pb accumulated in the earthworm bodies ranged from 0.03 to 211.42 mg/kg, while the Cd accumulated in the earthworm body ranged from 0.57 to 22.11 mg/kg. The bioaccumulation factor for Pb was 46.98%, while that of Cd was 53.83%t. The content of Pb in vermicompost ranged from 0.04 to 19.41 mg/kg, while that of Cd ranged from 0.01 to 1.58 mg/kg.

  8. Inherited resistance to arsenate toxicity in two populations of Lumbricus rubellus.

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    Langdon, Caroline J; Piearce, Trevor G; Meharg, Andrew A; Semple, Kirk T

    2003-10-01

    No unequivocal evidence exists of genetically inherited resistance to metals/metalloids in field populations of earthworms. We studied cocoon production in adult Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister collected from an abandoned arsenic and copper mine (Devon Great Consols, Devon, UK), and abandoned tungsten mine (Carrock Fell, Cumbria, UK) and an uncontaminated cultured population. The earthworms were kept in uncontaminated soil for nine weeks. From a total of 42 L. rubellus from each site, Devon Great Consols adults produced 301 cocoons, of which 42 were viable; Carrock Fell 60 cocoons, of which 11 were viable; and the reference population 101 cocoons, of which 62 were viable. The hatchlings were collected and stored at 4 degrees C at weekly intervals. After 12 weeks, all hatchlings were transferred to clean soil and maintained at 15 degrees C for 20 weeks until they showed evidence of a clitellum. In toxicity trials, F1 generation L. rubellus were exposed to 2,000 mg As/kg as sodium arsenate or 300 mg Cu/kg as copper chloride for 28 d. The F1 generation L. rubellus from Devon Great Consols mine demonstrated resistance to arsenate but not copper. All L. rubellus from Devon Great Consols kept in soil treated with sodium arsenate remained in good condition over the 28-d period but lost condition rapidly and suffered high mortality in soil treated with copper chloride. The control population suffered high mortality in soil treated with sodium arsenate and copper chloride. Previous work has shown that field-collected adults demonstrate resistance to both arsenate and Cu toxicity under these conditions. Thus, while arsenate resistance may be demonstrated in F1 generation L. rubellus from one of the contaminated sites, Cu resistance is not. The F1 adults and F2 cocoons did not have significantly higher levels of As than the control population, with no residual As tissue burden, suggesting that resistance to As in these populations may be inherited.

  9. Forest floor decomposition, metal exchangeability, and metal bioaccumulation by exotic earthworms: Amynthas agrestis and Lumbricus rubellus.

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    Richardson, J B; Görres, J H; Friedland, A J

    2016-09-01

    Earthworms have the potential to reduce the retention of pollutant and plant essential metals in the forest floor (organic horizons) by decomposing organic matter and increasing exchangeability of metals. We conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the effects of two exotic earthworms, Amynthas agrestis and Lumbricus rubellus, on forest floor decomposition, metal exchangeability, and metal bioaccumulation. Eighty-one pots containing homogenized forest floor material were incubated for 20, 40, or 80 days under three treatments: no earthworms, A. agrestis added, or L. rubellus added. For earthworm treatments, A. agrestis and L. rubellus were stocked at densities observed in previous field studies. Pots containing either A. agrestis or L. rubellus had lost more forest floor mass than the control plots after 40 and 80 days of incubation. Forest floor pots containing A. agrestis had significantly lower % C (16 ± 1.5 %) than control pots (21 ± 1.2 %) after 80 days. However, L. rubellus consumed more forest floor and C mass than A. agrestis, when evaluated on a per earthworm biomass basis. Exchangeable (0.1 M KCl + 0.01 M AcOH extractable) and stable (15 M HNO3+ 10 M HCl extractable) concentrations of Al, Ca, Cd, Cu, Mg, Mn, Pb, and Zn in forest floor material were measured. Stable concentrations and % exchangeable metals in forest floor material were similar among treatments. Although exchangeable metal concentrations varied significantly for most metals among treatments (except Mg and Zn), we conclude that earthworms did not increase or decrease the exchangeability of metals. However, earthworms bioaccumulated Cu, Cd, Zn, and Mg and had potentially hazardous tissue concentrations of Al and Pb. This was best illustrated by calculating bioaccumulation factors using exchangeable concentrations rather than total concentrations. Future research is needed to understand the effect of earthworms on metals in other soil types.

  10. Uji in Vitro Penghambatan Aktivitas Escherichia coli dengan Tepung Cacing Tanah (Lumbricus rubellus

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    H. Julendra

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to study the inhibition growth of E. coli by using earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus meal. The earthworm meal was used in various concentrations, i.e. 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg of earthworm meal in 100 ml DMSO for 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% (w/v as treatments respectively. Data were analyzed by ANOVA in Randomized Complete Block Design. Duncan’s multiple range test and polynomials orthogonal were used. Inhibition effects were measured through agar well diffusion test. Results showed that earthworm meal contain antibacterial compound which inhibit E. coli activity. There was a significant difference (P0.05 with 75% (w/v. It is concluded that earthworm meal is capable to inhibit E. coli in-vitro at the optimum level of 50% (w/v.

  11. Glutathione transferase (GST) as a candidate molecular-based biomarker for soil toxin exposure in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus

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    LaCourse, E. James, E-mail: james.la-course@liverpool.ac.u [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom); Hernandez-Viadel, Mariluz; Jefferies, James R. [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom); Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Huntingdon PE28 2LS (United Kingdom); Barrett, John [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom); John Morgan, A.; Kille, Peter [Biosciences, University of Cardiff, Cardiff CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); Brophy, Peter M. [Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    The earthworm Lumbricus rubellus (Hoffmeister, 1843) is a terrestrial pollution sentinel. Enzyme activity and transcription of phase II detoxification superfamily glutathione transferases (GST) is known to respond in earthworms after soil toxin exposure, suggesting GST as a candidate molecular-based pollution biomarker. This study combined sub-proteomics, bioinformatics and biochemical assay to characterise the L. rubellus GST complement as pre-requisite to initialise assessment of the applicability of GST as a biomarker. L. rubellus possesses a range of GSTs related to known classes, with evidence of tissue-specific synthesis. Two affinity-purified GSTs dominating GST protein synthesis (Sigma and Pi class) were cloned, expressed and characterised for enzyme activity with various substrates. Electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following SDS-PAGE were superior in retaining subunit stability relative to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). This study provides greater understanding of Phase II detoxification GST superfamily status of an important environmental pollution sentinel organism. - This study currently provides the most comprehensive view of the Phase II detoxification enzyme superfamily of glutathione transferases within the important environmental pollution sentinel earthworm Lumbricus rubellus.

  12. Assessment of avoidance behaviour by earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Octolasion cyaneum) in linear pollution gradients.

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    Lowe, Christopher N; Butt, Kevin R; Cheynier, Kevin Yves-Marie

    2016-02-01

    Avoidance behaviour by earthworms is recognised as a valuable endpoint in soil quality assessment and has resulted in the development of a standardised test (ISO 17512-1, 2008) providing epigeic earthworms with a choice between test and control soils. This study sought to develop and evaluate an avoidance test utilising soil-dwelling earthworms in linear pollution gradients with Visible Implant Elastomer (VIE) tags used to identify individual organisms. Sequential experiments were established in laboratory-based mesocosms (0.6m×0.13m×0.1m) that determined the relative sensitivities (in terms of associated avoidance behaviour) of Octolasion cyaneum and Lumbricus rubellus at varying levels of polluted soil and also assessed the influence of introduction point on recorded movement within gradients. In an initial gradient (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% polluted soil), both species exhibited a clear avoidance response with all surviving earthworms retrieved (after 7 days) from the unpolluted soil. In a less polluted gradient (0%, 6.25%, 12.5%, 18.75%, 25%) L. rubellus were retrieved throughout the gradient while O. cyaneum were located within the 0% and 6.25% divisions, suggesting a species-specific response to polluted soil. Results also showed that the use of a linear pollution gradient system has the potential to assess earthworm avoidance behaviour and could provide a more ecologically relevant alternative to the ISO 17512: 2008 avoidance test. However, further work is required to establish the effectiveness of this procedure, specifically in initial chemical screening and assessment of single contaminant bioavailability, where uptake of pollutants by earthworms could be measured and directly related to the point of introduction and retrieval.

  13. Earthworm Lumbricus rubellus MT-2: Metal Binding and Protein Folding of a True Cadmium-MT

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    Gregory R. Kowald

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthworms express, as most animals, metallothioneins (MTs—small, cysteine-rich proteins that bind d10 metal ions (Zn(II, Cd(II, or Cu(I in clusters. Three MT homologues are known for Lumbricus rubellus, the common red earthworm, one of which, wMT-2, is strongly induced by exposure of worms to cadmium. This study concerns composition, metal binding affinity and metal-dependent protein folding of wMT-2 expressed recombinantly and purified in the presence of Cd(II and Zn(II. Crucially, whilst a single Cd7wMT-2 species was isolated from wMT-2-expressing E. coli cultures supplemented with Cd(II, expressions in the presence of Zn(II yielded mixtures. The average affinities of wMT-2 determined for either Cd(II or Zn(II are both within normal ranges for MTs; hence, differential behaviour cannot be explained on the basis of overall affinity. Therefore, the protein folding properties of Cd- and Zn-wMT-2 were compared by 1H NMR spectroscopy. This comparison revealed that the protein fold is better defined in the presence of cadmium than in the presence of zinc. These differences in folding and dynamics may be at the root of the differential behaviour of the cadmium- and zinc-bound protein in vitro, and may ultimately also help in distinguishing zinc and cadmium in the earthworm in vivo.

  14. Organic Fertilizer Production From Cattle Waste Vermicomposting Assisted By Lumbricus Rubellus

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    Siswo Sumardiono

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Composting is decomposition of compound in organic waste by specific treatment using microorganism aerobically. Natural composting for producing organic fertilizer from manure and market waste utilize long time processing and less equal to the market demand. Vermicomposting is a technique to produce high quality compos fertilizer from biodegradable garbage and mixture of red worm (Lumbricus Rubellus. In conventional compos production took 8 weeks of processing time, in vermicomposting only took half processing time of conventional technique. It is occurred by red worm additional ease cellulose degradation contain in manure which is could not decomposed with composting bacteria. The purposes of this research are to investigate the effect of manure comparison to red worm growth and to evaluate the effect of comparison between manure and market waste to red worm growth. This research was conducted by vary the weight of red worm (100 gr, 200 gr, 300 gr, 400 gr, 500 gr and market waste addition (50 gr, 100 gr, 150 gr, 200 gr, 300 gr. Moreover, 3 kg of manure was mixed by various weight of red worm, while variation of market waste addition was involved 500 gr red worm and 3 kg manure mixture. Optimum increasing weight of red worm that was obtained by 100 gr red worm addition is 160 gr within 2 weeks. In added market waste variation, the highest increasing of red worm was resulted by 50 gr market waste addition, with 60 gr increasing weight of red worm. Production of casting fertilizer was highly effected by composition of used materials such as medium, manure and red worm comparison as well as market waste additional

  15. Effects of C{sub 60} nanoparticle exposure on earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus) and implications for population dynamics

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    Ploeg, M.J.C. van der, E-mail: merel.vanderploeg@wur.n [Alterra, Wageningen UR, Droevendaalssesteeg 3, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Tuinlaan 5, 6703 HE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Baveco, J.M.; Hout, A. van der [Alterra, Wageningen UR, Droevendaalssesteeg 3, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Bakker, R. [RIKILT, Wageningen UR, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB, Wageningen (Netherlands); Rietjens, I.M.C.M. [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Tuinlaan 5, 6703 HE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Brink, N.W. van den [Alterra, Wageningen UR, Droevendaalssesteeg 3, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Effects of C{sub 60} nanoparticles (nominal concentrations 0, 15.4 and 154 mg/kg soil) on mortality, growth and reproduction of Lumbricus rubellus earthworms were assessed. C{sub 60} exposure had a significant effect on cocoon production, juvenile growth rate and mortality. These endpoints were used to model effects on the population level. This demonstrated reduced population growth rate with increasing C{sub 60} concentrations. Furthermore, a shift in stage structure was shown for C{sub 60} exposed populations, i.e. a larger proportion of juveniles. This result implies that the lower juvenile growth rate due to exposure to C{sub 60} resulted in a larger proportion of juveniles, despite increased mortality among juveniles. Overall, this study indicates that C{sub 60} exposure may seriously affect earthworm populations. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that juveniles were more sensitive to C{sub 60} exposure than adults. - C{sub 60} nanoparticle exposure can affect Lumbricus rubellus populations.

  16. Bioconversion of biomass residue from the cultivation of pea sprouts on spent Pleurotus sajor-caju compost employing Lumbricus rubellus

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    Azizi Abu Bakar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vermicomposting is a green technology for the purpose of nutrient enrichment from a variety of organic waste products. In this study, saw dust-based spent mushroom compost (SMC, an organic waste and biomass residue, was used as a medium for the cultivation of pea sprouts. After harvesting the pea sprouts, the growth medium was reused to culture earthworms, Lumbricus rubellus. The culturing activity was conducted for 50 days without any pre-composting or thermocomposting. Thus duration of vermicomposting process was shortened as opposed to previous work on vermicomposting of saw dust-based SMC (no amendment for 70 days. The culturing treatments were conducted in triplicate, including one treatment without earthworms as the control. The analysis showed that concentrations of macronutrients in vermicompost were higher compared to controls, in which N = 4.12%, P = 2.07% and K = 1.56%. The C:N ratio was 11.77, which indicates a stabilisation and maturity of the organic waste compost, compared with the C:N ratio for the control, which was 59.34. At the end of the experiment, increment of total biomass and number of earthworms were observed and no mortality was recorded. The results suggested that vermicomposting could be used as an environmentally valuable technology to convert saw dust used for mushroom and pea sprouts cultivation into vermicompost or bio-fertiliser by employing L. rubellus.

  17. As-resistance in laboratory-reared F1, F2 and F3 generation offspring of the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus inhabiting an As-contaminated mine soil

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    Langdon, C.J., E-mail: clangdon1@btinternet.co [C/O The Open University in the North, Baltic Buiness Quarter, Abbots Hill, Gateshead NE8 3DF (United Kingdom); Morgan, A.J., E-mail: morganaj1@cardiff.ac.u [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, P.O. Box 913, Cardiff CF11 3TL, Wales (United Kingdom); Charnock, J.M., E-mail: john.charnock@manchester.ac.u [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Semple, K.T., E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.u [Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Lowe, C.N., E-mail: cnlowe@uclan.ac.u [School of Built and Natural Environment, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Previous studies provided no unequivocal evidence demonstrating that field populations of Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister (1843), exhibit genetically inherited resistance to As-toxicity. In this study F1, F2 and F3 generation offspring derived from adults inhabiting As-contaminated field soil were resistant when exposed to 2000 mg kg{sup -1} sodium arsenate. The offspring of uncontaminated adults were not As-resistant. Cocoon viability was 80% for F1 and 82% for F2 offspring from As-contaminated adults and 59% in the F1 control population. High energy synchrotron analysis was used to determine whether ligand complexation of As differed in samples of: resistant mine-site adults, the resistant F1 and F2 offspring of the mine-site earthworms exposed to the LC{sub 25} sodium arsenate (700 mg kg{sup -1}) of the F1 parental generation; and adult L. rubellus from an uncontaminated site exposed to LC{sub 25} concentrations of sodium arsenate (50 mg kg{sup -1}). XANES and EXAFS indicated that As was present as a sulfur-coordinated species. - As-resistance in F1, F2 and F3 offspring of the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus.

  18. Bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 containing lumbrokinase isolated from Lumbricus rubellus: ex vivo, in vivo, and pharmaceutic studies

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    Tjandrawinata RR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Raymond R Tjandrawinata,1 Jessica Trisina,1 Puji Rahayu,1 Lorentius Agung Prasetya,1 Aang Hanafiah,2 Heni Rachmawati3 1Dexa Laboratories of Biomolecular Sciences, Dexa Medica, Cikarang, Indonesia; 2National Nuclear Energy Agency, Bandung, Indonesia; 3School of Pharmacy, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia Abstract: DLBS1033 is a bioactive protein fraction isolated from Lumbricus rubellus that tends to be unstable when exposed to the gastrointestinal environment. Accordingly, appropriate pharmaceutical development is needed to maximize absorption of the protein fraction in the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo stability assays were performed to study the stability of the bioactive protein fraction in gastric conditions. The bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 was found to be unstable at low pH and in gastric fluid. The “enteric coating” formulation showed no leakage in gastric fluid–like medium and possessed a good release profile in simulated intestinal medium. DLBS1033 was absorbed through the small intestine in an intact protein form, confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE analysis. This result confirmed that an enteric coating formula using methacrylic acid copolymer could protect DLBS1033 from the acidic condition of the stomach by preventing the release of DLBS1033 in the stomach, while promoting its release when reaching the intestine. From the blood concentration–versus-time curve, 99mTc-DLBS1033 showed a circulation half-life of 70 minutes. This relatively long biological half-life supports its function as a thrombolytic protein. Thus, an enteric delivery system is considered the best approach for DLBS1033 as an oral thrombolytic agent. Keywords: bioactive protein fraction, enteric coated tablet, pharmacodynamic

  19. Surface adsorption of metals onto the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus and the isopod Porcellio scaber is negligible compared to absorption in the body.

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    Vijver, Martina G; Wolterbeek, Hubert Th; Vink, Jos P M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2005-03-20

    In terrestrial organisms, bioaccumulation is usually based on a summation of the amount of metal adsorbed to the body wall and absorbed into the body. The relative proportions of metal adsorption and absorption are usually not quantified. In this study, the distinction between adsorbed and absorbed metals was investigated in two different terrestrial species exposed to metals for 2 weeks. The earthworm Lumbricus rubellus was chosen as representative for organisms mainly taking up metals via the dermal route, and the isopod Porcellio scaber as an organism taking up metals mainly via the alimentary tract. Cross-sections of whole animals were made using a cryostat and accumulated metals were localized by means of a phosphor screen (autoradiography). Radiolabels were used to determine the distribution of metals over the different organs and to distinguish between adsorption and absorption. Cd in the earthworm was mainly found in tissues of the chloragogenous region, whereas Zn was also found in various other organs and in the connective tissue. In the isopod, both Cd and Zn were mainly located in the hepatopancreas. Adsorbed amounts of Cd and Zn were negligible compared to internalized Cd and Zn concentrations for both organisms. Consequently, when focusing on effects of metal uptake for the organism itself, there is no need to correct for adsorption. This suggests that adsorption to the epidermis is not a rate limiting step in metal uptake by soil invertebrates.

  20. Transcriptome profiling of developmental and xenobiotic responses in a keystone soil animal, the oligochaete annelid Lumbricus rubellus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owen, J.; Hedley, B.A.; Svendsen, C.; Wren, J.; Jonker, M.J.; Hankard, P.K.; Lister, L.J.; Stürzenbaum, S.R.; Morgan, A.J.; Spurgeon, D.J.; Blaxter, M.L.; Kille, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Natural contamination and anthropogenic pollution of soils are likely to be major determinants of functioning and survival of keystone invertebrate taxa. Soil animals will have both evolutionary adaptation and genetically programmed responses to these toxic chemicals, but mechanistic und

  1. Effectivity of water soluble granule from kenikir leaves extract (Cosmos caudatus, noni leaves extract (Morinda citrifolia, and earthworm meal extract (Lumbricus rubellus as a natural coccidiostat for broiler chickens against infection caused by Eimeri

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    Karimy MF

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study effectivity of water soluble granule from kenikir leaves extract (Cosmos caudatus, noni leaves extract (Morinda citrifolia, and earthworm meal extract (Lumbricus rubellus as a natural coccidiostat for broiler chickens against infection caused by Eimeria tenella. One hundred day old chick (DOC of the Cobb strain broiler were randomly devided into 10 groups and each group consisted of 10 chickens. All groups were orally infected by 5000 sporulated oocyst of E. tenella on the 25th days old as a challenge infection. The chickens was treated by granule of kenikir leaves extract, noni leaves extract and granule of earthworm meal extract which level dosage was 100, 200 and 300 mg/kgbw, respectively on each treatment (K1, K2, K3; M1, M2, M3 and T1, T2, T3. Control (K0 did not treated by feed additive. Treatment was administered on drinking water. On the 5th days after challenge infection 5 chickens of each groups were slaughtered and necropted to evaluate lession score and histopatology of caeca. Oocyst per gram excreta was count on 7th days until 10th days after challenge infection of the others 5 chickens of each groups. The results showed that the lowest score of lession was obtained on M2 and M3 whereas the lowest total oocyst per gram excreta was obtained on M3. Histopathological observation revealed that there was no stadia development of E. tenella in M2 treatment. It was concluded that granule of noni leaves extract at 200 mg/kgbw (M2 was the most effective natural coccidiostat.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in annelids

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    A Tasiemski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are widely distributed among living organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They constitute important effectors of the innate immune response by exerting multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis and immune induction. In invertebrates, most of the data describe the characterization and/or the function of AMPs in the numerically and economically most representative group which are arthropods. Annelids are among the first coelomates and are therefore of special phylogenetic interest. Compared to other invertebrate groups, data on annelid’s immunity reveal heavier emphasis on the cellular than on the humoral response suggesting that immune defense of annelids seems to be principally developed as cellular immunity.This paper gives an overview of the variety of AMPs identified in the three classes of annelids, i.e. polychaetes, oligochaetes and achaetes. Their functions, when they have been studied, in the humoral or cellular response of annelids are also mentioned.

  3. Properties of silver nanoparticles influencing their uptake in and toxicity to the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus following exposure in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makama, Sunday; Piella, Jordi; Undas, Anna; Dimmers, Wim J.; Peters, Ruud; Puntes, Victor F.; Brink, van den Nico W.

    2016-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles influence their environmental fate and toxicity, and studies investigating this are vital for a holistic approach towards a comprehensive and adequate environmental risk assessment. In this study, we investigated the effects of size, surface coating (ch

  4. On some Polychaetous Annelids from Curaçao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, R.

    1922-01-01

    Though we know already a rather large number of Polychaetous Annelids from the Caribbean Sea, hitherto, as far as I know, no Annelids have been described from the coast of the island Curaçao and I therefore was very glad, that my colleague Dr. VAN DER HORST kindly placed in my hands for identificati

  5. Incorporation of microplastics from litter into burrows of Lumbricus terrestris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza; Gertsen, H.F.; Gooren, H.; Peters, P.; Salanki, T.E.; Ploeg, van der M.; Besseling, E.; Koelmans, A.A.; Geissen, V.

    2017-01-01

    Pollution caused by plastic debris is an urgent environmental problem. Here, we assessed the effects of microplastics in the soil surface litter on the formation and characterization of burrows built by the anecic earthworm Lumbricus terrestris in soil and quantified the amount of microplastics that

  6. Cambrian stem-group annelids and a metameric origin of the annelid head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Luke; Vinther, Jakob; Edgecombe, Gregory D

    2015-10-01

    The oldest fossil annelids come from the Early Cambrian Sirius Passet and Guanshan biotas and Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale. While these are among the best preserved polychaete fossils, their relationship to living taxa is contentious, having been interpreted either as members of extant clades or as a grade outside the crown group. New morphological observations from five Cambrian species include the oldest polychaete with head appendages, a new specimen of Pygocirrus from Sirius Passet, and an undescribed form from the Burgess Shale. We propose that the palps of Canadia are on an anterior segment bearing neuropodia and that the head of Phragmochaeta is formed of a segment bearing biramous parapodia and chaetae. The unusual anatomy of these taxa suggests that the head is not differentiated into a prostomium and peristomium, that palps are derived from a modified parapodium and that the annelid head was originally a parapodium-bearing segment. Canadia, Phragmochaeta and the Marble Canyon annelid share the presence of protective notochaetae, interpreted as a primitive character state subsequently lost in Pygocirrus and Burgessochaeta, in which the head is clearly differentiated from the trunk.

  7. Neuromuscular Structure, Evolution and Development in Meiofaunal Annelids with Special Focus on Dinophilus gyrociliatus (Dinophilidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerbl, Alexandra

    regionalization (yet molecular), but comparison of closely related species revealed unexpected plasticity in the distribution of specific neuropeptidergic cells. The relatively similar molecular profile of the microscopic and macroscopic annelid brain suggests the presence of a common annelid pattern, though...

  8. Annelid phylogeny and the status of Sipuncula and Echiura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleidorn Christoph

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annelida comprises an ancient and ecologically important animal phylum with over 16,500 described species and members are the dominant macrofauna of the deep sea. Traditionally, two major groups are distinguished: Clitellata (including earthworms, leeches and "Polychaeta" (mostly marine worms. Recent analyses of molecular data suggest that Annelida may include other taxa once considered separate phyla (i.e., Echiura, and Sipuncula and that Clitellata are derived annelids, thus rendering "Polychaeta" paraphyletic; however, this contradicts classification schemes of annelids developed from recent analyses of morphological characters. Given that deep-level evolutionary relationships of Annelida are poorly understood, we have analyzed comprehensive datasets based on nuclear and mitochondrial genes, and have applied rigorous testing of alternative hypotheses so that we can move towards the robust reconstruction of annelid history needed to interpret animal body plan evolution. Results Sipuncula, Echiura, Siboglinidae, and Clitellata are all nested within polychaete annelids according to phylogenetic analyses of three nuclear genes (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, EF1α; 4552 nucleotide positions analyzed for 81 taxa, and 11 nuclear and mitochondrial genes for 10 taxa (additional: 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, ATP8, COX1-3, CYTB, NAD6; 11,454 nucleotide positions analyzed. For the first time, these findings are substantiated using approximately unbiased tests and non-scaled bootstrap probability tests that compare alternative hypotheses. For echiurans, the polychaete group Capitellidae is corroborated as the sister taxon; while the exact placement of Sipuncula within Annelida is still uncertain, our analyses suggest an affiliation with terebellimorphs. Siboglinids are in a clade with other sabellimorphs, and clitellates fall within a polychaete clade with aeolosomatids as their possible sister group. None of our analyses support the major polychaete

  9. Is Diurodrilus an annelid?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsaae, Katrine; Rouse, Greg W.

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial marine meiofaunal worms of the genus Diurodrilus have always been considered part of Annelida, either as basal or derived, though generally with reference to Dinophilidae. New evidence shows that Diurodrilus has a unique anatomy, and lacks key annelid features, possibly even...

  10. Charles Darwin's Observations on the Behaviour of Earthworms and the Evolutionary History of a Giant Endemic Species from Germany, Lumbricus badensis (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kutschera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The British naturalist Charles Darwin (1809–1882 began and ended his almost 45-year-long career with observations, experiments, and theories related to earthworms. About six months before his death, Darwin published his book on The Formation of Vegetable Mould, through the Actions of Worms, With Observations on their Habits (1881. Here we describe the origin, content, and impact of Darwin's last publication on earthworms (subclass Oligochaeta, family Lumbricidae and the role of these annelids as global “ecosystem reworkers” (concept of bioturbation. In addition, we summarize our current knowledge on the reproductive behaviour of the common European species Lumbricus terrestris. In the second part of our account we describe the biology and evolution of the giant endemic species L. badensis from south western Germany with reference to the principle of niche construction. Biogeographic studies have shown that the last common ancestor of L. badensis, and the much smaller sister-taxon, the Atlantic-Mediterranean L. friendi, lived less than 10 000 years ago. Allopatric speciation occurred via geographically isolated founder populations that were separated by the river Rhine so that today two earthworm species exist in different areas.

  11. Plasticity and regeneration of gonads in the annelid Pristina leidyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Duygu Özpolat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonads are specialized gamete-producing structures that, despite their functional importance, are generated by diverse mechanisms across groups of animals and can be among the most plastic organs of the body. Annelids, the segmented worms, are a group in which gonads have been documented to be plastic and to be able to regenerate, but little is known about what factors influence gonad development or how these structures regenerate. In this study, we aimed to identify factors that influence the presence and size of gonads and to investigate gonad regeneration in the small asexually reproducing annelid, Pristina leidyi. Results We found that gonad presence and size in asexual adult P. leidyi are highly variable across individuals and identified several factors that influence these structures. An extrinsic factor, food availability, and two intrinsic factors, individual age and parental age, strongly influence the presence and size of gonads in P. leidyi. We also found that following head amputation in this species, gonads can develop by morphallactic regeneration in previously non-gonadal segments. We also identified a sexually mature individual from our laboratory culture that demonstrates that, although our laboratory strain reproduces only asexually, it retains the potential to become fully sexual. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that gonads in P. leidyi display high phenotypic plasticity and flexibility with respect to their presence, their size, and the segments in which they can form. Considering our findings along with relevant data from other species, we find that, as a group, clitellate annelids can form gonads in at least four different contexts: post-starvation refeeding, fission, morphallactic regeneration, and epimorphic regeneration. This group is thus particularly useful for investigating the mechanisms involved in gonad formation and the evolution of post-embryonic phenotypic plasticity.

  12. Bio-inspired annelid robot: a dielectric elastomer actuated soft robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Chen, Han-Qing; Zou, Jiang; Dong, Wan-Ting; Gu, Guo-Ying; Zhu, Li-Min; Zhu, Xiang-Yang

    2017-01-31

    Biologically inspired robots with inherent softness and body compliance increasingly attract attention in the field of robotics. Aimed at solving existing problems with soft robots, regarding actuation technology and biological principles, this paper presents a soft bio-inspired annelid robot driven by dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) that can advance on flat rigid surfaces. The DEA, a kind of soft functional actuator, is designed and fabricated to mimic the axial elongation and differential friction of a single annelid body segment. Several (at least three) DEAs are connected together into a movable multi-segment robot. Bristles are attached at the bottom of some DEAs to achieve differential friction for imitating the setae of annelids. The annelid robot is controlled by periodic square waves, propagating from the posterior to the anterior, which imitate the peristaltic waves of annelids. Controlled by these waves, each DEA, one-by-one from tail to head, anchors to the ground by circumferential distention and pushes the front DEAs forward by axial elongation, enabling the robot to advance. Preliminary tests demonstrate that a 3-segment robot can reach an average speed of 5.3 mm s(-1) (1.871 body lengths min(-1)) on flat rigid surfaces and can functionally mimic the locomotion of annelids. Compared to the existing robots that imitate terrestrial annelids our annelid robot shows advantages in terms of speed and bionics.

  13. Annelid from the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation in Northeastern Guizhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yue; WANG Xunlian

    2008-01-01

    Wenghuiia jiangkouensis gen. et sp. nov., characterized by modem annelid taxonomy in morphology and functional biology, is found in black carbonaceous shale from the Neoproterozoic Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation (about 555 Ma) near Wenghui, Jiangkou, northeastern Guizhou Province. The elongate, cylindrical body is composed of many homologous metameres with a true coelom and coelomic pouches. The mouth is at the front of the first segment and the anus at the end of body. A long 11th or 12th segment is probably functionally for procreation, being a clitellum. There are parapodia on the venter of the segments from the rear of the second segment to the front of the clitellum. The setae on all metameres, on the parapodia, and around the anus, differ. In the centre of body, a line probably represents the alimentary canal passing through the body from mouth to anus. A closed vascular system consists of a dorsal vessel at least. W. jiankouensis might represent the oldest discovered 'modem' annelid but it is not a primitive type. It lived on the depositional surface of a shallow sea with an environment of calm-water and abundant light.

  14. Incorporation of microplastics from litter into burrows of Lumbricus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza; Gertsen, Hennie; Gooren, Harm; Peters, Piet; Salánki, Tamás; van der Ploeg, Martine; Besseling, Ellen; Koelmans, Albert A; Geissen, Violette

    2017-01-01

    Pollution caused by plastic debris is an urgent environmental problem. Here, we assessed the effects of microplastics in the soil surface litter on the formation and characterization of burrows built by the anecic earthworm Lumbricus terrestris in soil and quantified the amount of microplastics that was transported and deposited in L. terrestris burrows. Worms were exposed to soil surface litter treatments containing microplastics (Low Density Polyethylene) for 2 weeks at concentrations of 0%, 7%, 28%, 45% and 60%. The latter representing environmentally realistic concentrations found in hot spot soil locations. There were significantly more burrows found when soil was exposed to the surface treatment composed of 7% microplastics than in all other treatments. The highest amount of organic matter in the walls of the burrows was observed after using the treatments containing 28 and 45% microplastics. The highest microplastic bioturbation efficiency ratio (total microplastics (mg) in burrow walls/initial total surface litter microplastics (mg)) was found using the concentration of 7% microplastics, where L. terrestris introduced 73.5% of the surface microplastics into the burrow walls. The highest burrow wall microplastic content per unit weight of soil (11.8 ± 4.8 g kg-(1)) was found using a concentration of 60% microplastics. L. terrestris was responsible for size-selective downward transport when exposed to concentrations of 7, 28 and 45% microplastics in the surface litter, as the fraction ≤50 μm microplastics in burrow walls increased by 65% compared to this fraction in the original surface litter plastic. We conclude that the high biogenic incorporation rate of the small-fraction microplastics from surface litter into burrow walls causes a risk of leaching through preferential flow into groundwater bodies. Furthermore, this leaching may have implications for the subsequent availability of microplastics to terrestrial organisms or for the transport

  15. Genetic and genomic tools for the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zantke, Juliane; Bannister, Stephanie; Rajan, Vinoth Babu Veedin; Raible, Florian; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    The bristle worm Platynereis dumerilii displays many interesting biological characteristics. These include its reproductive timing, which is synchronized to the moon phase, its regenerative capacity that is hormonally controlled, and a slow rate of evolution, which permits analyses of ancestral genes and cell types. As a marine annelid, Platynereis is also representative of the marine ecosystem, as well as one of the three large animal subphyla, the Lophotrochozoa. Here, we provide an overview of the molecular resources, functional techniques, and behavioral assays that have recently been established for the bristle worm. This combination of tools now places Platynereis in an excellent position to advance research at the frontiers of neurobiology, chronobiology, evo-devo, and marine biology.

  16. Developmental and molecular biology of annelid regeneration: a comparative review of recent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özpolat, B Duygu; Bely, Alexandra E

    2016-10-01

    Studies of annelid regeneration have greatly increased in frequency in recent years, providing new insights into the developmental basis and evolution of regeneration. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to regeneration in annelids, focusing on molecular and developmental studies of epimorphic (blastema-based) regeneration, morphallactic (tissue-remodeling based) regeneration, and development and regeneration of putative stem cells of the posterior growth zone and germline. Regeneration is being investigated in a broad range of annelids spanning the phylum, and comparing findings among species reveals both widely conserved features that may be ancestral for the phylum as well as features that are variable across the group.

  17. Polychaete Annelid Biomass Size Spectra: The Effects of Hypoxia Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyuan Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative benthic samples were taken during spring and summer at three locations on the Louisiana continental shelf from 2004 to 2012 to assess the influence of hypoxia on the mean sizes (wet weight of polychaete annelid worms. While the mean body size over the entire study of 64 samples was 3.99 ± 4.66 mg wet weight per individual, the mean ranged from 2.97 ± 2.87 mg during consistently hypoxic conditions (2 mg/L. The variations in size within assemblages were estimated from conventional biomass size spectra (BSS and normalized biomass size spectra (NBSS across a broad range of oxygen concentrations. The decline in size was due to the elimination of large species under hypoxic conditions (<2 mg/L, not a reduction in size within species. At “severe” levels of hypoxia (<1 mg/L, the smallest species also declined in abundance, whereas the ubiquitous “medium-sized” Paraprionospio pinnata flourished. These results suggest that there will be enhanced selection for small sizes and species with enlarged branchial palps such as those in P. pinnata if, as predicted, hypoxia becomes more commonplace in time and space worldwide.

  18. Lumbricus terrestris L. activity increases the availability of metals and their accumulation in maize and barley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avenida Camilo Jose Cela, s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Alonso-Azcarate, J. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avenida Carlos III, s/n, 45071 Toledo (Spain); Rodriguez, L., E-mail: Luis.Rromero@uclm.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avenida Camilo Jose Cela, s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    The effect of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris L. on metal availability in two mining soils was assessed by means of chemical extraction methods and a pot experiment using crop plants. Results from single and sequential extractions showed that L. terrestris had a slight effect on metal fractionation in the studied soils: only metals bound to the soil organic matter were significantly increased in some cases. However, we found that L. terrestris significantly increased root, shoot and total Pb and Zn concentrations in maize and barley for the soil with the highest concentrations of total and available metals. Specifically, shoot Pb concentration was increased by a factor of 7.5 and 3.9 for maize and barley, respectively, while shoot Zn concentration was increased by a factor of 3.7 and 1.7 for maize and barley, respectively. Our results demonstrated that earthworm activity increases the bioavailability of metals in soils. - Research highlights: > Lumbricus terrestris L. activity increases the bioavailability of metals in soils. > Earthworm activity can significantly increase total, shoot and root metal concentrations for crop plants. > Both bioassays and chemical extraction methods are necessary for assessing the bioavailability of metals in contaminated soils. - Lumbricus terrestris L. activity increases the bioavailability of metals in soils and total, shoot and root metal concentrations for maize and barley.

  19. Gonad establishment during asexual reproduction in the annelid Pristina leidyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özpolat, B Duygu; Bely, Alexandra E

    2015-09-01

    Animals that can reproduce by both asexual agametic reproduction and sexual reproduction must transmit or re-establish their germ line post-embryonically. Although such a dual reproductive mode has evolved repeatedly among animals, how asexually produced individuals establish their germ line remains poorly understood in most groups. We investigated germ line development in the annelid Pristina leidyi, a species that typically reproduces asexually by paratomic fission, intercalating a new tail and head in the middle of the body followed by splitting. We found that in fissioning individuals, gonads occur in anterior segments in the anterior-most individual as well as in new heads forming within fission zones. Homologs of the germ line/multipotency genes piwi, vasa, and nanos are expressed in the gonads, as well as in proliferative tissues including the posterior growth zone, fission zone, and regeneration blastema. In fissioning animals, certain cells on the ventral nerve cord express a homolog of piwi, are abundant near fission zones, and sometimes make contact with gonads. Such cells are typically undetectable near the blastema and posterior growth zone. Time-lapse imaging provides direct evidence that cells on the ventral nerve cord migrate preferentially towards fission zones. Our findings indicate that gonads form routinely in fissioning individuals, that a population of piwi-positive cells on the ventral nerve cord is associated with fission and gonads, and that cells resembling these piwi-positive cells migrate along the ventral nerve cord. We suggest that the piwi-positive ventral cells are germ cells that transmit the germ line across asexually produced individuals via migration along the ventral nerve cord.

  20. Molecular regionalization in the compact brain of the meiofaunal annelid Dinophilus gyrociliatus (Dinophilidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerbl, Alexandra; Martín-Durán, José M.; Worsaae, Katrine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Annelida is a morphologically diverse animal group that exhibits a remarkable variety in nervous system architecture (e.g., number and location of longitudinal cords, architecture of the brain). Despite this heterogeneity of neural arrangements, the molecular profiles related to central...... nervous system patterning seem to be conserved even between distantly related annelids. In particular, comparative molecular studies on brain and anterior neural region patterning genes have focused so far mainly on indirect-developing macrofaunal taxa. Therefore, analyses on microscopic, direct......-developing annelids are important to attain a general picture of the evolutionary events underlying the vast diversity of annelid neuroanatomy. RESULTS: We have analyzed the expression domains of 11 evolutionarily conserved genes involved in brain and anterior neural patterning in adult females of the direct...

  1. Molecular regionalization in the compact brain of the meiofaunal annelid Dinophilus gyrociliatus (Dinophilidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerbl, Alexandra; Martín-Durán, José M.; Worsaae, Katrine;

    2016-01-01

    -developing annelids are important to attain a general picture of the evolutionary events underlying the vast diversity of annelid neuroanatomy. RESULTS: We have analyzed the expression domains of 11 evolutionarily conserved genes involved in brain and anterior neural patterning in adult females of the direct...

  2. The evolution of annelids reveals two adaptive routes to the interstitial realm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Torsten Hugo; Golombek, Anja; Weigert, Anne; Franke, Franziska Anni; Westheide, Wilfried; Purschke, Günter; Bleidorn, Christoph; Halanych, Kenneth Michael

    2015-08-03

    Many animals permanently inhabit the marine interstitium, the space between sand grains [1, 2]. Different evolutionary scenarios may explain the existence of interstitial animals [3, 4]. These scenarios include (1) that the interstitial realm is the ancestral habitat of bilaterians [5, 6], (2) that interstitial taxa evolved from larger ancestors by miniaturization, or (3) progenesis [3]. The first view mirrors the former hypothesis that interstitial annelids, called archiannelids, were at the base of the annelid radiation [7]. Based on morphological data, however, progenesis is generally favored for interstitial annelids today [3, 4, 8]. Herein, our phylogenomic approach revealed that interstitial archiannelids are robustly placed into two groups nested within the annelid tree. Evolution of the first group comprising among others Dinophilidae is best explained by progenesis. In contrast, the second group comprising Protodrilida and Polygordiidae appears to have evolved by stepwise miniaturization adapting from coarser to finer sediments. Thus, in addition to progenesis [3, 4], miniaturization, thought to be too slow for an adaptation to the interstitium [3], is an important second route allowing adaptation to interstitial environments. Both progenesis and miniaturization should be considered when investigating evolution of interstitial taxa [1, 3].

  3. Molecular regionalization in the compact brain of the meiofaunal annelid Dinophilus gyrociliatus (Dinophilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kerbl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annelida is a morphologically diverse animal group that exhibits a remarkable variety in nervous system architecture (e.g., number and location of longitudinal cords, architecture of the brain. Despite this heterogeneity of neural arrangements, the molecular profiles related to central nervous system patterning seem to be conserved even between distantly related annelids. In particular, comparative molecular studies on brain and anterior neural region patterning genes have focused so far mainly on indirect-developing macrofaunal taxa. Therefore, analyses on microscopic, direct-developing annelids are important to attain a general picture of the evolutionary events underlying the vast diversity of annelid neuroanatomy. Results We have analyzed the expression domains of 11 evolutionarily conserved genes involved in brain and anterior neural patterning in adult females of the direct-developing meiofaunal annelid Dinophilus gyrociliatus. The small, compact brain shows expression of dimmed, foxg, goosecoid, homeobrain, nk2.1, orthodenticle, orthopedia, pax6, six3/6 and synaptotagmin-1. Although most of the studied markers localize to specific brain areas, the genes six3/6 and synaptotagmin-1 are expressed in nearly all perikarya of the brain. All genes except for goosecoid, pax6 and nk2.2 overlap in the anterior brain region, while the respective expression domains are more separated in the posterior brain. Conclusions Our findings reveal that the expression patterns of the genes foxg, orthodenticle, orthopedia and six3/6 correlate with those described in Platynereis dumerilii larvae, and homeobrain, nk2.1, orthodenticle and synaptotagmin-1 resemble the pattern of late larvae of Capitella teleta. Although data on other annelids are limited, molecular similarities between adult Dinophilus and larval Platynereis and Capitella suggest an overall conservation of molecular mechanisms patterning the anterior neural regions, independent

  4. Novel Crystalline SiO2 Nanoparticles via Annelids Bioprocessing of Agro-Industrial Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeles-Chávez C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The synthesis of nanoparticles silica oxide from rice husk, sugar cane bagasse and coffee husk, by employing vermicompost with annelids (Eisenia foetida is reported. The product (humus is calcinated and extracted to recover the crystalline nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS show that the biotransformation allows creating specific crystalline phases, since equivalent particles synthesized without biotransformation are bigger and with different crystalline structure.

  5. Novel Crystalline SiO2 Nanoparticles via Annelids Bioprocessing of Agro-Industrial Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndola-Gonzalez, A.; Martínez-Hernández, A. L.; Angeles-Chávez, C.; Castaño, V. M.; Velasco-Santos, C.

    2010-09-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticles silica oxide from rice husk, sugar cane bagasse and coffee husk, by employing vermicompost with annelids ( Eisenia foetida) is reported. The product ( humus) is calcinated and extracted to recover the crystalline nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) show that the biotransformation allows creating specific crystalline phases, since equivalent particles synthesized without biotransformation are bigger and with different crystalline structure.

  6. The aquatic annelid fauna of the San Marcos River headsprings, Hays County, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean L.D. Worsham

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The San Marcos River in Central Texas has been well studied and has been demonstrated to be remarkably specious. Prior to the present study, research on free-living invertebrates in the San Marcos River only dealt with hard bodied taxa with the exception of the report of one gastrotrich, and one subterranean platyhelminth that only incidentally occurs in the head spring outflows. The remainder of the soft-bodied metazoan fauna that inhabit the San Marcos River had never been studied. Our study surveyed the annelid fauna and some other soft-bodied invertebrates of the San Marcos River headsprings. At least four species of Hirudinida, two species of Aphanoneura, one species of Branchiobdellida, and 11 (possibly 13 species of oligochaetous clitellates were collected. Other vermiform taxa collected included at least three species of Turbellaria and one species of Nemertea. We provide the results of the first survey of the aquatic annelid fauna of the San Marcos Springs, along with a dichotomous key to these annelids that includes photos of some representative specimens, and line drawings to elucidate potentially confusing diagnostic structures.

  7. The Notch pathway in the annelid Platynereis: insights into chaetogenesis and neurogenesis processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazave, Eve; Lemaître, Quentin I B; Balavoine, Guillaume

    2017-02-01

    Notch is a key signalling pathway playing multiple and varied functions during development. Notch regulates the selection of cells with a neurogenic fate and maintains a pool of yet uncommitted precursors through lateral inhibition, both in insects and in vertebrates. Here, we explore the functions of Notch in the annelid Platynereis dumerilii (Lophotrochozoa). Conserved components of the pathway are identified and a scenario for their evolution in metazoans is proposed. Unexpectedly, neither Notch nor its ligands are expressed in the neurogenic epithelia of the larva at the time when massive neurogenesis begins. Using chemical inhibitors and neural markers, we demonstrate that Notch plays no major role in the general neurogenesis of larvae. Instead, we find Notch components expressed in nascent chaetal sacs, the organs that produce the annelid bristles. Impairing Notch signalling induces defects in chaetal sac formation, abnormalities in chaetae producing cells and a change of identity of chaeta growth accessory cells. This is the first bilaterian species in which the early neurogenesis processes appear to occur without a major involvement of the Notch pathway. Instead, Notch is co-opted to pattern annelid-specific organs, likely through a lateral inhibition process. These features reinforce the view that Notch signalling has been recruited multiple times in evolution due to its remarkable 'toolkit' nature.

  8. The aquatic annelid fauna of the San Marcos River headsprings, Hays County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsham, McLean L. D.; Gibson, Randy; Huffman, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The San Marcos River in Central Texas has been well studied and has been demonstrated to be remarkably specious. Prior to the present study, research on free-living invertebrates in the San Marcos River only dealt with hard bodied taxa with the exception of the report of one gastrotrich, and one subterranean platyhelminth that only incidentally occurs in the head spring outflows. The remainder of the soft-bodied metazoan fauna that inhabit the San Marcos River had never been studied. Our study surveyed the annelid fauna and some other soft-bodied invertebrates of the San Marcos River headsprings. At least four species of Hirudinida, two species of Aphanoneura, one species of Branchiobdellida, and 11 (possibly 13) species of oligochaetous clitellates were collected. Other vermiform taxa collected included at least three species of Turbellaria and one species of Nemertea. We provide the results of the first survey of the aquatic annelid fauna of the San Marcos Springs, along with a dichotomous key to these annelids that includes photos of some representative specimens, and line drawings to elucidate potentially confusing diagnostic structures. PMID:27853397

  9. Measurement and simulation of unmyelinated nerve electrostimulation: Lumbricus terrestris experiment and numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šarolić, A.; Živković, Z.; Reilly, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    The electrostimulation excitation threshold of a nerve depends on temporal and frequency parameters of the stimulus. These dependences were investigated in terms of: (1) strength-duration (SD) curve for a single monophasic rectangular pulse, and (2) frequency dependence of the excitation threshold for a continuous sinusoidal current. Experiments were performed on the single-axon measurement setup based on Lumbricus terrestris having unmyelinated nerve fibers. The simulations were performed using the well-established SENN model for a myelinated nerve. Although the unmyelinated experimental model differs from the myelinated simulation model, both refer to a single axon. Thus we hypothesized that the dependence on temporal and frequency parameters should be very similar. The comparison was made possible by normalizing each set of results to the SD time constant and the rheobase current of each model, yielding the curves that show the temporal and frequency dependencies regardless of the model differences. The results reasonably agree, suggesting that this experimental setup and method of comparison with SENN model can be used for further studies of waveform effect on nerve excitability, including unmyelinated neurons.

  10. Bioavailability and cellular effects of metals on Lumbricus terrestris inhabiting volcanic soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Andre [Departamento de Biologia, Universidade dos Acores, R. Mae de Deus, APT 1422, PT-9501-855 Ponta Delgada (Portugal)]. E-mail: aamaral@notes.uac.pt; Soto, Manu [Biologia Zelularra eta Histologia Laborategia, Zoologia eta Biologia Zelularra Saila, Zientzi Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, 644 PK E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Cunha, Regina [Departamento de Biologia, Universidade dos Acores, R. Mae de Deus, APT 1422, PT-9501-855 Ponta Delgada (Portugal); Marigomez, Ionan [Biologia Zelularra eta Histologia Laborategia, Zoologia eta Biologia Zelularra Saila, Zientzi Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, 644 PK E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Rodrigues, Armindo [Departamento de Biologia, Universidade dos Acores, R. Mae de Deus, APT 1422, PT-9501-855 Ponta Delgada (Portugal)

    2006-07-15

    Whether the radial thickness (RT) of the chloragogenous tissue and intestinal epithelium of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) reflects the bioavailability of metals in soils was investigated in two areas, one with active volcanism (Furnas) and another with no volcanic activity since 3 million years ago (Santa Maria), in the Azores. Metal contents in soil samples and earthworms from the two areas were analyzed. Autometallography and measurements of the RT were performed in the chloragogenous tissue and intestinal epithelium. Earthworms from the active volcanic area demonstrated lower RT of chloragogenous tissue and intestinal epithelium as well as higher levels of bioavailable metals, especially Zn and Cd. Comparison of bioavailable metal contents between both areas suggests a higher risk for uptake of potentially toxic metals in the active volcanic area than in the non-active volcanic area, which is reflected by the lower RT of the chloragogenous tissue and intestinal epithelium in the former. - In earthworms, differences in the chloragogenous tissue morphometry may be related to the bioavailability of metals in soils.

  11. Annelid Endocrine Disruptors and a Survey of Invertebrate FMRFamide-Related Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajniak, Kevin G

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing body of literature describing the actions of endocrine disruptors on annelids. These pollutants cause decreases in growth and reproductive output, delay sexual maturation, and inhibit the immune system in annelids. More studies are needed to determine the mechanisms that underlie these responses. Most invertebrate endocrine disruptor research focuses on steroids. In recent years many new invertebrate peptide hormones including those related to the molluscan peptide FMRFamide have been identified. Since the storage of these peptides can be inhibited by steroids during insect metamorphosis, they may be affected by endocrine disruptors. Therefore, it is worthwhile to give a brief overview of this peptide family to those studying endocrine disruption in invertebrates with the hope that they may begin to consider these peptides in their future research. In 1977 Price and Greenberg isolated FMRFamide from the cerebral ganglia of the clam, Macrocallista nimbosa. Since then researchers have used bioassays and immunoassays to identify a large number of FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) from many invertebrate phyla. Even more peptides are predicted by the FaRP genes that have been sequenced. FaRPs have a variety of functions and act as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones. Each function is species and tissue specific. Most FaRP receptors are linked to a second messenger system. However, at least one is a ligand gated sodium channel. On going studies are examining FaRPs from the molecular to organismal level.

  12. Structural Characterization of Silica Particles Extracted from Grass Stenotaphrum secundatum: Biotransformation via Annelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Espíndola-Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the structural characterization of silica particles extracted from Stenotaphrum secundatum (St. Augustine grass using an annelid-based biotransformation process. This bioprocess starts when St. Augustine grass is turned into humus by vermicompost, and then goes through calcination and acid treatment to obtain silica particles. To determine the effect of the bioprocess, silica particles without biotransformation were extracted directly from the sample of grass. The characterization of the silica particles was performed using Infrared (FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS, and Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS. Both types of particles showed differences in morphology and size. The particles without biotransformation were essentially amorphous while those obtained via annelids showed specific crystalline phases. The biological relationship between the metabolisms of worms and microorganisms and the organic-mineral matter causes changes to the particles' properties. The results of this study are important because they will allow synthesis of silica in cheaper and more ecofriendly ways.

  13. Mesonerilla neridae, n. sp. (Nerillidae): First meiofaunal annelid from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsaae, Katrine; Rouse, Greg W

    2009-01-01

    Though most common in coastal sandy bottoms, nerillid annelids have been found in a broad variety of habitats around the world and two genera have previously been reported from the deep sea. During a cruise to the southern East Pacific Rise and northern Pacific Antarctic Ridge (near Easter Island...

  14. Arsenic speciation in field-collected and laboratory-exposed earthworms Lumbricus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Mark; Moriarty, Maeve M; Watts, Michael J; Zhang, Jun; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2011-11-01

    Mature Lumbricus terrestris were host soils and leaf litter were collected from a former arsenic mine in Devon, UK (Devon Great Consols), a former gold mine in Ontario, Canada (Deloro), and an uncontaminated residential garden in Nottingham, UK. Arsenic concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in soils were 16-348 mg kg(-1), 6.0-239 mg kg(-1) in the earthworms and 8.6 mg kg(-1) in leaf litter sampled at Deloro (all dry weight). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ICP-MS) analysis revealed arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)) and five organoarsenic species; arsenobetaine (AB), methylarsonate (MA(V)), dimethylarsinate (DMA(V)), arsenosugar 1 (glycerol sugar), arsenosugar 2 (phosphate sugar), and trimethylarsineoxide (TMAO) in field-collected L. terrestris. Differences were observed in the variety of organoarsenic species present between field sites. Several organoarsenic species were observed in the leaf litter (DMA(V), arsenosugar 2 and TMAO) but not AB. Depuration resulted in higher concentrations of inorganic As being detected in the earthworm whereas the concentration or variety of organoarsenic species was unchanged. Commercially sourced L. terrestris were exposed to As contaminated soil in laboratory mesocosms (1.0, 98, 183, 236, 324 and 436 mg kg(-1)) without leaf litter and were additionally analyzed using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). Only inorganic As(III) and As(V) was observed. It is proposed that ingestion of leaf litter and symbiotic processes in the natural soil environment are likely sources of organoarsenic compounds in field-collected L. terrestris.

  15. Novel mobbing strategies of a fish population against a sessile annelid predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachat, Jose; Haag-Wackernagel, Daniel

    2016-09-12

    When searching for food, foraging fishes expose themselves to hidden predators. The strategies that maximize the survival of foraging fishes are not well understood. Here, we describe a novel type of mobbing behaviour displayed by foraging Scolopsis affinis. The fish direct sharp water jets towards the hidden sessile annelid predator Eunice aphroditois (Bobbit worm). We recognized two different behavioural roles for mobbers (i.e., initiator and subsequent participants). The first individual to exhibit behaviour indicating the discovery of the Bobbit directed, absolutely and per time unit, more water jets than the subsequent individuals that joined the mobbing. We found evidence that the mobbing impacted the behaviour of the Bobbit, e.g., by inducing retraction. S. affinis individuals either mob alone or form mobbing groups. We speculate that this behaviour may provide social benefits for its conspecifics by securing foraging territories for S. affinis. Our results reveal a sophisticated and complex behavioural strategy to protect against a hidden predator.

  16. Arenicolsterol A, a Novel Cytotoxic Enolic Sulfated Sterol from a Marine Annelid Arenicola cristata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bin; SHEN Xian-Rong; KONG Ji-Lie

    2005-01-01

    Marine organisms are the important source of the bioactive metabolites. A novel enolic sulfated sterol, arenicolsterol A, has been isolated from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata collected in the coast of Mainland of China.The structure was elucidated using all sorts of spectroscopic data including ESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR etc. The cytotoxic bioactivity of this sterol was evaluated by MTT assay. It could inhibit the growth of human cervix cancer cell line (Hela) and human non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-h6) with IC50 of (3.1 ±0.6) μg/mL and (7.6±0.8) μg/mL.

  17. The impact of paralogy on phylogenomic studies - a case study on annelid relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten H Struck

    Full Text Available Phylogenomic studies based on hundreds of genes derived from expressed sequence tags libraries are increasingly used to reveal the phylogeny of taxa. A prerequisite for these studies is the assignment of genes into clusters of orthologous sequences. Sophisticated methods of orthology prediction are used in such analyses, but it is rarely assessed whether paralogous sequences have been erroneously grouped together as orthologous sequences after the prediction, and whether this had an impact on the phylogenetic reconstruction using a super-matrix approach. Herein, I tested the impact of paralogous sequences on the reconstruction of annelid relationships based on phylogenomic datasets. Using single-partition analyses, screening for bootstrap support, blast searches and pruning of sequences in the supermatrix, wrongly assigned paralogous sequences were found in eight partitions and the placement of five taxa (the annelids Owenia, Scoloplos, Sthenelais and Eurythoe and the nemertean Cerebratulus including the robust bootstrap support could be attributed to the presence of paralogous sequences in two partitions. Excluding these sequences resulted in a different, weaker supported placement for these taxa. Moreover, the analyses revealed that paralogous sequences impacted the reconstruction when only a single taxon represented a previously supported higher taxon such as a polychaete family. One possibility of a priori detection of wrongly assigned paralogous sequences could combine 1 a screening of single-partition analyses based on criteria such as nodal support or internal branch length with 2 blast searches of suspicious cases as presented herein. Also possible are a posteriori approaches in which support for specific clades is investigated by comparing alternative hypotheses based on differences in per-site likelihoods. Increasing the sizes of EST libraries will also decrease the likelihood of wrongly assigned paralogous sequences, and in the case

  18. Impact of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (L.) on As, Cu, Pb and Zn mobility and speciation in contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizmur, Tom, E-mail: t.p.sizmur@reading.ac.uk [Soil Research Centre, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6DW (United Kingdom); Palumbo-Roe, Barbara; Watts, Michael J. [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Hodson, Mark E. [Soil Research Centre, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6DW (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    To assess the risks that contaminated soils pose to the environment properly a greater understanding of how soil biota influence the mobility of metal(loid)s in soils is required. Lumbricus terrestris L. were incubated in three soils contaminated with As, Cu, Pb and Zn. The concentration and speciation of metal(loid)s in pore waters and the mobility and partitioning in casts were compared with earthworm-free soil. Generally the concentrations of water extractable metal(loid)s in earthworm casts were greater than in earthworm-free soil. The impact of the earthworms on concentration and speciation in pore waters was soil and metal specific and could be explained either by earthworm induced changes in soil pH or soluble organic carbon. The mobilisation of metal(loid)s in the environment by earthworm activity may allow for leaching or uptake into biota. - Research highlights: > Earthworms increase the mobility and availability of metals and metalloids in soils. > We incubated L. terrestris in three soils contaminated with As, Cu, Pb and Zn. > Earthworms increased the mobility of As, Cu, Pb and Zn in their casts. > The mechanisms for this could be explained by changes in pH or organic carbon. - Lumbricus terrestris change the partitioning of metal(loid)s between soil constituents and increase the mobility of metal(loid)s in casts and pore water.

  19. Novel Crystalline SiO2 Nanoparticles via Annelids Bioprocessing of Agro-Industrial Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Angeles-Chávez C; Martínez-Hernández AL; Velasco-Santos C.; Espíndola-Gonzalez A; Castaño VM

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis of nanoparticles silica oxide from rice husk, sugar cane bagasse and coffee husk, by employing vermicompost with annelids (Eisenia foetida) is reported. The product (humus) is calcinated and extracted to recover the crystalline nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) show that the biotransformation allows creating specific crystalline phase...

  20. Analysis of the immune-related transcriptome of a lophotrochozoan model, the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilcinskas Andreas

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii (Polychaeta, Nereididae has been recognized as a slow-evolving lophotrochozoan that attracts increasing attention as a valuable model for evolutionary and developmental research. Here, we analyzed its immune-related transcriptome. For targeted identification of immune-induced genes we injected bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a commonly used elicitor of innate immune responses, and applied the suppression subtractive hybridization technique that selectively amplifies cDNAs of differentially expressed genes. Results Sequence analysis of 288 cDNAs revealed induced expression of numerous genes whose potential homologues from other animals mediate recognition of infection (e.g. complement receptor CD35, signaling (e.g. myc and SOCS, or act as effector molecules like ferritins and the bactericidal permeability-increasing protein. Interestingly, phylogenetic analyses implicate that immune-related genes identified in P. dumerilii are more related to counterparts from Deuterostomia than are those from Ecdysozoa, similarly as recently described for opsin and intron-rich genes. Conclusion Obtained results may allow for a better understanding of Platynereis immunity and support the view that P. dumerilii represents a suitable model for analyzing immune responses of Lophotrochozoa.

  1. Life history and seasonal breeding of the deep-sea annelid Ophryotrocha sp. (Polychaeta: Dorvelleidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Annie; Baillon, Sandrine; Hamel, Jean-François

    2014-09-01

    Shallow-water annelids of the genus Ophryotrocha have become a popular biological system for exploring ecological, behavioral, developmental, and toxicological questions. Here we report on the successful maintenance in holding tanks, complete life cycle, and reproductive phenology of a first deep-water representative that could be used as a model species. This Ophryotrocha, which has yet to be formally described, is large (12-16 mm long) and exhibits simultaneous hermaphroditism. Specimens collected off northeast Newfoundland (eastern Canada) between 500 and 1500 m depth were monitored under flow-through laboratory conditions for over three years. They consistently exhibited seasonal feeding from April to February, followed by a reproductive season between February and May. Gametogenesis was initiated in early January and completed in early to mid-February, followed by courtship, which mainly involved pairs of individuals attached head to tail for hours to days. Transparent gelatinous masses containing 80-110 eggs were laid from mid-February to late-March. Propagules developed in the mass to the 1-chaetiger stage and, at an ambient temperature of ~1-4 °C, offspring emerged 30-45 days post-laying. Only ~40-45% of the eggs laid developed to the 1-chaetiger stage, with evidence of adelphophagy. After emerging from the gelatinous mass, 1-chaetiger stages remained aggregated and were guarded by adults for a few days before dispersing. All parents died following the dispersal of their offspring. The new generation reached sexual maturity in 8-9 months and was ready to reproduce the following January-February. A few cases of segmenting adult worms were also observed. Three complete generations developed successively to sexual maturity over the course of this study.

  2. Conditional and specific cell ablation in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinoth Babu Veedin-Rajan

    Full Text Available The marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii has become a model system for evo-devo, neurobiology and marine biology. The functional assessment of its cell types, however, has so far been very limited. Here we report on the establishment of a generally applicable, cell type specific ablation technique to overcome this restriction. Using a transgenic strain expressing the bacterial enzyme nitroreductase (ntr under the control of the worm's r-opsin1 locus, we show that the demarcated photoreceptor cells can be specifically ablated by the addition of the prodrug metronidazole (mtz. TUNEL staining indicates that ntr expressing cells undergo apoptotic cell death. As we used a transgenic strain co-expressing ntr with enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp coding sequence, we were able to validate the ablation of photoreceptors not only in fixed tissue, using r-opsin1 riboprobes, but also by monitoring eGFP+ cells in live animals. The specificity of the ablation was demonstrated by the normal presence of the eye pigment cells, as well as of neuronal markers expressed in other cells of the brain, such as phc2, tyrosine hydroxylase and brn1/2/4. Additional analyses of the position of DAPI stained nuclei, the brain's overall neuronal scaffold, as well as the positions and projections of serotonergic neurons further confirmed that mtz treatment did not induce general abnormalities in the worm's brain. As the prodrug is administered by adding it to the water, targeted ablation of specific cell types can be achieved throughout the life of the animal. We show that ablation conditions need to be adjusted to the size of the worms, likely due to differences in the penetration of the prodrug, and establish ablation conditions for worms containing 10 to 55 segments. Our results establish mtz/ntr mediated conditional cell ablation as a powerful functional tool in Platynereis.

  3. Inhibition, recovery and oxime-induced reactivation of muscle esterases following chlorpyrifos exposure in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collange, B. [Universite d' Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, UMR 406 Abeilles et Environnement, Site AGROPARC, F-84914, Avignon Cede 09 (France); Wheelock, C.E. [Division of Physiological Chemistry II, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, SE 171 77, Stockholm (Sweden); Rault, M.; Mazzia, C. [Universite d' Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, UMR 406 Abeilles et Environnement, Site AGROPARC, F-84914, Avignon Cede 09 (France); Capowiez, Y. [INRA, Unite PSH, Site AGROPARC, F-84914 Avignon Cedex 09 (France); Sanchez-Hernandez, J.C., E-mail: juancarlos.sanchez@uclm.e [Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Faculty of Environmental Science, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Carlos III s/n, 45071, Toledo (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    Assessment of wildlife exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides generally involves the measurement of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition, and complementary biomarkers (or related endpoints) are rarely included. Herein, we investigated the time course inhibition and recovery of ChE and carboxylesterase (CE) activities in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris exposed to chlorpyrifos, and the ability of oximes to reactivate the phosphorylated ChE activity. Results indicated that these esterase activities are a suitable multibiomarker scheme for monitoring OP exposure due to their high sensitivity to OP inhibition and slow recovery to full activity levels following pesticide exposure. Moreover, oximes reactivated the inhibited ChE activity of the earthworms exposed to 12 and 48 mg kg{sup -1} chlorpyrifos during the first week following pesticide exposure. This methodology is useful for providing evidence for OP-mediated ChE inhibition in individuals with a short history of OP exposure (<=1 week); resulting a valuable approach for assessing multiple OP exposure episodes in the field. - Esterase inhibition combined with oxime reactivation methods is a suitable approach for monitoring organophosphate contamination

  4. Tissue distribution, isozyme abundance and sensitivity to chlorpyrifos-oxon of carboxylesterases in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C. [Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Faculty of Environmental Science, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Carlos III, 45071 Toledo (Spain)], E-mail: juancarlos.sanchez@uclm.es; Wheelock, Craig E. [Division of Physiological Chemistry II, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, SE 171 77, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-01-15

    A laboratory-based study was conducted to determine the basal carboxylesterase (CbE) activity in different tissues of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris, and its sensitivity to the organophosphate (OP) pesticide chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPx). Carboxylesterase activity was found in the pharynx, crop, gizzard, anterior intestine, wall muscle and reproductive tissues of L. terrestris, and multiple tissue-specific isozymes were observed by native gel electrophoresis. Esterase activity and sensitivity to CPx inhibition varied on a tissue- and substrate-specific basis, suggesting isoforms-specific selectivity to OP-mediated inhibition. Three practical issues are recommended for the use of earthworm CbE activity as a biomarker of pesticide exposure: (i) CbE should be measured using several routine substrates, (ii) it should be determined in selected tissues instead of whole organism homogenate, and (iii) earthworm CbE activity should be used in conjuncture with other common biomarkers (e.g., ChE) within a multibiomarker approach to assess field exposure of OPs, and potentially other agrochemicals. - The measurement of carboxylesterase inhibition in earthworm is a sensitive and complementary biomarker of pesticide exposure.

  5. Interactions of juvenile Lumbricus terrestris with adults and their burrow systems in a two-dimensional microcosm Interações de juvenis de Lumbricus terrestris com adultos e seus sistemas de galerias em um microcosmo bidimensional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Grigoropoulou

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate interactions of Lumbricus terrestris juveniles with adults and with inherited burrow systems. An experiment was set up using a two dimensional Evans' boxes microcosm. Adult L. terrestris were added to 16 boxes (one individual per box and kept in darkness at 17ºC along with eight unoccupied boxes for two months. The adult L. terrestris were removed from eight randomly selected boxes, and L. terrestris juveniles were added (one juvenile per box, composing three treatments with eight replicates: 1, with an adult in an inherited burrow (ABJ; 2, alone in an inherited burrow (BJ; and 3, alone in a previously uninhabited box (J. The proportion of juveniles occupying adult burrows observed was significantly different in treatments ABJ (48% and BJ (75%. The mean mass of juveniles at experimental termination differed significantly among treatments and was greater in treatment J (4.04±0.39 g in comparison to the BJ (3.09±0.93 g and ABJ treatments (2.13±0.64 g. Results suggest a negative influence of both the presence of an adult and its burrow system on juvenile growth. Intraspecific competition partially explained this, but further investigation is required to examine how an inherited environment (i.e. burrow could negatively affect the growth of juveniles.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as interações de juvenis de Lumbricus terrestris com indivíduos adultos e com sistemas de galerias herdados. O experimento foi realizado usando microcosmos bidimensionais de Evans como unidades experimentais. Adultos de L. terrestris foram colocados em 16 unidades experimentais (um indivíduo por unidade e mantidos no escuro a 17ºC juntamente com oito unidades experimentais inabitadas, por dois meses. Os adultos foram removidos de oito unidades selecionadas aleatoriamente e juvenis foram adicionados a todas as unidades experimentais (um indivíduo por unidade, em três tratamentos, com oito repetições: 1, com um

  6. What role do annelid neoblasts play? A comparison of the regeneration patterns in a neoblast-bearing and a neoblast-lacking enchytraeid oligochaete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroko Myohara

    Full Text Available The term 'neoblast' was originally coined for a particular type of cell that had been observed during annelid regeneration, but is now used to describe the pluripotent/totipotent stem cells that are indispensable for planarian regeneration. Despite having the same name, however, planarian and annelid neoblasts are morphologically and functionally distinct, and many annelid species that lack neoblasts can nonetheless substantially regenerate. To further elucidate the functions of the annelid neoblasts, a comparison was made between the regeneration patterns of two enchytraeid oligochaetes, Enchytraeus japonensis and Enchytraeus buchholzi, which possess and lack neoblasts, respectively. In E. japonensis, which can reproduce asexually by fragmentation and subsequent regeneration, neoblasts are present in all segments except for the eight anterior-most segments including the seven head-specific segments, and all body fragments containing neoblasts can regenerate a complete head and a complete tail, irrespective of the region of the body from which they were originally derived. In E. japonensis, therefore, no antero-posterior gradient of regeneration ability exists in the trunk region. However, when amputation was carried out within the head region, where neoblasts are absent, the number of regenerated segments was found to be dependent on the level of amputation along the body axis. In E. buchholzi, which reproduces only sexually and lacks neoblasts in all segments, complete heads were never regenerated and incomplete (hypomeric heads could be regenerated only from the anterior region of the body. Such an antero-posterior gradient of regeneration ability was observed for both the anterior and posterior regeneration in the whole body of E. buchholzi. These results indicate that the presence of neoblasts correlates with the absence of an antero-posterior gradient of regeneration ability along the body axis, and suggest that the annelid neoblasts are

  7. Investment choices in post-embryonic development: quantifying interactions among growth, regeneration, and asexual reproduction in the annelid Pristina leidyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattara, Eduardo E; Bely, Alexandra E

    2013-12-01

    Animals capable of multiple forms of post-embryonic development, such as growth, regeneration, and asexual reproduction, must make choices about which processes to invest in. What strategies guide post-embryonic resource allocation investments? We investigated this question in the annelid Pristina leidyi, which can grow continuously, regenerates well, and reproduces asexually by fission. We found that in this species growth is concentrated in three zones: a subterminal posterior zone (forming new segments), a mid-body zone (forming fission zones), and a previously undescribed subterminal anterior zone at the base of the prostomium (which we suggest continually builds the prostomium through a "conveyor-belt" like process). Body-wide counts of proliferating cells are greater under high food than low food conditions but proliferation patterns themselves are independent of feeding level. Proliferation patterns are strongly affected by amputation, however, with proliferation rapidly shutting-down throughout the body, except at the wound site, following injury. Relative investment to fission and regeneration is highly context-dependent, being sensitive to the position of the cut and the stage of fission. Outcomes range from fission acceleration and regeneration stalling (high fission:regeneration investment) to resorption of fission zones and progression of regeneration (low fission:regeneration investment). Our findings reveal strong interactions between growth, regeneration, and fission and demonstrate a particularly important effect of injury on resource allocation patterns. Patterns of resource investment in P. leidyi show similarities to those described in two other groups that evolved fission independently (naidine annelids and catenulid flatworms), suggesting that similar developmental and physiological contexts may drive convergent evolution of resource allocation strategies.

  8. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel Acetylcholine-binding Protein from the Marine Annelid Capitella teleta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormack, T.; Petrovich,; Mercier, K; DeRose, E; Cuneo, M; Williams, J; Johnson, K; Lamb, P; London, R; Yakel, J

    2010-01-01

    We identified a homologue of the molluscan acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) in the marine polychaete Capitella teleta, from the annelid phylum. The amino acid sequence of C. teleta AChBP (ct-AChBP) is 21-30% identical with those of known molluscan AChBPs. Sequence alignments indicate that ct-AChBP has a shortened Cys loop compared to other Cys loop receptors, and a variation on a conserved Cys loop triad, which is associated with ligand binding in other AChBPs and nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) {alpha} subunits. Within the D loop of ct-AChBP, a conserved aromatic residue (Tyr or Trp) in nAChRs and molluscan AChBPs, which has been implicated directly in ligand binding, is substituted with an isoleucine. Mass spectrometry results indicate that Asn122 and Asn216 of ct-AChBP are glycosylated when expressed using HEK293 cells. Small-angle X-ray scattering data suggest that the overall shape of ct-AChBP in the apo or unliganded state is similar to that of homologues with known pentameric crystal structures. NMR experiments show that acetylcholine, nicotine, and {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind to ct-AChBP with high affinity, with KD values of 28.7 {micro}M, 209 nM, and 110 nM, respectively. Choline bound with a lower affinity (K{sub D} = 163 {micro}M). Our finding of a functional AChBP in a marine annelid demonstrates that AChBPs may exhibit variations in hallmark motifs such as ligand-binding residues and Cys loop length and shows conclusively that this neurotransmitter binding protein is not limited to the phylum Mollusca.

  9. Three new species of Gladiolus (Iridaceae from South Africa, a major range extension for G. rubellus and taxonomic notes for the genus in southern and tropical Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Manning

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of Gladiolus L. are described from South Africa.  G. dolichosiphon is the second known member of series Blandus from the mountains of the Little Karoo in Western Cape, and is distinguished from other members of the long tubed, pink-flowered G. carneus complex by its 5 or 6 linear leaves, creamy pink to salmon flowers with a tube 30-50 mm long and longer than the dorsal tepal, and its late summer flowering. G. karooicus from the Klein Roggeveld and the northern foothills of the Witteberg, is a spring-flowering species allied to G. permeabilis but has bright, canary-yellow flowers with the lower part of the lower tepals involute and conspicuously auriculate.  G. reginae is an edaphic endemic of the Sekhuk- huneland Centre of Floristic Endemism in Mpumalanga, and flowers in autumn. It is evidently a glabrous member of section Densiflorus series Scabridus, distinguished by its long-tubed flowers, streaked with red on the lower tepals and blotched with red in the throat. Anomalously, however, it has the tubular inner bracts and large capsules diagnostic of section Ophiolyza series Oppositiflorus. A re-examination of the morphology suggests that series Scabridus is better placed in section Ophiolyza and a slightly revised classification of Gladiolus in southern Africa is proposed. We also propose the replacement name G. sulculatus for the Tanzanian species, G. sulcatus Goldblatt, a later homonym of G. sulcatus Lam. Finally, a recent sighting of what appears to be G. rubellus from northern Namibia constitutes the first record of this species in the country and a major range extension from its previous known occurrence in southeastern Botswana.

  10. Host quality and spatial patterning in infections of the Eastern mudsnail (Ilyanassa obsoleta) by two trematodes (Himasthla quissetensis and Zoogonus rubellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Wayne; Sukhdeo, Michael V K

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have suggested that the fitness of a parasite can be directly impacted by the quality of its host. In such cases, selective pressures could act to funnel parasites towards the highest-quality hosts in a population. The results of this study demonstrate that snail host quality is strongly correlated with spatial patterning in trematode infections and that habitat type is the underlying driver for both of these variables. Two trematodes (Himasthla quissetensis and Zoogonus rubellus) with very different life cycles assume the same spatial infection pattern in populations of the first intermediate host (Ilyanassa obsoleta) in coastal marsh habitats. Infected snails are disproportionately recovered from intertidal panne habitats, which offer more hospitable environs for snails than do adjacent habitats (intertidal creeks, coastal flats, and subtidal creeks), in terms of protection from turbulence and wave action, as well as the availability of food stuffs. Snails in intertidal panne habitats are of higher quality when assessed in terms of average size-specific mass, growth rate, and fecundity. In mark-recapture experiments, snails frequently dispersed into intertidal pannes but were never observed leaving them. In addition, field experiments demonstrate that snails confined to intertidal panne habitats are disproportionately infected by both trematode species, relative to conspecifics confined to adjacent habitats. Laboratory experiments show that infected snails suffer significant energetic losses and consume more than uninfected conspecifics, suggesting that infected snails in intertidal pannes may survive better than in adjacent habitats. We speculate that 1 possible mechanism for the observed patterns is that the life cycles of both trematode species allows them to contact the highest-quality snails in this marsh ecosystem.

  11. Combining µXANES and µXRD mapping to analyse the heterogeneity in calcium carbonate granules excreted by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinza, Loredana [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Schofield, Paul F. [Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Hodson, Mark E. [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Weller, Sophie [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Ignatyev, Konstantin; Geraki, Kalotina; Quinn, Paul D.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W., E-mail: fred.mosselmans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental set-up enabling microfocus fluorescence XANES mapping and microfocus XRD mapping on the same sample at beamline I18 at Diamond Light Source is described. To demonstrate this set-up the heterogeneous mineralogy in calcium carbonate granules excreted by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris has been analysed. Data analysis methods have been developed which enable µXRD and µXANES two-dimensional maps to be compared. The use of fluorescence full spectral micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (µXANES) mapping is becoming more widespread in the hard energy regime. This experimental method using the Ca K-edge combined with micro-X-ray diffraction (µXRD) mapping of the same sample has been enabled on beamline I18 at Diamond Light Source. This combined approach has been used to probe both long- and short-range order in calcium carbonate granules produced by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. In granules produced by earthworms cultured in a control artificial soil, calcite and vaterite are observed in the granules. However, granules produced by earthworms cultivated in the same artificial soil amended with 500 p.p.m. Mg also contain an aragonite. The two techniques, µXRD and µXANES, probe different sample volumes but there is good agreement in the phase maps produced.

  12. Mitigating N2O emissions from clover residues by 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) without adverse effects on the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Xianwang; Duan, Yun-Feng (Kevin); Schramm, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    In EU-28, temporary grasslands constitute more than 10% of the total arable land. Grassland tillage will return up to 400 kg N ha−1 in residues that can lead to a pulse of N2O emissions. Here a novel application of the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) was evaluated...... in a 28-d mesocosm experiment, where DMPP spraying prior to tillage was simulated. Above-ground parts of 15N-labelled clover residues were treated with DMPP and either placed at 10 cm depth to simulate ploughing (PL), or mixed with soil at 0–10 cm depth to simulate rotovation (RO). Earthworms (Lumbricus...... terrestris) were introduced to study their role in residue decomposition and N2O emissions. Fluxes and isotopic composition of N2O were determined with dynamic chambers using laser spectroscopy. A gradual increase in 15N-enrichment of N2O indicated that denitrification was the main source. DMPP reduced...

  13. Combining µXANES and µXRD mapping to analyse the heterogeneity in calcium carbonate granules excreted by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinza, Loredana; Schofield, Paul F; Hodson, Mark E; Weller, Sophie; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Geraki, Kalotina; Quinn, Paul D; Mosselmans, J Frederick W

    2014-01-01

    The use of fluorescence full spectral micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (µXANES) mapping is becoming more widespread in the hard energy regime. This experimental method using the Ca K-edge combined with micro-X-ray diffraction (µXRD) mapping of the same sample has been enabled on beamline I18 at Diamond Light Source. This combined approach has been used to probe both long- and short-range order in calcium carbonate granules produced by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. In granules produced by earthworms cultured in a control artificial soil, calcite and vaterite are observed in the granules. However, granules produced by earthworms cultivated in the same artificial soil amended with 500 p.p.m. Mg also contain an aragonite. The two techniques, µXRD and µXANES, probe different sample volumes but there is good agreement in the phase maps produced.

  14. Differences in the ability of two marine annelid species, Thalassodrilides sp. and Perinereis nuntia, to detoxify 1-nitronaphthalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Katsutoshi; Ito, Mana; Onduka, Toshimitsu; Ohta, Kohei; Torii, Takaaki; Hano, Takeshi; Mochida, Kazuhiko; Ohkubo, Nobuyuki; Miura, Takeshi; Fujii, Kazunori

    2016-05-01

    Bioremediation is a promising method for remediating environmentally polluted water. We investigated the abilities of two benthic annelid species to biotransform 1-nitronaphthalene, a nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. We used an oligochaete, Thalassodrilides sp. (Naididae), collected from the sediment beneath a fish farm and a polychaete, Perinereis nuntia, which was obtained from a commercial source. Populations of both organisms were exposed to 1400 μg L(-1) of 1-nitronaphthalene in seawater for 3 days in the dark at 20 °C. The concentration of the pollutant decreased to 12 μg L(-1) in the seawater containing the Thalassodrilides sp. and to 560 μg L(-1) in the seawater containing P. nuntia. The 1-nitronaphthalene concentration in the bodies of the animals increased from 12 to 94 μg kg(-1) in Thalassodrilides sp. and from 0.90 μg kg(-1) to 38,000 μg kg(-1) in P. nuntia. After 3 days, 99% and 40% of the 1-nitronaphthalene had been biotransformed in the Thalassodrilides sp. and P. nuntia experimental groups, respectively. We then tested the acute toxicity of residual 1-nitronaphthalene from the same water using mummichog (fish) larvae. After the larvae had been exposed for 96 h, the percentage of apparently unaffected larvae remaining was 83.3% in Thalassodrilides sp. group but only 16.7% in the P. nuntia group. Clearly, of the two species we studied, Thalassodrilides sp. had a superior ability to convert 1-nitronaphthalene into substances that were nontoxic to mummichog larvae. Therefore, we recommend the use of this species for bioremediation of chemically polluted sediments.

  15. The effect of anthropogenic contaminations (PAH, PCB) on terrestrial annelids in conurban ecosystems. Final report; Einfluss von anthropogenen Schadstoffen (PAK und PCB) auf terrestrische Invertebraten urbaner Oekosysteme. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achazi, R.K.; Beylich, A.; Chroszcz, G.; Dueker, C.; Heck, M.; Henneken, M.; Flenner, C.; Froehlich, E.; Garbers, U.; Khan, M.A.; Kreibich, M.; Kronshage, J.; Philippe, L.; Pilz, C.; Rothe, B.; Schabedoth, E.; Schaub, K.; Scheiwe, E.; Schmid, C.; Steudel, I.; Struwe, M.; Throl, C.; Wuertz, S. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Back, H.; Naehring, D.; Thielemann, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Angewandte Oekologie und Umweltplanung mbH, Nussloch (Germany)

    1997-09-23

    The project was conducted from August 1993 until May 1997. The objectives were (a) an elaboration of effect concentrations and index values for organic contaminants (PAH, PCB) and heavy metals in soil of conurbations for the community of decomposers, (b) the improvement of a biotest system for the evaluation of the habitat function of contaminated soils and (c) to obtain informations concerning a controlled utilization of contaminated areas. For that purpose field investigations in former sewage water irrigation areas of Berlin, Germany, concerning the abundance, species composition and dominance structure of terrestrial annelids (Enchytraeids, Lumbricids) were performed, as well as bioassays using contaminated soils of these sites and soils spiked with bezo(a)pyrene, fluoranthene, PCB 52, Cd and Cu and experiments on accumulation, elimination and biotransformation in annelids. 12 of the 17 sites investigated lacked earthworms, while only 2 sites lacked enchytraeids. The abundance of enchytraeids was in the range of 500 to 12.500/m{sup 2}, compared to 25.000 to 280.000/m{sup 2} on reference sites. The hostility of the soils of former irrigation fields to annelids was confirmed by lamina bait tests and by bioassays with Enchytraeus crypticus, E. albidus, E. buchholzi and Eisenia f. fetida. The ecotoxicity of the combined contaminants was enforced by the acidity and the degradation of the soils. The toxicity of organic and inorganic contaminants to terrestrial annelids was definitely proved by reproduction tests in the agar test system. The applied methods of investigation can be used for evaluation of contaminated soils. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Projekt wurde von August 1993 bis Mai 1997 durchgefuehrt. Ziele waren die Erarbeitung (a) von Wirkschwellen fuer organische Schadstoffgruppen (PAK, PCB) und Schwermetalle im Boden fuer Destruenten urbaner Oekosysteme, (b) von Biotestsystemen zur Bewertung der Lebensraumfunktion belasteter Boeden und (c) von Hinweisen zur

  16. Deep transcriptome-sequencing and proteome analysis of the hydrothermal vent annelid Alvinella pompejana identifies the CvP-bias as a robust measure of eukaryotic thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holder Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alvinella pompejana is an annelid worm that inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean. Living at a depth of approximately 2500 meters, these worms experience extreme environmental conditions, including high temperature and pressure as well as high levels of sulfide and heavy metals. A. pompejana is one of the most thermotolerant metazoans, making this animal a subject of great interest for studies of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Results In order to complement existing EST resources we performed deep sequencing of the A. pompejana transcriptome. We identified several thousand novel protein-coding transcripts, nearly doubling the sequence data for this annelid. We then performed an extensive survey of previously established prokaryotic thermoadaptation measures to search for global signals of thermoadaptation in A. pompejana in comparison with mesophilic eukaryotes. In an orthologous set of 457 proteins, we found that the best indicator of thermoadaptation was the difference in frequency of charged versus polar residues (CvP-bias, which was highest in A. pompejana. CvP-bias robustly distinguished prokaryotic thermophiles from prokaryotic mesophiles, as well as the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum from mesophilic eukaryotes. Experimental values for thermophilic proteins supported higher CvP-bias as a measure of thermal stability when compared to their mesophilic orthologs. Proteome-wide mean CvP-bias also correlated with the body temperatures of homeothermic birds and mammals. Conclusions Our work extends the transcriptome resources for A. pompejana and identifies the CvP-bias as a robust and widely applicable measure of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Reviewer This article was reviewed by Sándor Pongor, L. Aravind and Anthony M. Poole.

  17. Soluble calcium-binding proteins (SCBPs) of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris: molecular characterization and localization by FISH in muscle and neuronal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruketheeswaran, Prasath; Kiehl, Ernst; D'Haese, Jochen

    2016-11-01

    Soluble calcium-binding proteins (SCBPs) of invertebrates probably serve like their vertebrate counterpart-the parvalbumins-as soluble relaxing factors in muscles. Three SCBP isoforms (SCBP1-3) have been isolated and biochemically characterized in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Huch et al. in J Comp Physiol B 158:325-334, 1988). For SCBP2, we found two isoforms named SCBP2a/2b. Both of them together with SCBP3 are present in the body wall muscle. In the gizzard solely, SCBP2b and no SCBP2a or SCBP3 could be detected. The coding sequences of all three isoforms consist of 534 bp for 178 amino acids and contain four EF-hand motifs, of which the second EF-hands are truncated. Recombinant proteins show heat stability and a Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift similar to the native proteins, indicating comparable calcium-binding properties. All three isoforms are encoded by three distinct and differentially expressed genes. The genes for SCBP2a, SCBP2b, and SCBP3 are interrupted by only one intron, inserting at nearly the same positions. Northern blot analysis revealed two mRNA transcripts for SCBP2 of approximately 1250 and 1500 kb and one transcript for SCBP3 of approximately 1250 kb. SCBP mRNA was localized by fluorescent in situ hybridization in the body wall and the gizzard. The distribution of the staining intensities resembles that for the myosin ATPase activity and indicates a correlation between the amount of SCBP and speed of muscle contraction. In addition, SCBP mRNA was localized within the nervous tissue, the cerebral and subesophageal ganglia and the ventral nerve cord.

  18. Expression of the pair-rule gene homologs runt, Pax3/7, even-skipped-1 and even-skipped-2 during larval and juvenile development of the polychaete annelid Capitella teleta does not support a role in segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seaver Elaine C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annelids and arthropods each possess a segmented body. Whether this similarity represents an evolutionary convergence or inheritance from a common segmented ancestor is the subject of ongoing investigation. Methods To investigate whether annelids and arthropods share molecular components that control segmentation, we isolated orthologs of the Drosophila melanogaster pair-rule genes, runt, paired (Pax3/7 and eve, from the polychaete annelid Capitella teleta and used whole mount in situ hybridization to characterize their expression patterns. Results When segments first appear, expression of the single C. teleta runt ortholog is only detected in the brain. Later, Ct-runt is expressed in the ventral nerve cord, foregut and hindgut. Analysis of Pax genes in the C. teleta genome reveals the presence of a single Pax3/7 ortholog. Ct-Pax3/7 is initially detected in the mid-body prior to segmentation, but is restricted to two longitudinal bands in the ventral ectoderm. Each of the two C. teleta eve orthologs has a unique and complex expression pattern, although there is partial overlap in several tissues. Prior to and during segment formation, Ct-eve1 and Ct-eve2 are both expressed in the bilaterial pair of mesoteloblasts, while Ct-eve1 is expressed in the descendant mesodermal band cells. At later stages, Ct-eve2 is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system, and in mesoderm along the dorsal midline. In late stage larvae and adults, Ct-eve1 and Ct-eve2 are expressed in the posterior growth zone. Conclusions C. teleta eve, Pax3/7 and runt homologs all have distinct expression patterns and share expression domains with homologs from other bilaterians. None of the pair-rule orthologs examined in C. teleta exhibit segmental or pair-rule stripes of expression in the ectoderm or mesoderm, consistent with an independent origin of segmentation between annelids and arthropods.

  19. Spatial and temporal distribution of 13C labelled plant residues in soil aggregates and Lumbricus terrestris surface casts: A combination of Transmission Electron Microscopy and Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Alix; Remusat, Laurent; Watteau, Françoise; Derenne, Sylvie; Quenea, Katell

    2016-04-01

    Earthworms play a central role in litter decomposition, soil structuration and carbon cycling. They ingest both organic and mineral compounds which are mixed, complexed with mucus and dejected in form of casts at the soil surface and along burrows. Bulk isotopic or biochemical technics have often been used to study the incorporation of litter in soil and casts, but they could not reflect the complex interaction between soil, plant and microorganisms at the microscale. However, the heterogeneous distribution of organic carbon in soil structures induces contrasted microbial activity areas. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), which is a high spatial resolution method providing elemental and isotopic maps of organic and mineral materials, has recently been applied in soil science (Herrmann et al., 2007; Vogel et al., 2014). The combination of Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has proven its potential to investigate labelled residues incorporation in earthworm casts (Vidal et al., 2016). In line of this work, we studied the spatial and temporal distribution of plant residues in soil aggregates and earthworm surface casts. This study aimed to (1) identify the decomposition states of labelled plant residues incorporated at different time steps, in casts and soil, (2) identify the microorganisms implied in this decomposition (3) relate the organic matter states of decomposition with their 13C signature. A one year mesocosm experiment was set up to follow the incorporation of 13C labelled Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) litter in a soil in the presence of anecic earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris). Soil and surface cast samples were collected after 8 and 54 weeks, embedded in epoxy resin and cut into ultra-thin sections. Soil was fractionated and all and analyzed with TEM and NanoSIMS, obtaining secondary ion images of 12C, 16O, 12C14N, 13C14N and 28Si. The δ13C maps were obtained using the 13C14

  20. The effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals on terrestrial annelids in urban soils O efeito de hidrocarbonetos aromáticos policíclicos e metais pesados em anelídeos terrestres de solos urbanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pižl Václav

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of soil contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH and heavy metals on earthworms and enchytraeids was studied in urban parks, in Brno, Czech Republic. In spring and autumn 2007, annelids were collected and soil samples taken in lawns along transects, at three different distances (1, 5 and 30 m from streets with heavy traffic. In both seasons, two parks with two transects each were sampled. Earthworms were collected using the electrical octet method. Enchytraeids were extracted by the wet funnel method from soil cores. All collected annelids were counted and identified. Basic chemical parameters and concentrations of 16 PAH, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were analysed from soil from each sampling point. PAH concentrations were rather low, decreasing with the distance from the street in spring but not in autumn. Heavy metal concentrations did not decrease significantly with increasing distance. Annelid densities did not significantly differ between distances, although there was a trend of increase in the number of earthworms with increasing distance. There were no significant correlations between soil content of PAH or heavy metals and earthworm or enchytraeid densities. Earthworm density and biomass were negatively correlated with soil pH; and enchytraeid density was positively correlated with soil phosphorus.O efeito da contaminação do solo por hidrocarbonetos aromáticos policíclicos (PAH e metais pesados em minhocas e enquitreídeos foi estudado em parques urbanos, em Brno, República Tcheca. Na primavera e outono de 2007, os anelídeos foram coletados, e amostras de solo foram retiradas de gramados ao longo de transectos, em três diferentes distâncias (1, 5 e 30 m de ruas com muito tráfego. Nas duas estações, foram amostrados dois parques com dois transectos cada um. As minhocas com uso do método do octeto elétrico, e os enquitreídeos foram extraídos das amostras de solo pelo método do funil úmido. Todos os anel

  1. UJI PENAMBAHAN BERBAGAI DOSIS VERMIKOMPOS TERHADAP PERTUMBUHAN VEGETATIF CABAI MERAH BESAR Capsicum annuum L.

    OpenAIRE

    Zohra Hasyim; Elis Tambaru; Andi Ilham Latunra

    2015-01-01

    This research entitled " Effect of Vermicompost on growth of Capsicum annuum Chilli Red Big L. " . Is aimed to determine the effect of vermicompost on the growth of vegetative big red chili . Planting medium used is consisted of soil and vermicompost . Vermicompost derived from the cultivation of earthworms Lumbricus rubellus . Large red chilli seeds purchased from the farm shop . Large red chilli seeds germinated in vermicompost mixed soil and covered with clear plastic . This study is an ex...

  2. Research on polychaete annelid osmoregulatory peptide(s) by immunocytochemical and physiological approaches. Computer reconstruction of the brain and evidence for a role of angiotensin-like molecules in Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor OF Müller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewou, J; Dhainaut-Courtois, N

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and physiological studies were carried out on Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor OF Müller in order to obtain evidence concerning the neuroendocrine control of polychaete osmoregulation. The occurrence in this animal of peptides immunologically related to mammalian angiotensin II and I (AII and AI) and oxytocin (OT) was demonstrated in the brain and the ventral nerve cord (VNC) perikarya and nerve fibres as well as in a few peripheral structures (peripheral nerves, epithelial cells, nuchal organ, intestine and nephridia). The exact localization of immunoreactive cells was achieved by serial sections of brain and ventral nerve cord followed by a three-dimensional reconstruction of brain ganglionic nuclei using the CATIA ('Conception Assistée Tridimensionnelle Inter Active') Dassault system program. Injections of polyclonal antisera against AII or OT provoked a partial inhibition of the increase in body weight in Nereis exposed to hypo-osmotic medium. The effect of a-AII seemed more pronounced than that of a-OT. In a subsequent test, injections of synthetic AII and AII-amide (peptide recently isolated from an achaete (Salzet et al (1995) J Biol Chem 270, 1575-1582) enhanced the increase in body weight and, therefore, strengthened the hypothesis of the neuroendocrine control of Nereis osmoregulation. The antidiuretic effect of both synthetic peptides in this study was indicative of the exact role of Nereis endogenous molecule(s). AII was less potent than its amidated form. If AI-like can easily be struck off the list of putative endogenous osmoregulatory factors, the role of OT-like substance in Nereis osmoregulation, which is partially demonstrated in this study, needs to be clarified by further physiological experiments using injection of synthetic peptide(s) or endogenous substance(s). All these results are discussed and compared to those recently obtained in an achaete annelid (Salzet et al (1993) Brain Res 631, 247-255; Salzet et al (1993) Brain

  3. Changes in hardwood forest understory plant communities in response to European earthworm invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Cindy M; Frelich, Lee E; Reich, Peter B

    2006-07-01

    European earthworms are colonizing earthworm-free northern hardwood forests across North America. Leading edges of earthworm invasion provide an opportunity to investigate the response of understory plant communities to earthworm invasion and whether the species composition of the earthworm community influences that response. Four sugar maple-dominated forest sites with active earthworm invasions were identified in the Chippewa National Forest in north central Minnesota, USA. In each site, we established a 30 x 150 m sample grid that spanned a visible leading edge of earthworm invasion and sampled earthworm populations and understory vegetation over four years. Across leading edges of earthworm invasion, increasing total earthworm biomass was associated with decreasing diversity and abundance of herbaceous plants in two of four study sites, and the abundance and density of tree seedlings decreased in three of four study sites. Sample points with the most diverse earthworm species assemblage, independent of biomass, had the lowest plant diversity. Changes in understory plant community composition were most affected by increasing biomass of the earthworm species Lumbricus rubellus. Where L. rubellus was absent there was a diverse community of native herbaceous plants, but where L. rubellus biomass reached its maximum, the herbaceous-plant community was dominated by Carex pensylvanica and Arisaema triphyllum and, in some cases, was completely absent. Evidence from these forest sites suggests that earthworm invasion can lead to dramatic changes in the understory community and that the nature of these changes is influenced by the species composition of the invading earthworm community.

  4. Mitochondrial Genomics and Northwestern Atlantic Population Genetics of Marine Annelids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Glycine _A H-istidine Isoleucine A U-A AU-C U-CU AU U: AA U-A A-A AAA -U -UC- AA AU CI C A U 6 AU U-V5IUU G CAAAAUU ol ~ C IA!Y AUla AU Aji~ ý LAI...and their virtual disappearance further south. In addition, both parsimony networks have substructures of haplotypes found only in Long Island and New

  5. Circadian and Circalunar Clock Interactions in a Marine Annelid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Zantke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Life is controlled by multiple rhythms. Although the interaction of the daily (circadian clock with environmental stimuli, such as light, is well documented, its relationship to endogenous clocks with other periods is little understood. We establish that the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii possesses endogenous circadian and circalunar (monthly clocks and characterize their interactions. The RNAs of likely core circadian oscillator genes localize to a distinct nucleus of the worm’s forebrain. The worm’s forebrain also harbors a circalunar clock entrained by nocturnal light. This monthly clock regulates maturation and persists even when circadian clock oscillations are disrupted by the inhibition of casein kinase 1δ/ε. Both circadian and circalunar clocks converge on the regulation of transcript levels. Furthermore, the circalunar clock changes the period and power of circadian behavior, although the period length of the daily transcriptional oscillations remains unaltered. We conclude that a second endogenous noncircadian clock can influence circadian clock function.

  6. The mitochondrial genome of the sipunculid Phascolopsis gouldii supports its association with Annelida rather than Mollusca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Staton, Joseph

    2001-09-01

    We have determined the sequence of about half (7470 nts) of the mitochondrial genome of the sipunculid Phascolopsis gouldii, the first representative of this phylum to be so studied. All of the 19 identified genes are transcribed from the same DNA strand. The arrangement of these genes is remarkably similar to that of the oligochaete annelid Lumbricus terrestris. Comparison of both the inferred amino acid sequences and the gene arrangements of a variety of diverse metazoan taxa reveals that the phylum Sipuncula is more closely related to Annelida than to Mollusca. This requires reinterpretation of the homology of several embryological features and of patterns of animal body plan evolution.

  7. Anti-elastase, anti-tyrosinase and matrix metalloproteinase-1 inhibitory activity of earthworm extracts as potential new anti-aging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurhazirah Azmi; Puziah Hashim; Dzulkifly M Hashim; Normala Halimoon; Nik Muhamad Nik Majid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether earthworms of Eisenia fetida, Lumbricus rubellus and Eudrilus eugeniae extracts have elastase, tyrosinase and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) inhibitory activity.Methods:activity and compared with the positive controls. It was also evaluated for whitening and anti-wrinkle capacity.Results:The earthworms extract was screened for elastase, tyrosinase and MMP-1 inhibitory and excellent MMP-1 inhibition compared to N-Isobutyl-N-(4-methoxyphenylsulfonyl)-glycylhydroxamic acid.Conclusions:Earthworms extract showed effective inhibition of tyrosinase, elastase and MMP-1 The extract showed significantly (P<0.05) good elastase and tyrosinase inhibition activities. Therefore, this experiment further rationalizes the traditional use of this worm extracts which may be useful as an anti-wrinkle agent.

  8. Caracterização de ácidos húmicos de vermicomposto de esterco bovino compostado durante 3 e 6 meses Caracterization of humic acids from vermicompost of cattle manure composting by 3 and 6 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Diva Landgraf

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was the characterization of the humic fractions isolated from vermicomposting, originating from cattle manure and treated with Eisenea foetida or Lumbricus rubellus, during 3 and 6 months. Elemental analysis and Infrared and UV-vis spectroscopy were used for their characterizations. The results obtained shown that both humic acids are very similar, but six-month humic acid shown lower percentage of organic material than three month humic acid. The spectroscopy analysis shown that the humic acid studied can be compared with other humic acids reported in the literature. By comparing both vermicomposts, the one produced in three months presents a great potential as fertilizer and it is more economical than the vermicompost produced during a six month period.

  9. Stable earthworm serine proteases: application of the protease function and usefulness of the earthworm autolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, N; Sugimoto, M; Ishihara, K

    2000-01-01

    The fibrinolytic enzymes from Lumbricus rubellus [Nakajima, N. et al., Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 57, 1726-1730 (1993), 60, 293-300 (1996), and 63, 2031-2033 (1999)] were further characterized to exploit their catalytic functions. These enzymes are stable in solution for long periods at room temperature and strongly resistant to organic solvents, even toluene and n-hexane. The serine proteases can act on various protein substrates such as elastin and hemoglobin as well as fibrin, and also catalyzed the hydrolysis of esters such as ethyl acetate and a bioplastic, poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] film. The enzymes, in the absence of microbial degradation, contributed to the production of the earthworm autolysate possessing antioxidant ability and protease activity, whose components were similar to those of soy sauce. The extract of the earthworm autolysate could be used as a peptone substitute in media for the cultivation of microorganisms.

  10. Do alterations in mesofauna community affect earthworms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarov, Alexei V; Karaban, Kamil

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between the saprotrophic animal groups that strongly control soil microbial activities and the functioning of detrital food webs, such as earthworms and mesofauna, are not well understood. Earthworm trophic and engineering activities strongly affect mesofauna abundance and diversity through various direct and indirect pathways. In contrast, mesofauna effects on earthworm populations are less evident; however, their importance may be high, considering the keystone significance of earthworms for the functioning of the soil system. We studied effects of a diverse mesofauna community of a deciduous forest on two earthworm species representing epigeic (Lumbricus rubellus) and endogeic (Aporrectodea caliginosa) ecological groups. In microcosms, the density of total mesofauna or its separate groups (enchytraeids, collembolans, gamasid mites) was manipulated (increased) and responses of earthworms and soil systems were recorded. A rise in mesofauna density resulted in a decrease of biomass and an increased mortality in L. rubellus, presumably due to competition with mesofauna for litter resources. In contrast, similar mesofauna manipulations promoted reproduction of A. caliginosa, suggesting a facilitated exploitation of litter resources due to increased mesofauna activities. Changes of microcosm respiration rates, litter organic matter content and microbial activities across the manipulation treatments indicate that mesofauna modify responses of soil systems in the presence of earthworms. However, similar mesofauna manipulations could induce different responses in soil systems with either epigeic or endogeic lumbricids, which suggests that earthworm/mesofauna interactions are species-specific. Thus, mesofauna impacts should be treated as a factor affecting the engineering activities of epigeic and endogeic earthworms in the soil.

  11. Trade-offs between nitrous oxide emission and C-sequestration in the soil: the role of earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenigen, J.; Lubbers, I. M.; Giannopoulos, G.

    2008-12-01

    The rapidly rising concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has spurred the interest in soils as a potential carbon (C) sink. However, there are many reports indicating that C- sequestration is often negated by elevated emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). It is not yet clear what the driving factors behind this trade-off are, nor how it can be avoided. We suggest that earthworm activity may be partly responsible for the trade-off. Earthworm activity is increasingly recognized as being beneficial to C-sequestration through stabilization of SOM. We report experimental results suggesting that they can also lead to strongly elevated N2O-emissions. In a first experiment, dried grass residue (Lolium perenne) was applied at the top of a loamy soil or mixed through the soil, and N2O-emission was followed for three months. Treatments included presence of the epigeic earthworm Lumbricus rubellus and the anecic earthworm Aporrectodea longa. Cumulative N2O-emissions increased significantly for both species. The strongest effect was measured for L. rubellus, where N2O-emissions significantly increased from 55.7 to 789.1 micro g N2O-N kg- 1 soil. This effect was only observed when residue was applied on top of the soil. In a second experiment we determined the effect of epigeic (L. rubellus) and endogeic (Aporrectodea caliginosa) earthworms on N2O-emissions for two different soil types (loam and sand) in the presence of 15N-labeled radish residue (Raphanus sativus subsp. oleiferus). Both species showed significant increases in N2O-emissions, which differed with residue application method and soil type. N2O- emissions were generally larger in loamy soils and the strongest effect was measured for A. caliginosa when residue was mixed into the soil, increasing emissions from 1350.1 to 2223.2 micro g N2O-N kg- 1 soil. L. rubellus only resulted in elevated N2O-emissions when residue was applied on top. These studies make it

  12. First record of the polychaetous annelid Diopatra micrura Pires et al., 2010 in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ARIAS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Until now the only recognised species of the onuphid genus Diopatra in the Mediterranean Sea was D. neapolitana. This paper reports the presence of another species, D. micrura, in the western Mediterranean, occurring in shallow waters along the coasts of southeastern Spain. 

  13. Can seamounts provide a good habitat for polychaete annelids? Example of the northeastern Atlantic seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surugiu, Victor; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Gillet, Patrick; Ruellet, Thierry

    2008-11-01

    Two seamount groups in the northeastern Atlantic were investigated during the 1980s and 1990s: the first was located along the Iberian and African coasts (Galicia, to the north of Portugal; and the Ampere, Gorringe, Josephine and Seine banks near the Madeira-Canary Islands) and the second was located offshore of the southern part of the Azores Islands, included the Atlantis, Hyeres, Irving, Meteor and Plato banks. Among the invertebrates, Annelida, specifically Polychaeta, were studied as surrogates for the biogeographical relationship between coastal and mid-oceanic seamounts in the northeastern Atlantic and the fauna in these areas. The dominant families were Onuphidae (27.46%), Syllidae (18.23%), Eunicidae (15.65%), Amphinomidae (11.45%) and Nereididae (5.61%), representing 78.4% of the total fauna. Data analyses clearly distinguished two seamount groups, one for coastal seamounts and the other offshore. Although the species distinguished and the family composition at the sampled sites were different (i.e., most diversified at the Josephine site and most impoverished at the Irving site), no coastal/offshore faunal impoverishment gradient could be identified. Thus, it seems that seamount environments do not favour any relationship between planktotrophic development and the direct development of polychaetes. Though the number of apparent endemic species was low (<7%), it remained in keeping with other invertebrate groups. Still, while seamounts may well encourage oceanic biodiversity in some zoological groups, this was clearly not the case for the polychaetes. We offer two explanations for this paradox: pelagic productivity and local environmental conditions.

  14. Stem cells in asexual reproduction of Enchytraeus japonensis (Oligochaeta, Annelid): proliferation and migration of neoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugio, Mutsumi; Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Ozawa, Kaname; Tochinai, Shin

    2012-05-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a small oligochaete that reproduces mainly asexually by fragmentation (autotomy) and regeneration. As sexual reproduction can also be induced, it is a good animal model for the study of both somatic and germline stem cells. To clarify the features of stem cells in regeneration, we investigated the proliferation and lineage of stem cells in E. japonensis. Neoblasts, which have the morphological characteristics of undifferentiated cells, were found to firmly adhere to the posterior surface of septa in each trunk segment. Also, smaller neoblast-like cells, which are designated as N-cells in this study, were located dorsal to the neoblasts on the septa. By conducting 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling-experiments, we have shown that neoblasts are slow-cycling (or quiescent) in intact growing worms, but proliferate rapidly in response to fragmentation. N-cells proliferate more actively than do neoblasts in intact worms. The results of pulse-chase experiments indicated that neoblast and N-cell lineage mesodermal cells that incorporated BrdU early in regeneration migrated toward the autotomized site to form the mesodermal region of the blastema, while the epidermal and intestinal cells also contributed to the blastema locally near the autotomized site. We have also shown that neoblasts have stem cell characteristics by expressing Ej-vlg2 and by the activity of telomerase during regeneration. Telomerase activity was high in the early stage of regeneration and correlated with the proliferation activity in the neoblast lineage of mesodermal stem cells. Taken together, our results indicate that neoblasts are mesodermal stem cells involved in the regeneration of E. japonensis.

  15. Fossilized spermatozoa preserved in a 50-Myr-old annelid cocoon from Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfleur, Benjamin; Mörs, Thomas; Ferraguti, Marco; Reguero, Marcelo A.; McLoughlin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The origin and evolution of clitellate annelids—earthworms, leeches and their relatives—is poorly understood, partly because body fossils of these delicate organisms are exceedingly rare. The distinctive egg cases (cocoons) of Clitellata, however, are relatively common in the fossil record, although their potential for phylogenetic studies has remained largely unexplored. Here, we report the remarkable discovery of fossilized spermatozoa preserved within the secreted wall layers of a 50-Myr-old clitellate cocoon from Antarctica, representing the oldest fossil animal sperm yet known. Sperm characters are highly informative for the classification of extant Annelida. The Antarctic fossil spermatozoa have several features that point to affinities with the peculiar, leech-like ‘crayfish worms' (Branchiobdellida). We anticipate that systematic surveys of cocoon fossils coupled with advances in non-destructive analytical methods may open a new window into the evolution of minute, soft-bodied life forms that are otherwise only rarely observed in the fossil record. PMID:26179804

  16. Transplants in annelids, nemerteans and planarians: a tool for embryology, immunology, endocrinology and regeneration research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EE Zattara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available While transplantation procedures are often associated with biomedical applications, they are also an invaluable tool for basic research. This review focuses on how transplantation techniques have been used to understand the biology of three large lophotrochozoan phyla: Annelida, Nemertea and Platyhelmintha. I describe how transplantation paradigms have uncovered fundamental principles regarding the embryology, immunology, endocrinology and regeneration biology of representative species within these three groups. In particular, embryologists have used blastomere transplantations to show that both mosaic and regulative development occurs in animals within the phyla. Immunologists have used transplantation techniques to demonstrate that these invertebrates mount a variety of innate immune responses, some of which include surprising features that classically characterize adaptive immunity. Endocrinologists have used transplantation experiments to uncover hormonal requirements for sexual development and maturation. Meanwhile, regeneration biologists continue to address fundamental questions regarding tissue polarity, post-embryonic patterning, stem cell physiology, and the role of the nervous system in regeneration. Along with recent technical and conceptual advances, transplantation remains a powerful tool for invertebrate research.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the polychaete annelidPlatynereis dumerilii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-08-15

    Complete mitochondrial genome sequences are now available for 126 metazoans (see Boore 1999; Mitochondrial Genomics link at http://www.jgi.doe.gov), but the taxonomic representation is highly biased. For example, 80 are from a single phylum, Chordata, and show little variation for many molecular features. Arthropoda is represented by 16 taxa, Mollusca by eight, and Echinodermata by five, with only 17 others from the remaining {approx}30 metazoan phyla. With few exceptions (see Wolstenholme 1992 and Boore 1999) these are circular DNA molecules, about 16 kb in size, and encode the same set of 37 genes. A variety of non-standard names are sometimes used for animal mitochondrial genes; see Boore (1999) for gene nomenclature and a table of synonyms. Mitochondrial genome comparisons serve as a model of genome evolution. In this system, much smaller and simpler than that of the nucleus, are all of the same factors of genome evolution, where one may find tractable the changes in tRNA structure, base composition, genetic code, gene arrangement, etc. Further, patterns of mitochondrial gene rearrangements are an exceptionally reliable indicator of phylogenetic relationships (Smith et al.1993; Boore et al. 1995; Boore, Lavrov, and Brown 1998; Boore and Brown 1998, 2000; Dowton 1999; Stechmann and Schlegel 1999; Kurabayashi and Ueshima 2000). To these ends, we are sampling further the variation among major animal groups in features of their mitochondrial genomes.

  18. Aggregate formation and soil carbon sequestration by earthworms at the ORNL FACE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-de Leon, Y.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.; Lugo-Perez, J.; Wise, D. H.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Earthworms have an important role in soil carbon sequestration, but their contribution to carbon sequestration in soils exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations has been largely overlooked. Previous studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Free Air CO2 Experiment (ORNL FACE) site showed that the formation of soil aggregates is a key mechanism for soil carbon sequestration. We did a microcosm experiment to quantify earthworm-mediated aggregate formation and compare between two earthworm species with different feeding habits (endogeic vs. epi-edogeic). In addition, we wanted to identify the carbon source (soil, leaf litter or root litter) within aggregates formed by earthworms. We used 13C-depleted soil and 15N-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) leaf and root litter collected from the ORNL FACE site to assess soil aggregate formation of the native, endogeic earthworm Diplocardia sp. and European, epi-endogeic earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. Both earthworm species are present at the ORNL FACE site. We crushed, sieved (treatments: (I) soil only; (II) soil and plant material; (III) soil, plant material and Diplocardia sp.; (IV) soil, plant material and L. rubellus. All treatments were at 30% water content and temperature was maintained at 20°C. The incubation period lasted 26 days. We measured aggregate size distribution, total aggregate carbon content and 13C and 15N to elucidate aggregate carbon source. Newly formed soil macroaggregates (> 250 μm) were higher in treatments with earthworms (III and IV) than in treatments without earthworms (I and II) (p = 0.02). Within macroaggregates, most of the carbon was soil-derived. Leaf and root-derived carbon was found in treatment IV only. Our results suggest that earthworms at the ORNL FACE site directly contribute to the formation of soil aggregates, thus contributing to soil carbon sequestration. Carbon source within macroaggregates correspond with earthworm feeding habits, with endogeic earthworms

  19. Monitoring of the process of composting of kitchen waste in an institutional scale worm farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiana, R; Nair, J; Anda, M; Mathew, K

    2005-01-01

    Vermicomposting provides an alternative method of managing waste that is ecofriendly and cost-effective. The Environmental Technology Centre (ETC) at Murdoch University and St. John of God Hospital (SJOG) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to install a vermiculture system in SJOG to treat some of the organic waste generated by the on site kitchen facility. This is an effort made by SJOG to reduce the amount of organic waste sent to landfill each year and to treat the waste on site as part of a recycling/reuse program. The study is aimed at scientifically monitoring vermicomposting process and to understand the optimum management requirements to improve the operation of an institutional scale worm farm. In addition, an experiment was conducted to investigate the suitability of bedding materials: horse manure, cow manure, peat coir, and natural bedding (vermicast). The species of earthworms used in this experiment were Red (Lumbricus rubellus), Tiger (Eisenia fetida), and Blue (Lumbricus excavatus). The pH, temperature, worm population and quality of castings were tested in different beds. Results indicated that vermicast was the best bedding for vermicomposting, and there were no significant difference between the performances of the other three beds. However, it can be concluded that the bedding material of horse manure, cow manure, and peat coir were successfully established well within the experimental period of eight weeks, and cow manure with the lowest C:N ratio produced the best quality bedding. As using vermicast for the initial bedding creates a very high capital cost these organic substrates provide cost-effective alternative. Therefore they would be quite appropriate to initiate an institutional scale worm farm.

  20. Effect of temperature and season on reproduction, neutral red retention and metallothionein responses of earthworms exposed to metals in field soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, Claus [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Monks Wood, Abbots Ripton, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 2LS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: csv@ceh.ac.uk; Hankard, Peter K. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Monks Wood, Abbots Ripton, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 2LS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: pkh@ceh.ac.uk; Lister, Lindsay J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Monks Wood, Abbots Ripton, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 2LS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: llist@ceh.ac.uk; Fishwick, Samantha K. [Environment Agency, Block 1 Government Buildings, Burghill Road, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol BS10 6BF (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: samantha.fishwick@environment-agency.gov.uk; Jonker, Martijs J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Monks Wood, Abbots Ripton, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 2LS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mjonker@science.uva.nl; Spurgeon, David J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Monks Wood, Abbots Ripton, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 2LS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: dasp@ceh.ac.uk

    2007-05-15

    This study investigated the short-term survival, reproduction and physiological (lysosomal membrane stability, metallothionein transcript copy number, body tissue metal concentrations) responses of Lumbricus rubellus exposed to metal contaminated field soils under different laboratory temperatures (10, 15 and 20 {sup o}C) and physiological responses of earthworms collected from the field in three different seasons (spring, autumn, winter). In the laboratory, metal contaminated soils had significant effects on reproduction (p < 0.001), metallothionein-2 (MT-2) expression (p = 0.033) and earthworm As (p = 0.003), Cd (p = 0.001), Pb (p < 0.001) and Zn (p < 0.001) concentration, but not lysosomal membrane stability and tissue Hg and Cu. No effect of temperature was found for any parameter. Principal component analysis of extractable and tissue metal concentrations indicated PC1 as a measure of metal stress. Both cocoon production (r = - 0.75) and MT-2 induction (r = 0.41) were correlated with PC1. A correlation was also found between cocoon production and MT-2 expression (r = - 0.41). Neutral red retention and MT-2 measurements in worms collected from the field sites in three seasons confirmed the absence of a temperature effect on these responses. - Laboratory and field studies demonstrate metal effects on earthworm life-cycle and biochemical responses are not influenced by temperature regime.

  1. Lead and stable lead isotope ratios in soil, earthworms, and bones of American woodcock (Scolopax minor) from eastern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuhammer, Anton M; Bond, Della E; Burgess, Neil M; Rodrigue, Jean

    2003-11-01

    A study to discriminate among different possible sources of elevated Pb exposure for American woodcock (Scolopax minor) in eastern Canada is described. Undamaged wing bones excised from young-of-the-year woodcock collected from several locations in southern Ontario, southern Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, Canada, along with soil and earthworm (Aporrectodea tuberculata and Lumbricus rubellus) samples from the same sites, were analyzed for total Pb, and stable Pb isotopes. Ignoring six soil samples with high (> 60 microg/g) Pb concentration from the vicinity of Montreal (QC, Canada), the mean soil-Pb concentration for all sites combined was 19 microg/g (dry wt; n = 64), with a mean 206Pb:207Pb ratio of 1.19, values typical for uncontaminated rural soils in eastern North America. In earthworms, Pb concentrations ranged from 2.4 to 865 (microg/g [dry wt], mean = 24 microg/g). Concentrations of Pb in worms and soils were positively correlated (r = 0.71; p 20 microg/g) had 206Pb:207Pb ratios substantially different from worms and soils sampled from the same areas, even though woodcock feed extensively on soil invertebrates, especially earthworms. The range of 206Pb:207Pb ratios in wing bones of woodcock with elevated Pb exposure was not consistent with exposure to environmental Pb from past gasoline combustion nor Precambrian mining wastes but was consistent with ingestion of spent Pb shotgun pellets.

  2. Molecular genetic differentiation in earthworms inhabiting a heterogeneous Pb-polluted landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, J., E-mail: Andrej@cardiff.ac.u [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, BIOSI 1, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); Department of Soil Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6DW (United Kingdom); King, R.A. [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, BIOSI 1, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); Stuerzenbaum, S.R. [King' s College London, School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Pharmaceutical Sciences Division, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom); Kille, P. [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, BIOSI 1, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); Hodson, M.E. [Department of Soil Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6DW (United Kingdom); Morgan, A.J. [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, BIOSI 1, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3TL (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    A Pb-mine site situated on acidic soil, but comprising of Ca-enriched islands around derelict buildings was used to study the spatial pattern of genetic diversity in Lumbricus rubellus. Two distinct genetic lineages ('A' and 'B'), differentiated at both the mitochondrial (mtDNA COII) and nuclear level (AFLPs) were revealed with a mean inter-lineage mtDNA sequence divergence of approximately 13%, indicative of a cryptic species complex. AFLP analysis indicates that lineage A individuals within one central 'ecological island' site are uniquely clustered, with little genetic overlap with lineage A individuals at the two peripheral sites. FTIR microspectroscopy of Pb-sequestering chloragocytes revealed different phosphate profiles in residents of adjacent acidic and calcareous islands. Bioinformatics found over-representation of Ca pathway genes in EST{sub Pb} libraries. Subsequent sequencing of a Ca-transport gene, SERCA, revealed mutations in the protein's cytosolic domain. We recommend the mandatory genotyping of all individuals prior to field-based ecotoxicological assays, particularly those using discriminating genomic technologies. - Landscapes punctuated by Pb-polluted islands have engendered local genetic differentiation in resident earthworms.

  3. Communities of microorganisms and invertebrates in soil-like bodies of soccer fields in Moscow oblast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutovaya, O. V.; Zamotaev, I. V.; Belobrov, V. P.

    2014-11-01

    Artificially created soil-like technogenic formations (STFs) of soccer fields are developed under combined action of intense technogenic and natural factors and processes, which cannot but affect the structure and biological activity of their microbial communities and mesofauna. The microflora of the STFs is very similar to the microflora of the background soddy-podzolic soils of Moscow oblast with respect to the composition of the physiological groups of microorganisms. However, they are drastically different in their quantitative characteristics. The numbers of all the trophic groups of microorganisms, except for the microscopic fungi, in the STFs are much higher than those in the zonal soils. An increased biological activity of the STFs is due to regular watering, heating, application of sand and mineral fertilizers, and technogenic turbation processes. The mesofauna of the STFs is represented by several ecological groups of earthworms, including soildwelling (endogeic) earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa), epigeic earthworms dwelling at the soil-litter interface ( Lumbricus rubellus), and litter-dwelling earthworms ( Eisenia foetida).

  4. Earthworms produce phytochelatins in response to arsenic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Liebeke

    Full Text Available Phytochelatins are small cysteine-rich non-ribosomal peptides that chelate soft metal and metalloid ions, such as cadmium and arsenic. They are widely produced by plants and microbes; phytochelatin synthase genes are also present in animal species from several different phyla, but there is still little known about whether these genes are functional in animals, and if so, whether they are metal-responsive. We analysed phytochelatin production by direct chemical analysis in Lumbricus rubellus earthworms exposed to arsenic for a 28 day period, and found that arsenic clearly induced phytochelatin production in a dose-dependent manner. It was necessary to measure the phytochelatin metabolite concentrations directly, as there was no upregulation of phytochelatin synthase gene expression after 28 days: phytochelatin synthesis appears not to be transcriptionally regulated in animals. A further untargetted metabolomic analysis also found changes in metabolites associated with the transsulfuration pathway, which channels sulfur flux from methionine for phytochelatin synthesis. There was no evidence of biological transformation of arsenic (e.g. into methylated species as a result of laboratory arsenic exposure. Finally, we compared wild populations of earthworms sampled from the field, and found that both arsenic-contaminated and cadmium-contaminated mine site worms had elevated phytochelatin concentrations.

  5. Earthworms produce phytochelatins in response to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebeke, Manuel; Garcia-Perez, Isabel; Anderson, Craig J; Lawlor, Alan J; Bennett, Mark H; Morris, Ceri A; Kille, Peter; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J; Bundy, Jacob G

    2013-01-01

    Phytochelatins are small cysteine-rich non-ribosomal peptides that chelate soft metal and metalloid ions, such as cadmium and arsenic. They are widely produced by plants and microbes; phytochelatin synthase genes are also present in animal species from several different phyla, but there is still little known about whether these genes are functional in animals, and if so, whether they are metal-responsive. We analysed phytochelatin production by direct chemical analysis in Lumbricus rubellus earthworms exposed to arsenic for a 28 day period, and found that arsenic clearly induced phytochelatin production in a dose-dependent manner. It was necessary to measure the phytochelatin metabolite concentrations directly, as there was no upregulation of phytochelatin synthase gene expression after 28 days: phytochelatin synthesis appears not to be transcriptionally regulated in animals. A further untargetted metabolomic analysis also found changes in metabolites associated with the transsulfuration pathway, which channels sulfur flux from methionine for phytochelatin synthesis. There was no evidence of biological transformation of arsenic (e.g. into methylated species) as a result of laboratory arsenic exposure. Finally, we compared wild populations of earthworms sampled from the field, and found that both arsenic-contaminated and cadmium-contaminated mine site worms had elevated phytochelatin concentrations.

  6. Earthworms drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities in post-mining sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Uteseny, Karoline; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Previous field observations indicated that earthworms promote late-successional plant species and reduce collembolan numbers at post-mining sites in the Sokolov coal mining district (Czech Republic). Here, we established a laboratory pot experiment to test the effect of earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffm.) and litter of low, medium, and high quality (the grass Calamagrostis epigejos, the willow Salix caprea, and the alder Alnus glutinosa, respectively) on late successional plants (grasses Arrhenatherum elatius and Agrostis capillaris, legumes Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium medium, and non-leguminous dicots Centaurea jacea and Plantago lanceolata) in spoil substrate originating from Sokolov post-mining sites and naturally inhabited by abundant numbers of Collembola. The earthworms increased plant biomass, especially that of the large-seeded A. elatius, but reduced the number of plant individuals, mainly that of the small-seeded A. capillaris and both legumes. Litter quality affected plant biomass, which was highest with S. caprea litter, but did not change the number of plant individuals. Litter quality did not modify the effect of earthworms on plants; the effect of litter quality and earthworms was only additive. Species composition of Collembola community was altered by litter quality, but earthworms reduced the number of individuals, increased the number of species, and increased species evenness consistently across the litter qualities. Because the results of this experiment were consistent with the field observations, we conclude that earthworms help drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities on post-mining sites.

  7. The influence of earthworms on the mobility of microelements in soil and their availability for plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bityutskii, N. P.; Kaidun, P. I.

    2008-12-01

    The influence of earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus, L. terrestris, and Eisenia fetida) on the mobility of microelements and their availability for plants was studied. The contents of water-soluble Fe and Mn compounds extracted from the coprolites were 5-10 times higher than that in the soil (enriched in calcium carbonate and dried) consumed by the earthworms. This digestion-induced effect became higher with the age of the coprolites (up to 9 days) and took place under their alkalization. In the excreta (surface + enteric) of earthworms, the Fe concentration exceeded those of Mn and Zn by many times. Iron and manganese were mostly concentrated (>80% and >60%, respectively) in the organic part of the excrements. In the tests with hydroponics, the excreta were found to be a source of iron compounds available for plants that were similar to Fe2(SO4)3 or Fe-citrate by their physiological effect in the case when the Fe concentration in the excretions was above 0.7 μM. However, the single application of excreta of different earthworm species into the CaCO3 enriched soil did not significantly affect the plant (cucumber) nutrition. The analysis of the transport of microelements with xylem sap showed that this fact appeared to be due to the absence of an Fe deficit in the cucumber plants because of their high capability for the absorption of weakly soluble iron compounds.

  8. INVESTIGATIONS ON THE IMPACT OF NANOPARTICLES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AND ECOTOXICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta M. Gatti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A special greenhouse was constructed to verify the impact of nanoparticles dispersed in air and in the soil on plant and small animal models.  A 40x4m2 greenhouse was divided in two specular parts in order to have a polluted area (B  and the reference one (A. Two different systems to spray nanoparticles (NPs were set up: the first consists in a combustion of wood or coke perfused with an alcoholic solution containing Copper and Cobalt NPs and following emission of the micro and nanosized by-products in the greenhouse. The second system is a suitable sprayer of NPs starting from a water solution of engineered NPs of Cobalt, Nickel, Silver, Titania, Cerine. Plants (tomato, rice, tillandsia and moss and insects (Ceratitis capitata were exposed to NPs according to specific protocols, as well as  aquatic marine animal models (Earth worms (Lumbricus rubellus, Sea urchins (Paracentrotus lividus, Brine shrimps (Artemia salina, Zebrafish (Danio rerio, Barnacles (Balanus amphitrite. The results indicate that the NPs produce some effects in photosinthesis in the plant and biological damages at the developmental stage in the sea urchins.

  9. EDTA retention and emissions from remediated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jez, Erika; Lestan, Domen

    2016-05-01

    EDTA-based remediation is reaching maturity but little information is available on the state of chelant in remediated soil. EDTA soil retention was examined after extracting 20 soil samples from Pb contaminated areas in Slovenia, Austria, Czech Republic and USA with 120 mM kg(-1) Na2H2EDTA, CaNa2EDTA and H4EDTA for 2 and 24 h. On average, 73% of Pb was removed from acidic and 71% from calcareous soils (24 h extractions). On average, 15% and up to 64% of applied EDTA was after remediation retained in acidic soils. Much less; in average 1% and up to the 22% of EDTA was retained in calcareous soils. The secondary emissions of EDTA retained in selected remediated soil increased with the acidity of the media: the TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) solution (average pH end point 3.6) released up to 36% of EDTA applied in the soil (28.1 mmol kg(-1)). Extraction with deionised water (pH > 6.0) did not produce measurable EDTA emissions. Exposing soil to model abiotic (thawing/freezing cycles) and biotic (ingestion by earthworms Lumbricus rubellus) ageing factors did not induce additional secondary emissions of EDTA retained in remediated soil.

  10. Proteomic changes between male and female worms of the polychaetous annelid Neanthes arenaceodentata before and after spawning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondethimmanahalli H Chandramouli

    Full Text Available The Neanthesacuminata species complex (Polychaeta are cosmopolitan in distribution. Neanthesarenaceodentata, Southern California member of the N. acuminata complex, has been widely used as toxicological test animal in the marine environment. Method of reproduction is unique in this polychaete complex. Same sexes fight and opposite sexes lie side by side until egg laying. Females lose about 75% of their weight and die after laying eggs. The male, capable of reproducing up to nine times, fertilizes the eggs and incubates the embryos for 3-4 weeks. The objective of this study was to determine if there is any set of proteins that influences this unique pattern of reproduction. Gel-based two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and gel-free quantitative proteomics methods were used to identify differential protein expression patterns before and after spawning in both male and female N. arenaceodentata. Males showed a higher degree of similarity in protein expression patterns but females showed large changes in phosphoproteme before and after spawning. There was a decrease (about 70% in the number of detected phosphoproteins in spent females. The proteins involved in muscular development, cell signaling, structure and integrity, and translation were differentially expressed. This study provides proteomic insights of the male and female worms that may serve as a foundation for better understanding of unusual reproductive patterns in polychaete worms.

  11. Proteomic Changes between Male and Female Worms of the Polychaetous Annelid Neanthes arenaceodentata before and after Spawning

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2013-08-30

    The Neanthes acuminata species complex (Polychaeta) are cosmopolitan in distribution. Neanthes arenaceodentata, complex, has been widely used as toxicological test animal in the marine environment. Method of reproduction is unique in this polychaete complex. Same sexes fight and opposite sexes lie side by side until egg laying. Females lose about 75% of their weight and die after laying eggs. The male, capable of reproducing up to nine times, fertilizes the eggs and incubates the embryos for 3-4 weeks. The objective of this study was to determine if there is any set of proteins that influences this unique pattern of reproduction. Gel-based two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and gel-free quantitative proteomics methods were used to identify differential protein expression patterns before and after spawning in both male and female N. arenaceodentata. Males showed a higher degree of similarity in protein expression patterns but females showed large changes in phosphoproteme before and after spawning. There was a decrease (about 70%) in the number of detected phosphoproteins in spent females. The proteins involved in muscular development, cell signaling, structure and integrity, and translation were differentially expressed. This study provides proteomic insights of the male and female worms that may serve as a foundation for better understanding of unusual reproductive patterns in polychaete worms. © 2013 Chandramouli et al.

  12. Animal-sediment interactions: the effect of ingestion and excretion by worms on mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. McIlroy

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available By controlled experiments that simulate marine depositional environments, it is shown that accelerated weathering and clay mineral authigenesis occur during the combined process of ingestion, digestion and excretion of fine-grained sediment by two species of annelid worms. Previously characterized synthetic mud was created using finely ground, low-grade metamorphic slate (temperature approximately 300°C containing highly crystalline chlorite and muscovite. This was added to experiment and control tanks along with clean, wind-blown sand. Faecal casts were collected at regular intervals from the experimental tanks and, less frequently, from the control tanks. Over a period of many months the synthetic mud (slate proved to be unchanged in the control tanks, but was significantly different in faecal casts from the experimental tanks that contained the worms Arenicola marina and Lumbricus terrestris. Chlorite was preferentially destroyed during digestion in the gut of A. marina. Both chlorite and muscovite underwent XRD peak broadening with a skew developing towards higher lattice spacing, characteristic of smectite formation. A neoformed Fe-Mg-rich clay mineral (possibly berthierine and as-yet undefined clay minerals with very high d-spacing were detected in both A. marina and L. terrestris cast samples. We postulate that a combination of the low pH and bacteria-rich microenvironment in the guts of annelid worms may radically accelerate mineral dissolution and clay mineral precipitation processes during digestion. These results show that macrobiotic activity significantly accelerates weathering and mineral degradation as well as mineral authigenesis. The combined processes of sediment ingestion and digestion thus lead to early diagenetic growth of clay minerals in clastic sediments.

  13. Animal-sediment interactions: the effect of ingestion and excretion by worms on mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Needham

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available By controlled experiments that simulate marine depositional environments, it is shown that accelerated weathering and clay mineral authigenesis occur during the combined process of ingestion, digestion and excretion of fine-grained sediment by two species of annelid worms. Previously characterized synthetic mud was created using finely ground, low-grade metamorphic slate (temperature approximately 300°C containing highly crystalline chlorite and muscovite. This was added to experiment and control tanks along with clean, wind-blown sand. Faecal casts were collected at regular intervals from the experimental tanks and, less frequently, from the control tanks. Over a period of many months the synthetic mud (slate proved to be unchanged in the control tanks, but was significantly different in faecal casts from the experimental tanks that contained the worms Arenicola marina and Lumbricus terrestris. Chlorite was preferentially destroyed during digestion in the gut of A. marina. Both chlorite and muscovite underwent XRD peak broadening with a skew developing towards higher lattice spacing, characteristic of smectite formation. A neoformed Fe-Mg-rich clay mineral (possibly berthierine and as-yet undefined clay minerals with very high d-spacing were detected in both A. marina and L. terrestris cast samples. We postulate that a combination of the low pH and bacteria-rich microenvironment in the guts of annelid worms may radically accelerate mineral dissolution and clay mineral precipitation processes during digestion. These results show that macrobiotic activity significantly accelerates weathering and mineral degradation as well as mineral authigenesis. The combined processes of sediment ingestion and digestion thus lead to early diagenetic growth of clay minerals in clastic sediments.

  14. Potential macro-detritivore range expansion into the subarctic stimulates litter decomposition: a new positive feedback mechanism to climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Koert G; Berg, Matty P; Aerts, Rien

    2011-12-01

    As a result of low decomposition rates, high-latitude ecosystems store large amounts of carbon. Litter decomposition in these ecosystems is constrained by harsh abiotic conditions, but also by the absence of macro-detritivores. We have studied the potential effects of their climate change-driven northward range expansion on the decomposition of two contrasting subarctic litter types. Litter of Alnus incana and Betula pubescens was incubated in microcosms together with monocultures and all possible combinations of three functionally different macro-detritivores (the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus, isopod Oniscus asellus, and millipede Julus scandinavius). Our results show that these macro-detritivores stimulated decomposition, especially of the high-quality A. incana litter and that the macro-detritivores tested differed in their decomposition-stimulating effects, with earthworms having the largest influence. Decomposition processes increased with increasing number of macro-detritivore species, and positive net diveristy effects occurred in several macro-detritivore treatments. However, after correction for macro-detritivore biomass, all interspecific differences in macro-detritivore effects, as well as the positive effects of species number on subarctic litter decomposition disappeared. The net diversity effects also appeared to be driven by variation in biomass, with a possible exception of net diversity effects in mass loss. Based on these results, we conclude that the expected climate change-induced range expansion of macro-detritivores into subarctic regions is likely to result in accelerated decomposition rates. Our results also indicate that the magnitude of macro-detritivore effects on subarctic decomposition will mainly depend on macro-detritivore biomass, rather than on macro-detritivore species number or identity.

  15. Legacy of earthworms' engineering effects enlarges the actual effects of earthworms on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrák, Obdřej; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms were recognized as key factor responsible for changes from early to late successional plant communities. They incorporate organic matter into the soil and creates there persistent structures, which improves conditions for plant growth. Earthworm activity might be therefore expected to be more important in early stages of the succession, when earthworm colonization of previously earthworm free soil starts, than in the late stages of the succession, where the soil was previously modified by earthworms. However, earthworms affect plants also via other effects such as increase of nutrient availability. The relative importance of soil structure modification and other earthworm effects on plants is poorly known, despite it is important for both theoretical and applied ecology. To test the effect of earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Aporrectodea caliginosa) on plants we performed microcosm laboratory experiment, where earthworms were affecting early successional (Poa compressa, Medicago lupulina, and Daucus carota) and late successional (Arrhenatherum elatius, Lotus corniculatus, and Plantago laceolata) plat species in soil previously unaffected by earthworms and in soil with previous long term effect of earthworms. These soils were taken from the early and late successional monitoring sites of the Sokolov coal mining district with known history. Earthworms increased plant biomass proportionally more in late successional soil. It was mainly because they increased availability of nutrients (nitrate and potassium) and plants get higher advantage out of this in late successional soil. Earthworms increased plant biomass of both early and late successional species, but late successional species suppressed early successional species in competition. This suppression was more intensive in presence of earthworms and in late successional soil. We therefore found multiplicative effect between earthworm soil engineering activity and their other effects, which might be

  16. Review on pharmacological action of lumbricus to treat rheumatism%地龙治疗风湿病的药理作用研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨茜茜; 龚国清

    2015-01-01

    本文分析了地龙在药理方面的实验研究结果,并结合相关方面知识从中医、西医两个方面证明了地龙可以治疗风湿病的药理学成因,并且简要介绍了地龙对于治疗各种类型风湿病的临床应用与生化指标,进一步证实了地龙对于治疗风湿病的重要作用。%This paper analyzes the earthworm in the pharmacological aspects of animal experimental results, indirect from the two aspects of traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine proved earthworm can treat rheumatism causes of pharmacology, and briefly introduces the earthworm for the treatment of various types of rheumatism clinical and biochemical indicators, which further confirmed the earthworm plays an important role in the treatment of rheumatism.

  17. Comportamiento de lombriz roja californiana y lombriz silvestre en bosta bovina y rumia bovina como sustrato Behavior of californian red earthworm and wild earthworm in bovine dung and bovine rumination as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Loza Murguía

    californian red earthworm (Eisenia spp. and the wild earthworm (Lumbricus spp. in two substrates with the aim to improve the quality of vermicompost produced by these annelids. The work has been carried out in the module of Environmental Microbiology, in facilities of Unidad Académica Campesina Carmen Pampa (UACCP, Campus Leahy, located in Coroico Nor Yungas of Departamento of La Paz-Bolivia. Their behavior has been studied in two substrates bovine dung (manure and bovine rumination (rumination in 40 experimental units of 0.2 m width*0.25 m length*0.4 m depth, each unit showed a density of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 individuals with two repetitions of each one in 1 000 g of substrate. The cocoons number, number of individuals at 8 weeks, and percentage of degradation of the substrate was determined. The results indicate that substrates manure is better in the population dynamics of Eisenia spp., in comparison with Lumbricus spp. The physical and chemical characteristics of manure and rumination possibly influenced in this type of behavior for Eisenia spp.

  18. Ecological transfer of radionuclides and metals to free-living earthworm species in natural habitats rich in NORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena, E-mail: jelena.mrdakovic.popic@umb.no; Salbu, Brit; Skipperud, Lindis

    2012-01-01

    Transfer of radionuclides ({sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U) and associated metals (As, Cd, Pb and Cr) from soil to free-living earthworm species was investigated in a thorium ({sup 232}Th) rich area in Norway. Sampling took place within former mining sites representing the technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM), at undisturbed site with unique bedrock geology representing the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) and at site outside the {sup 232}Th rich area taken as reference Background site. Soil analysis revealed the elevated levels of investigated elements at NORM and TENORM sites. Based on sequential extraction, uranium ({sup 238}U) and cadmium (Cd) were quite mobile, while the other elements were strongly associated with mineral components of soil. Four investigated earthworm species (Aporrectodea caliginosa, Aporrectodea rosea, Dendrodrilus rubidus and Lumbricus rubellus) showed large individual variability in the accumulation of radionuclides and metals. Differences in uptake by epigeic and endogeic species, as well as differences within same species from the NORM, TENORM and Background sites were also seen. Based on total concentrations in soil, the transfer factors (TF) were in ranges 0.03-0.08 and 0.09-0.25, for {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, respectively. TFs for lead (Pb), chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) were low (less than 0.5), while TFs for Cd were higher (about 10). Using the ERICA tool, the estimated radiation exposure dose rate of the earthworms ranged from 2.2 to 3.9 {mu}Gy/h. The radiological risk for investigated earthworms was low (0.28). The obtained results demonstrated that free-living earthworm species can survive in soil containing elevated {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, as well As, Cd, Pb and Cr levels, although certain amount of radionuclides was accumulated within their bodies. The present investigation contributes to general better understanding of complex soil-to-biota transfer processes of

  19. Immunoscreening of the antigen-mimic epitope of Cysticercosis from the phage peptide library screened by anti-lumbricus immunoglobulin%囊虫抗原模拟表位的筛选和序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李天群; 雷家慧; 姜昌富

    2004-01-01

    目的探讨能否从与兔抗蚯蚓血清免疫球蛋白(E-Ig)结合后的噬菌体12肽库中筛选囊虫抗原模拟表位.方法噬菌体12肽库经过E-Ig筛选1轮后,再以囊虫病患者血清免疫球蛋白(C-Ig)作为靶分子进行3轮吸附-洗脱-扩增, 随机挑取24个蓝色噬菌斑扩增;分析其抗原性及诊断囊虫病的价值;并测定核苷酸序列分析同源性.结果 24个克隆中有17个克隆可与囊虫病患者混合血清发生免疫反应,其中6个A491值较高的克隆ELISA和囊虫抗原Dot-ELISA的抗体阳性率无显著性差异(P>0.05);与其它寄生虫病的交叉反应率明显低于囊虫抗原(P <0.05), 说明所获克隆具有诊断囊虫病的潜在价值.挑选其中2个克隆(C3、C5)测定核苷酸序列,结果显示这两个抗原模拟表位的氨基酸序列具有结构同源性. 结论将E-Ig结合后的肽库作为源肽库经过3轮筛选,得到对囊虫病具有较高潜在诊断价值的抗原模拟表位.

  20. Effects of earthworms on nitrogen mineralization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, J.J.G.M.; Marinissen, J.C.Y.; Blair, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris and Aporrectodea tuberculata) on the rate of net N mineralization was studied, both in soil with intact soil structure (partly influenced by past earthworm activity) and in columns with sieved soil

  1. A revision of the genus Kaszabister Mazur (Histeridae, Histerinae, Exosternini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Degallier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We revise the four species of Kaszabister Mazur, 1972, one of which, Kaszabister barrigai sp. n., is described as new. The other species in the genus are K. rubellus (Erichson, 1834, K. ferrugineus (Kirsch, 1873 and K. carinatus (Lewis, 1888. The species are principally known from the subtropics of South America, with one in Central America. Lectotypes are designated for K. rubellus and K. ferrugineus, and a key is provided for all the species. Ants of the genus Solenopsis Westwood, mainly S. invicta Buren and S. saevissima (Smith, are documented as hosts of three of the four species.

  2. 黄芪、水蛭、地龙不同配伍治疗缺血性中风实验研究%EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON EFFECTS OF VARYING PRESCRIPTIONS OF RADIX ASTRAGALI SEU HEDYSARI,HIRUDO AND LUMBRICUS ON ISCHEMIC APOPLEXY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟晓翔

    2000-01-01

    提出气虚血瘀络阻为缺血性中风的基本病机,而益气活血通络则为基本治法.通过黄芪水蛭地龙、黄芪水蛭、黄芪地龙、水蛭地龙四个配伍组比较,以观察其对急性脑缺血大鼠血浆一氧化氮(NO)、丙二醛(MDA)、血小板聚集性及大鼠在体血栓形成时间的影响.结果表明,黄芪水蛭地龙配伍组在以上诸方面的作用明显优于其他组.

  3. National Waterways Study. Analysis of Environmental Aspects of Waterways Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Copper Annelids; arthropods; most molluscs Iron Bacteria; plankton Iodine Diatoms; brown algae; sponges; coelenterates; marine annelids Manganese...has been observed in sensi- *tive plants such as beang, tomatoes , and tobacco. Pul- monary changes have beei, caused in experimental animals by

  4. Live feed culture - Problems and perspectives

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Royan, J.P.

    The importance of live feed in aquaculture is stressed. Organisms currently cultured as live feed are microalgae, turbellarians, tanaidaceans, annelids, brine shrimps, fairy shrimps, rotifers, cladocerans and copepods. Their culture methods...

  5. New reconstruction of the Wiwaxia scleritome, with data from Chengjiang juveniles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifei; Smith, Martin R.; Shu, Degan

    2015-10-01

    Wiwaxiids are a problematic group of scale-covered lophotrochozoans known from Cambrian Stages 3-5. Their imbricating dorsal scleritome of leaf-like scales has prompted comparison with various annelids and molluscs, and has been used as a template to reconstruct the articulation pattern of isolated Small Shelly Fossils. The first articulated specimens of Wiwaxia from the Cambrian Stage 3 Chengjiang Konservat-Lagerstätte show that the Wiwaxia scleritome comprised nine equivalent transverse rows associated with outgrowths of soft tissue, but did not possess a separate zone of anterior sclerites. This serial construction is fundamentally incompatible with the circumferential disposition of sclerites in early molluscs, but does closely resemble the armature of certain annelids. A deep homology with the annelid scleritome must be reconciled with Wiwaxia’s mollusc-like mouthparts and foot; together these point to a deep phylogenetic position, close to the common ancestor of annelids and molluscs.

  6. 40 CFR 230.31 - Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in the food web include, but are not limited to, finfish, crustaceans, mollusks, insects, annelids... reproduction and growth and development due primarily to their limited mobility. They can be rendered unfit...

  7. Segmental mode of neural patterning in sipuncula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristof, Alen; Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    sipunculan, Phascolosoma agassizii, we found that neurogenesis initially follows a segmental pattern similar to that of annelids. Starting out with paired FMRFamidergic and serotonergic axons, four pairs of associated serotonergic perikarya and interconnecting commissures form one after another...

  8. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE DIURON ON FRESHWATER CLADOCERANS,AMPHIPODS,MIDGES,MINNOWS,WORMS, AND SNAILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulex, and survival and growth of the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, juvenile and embro/larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, annelid worms, Lumbriculus variegatus,...

  9. Cerambycidae (Coleoptera coletados na Venezuela na copa de Matayba (Sapindaceae e Vochysia (Vochysiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerambycidae coletados em Surumoni, Amazonas, Venezuela, com o auxílio de uma grua, por armadilha de interceptação de vôo e armadilha luminosa nas copas de Matayba guianensis Aubl e Vochysia sp. resultaram em novos registros para 14 espécies e descrição de quatro novas: Erythropterus urucuri sp. nov. (Heteropsini, Eriphus ruBELLus sp. nov. (Trachyderini, Lissonotus kuaiuba sp. nov. (Lissonotini e Acyphoderes itaiuba sp. nov. (Rhinotragini.Cerambycidae (Coleoptera collected in Venezuela at the canopy of Matayba (Sapindaceae and Vochysia (Vochysiaceae. Cerambycidae collected in Surumoni, Amazonas, Venezuela, with help of a crane, made with interception and light traps in the canopy of Matayba guianensis Aubl and Vochysia sp. resulted in new records for 14 species and descriptions of four new species: Erythropterus urucuri sp. nov. (Heteropsini, Eriphus ruBELLus sp. nov. (Trachyderini, Lissonotus kuaiuba sp. nov. (Lissonotini and Acyphoderes itaiuba sp. nov. (Rhinotragini.

  10. Mass distributions of a macromolecular assembly based on electrospray ionization mass spectrometric masses of the constituent subunits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leonid Hanin; Brian Green; Franck Zal; Serge Vinogradov

    2003-09-01

    Macromolecular assemblies containing multiple protein subunits and having masses in the megadalton (MDa) range are involved in most of the functions of a living cell. Because of variation in the number and masses of subunits, macromolecular assemblies do not have a unique mass, but rather a mass distribution. The giant extracelular erythrocruorins (Ers), ∼ 3.5 MDa, comprized of at least 180 polypeptide chains, are one of the best characterized assemblies. Three-dimensional reconstructions from cryoelectron microscopic images show them to be hexagonal bilayer complexes of 12 subassemblies, each comprised of 12 globin chains, anchored to a subassembly of 36 nonglobin linker chains. We have calculated the most probable mass distributions for Lumbricus and Riftia assemblies and their globin and linker subassemblies, based on the Lumbricus Er stoichiometry and using accurate subunit masses obtained by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The expected masses of Lumbricus and Riftia Ers are 3.517 MDa and 3.284 MDa, respectively, with a possible variation of ∼ 9% due to the breadth of the mass distributions. The Lumbricus Er mass is in astonishingly good agreement with the mean of 23 known masses, 3.524 ± 0.481 MDa.

  11. Earthworm functional traits and interspecific interactions affect plant nitrogen acquisition and primary production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriuzzi, Walter; Schmidt, Olaf; Brussaard, L.; Faber, J.H.; Bolger, T.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a greenhouse experiment to test how the functional diversity of earthworms, the dominant group of soil macro-invertebrates in many terrestrial ecosystems, affects nitrogen cycling and plant growth. Three species were chosen to represent a range of functional traits: Lumbricus terrestris

  12. Six3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmetz Patrick RH

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heads of annelids (earthworms, polychaetes, and others and arthropods (insects, myriapods, spiders, and others and the arthropod-related onychophorans (velvet worms show similar brain architecture and for this reason have long been considered homologous. However, this view is challenged by the 'new phylogeny' placing arthropods and annelids into distinct superphyla, Ecdysozoa and Lophotrochozoa, together with many other phyla lacking elaborate heads or brains. To compare the organisation of annelid and arthropod heads and brains at the molecular level, we investigated head regionalisation genes in various groups. Regionalisation genes subdivide developing animals into molecular regions and can be used to align head regions between remote animal phyla. Results We find that in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii, expression of the homeobox gene six3 defines the apical region of the larval body, peripherally overlapping the equatorial otx+ expression. The six3+ and otx+ regions thus define the developing head in anterior-to-posterior sequence. In another annelid, the earthworm Pristina, as well as in the onychophoran Euperipatoides, the centipede Strigamia and the insects Tribolium and Drosophila, a six3/optix+ region likewise demarcates the tip of the developing animal, followed by a more posterior otx/otd+ region. Identification of six3+ head neuroectoderm in Drosophila reveals that this region gives rise to median neurosecretory brain parts, as is also the case in annelids. In insects, onychophorans and Platynereis, the otx+ region instead harbours the eye anlagen, which thus occupy a more posterior position. Conclusions These observations indicate that the annelid, onychophoran and arthropod head develops from a conserved anterior-posterior sequence of six3+ and otx+ regions. The six3+ anterior pole of the arthropod head and brain accordingly lies in an anterior-median embryonic region and, in consequence, the optic

  13. The Anthelmintic Activity of Vernonia Amygdalina (Asteraceae) and Alstonia Boonei De Wild (Apocynaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ketor, E.C.; Annan, K.; Koffuor, G. A.; Danquah, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal worms affect a host of individuals resulting in malnutrition, stunted growth, intellectual retardation and cognitive deficits. The aim of this study is to investigate the antihelminthic activity of Alstonia boonei De Wild (Apocynaceae) and Vernonia amygdalina (Asteraceae) using earth-worms (Lumbricus terretris). The worms were directly exposed to 50, 100, and 200 mg/ml of aque-ous and ethanolic bark extracts of Alstonia boonei and leaf extract of Vernonia amygdalina and piperazine ...

  14. Glyphosate-based herbicides reduce the activity and reproduction of earthworms and lead to increased soil nutrient concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Mailin Gaupp-Berghausen; Martin Hofer; Boris Rewald; Zaller, Johann G.

    2015-01-01

    Herbicide use is increasing worldwide both in agriculture and private gardens. However, our knowledge of potential side-effects on non-target soil organisms, even on such eminent ones as earthworms, is still very scarce. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the impact of the most widely used glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup on two earthworm species with different feeding strategies. We demonstrate, that the surface casting activity of vertically burrowing earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris...

  15. Soil-dwelling polychaetes: enigmatic as ever? Some hints on their phylogenetic relationships as suggested by a maximum parsimony analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rota, Emilia; Martin, Patrick; Erséus, Christer

    2001-01-01

    To re-evaluate the various hypotheses on the systematic position of Parergodrilus heideri Reisinger, 1925 and Hrabeiella periglandulata Pizl & Chalupský, 1984, the sole truly terrestrial non-clitellate annelids known to date, their phylogenetic relationships were investigated using a data set of new

  16. The simplicity of males: Dwarf males of four species of Osedax (Siboglinidae; Annelida) investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsaae, Katrine; Rouse, Greg W

    2010-01-01

    mature sperm to a ciliated duct and seminal vesicle lying just behind the prototroch region. A duct then runs from the seminal vesicle into the dorsal part of the prostomium. The similarity of Osedax males to the larvae of Osedax and other siboglinid annelids as well as similarities shown here...

  17. Spionidae (Polychaeta) of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foster, Nancy Marie

    1971-01-01

    Although there have been several collections of polychaetous annelids from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, very few spionids have been included in the published species lists. This is not because they are poorly represented in this area but probably a result of their small size and the fact th

  18. Guide to Common Tidal Marsh Invertebrates of the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Richard W.

    The major groups of marine and estuarine macroinvertebrates of the tidal marshes of the northern Gulf of Mexico are described in this guide for students, taxonomists and generalists. Information on the recognition characteristics, distribution, habitat, and biology of salt marsh species from the coelenterate, annelid, mollusk and arthropod phyla…

  19. BIOTECHNOLOGY OF ORGANIC WASTE VERMICULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshchayev A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review contains the information about the role of annelids in maintaining soil fertility. Recommendations based on authors’ experience and scientific literature are given for vermicultivation, biomass use of Californian worms in animal husbandry and vermicompost use in crop production. Furthermore, detailed description of the methods of cultivation of worms is given

  20. Reefs, sand and reef-like sand: A comparision of the benthic biodiversity of habitats in the Dutch Borkum Reef Grounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, J.W.P.; Bos, O.G.; Glorius, S.T.; Lengkeek, W.; Cuperus, J.; Weide, van der B.E.; Agüera García, A.

    2015-01-01

    Reefs play an important role in the distribution of species associated with hard substrates and are of value forbiodiversity conservation. High densities of the habitat building annelid Lanice conchilega also increase localbiodiversity. This study describes the benthic biodiversity of a rocky reef a

  1. A contribution towards our knowlegde of the Polychaeta of South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, R.

    1917-01-01

    1. Amphinomidae and Aphroditidae. Professor Max Weber, during a short stay in South Africa in 1894, made a small collection of Annelids, which he kindly handed me over for examination. As I found among them some species, which for the first time are mentioned from this interesting region, where the

  2. Neurogenesis suggests independent evolution of opercula in serpulid polychaetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Nora; Wanninger, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The internal phylogenetic relationships of Annelida, one of the key lophotrochozoan lineages, are still heavily debated. Recent molecular analyses suggest that morphologically distinct groups, such as the polychaetes, are paraphyletic assemblages, thus questioning the homology of a nu...... neurogenesis provide a novel set of characters that highlight the developmental plasticity of the segmented annelid nervous system....

  3. Lipid Classes and Fatty Acids in Ophryotrocha cyclops, a Dorvilleid from Newfoundland Aquaculture Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Flora; Dufour, Suzanne C; Hamoutene, Dounia; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    A new opportunistic annelid (Ophryotrocha cyclops) discovered on benthic substrates underneath finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland (NL) may be involved in the remediation of organic wastes. At those aquaculture sites, bacterial mats and O. cyclops often coexist and are used as indicators of organic enrichment. Little is known on the trophic strategies used by these annelids, including whether they might consume bacteria or other aquaculture-derived wastes. We studied the lipid and fatty acid composition of the annelids and their potential food sources (degraded flocculent organic matter, fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats) to investigate feeding relationships in these habitats and compared the lipid and fatty acid composition of annelids before and after starvation. Fish pellets were rich in lipids, mainly terrestrially derived C18 fatty acids (18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 18:3ω3), while bacterial samples were mainly composed of ω7 fatty acids, and flocculent matter appeared to be a mixture of fresh and degrading fish pellets, feces and bacteria. Ophryotrocha cyclops did not appear to store excessive amounts of lipids (13%) but showed a high concentration of ω3 and ω6 fatty acids, as well as a high proportion of the main fatty acids contained in fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats. The dorvilleids and all potential food sources differed significantly in their lipid and fatty acid composition. Interestingly, while all food sources contained low proportions of 20:5ω3 and 20:2ω6, the annelids showed high concentrations of these two fatty acids, along with 20:4ω6. A starvation period of 13 days did not result in a major decrease in total lipid content; however, microscopic observations revealed that very few visible lipid droplets remained in the gut epithelium after three months of starvation. Ophryotrocha cyclops appears well adapted to extreme environments and may rely on lipid-rich organic matter for survival and dispersal in cold environments.

  4. Molecular identification of differentially regulated genes in the hydrothermal-vent species Bathymodiolus thermophilus and Paralvinella pandorae in response to temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shillito Bruce

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrothermal vents and cold seeps represent oases of life in the deep-sea environment, but are also characterized by challenging physical and chemical conditions. The effect of temperature fluctuations on vent organisms in their habitat has not been well explored, in particular at a molecular level, most gene expression studies being conducted on coastal marine species. In order to better understand the response of hydrothermal organisms to different temperature regimes, differentially expressed genes (obtained by a subtractive suppression hybridization approach were identified in the mussel Bathymodiolus thermophilus and the annelid Paralvinella pandorae irlandei to characterize the physiological processes involved when animals are subjected to long term exposure (2 days at two contrasting temperatures (10° versus 20°C, while maintained at in situ pressures. To avoid a potential effect of pressure, the experimental animals were initially thermally acclimated for 24 hours in a pressurized vessel. Results For each species, we produced two subtractive cDNA libraries (forward and reverse from sets of deep-sea mussels and annelids exposed together to a thermal challenge under pressure. RNA extracted from the gills, adductor muscle, mantle and foot tissue were used for B. thermophilus. For the annelid model, whole animals (small individuals were used. For each of the four libraries, we sequenced 200 clones, resulting in 78 and 83 unique sequences in mussels and annelids (about 20% of the sequencing effort, respectively, with only half of them corresponding to known genes. Real-time PCR was used to validate differentially expressed genes identified in the corresponding libraries. Strong expression variations have been observed for some specific genes such as the intracellular hemoglobin, the nidogen protein, and Rab7 in P. pandorae, and the SPARC protein, cyclophilin, foot protein and adhesive plaque protein in B. thermophilus

  5. Evolution and Structure of Neuromuscular Systems in Spiralian Meiofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekkouche, Nicolas Tarik

    into their evolution: Lobatocerebrum is an aberrant annelid showing only few common traits with Annelida, yet, our detailed studies unravel putative resemblances of muscular, nervous and glandular system to previous findings in annelids. Micrognathozoa shows more resemblances with Rotifera than Gnathostomulida (these...... on the evolution of this group. Diuronotus aspetos shows a unique combination of muscular traits not easily traceable, but in contrast the nervous system traits can be compared in high details, hereby bridging to other Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha). Moreover, we describe new gastrotrich characters...... such as the ciliary pattern or a system of pharyngeal canals of possible importance for future comparative approaches. These different studies show that information on rare and phylogenetically isolated animals with their unique combination of neural and muscular characters are necessary to understand the evolution...

  6. Diversity and host specificity of the Verminephrobacter–earthworm symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie Braad; Davidson, Seana; Holmstrup, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria of the genus Verminephrobacter (Betaproteobacteria) were detected in the nephridia of 19 out of 23 investigated earthworm species (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae) by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). While all four Lumbricus species...... not be demonstrated unambiguously due to the poor resolution of the host phylogeny [based on histone H3 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequence analyses]. However, there was a pattern of symbiont diversification within four groups of closely related hosts. The mean rate of symbiont 16S rRNA gene...

  7. ECOLOGICAL STUDY ON MACROZOOBENTHIC COMMUNITY OF VERINAG SPRING,KASHMIR

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Abida; Mohammad Farooq Mir; Syed Ifshana; I. A. Ahangar

    2013-01-01

    Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages of Verinag spring in Kashmir corresponding to different catchment and land uses acts as indicators of water quality. Physico-chemical parameters and population density of Annelids, Arthropoda and Mollusca individuals were determined. Diptera was dominating the study area instead of Annelida. The Oxygen Concentration was high and the mean dissolved oxygen was 9.8±0.90 mg/l. The presence of relatively high oxygen value seems to be a function of good periphy...

  8. Identification and Optimization of Classifier Genes from Multi-Class Earthworm Microarray Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    spermatogenesis (evcp-2) and GABA receptor modulator (DBI, also known as Acyl-CoA-binding protein or ACBP). Three of the top 10 ranked genes, PTB, DBI and...suggesting that both TNT and RDX may affect spermatogenesis . On the list, there are also several stress- responding genes such as HSP70 (#13 & #41) [42] as...T, Honda M, Matsumoto S, Sturzenbaum SR, Gamou S (2005) Valosine-containing proteins (VCP) in an annelid: identification of a novel spermatogenesis

  9. Variations in benthic macroinvertebratefauna as indicator of land use in the Ken River, central India

    OpenAIRE

    P. Nautiyal; Mishra, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Examination of benthic macroinvertebrates in semi-natural, urban and agricultural land use along the highland Ken River in central India reveals a significantly higher density in semi-natural compared with other two landuse. Insects dominate the fauna at semi-natural (90%) and urban locations (93%) compared to agriculture sites (48%) where where annelid share increases to 32%. The semi-natural location characterized by rocky substrate support high relative abundance of Caenidae and Neoepheme...

  10. Larval stages of Neoplagioporus elongatus (Goto and Ozaki, 1930) (Opecoelidae: Plagioporinae), with notes on potential second intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ayaka; Urabe, Misako

    2017-04-01

    The morphology of sporocysts and cercariae of Neoplagioporus elongatus (Goto and Ozaki, 1930) is described for the first time. A cotylomicrocercous cercaria obtained from the sorbeoconch snail Semisulcospira nakasekoae was confirmed to be the cercaria of N. elongatus, based on the degree of sequence identity of the COI gene to that of adult worms. Freshwater annelids (oligochaetes and leeches) and some aquatic insects (odonates) were demonstrated experimentally to be potential second intermediate hosts.

  11. Early development of the aplacophoran mollusc Chaetoderma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus; Haszprunar, Gerhard; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard;

    2007-01-01

    The early development of the trochophore larva of the aplacophoran Chaetoderma nitidulum (Mollusca: Caudofoveata = Chaetodermomorpha) is described using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and using fluorescence staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy of the muscle system...... of the early anlagen of the circular body wall muscles does not show the anterior-posterior mode of formation that is typical for annelids, thus strengthening the hypothesis of a non-segmented ancestry of Mollusca....

  12. Cellular and muscular growth patterns during sipunculan development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristof, Alen; Wollesen, Tim; Maiorova, Anastassya S

    2011-01-01

    Sipuncula is a lophotrochozoan taxon with annelid affinities, albeit lacking segmentation of the adult body. Here, we present data on cell proliferation and myogenesis during development of three sipunculan species, Phascolosoma agassizii, Thysanocardia nigra, and Themiste pyroides. The first anl...... the pelagosphera stage. This pattern disappears close to metamorphic competence. Our findings are congruent with data on sipunculan neurogenesis, as well as with recent molecular analyses that place Sipuncula within Annelida, and thus strongly support a segmental ancestry of Sipuncula....

  13. Comparative lophotrochozoan neurogenesis and larval neuroanatomy: recent advances from previously neglected taxa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanninger, A

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a number of neurodevelopmental studies of hitherto neglected taxa have become available, contributing to questions relating to the evolution of the nervous system of Lophotrochozoa (Spiralia + Lophophorata). As an example, neurogenesis of echiurans showed that these worm-shaped spiralians...... nerve during metamorphosis, and show transitional stages of segmentation. These findings indicate that echiurans, annelids and sipunculans stem from a segmented ancestor. By contrast, no traces of body segmentation are present during neurogenesis of basal molluscs. However, a tetraneurous condition (i...

  14. Étude de la faune microbienne et des paramètres physico-chimiques du tractus digestif d’annélides oligochètes, récoltés à Ebebda et à Nkolbikogo (région du Centre Cameroun)

    OpenAIRE

    Nana, Paul Alain

    2015-01-01

    The study focuses firstly on the morphological analysis of ciliates and secondly the variation in abundance of acaryotes and prokaryotes of the digestive tract of annelids Oligochaetes collected in the Center Region of Cameroon. In addition, the physicochemical parameters that influence the seriation of these microorganisms along the digestive tract of their hosts were analysed.The morphological study is based on the techniques of impregnation of specimens with the ammoniacal silver carbonate...

  15. Structure and anterior regeneration of musculature and nervous system in Cirratulus cf. cirratus (Cirratulidae, Annelida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidhase, Michael; Bleidorn, Christoph; Helm, Conrad

    2014-12-01

    Annelids provide suitable models for studying regeneration. By now, comprehensive information is restricted to only a few taxa. For many other annelids, comparative data are scarce or even missing. Here, we describe the regeneration of a member of the Cirratulus cirratus species complex. Using phalloidin-labeling and antibody-stainings combined with subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy, we provide data about the organization of body wall musculature and nervous system of intact specimens, as well as about anteriorly regenerating specimens. Our analyses show that C. cf. cirratus exhibits a prominent longitudinal muscle layer forming a dorsal muscle plate, two ventral muscle strands and a ventral-median muscle fiber. The circular musculature forms closed rings which are interrupted in the area of parapodia. The nervous system of C. cf. cirratus shows a typical rope-ladder like arrangement and the circumesophageal connectives exhibit two separate roots leading to the brain. During regeneration, the nervous system redevelops remarkably earlier than the musculature, first constituting a tripartite loop-like structure which later become the circumesophageal connectives. Regeneration of longitudinal musculature starts with diffuse ingrowth and subsequent structuring into the blastema. In contrast, circular musculature develops independently inside the blastema. Our findings constitute the first analysis of regeneration for a member of the Cirratuliformia on a structural level. Summarizing the regeneration process in C. cf. cirratus, five main phases can be subdivided: 1) wound closure, 2) blastema formation, 3) blastema differentiation, 4) resegmentation, and 5) growth, respectively elongation. Additionally, the described tripartite loop-like structure of the regenerating nervous system has not been reported for any other annelid taxon. In contrast, the regeneration of circular and longitudinal musculature originating from different groups of cells seems to be a

  16. Contrasting biogeography of endemic and alien terrestrial species in the Canary Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Vilà, Montserrat

    2006-01-01

    Endemics and alien organisms can be considered two faces of the same coin, since management of both groups of taxa have strongly interrelated conservation implications. Islands are rich in endemic species and are also very vulnerable to biological invasions. We analysed the biogeography and taxonomy of endemic and alien terrestrial species in the Canary Islands including fungi, lichens, bryophytes, vascular plants, arthropods, molluscs, annelids and vertebrates. By using the plant dataset we ...

  17. Canaveral Harbor, Florida, Integrated Section 203 Navigation Study Report and Final Environmental Assessment. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Athiri 752 India 66,497 32 10-Feb-11 Citron 600 Algeria 53,388 35 14-Feb-11 Oriental Ruby 620 Venezuela 40,244 39,490 35 24-Feb-11 Cartagena 601...Brevard County. The rock and worm rock reefs provide habitat for a number of crustaceans , fish, macroalgae, sponges, and other invertebrates. In...annelids, bivalves, gastropods, and crustaceans . The coarser to fine sand habitat typically supports a more diverse benthic community than the finer

  18. Cartap poisoning: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Praveen Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartap is a pesticide commonly used to control weevil and caterpillars. It is an analogue of nereistoxin, a neurotoxic substance isolated from the marine annelid Lumbriconereis heteropoda. It causes neuromuscular blockade. Poisoning with cartap is very rare and not yet reported from India. We report a 35-year-old lady with cartap poisoning who presented with nausea, vomiting, and dyspnea. She improved with N-acetyl cysteine and symptomatic management.

  19. Cartap poisoning: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    A S Praveen Kumar; Deepak Amalnath; T K Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Cartap is a pesticide commonly used to control weevil and caterpillars. It is an analogue of nereistoxin, a neurotoxic substance isolated from the marine annelid Lumbriconereis heteropoda. It causes neuromuscular blockade. Poisoning with cartap is very rare and not yet reported from India. We report a 35-year-old lady with cartap poisoning who presented with nausea, vomiting, and dyspnea. She improved with N-acetyl cysteine and symptomatic management.

  20. Cartap poisoning: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A S Praveen; Amalnath, Deepak; Dutta, T K

    2011-10-01

    Cartap is a pesticide commonly used to control weevil and caterpillars. It is an analogue of nereistoxin, a neurotoxic substance isolated from the marine annelid Lumbriconereis heteropoda. It causes neuromuscular blockade. Poisoning with cartap is very rare and not yet reported from India. We report a 35-year-old lady with cartap poisoning who presented with nausea, vomiting, and dyspnea. She improved with N-acetyl cysteine and symptomatic management.

  1. Musculature in sipunculan worms: ontogeny and ancestral states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Anja; Rice, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetics suggests that the Sipuncula fall into the Annelida, although they are morphologically very distinct and lack segmentation. To understand the evolutionary transformations from the annelid to the sipunculan body plan, it is important to reconstruct the ancestral states within the respective clades at all life history stages. Here we reconstruct the ancestral states for the head/introvert retractor muscles and the body wall musculature in the Sipuncula using Bayesian statistics. In addition, we describe the ontogenetic transformations of the two muscle systems in four sipunculan species with different developmental modes, using F-actin staining with fluorescent-labeled phalloidin in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy. All four species, which have smooth body wall musculature and less than the full set of four introvert retractor muscles as adults, go through developmental stages with four retractor muscles that are eventually reduced to a lower number in the adult. The circular and sometimes the longitudinal body wall musculature are split into bands that later transform into a smooth sheath. Our ancestral state reconstructions suggest with nearly 100% probability that the ancestral sipunculan had four introvert retractor muscles, longitudinal body wall musculature in bands and circular body wall musculature arranged as a smooth sheath. Species with crawling larvae have more strongly developed body wall musculature than those with swimming larvae. To interpret our findings in the context of annelid evolution, a more solid phylogenetic framework is needed for the entire group and more data on ontogenetic transformations of annelid musculature are desirable.

  2. Polychaetes and oligochaetes associated with intertidal rocky shores in a semi-enclosed industrial and urban embayment, with the description of two new species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parapar, Julio; Martínez-Ansemil, Enrique; Caramelo, Carlos; Collado, Rut; Schmelz, Rüdiger

    2009-12-01

    The species composition and relative abundance of the annelid benthic macrofauna (Polychaeta and Oligochaeta) inhabiting the rocky intertidal zone of the ria of Ferrol (Galicia, NW Spain) were studied during field collections, from 2000 to 2002. A total of 14,619 specimens (11,585 polychaetes belonging to 76 species and 24 families and 3,034 oligochaetes belonging to 18 species and two families) were collected from 98 quantitative samples taken from 13 sampling sites. The general spatial distribution of the annelid fauna reflects an increase of the diversity from the inner to the outer part of the ria. The general patterns found in the annelid composition suggest that the assemblages were dominated by oligochaetes in the inner sheltered sampling sites and polychaetes in the outer more exposed sites. Several faunistical and taxonomical remarks on selected species are presented. Two new species of oligochaetes are described: Coralliodrilus artabrensis sp. n. and Pirodrilus fungithecatus sp. n. (Naididae, Phallodrilinae). A new biological index, based on the oligochaete/polychaete ratio (O/P), is proposed as tool to evaluate environmental quality and to monitor future changes in the environment.

  3. Authentic FMRFamide is present in the polychaete Nereis virens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajniak, K G; Price, D A

    1990-01-01

    The tetrapeptide FMRFamide is but one member of a large family of invertebrate neuropeptides which includes another tetrapeptide, FLRFamide, and several longer peptides terminating in one or the other of these tetrapeptide sequences. These peptides have been isolated from both molluscs and arthropods, but so far not one has been isolated from an annelid. Since the annelid worms are believed to share a common ancestor with molluscs and arthropods, they should contain FMRFamide-like peptides. We found two immunoreactive peaks in Nereis virens, but microsequencing and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry revealed that they represent only one native peptide, FMRFamide. (The other peak is its methionyl sulfoxide derivative.) Each worm contained only 100 to 600 fmols of peptide, which is at least 10-100 times less than the levels in molluscs. Our identification of a tetrapeptide, and only a tetrapeptide, in this worm suggests that the tetrapeptides are the more ancient members of the family, and were probably present in the common ancestors of the annelids, arthropods, and molluscs.

  4. Growth patterns in Onychophora (velvet worms: lack of a localised posterior proliferation zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landman Kerry A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During embryonic development of segmented animals, body segments are thought to arise from the so-called "posterior growth zone" and the occurrence of this "zone" has been used to support the homology of segmentation between arthropods, annelids, and vertebrates. However, the term "posterior growth zone" is used ambiguously in the literature, mostly referring to a region of increased proliferation at the posterior end of the embryo. To determine whether such a localised posterior proliferation zone is an ancestral feature of Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda, we examined cell division patterns in embryos of Onychophora. Results Using in vivo incorporation of the DNA replication marker BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and anti-phospho-histone H3 immunolabelling, we found that a localised posterior region of proliferating cells does not occur at any developmental stage in onychophoran embryos. This contrasts with a localised pattern of cell divisions at the posterior end of annelid embryos, which we used as a positive control. Based on our data, we present a mathematical model, which challenges the paradigm that a localised posterior proliferation zone is necessary for segment patterning in short germ developing arthropods. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a posterior proliferation zone was absent in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda. By comparing our data from Onychophora with those from annelids, arthropods, and chordates, we suggest that the occurrence of a "posterior growth zone" currently cannot be used to support the homology of segmentation between these three animal groups.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Articulate Brachiopod Terebratal ia transversa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfenbein, Kevin G.; Brown, Wesley M.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2001-07-01

    We have sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the articulate brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. The circular genome is 14,291 bp in size, relatively small compared to other published metazoan mtDNAs. The 37 genes commonly found in animal mtDNA are present; the size decrease is due to the truncation of several tRNA, rRNA, and protein genes, to some nucleotide overlaps, and to a paucity of non-coding nucleotides. Although the gene arrangement differs radically from those reported for other metazoans, some gene junctions are shared with two other articulate brachiopods, Laqueus rubellus and Terebratulina retusa. All genes in the T. transversa mtDNA, unlike those in most metazoan mtDNAs reported, are encoded by the same strand. The A+T content (59.1 percent) is low for a metazoan mtDNA, and there is a high propensity for homopolymer runs and a strong base-compositional strand bias. The coding strand is quite G+T-rich, a skew that is shared by the confamilial (laqueid) specie s L. rubellus, but opposite to that found in T. retusa, a cancellothyridid. These compositional skews are strongly reflected in the codon usage patterns and the amino acid compositions of the mitochondrial proteins, with markedly different usage observed between T. retusa and the two laqueids. This observation, plus the similarity of the laqueid non-coding regions to the reverse complement of the non-coding region of the cancellothyridid, suggest that an inversion that resulted in a reversal in the direction of first-strand replication has occurred in one of the two lineages. In addition to the presence of one non-coding region in T. transversa that is comparable to those in the other brachiopod mtDNAs, there are two others with the potential to form secondary structures; one or both of these may be involved in the process of transcript cleavage.

  6. Primary structure of a constituent polypeptide chain (AIII) of the giant haemoglobin from the deep-sea tube worm Lamellibrachia. A possible H2S-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Takagi, T; Ohta, S

    1990-02-15

    The deep-sea tube worm Lamellibrachia, belonging to the Phylum Vestimentifera, contains two giant extracellular haemoglobins, a 3000 kDa haemoglobin and a 440 kDa haemoglobin. The former consists of four haem-containing chains (AI-AIV) and two linker chains (AV and AVI) for the assembly of the haem-containing chains [Suzuki, Takagi & Ohta (1988) Biochem. J. 255, 541-545]. The tube-worm haemoglobins are believed to have a function of transporting sulphide (H2S) to internal bacterial symbionts, as well as of facilitating O2 transport [Arp & Childress (1983) Science 219, 295-297]. We have determined the complete amino acid sequence of Lamellibrachia chain AIII by automated or manual Edman sequencing. The chain is composed of 144 amino acid residues, has three cysteine residues at positions 3, 74 and 133, and has a molecular mass of 16,620 Da, including a haem group. The sequence showed significant homology (30-50% identity) with those of haem-containing chains of annelid giant haemoglobins. Two of the three cysteine residues are located at the positions where an intrachain disulphide bridge is formed in all annelid chains, but the remaining one (Cys-74) was located at a unique position, compared with annelid chains. Since the chain AIII was shown to have a reactive thiol group in the intact 3000 kDa molecule by preliminary experiments, the cysteine residue at position 74 appears to be one of the most probable candidates for the sulphide-binding sites. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from nine chains of annelid giant haemoglobins and one chain of vestimentiferan tube-worm haemoglobin now determined. The tree clearly showed that Lamellibrachia chain AIII belongs to the family of strain A of annelid giant haemoglobins, and that the two classes of Annelida, polychaete and oligochaete, and the vestimentiferan tube worm diverged at almost the same time. H.p.l.c. patterns of peptides (Figs. 4-7), amino acid compositions of peptides (Table 2) and amino acid sequences of

  7. Earthworm cast production as a new behavioural biomarker for toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capowiez, Yvan, E-mail: capowiez@avignon.inra.f [INRA, UR1115 ' Plantes et Systemes Horticoles' , Domaine Saint Paul, 84914 Avignon Cedex 09 (France); Dittbrenner, Nils [INRA, UR1115 ' Plantes et Systemes Horticoles' , Domaine Saint Paul, 84914 Avignon Cedex 09 (France); Animal Physiological Ecology, University of Tuebingen, Konrad-Adenauer-Str. 20, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany); Rault, Magali [UAPV, UMR406 ' Abeilles et Environnement' , Domaine Saint Paul, 84914 Avignon Cedex 09 (France); Triebskorn, Rita [Animal Physiological Ecology, University of Tuebingen, Konrad-Adenauer-Str. 20, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany); Hedde, Mickael [INRA, UR251 ' PESSAC' , RD10, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France); Mazzia, Christophe [UAPV, UMR406 ' Abeilles et Environnement' , Domaine Saint Paul, 84914 Avignon Cedex 09 (France)

    2010-02-15

    There is currently a lack of ecotoxicity tests adapted to earthworm species of higher ecological relevance and whose endpoints could be directly related to their ecological role in the soil. We propose a new and relatively simple ecotoxicity test based on the estimation of cast production (CP) by Lumbricus terrestris under laboratory conditions. CP was found to be linearly correlated to earthworm biomass and to be greatly influenced by soil water content. Azinphos-methyl had no effect on CP at all the concentrations tested. Significant decreases were observed at the normal application rate for other pesticides with (imidacloprid, carbaryl, methomyl) or without (ethyl-parathion and chlorpyrifos-ethyl) a clear concentration-effect response. For the highest concentration tested, reduction in CP varied between 35 and 67%. CP is straightforward and rapidly measured and ecologically meaningful. We thus believe it to be of great use as an endpoint in ecotoxicity testing. - Cast production of Lumbricus terrestris is affected by pesticides under laboratory conditions.

  8. Long-term ecological consequences of herbicide treatment to control the invasive grass, Spartina anglica, in an Australian saltmarsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimeta, Jeff; Saint, Lynnette; Verspaandonk, Emily R.; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Howe, Steffan

    2016-07-01

    Invasive plants acting as habitat modifiers in coastal wetlands can have extensive ecological impacts. Control of invasive plants often relies on herbicides, although little is known about subsequent environmental impacts. Studying effects of herbicides on non-target species and long-term cascading consequences may yield insights into the ecology of invasive species by revealing interactions with native species. We conducted a long-term field experiment measuring effects of treating the invasive saltmarsh grass, Spartina anglica, with the herbicide Fusilade Forte®. No changes in sedimentary macrofaunal abundances or species richness, diversity, or assemblages were detected 1-2 months after spraying, despite known toxicity of Fusilade Forte® to fauna. This lack of impact may have been due to low exposure, since the herbicide was taken up primarily by plant leaves, with the small amount that reached the sediment hydrolyzing rapidly. Six months after spraying, however, total macrofauna in treated plots was more than four times more abundant than in unsprayed control plots, due to a fifteen-fold increase in annelids. This population growth correlated with increased sedimentary organic matter in treated plots, likely due to decomposition of dead S. anglica leaves serving as food for annelids. After another year, no differences in macrofauna or organic matter remained between treatments. The indirect effect on annelid populations from herbicide treatment could benefit management efforts by providing greater food resources for wading birds, in addition to improving birds' access to sediments by reducing plant cover. This study shows that an invasive grass can have a significant impact on native fauna through food-web interactions, influenced by herbicide usage.

  9. Megascopic Symmetrical Metazoans from the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation in the Northeastern Guizhou, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yue; Wang Xunlian; Huang Yuming

    2008-01-01

    In South China, various megascopic symmetrical metazoan fossils were found in the upper Doushantuo (陡山沱)Formation of the Neoproterozoic Ediacaran.The worm-like fossil is characterized by modern taxological annelid, for many metameres, parapodia, one possible tentale, an alimentary canal, and a dorsal vessel. The triradiate discoidal fossil is belong to Trilobozoa, and the octaradiate discoidal fossil might be Ctenophora. All these fossils indicate that the megascopic metazoans have appeared in the Doushantuoian of Eidacaran and imply that the symmetrical metazoans must have originated at least 550 Ma ago.

  10. Gene structure of the two-domain taurocyamine kinase from Paragonimus westermani: evidence for a distinct lineage of trematode phosphagen kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarilla, Blanca R; Tokuhiro, Shinji; Nagataki, Mitsuru; Uda, Kouji; Suzuki, Tomohiko; Acosta, Luz P; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2013-07-11

    Taurocyamine kinase (TK) is an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphate between ATP and taurocyamine. Annelid TKs were suggested to have evolved from a CK ancestor. However, TKs from the lung fluke Paragonimus westermani comprised another lineage. Construction of phylogenetic tree and comparison of exon/intron organization showed that P. westermani TK and other trematode TKs evolved from a molluscan arginine kinase (AK) gene. Exon shuffling probably caused the changes in amino acid sequence thereby changing the affinity from AK to TK. The present study provides new insights on the evolution of phosphagen kinases found in trematodes.

  11. Scenarios for the making of vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Nicholas D; Holland, Linda Z; Holland, Peter W H

    2015-04-23

    Over the past 200 years, almost every invertebrate phylum has been proposed as a starting point for evolving vertebrates. Most of these scenarios are outdated, but several are still seriously considered. The short-range transition from ancestral invertebrate chordates (similar to amphioxus and tunicates) to vertebrates is well accepted. However, longer-range transitions leading up to the invertebrate chordates themselves are more controversial. Opinion is divided between the annelid and the enteropneust scenarios, predicting, respectively, a complex or a simple ancestor for bilaterian animals. Deciding between these ideas will be facilitated by further comparative studies of multicellular animals, including enigmatic taxa such as xenacoelomorphs.

  12. Morphological support for the phylogenetic positioning of Pentastomida and related fossils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Christine Costa Eloy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Pentastomida is a group of parasites that infects the respiratory tracts of vertebrates. They have a mixture of annelid and arthropod characteristics. For that reason, the phylogenetic relationships of the pentastomids have been controversial in proposals of metazoan phylogeny. Forty-seven characters were selected for the analyses of the taxa Annelida, Arthropoda, Kinorhyncha, Loricifera, Nematoda, Nematomorpha, Onychophora, Pentastomida, Priapulida and Tardigrada. The analyses with PAUP resulted in a single shortest cladogram (length 89, ci 0.78, ri 0.86. Our results indicate that Pentastomida is a transitional group between the Arthropoda and some of the Nemathelminth groups such as Nematoda and Nematomorpha.

  13. A close phylogenetic relationship between Sipuncula and Annelida evidenced from the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Phascolosoma esculenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Jianfeng

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many advantages to the application of complete mitochondrial (mt genomes in the accurate reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships in Metazoa. Although over one thousand metazoan genomes have been sequenced, the taxonomic sampling is highly biased, left with many phyla without a single representative of complete mitochondrial genome. Sipuncula (peanut worms or star worms is a small taxon of worm-like marine organisms with an uncertain phylogenetic position. In this report, we present the mitochondrial genome sequence of Phascolosoma esculenta, the first complete mitochondrial genome of the phylum. Results The mitochondrial genome of P.esculenta is 15,494 bp in length. The coding strand consists of 32.1% A, 21.5% C, 13.0% G, and 33.4% T bases (AT = 65.5%; AT skew = -0.019; GC skew = -0.248. It contains thirteen protein-coding genes (PCGs with 3,709 codons in total, twenty-two transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes and a non-coding AT-rich region (AT = 74.2%. All of the 37 identified genes are transcribed from the same DNA strand. Compared with the typical set of metazoan mt genomes, sipunculid lacks trnR but has an additional trnM. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analyses of the protein sequences show that Myzostomida, Sipuncula and Annelida (including echiurans and pogonophorans form a monophyletic group, which supports a closer relationship between Sipuncula and Annelida than with Mollusca, Brachiopoda, and some other lophotrochozoan groups. Conclusion This is the first report of a complete mitochondrial genome as a representative within the phylum Sipuncula. It shares many more similar features with the four known annelid and one echiuran mtDNAs. Firstly, sipunculans and annelids share quite similar gene order in the mitochondrial genome, with all 37 genes located on the same strand; secondly, phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated protein sequences also strongly support the sipunculan + annelid

  14. The phylogeny of invertebrates and the evolution of myelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roots, Betty I

    2008-05-01

    Current concepts of invertebrate phylogeny are reviewed. Annelida and Arthropoda, previously regarded as closely related, are now placed in separate clades. Myelin, a sheath of multiple layers of membranes around nerve axons, is found in members of the Annelida, Arthropoda and Chordata. The structure, composition and function of the sheaths in Annelida and Arthropoda are examined and evidence for the separate evolutionary origins of myelin in the three clades is presented. That myelin has arisen independently at least three times, namely in Annelids, Arthropodas and Chordates, provides a remarkable example of convergent evolution.

  15. Targets and Effects of Yessotoxin, Okadaic Acid and Palytoxin: A Differential Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Ottaviani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focus on processes, organs and systems targeted by the marine toxins yessotoxin (YTX, okadaic acid (OA and palytoxin (PTX. The effects of YTX and their basis are analyzed from data collected in the mollusc Mytilus galloprovincialis, the annelid Enchytraeus crypticus, Swiss CD1 mice and invertebrate and vertebrate cell cultures. OA and PTX, two toxins with a better established mode of action, are analyzed with regard to their effects on development. The amphibian Xenopus laevis is used as a model, and the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX as the experimental protocol.

  16. Nematode abundance at the oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Adam A.; Lambshead, P. John D.; Hawkins, Lawrence E.; Mitchell, Nicola; Levin, Lisa A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper supports the hypothesis that low oxygen does not influence deep-sea nematode abundance by investigating an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the Oman slope in the Arabian Sea. Correlation with a number of environmental variables indicated that food quality (measured as the hydrogen index) rather than oxygen was the major predictor of nematode abundance. Nematode abundance was also positively correlated with abundance of total macrofauna, annelids, spionid polychaetes and macrofaunal tube builders. Comparison with published data showed Arabian Sea nematode abundance to be similar to that of the Porcupine Seabight and Bay of Biscay regions of the northeast Atlantic, which also receive significant quantities of phytodetritus but have no OMZ.

  17. [Structure of the glial cells in the nervous system of parasitic and free-living flatworms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biserova, N M; Gordeev, I I; Korneva, Zh V; Sal'nikova, M M

    2010-01-01

    This study is devoted to ultrastructural and immunosytochemical investigation of the nervous system in parasitic and free-living platyhelminthes to learn if glial cells exist in the nervous system of flatworms. We described the ultrastructure of different types of glial cells and the peculiarities of myelinization of gigantic axons; immunoreactivity to the S100b protein is revealed. Comparative analysis of the glia structure of annelids and platods is given; structural, functional, and evolutionary aspects of myelinization of gigantic axons, which are revealed in cestodes, are discussed.

  18. HmCRIP, a cysteine-rich intestinal protein, is expressed by an identified regenerating nerve cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emes, R D; Wang, W-Z; Lanary, K; Blackshaw, S E

    2003-01-02

    A Hirudo medicinalis cDNA isolated from regenerating CNS tissue at 24 h post-axotomy was identified as a leech homologue of the mammalian cysteine-rich intestinal proteins (CRIPs) and named HmCRIP. HmCRIP is up-regulated within 6 h of axotomy, peaking at 24 h. This is the first demonstration of a CRIP homologue in regenerating CNS and in a serotonergic neurone. In rodents CRIP is an important factor in the regulation of the inflammatory immune response through control of Th1/Th2 differentiation. The role of HmCRIP in the regeneration competent environment of the annelid central nervous system is discussed.

  19. Second contribution to the knowledge of earthworms (Lumbricidae in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Mirjana M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains the results of qualitative analysis of Lumbricidae (Oligochaeta in Montenegro, during the period 1997-2003. The research has included natural and cultivated biotopes. The presence of 15 species was established and the habitats, localities and their zoogeographical position are given. In Montenegro we found four species for the first time Dendrobaena jastrebensis, D. vejdovskyi, Octodrilus bretcheri and Lumbricus terrestris. The complete list of earthworm species in Montenegro includes 45 taxa. With respects to the zoogeographic situation of the earthworms in Montenegro, the largest number belongs to endemic (10 and European (10 species. But 8 taxa are south-European, 9 Holarctic, 7 cosmopolitan, and 1 Palearctic. The degree of endemism of the earthworm fauna of Montenegro is quite high, exceeding 22.2%.

  20. Combinatorics of giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanin, L G; Vinogradov, S N

    2000-01-01

    The paper discusses combinatorial and probabilistic models allowing to characterize various aspects of spacial symmetry and structural heterogeneity of the giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins (HBL Hb). Linker-dodecamer configurations of HBL are described for two and four linker types (occurring in the two most studied HBL Hb of Arenicola and Lumbricus, respectively), and the most probable configurations are found. It is shown that, for HBL with marked dodecamers, the number of 'normal-marked' pairs of dodecamers in homological position follows a binomial distribution. The group of symmetries of the dodecamer substructure of HBL is identified with the dihedral group D6. Under natural symmetry assumptions, the total dipole moment of the dodecamer substructure of HBL is shown to be zero. Biological implications of the mathematical findings are discussed.

  1. Arsenic resistance and cycling in earthworms residing at a former gold mine in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Mark; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2012-10-01

    Earthworms (Lumbricus castaneous and Dendrodrilus rubidus), their host soils and leaf litter were collected from a former gold mine with widespread arsenic (As) contamination in Nova Scotia, Canada and determined for total and speciated As. Resistance to As toxicity was investigated by measurement of DNA damage in exposed earthworm populations using the comet assay. Arsenobetaine (AB) was observed at low concentration in the earthworms but not in the host soil or leaf litter. Several different organoarsenic species were observed in the leaf litter and only inorganic As was found in the host soils. The results suggest that 1) adaptation to As toxicity in earthworms is widespread and not particular to a single species, 2) AB originates in the earthworm and not the consumed soil or leaf litter and 3) as previously hypothesised (Button et al., 2010), biotransformation of inorganic As to AB is not likely involved in the adaptation.

  2. Utilizing thin-film solid-phase extraction to assess the effect of organic carbon amendments on the bioavailability of DDT and dieldrin to earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Natasha A.; Centofanti, Tiziana; McConnell, Laura L.; Hapeman, Cathleen J.; Torrents, Alba; Anh, Nguyen; Beyer, W. Nelson; Chaney, Rufus L.; Novak, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Marya O.; Cantrell, Keri B.

    2014-01-01

    Improved approaches are needed to assess bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds in contaminated soils. Performance of thin-film solid-phase extraction (TF-SPE) using vials coated with ethylene vinyl acetate was compared to earthworm bioassay (Lumbricus terrestris). A DDT and dieldrin contaminated soil was amended with four organic carbon materials to assess the change in bioavailability. Addition of organic carbon significantly lowered bioavailability for all compounds except for 4,4′-DDT. Equilibrium concentrations of compounds in the polymer were correlated with uptake by earthworms after 48d exposure (R2 = 0.97; p 40yr of aging. Results show that TF-SPE can be useful in examining potential risks associated with contaminated soils and to test effectiveness of remediation efforts.

  3. Echinococcus granulosus: Cloning and Functional in Vitro Characterization of an Actin Filament Fragmenting Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez-Herrera, E; Yamamoto, R R; Rodrigues, J J; Farias, S E; Ferreira, H B; Zaha, A

    2001-04-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of an Echinococcus granulosus gene that codes for a protein with actin filament fragmenting and nucleating activities (EgAFFP). The genomic region corresponding to the EgAFFP gene presents a coding sequence of 1110 bp that is interrupted by eight introns. The EgAFFP deduced amino acid sequence is about 40% homologous to those of several members of the gelsolin family, such as Physarum polycephalum fragmin, Dictyostelium discoideum severin, and Lumbricus terrestris actin modulator. As do other proteins of the same family, EgAFFP presents three repeated domains, each one characterized by internal conserved amino acid motifs. Assays with fluorescence-labeled actin showed that the full-length recombinant EgAFFP effectively binds actin monomers in both a calcium-dependent and calcium-independent manner and also presents actin nucleating and severing activities.

  4. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of cDNA Encoding Fibrinolytic Enzyme-3 from Earthworm Eisenia foetida

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Qing DONG; Xiao-Ling YUAN; Ya-Jun SHAN; Zhen-Hu ZHAO; Jia-Pei CHEN; Yu-Wen CONG

    2004-01-01

    The earthworm fibrinolytic enzyme-3 (EFE-3, GenBank accession No: AY438622), from the earthworm Eiseniafoetida, is a component of earthworm fibrinolytic enzymes. In this study, cDNA encoding the EFE-3 was cloned by RT-PCR. The eDNA contained an open reading frame of 741 nucleotides, which encoded a deduced protein of 247 amino acid residues, including signal sequences. EFE-3 showed a high degree of homology to earthworm (Lumbricus rebullus) proteases F-III-1, F-III-2, and bovine trypsin. The recombinant EFE-3 was expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies, and the gene encoding the native form of EFE-3 was expressed in COS-7 cells in the medium. Both the refolding product of inclusion bodies and the secreted protease could dissolve the artificial fibrin plate.

  5. Cellular and muscular growth patterns during sipunculan development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristof, Alen; Wollesen, Tim; Maiorova, Anastassya S; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-05-15

    Sipuncula is a lophotrochozoan taxon with annelid affinities, albeit lacking segmentation of the adult body. Here, we present data on cell proliferation and myogenesis during development of three sipunculan species, Phascolosoma agassizii, Thysanocardia nigra, and Themiste pyroides. The first anlagen of the circular body wall muscles appear simultaneously and not subsequently as in the annelids. At the same time, the rudiments of four longitudinal retractor muscles appear. This supports the notion that four introvert retractors were part of the ancestral sipunculan bodyplan. The longitudinal muscle fibers form a pattern of densely arranged fibers around the retractor muscles, indicating that the latter evolved from modified longitudinal body wall muscles. For a short time interval, the distribution of S-phase mitotic cells shows a metameric pattern in the developing ventral nerve cord during the pelagosphera stage. This pattern disappears close to metamorphic competence. Our findings are congruent with data on sipunculan neurogenesis, as well as with recent molecular analyses that place Sipuncula within Annelida, and thus strongly support a segmental ancestry of Sipuncula.

  6. Molecular adaptation to an extreme environment: origin of the thermal stability of the pompeii worm collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicot, F X; Mesnage, M; Masselot, M; Exposito, J Y; Garrone, R; Deutsch, J; Gaill, F

    2000-09-29

    The annelid Alvinella pompejana is probably the most heat-tolerant metazoan organism known. Previous results have shown that the level of thermal stability of its interstitial collagen is significantly greater than that of coastal annelids and of vent organisms, such as the vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila, living in colder parts of the deep-sea hydrothermal environment. In order to investigate the molecular basis of this thermal behavior, we cloned and sequenced a large cDNA molecule coding the fibrillar collagen of Alvinella, including one half of the helical domain and the entire C-propeptide domain. For comparison, we also cloned the 3' part of the homologous cDNA from Riftia. Comparison of the corresponding helical domains of these two species, together with that of the previously sequenced domain of the coastal lugworm Arenicola marina, showed that the increase in proline content and in the number of stabilizing triplets correlate with the outstanding thermostability of the interstitial collagen of A. pompejana. Phylogenetic analysis showed that triple helical and the C-propeptide parts of the same collagen molecule evolve at different rates, in favor of an adaptive mechanism at the molecular level.

  7. Dietary partitioning by five sympatric species of stingray (Dasyatidae) on coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, O R; Thums, M; van Keulen, M; Kempster, R M; Meekan, M G

    2013-06-01

    Dietary characteristics and the degree of dietary partitioning by five species of sympatric stingray were assessed using stomach content and sediment analyses within a coral reef lagoon at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia (the cowtail Pastinachus atrus, blue-spotted fantail Taeniura lymma, blue-spotted mask Neotrygon kuhlii, porcupine Urogymnus asperrimus rays and the reticulate whipray Himantura uarnak). A total of 2804 items were recovered from the stomachs of 170 rays and 3215 individual taxa from the environment, which were used in selectivity analyses. Twenty-four prey taxa were identified from stomach contents and pooled into 10 taxonomic categories for analysis, of which annelids, prawns, brachyurans and bivalves were the most abundant, together accounting for 96% of the diet. Himantura uarnak had the greatest interspecific dissimilarity in diet, consuming a larger proportion of crustaceans, notably penaeids (41% of total diet) than the other four species of rays, all of which had diets dominated by annelids (71-82% of total diet). Crustacean specialization by H. uarnak may exist to maximize resources and reduce competition among sympatric species. The remaining species may partition resources on the basis of space, rather than diet.

  8. Mouthparts of the Burgess Shale fossils Odontogriphus and Wiwaxia: implications for the ancestral molluscan radula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin R

    2012-10-22

    The Middle Cambrian lophotrochozoans Odontogriphus omalus and Wiwaxia corrugata have been interpreted as stem-group members of either the Mollusca, the Annelida, or a group containing Mollusca + Annelida. The case for each classification rests on the organisms' unusual mouthparts, whose two to three tooth-rows resemble both the molluscan radula and the jaws of certain annelid worms. Despite their potential significance, these mouthparts have not previously been described in detail. This study examined the feeding apparatuses of over 300 specimens from the 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale, many of which were studied for the first time. Rather than denticulate plates, each tooth row comprises a single axial tooth that is flanked on each side by eight to 16 separate shoehorn-shaped teeth. Tooth rows sat on a grooved basal tongue, and two large lobes flanked the apparatus. New observations--the shape, distribution and articulation of the individual teeth, and the mouthparts' mode of growth--are incompatible with an annelid interpretation, instead supporting a classification in Mollusca. The ancestral molluscan radula is best reconstructed as unipartite with a symmetrical medial tooth, and Odontogriphus and Wiwaxia as grazing deposit-feeders.

  9. Embryonic chirality and the evolution of spiralian left–right asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The group Spiralia includes species with one of the most significant cases of left–right asymmetries in animals: the coiling of the shell of gastropod molluscs (snails). In this animal group, an early event of embryonic chirality controlled by cytoskeleton dynamics and the subsequent differential activation of the genes nodal and Pitx determine the left–right axis of snails, and thus the direction of coiling of the shell. Despite progressive advances in our understanding of left–right axis specification in molluscs, little is known about left–right development in other spiralian taxa. Here, we identify and characterize the expression of nodal and Pitx orthologues in three different spiralian animals—the brachiopod Novocrania anomala, the annelid Owenia fusiformis and the nemertean Lineus ruber—and demonstrate embryonic chirality in the biradial-cleaving spiralian embryo of the bryozoan Membranipora membranacea. We show asymmetric expression of nodal and Pitx in the brachiopod and annelid, respectively, and symmetric expression of Pitx in the nemertean. Our findings indicate that early embryonic chirality is widespread and independent of the cleavage programme in the Spiralia. Additionally, our study illuminates the evolution of nodal and Pitx signalling by demonstrating embryonic asymmetric expression in lineages without obvious adult left–right asymmetries. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Provocative questions in left–right asymmetry’. PMID:27821523

  10. Mitochondrial genome sequence and gene order of Sipunculus nudus give additional support for an inclusion of Sipuncula into Annelida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomaeus Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial genomes are a valuable source of data for analysing phylogenetic relationships. Besides sequence information, mitochondrial gene order may add phylogenetically useful information, too. Sipuncula are unsegmented marine worms, traditionally placed in their own phylum. Recent molecular and morphological findings suggest a close affinity to the segmented Annelida. Results The first complete mitochondrial genome of a member of Sipuncula, Sipunculus nudus, is presented. All 37 genes characteristic for metazoan mtDNA were detected and are encoded on the same strand. The mitochondrial gene order (protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes resembles that of annelids, but shows several derivations so far found only in Sipuncula. Sequence based phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial protein-coding genes results in significant bootstrap support for Annelida sensu lato, combining Annelida together with Sipuncula, Echiura, Pogonophora and Myzostomida. Conclusion The mitochondrial sequence data support a close relationship of Annelida and Sipuncula. Also the most parsimonious explanation of changes in gene order favours a derivation from the annelid gene order. These results complement findings from recent phylogenetic analyses of nuclear encoded genes as well as a report of a segmental neural patterning in Sipuncula.

  11. Molecular phylogeny of echiuran worms (Phylum: Annelida reveals evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Goto

    Full Text Available The Echiura, or spoon worms, are a group of marine worms, most of which live in burrows in soft sediments. This annelid-like animal group was once considered as a separate phylum because of the absence of segmentation, although recent molecular analyses have placed it within the annelids. In this study, we elucidate the interfamily relationships of echiuran worms and their evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism, by performing molecular phylogenetic analyses using four genes (18S, 28S, H3, and COI of representatives of all extant echiuran families. Our results suggest that Echiura is monophyletic and comprises two unexpected groups: [Echiuridae+Urechidae+Thalassematidae] and [Bonelliidae+Ikedidae]. This grouping agrees with the presence/absence of marked sexual dimorphism involving dwarf males and the paired/non-paired configuration of the gonoducts (genital sacs. Furthermore, the data supports the sister group relationship of Echiuridae and Urechidae. These two families share the character of having anal chaetae rings around the posterior trunk as a synapomorphy. The analyses also suggest that deposit feeding is a basal feeding mode in echiurans and that filter feeding originated once in the common ancestor of Urechidae. Overall, our results contradict the currently accepted order-level classification, especially in that Echiuroinea is polyphyletic, and provide novel insights into the evolution of echiuran worms.

  12. Oxygen Requirements for the Cambrian Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingliang Zhang; Linhao Cui

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic tolerance experiments may be helpful to constrain the oxygen requirement for animal evolution. Based on literature review, available data demonstrate that fishes are more sensitive to hypoxia than crustaceans and echinoderms, which in turn are more sensitive than annelids, whilst mollusks are the least sensitive. Mortalities occur where O2 concentrations are below 2.0 mg/L, equivalent to saturation with oxygen content about 25% PAL (present atmospheric level). Therefore, the minimal oxygen requirement for maintaining animal diversity since Cambrian is determined as 25% PAL. The traditional view is that a rise in atmospheric oxygen concentrations led to the oxygenation of the ocean, thus triggering the evolution of animals. Geological and geochemical studies suggest a constant increase of the oxygen level and a contraction of anoxic oceans during Ediacaran–Cambrian transition when the world oceans experienced a rapid diversification of metazoan lineages. However, fossil first appearances of animal phyla are obviously asynchronous and episodic, showing a sequence as:basal metazoans>lophotrochozoans>ecdysozoans and deuterostomes. According to hitherto known data of fossil record and hypoxic sensitivity of animals, the appearance sequence of different animals is broadly consistent with their hypoxic sensitivity:animals like molluscs and annelids that are less sensitive to hypoxia appeared earlier, while animals like echinoderms and fishes that are more sensitive to hypoxia came later. Therefore, it is very likely that the appearance order of animals is corresponding to the increasing oxygen level and/or the contraction of anoxic oceans during Ediacaran–Cambrian transition.

  13. Myzostomida: a link between trochozoans and flatworms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeckhaut, I; McHugh, D; Mardulyn, P; Tiedemann, R; Monteyne, D; Jangoux, M; Milinkovitch, M C

    2000-07-22

    Myzostomids are obligate symbiotic invertebrates associated with echinoderms with a fossil record that extends to the Ordovician period. Due to their long history as host-specific symbionts, myzostomids have acquired a unique anatomy that obscures their phylogenetic affinities to other metazoans: they are incompletely segmented, parenchymous, acoelomate organisms with chaetae and a trochophore larva. Today, they are most often classified within annelids either as an aberrant family of polychaetes or as a separate class. We inferred the phylogenetic position of the Myzostomida by analysing the DNA sequences of two slowly evolving nuclear genes: the small subunit ribosomal RNA and elongation factor-1alpha. All our analyses congruently indicated that myzostomids are not annelids but suggested instead that they are more closely related to flatworms than to any trochozoan taxon. These results, together with recent analyses of the myzostomidan ultrastructure, have significant implications for understanding the evolution of metazoan body plans, as major characters (segmentation, coeloms, chaetae and trochophore larvae) might have been independently lost or gained in different animal phyla.

  14. Timing and Scope of Genomic Expansion within Annelida: Evidence from Homeoboxes in the Genome of the Earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarycz, Allison S; Nossa, Carlos W; Putnam, Nicholas H; Ryan, Joseph F

    2015-12-10

    Annelida represents a large and morphologically diverse group of bilaterian organisms. The recently published polychaete and leech genome sequences revealed an equally dynamic range of diversity at the genomic level. The availability of more annelid genomes will allow for the identification of evolutionary genomic events that helped shape the annelid lineage and better understand the diversity within the group. We sequenced and assembled the genome of the common earthworm, Eisenia fetida. As a first pass at understanding the diversity within the group, we classified 363 earthworm homeoboxes and compared them with those of the leech Helobdella robusta and the polychaete Capitella teleta. We inferred many gene expansions occurring in the lineage connecting the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of Capitella and Eisenia to the Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA. Likewise, the lineage leading from the Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA to the leech H. robusta has experienced substantial gains and losses. However, the lineage leading from Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA to E. fetida is characterized by extraordinary levels of homeobox gain. The evolutionary dynamics observed in the homeoboxes of these lineages are very likely to be generalizable to all genes. These genome expansions and losses have likely contributed to the remarkable biology exhibited in this group. These results provide a new perspective from which to understand the diversity within these lineages, show the utility of sub-draft genome assemblies for understanding genomic evolution, and provide a critical resource from which the biology of these animals can be studied.

  15. Apes finding ants: Predator-prey dynamics in a chimpanzee habitat in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Garrido, Alejandra; Umaru, Buba; Allon, Oliver; Sommer, Volker

    2013-12-01

    Some chimpanzee populations prey upon army ants, usually with stick tools. However, how their prey's subterranean nesting and nomadic lifestyle influence the apes' harvesting success is still poorly understood. This is particularly true for chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes ellioti) at Gashaka/Nigeria, which consume army ants (Dorylus rubellus) with much higher frequency than at other sites. We assessed various harvesting and search options theoretically available to the apes. For this, we reconstructed annual consumption patterns from feces and compared the physical characteristics of exploited ant nests with those that were not targeted. Repeated exploitation of a discovered nest is viable only in the short term, as disturbed colonies soon moved to a new site. Moreover, monitoring previously occupied nest cavities is uneconomical, as ants hardly ever re-used them. Thus, the apes have to detect new nests regularly, although colony density is relatively low (1 colony/1.3 ha). Surprisingly, visual search cues seem to be of limited importance because the probability of a nest being exploited was independent of its conspicuousness (presence of excavated soil piles, concealing leaf-litter or vegetation). However, chimpanzees preferentially targeted nests in forests or at the base of food trees, that is, where the apes spend relatively more time and/or where ant colony density is highest. Taken together, our findings suggest that, instead of employing a search strategy based on visual cues or spatial memory, chimpanzee predation on army ants contains a considerable opportunistic element.

  16. Insights into metazoan evolution from alvinella pompejana cDNAs

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    Thierry Jean-Claude

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alvinella pompejana is a representative of Annelids, a key phylum for evo-devo studies that is still poorly studied at the sequence level. A. pompejana inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vents and is currently known as one of the most thermotolerant Eukaryotes in marine environments, withstanding the largest known chemical and thermal ranges (from 5 to 105°C. This tube-dwelling worm forms dense colonies on the surface of hydrothermal chimneys and can withstand long periods of hypo/anoxia and long phases of exposure to hydrogen sulphides. A. pompejana specifically inhabits chimney walls of hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise. To survive, Alvinella has developed numerous adaptations at the physiological and molecular levels, such as an increase in the thermostability of proteins and protein complexes. It represents an outstanding model organism for studying adaptation to harsh physicochemical conditions and for isolating stable macromolecules resistant to high temperatures. Results We have constructed four full length enriched cDNA libraries to investigate the biology and evolution of this intriguing animal. Analysis of more than 75,000 high quality reads led to the identification of 15,858 transcripts and 9,221 putative protein sequences. Our annotation reveals a good coverage of most animal pathways and networks with a prevalence of transcripts involved in oxidative stress resistance, detoxification, anti-bacterial defence, and heat shock protection. Alvinella proteins seem to show a slow evolutionary rate and a higher similarity with proteins from Vertebrates compared to proteins from Arthropods or Nematodes. Their composition shows enrichment in positively charged amino acids that might contribute to their thermostability. The gene content of Alvinella reveals that an important pool of genes previously considered to be specific to Deuterostomes were in fact already present in the last common ancestor of the Bilaterian

  17. Expression of the Lhx genes apterous and lim1 in an errant polychaete: implications for bilaterian appendage evolution, neural development, and muscle diversification

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    Winchell Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod and vertebrate appendages appear to have evolved via parallel co-option of a plesiomorphic gene regulatory network. Our previous work implies that annelids evolved unrelated appendage-forming mechanisms; we therefore found no support for homology of parapodia and arthropodia at the level of the whole appendage. We expand on that study here by asking whether expression of the LIM homeobox (Lhx genes apterous and lim1 in the annelid Neanthes arenaceodentata supports homology of the dorsal branches as well as the proximodistal axes of parapodia and arthropodia. In addition, we explore whether the neural expression of apterous and lim1 in Neanthes supports the putative ancestral function of the Lhx gene family in regulating the differentiation and maintenance of neuronal subtypes. Results Both genes exhibit continuous expression in specific portions of the developing central nervous system, from hatching to at least the 13-chaetiger stage. For example, nerve cord expression occurs in segmentally iterated patterns consisting of diffuse sets of many lim1-positive cells and comparatively fewer, clustered pairs of apterous-positive cells. Additionally, continuous apterous expression is observed in presumed neurosecretory ganglia of the posterior brain, while lim1 is continuously expressed in stomatogastric ganglia of the anterior brain. apterous is also expressed in the jaw sacs, dorsal parapodial muscles, and a presumed pair of cephalic sensory organs, whereas lim1 is expressed in multiple pharyngeal ganglia, the segmental peripheral nervous system, neuropodial chaetal sac muscles, and parapodial ligules. Conclusions The early and persistent nervous system expression of apterous and lim1 in Neanthes juveniles supports conservation of Lhx function in bilaterian neural differentiation and maintenance. Our results also suggest that diversification of parapodial muscle precursors involves a complementary LIM code similar to

  18. The normal development of Platynereis dumerilii (Nereididae, Annelida

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    Henrich Thorsten

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii is an emerging model organism for the study of molecular developmental processes, evolution, neurobiology and marine biology. Annelids belong to the Lophotrochozoa, the so far understudied third major branch of bilaterian animals besides deuterostomes and ecdysozoans. P. dumerilii has proven highly relevant to explore ancient bilaterian conditions via comparison to the deuterostomes, because it has accumulated less evolutionary change than conventional ecdysozoan models. Previous staging was mainly referring to hours post fertilization but did not allow matching stages between studies performed at (even slightly different temperatures. To overcome this, and to provide a first comprehensive description of P. dumerilii normal development, a temperature-independent staging system is needed. Results Platynereis dumerilii normal development is subdivided into 16 stages, starting with the zygote and ending with the death of the mature worms after delivering their gametes. The stages described can be easily identified by conventional light microscopy or even by dissecting scope. Developmental landmarks such as the beginning of phototaxis, the visibility of the stomodeal opening and of the chaetae, the first occurrence of the ciliary bands, the formation of the parapodia, the extension of antennae and cirri, the onset of feeding and other characteristics are used to define different developmental stages. The morphology of all larval stages as well as of juveniles and adults is documented by light microscopy. We also provide an overview of important steps in the development of the nervous system and of the musculature, using fluorescent labeling techniques and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Timing of each developmental stage refers to hours post fertilization at 18 ± 0.1°C. For comparison, we determined the pace of development of larvae raised at 14°C, 16°C, 20°C, 25°C, 28°C and

  19. Evolutionary loss of animal regeneration: pattern and process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bely, Alexandra E

    2010-10-01

    The ability to regenerate lost or damaged body parts is widespread among animals and provides obvious potential benefits. It is therefore perplexing that this ability has become greatly restricted or completely lost in many lineages. Despite growing interest in the cellular and molecular basis of regeneration, our understanding of how and why regenerative abilities are lost remains rudimentary. In an effort to develop a framework for studying losses of regeneration, here I outline an approach for rigorously identifying such losses, review broad patterns of regenerative ability across animals, describe some of the clearest examples of regeneration loss, discuss some possible scenarios by which regeneration may be lost, and review recent work in annelids that is providing new insights into loss of regenerative ability.

  20. The reproduction of Enchytraeus sp.--technical improvement for the counting of juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matějů, Vít; Vosáhlová, Simona; Kyclt, Robin; Janoch, Tomáš; Šedivcová, Gabriela

    2014-02-01

    Soil-dwelling annelids of the genus Enchytraeus are used in ecotoxicology for testing of chemicals mixed in artificial soil or for testing of wastes and soils of unknown quality. ISO 16387 describes a method for determining the effects of substances or contaminated soils on survival and reproduction of Enchytraeus albidus or of the smaller species Enchytraeus buchholzi or Enchy-traeus crypticus. After the total test duration of 6 (or 4) weeks, the juveniles hatched in the meantime are counted. There are several possible extraction techniques, which are always followed by counting the juveniles by hand, but none of them seems easy to handle. We proposed a new modification of the worm extraction method using flotation of fixed and stained juveniles followed by taking a photograph. The digital image of the juveniles is evaluated by computer processing. It makes the counting of juveniles much easier and less labor intensive.

  1. Host Matters: Medicinal Leech Digestive-Tract Symbionts and their Pathogenic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah Marden

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Digestive-tract microbiota exert tremendous influence over host health. Host-symbiont model systems are studied to investigate how symbioses are initiated and maintained, as well as to identify host processes affected by resident microbiota. The medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, is an excellent model to address such questions owing to a microbiome that is consistently dominanted by two species, Aeromonas veronii and Mucinivorans hirudinis, both of which are cultivable and have sequenced genomes. This review outlines current knowledge about the dynamics of the H. verbana microbiome. We discuss in depth the factors required for A. veronii colonization and proliferation in the leech crop and summarize the current understanding of interactions between A. veronii and its annelid host. Lastly, we discuss leech usage in modern medicine and highlight how leech-therapy associated infections, often attributable to Aeromonas spp., are of growing clinical concern due in part to an increased prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistant strains.

  2. A New Approach in Teaching the Features and Classifications of Invertebrate Animals in Biology Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih SEZEK

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effectiveness of a new learning approach in teaching classification of invertebrate animals in biology courses. In this approach, we used an impersonal style: the subject jigsaw, which differs from the other jigsaws in that both course topics and student groups are divided. Students in Jigsaw group were divided into five “subgroups” since teaching the features and classification of invertebrate animals is divided into five subtopics (modules A, B, C, D and E. The subtopics are concerning characteristics used in classification of invertebrate animals and fundamental structures of: phyla porifera and cnidarians (module A, annelid (module B, mollusks (module C, arthropods (module D and Echinodermata (module E. The data obtained in the tests indicated that the the new learning approach was more successful than teacher-centered learning.

  3. Symbiosis insights through metagenomic analysis of a microbialconsortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman,Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-09-01

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here, we used a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut, and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model which describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments which it inhabits.

  4. Metagenomic Analysis of Microbial Symbionts in a Gutless Worm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman, Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boeffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-05-01

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here we use a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulphur-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, thus providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model that describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments that it inhabits.

  5. Articulated Wiwaxia from the Cambrian Stage 3 Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Smith, Martin R.; Lan, Tian; Hou, Jin-Bo; Zhang, Xi-Guang

    2014-04-01

    Wiwaxia is a bizarre metazoan that has been interpreted as a primitive mollusc and as a polychaete annelid worm. Extensive material from the Burgess Shale provides a detailed picture of its morphology and ontogeny, but the fossil record outside this lagerstätte is scarce, and complete wiwaxiids are particularly rare. Here we report small articulated specimens of Wiwaxia foliosa sp. nov. from the Xiaoshiba fauna (Cambrian Stage 3, Hongjingshao Formation, Kunming, south China). Although spines are absent, the fossils' sclerites - like those of W. corrugata - are symmetrically arranged in five distinct zones. They form rows across the body, and were individually added and shed throughout growth to retain an approximately symmetrical body shape. Their development pattern suggests a molluscan affinity. The basic body plan of wiwaxiids is fundamentally conserved across two continents through Cambrian Stages 3-5 - revealing morphological stasis in the wake of the Cambrian explosion.

  6. A biogeographical analysis of the polychaetes (Annelida: Polychaeta from the gulf of Tehuantepec, México.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivianne Solís-Weiss

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The biogeographic affinities of 84 species of annelid polychaetes collected in the continental shelf of the Gulf of Tehuantepec are surveyed in this study. Four predominant faunistic assemblages were found: Wide distribution (24,99%, Amphiamerican (21,42%, Pacific (42,84% and Disjunct (10,91%; those were defined from the eleven most generalized groups found there (Cosmopolitan, Circumtropical, Amphiamerican extended, Amphiamerican warm waters, Northeastern Pacific, Eastern tropical Pacific, Indopacific, Transpacific, Amphiamerican-Eastern Atlantic, Amphiamerican-Western Pacific, Eastern Pacific-Eastern Atlantic. The distribution patterns as well as the migration hypotheses that might explain the present distribution are discussed, and comparisons are made with recent biogeographic studies in nearby areas in the eastern Pacific such as Panama, Colombia and western Mexico.

  7. Feeding habits of Solea senegalensis in earthen ponds in Sado estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo Branco, Maria Ana; Arruda, Marco A.; Gamito, Sofia

    2010-11-01

    The senegale sole, Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858, is a commercially valuable fish and it is beginning to be cultured in a semi-intensive way in fish farms in southern European countries. The present study was initiated to investigate the diet of S. senegalensis under semi-extensive conditions. The feeding habits of sole were studied in two earthen ponds of a fish farm in the Sado estuary. In one earthen pond, artificial fish ration was given. S. senegalensis feeds on few prey items, its diet is mainly composed of insect larvae ( Chironomus salinarus) and polychaeta ( Hediste diversicolor). The diet composition of this species suggests feeding specialization, by consuming mainly annelids and insect larvae and by avoiding other items, extremely abundant in the environment, such as gastropods. In the water reservoir where ration was given, some fish consumed simultaneously benthic organism together with ration. However, benthic organisms seem to be the most important component of S. senegalensis diet.

  8. Southern hemisphere deep-water stylasterid corals including a new species, Errinalabrosa sp. n. (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa, Stylasteridae), with notes on some symbiotic scalpellids (Cirripedia, Thoracica, Scalpellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Daniela; Cairns, Stephen D; Puce, Stefania; Newman, William A

    2015-01-01

    A number of stylasterid corals are known to act as host species and create refuges for a variety of mobile and sessile organisms, which enhances their habitat complexity. These include annelids, anthozoans, cirripeds, copepods, cyanobacteria, echinoderms, gastropods, hydroids and sponges. Here we report the first evidence of a diverse association between stylasterids and scalpellid pedunculate barnacles and describe a new stylasterid species, Errinalabrosa, from the Tristan da Cunha Archipelago. Overall, five stylasterid species are found to host eight scalpellid barnacles from several biogeographic regions in the southern hemisphere (Southern Ocean, temperate South America and the southern Indo-Pacific realms). There is an apparent lack of specificity in this kind of association and different grades of reaction to the symbiosis have been observed in the coral. These records suggest that the association between pedunculate barnacles and hard stylasterid corals has a wide distribution among different biogeographic realms and that it is relatively rare and confined largely to deep water.

  9. Benthos response following petroleum exploration in the southern Caspian Sea: Relating effects of nonaqueous drilling fluid, water depth, and dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, R D; Maxon, C L; Parr, T D; Newton, F C

    2016-09-15

    The effects of linear alpha olefin (LAO) nonaqueous drilling fluid on benthic macrofauna were assessed over a six year period at a southern Caspian Sea petroleum exploration site. A wide-ranging, pre-drilling survey identified a relatively diverse shelf-depth macrofauna numerically dominated by amphipods, cumaceans, and gastropods that transitioned to a less diverse assemblage dominated by hypoxia-tolerant annelid worms and motile ostracods with increasing depth. After drilling, a similar transition in macrofauna assemblage was observed with increasing concentration of LAO proximate to the shelf-depth well site. Post-drilling results were consistent with a hypothesis of hypoxia from microbial degradation of LAO, supported by the presence of bacterial mats and lack of oxygen penetration in surface sediment. Chemical and biological recoveries at ≥200m distance from the well site were evident 33months after drilling ceased. Our findings show the importance of monitoring recovery over time and understanding macrofauna community structure prior to drilling.

  10. Distribution of O-glycosylhydrolases in marine invertebrates. Enzymes of the marine mollusk Littorina kurila that catalyze fucoidan transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaykin, M I; Burtseva, Yu V; Svetasheva, T G; Sova, V V; Zvyagintseva, T N

    2003-03-01

    The distribution of O-glycosylhydrolases (fucoidan hydrolases, alpha-D-mannosidases, beta-D-glucosidases, and beta-D-galactosidases) in 30 species of marine invertebrates occurring in the Sea of Japan was studied. It is shown that fucoidanases and glycosidases are widespread in the animals analyzed. Some molluscan, annelid, and echinoderm species can probably serve as objects for isolation and detailed study of the fucoidan-hydrolyzing enzymes. Fucoidan hydrolase, alpha-L-fucosidase, and arylsulfatase from the marine mollusk Littorina kurila were isolated and described. It was found that alpha-L-fucosidase and arylsulfatase hydrolyze synthetic substrates and cannot hydrolyze natural fucoidan, whereas fucoidan hydrolase cleaves fucoidan to produce sulfated oligosaccharides and fucose.

  11. [Spatial and temporal distribution of benthic Polychaeta from the continental shelf of Tamaulipas, Gulf of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Blas, V H

    2001-03-01

    In three oceanographic cruises off southern Tamaulipas (May, July and November, 1992), a total of 102 sediment samples were collected by autonomous diving at depths of 2.5 to 20.5 m, with a cylindrical 4 liter acrylic tube. The samples were sieved (aperture size 0.5 and 1.0 mm). In total, 88 species of polychaete annelids were determined (33 families); 15 species are first records for Mexico and three for the Gulf of Mexico. The dominant species were Paraprionospio pinnata, Scoletoma verrilli, Ceratocephale oculata, Aricidea finitima, Apoprionospio pygmaea, Onuphis eremita oculata and Prionospio cristata; P. pinnata was the most abundant (14.4% of the total). Highest abundance and diversity of species was in May (63 species and 622 organisms), followed by July (48 species and 401 organism); November was lowest (47 species and 217 organisms). Most diversity and abundance were found in the sandy bottoms.

  12. Reflections about chance in my career, and on the top-down regulated world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banse, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Paraphrasing Pasteur, in scientific work Fortuna favors only the prepared mind. This is illustrated by my career after an incidental escape from the former German East Prussia just ahead of the Red Army, my switch in Kiel from zoology to oceanography, and my learning of a vacancy in Seattle. Treated here are the accidental discovery of upwelling during the southwest monsoon along India's west coast, studies of benthic polychaetous annelids in the Oregonian zoogeographic province, the discovery of phytoplankton blooms and an absence of upwelling during the northeast monsoon in the northern Arabian Sea, and an ocean-wide description of the seasonality of satellite-derived chlorophyll. My admonition is that grazing rather than cell division rate regulates the abundance and size composition of phytoplankton and affects the dynamics of the understudied zooplankton. I end with a pessimistic view about predicting the vertical flux of particulate organic matter from the euphotic layer with an accuracy useful for deep-sea carbon budgets.

  13. NOTES ON SOME PREOCCUPIED NAMES IN ARTHROPODA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian F. Kammerer

    2006-01-01

    New replacement names for the preoccupied mite genera Absentia Huang, 2001 and Venilia Kuznetsov, 1979 are proposed (Huangiella nom. nov. and Kuznetsovia nom. nov. , respectively. ). Fourteen further new replacement names are proposed for additional preoccupied generic names in the Arthropoda. These names are: Vailimia nom. nov. , Millidgella nom. nov., and Nolavia nom. nov. in Araneae, Vadumasonium nom. nov. in Hymenoptera, Gridellia nom. nov.,Vanstaronia nom. nov. and Veraniella nom. nov. in Coleoptera, Poletaevega nom. nov. in Trilobita, Vandelia nom. nov.in Isopoda, Gandoa nom. nov. and Vanuachela nom. nov. in Decapoda, and Crasquinia nom. nov. , Oertlia nom. nov. ,and Soleaua nom. nov. in Ostracoda. Additionally, one new annelid replacement name, Omodeodrilus nom. nov., is proposed.

  14. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  15. Southern hemisphere deep-water stylasterid corals including a new species, Errina labrosa sp. n. (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa, Stylasteridae, with notes on some symbiotic scalpellids (Cirripedia, Thoracica, Scalpellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of stylasterid corals are known to act as host species and create refuges for a variety of mobile and sessile organisms, which enhances their habitat complexity. These include annelids, anthozoans, cirripeds, copepods, cyanobacteria, echinoderms, gastropods, hydroids and sponges. Here we report the first evidence of a diverse association between stylasterids and scalpellid pedunculate barnacles and describe a new stylasterid species, Errina labrosa, from the Tristan da Cunha Archipelago. Overall, five stylasterid species are found to host eight scalpellid barnacles from several biogeographic regions in the southern hemisphere (Southern Ocean, temperate South America and the southern Indo-Pacific realms. There is an apparent lack of specificity in this kind of association and different grades of reaction to the symbiosis have been observed in the coral. These records suggest that the association between pedunculate barnacles and hard stylasterid corals has a wide distribution among different biogeographic realms and that it is relatively rare and confined largely to deep water.

  16. Assessment and rehabilitation of wildlife affected by an oil spill in Puerto Rico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignucci-Giannoni, A.A. [University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico). Caribbean Stranding Network

    1999-10-01

    On 7 January 1994, the barge Morris J. Berman spilled approximately 3.6 million liters of oil off Punta Escambron in San Juan, Puerto Rico. This resulted in the contamination of extensive areas, impacting on natural resources along more than 48 km of Puerto Rico`s north shore. Thousands of dead and alive oiled organisms washed ashore. Dead wildlife were collected opportunistically, and examined for the presence of oil and identified. Live wildlife was cleaned and treated at a temporary triage facility. A total of 5687 organisms of over 152 species were collected, including cnidarians, annelids, crustaceans, molluscs, echinoderms, fishes, birds and sea turtles. Molluscs and echinoderms were noticeably more affected than other species. Four species classified as endangered or threatened were also affected. A significant impact was observed on the live specimens presented for medical treatment, including shore crabs, birds and sea turtles. Only 63% of these were successfully rehabilitated. (author)

  17. Assessment and rehabilitation of wildlife affected by an oil spill in Puerto Rico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignucci-Giannoni, A.A. [University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico). Caribbean Stranding Network

    1999-07-01

    On 7 January 1994, the barge Morris J. Berman spilled approximately 3.6 million liters of oil off Punta Escambron in San Juan, Puerto Rico. This resulted in the contamination of extensive areas, impacting on natural resources along more than 48 km of Puerto Rico's north shore. Thousands of dead and alive oiled organisms washed ashore. Dead wildlife were collected opportunistically, and examined for the presence of oil and identified. Live wildlife was cleaned and treated at a temporary triage facility. A total of 5687 organisms of over 152 species were collected, including cnidarians, annelids, crustaceans, molluscs, echinoderms, fishes, birds and sea turtles. Molluscs and echinoderms were noticeably more affected than other species. Four species classified as endangered or threatened were also affected. A significant impact was observed on the live specimens presented for medical treatment, including shore crabs, birds and sea turtles. Only 63% of these were successfully rehabilitated. (author)

  18. Mitochondrial genomes of parasitic flatworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thanh H; Blair, David; McManus, Donald P

    2002-05-01

    Complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes are now available for 11 species or strains of parasitic flatworms belonging to the Trematoda and the Cestoda. The organization of these genomes is not strikingly different from those of other eumetazoans, although one gene (atp8) commonly found in other phyla is absent from flatworms. The gene order in most flatworms has similarities to those seen in higher protostomes such as annelids. However, the gene order has been drastically altered in Schistosoma mansoni, which obscures this possible relationship. Among the sequenced taxa, base composition varies considerably, creating potential difficulties for phylogeny reconstruction. Long non-coding regions are present in all taxa, but these vary in length from only a few hundred to approximately 10000 nucleotides. Among Schistosoma spp., the long non-coding regions are rich in repeats and length variation among individuals is known. Data from mitochondrial genomes are valuable for studies on species identification, phylogenies and biogeography.

  19. Macrozoobenthos of the danubean lake Crivoe in the conditions of anthropogenous influence

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    Y. M. Dzhurtubaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 2009 macrozoobenthos of the danubean Lake Crivoe, located in the Odessaarea was studied. 26 species of sponges, annelids, crustaceans, insects, gastropods and bivalves were revealed. In the upper and middle part of the lake 24 were found, in the lower one 9 species were detected. Oligochetes, and larvae of dragonflies and chironomids are characterised by the greatest number (up to 300 spec/m², the greatest biomass was found for gastropod molluscs (to 17 g/m². The total maximal number of the macrozoobenthos reached 880 spec/m² and biomass – 40.2 g/m². Benthic faunas of two lakes, Crivoe and Lung, were compared.

  20. Fossil traces of the bone-eating worm Osedax in early Oligocene whale bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Steffen; Goedert, James L; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Rouse, Greg W

    2010-05-11

    Osedax is a recently discovered group of siboglinid annelids that consume bones on the seafloor and whose evolutionary origins have been linked with Cretaceous marine reptiles or to the post-Cretaceous rise of whales. Here we present whale bones from early Oligocene bathyal sediments exposed in Washington State, which show traces similar to those made by Osedax today. The geologic age of these trace fossils ( approximately 30 million years) coincides with the first major radiation of whales, consistent with the hypothesis of an evolutionary link between Osedax and its main food source, although older fossils should certainly be studied. Osedax has been destroying bones for most of the evolutionary history of whales and the possible significance of this "Osedax effect" in relation to the quality and quantity of their fossils is only now recognized.

  1. Selection of focal earthworm species as non-target soil organisms for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Capelle, Christine; Schrader, Stefan; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    By means of a literature survey, earthworm species of significant relevance for soil functions in different biogeographical regions of Europe (Atlantic, Boreal, Mediterranean) were identified. These focal earthworm species, defined here according to the EFSA Guidance Document on the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified plants, are typical for arable soils under crop rotations with maize and/or potatoes within the three regions represented by Ireland, Sweden and Spain, respectively. Focal earthworm species were selected following a matrix of four steps: Identification of functional groups, categorization of non-target species, ranking species on ecological criteria, and final selection of focal species. They are recommended as appropriate non-target organisms to assess environmental risks of genetically modified (GM) crops; in this case maize and potatoes. In total, 44 literature sources on earthworms in arable cropping systems including maize or potato from Ireland, Sweden and Spain were collected, which present information on species diversity, individual density and specific relevance for soil functions. By means of condensed literature data, those species were identified which (i) play an important functional role in respective soil systems, (ii) are well adapted to the biogeographical regions, (iii) are expected to occur in high abundances under cultivation of maize or potato and (iv) fulfill the requirements for an ERA test system based on life-history traits. First, primary and secondary decomposers were identified as functional groups being exposed to the GM crops. In a second step, anecic and endogeic species were categorized as potential species. In step three, eight anecic and endogeic earthworm species belonging to the family Lumbricidae were ranked as relevant species: Aporrectodea caliginosa, Aporrectodea rosea, Aporrectodea longa, Allolobophora chlorotica, Lumbricus terrestris, Lumbricus friendi, Octodrilus complanatus and

  2. Polyethylene Glycol Camouflaged Earthworm Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moges, Selamawit; Nacharaju, Parimala; Roche, Camille; Dantsker, David; Palmer, Andre; Friedman, Joel M.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 21 million components of blood and whole blood and transfused annually in the United States, while on average only 13.6 million units of blood are donated. As the demand for Red Blood Cells (RBCs) continues to increase due to the aging population, this deficit will be more significant. Despite decades of research to develop hemoglobin (Hb) based oxygen (O2) carriers (HBOCs) as RBC substitutes, there are no products approved for clinical use. Lumbricus terrestris erythrocruorin (LtEc) is the large acellular O2 carrying protein complex found in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. LtEc is an extremely stable protein complex, resistant to autoxidation, and capable of transporting O2 to tissue when transfused into mammals. These characteristics render LtEc a promising candidate for the development of the next generation HBOCs. LtEc has a short half-life in circulation, limiting its application as a bridge over days, until blood became available. Conjugation with polyethylene glycol (PEG-LtEc) can extend LtEc circulation time. This study explores PEG-LtEc pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. To study PEG-LtEc pharmacokinetics, hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber were subjected to a 40% exchange transfusion with 10 g/dL PEG-LtEc or LtEc and followed for 48 hours. To study the vascular response of PEG-LtEc, hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber received multiple infusions of 10 g/dL PEG-LtEc or LtEc solution to increase plasma LtEc concentration to 0.5, then 1.0, and 1.5 g/dL, while monitoring the animals’ systemic and microcirculatory parameters. Results confirm that PEGylation of LtEc increases its circulation time, extending the half-life to 70 hours, 4 times longer than that of unPEGylated LtEc. However, PEGylation increased the rate of LtEc oxidation in vivo. Vascular analysis verified that PEG-LtEc showed the absence of microvascular vasoconstriction or systemic hypertension. The molecular size of PEG-LtEc did not change the

  3. Contribution of soil fauna to soil functioning in degraded environments: a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Laura; Mele, Giacomo; Moradi, Jabbar; Kukla, Jaroslav; Jandová, Kateřina; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The restoration of the soil functions is essential for the recovery of highly degraded sites and, consequently, the study of the soil fauna role in the soil development in such environments has great potential from a practical point of view. The soils of the post-mining sites represent unique models for the study of the natural ecological succession because mining creates similar environments characterized by the same substrate, but by different ages according to the year of closure of mines. The aim of this work was to assess the contribution of different species of macrofauna on the evolution of soil structure and on the composition and activity of the microbial community in soil samples subjected to ecological restoration or characterized by spontaneous ecological succession. For this purpose, an experimental test was carried out in two sites characterized by different post-mining conditions: 1) natural succession, 2) reclamation with planting trees. These sites are located in the post-mining area of Sokolov (Czech Republic). For the experimental test repacked soil cores were prepared in laboratory with sieved soil sampled from the two sites. The soil cores were prepared maintaining the sequence of soil horizons present in the field. These samples were inoculated separately with two genera of earthworms (Lumbricus and Aporrectodea) and two of centipedes (Julida and Polydesmus). In particular, based on their body size, were inoculated for each cylinder 2 individuals of millipedes, 1 individual of Lumbricus and 4 individuals of Aporrectodea. For each treatment and for control samples 5 replicates were prepared and all samples were incubated in field for 1 month in the two original sampling sites. After the incubation the samples were removed from the field and transported in laboratory in order to perform the analysis of microbial respiration, of PLFA (phospholipid-derived fatty acids) and ergosterol contents and finally for the characterization of soil structure

  4. Capitellid connections: contributions from neuromuscular development of the maldanid polychaete Axiothella rubrocincta (Annelida

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    Wanninger Andreas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous phylogenetic analyses on polychaete annelids suggest a taxon Capitellida that comprises the three families Maldanidae, Arenicolidae and Capitellidae. Recent molecular studies support the position of the Echiura, traditionally ranked as a separate phylum, within the capitellids. In order to test the robustness of this molecular-based hypothesis we take a different approach using comparative analyses of nervous and muscle system development in the maldanid Axiothella rubrocincta. Employing immunocytochemistry in combination with confocal laserscanning microscopy, we broaden the database on capitellid organogenesis, thereby incorporating classical histological data in our analysis. Besides assessing possible shared features with the echiurans, we also discuss the variability of neural and muscular characters within the Capitellida. Results The scaffold of the adult central nervous system, which is already established in early developmental stages of Axiothella, consists of cerebral commissures that give rise to simple circumesophageal connectives with fused ventral and dorsal roots and a single ventral neurite bundle. From the latter arise segmental neurites that innervate the peripheral bodywall. Since there is no observable regular pattern, and individual neurites are lost during ontogeny, their exact arrangement remains elusive. The pharynx is encircled by a prominent stomatogastric nerve ring, with a pair of anterior and lateral proboscis neurites directly connecting it to the central nervous system. One pair of ventral and one pair of dorsal longitudinal muscles form the earliest rudiments of the bodywall musculature in late larval stages, while a continuous layer of circular muscles is lacking throughout ontogeny. Conclusions Comparative neurodevelopmental analysis of capitellid and echiuran species reveals several common characters, including simple circumesophageal connectives, a single fused ventral nerve

  5. The development of the larval nervous system, musculature and ciliary bands of Pomatoceros lamarckii (Annelida: heterochrony in polychaetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimeld Sebastian M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the evolution of animals it is essential to have taxon sampling across a representative spread of the animal kingdom. With the recent rearrangement of most of the Bilateria into three major clades (Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa and Deuterostomia it has become clear that the Lophotrochozoa are relatively poorly represented in our knowledge of animal development, compared to the Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia. We aim to contribute towards redressing this balance with data on the development of the muscular, nervous and ciliary systems of the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii (Serpulidae. We compare our data with other lophotrochozoans. Results P. lamarckii develops locomotory and feeding structures that enable it to become a swimming, planktotrophic larva within 24 hours. Formation of the trochophore includes development of a prototroch, metatroch and neurotroch, development of apical and posterior nervous elements at similar times, and development of musculature around the ciliary bands and digestive tract prior to development of any body wall muscles. The adult nervous and muscular systems are essentially preformed in the late larva. Interestingly, the muscular systems of the larvae and juvenile worms do not include the circular muscles of the body wall, which are considered to be plesiomorphic for annelids, although the possibility that circular muscles develop after these stages cannot be ruled out at this point. Conclusion A comparison between polychaetes shows variability in the timing (heterochrony of development of body wall muscles and elements of the nervous system. These heterochronies are one route for evolution of different life history strategies, such as adaptations to feeding requirements.

  6. Effects of Lumbriculus variegatus (Annelida, Oligochaete) bioturbation on zinc sediment chemistry and toxicity to the epi-benthic invertebrate Chironomus tepperi (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Valentina; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Golding, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Classical laboratory-based single-species sediment bioassays do not account for modifications to toxicity from bioturbation by benthic organisms which may impact predictions of contaminated sediment risk to biota in the field. This study aims to determine the effects of bioturbation on the toxicity of zinc measured in a standard laboratory bioassay conducted with chironomid larvae (Chironomus tepperi). The epi-benthic chironomid larvae were exposed to two different levels of sediment contamination (1600 and 1980 mg/kg of dry weight zinc) in the presence or absence of annelid worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) which are known to be tolerant to metal and to have a large impact on sediment properties through bioturbation. Chironomids had 5-6x higher survival in the presence of L. variegatus which shows that bioturbation had a beneficial effect on the chironomid larvae. Chemical analyses showed that bioturbation induced a flux of zinc from the pore water into the water column, thereby reducing the bioavailability of zinc in pore water to the chironomid larvae. This also suggested that pore water was the major exposure path for the chironomids to metals in sediment. During the study, annelid worms (Oligochaetes) produced a thin layer of faecal pellets at the sediment surface, a process known to: (i) create additional adsorption sites for zinc, thus reducing its availability, (ii) increase the microbial abundance that in turn could represent an additional food source for opportunistic C. tepperi larvae, and (iii) modify the microbial community's structure and alter the biogeochemical processes it governs thus indirectly impact zinc toxicity. This study represents a contribution in recognising bioturbating organisms as "ecological engineers" as they directly and indirectly influence metal bioavailability and impact other sediment-inhabiting species. This is significant and should be considered in risk assessment of zinc levels (and other metals) in contaminated sediment

  7. Trace fossil evidence for late Permian shallow water condition in Guryul ravine, Kashmir, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcha, Suraj; Horacek, Micha; Krystyn, Leopold; Pandey, Shivani

    2015-04-01

    The present study is focused on the Late Permian (Changhsingian) succession, present in the Guryul ravine, Kashmir Basin. The basin has a complete Cambro-Triassic sequence and thus contains a unique position in the geology of Himalaya. The Guryul Ravine Permian mainly comprises of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate sediments deposited in a shallow-shelf or ramp setting. The present assemblage of Ichnofossils is the first significant report of trace fossils in the Guryul ravine since early reports in the 1970s. The Ichnofossils reported from this section include: Diplichnites, Dimorphichnus, Monomorphichnus, Planolites, Skolithos along with burrow, scratch marks and annelid worm traces?. The ichnofossils are mainly preserved in medium grain sandstone-mudstone facies. The Ichnofossils are widely distributed throughout the section and are mostly belonging to arthropods and annelid origin, showing behavioral activity, mainly dwelling and feeding, and evidence the dominant presence of deposit feeders. The vertical to slightly inclined biogenic structures are commonly recognized from semi-consolidated substrate which are characteristic features of the near shore/foreshore marine environment, with moderate to high energy conditions. The topmost layer of silty shale contains trace fossils like Skolithos and poorly preserved burrows. The burrow material filled is same as that of host rock. The studied Zewan C and D sequence represents the early to late part of the Changhsingian stage, from 40 to 5 m below the top of Zewan D member with bioturbation still evident in some limestone layers till 2 metres above. No trace fossils could be recognized in the topmost 3 m beds of Zewan D due to their gliding related amalgamated structure. The widespread distribution of traces and their in situ nature will be useful for interpretation of the paleoecological and paleoenvironmental conditions during the late Permian in the Guryul ravine of Kashmir.

  8. Development of the excretory system in a polyplacophoran mollusc: stages in metanephridial system development

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    Baeumler Natalie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two types of excretory systems, protonephridia and metanephridial systems are common among bilaterians. The homology of protonephridia of lophotrochozoan taxa has been widely accepted. In contrast, the homology of metanephridial systems – including coelomic cavities as functional units – among taxa as well as the homology between the two excretory systems is a matter of ongoing discussion. This particularly concerns the molluscan kidneys, which are mostly regarded as being derived convergently to the metanephridia of e.g. annelids because of different ontogenetic origin. A reinvestigation of nephrogenesis in polyplacophorans, which carry many primitive traits within molluscs, could shed light on these questions. Results The metanephridial system of Lepidochitona corrugata develops rapidly in the early juvenile phase. It is formed from a coelomic anlage that soon achieves endothelial organization. The pericardium and heart are formed from the central portion of the anlage. The nephridial components are formed by outgrowth from lateral differentiations of the anlage. Simultaneously with formation of the heart, podocytes appear in the atrial wall of the pericardium. In addition, renopericardial ducts, kidneys and efferent nephroducts, all showing downstream ciliation towards the internal lumen, become differentiated (specimen length: 0.62 mm. Further development consists of elongation of the kidney and reinforcement of filtration and reabsorptive structures. Conclusions During development and in fully formed condition the metanephridial system of Lepidochitona corrugata shares many detailed traits (cellular and overall organization with the protonephridia of the same species. Accordingly, we suggest a serial homology of various cell types and between the two excretory systems and the organs as a whole. The formation of the metanephridial system varies significantly within Mollusca, thus the mode of formation cannot be used

  9. A Stable Thoracic Hox Code and Epimorphosis Characterize Posterior Regeneration in Capitella teleta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Danielle M; Seaver, Elaine C

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration, the ability to replace lost tissues and body parts following traumatic injury, occurs widely throughout the animal tree of life. Regeneration occurs either by remodeling of pre-existing tissues, through addition of new cells by cell division, or a combination of both. We describe a staging system for posterior regeneration in the annelid, Capitella teleta, and use the C. teleta Hox gene code as markers of regional identity for regenerating tissue along the anterior-posterior axis. Following amputation of different posterior regions of the animal, a blastema forms and by two days, proliferating cells are detected by EdU incorporation, demonstrating that epimorphosis occurs during posterior regeneration of C. teleta. Neurites rapidly extend into the blastema, and gradually become organized into discrete nerves before new ganglia appear approximately seven days after amputation. In situ hybridization shows that seven of the ten Hox genes examined are expressed in the blastema, suggesting roles in patterning the newly forming tissue, although neither spatial nor temporal co-linearity was detected. We hypothesized that following amputation, Hox gene expression in pre-existing segments would be re-organized to scale, and the remaining fragment would express the complete suite of Hox genes. Surprisingly, most Hox genes display stable expression patterns in the ganglia of pre-existing tissue following amputation at multiple axial positions, indicating general stability of segmental identity. However, the three Hox genes, CapI-lox4, CapI-lox2 and CapI-Post2, each shift its anterior expression boundary by one segment, and each shift includes a subset of cells in the ganglia. This expression shift depends upon the axial position of the amputation. In C. teleta, thoracic segments exhibit stable positional identity with limited morphallaxis, in contrast with the extensive body remodeling that occurs during regeneration of some other annelids, planarians and acoel

  10. The spatial and temporal expression of Ch-en, the engrailed gene in the polychaete Chaetopterus, does not support a role in body axis segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaver, E. C.; Paulson, D. A.; Irvine, S. Q.; Martindale, M. Q.

    2001-01-01

    We are interested in understanding whether the annelids and arthropods shared a common segmented ancestor and have approached this question by characterizing the expression pattern of the segment polarity gene engrailed (en) in a basal annelid, the polychaete Chaetopterus. We have isolated an en gene, Ch-en, from a Chaetopterus cDNA library. Genomic Southern blotting suggests that this is the only en class gene in this animal. The predicted protein sequence of the 1.2-kb cDNA clone contains all five domains characteristic of en proteins in other taxa, including the en class homeobox. Whole-mount in situ hybridization reveals that Ch-en is expressed throughout larval life in a complex spatial and temporal pattern. The Ch-en transcript is initially detected in a small number of neurons associated with the apical organ and in the posterior portion of the prototrochophore. At later stages, Ch-en is expressed in distinct patterns in the three segmented body regions (A, B, and C) of Chaetopterus. In all segments, Ch-en is expressed in a small set of segmentally iterated cells in the CNS. In the A region, Ch-en is also expressed in a small group of mesodermal cells at the base of the chaetal sacs. In the B region, Ch-en is initially expressed broadly in the mesoderm that then resolves into one band/segment coincident with morphological segmentation. The mesodermal expression in the B region is located in the anterior region of each segment, as defined by the position of ganglia in the ventral nerve cord, and is involved in the morphogenesis of segment-specific feeding structures late in larval life. We observe banded mesodermal and ectodermal staining in an anterior-posterior sequence in the C region. We do not observe a segment polarity pattern of expression of Ch-en in the ectoderm, as is observed in arthropods. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Embracing the comparative approach: how robust phylogenies and broader developmental sampling impacts the understanding of nervous system evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejnol, Andreas; Lowe, Christopher J

    2015-12-19

    Molecular biology has provided a rich dataset to develop hypotheses of nervous system evolution. The startling patterning similarities between distantly related animals during the development of their central nervous system (CNS) have resulted in the hypothesis that a CNS with a single centralized medullary cord and a partitioned brain is homologous across bilaterians. However, the ability to precisely reconstruct ancestral neural architectures from molecular genetic information requires that these gene networks specifically map with particular neural anatomies. A growing body of literature representing the development of a wider range of metazoan neural architectures demonstrates that patterning gene network complexity is maintained in animals with more modest levels of neural complexity. Furthermore, a robust phylogenetic framework that provides the basis for testing the congruence of these homology hypotheses has been lacking since the advent of the field of 'evo-devo'. Recent progress in molecular phylogenetics is refining the necessary framework to test previous homology statements that span large evolutionary distances. In this review, we describe recent advances in animal phylogeny and exemplify for two neural characters-the partitioned brain of arthropods and the ventral centralized nerve cords of annelids-a test for congruence using this framework. The sequential sister taxa at the base of Ecdysozoa and Spiralia comprise small, interstitial groups. This topology is not consistent with the hypothesis of homology of tripartitioned brain of arthropods and vertebrates as well as the ventral arthropod and rope-like ladder nervous system of annelids. There can be exquisite conservation of gene regulatory networks between distantly related groups with contrasting levels of nervous system centralization and complexity. Consequently, the utility of molecular characters to reconstruct ancestral neural organization in deep time is limited.

  12. A Stable Thoracic Hox Code and Epimorphosis Characterize Posterior Regeneration in Capitella teleta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle M de Jong

    Full Text Available Regeneration, the ability to replace lost tissues and body parts following traumatic injury, occurs widely throughout the animal tree of life. Regeneration occurs either by remodeling of pre-existing tissues, through addition of new cells by cell division, or a combination of both. We describe a staging system for posterior regeneration in the annelid, Capitella teleta, and use the C. teleta Hox gene code as markers of regional identity for regenerating tissue along the anterior-posterior axis. Following amputation of different posterior regions of the animal, a blastema forms and by two days, proliferating cells are detected by EdU incorporation, demonstrating that epimorphosis occurs during posterior regeneration of C. teleta. Neurites rapidly extend into the blastema, and gradually become organized into discrete nerves before new ganglia appear approximately seven days after amputation. In situ hybridization shows that seven of the ten Hox genes examined are expressed in the blastema, suggesting roles in patterning the newly forming tissue, although neither spatial nor temporal co-linearity was detected. We hypothesized that following amputation, Hox gene expression in pre-existing segments would be re-organized to scale, and the remaining fragment would express the complete suite of Hox genes. Surprisingly, most Hox genes display stable expression patterns in the ganglia of pre-existing tissue following amputation at multiple axial positions, indicating general stability of segmental identity. However, the three Hox genes, CapI-lox4, CapI-lox2 and CapI-Post2, each shift its anterior expression boundary by one segment, and each shift includes a subset of cells in the ganglia. This expression shift depends upon the axial position of the amputation. In C. teleta, thoracic segments exhibit stable positional identity with limited morphallaxis, in contrast with the extensive body remodeling that occurs during regeneration of some other annelids

  13. Exploiting gene families for phylogenomic analysis of myzostomid transcriptome data.

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    Stefanie Hartmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In trying to understand the evolutionary relationships of organisms, the current flood of sequence data offers great opportunities, but also reveals new challenges with regard to data quality, the selection of data for subsequent analysis, and the automation of steps that were once done manually for single-gene analyses. Even though genome or transcriptome data is available for representatives of most bilaterian phyla, some enigmatic taxa still have an uncertain position in the animal tree of life. This is especially true for myzostomids, a group of symbiotic (or parasitic protostomes that are either placed with annelids or flatworms. METHODOLOGY: Based on similarity criteria, Illumina-based transcriptome sequences of one myzostomid were compared to protein sequences of one additional myzostomid and 29 reference metazoa and clustered into gene families. These families were then used to investigate the phylogenetic position of Myzostomida using different approaches: Alignments of 989 sequence families were concatenated, and the resulting superalignment was analyzed under a Maximum Likelihood criterion. We also used all 1,878 gene trees with at least one myzostomid sequence for a supertree approach: the individual gene trees were computed and then reconciled into a species tree using gene tree parsimony. CONCLUSIONS: Superalignments require strictly orthologous genes, and both the gene selection and the widely varying amount of data available for different taxa in our dataset may cause anomalous placements and low bootstrap support. In contrast, gene tree parsimony is designed to accommodate multilocus gene families and therefore allows a much more comprehensive data set to be analyzed. Results of this supertree approach showed a well-resolved phylogeny, in which myzostomids were part of the annelid radiation, and major bilaterian taxa were found to be monophyletic.

  14. Rapid separation and identification of 54 major constituents in Buyang Huanwu decoction by ultra-fast HPLC system coupled with DAD-TOF/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E-Hu; Qi, Lian-Wen; Peng, Yong-Bo; Cheng, Xiao-Lan; Wu, Qian; Li, Ping; Li, Chang-Yin

    2009-08-01

    Buyang Huanwu Decoction (BYHWD), is a well-known traditional Chinese preparation consisting of Radix Astragali, Radix Angelicae Sinensis, Rhizoma Ligustici Chuanxiong, Radix paeoniae Rubra, Flos Carthami, Semen Persicae and Lumbricus. An ultra-fast high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method coupled with diode array detection (DAD) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF/MS) has been developed for rapid separation and structural identification of constituents in BYHWD. Using an ultra-fast HPLC system with short columns (4.6 x 50 mm, 1.8 microm), the total analysis time for this complex prescription is less than 30 min. With various fragmentor voltages in TOF/MS, accurate mass measurements (less than 5 ppm error) for molecular ions and characteristic fragment ions could represent reliable identification criteria for these compounds. Fifty-four major constituents from BYHWD sample, including four C-glycosyl quinochalcones, four flavonoid O-glycosides, sixteen isoflavones, six monoterpene glycosides, eight saponins, four organic acids and five amino acids, were identified or tentatively characterized based on their retention times, DAD and TOF/MS data. All the compounds were further assigned in the seven individual crude drugs. In conclusion, the ultra-fast HPLC with DAD-TOF/MS is a highly useful and efficient technique to separate and identify constituents in complex matrices of herbal medicines or preparations.

  15. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Sam [Department of Agricultural Biology, National Academy of Agricultural Science, RDA, Suwon 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Heon [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Jungwon University, Goesan, Chungcheongbukdo 367-700 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun [School of Life Sciences, KNU Creative Bioresearch Group (BK21 Plus Program), College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daehak-ro 80, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Il [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho, E-mail: hokim@daejin.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-06

    Highlights: • 11-mer peptide Lumbricusin, a defensin like peptide, is isolated from earthworm. • We here demonstrated that Lumbricusin has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. • p27 degradation by Lumbricusin mediates effects of Lumbricusin on neuronal cells. - Abstract: We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH{sub 2}-RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson’s disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27{sup Kip1} protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27{sup Kip1} significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27{sup Kip1} degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin.

  16. Soil sterilization affects aging-related sequestration and bioavailability of p,p'-DDE and anthracene to earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slizovskiy, Ilya B. [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States); Kelsey, Jason W., E-mail: Kelsey@muhlenberg.ed [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Laboratory experiments investigated the effects of soil sterilization and compound aging on the bioaccumulation of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene by Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris. Declines in bioavailability occurred as pollutant residence time in both sterile and non-sterile soils increased from 3 to 203 d. Accumulation was generally higher in sterile soils during initial periods of aging (from 3-103 d). By 203 d, however, bioavailability of the compounds was unaffected by sterilization. Gamma irradiation and autoclaving may have altered bioavailability by inducing changes in the chemistry of soil organic matter (SOM). The results support a dual-mode partitioning sorption model in which the SOM components associated with short-term sorption (the 'soft' or 'rubbery' phases) are more affected than are the components associated with long-term sorption (the 'glassy' or microcrystalline phases). Risk assessments based on data from experiments in which sterile soil was used could overestimate exposure and bioaccumulation of pollutants. - Soil sterilization affects aging-related sequestration of organic contaminants.

  17. Influence of Soil Organic Matter Content on Abundance and Biomass of Earthworm (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo Valchovski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study explores the influence of soil organic matter content on abundance and biomass of earthworm communities. The observation was carried out on three type of soils: PellicVertisols (very fine texture, Cromi-Vertic Luvisols (fine texture and Calcaric Fluvisols (mediumtexture from the Balkan Peninsula (Bulgaria. The field experiment was provided on uncultivatedplots. In the studied area earthworm fauna comprises of four species: Aporrectodea rosea,Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus terrestris and Octolasion lacteum. We found peregrine lumbricidtaxa, which are widely distributed in European soils. Our study demonstrated that soil organicmatter has a positive effect on lumbricid populations. It was revealed that augmentation of soilorganic matter favours characteristics of earthworm communities. The soil organic matter contentand earthworm abundance are in strong positive correlation (r > 0.981. The same relationship wasrevealed between the biomass of lumbricid fauna and amount of soil organic matter (r > 0.987. Insum, the soil organic matter could be used as an indicator for earthworm communities inuncultivated soils.

  18. Impact of earthworms on trace element solubility in contaminated mine soils amended with green waste compost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizmur, Tom, E-mail: t.p.sizmur@reading.ac.uk [Soil Research Centre, Dept. Geography and Environmental Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6DW (United Kingdom); Palumbo-Roe, Barbara [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Hodson, Mark E. [Soil Research Centre, Dept. Geography and Environmental Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6DW (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    The common practice of remediating metal contaminated mine soils with compost can reduce metal mobility and promote revegetation, but the effect of introduced or colonising earthworms on metal solubility is largely unknown. We amended soils from an As/Cu (1150 mgAs kg{sup -1} and 362 mgCu kg{sup -1}) and Pb/Zn mine (4550 mgPb kg{sup -1} and 908 mgZn kg{sup -1}) with 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% compost and then introduced Lumbricus terrestris. Porewater was sampled and soil extracted with water to determine trace element solubility, pH and soluble organic carbon. Compost reduced Cu, Pb and Zn, but increased As solubility. Earthworms decreased water soluble Cu and As but increased Pb and Zn in porewater. The effect of the earthworms decreased with increasing compost amendment. The impact of the compost and the earthworms on metal solubility is explained by their effect on pH and soluble organic carbon and the environmental chemistry of each element. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Compost reduced the mobility of Cu, Pb and Zn. > Compost increased the mobility of As. > Earthworms decreased water soluble As and Cu but increased Pb and Zn in porewater. > These effects are explained by the impact of the earthworms and compost on pH and DOC. - The effect of earthworms on metal solubility was due to changes in dissolved organic carbon and pH but was reduced with increasing compost amendments.

  19. Potential risk of microplastics transportation into ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Esperanza; Gertsen, Hennie; Gooren, Harm; Peters, Piet; Salánki, Tamás; van der Ploeg, Martine; Besseling, Ellen; Koelmans, Albert A.; Geissen, Violette

    2016-04-01

    Microplastics, are plastics particles with a size smaller than 5mm. They are formed by the fragmentation of plastic wastes. They are present in the air, soil and water. But only in aquatic systems (ocean and rivers) are studies over their distribution, and the effect of microplastics on organisms. There is a lack of information of what is the distribution of microplastics in the soil, and in the ground water. This study tries to estimate the potential risk of microplastics transportation into the ground water by the activity of earthworms. Earthworms can produce burrows and/or galleries inside the soil, with the presence of earthworms some ecosystem services are enhanced, as infiltration. In this study we observed after 14 days with 5 treatments (0, 7, 28 and 60% w/w microplastics mixed with Populus nigra litter) and the anecic earthworm Lumbricus terrestris, in microcosms (3 replicas per treatment) that macroplastics are indeed deposit inside earthworms burrows, with 7% microplastics on the surface is possible to find 1.8 g.kg-1 microplastics inside the burrows, with a bioaumentation factor of 0.65. Burrows made by earthworms under 60% microplastics, are significant bigger (pmicroplastics in their soil surface. The amount of litter that is deposit inside the burrows is significant higher (pmicroplastics on the surface than without microplastics. The microplastics size distribution is smaller inside the burrows than on the surface, with an abundance of particles under 63 μm.

  20. Plastic Bag Derived-Microplastics as a Vector for Metal Exposure in Terrestrial Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Mark E; Duffus-Hodson, Calum A; Clark, Andy; Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T; Thorpe, Karen L

    2017-04-05

    Microplastics are widespread contaminants in terrestrial environments but comparatively little is known about interactions between microplastics and common terrestrial contaminants such as zinc (Zn). In adsorption experiments fragmented HDPE bags c. one mm(2) in size showed similar sorption characteristics to soil. However, when present in combination with soil, concentrations of adsorbed Zn on a per mass basis were over an order of magnitude lower on microplastics. Desorption of the Zn was minimal from both microplastics and soil in synthetic soil solution (0.01 M CaCl2), but in synthetic earthworm guts desorption was higher from microplastics (40-60%) than soil (2-15%), suggesting microplastics could increase Zn bioavailability. Individual Lumbricus terrestris earthworms exposed for 28 days in mesocosms of 260 g moist soil containing 0.35 wt % of Zn-bearing microplastic (236-4505 mg kg(-1)) ingested the microplastics, but there was no evidence of Zn accumulation, mortality, or weight change. Digestion of the earthworms showed that they did not retain microplastics in their gut. These findings indicate that microplastics could act as vectors to increase metal exposure in earthworms, but that the associated risk is unlikely to be significant for essential metals such as Zn that are well regulated by metabolic processes.

  1. Use of plant and earthworm bioassays to evaluate remediation of soil from a site contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, J.R.; Chang, L.W.; Meckes, M.C.; Smith, M.K. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Jacobs, S. [DynCorp, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Torsella, J. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Soil from a site heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was treated with a pilot-scale, solvent extraction technology. Bioassays in earthworms and plants were used to examine the efficacy of the remediation process for reducing the toxicity of the soil. The earthworm toxicity bioassays were the 14-d survival test and 21-d reproduction test, using Lumbricus terrestris and Eisenia fetida andrei. The plant bioassays included phytotoxicity tests for seed germination and root elongation in lettuce and oats, and a genotoxicity test (anaphase aberrations) in Allium cepa (common onion). Although the PCB content of the soil was reduced by 99% (below the remediation goal), toxicity to earthworm reproduction remained essentially unchanged following remediation. Furthermore, phytotoxicity and genotoxicity were higher for the remediated soil compared to the untreated soil. The toxicity remaining after treatment appeared to be due to residual solvent introduced during the remediation process, and/or to heavy metals or other inorganic contaminants not removed by the treatment. Mixture studies involving isopropanol and known toxicants indicated possible synergistic effects of the extraction solvent and soil contaminants. The toxicity in plants was essentially eliminated by a postremediation, water-rinsing step. These results demonstrate a need for including toxicity measurements in the evaluation of technologies used in hazardous waste site remediations, and illustrate the potential value of such measurements for making modifications to remediation processes.

  2. Effects of elk herbivory on vegetation and nitrogen processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenecker, K.A.; Singer, F.J.; Zeigenfuss, L.C.; Binkley, D.; Menezes, R.S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Numbers of American woodcocks (Philohela minor) were held in cages for experimental work lasting several months. Injuries caused by birds attempting to flush were greatly reduced by clipping feathers from one wing, by making cage walls opaque, and by using high cages or false ceilings of fabric. Size of cage was found not to be important, to judge from weight changes, so long as ample food was unmistakably available. Birds were kept in both large and small cages without social conflicts. Cages on the ground proved too unsanitary for long-term use; small steel cages with removable floors were practical but did not solve the sanitation problem. Living earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) were provided daily in amounts roughly equal to weights of birds. Birds gained on this food when worms were offered in suitable ways. The feeding tray recommended is a large roasting pan with a snap-on metal rim that retards loss of worms. Trays contained moist peat in which birds probed for worms. Two efforts to keep woodcocks on a diet of red worms (Eisenia foetide) were unsuccessful; use of this worm was considered responsible. Woodcocks were handled and transported for short periods with least injury to them when they were rolled individually in soft bags.

  3. Care of captive woodcocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, W.H.; Sheldon, W.G.; Stickel, L.F.

    1965-01-01

    Numbers of American woodcocks (Philohela minor) were held in cages for experimental work lasting several months. Injuries caused by birds attempting to flush were greatly reduced by clipping feathers from one wing, by making cage walls opaque, and by using high cages or false ceilings of fabric. Size of cage was found not to be important, to judge from weight changes, so long as ample food was unmistakably available. Birds were kept in both large and small cages without social conflicts. Cages on the ground proved too unsanitary for long-term use; small steel cages with removable floors were practical but did not solve the sanitation problem. Living earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) were provided daily in amounts roughly equal to weights of birds. Birds gained on this food when worms were offered in suitable ways. The feeding tray recommended is a large roasting pan with a snap-on metal rim that retards loss of worms. Trays contained moist peat in which birds probed for worms. Two efforts to keep woodcocks on a diet of red worms (Eisenia foetide) were unsuccessful; use of this worm was considered responsible. Woodcocks were handled and transported for short periods with least injury to them when they were rolled individually in soft bags.

  4. Sterilization affects soil organic matter chemistry and bioaccumulation of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene by earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Jason W., E-mail: kelsey@muhlenberg.ed [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew Street, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States); Slizovskiy, Ilya B.; Peters, Richard D.; Melnick, Adam M. [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew Street, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the effects of soil sterilization on the bioavailability of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene to the earthworms Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris. Physical and chemical changes to soil organic matter (SOM) induced by sterilization were also studied. Uptake of both compounds added after soil was autoclaved or gamma irradiated increased for E. fetida. Sterilization had no effect on bioaccumulation of p,p'-DDE by L. terrestris, and anthracene uptake increased only in gamma-irradiated soils. Analyses by FT-IR and DSC indicate sterilization alters SOM chemistry and may reduce pollutant sorption. Chemical changes to SOM were tentatively linked to changes in bioaccumulation, although the effects were compound and species specific. Artifacts produced by sterilization could lead to inaccurate risk assessments of contaminated sites if assumptions derived from studies carried out in sterilized soil are used. Ultimately, knowledge of SOM chemistry could aid predictions of bioaccumulation of organic pollutants. - Soil sterilization affects soil organic matter chemistry and pollutant bioaccumulation.

  5. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  6. Vegetable and animal food sorts found in the gastric content of Sardinian Wild Boar (Sus scrofa meridionalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, W; Nieddu, G; Moniello, G; Cappai, M G

    2007-06-01

    Authors report results emerging from gastric content analysis from n. 96 wild boars hunted in Sardinia isle, during the hunting tide (2001-2005), from November to January. Mean pH of the gastric content was 3.77 +/- 0.69. Mean total capacity (TC) of each stomach was 1702 +/- 680 g. Mean Stuff ratio (CW/TC) between the content weight (CW) and stomachs TC was 0.45. Food categories found in animal stomachs were: 19 categories of vegetal species (Allium spp., Arbutus unedo, Arisarum vulgare, Avena fatua, Avena sativa, Castanea sativa, Ceratonia siliqua, Chamaerops umilis, Cichorium intybus, Hordeum sativum, Juniperus oxycedrus, Myrtus communis, Olea europea, Pirus amygdaliformis, Pistacia lentiscus, Quercus spp., Rhamnus alaternus, Triticum durum, Zea mais); 11 categories of animal species (Agriotes lineatus, Apodemus sylvaticus dicrurus, Chalcides chalcides, Chalcides ocellatus tiligugu, Crematogaster scutellaris, Forficula auricularia, Helix aspersa, Lumbricus terrestris, Ovis aries, Podarcis tiliguerta tiliguerta, Scolopendra cingulata); three categories were identified in general terms (insects larvae, hairs of mammals, feathers of birds). Food categories found in the stomach contents of Sus scrofa meridionalis confirm observations by other researchers who report the prevalence of vegetables in spite of animal food sorts in the wild boar diet in Italian regions.

  7. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S; Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina; Tervahauta, Arja; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low.

  8. Dietary supplementation with two Lamiaceae herbs-(oregano and sage modulates innate immunity parameters in Lumbric us terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D A Vattem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lamiaceae herbs have are well known for their immunomodulatory effects, however, the mechanism by which they effect innate immune system is not clearly understood. Objective: The effect of dietary supplementation with two Lamiaceae herbs (oregano and sage modulation of on innate immunological parameters was investigated in Lumbricus terrestris. Materials and Methods: Animals were fed (ad libitum on herbs supplemented diet [(0.1% (w/v and 0.5% (w/v] for 6 days. Changes in immune competent cell counts, viability, and relative neutrophil-like cell counts were determined in response to herb treatment. Changes in nitric oxide, phagocytic activity, and respiratory burst index were also determined in response to herb treatment relative to control. Additionally, effect of herb co-treatment cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg-BW induced immunosuppression was also evaluated. Results: Our results suggested abrogation of CP-induced immunosuppression in response to co-treatment with herbs. Significant increase in nitric oxide-mediated immune-competent cell counts, viability, and differentiation into neutrophil-like cells were observed in response to dietary supplementation with Lamiaceae herbs. Significantly higher phagocytic activity relative to control was also noted in response to dietary intake of oregano and sage. However, the respiratory burst index did not increase exponentially in response to herb treatments, suggesting a potential enhancement in pathogen recognition and antioxidant defenses. Conclusion: Lamiaceae herbs may have potential immune-modulatory properties important for human health and merits further investigation.

  9. Crystallization and Preliminary Structural Analysis of the Giant Haemoglobin from Glossoscolex paulistus at 3.2 Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Bachega; l Bleicher; E Horjales; p Santiago; R Garratt; M Tabak

    2011-12-31

    Glossoscolex paulistus is a free-living earthworm encountered in south-east Brazil. Its oxygen transport requirements are undertaken by a giant extracellular haemoglobin, or erythrocruorin (HbGp), which has an approximate molecular mass of 3.6 MDa and, by analogy with its homologue from Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt), is believed to be composed of a total of 180 polypeptide chains. In the present work the full 3.6 MDa particle in its cyanomet state was purified and crystallized using sodium citrate or PEG8000 as precipitant. The crystals contain one-quarter of the full particle in the asymmetric unit of the I222 cell and have parameters of a = 270.8 {angstrom}, b = 320.3 {angstrom} and c = 332.4 {angstrom}. Diffraction data were collected to 3.15 {angstrom} using synchrotron radiation on beamline X29A at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and represent the highest resolution data described to date for similar erythrocruorins. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using a search model corresponding to one-twelfth of its homologue from HbLt. This revealed that HbGp belongs to the type I class of erythrocruorins and provided an interpretable initial electron density map in which many features including the haem groups and disulfide bonds could be identified.

  10. Influence of flooding and metal immobilising soil amendments on availability of metals for willows and earthworms in calcareous dredged sediment-derived soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecasteele, Bart, E-mail: bart.vandecasteele@ilvo.vlaanderen.b [Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research (ILVO), Scientific Institute of the Flemish Government, Burg. Van Gansberghelaan 109, B-9820 Merelbeke (Belgium); Du Laing, Gijs [Ghent University, Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Coupure 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Lettens, Suzanna [Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Scientific Institute of the Flemish Government, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium); Jordaens, Kurt [Department of Biology, Evolutionary Biology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Tack, Filip M.G. [Ghent University, Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Coupure 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    Soil amendments previously shown to be effective in reducing metal bioavailability and/or mobility in calcareous metal-polluted soils were tested on a calcareous dredged sediment-derived soil with 26 mg Cd/kg dry soil, 2200 mg Cr/kg dry soil, 220 mg Pb/kg dry soil, and 3000 mg Zn/kg dry soil. The amendments were 5% modified aluminosilicate (AS), 10% w/w lignin, 1% w/w diammonium phosphate (DAP, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}), 1% w/w MnO, and 5% w/w CaSO{sub 4}. In an additional treatment, the contaminated soil was submerged. Endpoints were metal uptake in Salix cinerea and Lumbricus terrestris, and effect on oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) in submerged soils. Results illustrated that the selected soil amendments were not effective in reducing ecological risk to vegetation or soil inhabiting invertebrates, as metal uptake in willows and earthworms did not significantly decrease following their application. Flooding the polluted soil resulted in metal uptake in S. cinerea comparable with concentrations for an uncontaminated soil. - Some soil amendments resulted in higher metal uptake by earthworms and willows than when the polluted soil was not amended but submersion of the polluted soil resulted in reduced Cd and Zn uptake in Salix cinerea.

  11. The biogeochemistry of carbon in continental slope sediments: The North Carolina margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, N.; Levin, L.; DeMaster, D.; Plaia, G.; Martin, C.; Fornes, W.; Thomas, C.; Pope, R.

    1999-12-01

    The responses of the continental slope benthos to organic detritus deposition were studied with a multiple trace approach. Study sites were offshore of Cape Fear (I) and Cape Hatteras (III), N.C. (both 850 m water depth) and were characterized by different organic C deposition rates, macrofaunal densities (III>I in both cases) and taxa. Natural abundances of {sup 13}C and {sup 12}C in particulate organic carbon (POC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and macrofauna indicate that the reactive organic detritus is marine in origin. Natural abundance levels of {sup 14}C and uptake of {sup 13}C-labeled diatoms by benthic animals indicate that they incorporate a relatively young component of carbon into their biomass. {sup 13}C-labeled diatoms (Thalassiorsira pseudonana) tagged with {sup 210}Pb, slope sediment tagged with {sup 113}Sn and {sup 228}Th-labeled glass beads were emplaced in plots on the seafloor at both locations and the plots were sampled after 30 min., 1-1.5 d and 14 mo. At Site I, tracer diatom was intercepted at the surface primarily by protozoans and surface-feeding annelids. Little of the diatom C penetrated below 2 cm even after 14 months. Oxidation of organic carbon appeared to be largely aerobic. At Site III, annelids were primarily responsible for the initial uptake of tracer. On the time scale of days, diatom C was transported to a depth of 12 cm and was found in animals collected between 5-10 cm. The hoeing of tracer from the surface by the maldanid Praxillela sp. may have been responsible for some of the rapid nonlocal transport. Oxidation of the diatom organic carbon was evident to at least 10 cm depth. Anaerobic breakdown of organic matter is more important at Site III. Horizontal transport, which was probably biologically mediated, was an order of magnitude more rapid than vertical displacement over a year time scale. If the horizontal transport was associated with biochemical transformations of the organic matter, it may represent an

  12. Cleavage pattern and fate map of the mesentoblast, 4d, in the gastropod Crepidula: a hallmark of spiralian development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Deirdre C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animals with a spiral cleavage program, such as mollusks and annelids, make up the majority of the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The great diversity of larval and adult body plans in this group emerges from this highly conserved developmental program. The 4d micromere is one of the most conserved aspects of spiralian development. Unlike the preceding pattern of spiral divisions, cleavages within the 4d teloblastic sublineages are bilateral, representing a critical transition towards constructing the bilaterian body plan. These cells give rise to the visceral mesoderm in virtually all spiralians examined and in many species they also contribute to the endodermal intestine. Hence, the 4d lineage is an ideal one for studying the evolution and diversification of the bipotential endomesodermal germ layer in protostomes at the level of individual cells. Little is known of how division patterns are controlled or how mesodermal and endodermal sublineages diverge in spiralians. Detailed modern fate maps for 4d exist in only a few species of clitellate annelids, specifically in glossiphoniid leeches and the sludge worm Tubifex. We investigated the 4d lineage in the gastropod Crepidula fornicata, an established model system for spiralian biology, and in a closely related direct-developing species, C. convexa. Results High-resolution cell lineage tracing techniques were used to study the 4d lineage of C. fornicata and C. convexa. We present a new nomenclature to name the progeny of 4d, and report the fate map for the sublineages up through the birth of the first five pairs of teloblast daughter cells (when 28 cells are present in the 4d sublineage, and describe each clone’s behavior during gastrulation and later stages as these undergo differentiation. We identify the precise origin of the intestine, two cells of the larval kidney complex, the larval retractor muscles and the presumptive germ cells, among others. Other tissues that arise

  13. Macrofauna of shallow hydrothermal vents on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge at 71N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schander, C.; Rapp, H. T.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are usually associated with a highly specialized fauna and since their discovery in 1977, more than 400 species of animals have been described. Specialized vent fauna includes various animal phyla, but the most conspicuous and well known are annelids, mollusks and crustaceans. We have investigated the fauna collected around newly discovered hydrothermal vents on the Mohns Ridge north of Jan Mayen. The venting fields are located at 71°N and the venting takes place within two main areas separated by 5 km. The shallowest vent area is at 500-550 m water depth and is located at the base of a normal fault. This vent field stretches approximately 1 km along the strike of the fault, and it is composed of 10-20 major vent sites each with multiple chimney constructions discharging up to 260°C hot fluids. A large area of diffuse, low- temperature venting occurs in the area surrounding the high-temperature field. Here, partly microbial mediated iron-oxide-hydroxide deposits are abundant. The hydrothermal vent sites do not show any high abundance of specialized hydrothermal vent fauna. Single groups (i.e. Porifera and Mollusca) have a few representatives but groups otherwise common in hydrothermal vent areas (e.g. vestimentifera, Alvinellid worms, mussels, clams, galathaeid and brachyuran crabs) are absent. Up until now slightly more than 200 species have been identified from the vent area. The macrofauna found in the vent area is, with few exceptions, an assortment of bathyal species known in the area. One endemic, yet undescribed, species of mollusc has been found so far, an gastropod related to Alvania incognita Warén, 1996 and A. angularis Warén, 1996 (Rissoidae), two species originally described from pieces of sunken wood north and south of Iceland. It is by far the most numerous mollusc species at the vents and was found on smokers, in the bacterial mats, and on the ferric deposits. A single specimen of an undescribed tanaidacean has also

  14. Un modèle animal simple pour l’apprentissage des techniques de microanastomoses vasculaires de congruences différentes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclère, Franck Marie P; Kolb, Frédéric; Lewbart, Gregory A; Casoli, Vincent; Vögelin, Esther

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Depuis les premiers travaux de Jacobson et Suarez, la microchirurgie a considérablement évolué et celle-ci est devenue omniprésente en chirurgie plastique comme dans les autres spécialités chirurgicales. L’apprentissage au laboratoire des techniques de base est nécessaire avant d’envisager l’exécution de procédures cliniques. Dans cet article, nous avons évalué un modèle animal permettant de fournir une solution aux problèmes suivants : règles d’éthique, coût, anesthésie, temps nécessaire à la formation. MATÉRIEL ET MÉTHODE: Entre juillet et septembre 2012, 150 simulations de microanastomoses de vaisseaux incongruents par la technique d’Harashina ont été réalisées sur 182 Lumbricus terrestris. L’entrainement a été divisé en 10 périodes de 7 jours comprenant chacune 15 simulations de microanastomoses de vaisseaux incongruents, dont le plus petit diamètre était supérieur à 1,5 mm (n = 5), compris entre 1,0 mm et 1,5 mm (n = 5), ou inférieur à 1,0 mm (n = 5). Un modèle linéaire avec le numéro de la période comme variable principale et la taille de l’animal comme facteur étaient utilisés afin de déterminer la tendance de la durée d’exécution de l’exercice microchirurgical ainsi que les différences entre les sous-groupes de tailles différentes au cours des périodes d’apprentissages. RÉSULTATS: Le modèle linéaire montre une tendance significative (P < 0,001) à la réduction du temps opératoire durant le décours du training ainsi qu’une différence significative entre les groupes d’animaux de tailles différentes. Pour les microanastomoses de taille supérieure à 1,5 mm, le temps d’anastomose moyen est passé de 19,6±1,9 min à 12,6±0,7 min entre la première et la dernière semaine de formation (diminution de 35,7 %). Pour un training avec des vaisseaux de diamètre inférieur, les résultats montraient une diminution dans le temps d’exécution de 36,1 % (diamètre compris

  15. Role of epigeic earthworms on trophic group of nematodes during organic matter decomposition in litter bags under tomato cropping on ultisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Syamsu; Lisnawati, Kilowasid, Laode Muhammad Harjoni; Darwis, Asniah, Nurmas, Andi

    2015-09-01

    Epigeic earthworms are often used to restore of soil quality. Trophic group of nematodes plays an important role in driving of decomposition rate of organic matter. Ultisols is characterized with the soil biological quality that is not suitable for the development of vegetable crops. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of epigeic earthworms on the abundance of nematode trophic groups during the decomposition of organic material in litter bags under cropping of tomato (L. esculentum Mill.) on Ultisols. Epigeic species of earthworms (Lumbricus sp.) were used to modify the soil environment. The experiment treatment consisted of nine combinations of three types of organic matter and three individual levels of earthworms. The organic material consisted of litters of C. odorata, I. cylindrica and Colopogonium sp. The number of earthworms consisted of 0, 20 and 40 individuals plot-1. Each combination of each litter type and number of earthworms was repeated three times in an experimental randomized block design. Research found three trophic groups of nematodes, namely root-herbivorous, bacterivorous and predaceous in the litter bags. Abundance of root-herbivorous between combinations was significantly different at 30 days after exposure. Abundance of bacterivorous nematodes among treatments was significant at 60 days after exposure, which at the 30 and 90 days were not significant. Abundance of predaceous was differed significantly at the 60 and 90 days, and at the 30 days was not significantly different. Constant of decomposition rate of each organic matter under different number of earthworms was similar. Coefficient correlation showed that relation between the constant of decomposition rate with abundance of root-herbivorous was positive at 30 days and negative with bacterivorous at the 90 days. Research concluded that the introduction of epigeic earthworms influenced trophic group dynamics of nematodes during the decomposition of organic material

  16. Effects of a constructed Technosol on mortality, survival and reproduction of earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Benjamin; Cortet, Jerome; Capowiez, Yvan; Mignot, Lenaic; Nahmani, Johanne; Watteau, Francoise; Schwartz, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    Soils, whose properties and pedogenesis are dominated by artificial materials or transported materials, are classified as Technosols. Some of these Technosols are used in soil engineering, which is the voluntary action to combine technical materials in a given objective to restore an ecosystem. Primary by products that are used to build these Technosols need to be assessed on an ecotoxicological point of view. The following study aims to assess the effects of a constructed Technosol made from different primary by-products on the mortality, survival and reproductions of two earthworm species. The model of Technosol used here is a combination of green-waste compost (GWC) and papermill sludge (PS) mixed with thermally treated industrial soil (TIS). OECD soil is used as a control soil. Three different experiments have been managed: i) the first, to assess the potential toxicity effect on Eisenia foetida biomass (28 days) and reproduction (56 days), ii) the second to assess the short-term effect (7 days) on Lumbricus terrestris biomass, iii) and the third to assess the medium-term effect (30 days) on L. terrestris biomass. Reproduction of E. foetida is enhanced with high proportions of GWC. For biomass, GWC seems to improve body mass contrary to other materials which lead to losses of body mass. Thus, for E. foetida, GWC seems to be a high-quality and long-term source of food. Body mass of L. terrestris decreased with GWC and OECD. At short-term only, TIS/PS leads to a gain of body mass. Only equilibrium of 25% GWC - 75% TIS/PS allows a gain of body mass at medium term. TIS/PS appears to be a low-quality and short-term food resource but an excellent water tank. It can be concluded that the constructed Technosol is not toxic for fauna but some differences appear between different tested material combinations, depending on nature, proportion and trophic properties of materials.

  17. Earthworms influenced by reduced tillage, conventional tillage and energy forest in Swedish agricultural field experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerloef, Jan (SLU, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)), Email: Jan.Lagerlof@ekol.slu.se; Paalsson, Olof; Arvidsson, Johan (SLU, Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2012-03-15

    We compared earthworm density, depth distribution and species composition in three soil cultivation experiments including the treatments ploughless tillage and mouldboard ploughing. Sampling was done in September 2005 and for one experiment also in 1994. By yearly sampling 1995-2005, earthworms in an energy forest of Salix viminalis were compared with those in an adjacent arable field. Sampling method was digging of soil blocks and hand sorting and formalin sampling in one cultivation experiment. Both methods were used in the energy forest and arable land comparison. In two soil cultivation experiments, highest abundances or biomass were found in ploughless tillage. Earthworm density was higher in the upper 10 cm, especially in the ploughless tillage. Earthworm density was significantly higher in the energy forest than in the arable field. Formalin sampling revealed c. 36% of the earthworm numbers found by digging in the energy forest and gave almost no earthworms in the arable field. In all treatments with soil cultivation, species living and feeding in the rhizosphere and soil dominated. One such species, Allolobophora chlorotica, was more abundant under mouldboard ploughing than ploughless tillage. Lumbricus terrestris, browsing on the surface and producing deep vertical burrows, was more common in the ploughless tillage. Species living and feeding close to the soil surface were almost only found in the energy forest, which had not been soil cultivated since 1984. The findings support earlier studies pointing out possibilities to encourage earthworms by reduced soil cultivation. This is one of the first published studies that followed earthworm populations in an energy forest plantation during several years. Explanation of earthworm reactions to management and environmental impacts should be done with consideration of the ecology of species or species groups. Earthworm sampling by formalin must always be interpreted with caution and calibrated by digging and

  18. Electron microscope studies. Progress report, 1 July 1990--1 June 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1991-06-01

    This year our laboratory has continued to make progress in the design of electron-optical systems, in the study of structure-function relationships of large multi-subunit proteins, in the development of new image processing software and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. We present an algebraic approach to the symmetrical Einzel (unipotential) lens wherein we simplify the analysis by specifying a field shape that meets some preferred set of boundary or other conditions and then calculate the fields. In a second study we generalize this approach to study of three element electrostatic lenses of which the symmetrical Einzel lens is a particular form. The purpose is to develop a method for assisting in the design of a lens for a particular purpose. In our biological work we study a stable and functional dodecameric complex of globin chains from the hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris. This is a complex lacking the ``linker`` subunit first imaged in this lab and required for maintenance of the native structure. In addition, we do a complete work-up on the hemoglobin of the marine polychaete Eudistylia vancouverii demonstrating the presence of a hierarchy of globin complexes. We demonstrate stable field-emission in the sub-angstrom STEM and the preliminary alignment of the beam. We continue our exploration of a algorithms for alignment of sequences of protein and DNA. Our computer facilities now include four second generation RISC workstations and we continue to take increasing advantage of the floating-point and graphical performance of these devices.

  19. Electron microscope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1991-06-01

    This year our laboratory has continued to make progress in the design of electron-optical systems, in the study of structure-function relationships of large multi-subunit proteins, in the development of new image processing software and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. We present an algebraic approach to the symmetrical Einzel (unipotential) lens wherein we simplify the analysis by specifying a field shape that meets some preferred set of boundary or other conditions and then calculate the fields. In a second study we generalize this approach to study of three element electrostatic lenses of which the symmetrical Einzel lens is a particular form. The purpose is to develop a method for assisting in the design of a lens for a particular purpose. In our biological work we study a stable and functional dodecameric complex of globin chains from the hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris. This is a complex lacking the linker'' subunit first imaged in this lab and required for maintenance of the native structure. In addition, we do a complete work-up on the hemoglobin of the marine polychaete Eudistylia vancouverii demonstrating the presence of a hierarchy of globin complexes. We demonstrate stable field-emission in the sub-angstrom STEM and the preliminary alignment of the beam. We continue our exploration of a algorithms for alignment of sequences of protein and DNA. Our computer facilities now include four second generation RISC workstations and we continue to take increasing advantage of the floating-point and graphical performance of these devices.

  20. Assessment of trace element accumulation by earthworms in an orchard soil remediation study using soil amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centofantia, Tiziana; Chaney, Rufus L.; Beyer, W. Nelson; McConnell, Laura L.; Davis, A. P.; Jackson, Dana

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed potential bioaccumulation of various trace elements in grasses and earthworms as a consequence of soil incorporation of organic amendments for in situ remediation of an orchard field soil contaminated with organochlorine and Pb pesticide residues. In this experiment, four organic amendments of differing total organic carbon content and quality (two types of composted manure, composted biosolids, and biochar) were added to a contaminated orchard field soil, planted with two types of grasses, and tested for their ability to reduce bioaccumulation of organochlorine pesticides and metals in earthworms. The experiment was carried out in 4-L soil microcosms in a controlled environment for 90 days. After 45 days of orchardgrass or perennial ryegrass growth, Lumbricus terrestris L. were introduced to the microcosms and exposed to the experimental soils for 45 days before the experiment was ended. Total trace element concentrations in the added organic amendments were below recommended safe levels and their phytoavailablity and earthworm availability remained low during a 90-day bioremediation study. At the end of the experiment, total tissue concentrations of Cu, Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn in earthworms and grasses were below recommended safe levels. Total concentrations of Pb in test soil were similar to maximum background levels of Pb recorded in soils in the Eastern USA (100 mg kg−1 d.w.) because of previous application of orchard pesticides. Addition of aged dairy manure compost and presence of grasses was effective in reducing the accumulation of soil-derived Pb in earthworms, thus reducing the risk of soil Pb entry into wildlife food chains.

  1. Tillage and crop residue management methods had minor effects on the stock and stabilization of topsoil carbon in a 30-year field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pooja; Heikkinen, Jaakko; Ketoja, Elise; Nuutinen, Visa; Palojärvi, Ansa; Sheehy, Jatta; Esala, Martti; Mitra, Sudip; Alakukku, Laura; Regina, Kristiina

    2015-06-15

    We studied the effects of tillage and straw management on soil aggregation and soil carbon sequestration in a 30-year split-plot experiment on clay soil in southern Finland. The experimental plots were under conventional or reduced tillage with straw retained, removed or burnt. Wet sieving was done to study organic carbon and soil composition divided in four fractions: 1) large macroaggregates, 2) small macroaggregates, 3) microaggregates and 4) silt and clay. To further estimate the stability of carbon in the soil, coarse particulate organic matter, microaggregates and silt and clay were isolated from the macroaggregates. Total carbon stock in the topsoil (equivalent to 200 kg m(-2)) was slightly lower under reduced tillage (5.0 kg m(-2)) than under conventional tillage (5.2 kg m(-2)). Reduced tillage changed the soil composition by increasing the percentage of macroaggregates and decreasing the percentage of microaggregates. There was no evidence of differences in the composition of the macroaggregates or carbon content in the macroaggregate-occluded fractions. However, due to the higher total amount of macroaggregates in the soil, more carbon was bound to the macroaggregate-occluded microaggregates in reduced tillage. Compared with plowed soil, the density of deep burrowing earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) was considerably higher under reduced tillage and positively associated with the percentage of large macroaggregates. The total amount of microbial biomass carbon did not differ between the treatments. Straw management did not have discernible effects either on soil aggregation or soil carbon stock. We conclude that although reduced tillage can improve clay soil structure, generally the chances to increase topsoil carbon sequestration by reduced tillage or straw management practices appear limited in cereal monoculture systems of the boreal region. This may be related to the already high C content of soils, the precipitation level favoring decomposition and

  2. Kinetics and spatial distribution of enzymes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in earthworm biopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Thi Thu, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2016-04-01

    Earthworms boost microbial activities and consequently form hotspots in soil. The distribution of enzyme activities inside the earthworm biopores is completely unknown. For the first time, we analyzed enzyme kinetics and visualized enzyme distribution inside and outside biopores by in situ soil zymography. Kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) of 6 enzymes β-glucosidase (GLU), cellobiohydrolase (CBH), xylanase (XYL), chitinase (NAG), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acid phosphatase (APT) were determined in biopores formed by Lumbricus terrestris L.. The spatial distributions of GLU, NAG and APT become visible via zymograms in comparison between earthworm-inhabited and earthworm-free soil. Zymography showed heterogeneous distribution of hotspots in the rhizosphere and biopores. The hotspot areas were 2.4 to 14 times larger in the biopores than in soil without earthworms. The significantly higher Vmax values for GLU, CBH, XYL, NAG and APT in biopores confirmed the stimulation of enzyme activities by earthworms. For CBH, XYL and NAG, the 2- to 3-fold higher Km values in biopores indicated different enzyme systems with lower substrate affinity compared to control soil. The positive effects of earthworms on Vmax were cancelled by the Km increase for CBH, XYL and NAG at a substrate concentration below 20 μmol g-1 soil. The change of enzyme systems reflected a shift in dominant microbial populations toward species with lower affinity to holo-celluloses and to N-acetylglucosamine, and with higher affinity to proteins as compared to the biopores-free soil. We conclude that earthworm biopores are microbial hotspots with much higher and dense distribution of enzyme activities compared to bulk soil. References Spohn M, Kuzyakov Y. (2014) Spatial and temporal dynamics of hotspots of enzyme activity in soil as affected by living and dead roots - a soil zymography analysis, Plant Soil 379: 67-77. Blagodatskaya, E., Kuzyakov, Y., 2013. Review paper: Active microorganisms in soil

  3. Crystallization and preliminary structural analysis of the giant haemoglobin from Glossoscolex paulistus at 3.2 Å

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachega, J. F. R., E-mail: bachega@ursa.if.sc.usp.br; Bleicher, L.; Horjales, E. R. [Centro de Biotecnologia Molecular Estrutural, Instituto de Fisica de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos - SP, CEP 13566-590 (Brazil); Santiago, P. S. [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos - SP, CEP 13566-590 (Brazil); Garratt, R. C. [Centro de Biotecnologia Molecular Estrutural, Instituto de Fisica de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos - SP, CEP 13566-590 (Brazil); Tabak, M., E-mail: bachega@ursa.if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos - SP, CEP 13566-590 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    Diffraction data to 3.2 Å from crystals of the 3.6 MDa erythrocruorin from a Brazilian earthworm represent the highest resolution reported to date for similar complexes. An unambiguous molecular replacement solution shows the particle to belong to the type I class. Glossoscolex paulistus is a free-living earthworm encountered in south-east Brazil. Its oxygen transport requirements are undertaken by a giant extracellular haemoglobin, or erythrocruorin (HbGp), which has an approximate molecular mass of 3.6 MDa and, by analogy with its homologue from Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt), is believed to be composed of a total of 180 polypeptide chains. In the present work the full 3.6 MDa particle in its cyanomet state was purified and crystallized using sodium citrate or PEG8000 as precipitant. The crystals contain one-quarter of the full particle in the asymmetric unit of the I222 cell and have parameters of a = 270.8 Å, b = 320.3 Å and c = 332.4 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 3.15 Å using synchrotron radiation on beamline X29A at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and represent the highest resolution data described to date for similar erythrocruorins. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using a search model corresponding to one-twelfth of its homologue from HbLt. This revealed that HbGp belongs to the type I class of erythrocruorins and provided an interpretable initial electron density map in which many features including the haem groups and disulfide bonds could be identified.

  4. Application of lime (CaCO3) to promote forest recovery from severe acidification increases potential for earthworm invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Caitlin; Beirer, Colin M; McCay, Timothy S; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    The application of lime (calcium carbonate) may be a cost-effective strategy to promote forest ecosystem recovery from acid impairment, under contemporary low levels of acidic deposition. However, liming acidified soils may create more suitable habitat for invasive earthworms that cause significant damage to forest floor communities and may disrupt ecosystem processes. We investigated the potential effects of liming in acidified soils where earthworms are rare in conjunction with a whole-ecosystem liming experiment in the chronically acidified forests of the western Adirondacks (USA). Using a microcosm experiment that replicated the whole-ecosystem treatment, we evaluated effects of soil liming on Lumbricus terrestris survivorship and biomass growth. We found that a moderate lime application (raising pH from 3.1 to 3.7) dramatically increased survival and biomass of L. terrestris, likely via increases in soil pH and associated reductions in inorganic aluminum, a known toxin. Very few L. terrestris individuals survived in unlimed soils, whereas earthworms in limed soils survived, grew, and rapidly consumed leaf litter. We supplemented this experiment with field surveys of extant earthworm communities along a gradient of soil pH in Adirondack hardwood forests, ranging from severely acidified (pH 5). In the field, no earthworms were observed where soil pH 4.4 and human dispersal vectors, including proximity to roads and public fishing access, were most prevalent. Overall our results suggest that moderate lime additions can be sufficient to increase earthworm invasion risk where dispersal vectors are present.

  5. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S., E-mail: tiina.tuovinen@uef.fi [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Tervahauta, Arja [Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box FI-70211, Kuopio (Finland); Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low. - Highlights: • We studied transfer of elements in boreal food chain using meso- and microcosms. • Elements related to nuclear fuel cycle and mining were examined. • Higher uptake at lower soil concentrations was observed for primary producers. • Snails took up elements mainly from food but for U also soil was an element source. • Non-linear transfer of essential elements was observed for herbivore and decomposer.

  6. Structural and redox behavior of OxyVita, a zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin: comparison with natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, John P; Orlik, Kseniya; Orlig, Kseniya; Zito, Samantha L; Wollocko, Jacek; Wollocko, Hanna

    2010-04-01

    A zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin (OxyVita Hb) has been developed for application as an acellular therapeutic hemoglobin-based-oxygen-carrier (HBOC). For effective and safe oxygen binding, transport and delivery, an HBOC must meet essential molecular requirements related to its structural integrity and redox stability. OxyVita is a super polymer possessing an average M.wt. of 17 x 10(6) Da. Structural integrity was determined by unfolding studies of OxyVita in the presence of increasing concentrations of urea. The unfolding midpoints (D(1/2)) of different preparations of OxyVita (solution and powder forms) were compared to Lumbricus Hb (LtHb) and Arenicola Hb (ArHb), natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins, which are serving as models for an effective and safe acellular HBOC. Reduction studies of OxyVita Hb using endogenous reducing agents were also investigated. Results from these studies indicate that: 1) OxyVita Hb exhibits greater resistance to conformational change than either LtHb or ArHb in the reduced (oxyHb) state; and 2) the reduction of met OxyVita Hb to oxyHb occurs slowly in the presence of either ascorbic acid (70% reduction in 560 min.) or beta-NADH (40% reduction in 90 min.). These studies provide consistent evidence that OxyVita Hb possesses physiochemical properties that exhibit structural integrity and redox behavior necessary for functioning as an effective and safe HBOC within clinical applications. These results are in agreement with observations made by other investigators as to the reduction in heme-loss of OxyVita Hb, essential for the reversible binding/release of molecular oxygen within the circulatory system.

  7. Impact of a changed inundation regime caused by climate change and floodplain rehabilitation on population viability of earthworms in a lower River Rhine floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonon, Ivo; Klok, Chris

    2007-01-01

    River floodplains are dynamic and fertile ecosystems where soil invertebrates such as earthworms can reach high population densities. Earthworms are an important food source for a wide range of organisms including species under conservation such as badgers. Flooding, however, reduces earthworm numbers. Populations recover from cocoons that survive floods. If the period between two floods is too short such that cocoons cannot develop into reproductive adults, populations cannot sustain themselves. Both climate change and floodplain rehabilitation change the flooding frequency affecting earthworm populations. The present paper estimates the influence of climate change and floodplain rehabilitation on the viability of earthworm populations in a Dutch floodplain; the Afferdensche and Deestsche Waarden along the River Waal. This floodplain will be part of major river rehabilitation plans of the Dutch government. In those plans, the floodplain will experience the construction of a secondary channel and the removal of part of its minor embankment. To estimate the impact of these plans and climate change, we used a dataset of daily discharges for 1900-2003 for the River Rhine at the Dutch-German border. We perturbed this dataset to obtain two new datasets under climate change scenarios for 2050 and 2100. From the original and two projected datasets we derived the frequency distributions for the annual periods without inundations for the studied floodplain. We subsequently compared the duration of these inundation-free (dry) periods with the maturation age distribution for L. rubellus as derived from a Dynamic Energy Budget model. This comparison yielded in which parts of our study area and under which climate conditions the populations would still be viable, be able to adapt or become extinct. The results show that climate change has almost no adverse effect on earthworm viability. This is because climate change reduces the flooding frequency during the earthworms growing

  8. The larval nervous system of the penis worm Priapulus caudatus (Ecdysozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Durán, José M; Wolff, Gabriella H; Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hejnol, Andreas

    2016-01-05

    The origin and extreme diversification of the animal nervous system is a central question in biology. While most of the attention has traditionally been paid to those lineages with highly elaborated nervous systems (e.g. arthropods, vertebrates, annelids), only the study of the vast animal diversity can deliver a comprehensive view of the evolutionary history of this organ system. In this regard, the phylogenetic position and apparently conservative molecular, morphological and embryological features of priapulid worms (Priapulida) place this animal lineage as a key to understanding the evolution of the Ecdysozoa (i.e. arthropods and nematodes). In this study, we characterize the nervous system of the hatching larva and first lorica larva of the priapulid worm Priapulus caudatus by immunolabelling against acetylated and tyrosinated tubulin, pCaMKII, serotonin and FMRFamide. Our results show that a circumoral brain and an unpaired ventral nerve with a caudal ganglion characterize the central nervous system of hatching embryos. After the first moult, the larva attains some adult features: a neck ganglion, an introvert plexus, and conspicuous secondary longitudinal neurites. Our study delivers a neuroanatomical framework for future embryological studies in priapulid worms, and helps illuminate the course of nervous system evolution in the Ecdysozoa.

  9. A rare lobopod with well-preserved eyes from Chengjiang Lagerst(a)tte and its implications for origin of arthropods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianni; SHU Degan; HAN Jian; ZHANG Zhifei

    2004-01-01

    The origin of arthropods has long been one of the most hotly-debated subjects. Arthropods used to be thought closely related with annelids, but the two groups are now believed to be separated into two major realms within Protostomia on the basis of new molecular data. Although it is generally held by paleontologists that arthropods should be rooted in the early lobopods--a kind of worm-like creature with non-segmented legs, no intermediate forms have been found to bridge them. Here we report an organism with a mixture of characters, including features characteristic of arthropods (e.g., primary cephalization with paired eyes,paired antennae, and preliminary tagmosis) and of lobopods (e.g., worm-like body design, the dorsal spines, and non-segmented limbs or lobe-like legs). The discovery of the rare transitional form may throw new light on the origin of arthropods and suggests that the most primitive arthropods began with paired uniramous legs and the biramous ones evolved later.

  10. Spatiotemporal bioerosion patterns in deep-water scleractinians from off Santa Maria di Leuca (Apulia, Ionian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuck, L.; Freiwald, A.; Taviani, M.

    2010-03-01

    This study focuses on the carbonate biodegradation processes of deep-water scleractinians from off Apulia at Santa Maria di Leuca (SML) in the Ionian Sea, including living colonies of Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata and Desmophyllum dianthus. The corallites were grouped into three zones: the live zone, edge zone and dead zone. In total, 13 trace types were encountered and are attributed to borings of sponges (3), fungi (6), foraminifers (2), bacteria (1) and annelids (1). Their relative spatial appearance within the host skeletons led to the distinction between six succession stages of bioerosion. The first endobiontic traces are exclusively produced by bacteria and fungi and are already present in the edge zone, which could be attributed to their fast growth rates and/or temporal exposure of the bare skeleton to the water column. In D. dianthus the entire ichnospecies assemblage has been documented within the first 1.9 cm below the live zone and represents the most condensed bioerosion succession amongst the coral species studied. The strongest degradation of corallites at SML is made by boring sponges, which can excavate 70% or more of the skeleton. The finding of a unilateral condensed succession of bioerosion stages may be linked to prevailing unidirectional strong currents. A comparison of the present ichnocoenosis with bioerosion studies from the Eastern Atlantic evidences a reduced ichnodiversity in Ionian Sea bathyal corals.

  11. Measurement of annetocin gene expression: a new reproductive biomarker in earthworm ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, H J; Morgan, A J; Spurgeon, D J; Kille, P

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of new technologies from the genomics revolution will transform the potential application of biomarkers to assess how pollutants impact people, animals, and ecosystems. Genetic databases provide a huge resource from which candidate molecular biomarkers can be identified and, subsequently, exploited to address these issues. However, a major challenge is to link these novel molecular indices to ecologically relevant whole-organism life-cycle traits (such as reproduction and growth). Such a functional link is provided by annetocin, previously characterized as a member of the vasopressin/oxytocin superfamily of neuropeptides. It is expressed in annelid worms within the neurons of the central nervous system and has been shown to be involved in the induction of egg-laying behavior. This paper outlines the validation of annetocin as a novel biomarker of reproductive fitness in the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The design of primer pairs targeted toward oligochaete annetocin has facilitated the isolation of a full-length annetocin cDNA from this species. Optimization of a real-time quantitative PCR procedure exploiting the fluorescent DNA-binding molecule, Sybr Green, has allowed the measurement of annetocin transcript levels over a range covering six orders of magnitude. Using this approach, gene expression was measured in earthworms exposed to soils polluted with high concentrations of zinc and lead. Traditional growth and reproductive indices, including cocoon production, were also recorded and related to the molecular parameter. The future use of annetocin as a molecular genetic biomarker in terrestrial ecotoxicology is discussed.

  12. Genetic assessment of meiobenthic community composition and spatial distribution in coastal sediments along northern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannock, Pamela M; Wang, Lei; Ortmann, Alice C; Waits, Damien S; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2016-08-01

    Meiobenthic (meiofauna and micro-eukaryotes) organisms are important contributors to ecosystem functioning in aquatic environments through their roles in nutrient transport, sediment stability, and food web interactions. Despite their ecological importance, information pertaining to variation of these communities at various spatial and temporal scales is not widely known. Many studies in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) have focused either on deep sea or continental shelf areas, while little attention has been paid to bays and coastal regions. Herein, we take a holistic approach by using high-throughput sequencing approaches to examine spatial variation in meiobenthic communities within Alabama bays and the coastal northern GOM region. Sediment samples were collected along three transects (Mississippi Sound: MS, FOCAL: FT, and Orange Beach: OB) from September 2010 to April 2012 and community composition was determined by metabarcoding the V9 hypervariable region of the nuclear18S rRNA gene. Results showed that Stramenopiles (diatoms), annelids, arthropods (copepods), and nematodes were the dominate groups within samples, while there was presence of other phyla throughout the dataset. Location played a larger role than time sampled in community composition. However, samples were collected over a short temporal scale. Samples clustered in reference to transect, with the most eastern transect (OB) having a distinct community composition in comparison to the other two transects (MS and FT). Communities also differed in reference to region (Bay versus Shelf). Bulk density and percent inorganic carbon were the only measured environmental factors that were correlated with community composition.

  13. Review of experimental and natural invertebrate hosts of sealworm (Pseudoterranova decipiens and its distribution and abundance in macroinvertebrates in eastern Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Marcogliese

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and natural invertebrate intermediate hosts of sealworm (Pseudoterranova decipiens as well as transmission experiments of sealworm from invertebrates to fish are reviewed and summarized. Experimental hosts include copepods, mysids, cumaceans, isopods, amphipods, decapods, annelids, and molluscs. Invertebrates collected from eastern Canada between 1989 and 1995 were checked for nematode infections by microscopic examination of dissected animals or enzymatic digestion of bulk samples. Third-stage larval sealworm were found in mysids (Neomysis americana, Mysis stenolepis from Passamaquoddy Bay, the Bras d’Or Lakes, inshore Cape Breton, Sable Island and Sable Island Bank. Infected amphipods (Amphiporeia virginiana, Americorchestia megalophthalma, Gammarus spp. were found only on Sable Island. Typical infection rates in macroinvertebrates were 1-4/1000. No sealworm infections were found in approximately 18,000 amphipods examined from Sable Island Bank, the site of the most heavily infected fishes in eastern Canada. In Wallace Lake, a brackish pond on Sable Island, infection rates were much higher in mysids than in amphipods. Estimates of rates of transmission of sealworm from invertebrates to fish were derived from infection levels in Wallace Lake and feeding experiments involving sticklebacks and invertebrate prey. It is concluded that mysids may be much more important than amphipods in transmitting sealworm to fish hosts.

  14. Ultrastructural study of spermatogenesis and sperm in the African medicinal leech Hirudo troctina Johnson, 1816 (Annelida, Hirudinida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ahmed, Raja; Tekaya, Saïda; Urbisz, Anna Z; Świątek, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the process of spermatogenesis in the leech Hirudo troctina Johnson, 1816 using light, fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy. At the onset of spermatogenesis in testes, the pear-shaped spermatogonia divide mitotically without full cytokinesis and as a result isogenic groups are formed (clusters, clones) with 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128 spermatogonia and, finally, 256 primary spermatocytes occur. The final meiotic divisions of spermatocytes give rise to clones with 1024 spermatids. There are hundreds of developing germ-line clones in each testis. In each clone, the male germ cells divide in full synchrony and they are in the same phase of spermatogenesis. During complex spermiogenesis each spermatid becomes a filiform spermatozoon with a helicoid nucleus, which is characterized by the presence of a long acrosome with two regions - anterior and posterior, which are followed by a helicoid nucleus, a midpiece with only one mitochondrion and a long flagellum. Our results were compared to those on other clitellate annelids that have been studied to date, especially to sperm formation in Hirudo medicinalis Linnaeus, 1785. Only minor differences were found in the length and the diameter of different organelles and the number of spermatids in germ-line clones.

  15. Identification, isolation and expansion of myoendothelial cells involved in leech muscle regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Grimaldi

    Full Text Available Adult skeletal muscle in vertebrates contains myoendothelial cells that express both myogenic and endothelial markers, and which are able to differentiate into myogenic cells to contribute to muscle regeneration. In spite of intensive research efforts, numerous questions remain regarding the role of cytokine signalling on myoendothelial cell differentiation and muscle regeneration. Here we used Hirudo medicinalis (Annelid, leech as an emerging new model to study myoendothelial cells and muscle regeneration. Although the leech has relative anatomical simplicity, it shows a striking similarity with vertebrate responses and is a reliable model for studying a variety of basic events, such as tissue repair. Double immunohistochemical analysis were used to characterize myoendothelial cells in leeches and, by injecting in vivo the matrigel biopolymer supplemented with the cytokine Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, we were able to isolate this specific cell population expressing myogenic and endothelial markers. We then evaluated the effect of VEGF on these cells in vitro. Our data indicate that, similar to that proposed for vertebrates, myoendothelial cells of the leech directly participate in myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro, and that VEGF secretion is involved in the recruitment and expansion of these muscle progenitor cells.

  16. Dinosaur footprints and other ichnofauna from the cretaceous Kem Kem beds of Morocco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizar Ibrahim

    Full Text Available We describe an extensive ichnofossil assemblage from the likely Cenomanian-age 'lower' and 'upper' units of the 'Kem Kem beds' in southeastern Morocco. In the lower unit, trace fossils include narrow vertical burrows in cross-bedded sandstones and borings in dinosaur bone, with the latter identified as the insect ichnotaxon Cubiculum ornatus. In the upper unit, several horizons preserve abundant footprints from theropod dinosaurs. Sauropod and ornithischian footprints are much rarer, similar to the record for fossil bone and teeth in the Kem Kem assemblage. The upper unit also preserves a variety of invertebrate traces including Conichnus (the resting trace of a sea-anemone, Scolicia (a gastropod trace, Beaconites (a probable annelid burrow, and subvertical burrows likely created by crabs for residence and detrital feeding on a tidal flat. The ichnofossil assemblage from the Upper Cretaceous Kem Kem beds contributes evidence for a transition from predominantly terrestrial to marine deposition. Body fossil and ichnofossil records together provide a detailed view of faunal diversity and local conditions within a fluvial and deltaic depositional setting on the northwestern coast of Africa toward the end of the Cretaceous.

  17. Neuroanatomy of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma provides insights into the evolution of the polychaete nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Vestimentiferan tubeworms are marine invertebrates that inhabit chemosynthetic environments, and although recent molecular phylogenetic analyses have suggested that vestimentiferan tubeworms are derived from polychaete annelids, they show some morphological features that are different from other polychaetes. For example, vestimentiferans lack a digestive tract and have less body segments and comparative neuroanatomy can provide essential insight into the vestimentiferan body plan and its evolution. In the present study, we investigated the adult nervous system in the vestimentiferan Lamellibrachia satsuma using antibodies against synapsin, serotonin, FMRMamide and acetylated α-tubulin. We also examined the expressions of neural marker genes, elav and synaptotagmin to reveal the distribution of neuronal cell bodies. Brain anatomy shows simple organization in Lamellibrachia compared to other polychaetes. This simplification is probably due to the loss of the digestive tract, passing through the body between the brain and the subesophageal ganglion. In contrast, the ventral nerve cord shows a repeated organizational structure as in the other polychaetes, despite the absence of the multiple segmentation of the trunk. These results suggest that the brain anatomy is variable depending on the function and the condition of surrounding tissues, and that the formation of the rope ladder-like nervous system of the ventral nerve cord is independent from segmentation in polychaetes.

  18. Proteomic Changes Associated with Successive Reproductive Periods in Male Polychaetous Neanthes arenaceodentata

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2015-09-04

    The polychaetous annelid Neanthes acuminata complex has a widespread distribution, with the California population referred to as N. arenaceodentata. The reproductive pattern in this complex is unique, in that the female reproduces once and then dies, whereas the male can reproduce up to nine times. The male incubates the embryos until the larvae leave the male’s tube 21–28 days later and commences feeding. Reproductive success and protein expression patterns were measured over the nine reproductive periods. The percent success of the male in producing juveniles increased during the first three reproductive periods and then decreased, but the number of juveniles produced was similar through all nine periods. iTRAQ based quantitative proteomics were used to analyze the dynamics of protein expression patterns. The expression patterns of several proteins were found to be altered. The abundant expression of muscular and contractile proteins may have affected body weight and reproductive success. Sperm have never been observed; fertilization occurs within the parent’s tube. Proteins associated with sperm maturation and fertilization were identified, including ATPase, clathrin, peroxiredoxins and enolase, which may provide clues to the molecular mechanisms enabling males to reproduce multiple times.

  19. Chitosan functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, R; Reader, S; Falshaw, A

    1997-06-01

    Chitosan is a partially deacetylated polymer of N-acetyl glucosamine. It is essentially a natural, water-soluble, derivative of cellulose with unique properties. Chitosan is usually prepared from chitin (2 acetamido-2-deoxy beta-1,4-D-glucan) and chitin has been found in a wide range of natural sources (crustaceans, fungi, insects, annelids, molluscs, coelenterata etc.) However chitosan is only manufactured from crustaceans (crab and crayfish) primarily because a large amount of the crustacean exoskeleton is available as a by product of food processing. Squid pens (a waste byproduct of New Zealand squid processing) are a novel, renewable source of chitin and chitosan. Squid pens are currently regarded as waste and so the raw material is relatively cheap. This study was intended to assess the functional properties of squid pen chitosan. Chitosan was extracted from squid pens and assessed for composition, rheology, flocculation, film formation and antimicrobial properties. Crustacean chitosans were also assessed for comparison. Squid chitosan was colourless, had a low ash content and had significantly improved thickening and suspending properties. The flocculation capacity of squid chitosan was low in comparison with the crustacean sourced chitosans. However it should be possible to increase the flocculation capacity of squid pen chitosan by decreasing the degree of acetylation. Films made with squid chitosan were more elastic than crustacean chitosan with improved functional properties. This high quality chitosan could prove particularly suitable for medical/analytical applications.

  20. Parasitic infections in the Mediterranean needlefish Tylosurus acus imperialis (Teleostei: Belonidae off Tunisian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Châari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide a current survey of parasitic infections in the Mediterranean needlefish Tylosurus acus imperialis (T. acus imperialis. The impact of host’s size and sex on some characteristics of the infection was also examined. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 126 specimens of T. acus imperialis were necropsied to study their parasites. Results: Fifteen species of metazoan parasites were collected including 3 monogeneans (Aspinatrium gallieni, Nudaciraxine imperium and Axinoides sp., 4 digeneans (Lecithostaphylus tylosuri, Tetrochetus coryphaenae, Oesophagotrema mediterranea and Sclerodistomoides pacificus, 1 cestode (Ptychobothrium sp., 3 copepods (Lernanthropus tylosuri, Caligodes laciniatus and Caligus sp., 1 isopod (Irona nana, 1 acanthocephalan (Rhadinorhynchus sp., 1 nematode (anisakid larvae and 1 annelid (piscicolid. Cestoda Ptychobothrium sp. was the most frequent species (72%. Prevalence and abundance of infection with Ptychobothrium sp. and Rhadinorhynchus sp. were positively correlated with the total length of the host. Host’s sex did not seem to affect the infection parameters of parasites in T. acus imperialis. Conclusions: This study provides first information on parasitic infections in the Mediterranean needlefish T. acus imperialis off Tunisia. Parasites can be used to understand phylogeny, biology and ecology of fish host and also as bioindicators of water quality

  1. Reduction of nitrogen in the excretion on Japanese flounder using Ulva and Capitellid; Anaaosa to itogokai ni yoru hirame haisetsubutsuchu no chisso shori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, H.; Kikuchi, K.; Sakaguchi, I. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    To develop the culture residue treatment technique using aquatic organisms, the ammonia and nitrate uptake rates of seaweed Ulva and the nitrogen reduction rate of polychaeta annelid Captella sp. with organic sediment predaceous ability were examined in the excretion of Japanese flounder. Nitrogen uptake rate of Ulva was affected by water temperature. It was highest at 20degC, followed at 15degC and 25degC in the order. It was not affected by light intensity between 1500 and 6000 lux. Ammonia and nitrate uptake rates by Ulva were estimated to be 28.2 and 14.6 {mu}g-N/g/h at 20degC under 3000 lux, respectively. Proportion of feces excreted from Capitellid to ingested sediments was 0.38. At 25degC, Capitellid population of one thousand individuals ingested-N at the rate of 24 mg-N/day, and excreted the feces-N of Capitellid at the rate of 7 mg-N/day. About 70% of nitrogen in the sediment was reduced through this process. 15 refs., 9 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Reconfirmation of antimicrobial activity in the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia fetida andrei by colorimetric assay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weidong Pan; Xianghui Liu; Feng Ge; Tao Zheng

    2003-12-01

    A novel tetrazolium salt, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenyl)-2Htetrazolium (MTS) was used in the assessment of antimicrobial activity in earthworm in the presence of phenazine methosulphate (PMS) as an electron coupling reagent. This activity was purified from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm (ECF), Eisenia fetida andrei (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae, annelids) using a series of column chromatography techniques and was tested against three Gram-negative strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aeromonas hydrophila and three Gram-positive strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus megaterium, Arthrobacter sp., respectively. Only the pigment-free eluate of coelomic fluid of the earthworm (ECFPE) showed activity against B. megaterium amongst three isolated active fractions. The anion (DEAE-52) exchange effluent of the ECFPE was reported to have the strongest activity against P. aeruginosa amongst the three active fractions. The 20% acetonitrile eluate (AE) by Sep-Pak C18 cartridge was also tested and showed fair resistance against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and Arthrobacter sp., respectively.

  3. Diversity of Soil Macrofauna at Different Stages of the Age of Sengon’s Stand in Jatirejo, Kediri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUGIYARTO

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil fauna have important roles on increasing and maintaining soil productivity through it’s function on organic decomposition processes, and optimizing physics, chemist and biology of soil characters. The research was conducted to investigate structure of the community of soil macrofauna from different stages of the age of sengon’s (Paraserianthes falcataria stand in wet season of year 2000. Pit fall trap and hand-shorting methods were used to catch soil macrofauna. Sampling was done on 8 different age stages (year of sengon plant each with triplicate repetition. Twenty-seven macrofauna species in the soil and 26 macrofauna species in soil surface were found in this study. Those species belong to the phylum of Mollusc, Annelid and Arthropod. Pontoscolex sp and Lobopelta ocellifera were species that having high important value. Similarities analysis resulting in an index of 65% indicating low level of diversity differences among soil macrofauna from different ages of the sengon stand. Simple correlation analysis indicates that macrofauna diversity in the soil was closely related with soil organic content, domination of ground vegetation and soil humidity; while macrofauna diversity of soil surface was closely related with the level of light penetration.

  4. Regeneration in planarians and other worms: New findings, new tools, and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saló, Emili; Baguñà, Jaume

    2002-05-01

    Molecular biology, recombinant DNA techniques, and new methods of cell lineage have reignited the interest of planarians and other worms (mainly annelids and nemerteans) as invertebrate model systems of regeneration. Here, the mean results produced in the last five years are reviewed, an update of the genes and molecules involved in planarian regeneration is provided, and a new morphallactic-epimorphic model of pattern formation is suggested. Moreover, and most importantly, we highlight the new strides brought upon by genomic/proteomic analyses, RNA interference (RNAi) to inactivate gene function, and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) cell labelling. The raising hope to obtain transformed neoblasts and transgenic planarians is also stressed. Altogether, such approaches will eventually lead to solve the long-standing open questions on regeneration which still baffles us. Finally, we warn against overlooking the evident links between regeneration processes and those controlling the daily wear and tear of tissues and cells. Both processes act, at least in planarians, upon a unique stem-cell endowed with an unrivaled developmental potential in the animal kingdom-the neoblast. This cell could be considered the forebear and a model system for stem-cell analysis.

  5. Skeletogenesis and asexual reproduction in the earliest biomineralizing animal Cloudina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Hong; Chen, Zhe; Yuan, Xunlai; Zhang, Luyi; Xiao, Shuhai

    2005-04-01

    The tubular fossil Cloudina is emerging as an important Ediacaran index fossil. However, its morphology, skeletogenesis, reproduction, and phylogenetic affinity have not been fully resolved. New material from the Dengying Formation of south China confirms that Cloudina tubes consist of eccentrically and sometimes deeply nested funnels and that the tubes lack transverse cross-walls, inconsistent with the traditional cone-in-cone morphological reconstruction. Tube walls are composed of micrometer-sized, more or less equant crystals. A number of Cloudina tubes branch dichotomously, in which daughter funnels split within parent ones. The Cloudina animal is interpreted to have been able to initiate biomineralization of new funnels within old ones. Its skeleton was probably secreted as calcite crystals suspended in organic matrix; the crystals do not appear to have nucleated and grown on a sheeted substrate. It was clearly capable of asexual reproduction, through budding within parent funnels rather than at the apertural end. The morphology, skeletogenesis, and asexual reproduction of Cloudina are broadly similar to modern serpulid annelids, indicating possible phylogenetic relationships or morphological convergence.

  6. Motor patterns associated with crawling in a soft-bodied arthropod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Michael A; Fusillo, Steven J; Colman, Kara; Trimmer, Barry A

    2010-07-01

    Soft-bodied animals lack distinct joints and levers, and so their locomotion is expected to be controlled differently from that of animals with stiff skeletons. Some invertebrates, such as the annelids, use functionally antagonistic muscles (circumferential and longitudinal) acting on constant-volume hydrostatics to produce extension and contraction. These processes form the basis for most theoretical considerations of hydrostatic locomotion in organisms including larval insects. However, caterpillars do not move in this way, and their powerful appendages provide grip independent of their dimensional changes. Here, we show that the anterograde wave of movement seen in the crawling tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, is mediated by co-activation of dorsal and ventral muscles within a body segment, rather than by antiphasic activation, as previously believed. Furthermore, two or three abdominal segments are in swing phase simultaneously, and the activities of motor neurons controlling major longitudinal muscles overlap in more than four segments. Recordings of muscle activity during natural crawling show that some are activated during both their shortening and elongation. These results do not support the typical peristaltic model of crawling, but they do support a tension-based model of crawling, in which the substrate is utilized as an anchor to generate propulsion.

  7. Dinosaur footprints and other ichnofauna from the cretaceous Kem Kem beds of Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nizar; Varricchio, David J; Sereno, Paul C; Wilson, Jeffery A; Wilson, Jeff A; Dutheil, Didier B; Martill, David M; Baidder, Lahssen; Zouhri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    We describe an extensive ichnofossil assemblage from the likely Cenomanian-age 'lower' and 'upper' units of the 'Kem Kem beds' in southeastern Morocco. In the lower unit, trace fossils include narrow vertical burrows in cross-bedded sandstones and borings in dinosaur bone, with the latter identified as the insect ichnotaxon Cubiculum ornatus. In the upper unit, several horizons preserve abundant footprints from theropod dinosaurs. Sauropod and ornithischian footprints are much rarer, similar to the record for fossil bone and teeth in the Kem Kem assemblage. The upper unit also preserves a variety of invertebrate traces including Conichnus (the resting trace of a sea-anemone), Scolicia (a gastropod trace), Beaconites (a probable annelid burrow), and subvertical burrows likely created by crabs for residence and detrital feeding on a tidal flat. The ichnofossil assemblage from the Upper Cretaceous Kem Kem beds contributes evidence for a transition from predominantly terrestrial to marine deposition. Body fossil and ichnofossil records together provide a detailed view of faunal diversity and local conditions within a fluvial and deltaic depositional setting on the northwestern coast of Africa toward the end of the Cretaceous.

  8. Cloning, expression and activity analysis of a novel fibrinolytic serine protease from Arenicola cristata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunling; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-06-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (< 40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form of A. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result suggested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clot in vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene in A. cristata.

  9. Asexual reproduction in Pygospio elegans claparède (Annelida, Polychaeta) in relation to parasitism by Lepocreadium setiferoides (Miller and Northup) (Platyhelminthes, Trematoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, D G

    2001-08-01

    Life-history theory predicts that parasitized hosts should alter their investment in reproduction in ways that maximize host reproductive success. I examined the timing of asexual reproduction (fragmentation and regeneration) in the polychaete annelid Pygospio elegans experimentally exposed to cercariae of the trematode Lepocreadium setiferoides. Consistent with adaptive host response, polychaetes that became infected by metacercariae of trematodes fragmented sooner than unexposed controls. Parasites were not directly associated with fission in that exposed polychaetes that did not become infected also fragmented earlier than controls. For specimens of P. elegans that were not exposed to trematodes, new fragments that contained original heads were larger than those that contained original tails, whereas original head and tail fragments did not differ in size for infected polychaetes. In infected specimens, metacercariae were equally represented in original head and tail fragments and were more likely to be found in whichever fragment was larger. Despite early reproduction, parasitism was still costly because populations of P. elegans exposed to parasites were smaller than controls when measured 8 weeks later and because exposure to cercariae reduced survivorship of newly divided polychaetes. Taken together, my results suggest that early fragmentation is a host response to minimize costs associated with parasitism.

  10. Regeneration and asexual reproduction share common molecular changes: upregulation of a neural glycoepitope during morphallaxis in Lumbriculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Veronica G; Menger, Gus J; Zoran, Mark J

    2005-05-01

    Neural morphallaxis is a regenerative process characterized by wide-spread anatomical and physiological changes in an adult nervous system. During segmental regeneration of the annelid worm, Lumbriculus variegatus, neural morphallaxis involved a reorganization of sensory, interneuronal, and motor systems as posterior fragments gained a more anterior body position. A monoclonal antibody, Lan 3-2, which labels a neural glyco-domain in the leech, was reactive in Lumbriculus. In the worm, this antibody labeled neural structures, particularly axonal tracts and giant fiber pathways of the central nervous system. A 60kDa protein, possessing a lumbriculid mannose-rich glycoepitope, was upregulated during neural morphallaxis, peaking in its expression at 3 weeks post-amputation. Peak upregulation of the Lan 3-2 epitope, or the protein possessing it, corresponded to the time of major neurobehavioral plasticity during regeneration. Analyses of asexually reproducing animals also revealed induction of the Lan 3-2 epitope. In this developmental context, Lan 3-2 epitope upregulation was also confined to segments expressing both changes in positional identity and neurobehavioral plasticity, but these molecular and behavioral changes occurred prior to body fragmentation. These results suggest that the lumbriculid Lan 3-2 glycoepitope and proteins that bear them have been co-opted for neural morphallactic programs, induced both in anticipation of reproductive fragmentation and in compensation for injury-induced fragmentation.

  11. Biological Control beneath the Feet: A Review of Crop Protection against Insect Root Herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Kergunteuil

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable agriculture is certainly one of the most important challenges at present, considering both human population demography and evidence showing that crop productivity based on chemical control is plateauing. While the environmental and health threats of conventional agriculture are increasing, ecological research is offering promising solutions for crop protection against herbivore pests. While most research has focused on aboveground systems, several major crop pests are uniquely feeding on roots. We here aim at documenting the current and potential use of several biological control agents, including micro-organisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi, and nematodes and invertebrates included among the macrofauna of soils (arthropods and annelids that are used against root herbivores. In addition, we discuss the synergistic action of different bio-control agents when co-inoculated in soil and how the induction and priming of plant chemical defense could be synergized with the use of the bio-control agents described above to optimize root pest control. Finally, we highlight the gaps in the research for optimizing a more sustainable management of root pests.

  12. Draft genome assemblies and predicted microRNA complements of the intertidal lophotrochozoans Patella vulgata (Mollusca, Patellogastropoda) and Spirobranchus (Pomatoceros) lamarcki (Annelida, Serpulida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Nathan J; Namigai, Erica K O; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Hui, Jerome H L; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small non-coding RNAs that act post-transcriptionally to regulate gene expression levels. Some studies have indicated that microRNAs may have low homoplasy, and as a consequence the phylogenetic distribution of microRNA families has been used to study animal evolutionary relationships. Limited levels of lineage sampling, however, may distort such analyses. Lophotrochozoa is an under-sampled taxon that includes molluscs, annelids and nemerteans, among other phyla. Here, we present two novel draft genomes, those of the limpet Patella vulgata and polychaete Spirobranchus (Pomatoceros) lamarcki. Surveying these genomes for known microRNAs identifies numerous potential orthologues, including a number that have been considered to be confined to other lineages. RT-PCR demonstrates that some of these (miR-1285, miR-1287, miR-1957, miR-1983 and miR-3533), previously thought to be found only in vertebrates, are expressed. This study provides genomic resources for two lophotrochozoans and reveals patterns of microRNA evolution that could be hidden by more restricted sampling.

  13. Oxytocin/vasopressin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone from cephalopods to vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-01

    Recent advances in peptide search methods have revealed two peptide systems that have been conserved through metazoan evolution. Members of the oxytocin/vasopressin-superfamily have been identified from protostomian and deuterostomian animals, indicating that the oxytocin/vasopressin hormonal system represents one of the most ancient systems. In most protostomian animals, a single member of the superfamily shares oxytocin-like and vasopressin-like actions. Co-occurrence of two members has been discovered in modern cephalopods, octopus, and cuttlefish. We propose that cephalopods have developed two peptides in the molluscan evolutionary lineage like vertebrates have established two lineages in the oxytocin/vasopressin superfamily. The existence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in protostomian animals was initially suggested by immunohistochemical analysis using chordate GnRH antibodies. A peptide with structural features similar to those of chordate GnRHs was originally isolated from octopus, and an identical peptide has been characterized from squid and cuttlefish. Novel forms of GnRH-like molecules from other molluscs, an annelid, arthropods, and nematodes demonstrate somewhat conserved structures at the N-terminal regions; but structures of the C-terminal regions critical to gonadotropin-releasing activity are diverse. These findings may be important for the study of the molecular evolution of GnRH in protostomian animals.

  14. Pyrosequencing assessment of prokaryotic and eukaryotic diversity in biofilm communities from a French river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricheux, Geneviève; Morin, Loïc; Le Moal, Gwenaël; Coffe, Gérard; Balestrino, Damien; Charbonnel, Nicolas; Bohatier, Jacques; Forestier, Christiane

    2013-06-01

    Despite the recent and significant increase in the study of aquatic microbial communities, little is known about the microbial diversity of complex ecosystems such as running waters. This study investigated the biodiversity of biofilm communities formed in a river with 454 Sequencing™. This river has the particularity of integrating both organic and microbiological pollution, as receiver of agricultural pollution in its upstream catchment area and urban pollution through discharges of the wastewater treatment plant of the town of Billom. Different regions of the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene were targeted using nine pairs of primers, either universal or specific for bacteria, eukarya, or archaea. Our aim was to characterize the widest range of rDNA sequences using different sets of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. A first look at reads abundance revealed that a large majority (47-48%) were rare sequences (<5 copies). Prokaryotic phyla represented the species richness, and eukaryotic phyla accounted for a small part. Among the prokaryotic phyla, Proteobacteria (beta and alpha) predominated, followed by Bacteroidetes together with a large number of nonaffiliated bacterial sequences. Bacillariophyta plastids were abundant. The remaining bacterial phyla, Verrucomicrobia and Cyanobacteria, made up the rest of the bulk biodiversity. The most abundant eukaryotic phyla were annelid worms, followed by Diatoms, and Chlorophytes. These latter phyla attest to the abundance of plastids and the importance of photosynthetic activity for the biofilm. These findings highlight the existence and plasticity of multiple trophic levels within these complex biological systems.

  15. Cloning, Expression and Activity Analysis of a Novel Fibrinolytic Serine Protease fromArenicola cristata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunling; JU Jiyu

    2015-01-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplifi-cation of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encod-ing a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (<40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form ofA. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed inE. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result sug-gested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clotin vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene inA. cristata.

  16. Fossil worm burrows reveal very early terrestrial animal activity and shed light on trophic resources after the end-cretaceous mass extinction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Chin

    Full Text Available The widespread mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous caused world-wide disruption of ecosystems, and faunal responses to the one-two punch of severe environmental perturbation and ecosystem collapse are still unclear. Here we report the discovery of in situ terrestrial fossil burrows from just above the impact-defined Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg boundary in southwestern North Dakota. The crisscrossing networks of horizontal burrows occur at the interface of a lignitic coal and silty sandstone, and reveal intense faunal activity within centimeters of the boundary clay. Estimated rates of sedimentation and coal formation suggest that the burrows were made less than ten thousand years after the end-Cretaceous impact. The burrow characteristics are most consistent with burrows of extant earthworms. Moreover, the burrowing and detritivorous habits of these annelids fit models that predict the trophic and sheltering lifestyles of terrestrial animals that survived the K/Pg extinction event. In turn, such detritus-eaters would have played a critical role in supporting secondary consumers. Thus, some of the carnivorous vertebrates that radiated after the K/Pg extinction may owe their evolutionary success to thriving populations of earthworms.

  17. Mechanisms and constraints shaping the evolution of body plan segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Tusscher, K H W J

    2013-05-01

    Segmentation of the major body axis into repeating units is arguably one of the major inventions in the evolution of animal body plan pattering. It is found in current day vertebrates, annelids and arthropods. Most segmented animals seem to use a clock-and-wavefront type mechanism in which oscillations emanating from a posterior growth zone become transformed into an anterior posterior sequence of segments. In contrast, few animals such as Drosophila use a complex gene regulatory hierarchy to simultaneously subdivide their entire body axis into segments. Here I discuss how in silico models simulating the evolution of developmental patterning can be used to investigate the forces and constraints that helped shape these two developmental modes. I perform an analysis of a series of previous simulation studies, exploiting the similarities and differences in their outcomes in relation to model characteristics to elucidate the circumstances and constraints likely to have been important for the evolution of sequential and simultaneous segmentation modes. The analysis suggests that constraints arising from the involved growth process and spatial patterning signal--posterior elongation producing a propagating wavefront versus a tissue wide morphogen gradient--and the evolutionary history--ancestral versus derived segmentation mode--strongly shaped both segmentation mechanisms. Furthermore, this implies that these patterning types are to be expected rather than random evolutionary outcomes and supports the likelihood of multiple parallel evolutionary origins.

  18. Mesoderm patterning and morphogenesis in the polychaete Alitta virens (Spiralia, Annelida): Expression of mesodermal markers Twist, Mox, Evx and functional role for MAP kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozin, Vitaly V; Filimonova, Daria A; Kupriashova, Ekaterina E; Kostyuchenko, Roman P

    2016-05-01

    Mesoderm represents the evolutionary youngest germ layer and forms numerous novel tissues in bilaterian animals. Despite the established conservation of the gene regulatory networks that drive mesoderm differentiation (e.g. myogenesis), mechanisms of mesoderm specification are highly variable in distant model species. Thus, broader phylogenetic sampling is required to reveal common features of mesoderm formation across bilaterians. Here we focus on a representative of Spiralia, the marine annelid Alitta virens, whose mesoderm development is still poorly investigated on the molecular level. We characterize three novel early mesodermal markers for A. virens - Twist, Mox, and Evx - which are differentially expressed within the mesodermal lineages. The Twist mRNA is ubiquitously distributed in the fertilized egg and exhibits specific expression in endomesodermal- and ectomesodermal-founder cells at gastrulation. Twist is expressed around the blastopore and later in a segmental metameric pattern. We consider this expression to be ancestral, and in support of the enterocoelic hypothesis of mesoderm evolution. We also revealed an early pattern of the MAPK activation in A. virens that is different from the previously reported pattern in spiralians. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway by U0126 disrupts the metameric Twist and Mox expression, indicating an early requirement of the MAPK cascade for proper morphogenesis of endomesodermal tissues.

  19. Parasitic infections in the Mediterranean needlefish Tylosurus acus imperialis (Teleostei:Belonidae) off Tunisian coast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manel Châari; Lassâd Neifar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To provide a current survey of parasitic infections in the Mediterranean needlefish Tylosurus acus imperialis (T. acus imperialis). The impact of host’s size and sex on some characteristics of the infection was also examined. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 126 specimens of T. acus imperialis were necropsied to study their parasites. Results: Fifteen species of metazoan parasites were collected including 3 monogeneans (Aspinatrium gallieni, Nudaciraxine imperium and Axinoides sp.), 4 digeneans (Lecithostaphylus tylosuri, Tetrochetus coryphaenae, Oesophagotrema mediterranea and Sclerodistomoides pacificus), 1 cestode (Ptychobothrium sp.), 3 copepods (Lernanthropus tylosuri, Caligodes laciniatus and Caligus sp.), 1 isopod (Irona nana), 1 acanthocephalan (Rhadinorhynchus sp.), 1 nematode (anisakid larvae) and 1 annelid (piscicolid). Cestoda Ptychobothrium sp. was the most frequent species (72%). Prevalence and abundance of infection with Ptychobothrium sp. and Rhadinorhynchus sp. were positively correlated with the total length of the host. Host’s sex did not seem to affect the infection parameters of parasites in T. acus imperialis. Conclusions: This study provides first information on parasitic infections in the Mediterranean needlefish T. acus imperialis off Tunisia. Parasites can be used to understand phylogeny, biology and ecology of fish host and also as bioindicators of water quality.

  20. Osedax borings in fossil marine bird bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Steffen; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Goedert, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The bone-eating marine annelid Osedax consumes mainly whale bones on the deep-sea floor, but recent colonization experiments with cow bones and molecular age estimates suggesting a possible Cretaceous origin of Osedax indicate that this worm might be able grow on a wider range of substrates. The suggested Cretaceous origin was thought to imply that Osedax could colonize marine reptile or fish bones, but there is currently no evidence that Osedax consumes bones other than those of mammals. We provide the first evidence that Osedax was, and most likely still is, able to consume non-mammalian bones, namely bird bones. Borings resembling those produced by living Osedax were found in bones of early Oligocene marine flightless diving birds (family Plotopteridae). The species that produced these boreholes had a branching filiform root that grew to a length of at least 3 mm, and lived in densities of up to 40 individuals per square centimeter. The inclusion of bird bones into the diet of Osedax has interesting implications for the recent suggestion of a Cretaceous origin of this worm because marine birds have existed continuously since the Cretaceous. Bird bones could have enabled this worm to survive times in the Earth's history when large marine vertebrates other than fish were rare, specifically after the disappearance of large marine reptiles at the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event and before the rise of whales in the Eocene.

  1. Nuclear envelope remnants: fluid membranes enriched in sterols and polyphosphoinositides.

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    Marie Garnier-Lhomme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells is a highly dynamic compartment where membranes readily undergo fission and fusion to reorganize the cytoplasmic architecture, and to import, export and transport various cargos within the cell. The double membrane of the nuclear envelope that surrounds the nucleus, segregates the chromosomes from cytoplasm and regulates nucleocytoplasmic transport through pores. Many details of its formation are still unclear. At fertilization the sperm devoid of nuclear envelope pores enters the egg. Although most of the sperm nuclear envelope disassembles, remnants of the envelope at the acrosomal and centriolar fossae do not and are subsequently incorporated into the newly forming male pronuclear envelope. Remnants are conserved from annelid to mammalian sperm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using lipid mass spectrometry and a new application of deuterium solid-state NMR spectroscopy we have characterized the lipid composition and membrane dynamics of the sperm nuclear envelope remnants in isolated sperm nuclei. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report nuclear envelope remnants are relatively fluid membranes rich in sterols, devoid of sphingomyelin, and highly enriched in polyphosphoinositides and polyunsaturated phospholipids. The localization of the polybasic effector domain of MARCKS illustrates the non-nuclear aspect of the polyphosphoinositides. Based on their atypical biophysical characteristics and phospholipid composition, we suggest a possible role for nuclear envelope remnants in membrane fusion leading to nuclear envelope assembly.

  2. Evolutionary patterns in life histories of Oxyurida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, M

    1994-12-01

    The Oxyurida comprises some 850 known species that occur in the intestine of arthropods and vertebrates (one species in annelids). Important arthropod hosts include Diplopoda, Blattodea, Gryllotalpoidea, Passalidae, Scarabaeida and Hydrophilidae. The major vertebrate hosts are lizards, tortoises, primates, rodents and lagomorphs. An underlying characteristic of the group is haplodiploid reproduction and like many haplodiploid groups, pinworms tend to have life histories that involve high levels of inbreeding. Unlike Strongylida, Ascaridida and Spirurida, which have diversified in tissue site and life cycle as well as hosts, pinworms show little variation in these features and have radiated only across host groups. Two explanations are advanced for this. Haplodiploidy and its concomitant inbreeding may act to canalise evolutionary change, although diverse groups such as the Hymenoptera belie this. Alternatively, Strongylida, Ascaridida and Spirurida are presumed to have arisen from skin-penetrating ancestors that were forced to undergo a tissue migration before reaching their primitive tissue site, the gut. This migration demanded they adapt to a variety of tissue sites and thus acted as a preadaptation to further diversification. The Oxyurida, in contrast, probably arose using oral contaminative transmission. The lack of exposure to other tissue sites may therefore have relegated pinworms to their position in the posterior gut.

  3. Progress in nemertean biology: development and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbeville, J M

    2002-07-01

    This paper reviews progress in developmental biology and phylogeny of the Nemertea, a common but poorly studied spiralian taxon of considerable ecological and evolutionary significance. Analyses of reproductive biology (including calcium dynamics during fertilization and oocyte maturation), larval morphology and development and developmental genetics have significantly extended our knowledge of spiralian developmental biology. Developmental genetics studies have in addition provided characters useful for reconstructing metazoan phylogeny. Reinvestigation of the cell lineage of Cerebratulus lacteus using fluorescent tracers revealed that endomesoderm forms from the 4d cell as in other spiralians and that ectomesoderm is derived from the 3a and 3b cells as in annelids, echiurans and molluscs. Studies examining blastomere specification show that cell fates are established precociously in direct developers and later in indirect developers. Morphological characters used to estimate the phylogenetic position of nemerteans are critically re-evaluated, and cladistic analyses of morphology reveal that conflicting hypotheses of nemertean relationships result because of different provisional homology statements. Analyses that include disputed homology statements (1, gliointerstitial cell system 2, coelomic circulatory system) suggest that nemerteans form the sister taxon to the coelomate spiralian taxa rather than the sister taxon to Platyhelminthes. Analyses of small subunit rRNA (18S rDNA) sequences alone or in combination with morphological characters support the inclusion of the nemerteans in a spiralian coelomate clade nested within a more inclusive lophotrochozoan clade. Ongoing evaluation of nemertean relationships with mitochondrial gene rearrangements and other molecular characters is discussed.

  4. Phylogeny of forkhead genes in three spiralians and their expression in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Xu, Fei; Liu, Jun; Que, Huayong; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-11-01

    The Fox genes encode a group of transcription factors that contain a forkhead domain, which forms a structure known as a winged helix. These transcription factors play a crucial role in several key biological processes, including development. High-degree identity in the canonical forkhead domain has been used to divide Fox proteins into 23 families (FoxA to FoxS). We surveyed the genome of three spiralians, the oyster Crassostrea gigas, the limpet Lottia gigantea, and the annelid Capitella teleta. We identified 25 C. gigas fox genes, 21 L. gigantea fox genes, and 25 C. teleta fox genes. The C. gigas fox and L. gigantea fox genes represented 19 of the 23 families, whereas FoxI, Q1, R, and S were missing. The majority of the Fox families were observed within the C. teleta fox genes, with the exception of FoxR and S. In addition, the foxAB-like gene, foxY-like gene, and foxH gene were also present in the three genomes. The conserved FoxC-FoxL1 cluster, observed in mammals, was also found in C. gigas. The diversity of temporal expression patterns observed across the developmental process implies the C. gigas fox genes exert a wide range of functions. Further functional studies are required to gain insight into the evolution of Fox genes in bilaterians.

  5. Serendipity or prepared mind? Recollections of the KOP translocation (1967) and of one form of Perrault syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, John M

    2014-12-01

    The human X/autosome translocation, designated KOP, was discovered by Dr. Philip D. Pallister in Montana in 1967 in a young man with apparent Klinefelter syndrome. Collaboratively it was possible to elucidate the genetic nature of his unprecedented chromosome rearrangement and its developmental effects in mother and son. In retrospect, these clinical and genetic studies at the height of the somatic cell genetics era (Ruddle, Siniscalco, etc.) presented human genetics with a highly productive opportunity to begin gene mapping of autosomes and the X chromosome. The late Victor McKusick considered the discovery of the KOP translocation, as he determined personally in Montana, one of the major transforming events in human genetics. The Perrault syndrome evaluated in two families in Montana and one in Sicily for familial deafness, primary amenorrhea and neurologic impairment (progressive in some), turned out to be heterogeneous. In the "hands" of Dr. M.-C. King of Seattle four forms of Perrault syndrome have been identified. The autosomal recessive mutation present in the P family studied with Dr. Pallister in Helena, turned out to affect the mitochondrial histidyl tRNA synthetase gene present in prokaryotes, annelids, fungi and mammals, hence, must already have been present in LUCA some 3.8 billion years ago.

  6. Linking micro- and macro-evolution at the cell type level: a view from the lophotrochozoan Platynereis dumerilii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Oleg; Larsson, Tomas A; Arendt, Detlev

    2013-09-01

    Ever since the origin of the first metazoans over 600 million years ago, cell type diversification has been driven by micro-evolutionary processes at population level, leading to macro-evolution changes above species level. In this review, we introduce the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii, a member of the lophotrochozoan clade (a key yet most understudied superphylum of bilaterians), as a suitable model system for the simultaneous study, at cellular resolution, of macro-evolutionary processes across phyla and of micro-evolutionary processes across highly polymorphic populations collected worldwide. Recent advances in molecular and experimental techniques, easy maintenance and breeding, and the fast, synchronous and stereotypical development have facilitated the establishment of Platynereis as one of the leading model species in the eco-evo-devo field. Most importantly, Platynereis allows the combination of expression profiling, morphological and physiological characterization at the single cell level. Here, we discuss recent advances in the collection of -omics data for the lab strain and for natural populations collected world-wide that can be integrated with population-specific cellular analyses to result in a cellular atlas integrating genetic, phenotypic and ecological variation. This makes Platynereis a tractable system to begin understanding the interplay between macro- and micro-evolutionary processes and cell type diversity.

  7. Phylogeny and mitochondrial gene order variation in Lophotrochozoa in the light of new mitogenomic data from Nemertea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Döhren Jörn

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The new animal phylogeny established several taxa which were not identified by morphological analyses, most prominently the Ecdysozoa (arthropods, roundworms, priapulids and others and Lophotrochozoa (molluscs, annelids, brachiopods and others. Lophotrochozoan interrelationships are under discussion, e.g. regarding the position of Nemertea (ribbon worms, which were discussed to be sister group to e.g. Mollusca, Brachiozoa or Platyhelminthes. Mitochondrial genomes contributed well with sequence data and gene order characters to the deep metazoan phylogeny debate. Results In this study we present the first complete mitochondrial genome record for a member of the Nemertea, Lineus viridis. Except two trnP and trnT, all genes are located on the same strand. While gene order is most similar to that of the brachiopod Terebratulina retusa, sequence based analyses of mitochondrial genes place nemerteans close to molluscs, phoronids and entoprocts without clear preference for one of these taxa as sister group. Conclusion Almost all recent analyses with large datasets show good support for a taxon comprising Annelida, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Phoronida and Nemertea. But the relationships among these taxa vary between different studies. The analysis of gene order differences gives evidence for a multiple independent occurrence of a large inversion in the mitochondrial genome of Lophotrochozoa and a re-inversion of the same part in gastropods. We hypothesize that some regions of the genome have a higher chance for intramolecular recombination than others and gene order data have to be analysed carefully to detect convergent rearrangement events.

  8. The mechanisms of primordial germ cell determination during embryogenesis in molluscan species

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    M Obata

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Primordial germ cells (PGCs are the first germ cells distinguishable from surrounding somatic cells during embryogenesis. In many animal species PGC specification is generally classified into two modes: preformation, in which PGCs are determined by maternally inherited components in early development, and epigenesis, in which PGCs arise from proximal somatic cells by inductive signal in late development. In this review we focused on the process of PGC formation in molluscan bivalves and gastropods and compared the PGC specification modes of these two classes. Several reports indicated that bivalves tend to adopt preformation, as maternally inherited germline-specific genes are transcribed in specific blastomeres differentiating into PGCs. In gastropods, maternal germline-specific genes are transcribed in mesodermal stem cells. PGCs seem to be epigenetically determined from mesodermal stem cells by inductive signals after the veliger larval stage, which indicates that PGC precursor cells not only generate germline tissues but also generate mesodermal somatic tissues. The common origin of germline and mesodermal somatic tissues is observed in the annelids Platyhelminthes and Cnidaria, and is considered to be an ancient mode of germ cell determination. We suggest that gastropods retain the ancient PGC specification mode, while bivalves switch their PGC specification mode to preformation.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of dicyemid mesozoans (phylum Dicyemida) from innexin amino acid sequences: dicyemids are not related to Platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahito G; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Tsuneki, Kazuhiko; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2010-06-01

    Dicyemid mesozoans are endoparasites, or endosymbionts, found only in the renal sac of benthic cephalopod molluscs. The body organization of dicyemids is very simple, consisting of usually 10 to 40 cells, with neither body cavities nor differentiated organs. Dicyemids were considered as primitive animals, and the out-group of all metazoans, or as occupying a basal position of lophotrochozoans close to flatworms. We cloned cDNAs encoding for the gap junction component proteins, innexin, from the dicyemids. Its expression pattern was observed by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In adult individuals, the innexin was expressed in calottes, infusorigens, and infusoriform embryos. The unique temporal pattern was observed in the developing infusoriform embryos. Innexin amino acid sequences had taxon-specific indels which enabled identification of the 3 major protostome lineages, i.e., 2 ecdysozoans (arthropods and nematodes) and the lophotrochozoans. The dicyemids show typical, lophotrochozoan-type indels. In addition, the Bayesian and maximum likelihood trees based on the innexin amino acid sequences suggested dicyemids to be more closely related to the higher lophotrochozoans than to the flatworms. Flatworms were the sister group, or consistently basal, to the other lophotrochozoan clade that included dicyemids, annelids, molluscs, and brachiopods.

  10. STUDY OF MACROFAUNA AT HAMISAR LAKE, BHUJ-KACHCHH, GUJARAT

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    NAVINKUMAR K. GUPTE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A  majority  of  recognized  animal  phyla  have  benthic  macro  faunal representatives  living  in  marine,  estuarine  or  freshwater environments.   Annelid  worms,  bivalves,  gastropods,  crustaceans,  tunicates, and  insect  larvae  are  the  most  commonly  encountered  macro  fauna  in estuarine  and  coastal  areas.  They  are  usually  collected  using  0.5  or  1  mm mesh screens. Crustaceans constitute a vital component of the food-chains, in an  aquatic  ecosystem.  Phylum  Mollusca  is  used  by  the  birds  like  painted storks for feeding. Hence it supports a large avifaunal diversity in the lake.

  11. Dependency of soil activity concentration on soil -biota concentration ratio of radionuclides for earthworm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Kim, Byeong Ho; Jun, In; Lim, Kwang Muk; Choi, Yong Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The transfer of radionuclides to wildlife (non-human biota) is normally quantified using an equilibrium concentration ratio (CR{sub eq}), defined as the radionuclide activity concentration in the whole organism (fresh weight) divided by that in the media (dry weight for soil). The present study describes the effect of soil radionuclide activity concentration on the transfer of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 65}Zn to a functionally important wildlife group, annelids, using a commonly studied experimental worm (E.andrei). Time-dependent whole body concentration ratios of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 65}Zn for the earthworm were experimentally measured for artificially contaminated soils with three different activity concentrations for each radionuclide which were considerably higher than normal background levels. Two parameters of a first order kinetic model, the equilibrium concentration ratio (CR{sub eq}) and the effective loss rate constant (k), were estimated by comparison of experimental CR results with the model prediction

  12. The Histochemical Characterization of the Glycoconjugates in the Epidermal Mucous Cells of the Red Californian Earthworm, Eisenia foetida

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    Kenan Çinar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the nature and regional distribution of the glycoconjugates secreted by epidermal mucous cells in Eisenia foetida (Annelida. Specimens were divided into six regions from anterior to posterior. The histochemistry was carried out by using standard histochemical methods. Histochemical staining properties of glycoconjugates in epidermal mucous cells were determined regionally. The epidermis of all regions contained strong to stronger PAS (+ cells in various degrees. The epidermis of the first, fourth, fifth, and sixth regions had strong to stronger AB pH 2.5 (+ cells. On the contrary, all regions contained weak to moderate AB pH 0.5 and AB pH 1.0 (+ cells. Most of mucous cells in epidermis of the first region contained both PAS (+ and AB (+ mucosubstances. All regions included weaker to weak AF (+ cells. All regions featured KOH/PAS (+ cells, with a slight reduction in reaction intensity in the epidermis of the last three regions. In this context, the different staining patterns observed in epidermal mucous cells hinted at their functional roles with respect to production of mucus with different physical properties. This study provided comprehensive information about the regional distribution patterns of the glycoconjugates and an opportunity to compare their distributional patterns in other annelids.

  13. Nervous systems and scenarios for the invertebrate-to-vertebrate transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Nicholas D

    2016-01-05

    Older evolutionary scenarios for the origin of vertebrates often gave nervous systems top billing in accordance with the notion that a big-brained Homo sapiens crowned a tree of life shaped mainly by progressive evolution. Now, however, tree thinking positions all extant organisms equidistant from the tree's root, and molecular phylogenies indicate that regressive evolution is more common than previously suspected. Even so, contemporary theories of vertebrate origin still focus on the nervous system because of its functional importance, its richness in characters for comparative biology, and its central position in the two currently prominent scenarios for the invertebrate-to-vertebrate transition, which grew out of the markedly neurocentric annelid and enteropneust theories of the nineteenth century. Both these scenarios compare phyla with diverse overall body plans. This diversity, exacerbated by the scarcity of relevant fossil data, makes it challenging to establish plausible homologies between component parts (e.g. nervous system regions). In addition, our current understanding of the relation between genotype and phenotype is too preliminary to permit us to convert gene network data into structural features in any simple way. These issues are discussed here with special reference to the evolution of nervous systems during proposed transitions from invertebrates to vertebrates.

  14. Interplay between a Wnt-dependent organiser and the Notch segmentation clock regulates posterior development in Periplaneta americana

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    John E. Chesebro

    2012-12-01

    Sequential addition of segments in the posteriorly growing end of the embryo is a developmental mechanism common to many bilaterians. However, posterior growth and patterning in most animals also entails the establishment of a ‘posterior organiser’ that expresses the Caudal and Wnt proteins and has been proposed to be an ancestral feature of animal development. We have studied the functional relationships between the Wnt-driven organiser and the segmentation mechanisms in a basal insect, the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Here, posteriorly-expressed Wnt1 promotes caudal and Delta expression early in development to generate a growth zone from which segments will later bud off. caudal maintains the undifferentiated growth zone by dampening Delta expression, and hence Notch-mediated segmentation occurs just outside the caudal domain. In turn, Delta expression maintains Wnt1, maintaining this posterior gene network until all segments have formed. This feedback between caudal, Wnt and Notch-signalling in regulating growth and segmentation seems conserved in other arthropods, with some aspects found even in vertebrates. Thus our findings not only support an ancestral Wnt posterior organiser, but also impinge on the proposals for a common origin of segmentation in arthropods, annelids and vertebrates.

  15. Ecological innovations in the Cambrian and the origins of the crown group phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Graham E; Jackson, Illiam S C

    2016-01-05

    Simulation studies of the early origins of the modern phyla in the fossil record, and the rapid diversification that led to them, show that these are inevitable outcomes of rapid and long-lasting radiations. Recent advances in Cambrian stratigraphy have revealed a more precise picture of the early bilaterian radiation taking place during the earliest Terreneuvian Series, although several ambiguities remain. The early period is dominated by various tubes and a moderately diverse trace fossil record, with the classical 'Tommotian' small shelly biota beginning to appear some millions of years after the base of the Cambrian at ca 541 Ma. The body fossil record of the earliest period contains a few representatives of known groups, but most of the record is of uncertain affinity. Early trace fossils can be assigned to ecdysozoans, but deuterostome and even spiralian trace and body fossils are less clearly represented. One way of explaining the relative lack of clear spiralian fossils until about 536 Ma is to assign the various lowest Cambrian tubes to various stem-group lophotrochozoans, with the implication that the groundplan of the lophotrochozoans included a U-shaped gut and a sessile habit. The implication of this view would be that the vagrant lifestyle of annelids, nemerteans and molluscs would be independently derived from such a sessile ancestor, with potentially important implications for the homology of their sensory and nervous systems.

  16. Shape optimization of a sheet swimming over a thin liquid layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkening, J.; Hosoi, A.E.

    2008-12-10

    Motivated by the propulsion mechanisms adopted by gastropods, annelids and other invertebrates, we consider shape optimization of a flexible sheet that moves by propagating deformation waves along its body. The self-propelled sheet is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin layer of viscous Newtonian fluid. We use a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics and derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to simultaneously optimize swimming speed, efficiency and fluid loss. We find that as the parameters controlling these quantities approach critical values, the optimal solutions become singular in a self-similar fashion and sometimes leave the realm of validity of the lubrication model. We explore these singular limits by computing higher order corrections to the zeroth order theory and find that wave profiles that develop cusp-like singularities are appropriately penalized, yielding non-singular optimal solutions. These corrections are themselves validated by comparison with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations, and, to the extent possible, using recent rigorous a-priori error bounds.

  17. Biology and mucosal immunity to myxozoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2014-04-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed.

  18. Insights into bilaterian evolution from three spiralian genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Oleg; Marletaz, Ferdinand; Cho, Sung-Jin; Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric; Havlak, Paul; Hellsten, Uffe; Kuo, Dian-Han; Larsson, Tomas; Lv, Jie; Arendt, Detlev; Savage, Robert; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; de Jong, Pieter; Grimwood, Jane; Chapman, Jarrod A.; Shapiro, Harris; Otillar, Robert P.; Terry, Astrid Y.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lindberg, David R.; Seaver, Elaine C.; Weisblat, David A.; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Aerts, Andrea

    2012-01-07

    Current genomic perspectives on animal diversity neglect two prominent phyla, the molluscs and annelids, that together account for nearly one-third of known marine species and are important both ecologically and as experimental systems in classical embryology1, 2, 3. Here we describe the draft genomes of the owl limpet (Lottia gigantea), a marine polychaete (Capitella teleta) and a freshwater leech (Helobdella robusta), and compare them with other animal genomes to investigate the origin and diversification of bilaterians from a genomic perspective. We find that the genome organization, gene structure and functional content of these species are more similar to those of some invertebrate deuterostome genomes (for example, amphioxus and sea urchin) than those of other protostomes that have been sequenced to date (flies, nematodes and flatworms). The conservation of these genomic features enables us to expand the inventory of genes present in the last common bilaterian ancestor, establish the tripartite diversification of bilaterians using multiple genomic characteristics and identify ancient conserved long- and short-range genetic linkages across metazoans. Superimposed on this broadly conserved pan-bilaterian background we find examples of lineage-specific genome evolution, including varying rates of rearrangement, intron gain and loss, expansions and contractions of gene families, and the evolution of clade-specific genes that produce the unique content of each genome.

  19. Quo Vadis Venomics? A Roadmap to Neglected Venomous Invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern Marcus von Reumont

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Venomics research is being revolutionized by the increased use of sensitive -omics techniques to identify venom toxins and their transcripts in both well studied and neglected venomous taxa. The study of neglected venomous taxa is necessary both for understanding the full diversity of venom systems that have evolved in the animal kingdom, and to robustly answer fundamental questions about the biology and evolution of venoms without the distorting effect that can result from the current bias introduced by some heavily studied taxa. In this review we draw the outlines of a roadmap into the diversity of poorly studied and understood venomous and putatively venomous invertebrates, which together represent tens of thousands of unique venoms. The main groups we discuss are crustaceans, flies, centipedes, non-spider and non-scorpion arachnids, annelids, molluscs, platyhelminths, nemerteans, and echinoderms. We review what is known about the morphology of the venom systems in these groups, the composition of their venoms, and the bioactivities of the venoms to provide researchers with an entry into a large and scattered literature. We conclude with a short discussion of some important methodological aspects that have come to light with the recent use of new -omics techniques in the study of venoms.

  20. Coelomocytes: Biology and Possible Immune Functions in Invertebrates with Special Remarks on Nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qudsia Tahseen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available All metazoans are exposed to a wide range of microbes and have evolved complex immune defenses used to repel infectious agents. Coelomocytes play a key role in the defense reactions of most invertebrates. They are involved in important immune functions, such as phagocytosis, encapsulation, graft rejection, and inflammation, as well as the synthesis and secretion of several humoral factors especially in annelids and echinoderms. Coelomocytes in nematodes are variable in shapes from round, ovoid, cuboidal, and spindle-shaped to stellate or branched cells that are found usually at fixed positions in the pseudocoelom. Their number usually varies from 2 to 6. The model nematode, C. elegans lacks an adaptive immune system and the coelomocytes are capable of endocytosis, but their involvement in phagocytosis of bacteria seems unlikely. The aim of this review is to evaluate current knowledge on coelomocytes of invertebrates with special reference to nematodes. The morphology and structure of these coelomocytes are discussed along with their origin. Their relative positions and diversity in different nematode groups have also been discussed and illustrated.

  1. The functional relationship between ectodermal and mesodermal segmentation in the crustacean, Parhyale hawaiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Roberta L; Price, Alivia L; Patel, Nipam H

    2012-01-15

    In arthropods, annelids and chordates, segmentation of the body axis encompasses both ectodermal and mesodermal derivatives. In vertebrates, trunk mesoderm segments autonomously and induces segmental arrangement of the ectoderm-derived nervous system. In contrast, in the arthropod Drosophila melanogaster, the ectoderm segments autonomously and mesoderm segmentation is at least partially dependent on the ectoderm. While segmentation has been proposed to be a feature of the common ancestor of vertebrates and arthropods, considering vertebrates and Drosophila alone, it is impossible to conclude whether the ancestral primary segmented tissue was the ectoderm or the mesoderm. Furthermore, much of Drosophila segmentation occurs before gastrulation and thus may not accurately represent the mechanisms of segmentation in all arthropods. To better understand the relationship between segmented germ layers in arthropods, we asked whether segmentation is an intrinsic property of the ectoderm and/or the mesoderm in the crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis by ablating either the ectoderm or the mesoderm and then assaying for segmentation in the remaining tissue layer. We found that the ectoderm segments autonomously. However, mesoderm segmentation requires at least a permissive signal from the ectoderm. Although mesodermal stem cells undergo normal rounds of division in the absence of ectoderm, they do not migrate properly in respect to migration direction and distance. In addition, their progeny neither divide nor express the mesoderm segmentation markers Ph-twist and Ph-Even-skipped. As segmentation is ectoderm-dependent in both Parhyale and holometabola insects, we hypothesize that segmentation is primarily a property of the ectoderm in pancrustacea.

  2. β‐catenin‐driven binary cell fate decisions in animal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β‐catenin pathway plays key roles during animal development. In several species, β‐catenin is used in a reiterative manner to regulate cell fate diversification between daughter cells following division. This binary cell fate specification mechanism has been observed in animals that belong to very diverse phyla: the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the annelid Platynereis, and the ascidian Ciona. It may also play a role in the regulation of several stem cell lineages in vertebrates. While the molecular mechanism behind this binary cell fate switch is not fully understood, it appears that both secreted Wnt ligands and asymmetric cortical factors contribute to the generation of the difference in nuclear β‐catenin levels between daughter cells. β‐Catenin then cooperates with lineage specific transcription factors to induce the expression of novel sets of transcription factors at each round of divisions, thereby diversifying cell fate. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:377–388. doi: 10.1002/wdev.228 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26952169

  3. Microbial diversity in Frenulata (Siboglinidae, Polychaeta) species from mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Clara F; Hilário, Ana; Cunha, Marina R; Weightman, Andrew J; Webster, Gordon

    2011-06-01

    Frenulates are a group of gutless marine annelids belonging to the Siboglinidae that are nutritionally dependent upon endosymbiotic bacteria. We have characterized the bacteria associated with several frenulate species from mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz by PCR-DGGE of bacterial 16S rRNA genes, coupled with analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries. In addition to the primary symbiont, bacterial consortia (microflora) were found in all species analysed. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the primary symbiont in most cases belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria and were related to thiotrophic and methanotrophic symbionts from other marine invertebrates, whereas members of the microflora were related to multiple bacterial phyla. This is the first molecular evidence of methanotrophic bacteria in at least one frenulate species. In addition, the occurrence of the same bacterial phylotype in different Frenulata species, from different depths and mud volcanoes suggests that there is no selection for specific symbionts and corroborates environmental acquisition as previously proposed for this group of siboglinids.

  4. Structural characterization of hemoglobins from Monilifera and Frenulata tubeworms (Siboglinids): first discovery of giant hexagonal-bilayer hemoglobin in the former "Pogonophora" group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Cédric; Andersen, Ann C; Bruneaux, Matthieu; Le Guen, Dominique; Terrier, Peran; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; Zal, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Siboglinids are symbiotic polychete annelids having hemoglobins as essential oxygen- and sulfide-carriers for their endosymbiotic bacteria. We analyzed the structure of the hemoglobins from two species of siboglinids: the monilifera Sclerolinum contortum and the frenulata Oligobrachia webbi (i.e. haakonmosbiensis) from Norwegian cold seeps. Measured by Multi-Angle Laser Light Scattering (MALLS), Sclerolinum shows a 3190+/-50 kDa hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb) and a 461+/-46 kDa ring-Hb, just as vestimentifera, whereas Oligobrachia has a 409+/-3.7 kDa ring-Hb only. Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) showed Sclerolinum HBL-Hb composed of seven monomeric globins (15-16 kDa), three disulfide-bonded globin heterodimers and three linkers. The heterodimers always contain globin-b (15814.4+/-1.5 Da). Sclerolinum ring-Hb is composed of globins and dimers with identical masses as its HBL-Hb, but lacks linkers. Oligobrachia ring-Hb has three globin monomers (14-15 kDa) only, with no disulfide-bonded dimers. Comparison of Sclerolinum hemoglobins between Storegga and Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, using the normalized height of deconvoluted ESI-MS peaks, shows differences in globin monomers abundances that could reflect genetic differences or differential gene expression between distinct seep populations. The discovery of HBL-Hb in Sclerolinum is a new element supporting the hypothesis of monilifera being phylogenetically more closely related to vestimentifera, than to frenulata.

  5. Development of whole sediment bioassay using the marine/estuarine polychaetes Polydora cornuta Bosc 1802 and Boccardia proboscidea Hartman 1940

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pocklington, P. [Arenicola Marine, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Canada); Doe, K.; Huybers, A.; Wade, S. [Environment Canada, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Canada). Environmental Quality Lab.; Lee, D. [Environment Canada, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Pacific Environmental Science Centre

    1995-12-31

    The growing need by Environment Canada for a battery of marine toxicity tests has prompted the development of chronic, sublethal, sediment bioassay tests using marine or estuarine annelids (polychaetes). Initially several species of polychaetes found in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic waters were assessed and a few of these were selected for testing survival and sensitivity under laboratory conditions and sensitivity to reference toxicants using field collected specimens. From these experiments, the authors identified several promising species and attempts were made to culture them. To date they have been successful in culturing one species from the Atlantic coast--Polydora cornuta and one species from the Pacific Coast--Boccardia proboscidea. They have been able to generate sufficient numbers of same-age larvae, raise them under controlled conditions to juveniles/young adults, and, subject them to a variety of Non-Contaminant Effects Trials (NCETs) and Contaminant Effects Trials (CETs). In the NCETs the authors determined the effect of food type and food ration, temperature, salinity, grain size, length of test condition. They found them to be moderately robust in terms of variable environmental parameters. In the CETs they found this species to be sensitive to sediments considered by Environment Canada to be toxic. They also determined the animal`s sensitivity to a reference toxicant CdCl{sub 2} (96 hr LC50).

  6. First record of Dero (Aulophorus) bimagnasetus Harman (Oligochaeta) from Brazil and habitat characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campitelli-Ramos, R; Lucca, J V; Oliveira, L L D; Marchese, M R; Rocha, O

    2014-05-01

    Annelid worms represent a significant part of freshwater benthic communities worldwide and Oligochaeta is a particularly species-rich group. Dero (A) bimagnasetus (Naididae) previously found and described from a small marsh in Surinam in 1974, has now been found for the first time in Barra Lake, MG, Brazil. Due to the scarce biological data and absence of ecological information in the literature regarding this species we are presenting morphological information on the specimens obtained and the physical and chemical characteristics of the habitat they were found. This species occurred only in the littoral zone of Barra Lake, in muddy, low oxygen, low conductivity and low organic matter sediment. The four individuals collected ranged 3.17-4.15 mm total length; 0.25 - 0.26 mm body width and 0.16-0.21 mm3 total volume. Considering the present anthropic pressures on freshwater biota and fast biodiversity losses worldwide it is now recognized that attention must be paid to low abundance species and the urgency for preservation of their habitats.

  7. Tolerance and biomarkers as useful tools for assessing environmental quality in the Oued Souss estuary (Bay of Agadir, Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Alla, A; Mouneyrac, C; Durou, C; Moukrim, A; Pellerin, J

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess aquatic environmental quality of Oued Souss (Agadir, Morocco). This estuary has been subjected for a long time to large amounts of sewage discharges and industrial effluents. Since November 2002, no waste outlets have been discharged in this site due to their connection to a wastewater purification plant. Firstly, we have compared metal tolerance of the annelid polychaete (Nereis diversicolor) originating from Oued Souss and a relatively clean site (Oualidia, Morocco). Secondly, we have evaluated with a multi-marker approach (acetylcholinesterase [AChE], glutathione-S-transferases [GSTs], catalase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances [TBARs]) responses of worms to the pollution gradient. Results have shown that worms from Oued Souss have acquired tolerance to copper and zinc due to a long-term sub-lethal metal exposure and this metal tolerance was maintained in spite of the end of wastewater discharges in this site. Higher catalase, GSTs and TBARs values have been observed in worms from Oued Souss sampled before implantation of wastewater treatment. The multi-marker approach confirms that these worms have been submitted to various contaminants. In contrast, high inhibition in AChE activities measured in worms from Oued Souss could be explained by the continuous agricultural influence of nearest areas. The level of contamination was probably maintained since biomarker values were generally higher in worms from Oued Souss when compared to Oualidia.

  8. Action of nereistoxin on recombinant neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond Delpech, Valérie; Ihara, Makoto; Coddou, Claudio; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2003-11-01

    Nereistoxin (NTX), a natural neurotoxin from the salivary glands of the marine annelid worm Lumbriconereis heteropoda, is highly toxic to insects. Its synthetic analogue, Cartap, was the first commercial insecticide based on a natural product. We have used voltage-clamp electrophysiology to compare the actions of NTX on recombinant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nicotinic AChRs) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes following nuclear injection of cDNAs. The recombinant nicotinic AChRs investigated were chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the Drosophila melanogaster/chicken hybrid receptors SAD/beta2 and ALS/beta2. No agonist action of NTX (0.1-100 microM) was observed on chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the Drosophila/chicken hybrid nicotinic AChRs. Currents elicited by ACh were reduced in amplitude by NTX in a dose-dependent manner. The toxin was slightly more potent on recombinant Drosophila/vertebrate hybrid receptors than on vertebrate homomeric (alpha7) or heteromeric (alpha4beta2) nicotinic AChRs. Block by NTX of the chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the SAD/beta2 and ALS/beta2 Drosophila/chicken hybrid receptors is in all cases non-competitive. Thus, the site of action on nicotinic AChRs of NTX, to which the insecticide Cartap is metabolised in insects, differs from that of the major nicotinic AChR-active insecticide, imidacloprid.

  9. Advanced analytical method of nereistoxin using mixed-mode cationic exchange solid-phase extraction and GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yujin; Choe, Sanggil; Lee, Heesang; Jo, Jiyeong; Park, Yonghoon; Kim, Eunmi; Pyo, Jaesung; Jung, Jee H

    2015-07-01

    Nereistoxin(NTX) was originated from a marine annelid worm Lumbriconereis heteropoda and its analogue pesticides including cartap, bensultap, thiocyclam and thiobensultap have been commonly used in agriculture, because of their low toxicity and high insecticidal activity. However, NTX has been reported about its inhibitory neuro toxicity in human and animal body, by blocking nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and it cause significant neuromuscular toxicity, resulting in respiratory failure. We developed a new method to determine NTX in biological fluid. The method involves mixed-mode cationic exchange based solid phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for final identification and quantitative analysis. The limit of detection and recovery were substantially better than those of other methods using liquid-liquid extraction or headspace solid phase microextraction. The good recoveries (97±14%) in blood samples were obtained and calibration curves over the range 0.05-20 mg/L have R2 values greater than 0.99. The developed method was applied to a fatal case of cartap intoxication of 74 years old woman who ingested cartap hydrochloride for suicide. Cartap and NTX were detected from postmortem specimens and the cause of the death was ruled to be nereistoxin intoxication. The concentrations of NTX were 2.58 mg/L, 3.36 mg/L and 1479.7 mg/L in heart, femoral blood and stomach liquid content, respectively. The heart blood/femoral blood ratio of NTX was 0.76.

  10. Biodiversity of the white coral bank off Cape Santa Maria di Leuca (Mediterranean Sea): An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrototaro, F.; D'Onghia, G.; Corriero, G.; Matarrese, A.; Maiorano, P.; Panetta, P.; Gherardi, M.; Longo, C.; Rosso, A.; Sciuto, F.; Sanfilippo, R.; Gravili, C.; Boero, F.; Taviani, M.; Tursi, A.

    2010-03-01

    The biodiversity of the Santa Maria di Leuca (SML) coral bank is summarized and its description is updated using data collected by means of underwater video systems, benthic samplers and fishing gears. A total of 222 living species have been recorded within the coral bank area in the depth range 280-1121 m. The most abundant benthic taxa recorded are Porifera (36 species) followed by Mollusca (35) and Cnidaria (31). The scleractinian corals Madrepora oculata and Lophelia pertusa are the main colonial species in the structure of the SML bank. Annelida, Crustacea and Bryozoa have been found with 24, 23 and 19 species, respectively. A total of 40 species of demersal fish have been recorded. Other faunal taxa were found with small numbers of species. One hundred and thirty-five species are new for the SML bank, 31 of which represent new records for the north-western Ionian Sea (2 Porifera, 17 Cnidaria, 1 Mollusca, 3 Annelida, 2 Crustacea, 4 Bryozoa and 4 Echinodermata). The finding of the annelid Harmothoë vesiculosa represents the first record for the Mediterranean Sea. The SML coral bank represents a biodiversity "hot-spot" on the bathyal bottoms of the Mediterranean Sea.

  11. 河北昌黎生态监控区8月潮间带生物多样性年际变化趋势%The inter-annual variation trend of intertidal biodiversity in August in the ecology-monitoring area of Changli in Hebei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张月明; 梁晓林; 赵志楠; 韩晓庆; 金照光; 高伟明

    2014-01-01

    According to the monitoring data and information obtained from National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, the species composition, density, biomass, dominant species andthe trend of biodiversity variation in the ecology-monitoring area of Changli in Hebei Province from 2009 to 2013 were analyzed. The results showed that 5 phylum including arthropods, annelid, mollusks, echinodermata and chordata, totally 17 family and 26 species were identified. The types and number of species were declined annually. The density and biomass were consistent with the characteristics of low tidal zone>medium tidal zone>high tidal zone. The dominant species were changed significantly, by which arthropods, annelid and mollusks appearing alternately. As the decreasing of the number of dominant species, the dominance index went up which suppressed the other species. The Shannon-Wiener’s index(H’), Margalef’s richness index (dMa) were low, and their variation ranges were 0.81~3.23 and 0.48~3.96, respectively. The variation range of Pielou’s evenness index (J) was0.64~0.8, which presented a miniature uptrend and stable status.%依据国家海洋环境监测中心2009~2013年测得的数据和资料,对河北昌黎生态监控区潮间带生物的种类组成、栖息密度、生物量、优势种以及多样性指数进行统计运算,分析该监控区5年时间尺度的潮间带生物多样性变化趋势。结果表明:监控区共鉴定出潮间带生物5门,包括节肢动物、环节动物、软体动物、棘皮动物和脊索动物,共17科,26种,类型较少,年际种数呈逐年下降趋势;栖息密度与生物量较低,保持低潮带>中潮带>高潮带的特征;优势种群变化显著,节肢动物、环节动物和软体动物交替出现,优势种数逐年减少,优势度上升,对其他物种抑制作用增强;均匀度指数(J)呈微上升趋势,变化范围为0.64~0.81,状况良好,物种多样性指数(H′)和丰富度指数(d

  12. Effects of natural and human-induced hypoxia on coastal benthos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Levin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Coastal hypoxia (<1.42 ml L−1; 62.5 μM; 2 mg L−1, approx. 30% oxygen saturation occurs seasonally in many estuaries, fjords, and along open coasts subject to upwelling or excessive riverine nutrient input, and permanently in some isolated seas and marine basins. Underlying causes of hypoxia include enhanced nutrient input from natural causes (upwelling or anthropogenic origin (eutrophication and reduction of mixing by limited circulation or enhanced stratification; combined these lead to higher surface water production, microbial respiration and eventual oxygen depletion. Advective inputs of low-oxygen waters may initiate or expand hypoxic conditions. Responses of estuarine, enclosed sea, and open shelf benthos to hypoxia depend on the duration, predictability, and intensity of oxygen depletion and on whether H2S is formed. Under suboxic conditions, large mats of filamentous sulfide oxidizing bacteria cover the seabed and consume sulfide, thereby providing a detoxified microhabitat for eukaryotic benthic communities. Calcareous foraminiferans and nematodes are particularly tolerant of low oxygen concentrations and may attain high densities and dominance, often in association with microbial mats. When oxygen is sufficient to support metazoans, small, soft-bodied invertebrates (typically annelids, often with short generation times and elaborate branchial structures, predominate. Large taxa are more sensitive than small taxa to hypoxia. Crustaceans and echinoderms are typically more sensitive to hypoxia, with lower oxygen thresholds, than annelids, sipunculans, molluscs and cnidarians. Mobile fish and shellfish will migrate away from low-oxygen areas. Within a species, early life stages may be more subject to oxygen stress than older life stages.

    Hypoxia alters both the structure and function of benthic communities, but effects may differ with regional hypoxia history. Human-caused hypoxia is generally

  13. Análisis de los componentes zoobentónicos en un bordo temporal utilizado para acuicultura extensiva en Norte del Estado de Guerrero, México.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiroz-Castelán, Héctor

    2009-04-01

    of a body of water and the degree of contamination by the presence of certain groups and is a key source of food for fish farming in semi-intensive or extensive systems, the objective of this study were: Analyzing the main components of zoobenthos abundance, distribution and its relation to biotic and abiotic factors in a temporary earth pond that is located north of the town of Piedras Negras, Guerrero, Mexico. Collections of samples of zoobenthos, phytoplankton and monitoring of physical and chemical parameters were conducted every 30 days at four sites. The groups of organisms reported in the benthic coastline region were 12:Chironomids (Class insecta were the dominant group (20.75%, followed by copepods (16.11%, ostracods (11.21%, cladocerans (10.18%, oligochaetes ( Class annelid worms (9.41%, gastropods (8.89%, nematodes and rotifers (7.99%, Tardigrada (3.87%, insects (2.84%, hydracarina (0.52% and Hirudinea (class annelid worms (0.26%. Presented significant variations in the physical-chemical parameters during different months of sampling, due to seasonality. There were significant correlations with some abiotic parameters. The abundance,distribution and composition of zoobenthonics organisms in temporaryearth pond "Laguna Seca," are related to the timing (phases ofconcentration and dilution.

  14. Community characteristics and secondary production of macrozoobenthos in intertidal zone of the Yellow River Estuary%黄河入海口潮间带大型底栖动物群落组成及次级生产力

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志忠; 张金路; 陈述江; 杜兴华; 段登选; 刘艳春; 蒋万钊; 赵磊

    2012-01-01

    为了解黄河入海口潮间带大型底栖生物现状,于2008年和2009年黄河枯水期的5月和丰水期的8月分别对黄河入海口5条潮间带断面大型底栖动物进行了采样调查.结果表明,采集到大型底栖动物65种,其中软体动物26种、甲壳动物22种、多毛类12种、腔肠动物2种、腕足动物、棘皮动物和鱼类各1种.软体动物和甲壳动物是构成潮间带底栖动物的主要类群.黄河入海口潮间带大型底栖动物平均栖息密度为(929.60±356.53)/m2,平均生物量(湿重)为(169.92±7.31)g/m2.在栖息密度组成中,软体动物占绝对优势,其次甲壳动物和多毛类,其他类群较低.Shannon-Weiner多样性指数为1.44±0.44,Margalef物种丰富度指数1.57±0.15,Pielou均匀度指数0.42±0.11.年平均去灰干重(13.96±0.61)g(AFDW)/m2,年次级生产力(11.26±0.62)g( AFDW)/( m2·a),P/B值平均(0.89±0.11)/a,表明黄河入海口潮间带个体较大、生活史较长的大型底栖动物种类所占比例较高.%In order to understand the present status of macrozoobenthic fauna in the intertidal zone of Yellow River Estuary, four surveys were made at 5 sections of the zone in May and Aug. of 2008 and 2009. A total of 65 maerozoobenthos species were recorded, including 26 species Mollusc, 22 species Crustacea, 12 species annelid polychaete, 2 species Coelenterate, 1 species Brachiopoda, 1 species Echinoderm and 1 species fish. The dominant species were Mollusc and Crustacea. The inhabit density and biomass (fresh weight) of maerozoobenthos were (929. 60 ± 356. 53 )/m2 and (169. 92 ±7.31) g/m2 respectively. The dominant inhabit density species were as follows: Mollusc > Crustacea and annelid polychaete > the other kinds. The mean Shannon-Weiner index was 1.44 ±0.44 when the mean Margalef species richness index and the mean Pielou evenness index were 1. 57 ±0. 15 and 0.42 ±0. 11 respectively. The mean ash free dry mass per year was (13. 96 ±0. 61 )g( AFDW)/m2 with the

  15. Effects of natural and human-induced hypoxia on coastal benthos

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    L. A. Levin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Coastal hypoxia (defined here as <1.42 ml L−1; 62.5 μM; 2 mg L−1, approx. 30% oxygen saturation develops seasonally in many estuaries, fjords, and along open coasts as a result of natural upwelling or from anthropogenic eutrophication induced by riverine nutrient inputs. Permanent hypoxia occurs naturally in some isolated seas and marine basins as well as in open slope oxygen minimum zones. Responses of benthos to hypoxia depend on the duration, predictability, and intensity of oxygen depletion and on whether H2S is formed. Under suboxic conditions, large mats of filamentous sulfide oxidizing bacteria cover the seabed and consume sulfide. They are hypothesized to provide a detoxified microhabitat for eukaryotic benthic communities. Calcareous foraminiferans and nematodes are particularly tolerant of low oxygen concentrations and may attain high densities and dominance, often in association with microbial mats. When oxygen is sufficient to support metazoans, small, soft-bodied invertebrates (typically annelids, often with short generation times and elaborate branchial structures, predominate. Large taxa are more sensitive than small taxa to hypoxia. Crustaceans and echinoderms are typically more sensitive to hypoxia, with lower oxygen thresholds, than annelids, sipunculans, molluscs and cnidarians. Mobile fish and shellfish will migrate away from low-oxygen areas. Within a species, early life stages may be more subject to oxygen stress than older life stages.

    Hypoxia alters both the structure and function of benthic communities, but effects may differ with regional hypoxia history. Human-caused hypoxia is generally linked to eutrophication, and occurs adjacent to watersheds with large populations or agricultural activities. Many occurrences are seasonal, within estuaries, fjords or enclosed seas of the North Atlantic and the NW Pacific Oceans. Benthic faunal responses, elicited at oxygen levels below

  16. CLINICAL STUDY ON TREATMENT OF SENILE STROKE PATIENTS BY ACUPUNCTURE PLUS CHINESE MEDICINAL HERBS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xiuzhen

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of acupuncture therapy plus Chinese medicinal herbs in the treatment of 38 cases of senile patients with hemiplegia. Methods; A total of 69 senile stroke patients were ran domly divided into treatment group (n = 38, accepting acupuncture plus herbal medicine treatment) and control group (n=31, accepting herbal medicine treatment only). Principal acupoints used were Baihui(GV 20), Jiquan(HT 1),Jianyu(LI 15), Quchi (LI 11), Zhongwan(RN 12), Siqiang (Extra acupoint) and Zusanli(ST 36), combined with other acupoints according to the symptoms. These acupoints were punctured with filiform needles and stimulated with uniform reinforcing-reducing method, once everyday except Sundays, with 30 sessions being a therapeutic course. Chinese medicinal herbs used were Huangqi (Radix Astragali, 黄芪 )30 g, Dangshen (Radix Codonopsis Pilosulae, 党参)30 g,Danshen (Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, 丹参)30 g, Chishao (Radix Paeoniae Rubra,赤芍)30 g, Chuanxiong (Rhizoma Ligustici Chuanxiong, 川芎) 10 g, Dilong (Lumbricus, 地 龙 ) 10 g, Niuxi (Radix Achyranthis Bidentatae, 牛膝 ) 15 g, Jixueteng (Caulis Spatholobi, 鸡血藤)30 g and Gancao (Radix Glycyrrhizae, 甘草)6 g which were decocted in water to be taken one dose everyday ( in the morning and evening), continuously for 60 days, with 30 days being a therapeutic course. Results: After treatment, in treatment and control groups, of the 38 and 31 cases, 18 (47.37%) and 8(25.81%) experienced remarkable improvement, 18 (47.37%) and 18 (58.06%) were effective, and 2 (5.26%)and 5 (16.13%) had no significant changes, with the total effective rates being 94.74% and 83.87% respectively.Simultaneously, indexes of blood rheology as whole blood ratio high shear viscosity (WBRHSV), whole blood ratio low shear viscosity (WBRLSV), plasma ratio viscosity (PRV), hematacrit (HCT) and fibrinogen (Fib) were remarkably reduced in comparison with pre-treatment, meaning improvement of the

  17. Ecological and geochemical impacts of exotic earthworm dispersal in forest ecosystems of Eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Melanie; Fugere, Martine; Lapointe, Line; Vellend, Mark; Bradley, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    In Eastern Canada, native earthworm species did not survive the Wisconsin glaciation, which ended over 11,000 years ago. Accordingly, the 17 known Lumbricidae species in the province of Québec were introduced in recent centuries by European settlers. Given that natural migration rates are no more than 5-10 m yr-1, exotic earthworm dispersal across the landscape is presumed to be mediated by human activities, although this assertion needs further validation. In agroecosystems, earthworms have traditionally been considered beneficial soil organisms that facilitate litter decomposition, increase nutrient availability and improve soil structure. However, earthworm activities could also increase soil nutrient leaching and CO2 emissions. Furthermore, in natural forest ecosystems, exotic earthworms may reduce organic forest floors provoking changes in watershed hydrology and loss of habitat for some faunal species. Over the past decade, studies have also suggested a negative effect of exotic earthworms on understory plant diversity, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Finally, there are no studies to our knowledge that have tested the effects of Lumbricidae species on the production of N2O (an important greenhouse gas) in forest ecosystems. We report on a series of field, greenhouse and laboratory studies on the human activities responsible for the dispersal of exotic earthworms, and on their ecological / geochemical impacts in natural forest ecosystems. Our results show: (1) Car tire treads and bait discarded by fishermen are important human vectors driving the dispersal of earthworms into northern temperate forests; (2) Exotic earthworms significantly modify soil physicochemical properties, nutrient cycling, microbial community structure and biomass; (3) Earthworm abundances in the field correlate with a decrease in understory plant diversity; (4) Lumbricus terrestris, an anecic earthworm species and favorite bait of fishermen, reduces seed germination and

  18. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm biopores by in situ soil zymography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Duyen Hoang, Thi; Razavi, Bahar. S.; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms can strongly activate microorganisms, increase microbial and enzyme activities and consequently the turnover of native soil organic matter. In extremely dynamic microhabitats and hotspots as biopores made by earthworms, the in situ enzyme activities are a footprint of complex biotic interactions. The effect of earthworms on the alteration of enzyme activities inside biopores and the difference between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil was visualized by in situ soil zymography (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2014). For the first time, we prepared quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in biopores. Furthermore, we developed the zymography technique by direct application of a substrate saturated membrane to the soil to obtain better spatial resolution. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). Simultaneously, maize seed was sown in the soil. Control soil box with maize and without earthworm was prepared in the same way. After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworm, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine aminopeptidase) and phosphatase. Followed by non-destructive zymography, biopore samples and control soil were destructively collected to assay enzyme kinetics by fluorogenically labeled substrates method. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. These differences were further confirmed by fluorimetric microplate enzyme assay detected significant difference of Vmax in four above mentioned enzymes. Vmax of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores is 68%, 108%, 50% and 49% higher than that of control soil. However, no difference in cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase kinetics between biopores and control soil were detected. This indicated little effect of earthworms on protein and cellulose transformation in soil

  19. Influence of environmental factors on abundance and temporal variation of benthic fauna resources in the eutrophic Tha Chin estuary, Samut Sakhon province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritnim, Nittaya; Meksumpun, Charumas

    2011-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors on the abundance and temporal variation of benthic fauna resources was studied in the eutrophic Tha Chin estuary located in Samut Sakhon province. The objectives were to analyze the status of abundance and temporal variation of the benthic fauna and to clarify the impacts from environmental factors (water and sediment quality). Field surveys were conducted monthly from August 2007 to March 2008 at 11 sampling stations in the estuary. Based on freshwater runoff volumes, the high-, medium-, and low-loading periods were categorized to be from August to October 2007, November to December 2007, and January to March 2008, respectively. The benthic fauna resources were composed of 57 species in eight phyla. Annelids were the dominant species (with the maximum density being 19,885 individuals/m2), followed by the mollusks. Both densities decreased during the low-loading period in 2008. Water quality deteriorated during the high-loading period. Land-based wastewater discharges decreased the levels of salinity and dissolved oxygen but dramatically increased various nutrients. Consequently, the sediment quality deteriorated during the medium-loading period. Bottom deposits during this time depicted high accumulation of acid volatile sulfides (more than 0.76 mg/g dry weight). Analyzing the environmental relationships, deposit feeders (for example, Nereis sp. and Prionospio sp.) and a clam (Arcuatula sp.) showed potential as bio-indicators for environmental monitoring. The overall results revealed the importance of changes in the water and sediment qualities that had an influence on related benthic resources. The increase in the level of NH4(+)-N had a negative impact on the economic clam species, while the sedimentary TOM showed positive correlation (P land-based runoff should be controlled for the protection of resources. Further effective sustainable management will be enhanced by giving serious consideration to an eco-based zoning

  20. On the Temperature Behavior of Pulse Propagation and Relaxation in Worms, Nerves and Gels.

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    Christian Fillafer

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on pulse propagation in biological systems has been an important field of research. Environmental temperature not only affects a host of physiological processes e.g. in poikilotherms but also provides an experimental means to investigate the thermodynamic phenomenology of nerves and muscle. In the present work, the temperature dependence of blood vessel pulsation velocity and frequency was studied in the annelid Lumbriculus variegatus. The pulse velocity was found to vary linearily between 0°C and 30°C. In contrast, the pulse frequency increased non-linearly in the same temperature range. A heat block ultimately resulted in complete cessation of vessel pulsations at 37.2±2.7°C (lowest: 33°C, highest: 43°C. However, quick cooling of the animal led to restoration of regularly propagating pulses. This experimentally observed phenomenology of pulse propagation and frequency is interpreted without any assumptions about molecules in the excitable membrane (e.g. ion channels or their temperature-dependent behaviour. By following Einstein's approach to thermodynamics and diffusion, a relation between relaxation time τ and compressibility κ of the excitable medium is derived that can be tested experimentally (for κT ∼ κS. Without fitting parameters this theory predicts the temperature dependence of the limiting (i.e. highest pulse frequency in good agreement with experimental data. The thermodynamic approach presented herein is neither limited to temperature nor to worms nor to living systems. It describes the coupling between pulse propagation and relaxation equally well in nerves and gels. The inherent consistency and universality of the concept underline its potential to explain the dependence of pulse propagation and relaxation on any thermodynamic observable.

  1. Reefs, sand and reef-like sand: A comparison of the benthic biodiversity of habitats in the Dutch Borkum Reef Grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Joop W. P.; Bos, Oscar G.; Glorius, Sander; Lengkeek, Wouter; Cuperus, Joël; van der Weide, Babeth; Agüera, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Reefs play an important role in the distribution of species associated with hard substrates and are of value for biodiversity conservation. High densities of the habitat building annelid Lanice conchilega also increase local biodiversity. This study describes the benthic biodiversity of a rocky reef and its surrounding sand bottom with dense L. conchilega beds in the Borkum Reef Grounds, north of the island of Schiermonnikoog in the Dutch North Sea. A side-scan sonar survey revealed distinct seabed areas with high acoustic reflections, indicating the presence of hard substrate on the sandy seafloor. To ground truth the side-scan sonar data and make an inventory of the biodiversity of the observed habitats, a multi-method sampling approach (box corer, SCUBA airlift sampler and visual transects, drop-down camera) was used. This revealed (1) rocky reefs: a combination of gravel, stones and rocks; (2) individual rocks in a sandy environment; (3) sand with dense L. conchilega beds (> 1500 ind·m- 2) and (4) sand bottom habitat. A total of 193 taxa were found with many unique species per habitat. Species richness was significantly higher on sand when compared to the rocky reef (NB-GLM; p = 0.006), caused by the presence of dense L. conchilega beds (Poisson GLM; p 1500 ind·m- 2 to be 74 km2. Further research should focus on the possible function of L. conchilega as an ecosystem engineer creating intermediate sand-reef systems. For mapping these L. conchilega beds, we advise using side-scan sonar imaging combined with ground truthing by drop-down cameras.

  2. A Return to Linnaeus's Focus on Diagnosis, Not Description: The Use of DNA Characters in the Formal Naming of Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Susanne S

    2016-11-01

    Descriptions and diagnoses are alternative choices in all Codes of Nomenclature because Linnaeus relied on diagnoses, not descriptions, to name ca. 13,400 animals, plants, and fungi. A diagnosis names characters in which a new taxon differs from the most similar known taxon; a description mixes taxonomically informative and uninformative features, usually without indicating which is which. The first formal diagnoses of new taxa that included DNA-based characters came out in 2001, and by November 2015, at least 98 names of species of acoels, lichens, angiosperms, annelids, alveolates, arachnids, centipedes, turtles, fishes, butterflies, mollusks, nematodes, and pathogenic fungi have been published based on diagnostic mitochondrial, plastid, or nuclear DNA substitutions, indels, or rarely genetic distances, with or without additional morphological features. Authors have found diverse ways to specify the diagnostic traits (all published studies are here tabulated). While descriptions try to "cover" within-species variation, a goal rarely accomplished because of (i) the stochastic nature of specimen availability (thousands of species are known from single collections) and (ii) the subjective circumscription of species, the purpose of diagnoses was and is speedy identification. Linnaeus tried to achieve this by citing images, geographic occurrence, and previous literature. The renewed attention to sharp diagnosis now coincides with worldwide barcoding efforts, may speed up formal naming, and matches the increasing reliance on DNA for both classification and identification. I argue for DNA-based diagnoses of new species becoming a recommendation in all Codes, not just the bacterial code. [Codes of Nomenclature; description; diagnosis; DNA-based diagnosis; naming new species; nomenclature.

  3. Diet reconstruction and resource partitioning of a Caribbean marine mesopredator using stable isotope bayesian modelling.

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    Alexander Tilley

    Full Text Available The trophic ecology of epibenthic mesopredators is not well understood in terms of prey partitioning with sympatric elasmobranchs or their effects on prey communities, yet the importance of omnivores in community trophic dynamics is being increasingly realised. This study used stable isotope analysis of (15N and (13C to model diet composition of wild southern stingrays Dasyatis americana and compare trophic niche space to nurse sharks Ginglymostoma cirratum and Caribbean reef sharks Carcharhinus perezi on Glovers Reef Atoll, Belize. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models were used to investigate prey choice as well as viable Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors for use with stingrays. Stingray δ(15N values showed the greatest variation and a positive relationship with size, with an isotopic niche width approximately twice that of sympatric species. Shark species exhibited comparatively restricted δ(15N values and greater δ(13C variation, with very little overlap of stingray niche space. Mixing models suggest bivalves and annelids are proportionally more important prey in the stingray diet than crustaceans and teleosts at Glovers Reef, in contrast to all but one published diet study using stomach contents from other locations. Incorporating gut contents information from the literature, we suggest diet-tissue discrimination factors values of Δ(15N ≈ 2.7‰ and Δ(13C ≈ 0.9‰ for stingrays in the absence of validation experiments. The wide trophic niche and lower trophic level exhibited by stingrays compared to sympatric sharks supports their putative role as important base stabilisers in benthic systems, with the potential to absorb trophic perturbations through numerous opportunistic prey interactions.

  4. Experimental biological effects assessment associated with on-shore brine discharge from the creation of gas storage caverns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintino, Victor; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Freitas, Rosa; Ré, Ana

    2008-09-01

    Most of the studies on biological and ecological effects associated with brine discharge into the marine environment are related to the operation of desalination plants, for the production of freshwater. In this study we analysed the biological effects of a brine effluent from a completely different source, produced from the lixiviation of rock salt caves, for the creation of natural gas storage caverns. Lethal and sub-lethal endpoints following exposure to the brine were studied in a range of macrofauna species characteristic of the soft and hard bottom habitats in the vicinity of the discharge area, namely the isopod Eurydice pulchra, the annelids Sabellaria alveolata and Ophelia radiata, the sea-urchin Paracentrotus lividus and the bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis. In a first series of experiments, brine, with salinity above 300, was diluted in distilled water to a salinity value close to that of the seawater in the discharge area (salinity 36) and, surprisingly, none of the exposed species was able to survive or develop into viable larvae. A second series of experiments exposed the species to brine diluted with seawater, simulating more realistic discharge circumstances. All the tested species at all the measured endpoints (adult survival, larval abnormal development, sperm fertilization success) showed negative biological effects in brine solutes always at a lower salinity than that of a salinity control obtained with concentrated seawater. The sub-lethal experiments with larval development of P. lividus, S. alveolata and M. galloprovincialis, and the fertilization success of P. lividus gave EC 50 values for the brine solute with salinity in the range of 40.9-43.5, whereas the EC 50 values for the concentrated seawater were in the range of salinity 44.2-49.0. It is hypothesised that differences in the ionic composition of the brine cause the inability of the species to tolerate the exposure to brine.

  5. Lophotrochozoan neuroanatomy: An analysis of the brain and nervous system of Lineus viridis(Nemertea using different staining techniques

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    Loesel Rudi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The now thriving field of neurophylogeny that links the morphology of the nervous system to early evolutionary events relies heavily on detailed descriptions of the neuronal architecture of taxa under scrutiny. While recent accounts on the nervous system of a number of animal clades such as arthropods, annelids, and molluscs are abundant, in depth studies of the neuroanatomy of nemerteans are still wanting. In this study, we used different staining techniques and confocal laser scanning microscopy to reveal the architecture of the nervous system of Lineus viridis with high anatomical resolution. Results In L. viridis, the peripheral nervous system comprises four distinct but interconnected nerve plexus. The central nervous system consists of a pair of medullary cords and a brain. The brain surrounds the proboscis and is subdivided into four voluminous lobes and a ring of commissural tracts. The brain is well developed and contains thousands of neurons. It does not reveal compartmentalized neuropils found in other animal groups with elaborate cerebral ganglia. Conclusions The detailed analysis of the nemertean nervous system presented in this study does not support any hypothesis on the phylogenetic position of Nemertea within Lophotrochozoa. Neuroanatomical characters that are described here are either common in other lophotrochozoan taxa or are seemingly restricted to nemerteans. Since detailed descriptions of the nervous system of adults in other nemertean species have not been available so far, this study may serve as a basis for future studies that might add data to the unsettled question of the nemertean ground pattern and the position of this taxon within the phylogenetic tree.

  6. Biodiversity and evolution of the Myxozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Elizabeth U; Okamura, Beth

    2004-01-01

    Myxozoans (phylum Myxozoa) are metazoan parasites utilizing invertebrate and (mainly) aquatic vertebrate hosts. They have in common with cnidarians the possession of virtually identical, highly complex organelles, namely the polar capsules in myxozoan spores, serving for attachment to new hosts and the nematocysts in surface epithelia of cnidarians, serving for food capture. Although myxozoan spores are multicellular, the simple trophic body forms of almost all species, reduced to syncytial plasmodia or single cells, reveal no clues to myxozoan ancestry or phylogenetic relationships. The myxozoan genus Buddenbrockia is one of only two known genera belonging to a clade which diverged early in the evolution of the Myxozoa. Today the Myxozoa are represented by two classes, the Myxosporea, containing all the better-known genera, which alternate between fish and annelids, and the Malacosporea, containing Buddenbrockia and Tetracapsuloides, parasitising bryozoans. The latter genus also infects salmonid fish, causing proliferative kidney disease (PKD). The enigmatic Buddenbrockia has retained some of its ancestral features in a body wall of two cell layers and a worm-like shape, maintained by four longitudinally-running muscle blocks, similar to a gutless nematode and suggestive of a bilaterian ancestry. Although some analyses of 18S rDNA sequences tend towards a cnidarian (diploblast) affinity for myxozoans, the majority of these studies place them within, or sister to, the Bilateria. The latter view is supported by their possession of central class Hox genes, so far considered to be synapomorphic for Bilateria. The simple body form is, therefore, an extreme example of simplification due to parasitism. Various hypotheses for the occurrence of identical complex organelles (nematocysts and polar capsules) in diploblast and triploblast phyla are evaluated: common ancestry, convergent evolution, gene transfer and, especially, endosymbiosis. A theory of the evolution of their

  7. Light and vision in the deep-sea benthos: I. Bioluminescence at 500-1000 m depth in the Bahamian islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Sönke; Frank, Tamara M; Haddock, Steven H D; Widder, Edith A; Messing, Charles G

    2012-10-01

    Bioluminescence is common and well studied in mesopelagic species. However, the extent of bioluminescence in benthic sites of similar depths is far less studied, although the relatively large eyes of benthic fish, crustaceans and cephalopods at bathyal depths suggest the presence of significant biogenic light. Using the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible, we collected numerous species of cnidarians, echinoderms, crustaceans, cephalopods and sponges, as well as one annelid from three sites in the northern Bahamas (500-1000 m depth). Using mechanical and chemical stimulation, we tested the collected species for light emission, and photographed and measured the spectra of the emitted light. In addition, in situ intensified video and still photos were taken of different benthic habitats. Surprisingly, bioluminescence in benthic animals at these sites was far less common than in mesopelagic animals from similar depths, with less than 20% of the collected species emitting light. Bioluminescent taxa comprised two species of anemone (Actinaria), a new genus and species of flabellate Parazoanthidae (formerly Gerardia sp.) (Zoanthidea), three sea pens (Pennatulacea), three bamboo corals (Alcyonacea), the chrysogorgiid coral Chrysogorgia desbonni (Alcyonacea), the caridean shrimp Parapandalus sp. and Heterocarpus ensifer (Decapoda), two holothuroids (Elasipodida and Aspidochirota) and the ophiuroid Ophiochiton ternispinus (Ophiurida). Except for the ophiuroid and the two shrimp, which emitted blue light (peak wavelengths 470 and 455 nm), all the species produced greener light than that measured in most mesopelagic taxa, with the emissions of the pennatulaceans being strongly shifted towards longer wavelengths. In situ observations suggested that bioluminescence associated with these sites was due primarily to light emitted by bioluminescent planktonic species as they struck filter feeders that extended into the water column.

  8. Identification of novel target genes for safer and more specific control of root-knot nematodes from a pan-genome mining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne G J Danchin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes are globally the most aggressive and damaging plant-parasitic nematodes. Chemical nematicides have so far constituted the most efficient control measures against these agricultural pests. Because of their toxicity for the environment and danger for human health, these nematicides have now been banned from use. Consequently, new and more specific control means, safe for the environment and human health, are urgently needed to avoid worldwide proliferation of these devastating plant-parasites. Mining the genomes of root-knot nematodes through an evolutionary and comparative genomics approach, we identified and analyzed 15,952 nematode genes conserved in genomes of plant-damaging species but absent from non target genomes of chordates, plants, annelids, insect pollinators and mollusks. Functional annotation of the corresponding proteins revealed a relative abundance of putative transcription factors in this parasite-specific set compared to whole proteomes of root-knot nematodes. This may point to important and specific regulators of genes involved in parasitism. Because these nematodes are known to secrete effector proteins in planta, essential for parasitism, we searched and identified 993 such effector-like proteins absent from non-target species. Aiming at identifying novel targets for the development of future control methods, we biologically tested the effect of inactivation of the corresponding genes through RNA interference. A total of 15 novel effector-like proteins and one putative transcription factor compatible with the design of siRNAs were present as non-redundant genes and had transcriptional support in the model root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Infestation assays with siRNA-treated M. incognita on tomato plants showed significant and reproducible reduction of the infestation for 12 of the 16 tested genes compared to control nematodes. These 12 novel genes, showing efficient reduction of parasitism when

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems of the Spider Cupiennius salei Reveals Multiple Putative Cys-Loop Ligand Gated Ion Channel Subunits and an Acetylcholine Binding Protein.

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    Päivi H Torkkeli

    Full Text Available Invertebrates possess a diverse collection of pentameric Cys-loop ligand gated ion channel (LGIC receptors whose molecular structures, evolution and relationships to mammalian counterparts have been intensely investigated in several clinically and agriculturally important species. These receptors are targets for a variety of control agents that may also harm beneficial species. However, little is known about Cys-loop receptors in spiders, which are important natural predators of insects. We assembled de novo transcriptomes from the central and peripheral nervous systems of the Central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei, a model species for neurophysiological, behavioral and developmental studies. We found 15 Cys-loop receptor subunits that are expected to form anion or cation permeable channels, plus a putative acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP that has only previously been reported in molluscs and one annelid. We used phylogenetic and sequence analysis to compare the spider subunits to homologous receptors in other species and predicted the 3D structures of each protein using the I-Tasser server. The quality of homology models improved with increasing sequence identity to the available high-resolution templates. We found that C. salei has orthologous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, GluCl, pHCl, HisCl and nAChα LGIC subunits to other arthropods, but some subgroups are specific to arachnids, or only to spiders. C. salei sequences were phylogenetically closest to gene fragments from the social spider, Stegodyphus mimosarum, indicating high conservation within the Araneomorphae suborder of spiders. C. salei sequences had similar ligand binding and transmembrane regions to other invertebrate and vertebrate LGICs. They also had motifs associated with high sensitivity to insecticides and antiparasitic agents such as fipronil, dieldrin and ivermectin. Development of truly selective control agents for pest species will require information about

  10. 3'RACE and 5'RACE Used to Clone Tryptophan Hydroxylase Gene in Central Nervous System of Nereis (N. japonica)%利用3'RACE和5'RACE技术克隆日本刺沙蚕中枢神经系统TPH基因全长

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董哲; 任桂敏; 李燊; 尹浩天; 暴学祥; 王顺

    2016-01-01

    Objective To Clone tryptophan hydroxylase gene in central nervous system of nereis ( N. japonica) , and provide evi-dence for the study of aromatic amino acid hydroxylase gene evolution in invertebrate. Methods Rapid amplification of cDNA ends ( RACE) was used to clone tryptophan hydroxylase gene. Results 3'sequence and 5'sequence of tryptophan hydroxylase gene were cloned in central nervous system of nereis ( N. japonica) . Conclusion Tryptophan hydroxylase gene exists in the central nervous sys-tem of Nereis ( N. japonica) independently, which carries forward the node of tryptophan hydroxylase and phenylalanine hydroxylase gene differentiation to annelid.%目的:克隆低等无脊椎环节典型代表动物日本刺沙蚕中枢神经系统色氨酸羟化酶基因全长,为无脊椎动物芳香族氨基酸羟化酶的基因进化研究提供依据。方法应用cDNA末端快速扩增( rapid amplification of cDNA ends, RACE)技术进行色氨酸羟化酶基因序列克隆。结果在日本刺沙蚕中枢神经系统克隆出色氨酸羟化酶基因3'序列和5'序列。结论在低等环节动物日本刺沙蚕中枢神经系统存在独立的色氨酸羟化酶基因,使色氨酸羟化酶和苯丙氨酸羟化酶基因分化的节点向前推进到环节动物。

  11. No adverse effect of genetically modified antifungal wheat on decomposition dynamics and the soil fauna community--a field study.

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    Caroline Duc

    Full Text Available The cultivation of genetically modified (GM plants has raised several environmental concerns. One of these concerns regards non-target soil fauna organisms, which play an important role in the decomposition of organic matter and hence are largely exposed to GM plant residues. Soil fauna may be directly affected by transgene products or indirectly by pleiotropic effects such as a modified plant metabolism. Thus, ecosystem services and functioning might be affected negatively. In a litterbag experiment in the field we analysed the decomposition process and the soil fauna community involved. Therefore, we used four experimental GM wheat varieties, two with a race-specific antifungal resistance against powdery mildew (Pm3b and two with an unspecific antifungal resistance based on the expression of chitinase and glucanase. We compared them with two non-GM isolines and six conventional cereal varieties. To elucidate the mechanisms that cause differences in plant decomposition, structural plant components (i.e. C∶N ratio, lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose were examined and soil properties, temperature and precipitation were monitored. The most frequent taxa extracted from decaying plant material were mites (Cryptostigmata, Gamasina and Uropodina, springtails (Isotomidae, annelids (Enchytraeidae and Diptera (Cecidomyiidae larvae. Despite a single significant transgenic/month interaction for Cecidomyiidae larvae, which is probably random, we detected no impact of the GM wheat on the soil fauna community. However, soil fauna differences among conventional cereal varieties were more pronounced than between GM and non-GM wheat. While leaf residue decomposition in GM and non-GM wheat was similar, differences among conventional cereals were evident. Furthermore, sampling date and location were found to greatly influence soil fauna community and decomposition processes. The results give no indication of ecologically relevant adverse effects of antifungal GM

  12. The nervous systems of basally branching nemertea (palaeonemertea.

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    Patrick Beckers

    Full Text Available In recent years, a lot of studies have been published dealing with the anatomy of the nervous system in different spiralian species. The only nemertean species investigated in this context probably shows derived characters and thus the conditions found there are not useful in inferring the relationship between nemerteans and other spiralian taxa. Ingroup relationships within Nemertea are still unclear, but there is some agreement that the palaeonemerteans form a basal, paraphyletic grade. Thus, palaeonemertean species are likely the most informative when comparing with other invertebrate groups. We therefore analyzed the nervous system of several palaeonemertean species by combining histology and immunostaining. 3D reconstructions based on the aligned slices were performed to get an overall impression of the central nervous system, and immunohistochemistry was chosen to reveal fine structures and to be able to compare the data with recently published results. The insights presented here permit a first attempt to reconstruct the primary organization of the nemertean nervous system. This comparative analysis allows substantiating homology hypotheses for nerves of the peripheral nervous system. This study also provides evidence that the nemertean brain primarily consists of two lobes connected by a strong ventral commissure and one to several dorsal commissures. During nemertean evolution, the brain underwent continuous compartmentalization into a pair of dorsal and ventral lobes interconnected by commissures and lateral tracts. Given that this conclusion can be corroborated by cladistic analyses, nemerteans should share a common ancestor with spiralians that primarily have a simple brain consisting of paired medullary, frontally commissurized and reinforced cords. Such an organization resembles the situation found in presumably basally branching annelids or mollusks.

  13. The nervous systems of basally branching nemertea (palaeonemertea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Patrick; Loesel, Rudi; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of studies have been published dealing with the anatomy of the nervous system in different spiralian species. The only nemertean species investigated in this context probably shows derived characters and thus the conditions found there are not useful in inferring the relationship between nemerteans and other spiralian taxa. Ingroup relationships within Nemertea are still unclear, but there is some agreement that the palaeonemerteans form a basal, paraphyletic grade. Thus, palaeonemertean species are likely the most informative when comparing with other invertebrate groups. We therefore analyzed the nervous system of several palaeonemertean species by combining histology and immunostaining. 3D reconstructions based on the aligned slices were performed to get an overall impression of the central nervous system, and immunohistochemistry was chosen to reveal fine structures and to be able to compare the data with recently published results. The insights presented here permit a first attempt to reconstruct the primary organization of the nemertean nervous system. This comparative analysis allows substantiating homology hypotheses for nerves of the peripheral nervous system. This study also provides evidence that the nemertean brain primarily consists of two lobes connected by a strong ventral commissure and one to several dorsal commissures. During nemertean evolution, the brain underwent continuous compartmentalization into a pair of dorsal and ventral lobes interconnected by commissures and lateral tracts. Given that this conclusion can be corroborated by cladistic analyses, nemerteans should share a common ancestor with spiralians that primarily have a simple brain consisting of paired medullary, frontally commissurized and reinforced cords. Such an organization resembles the situation found in presumably basally branching annelids or mollusks.

  14. Shared gene structures and clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons within the metazoan muscle myosin heavy chain genes.

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    Martin Kollmar

    Full Text Available Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs. The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both have independently been developed

  15. Natural invertebrate hosts of iridoviruses (Iridoviridae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Trevor [Instituto de Ecologia A.C., Veracruz (Mexico)]. E-mail: trevor.williams@inecol.edu.mx

    2008-11-15

    Invertebrate iridescent viruses (IIVs) are icosahedral DNA viruses that infect invertebrates, mainly insects and terrestrial isopods, in damp and aquatic habitats. Exhaustive searches of databases resulted in the identification of 79 articles reporting 108 invertebrate species naturally infected by confirmed or putative iridoviruses. Of these, 103 (95%) were arthropods and the remainder were molluscs, an annelid worm and a nematode. Nine species were from marine habitats. Of the 99 non-marine species, 49 were from terrestrial habitats and 50 were aquatic, especially the aquatic stages of Diptera (44 species). The abundance of records from species of Aedes, Ochlerotatus and Psorophora contrasts markedly with a paucity of records from species of Anopheles, Culex and Culiseta. Records from terrestrial isopods are numerous (19 species), although the diversity of IIVs that infect them is mostly unstudied. IIV infections have been reported from every continent, except Antarctica, but there are few records from Africa, southern Asia and Latin America. Most reports describe patent IIV infections as rare whereas inapparent (covert) infection may be common in certain species. The relationship between particle size and iridescent colour of the host is found to be consistent with optical theory in the great majority of cases. Only 24 reported IIVs from insect hosts have partial characterization data and only two have been subjected to complete genome sequencing. I show that the rate of publication on IIVs has slowed from 1990 to the present, and I draw a number of conclusions and suggestions from the host list and make recommendations for future research efforts. (author)

  16. Nearly complete rRNA genes assembled from across the metazoan animals: effects of more taxa, a structure-based alignment, and paired-sites evolutionary models on phylogeny reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallatt, Jon; Craig, Catherine Waggoner; Yoder, Matthew J

    2010-04-01

    This study (1) uses nearly complete rRNA-gene sequences from across Metazoa (197 taxa) to reconstruct animal phylogeny; (2) presents a highly annotated, manual alignment of these sequences with special reference to rRNA features including paired sites (http://purl.oclc.org/NET/rRNA/Metazoan_alignment) and (3) tests, after eliminating as few disruptive, rogue sequences as possible, if a likelihood framework can recover the main metazoan clades. We found that systematic elimination of approximately 6% of the sequences, including the divergent or unstably placed sequences of cephalopods, arrowworm, symphylan and pauropod myriapods, and of myzostomid and nemertodermatid worms, led to a tree that supported Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa, Protostomia, and Bilateria. Deuterostomia, however, was never recovered, because the rRNA of urochordates goes (nonsignificantly) near the base of the Bilateria. Counterintuitively, when we modeled the evolution of the paired sites, phylogenetic resolution was not increased over traditional tree-building models that assume all sites in rRNA evolve independently. The rRNA genes of non-bilaterians contain a higher % AT than do those of most bilaterians. The rRNA genes of Acoela and Myzostomida were found to be secondarily shortened, AT-enriched, and highly modified, throwing some doubt on the location of these worms at the base of Bilateria in the rRNA tree--especially myzostomids, which other evidence suggests are annelids instead. Other findings are marsupial-with-placental mammals, arrowworms in Ecdysozoa (well supported here but contradicted by morphology), and Placozoa as sister to Cnidaria. Finally, despite the difficulties, the rRNA-gene trees are in strong concordance with trees derived from multiple protein-coding genes in supporting the new animal phylogeny.

  17. Biodiversity of Macrofauna Associated with Sponges across Ecological Gradients in the Central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Kandler, Nora

    2015-12-01

    Between 33 and 91 percent of marine species are currently undescribed, with the majority occurring in tropical and offshore environments. Sponges act as important microhabitats and promote biodiversity by harboring a wide variety of macrofauna and microbiota, but little is known about the relationships between the sponges and their symbionts. This study uses DNA barcoding to examine the macrofaunal communities associated with sponges of the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea, a drastically understudied ecosystem with high biodiversity and endemism. In total, 185 epifaunal and infaunal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were distinguished from the 1399 successfully-sequenced macrofauna individuals from 129 sponges representing seven sponge species, one of which (Stylissa carteri) was intensively studied. A significant difference was found in the macrofaunal community composition of Stylissa carteri along a cross-shelf gradient using relative OTU abundance (Bray-Curtis diversity index). The abundance of S. carteri also follows a cross-shelf gradient, increasing with proximity to shore. The difference in macrofaunal communities of several species of sponges at one location was found to be significant as well, using OTU presence (binary Jaccard diversity index). Four of the seven sponge species collected were dominated by a single annelid OTU, each unique to one sponge species. A fifth was dominated by four arthropod OTUs, all species-specific as well. Region-based diversity differences may be attributed to environmental factors such as reef morphology, water flow, and sedimentation, whereas species-based differences may be caused by sponge morphology, microbial abundances, and chemical defenses. As climate change and ocean acidification continue to modify coral reef ecosystems, understanding the ecology of sponges and their role as microhabitats may become more important. This thesis also includes a supplemental document in the form of a spreadsheet showing the number of

  18. Evolution of pigment-dispersing factor neuropeptides in Panarthropoda: Insights from Onychophora (velvet worms) and Tardigrada (water bears).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Georg; Hering, Lars; Stosch, Juliane M; Stevenson, Paul A; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2015-09-01

    Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) denotes a conserved family of homologous neuropeptides present in several invertebrate groups, including mollusks, nematodes, insects, and crustaceans (referred to here as pigment-dispersing hormone [PDH]). With regard to their encoding genes (pdf, pdh), insects possess only one, nematodes two, and decapod crustaceans up to three, but their phylogenetic relationship is unknown. To shed light on the origin and diversification of pdf/pdh homologs in Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda) and other molting animals (Ecdysozoa), we analyzed the transcriptomes of five distantly related onychophorans and a representative tardigrade and searched for putative pdf homologs in publically available genomes of other protostomes. This revealed only one pdf homolog in several mollusk and annelid species; two in Onychophora, Priapulida, and Nematoda; and three in Tardigrada. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the last common ancestor of Panarthropoda possessed two pdf homologs, one of which was lost in the arthropod or arthropod/tardigrade lineage, followed by subsequent duplications of the remaining homolog in some taxa. Immunolocalization of PDF-like peptides in six onychophoran species, by using a broadly reactive antibody that recognizes PDF/PDH peptides in numerous species, revealed an elaborate system of neurons and fibers in their central and peripheral nervous systems. Large varicose projections in the heart suggest that the PDF neuropeptides functioned as both circulating hormones and locally released transmitters in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda. The lack of PDF-like-immunoreactive somata associated with the onychophoran optic ganglion conforms to the hypothesis that onychophoran eyes are homologous to the arthropod median ocelli.

  19. Postnatal ontogeny and the evolution of macrostomy in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanferla, Agustín

    2016-11-01

    Macrostomy is the anatomical feature present in macrostomatan snakes that permits the ingestion of entire prey with high cross-sectional area. It depends on several anatomical traits in the skeleton and soft tissues, of which the elongation of gnathic complex and backward rotation of the quadrate represent crucial skeletal requirements. Here, the relevance of postnatal development of these skull structures and their relationship with macrohabitat and diet are explored. Contrary to the condition present in lizards and basal snakes that occupy underground macrohabitats, elements of the gnathic complex of most macrostomatan snakes that exploit surface macrohabitats display conspicuous elongation during postnatal growth, relative to the rest of the skull, as well as further backward rotation of the quadrate bone. Remarkably, several clades of small cryptozoic macrostomatans reverse these postnatal transformations and return to a diet based on prey with low cross-sectional area such as annelids, insects or elongated vertebrates, thus resembling the condition present in underground basal snakes. Dietary ontogenetic shift observed in most macrostomatan snakes is directly linked with this ontogenetic trajectory, indicating that this shift is acquired progressively as the gnathic complex elongates and the quadrate rotates backward during postnatal ontogeny. The numerous independent events of reversion in the gnathic complex and prey type choice observed in underground macrostomatans and the presence of skeletal requirements for macrostomy in extinct non-macrostomatan species reinforce the possibility that basal snakes represent underground survivors of clades that had the skeletal requirements for macrostomy. Taken together, the data presented here suggest that macrostomy has been shaped during multiple episodes of occupation of underground and surface macrohabitats throughout the evolution of snakes.

  20. Benthic Community Structure and Sediment Geochemical Properties at Hydrocarbon Seeps Along the Continental Slope of the Western North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, A. W.; Bourque, J. R.; Brooke, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps support distinct benthic communities capable of utilizing reduced chemical compounds for nutrition. In recent years, methane seepage has been increasingly documented along the continental slope of the U.S. Atlantic margin. In 2012 and 2013, two seeps were investigated in this region: a shallow site near Baltimore Canyon (410-450 m) and a deep site near Norfolk Canyon (1600 m). Both sites contain extensive mussel beds and microbial mats. Sediment cores and grab samples were collected to quantify the abundance, diversity, and community structure of benthic macrofauna (>300 mm) in relationship to the associated sediment environment (organic carbon and nitrogen, stable isotopes 13C and 15N, grain size, and depth) of mussel beds, mats, and slope habitats. Macrofaunal densities in microbial mats were four times greater than those present in mussel beds and slope sediments. Macrofaunal communities were distinctly different both between depths and among habitat types. Specifically, microbial mat sediments were dominated by the annelid families Dorvilleidae, Capitellidae, and Tubificidae, while mussel habitats had higher proportions of crustaceans. Diversity was lower in Baltimore microbial mat habitats, but higher in mussel and slope sediments compared to Norfolk seep habitats found at deeper depths. Multivariate statistical analysis identified sediment carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratios and 13C values as important variables for structuring the macrofaunal communities. Higher C:N ratios were present within microbial mat habitats and depleted 13C values occurred in sediments adjacent to mussel beds found in Norfolk Canyon seeps. Differences in the quality and source of organic matter present in the seep habitats are known to be important drivers in macrofaunal community structure and associated food webs. The multivariate analysis provides new insight into the relative importance of the seep sediment quality in supporting dense macrofaunal communities compared

  1. A Polychaete's powerful punch: venom gland transcriptomics of Glycera reveals a complex cocktail of toxin homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Reumont, Björn M; Campbell, Lahcen I; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-09-05

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands.

  2. Polychaeta, Annelida, and Articulata are not monophyletic: articulating the Metameria (Metazoa, Coelomata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waltécio de Oliveira Almeida

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Polychaetes are metameric worms recognized for having parapodia, chaetae, and nuchal organs. Some authors have extended the Annelida to include Pogonophora, Echiura, and Clitellata. These suggestions are insufficient to generate a monophyletic group. They do not take into account two very large and important clades that in a cladistic analysis at a higher level are shown to be nested within the Annelida: the Ecdysozoa (arthropods and related taxa and Enterocoela (deuterostomes and related taxa. Evolutionary histories of most characters across metazoan phyla are still very poorly known. Metameres and coeloms have been considered homoplastic in the literature, and yet the homeobox genes responsible for the expression of metamerism and of paired appendages, at least, are very largely distributed among the Metazoa. A phylogenetic analysis was performed for the ingroups of Polychaeta, including Clitellata, Enterocoela, and Ecdysozoa as terminal taxa. The remaining non-metameric phyla Platyhelminthes, Nemertea, Mollusca, and Sipuncula were included to root the tree within the Bilateria. Empirical data was obtained from the literature and run with the software Hennig86 with two comparative interpretations of a priori hypotheses of primary homology: one with negative characters (coding losses and another considering only positive characters (without assumptions about losses. The most relevant conclusions are: (1 Annelida and Polychaeta are non-monophyletic, even when including Echiura, Clitellata, and Pogonophora; (2 Articulata, as traditionally circumscribed for Annelida and Arthropoda, is also not monophyletic; (3 Metameria becomes monophyletic only when Ecdysozoa and Enterocoela are included in addition to the traditional annelid taxa; (4 Ecdysozoa are the sister group of Aphrodita; (5 Clitellata are related to deposit-feeding sedentary polychaetes (scolecids, and Questidae represent their sister group; (6 Owenia plus Enterocoela form a monophyletic

  3. Plasticity of hatching and the duration of planktonic development in marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzun, Fernanda X; Strathmann, Richard R

    2011-07-01

    Plasticity in hatching potentially adjusts risks of benthic and planktonic development for benthic marine invertebrates. The proportionate effect of hatching plasticity on duration of larval swimming is greatest for animals that can potentially brood or encapsulate offspring until hatching near metamorphic competence. As an example, early hatching of the nudibranch mollusk Phestilla sibogae is stimulated by scattering of encapsulated offspring, as by a predator feeding on the gelatinous egg ribbon. When egg ribbons are undisturbed, hatching is at or near metamorphic competence. Disturbance of an unguarded benthic egg mass can insert 4 or more days of obligate larval dispersal into the life history. As another example, the spionid annelid Boccardia proboscidea broods capsules, each with both cannibalistic and developmentally arrested planktivorous siblings plus nurse eggs. Early hatching produces mainly planktivorous larvae with a planktonic duration of 15 days. Late hatching produces mainly adelphophages who have eaten their planktivorous siblings and metamorphose with little or no period of swimming. Mothers actively hatch their offspring by tearing the capsules, and appeared to time hatching in response to their environment and not to the stage of development of their offspring. Higher temperature increased the variance of brooding time. Females appeared to hatch capsules at an earlier developmental stage at lower temperatures. Species that release gametes or zygotes directly into the plankton have less scope for plasticity in stage at hatching. Their embryos develop singly with little protection and hatch at early stages, often as blastulae or gastrulae. Time of hatching cannot be greatly advanced, and sensory capabilities of blastulae may be limited.

  4. Bacterial Exopolysaccharides from Extreme Marine Habitats: Production, Characterization and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarita Poli

    2010-06-01

    this paper is to give an overview of current knowledge on EPSs produced by marine bacteria including symbiotic marine EPS-producing bacteria isolated from some marine annelid worms that live in extreme niches.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of taurocyamine kinase from Clonorchis sinensis: a candidate chemotherapeutic target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Ying Xiao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult Clonorchis sinensis lives in the bile duct and causes endemic clonorchiasis in East Asian countries. Phosphagen kinases (PK constitute a highly conserved family of enzymes, which play a role in ATP buffering in cells, and are potential targets for chemotherapeutic agents, since variants of PK are found only in invertebrate animals, including helminthic parasites. This work is conducted to characterize a PK from C. sinensis and to address further investigation for future drug development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: [corrected] A cDNA clone encoding a putative polypeptide of 717 amino acids was retrieved from a C. sinensis transcriptome. This polypeptide was homologous to taurocyamine kinase (TK of the invertebrate animals and consisted of two contiguous domains. C. sinensis TK (CsTK gene was reported and found consist of 13 exons intercalated with 12 introns. This suggested an evolutionary pathway originating from an arginine kinase gene group, and distinguished annelid TK from the general CK phylogenetic group. CsTK was found not to have a homologous counterpart in sequences analysis of its mammalian hosts from public databases. Individual domains of CsTK, as well as the whole two-domain enzyme, showed enzymatic activity and specificity toward taurocyamine substrate. Of the CsTK residues, R58, I60 and Y84 of domain 1, and H60, I63 and Y87 of domain 2 were found to participate in binding taurocyamine. CsTK expression was distributed in locomotive and reproductive organs of adult C. sinensis. Developmentally, CsTK was stably expressed in both the adult and metacercariae stages. Recombinant CsTK protein was found to have low sensitivity and specificity toward C. sinensis and platyhelminth-infected human sera on ELISA. CONCLUSION: CsTK is a promising anti-C. sinensis drug target since the enzyme is found only in the C. sinensis and has a substrate specificity for taurocyamine, which is different from its mammalian counterpart

  6. Macroinvertebrates communities associated with the decomposition of Phragmites australis and Fucus vesiculosus in transitional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marta Lobão; Martins, Patrícia; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Quintino, Victor

    2013-10-01

    The decomposition rates of a macrophyte (Phragmites australis) and an alga (Fucus vesiculosus) and the associated macrofauna communities were studied along a full salinity gradient, using the leaf-bag technique and four sampling times (days 3, 7, 15 and 30). A control was set up using an artificial substrate. A subsequent study conducted in the mesohaline part of the salinity gradient also included empty bags as procedure control. The decay rates of the alga and the macrophyte were significantly different, the alga decaying faster, and presented an opposite trend along the salinity gradient, with the faster decay rate for reed in the less saline areas and for the alga in the euhaline part of the gradient. The fauna associated with the decaying and the artificial substrate showed equally well the benthic succession from the marine to the freshwater areas, in all sampling times. Arthropods were dominant in all substrates along the estuarine gradient and replaced by annelids in freshwater. No significant differences were found between the benthic communities associated with P. australis and F. vesiculosus, despite the strong differences in the decay rates, suggesting that these do not seem to be primarily related to the benthic colonizers. Although the organic substrates sustained a more abundant fauna, the benthic communities did not show significant differences between the organic and the artificial substrates, especially at the level of the species composition, suggesting that the macroinvertebrates may colonize both substrates to feed on the biofilm and/or to seek shelter. The strongly impoverished benthic community sampled by the empty bags reinforced this idea.

  7. Recovery of floral and faunal communities after placement of dredged material on seagrasses in Laguna Madre, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, P.

    2004-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine how long alterations in habitat characteristics and use by fishery and forage organisms were detectable at dredged material placement sites in Laguna Madre, Texas. Water, sediment, seagrass, benthos, and nekton characteristics were measured and compared among newly deposited sediments and nearby and distant seagrasses each fall and spring over three years. Over this period, 75% of the estimated total surface area of the original deposits was either re-vegetated by seagrass or dispersed by winds and currents. Differences in water and sediment characteristics among habitat types were mostly detected early in the study. There were signs of steady seagrass re-colonization in the latter half of the study period, and mean seagrass coverage of deposits had reached 48% approximately three years after dredging. Clovergrass Halophila engelmannii was the initial colonist, but shoalgrass Halodule wrightii predominated after about one year. Densities of annelids and non-decapod crustaceans were generally significantly greater in close and distant seagrass habitats than in dredged material habitat, whereas densities of molluscs were not significantly related to habitat type. Nekton (fish and decapod) densities were almost always significantly greater in the two seagrass habitats than in dredged material deposits. Benthos and nekton communities in dredged material deposits were distinct from those in seagrass habitats. Recovery from dredged material placement was nearly complete for water column and sediment components after 1.5 to 3 years, but recovery of seagrasses, benthos, and nekton was predicted to take 4 to 8 years. The current 2 to 5 years dredging cycle virtually insures no time for ecosystem recovery before being disturbed again. The only way to ensure permanent protection of the high primary and secondary productivity of seagrass beds in Laguna Madre from acute and chronic effects of maintenance dredging, while ensuring

  8. Children's perceptions of rainforest biodiversity: which animals have the lion's share of environmental awareness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake L Snaddon

    Full Text Available Globally, natural ecosystems are being lost to agricultural land at an unprecedented rate. This land-use often results in significant reductions in abundance and diversity of the flora and fauna as well as alterations in their composition. Despite this, there is little public perception of which taxa are most important in terms of their total biomass, biodiversity or the ecosystem services they perform. Such awareness is important for conservation, as without appreciation of their value and conservation status, species are unlikely to receive adequate conservation protection. We investigated children's perceptions of rainforest biodiversity by asking primary-age children, visiting the University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge to draw their ideal rainforest. By recording the frequency at which children drew different climatic, structural, vegetative and faunal components of the rainforest, we were able to quantify children's understanding of a rainforest environment. We investigated children's perceptions of rainforest biodiversity by comparing the relative numbers of the taxa drawn with the actual contributions made by these taxa to total rainforest biomass and global biodiversity. We found that children have a sophisticated view of the rainforest, incorporating many habitat features and a diverse range of animals. However, some taxa were over-represented (particularly mammals, birds and reptiles and others under-represented (particularly insects and annelids relative to their contribution to total biomass and species richness. Scientists and naturalists must continue to emphasise the diversity and functional importance of lesser-known taxa through public communication and outdoor events to aid invertebrate conservation and to ensure that future generations are inspired to become naturalists themselves.

  9. Nitric oxide acts as a positive regulator to induce metamorphosis of the ascidian Herdmania momus.

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    Nobuo Ueda

    Full Text Available Marine invertebrates commonly have a biphasic life cycle in which the metamorphic transition from a pelagic larva to a benthic post-larva is mediated by the nitric oxide signalling pathway. Nitric oxide (NO is synthesised by nitric oxide synthase (NOS, which is a client protein of the molecular chaperon heat shock protein 90 (HSP90. It is notable, then, that both NO and HSP90 have been implicated in regulating metamorphosis in marine invertebrates as diverse as urochordates, echinoderms, molluscs, annelids, and crustaceans. Specifically, the suppression of NOS activity by the application of either NOS- or HSP90-inhibiting pharmacological agents has been shown consistently to induce the initiation of metamorphosis, leading to the hypothesis that a negative regulatory role of NO is widely conserved in biphasic life cycles. Further, the induction of metamorphosis by heat-shock has been demonstrated for multiple species. Here, we investigate the regulatory role of NO in induction of metamorphosis of the solitary tropical ascidian, Herdmania momus. By coupling pharmacological treatments with analysis of HmNOS and HmHSP90 gene expression, we present compelling evidence of a positive regulatory role for NO in metamorphosis of this species, in contrast to all existing ascidian data that supports the hypothesis of NO as a conserved negative regulator of metamorphosis. The exposure of competent H. momus larvae to a NOS inhibitor or an NO donor results in an up-regulation of NOS and HSP90 genes. Heat shock of competent larvae induces metamorphosis in a temperature dependent manner, up to a thermal tolerance that approaches 35°C. Both larval/post-larval survival and the appearance of abnormal morphologies in H. momus post-larvae reflect the magnitude of up-regulation of the HSP90 gene in response to heat-shock. The demonstrated role of NO as a positive metamorphic regulator in H. momus suggests the existence of inter-specific adaptations of NO regulation

  10. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification

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    Chicote, Javier U.; DeSalle, Rob; García-España, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs) are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i) have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans), (ii) are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes); (iii) a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates) generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv) R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins. PMID:28257417

  11. Identification of novel target genes for safer and more specific control of root-knot nematodes from a pan-genome mining.

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    Danchin, Etienne G J; Arguel, Marie-Jeanne; Campan-Fournier, Amandine; Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Magliano, Marc; Rosso, Marie-Noëlle; Da Rocha, Martine; Da Silva, Corinne; Nottet, Nicolas; Labadie, Karine; Guy, Julie; Artiguenave, François; Abad, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Root-knot nematodes are globally the most aggressive and damaging plant-parasitic nematodes. Chemical nematicides have so far constituted the most efficient control measures against these agricultural pests. Because of their toxicity for the environment and danger for human health, these nematicides have now been banned from use. Consequently, new and more specific control means, safe for the environment and human health, are urgently needed to avoid worldwide proliferation of these devastating plant-parasites. Mining the genomes of root-knot nematodes through an evolutionary and comparative genomics approach, we identified and analyzed 15,952 nematode genes conserved in genomes of plant-damaging species but absent from non target genomes of chordates, plants, annelids, insect pollinators and mollusks. Functional annotation of the corresponding proteins revealed a relative abundance of putative transcription factors in this parasite-specific set compared to whole proteomes of root-knot nematodes. This may point to important and specific regulators of genes involved in parasitism. Because these nematodes are known to secrete effector proteins in planta, essential for parasitism, we searched and identified 993 such effector-like proteins absent from non-target species. Aiming at identifying novel targets for the development of future control methods, we biologically tested the effect of inactivation of the corresponding genes through RNA interference. A total of 15 novel effector-like proteins and one putative transcription factor compatible with the design of siRNAs were present as non-redundant genes and had transcriptional support in the model root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Infestation assays with siRNA-treated M. incognita on tomato plants showed significant and reproducible reduction of the infestation for 12 of the 16 tested genes compared to control nematodes. These 12 novel genes, showing efficient reduction of parasitism when silenced, constitute

  12. Revealing polychaetes invasion patterns: Identification, reproduction and potential risks of the Korean ragworm, Perinereis linea (Treadwell), in the Western Mediterranean

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    Arias, Andrés; Richter, Alexandra; Anadón, Nuria; Glasby, Christopher J.

    2013-10-01

    An established population of the polychaetous annelid Perinereis linea (Treadwell) is reported for the first time outside its native distribution range (NW Pacific). This exotic worm has reached the Western Mediterranean (Mar Menor lagoon) via importing live fishing-bait as it is commonly used by anglers in Mar Menor lagoon, an area largely used for recreational fishing. To avoid confusion with other related species, and because the scientific name has been in synonymy for many years, P. linea is redescribed and illustrated. We focus on the reproductive biology and ecology of P. linea to help to understand its introduction, naturalization and spread along this coastal lagoon. Comparison between the Mediterranean population with a native population from South Korea revealed that the species exhibits a great reproductive plasticity and adaptability, which depends on the environmental conditions. Perinereis linea can reproduce after acquiring the epitokous form or prior to complete epitokal modification. In the Mar Menor lagoon population females release eggs asynchronically without completing epitokal modifications. However, under particular laboratory conditions females produce eggs synchronically and release them after complete epitokal transformations. Fertilization can occur internally in the female coelom, and females release zygotes and larvae through openings in their body walls; they are then incubated in gelatinous masses attached to the female parapodia. The sperm morphology is of the ent-aquasperm type. The eggs and larvae are attacked by symbiotic ciliate protozoa that feed on their yolk reserves. These foreign ciliates may act as carriers of disease in native beachworms and constitute an important risk for the ecosystem health. Finally, we provide recommendations on the prevention of the adverse effects that this exotic ragworm can cause in receiving ecosystems.

  13. First record of the polychaete Ficopomatus uschakovi (Pillai, 1960 (Annelida, Serpulidae in the Colombian Caribbean, South America

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    Catalina Arteaga-Florez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Ficopomatus (Serpulidae consists of sessile, tubicolous polychaete annelid worms that may colonize a diversity of substrata, and tolerate considerable variations in salinity. Thus, members of this genus, including Ficopomatus uschakovi, in some cases are exotic and maybe invasive. The purpose of our research was to collect and identify marine organisms associated with the submerged roots of mangrove trees in the Gulf of Urabá, Colombian Caribbean, South America. Within the Gulf, there is a well-developed forest of the Red Mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, along the margins of El Uno Bay. We sampled the roots of R. mangle from five stations of the bay, and we identified specimens of F. uschakovi from each of those stations. Ficopomatus uschakovi was found to be more abundant in regions of the bay that exhibit the lowest salinity. Based on a morphological comparison of the present specimens with the original species description, revised descriptions, and other records from the Indo-West Pacific, Mexican Pacific, and Venezuelan and Brazilian Caribbean, we suggest that F. uschakovi has a broader geographical distribution. Furthermore, because of this broad distribution, and the observed tolerance for low salinity in our study, we also suggest that F. uschakovi is a euryhaline species. It is also likely that F. uschakovi will be found in other localities in the Gulf of Urabá, and in other regions of the Colombian Caribbean. Thus, this record extends the distribution of the species to the Colombian Caribbean, giving the species a continuous distribution across the northern coast of South America.

  14. Metazoan parasites of fishes from the Celestun coastal lagoon, Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Medina, Trinidad; Vidal-Martínez, Víctor M; Aguirre-Macedo, M Leopoldina

    2015-08-31

    The aims of this study were to produce a checklist of the metazoan parasites of fishes from the Celestun coastal lagoon and to determine the degree of faunal similarity among the fishes based on the metazoan parasites they share. A checklist was prepared including all available records (1996-2014) of parasites of marine, brackish water and freshwater fishes of the area. All of these data were included in a presence/absence database and used to determine similarity via Jaccard's index. The results indicate the presence of 62 metazoan parasite species infecting 22 fish species. The number of metazoan parasite species found in the fishes from the Celestún lagoon is apparently the highest reported worldwide for a tropical coastal lagoon. The parasites included 12 species of adult digeneans, 27 digeneans in the metacercarial stage, 6 monogeneans, 3 metacestodes, 9 nematodes, 2 acanthocephalans, 2 crustaceans and 1 annelid. Forty parasite species were autogenic and 23 were allogenic and 1 unknown. The overall similarity among all of the species of fish with respect to the metazoan parasites they share was low (0.08 ± 0.12), with few similarity values above 0.4 being obtained. This low similarity was due primarily to the presence of suites of parasites exclusive to specific species of fish. The autogenic component of the parasite fauna (40 species) dominated the allogenic component (21 species). The most likely explanation for the large number of fish parasites found at Celestún is the good environmental condition of the lagoon, which allows the completion of parasite life cycles and free circulation of euryhaline fishes from the marine environment bringing marine parasites into the lagoon.

  15. Deriving Freshwater Quality Criteria for Iron, Lead, Nickel, and Zinc for Protection of Aquatic Life in Malaysia

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    M. Shuhaimi-Othman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater quality criteria for iron (Fe, lead (Pb, nickel (Ni, and zinc (Zn were developed with particular reference to aquatic biota in Malaysia, and based on USEPA’s guidelines. Acute toxicity tests were performed on eight different freshwater domestic species in Malaysia which were Macrobrachium lanchesteri (prawn, two fish: Poecilia reticulata and Rasbora sumatrana, Melanoides tuberculata (snail, Stenocypris major (ostracod, Chironomus javanus (midge larvae, Nais elinguis (annelid, and Duttaphrynus melanostictus (tadpole to determine 96 h LC50 values for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The final acute value (FAV for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn were 74.5, 17.0, 165, and 304.9 μg L−1, respectively. Using an estimated acute-to-chronic ratio (ACR of 8.3, the value for final chronic value (FCV was derived. Based on FAV and FCV, a criterion maximum concentration (CMC and a criterion continuous concentration (CCC for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn that are 37.2, 8.5, 82.5, and 152.4 μg L−1 and 9.0, 2.0, 19.9, and 36.7 μg L−1, respectively, were derived. The results of this study provide useful data for deriving national or local water quality criteria for Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn based on aquatic biota in Malaysia. Based on LC50 values, this study indicated that N. elinguis, M. lanchesteri, N. elinguis, and R. sumatrana were the most sensitive to Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn, respectively.

  16. Phylogenetics of Lophotrochozoan bHLH Genes and the Evolution of Lineage-Specific Gene Duplicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yongbo

    2017-01-01

    The gain and loss of genes encoding transcription factors is of importance to understanding the evolution of gene regulatory complexity. The basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) genes encode a large superfamily of transcription factors. We systematically classify the bHLH genes from five mollusc, two annelid and one brachiopod genomes, tracing the pattern of bHLH gene evolution across these poorly studied Phyla. In total, 56–88 bHLH genes were identified in each genome, with most identifiable as members of previously described bilaterian families, or of new families we define. Of such families only one, Mesp, appears lost by all these species. Additional duplications have also played a role in the evolution of the bHLH gene repertoire, with many new lophotrochozoan-, mollusc-, bivalve-, or gastropod-specific genes defined. Using a combination of transcriptome mining, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization we compared the expression of several of these novel genes in tissues and embryos of the molluscs Crassostrea gigas and Patella vulgata, finding both conserved expression and evidence for neofunctionalization. We also map the positions of the genes across these genomes, identifying numerous gene linkages. Some reflect recent paralog divergence by tandem duplication, others are remnants of ancient tandem duplications dating to the lophotrochozoan or bilaterian common ancestors. These data are built into a model of the evolution of bHLH genes in molluscs, showing formidable evolutionary stasis at the family level but considerable within-family diversification by tandem gene duplication. PMID:28338988

  17. A Tale of Two Drug Targets: The Evolutionary History of BACE1 and BACE2

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    Christopher eSouthan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The beta amyloid (APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1 has been a drug target for Alzheimer's Disease (AD since 1999 with lead inhibitors now entering clinical trials. In 2011, the paralogue, BACE2, became a new target for type II diabetes (T2DM having been identified as a TMEM27 secretase regulating pancreatic β cell function. However, the normal roles of both enzymes are unclear. This study outlines their evolutionary history and new opportunities for functional genomics. We identified 30 homologues (UrBACEs in basal phyla including Placozoans, Cnidarians, Choanoflagellates, Porifera, Echinoderms, Annelids, Mollusks and Ascidians (but not Ecdysozoans. UrBACEs are predominantly single copy, show 35% to 45% protein sequence identity with mammalian BACE1, are approximately 100 residues longer than cathepsin paralogues with an aspartyl protease domain flanked by a signal peptide and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. While multiple paralogues in Trichoplax and Monosiga pre-date the nervous system, duplication of the UrBACE in fish gave rise to BACE1 and BACE2 in the vertebrate lineage. The latter evolved more rapidly as the former maintained the emergent neuronal role. In mammals, Ka/Ks for BACE2 is higher than BACE1 but low ratios for both suggest purifying selection. The 5’ exons show higher Ka/Ks than the catalytic section. Model organism genomes show the absence of certain BACE human substrates when the UrBACE is present. Experiments could thus reveal undiscovered substrates and roles. The human protease double-target status means that evolutionary trajectories and functional shifts associated with different substrates will have implications for the development of clinical candidates for both AD and T2DM. A rational basis for inhibition specificity ratios and assessing target-related side effects will be facilitated by a more complete picture of BACE1 and BACE2 functions informed by their evolutionary context.

  18. The Ovary of Tubifex tubifex (Clitellata, Naididae, Tubificinae Is Composed of One, Huge Germ-Line Cyst that Is Enriched with Cytoskeletal Components.

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    Anna Z Urbisz

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the ovary organization and oogenesis in Tubificinae have revealed that their ovaries are small polarized structures that are composed of germ cells in subsequent stages of oogenesis that are associated with somatic cells. In syncytial cysts, as a rule, each germ cell is connected to the central cytoplasmic mass, the cytophore, via only one stable intercellular bridge (ring canal. In this paper we present detailed data about the composition of germ-line cysts in Tubifex tubifex with special emphasis on the occurrence and distribution of the cytoskeletal elements. Using fixed material and live cell imaging techniques, we found that the entire ovary of T. tubifex is composed of only one, huge multicellular germ-line cyst, which may contain up to 2,600 cells. Its architecture is broadly similar to the cysts that are found in other clitellate annelids, i.e. a common, anuclear cytoplasmic mass in the center of the cyst and germ cells that are connected to it via intercellular bridges. The cytophore in the T. tubifex cyst extends along the long axis of the ovary in the form of elongated and branched cytoplasmic strands. Rhodamine-coupled phalloidin staining revealed that the prominent strands of actin filaments occur inside the cytophore. Similar to the cytophore, F-actin strands are branched and they are especially well developed in the middle and outermost parts of the ovary. Microfilaments are also present in the ring canals that connect the germ cells with the cytophore in the narrow end of the ovary. Using TubulinTracker, we found that the microtubules form a prominent network of loosely and evenly distributed tubules inside the cytophore as well as in every germ cell. The well-developed cytoskeletal elements in T. tubifex ovary seem to ensure the integrity of such a huge germ-line cyst of complex (germ cells-ring canals-cytophore organization. A comparison between the cysts that are described here and other well-known female

  19. Introduction to 'Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution'.

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    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the 'Cambrian explosion' arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to discuss

  20. Myxosporean hyperparasites of gill monogeneans are basal to the Multivalvulida

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    Freeman Mark A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myxosporeans are known from aquatic annelids but parasitism of platyhelminths by myxosporeans has not been widely reported. Hyperparasitism of gill monogeneans by Myxidium giardi has been reported from the European eel and Myxidium-like hyperparasites have also been observed during studies of gill monogeneans from Malaysia and Japan. The present study aimed to collect new hyperparasite material from Malaysia for morphological and molecular descriptions. In addition, PCR screening of host fish was undertaken to determine whether they are also hosts for the myxosporean. Results Heavy myxosporean infections were observed in monogeneans from two out of 14 fish and were detected from a further five fish using specific PCRs and pooled monogenean DNA. Positive DNA isolates were sequenced and were from a single species of myxosporean. Myxospore morphology was consistent with Myxidium with histozoic development in the parenchymal tissues of the monogenean. Simultaneous infections in the fish could not be confirmed microscopically; however, identical myxosporean DNA could be amplified from kidney, spleen and intestinal tract tissues using the specific PCR. Small subunit (SSU rDNA for the myxosporean was amplified and was found to be most similar (92% to that of another hyperparasitic myxosporean from a gill monogenean from Japan and to numerous multivalvulidan myxosporeans from the genus Kudoa (89-91%. Phylogenetic analyses placed the hyperparasite sequence basally to clades containing Kudoa, Unicapsula and Sphaerospora. Conclusions The myxosporean infecting the gill monogenean, Diplectanocotyla gracilis, from the Indo-Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides, is described as a new species, Myxidium incomptavermi, based on a histozoic development in the monogenean host and its phylogenetic placement. We have demonstrated for the first time that a myxosporean hyperparasite of gill monogeneans is detectable in the fish host. However

  1. Formation of body appendages during caudal regeneration in Platynereis dumerilii: adaptation of conserved molecular toolsets

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    Jan Grimmel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platynereis and other polychaete annelids with homonomous segmentation are regarded to closely resemble ancestral forms of bilateria. The head region comprises the prostomium, the peristomium, a variable number of cephalized body segments and several appendages, like cirri, antennae and palps. The trunk of such polychaetes shows numerous, nearly identical segments. Each segment bears a parapodium with species-specific morphology on either side. The posterior end of the trunk features a segment proliferation zone and a terminal pygidium with the anus and anal cirri. The removal of a substantial part of the posterior trunk is by no means lethal. Cells at the site of injury dedifferentiate and proliferate forming a blastema to regenerate both the pygidium and the proliferation zone. The pygidium forms new anal cirri, and the proliferation zone generates new segments at a rapid pace. The formation of body appendages like the cirri and the segmental parapodia can thus be studied in the caudal regenerate of Platynereis within only a few days. Results The development of body appendages in Platynereis is regulated by a network of genes common to polychaetes but also shared by distant taxa. We isolated DNA sequences from P. dumerilii of five genes known to be involved in appendage formation within other groups: Meis/homothorax, Pbx1/extradenticle, Dlx/Distal-less, decapentaplegic and specific protein 1/buttonhead. Analyses of expression patterns during caudal regeneration by in situ hybridization reveal striking similarities related to expression in arthropods and vertebrates. All genes exhibit transient expression during differentiation and growth of segments. As was shown previously in other phyla Pdu-Meis/hth and Pdu-Pbx1/exd are co-expressed, although the expression is not limited to the proximal part of the parapodia. Pdu-Dll is prominent in parapodia but upregulated in the anal cirri. No direct dependence concerning Pdu-Dll and

  2. Biodiversity and density of subtidal benthos of an oceanic tropical island (a comparison within the Pacific Ocean)

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    Sibaja-Cordero, Jeffrey A.; Troncoso, Jesús S.; Cortés, Jorge; Moreira, Juan; Vargas, José A.; Benavides-Varela, Catalina

    2016-09-01

    The marine macrofauna of the shallow sandy bottom of Isla del Coco, Costa Rica (5°32‧N-87°04‧W) was assessed in April 2010. Comparisons of richness, density and diversity between levels of exposure to ocean influence were carried out. During this study 15,407 specimens with a mean density of 1826 ind m- 2 were found between 3-75 m depth. The specimens were distributed in 267 taxa (29% new additions) with a mean of 55 ± 14 expected taxa m- 2. The values of density, richness and diversity were higher at the exposed coast, whereas they decreased at inner bays due to the influence of freshwater input. These estimates were compared with 40 studies in the Tropical Pacific Ocean (TPO). Taxa and density previously reported from the TPO were dependent on the area and depth range studied. Additionally, these parameters varied according to the sampling gear used. For example, higher densities were reported by using corers or boxcorers. The Shannon-Wiener index was most effective in identifying sediment and geographical patterns of variation along the TPO. Differences in these diversity parameters were also found between islands and mainland studies. Moreover, richness and density values from Isla del Coco were higher than the same parameters reported in studies using grabs in the TPO. At Isla del Coco annelids were dominant in terms of relative abundance (49.6%), followed by crustaceans (10.1%), mollusks (2.8%), and others faunal groups (37.5%). The faunistic composition at Isla del Coco differed when compared to the rest of localities of TPO due to the higher contribution of miscellaneous groups. In conclusion, the comparison with previous studies in the TPO indicate that islands like Isla del Coco have high numbers of taxa and diversity than those of the mainland, but lower density. However, this value is influenced by the sampling methodology. The taxa accumulation curve at Isla del Coco did not reach the asymptote, suggesting that an intensive sampling, especially

  3. Authigenic carbonate crusts and chimneys along the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara, Turkey

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    Yıldız, Güliz; Namık Çaǧatay, M.

    2016-04-01

    The Sea of Marmara is located on the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) fault zone that is a major continental transform plate boundary. It has ca. 1250 m-deep Tekirdag, Central and Cinarcik basins that are separated by two NE-SW trending Central and Western Highs. Extensive cold seeps occur along the active fault segments of the NAF in the deep basins and highs, which are associated with authigenic carbonate crusts, carbonate chimneys and mounds, black sulphidic sediments, and local gas hydrates and oil seepage. The cold seep sites were observed and sampled during the Nautile submersible and Victor 6000 Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) dives carried out during MARNAUT and MARSITE cruises in 2007 and 2014, respectively. Here, we report the mineralogical and stable isotopic composition of the authigenic carbonates and discuss their environmental conditions and mechanisms of formation. The carbonate crusts range up to 5 cm in thickness and the chimneys and mounds are up to 2 m high. Some chimneys are active emitting fresh to brackish water at ambient bottom water temperatures (˜ 14° C). The carbonate crusts occur as a pavements, and are commonly covered with black sulphidic sediments and bacterial mats that accommodate a rich chemosynthetic community of bivalves, sea urchins and marine annelid worms (Polychaeta). The authigenic carbonates commonly consist mainly of aragonite, but in a few instances contain subequal amounts of aragonite and calcite. High Mg-calcite is usually a minor to trace component, except in one sample in which it is present as a cement of mudstone. In the active methane emission zones, the sulphate/methane boundary occurs at or close to the seafloor, whereas elsewhere in the Sea of Marmara, the same boundary is located at 2-5 m below the seafloor. This, together with very light stable carbon isotope values (δ13C=-29.8 to - 46.3 ‰ V-PDB), indicates that the anaerobic oxidation of high methane flux emitted from the active faults is the major process

  4. Localization of neuropeptide gene expression in larvae of an echinoderm, the starfish Asterias rubens

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    Tatiana D Mayorova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are an ancient class of neuronal signaling molecules that regulate a variety of physiological and behavioral processes in animals. The life cycle of many animals includes a larval stage(s that precedes metamorphic transition to a reproductively active adult stage but, with the exception of Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, research on neuropeptide signaling has hitherto largely focused on adult animals. However, recent advances in genome/transcriptome sequencing have facilitated investigation of neuropeptide expression/function in the larvae of protostomian (e.g. the annelid Platynereis dumerilii and deuterostomian (e.g. the urochordate Ciona intestinalis invertebrates. Accordingly, here we report the first multi-gene investigation of larval neuropeptide precursor expression in a species belonging to the phylum Echinodermata - the starfish Asterias rubens. Whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization was used to visualize in bipinnaria and brachiolaria stage larvae the expression of eight neuropeptide precursors: L-type SALMFamide (S1, F-type SALMFamide (S2, vasopressin/oxytocin-type, NGFFYamide, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type. Expression of only three of the precursors (S1, S2, NGFFYamide was observed in bipinnaria larvae but by the brachiolaria stage expression of all eight precursors was detected. An evolutionarily conserved feature of larval nervous systems is the apical organ and in starfish larvae this comprises the bilaterally symmetrical lateral ganglia, but only the S1 and S2 precursors were found to be expressed in these ganglia. A prominent feature of brachiolaria larvae is the attachment complex, comprising the brachia and adhesive disk, which mediates larval attachment to a substratum prior to metamorphosis. Interestingly, all of the neuropeptide precursors examined here are expressed in the attachment complex, with

  5. The Ovary of Tubifex tubifex (Clitellata, Naididae, Tubificinae) Is Composed of One, Huge Germ-Line Cyst that Is Enriched with Cytoskeletal Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbisz, Anna Z; Chajec, Łukasz; Świątek, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on the ovary organization and oogenesis in Tubificinae have revealed that their ovaries are small polarized structures that are composed of germ cells in subsequent stages of oogenesis that are associated with somatic cells. In syncytial cysts, as a rule, each germ cell is connected to the central cytoplasmic mass, the cytophore, via only one stable intercellular bridge (ring canal). In this paper we present detailed data about the composition of germ-line cysts in Tubifex tubifex with special emphasis on the occurrence and distribution of the cytoskeletal elements. Using fixed material and live cell imaging techniques, we found that the entire ovary of T. tubifex is composed of only one, huge multicellular germ-line cyst, which may contain up to 2,600 cells. Its architecture is broadly similar to the cysts that are found in other clitellate annelids, i.e. a common, anuclear cytoplasmic mass in the center of the cyst and germ cells that are connected to it via intercellular bridges. The cytophore in the T. tubifex cyst extends along the long axis of the ovary in the form of elongated and branched cytoplasmic strands. Rhodamine-coupled phalloidin staining revealed that the prominent strands of actin filaments occur inside the cytophore. Similar to the cytophore, F-actin strands are branched and they are especially well developed in the middle and outermost parts of the ovary. Microfilaments are also present in the ring canals that connect the germ cells with the cytophore in the narrow end of the ovary. Using TubulinTracker, we found that the microtubules form a prominent network of loosely and evenly distributed tubules inside the cytophore as well as in every germ cell. The well-developed cytoskeletal elements in T. tubifex ovary seem to ensure the integrity of such a huge germ-line cyst of complex (germ cells-ring canals-cytophore) organization. A comparison between the cysts that are described here and other well-known female germ-line cysts is

  6. Bone-Eating Worms Spread: Insights into Shallow-Water Osedax (Annelida, Siboglinidae from Antarctic, Subantarctic, and Mediterranean Waters.

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    Sergi Taboada

    Full Text Available Osedax, commonly known as bone-eating worms, are unusual marine annelids belonging to Siboglinidae and represent a remarkable example of evolutionary adaptation to a specialized habitat, namely sunken vertebrate bones. Usually, females of these animals live anchored inside bone owing to a ramified root system from an ovisac, and obtain nutrition via symbiosis with Oceanospirillales gamma-proteobacteria. Since their discovery, 26 Osedax operational taxonomic units (OTUs have been reported from a wide bathymetric range in the Pacific, the North Atlantic, and the Southern Ocean. Using experimentally deployed and naturally occurring bones we report here the presence of Osedax deceptionensis at very shallow-waters in Deception Island (type locality; Antarctica and at moderate depths near South Georgia Island (Subantarctic. We present molecular evidence in a new phylogenetic analysis based on five concatenated genes (28S rDNA, Histone H3, 18S rDNA, 16S rDNA, and cytochrome c oxidase I-COI-, using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference, supporting the placement of O. deceptionensis as a separate lineage (Clade VI although its position still remains uncertain. This phylogenetic analysis includes a new unnamed species (O. 'mediterranea' recently discovered in the shallow-water Mediterranean Sea belonging to Osedax Clade I. A timeframe of the diversification of Osedax inferred using a Bayesian framework further suggests that Osedax diverged from other siboglinids during the Middle Cretaceous (ca. 108 Ma and also indicates that the most recent common ancestor of Osedax extant lineages dates to the Late Cretaceous (ca. 74.8 Ma concomitantly with large marine reptiles and teleost fishes. We also provide a phylogenetic framework that assigns newly-sequenced Osedax endosymbionts of O. deceptionensis and O. 'mediterranea' to ribospecies Rs1. Molecular analysis for O. deceptionensis also includes a COI-based haplotype network indicating that individuals from

  7. Diversity, natural history, and geographic distribution of snakes in the Caatinga, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Thaís B; Nogueira, Cristiano; Marques, Otavio A V

    2014-09-19

    prey, as arthropods, annelids, and mollusks. In relation to time of activity, 35.7% of snakes are both diurnal and nocturnal, 33.0% are strictly nocturnal, and 30.4% are diurnal. The data provided herein increase the list of Caatinga snake species from 50 to 112, and includes detailed maps and information on geographic distribution. The Caatinga snake assemblage shows high richness and endemism levels, and our results highlight the usefulness of basic natural history data and revision of voucher specimens as baseline information for biogeographic studies and conservation strategies. 

  8. Aspectos tróficos y reproductivos de algunos batoideos capturados en Santa Marta, Mar Caribe de Colombia Trophic and reproductive aspects of some batoids caught at Santa Marta in the Colombian Caribbean Sea

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    Marcela Grijalba-Bendeck

    2012-07-01

    males, and 119 Dasyatis guttata (58 females, 61 males. Although specimens from all stages of maturity were caught, the immature (I and mature (III stages were dominant. Based on the sexual proportion obtained, no marked spatial-temporal segregation was observed. The overall diet consisted of crustaceans, annelids, and teleosts, with unique food preferences that allow the sampled species to avoid interspecific competition.

  9. Succession and seasonal variation in epilithic biofilms on artificial reefs in culture waters of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Du, Rongbin; Zhang, Xiaoling; Dong, Shuanglin; Sun, Shichun

    2017-01-01

    Periphytic biofilms in aquaculture waters are thought to improve water quality, provide an additional food source, and improve the survival and growth of some reared animals. In the Asia- Pacific region, particularly in China, artificial reefs are commonly used in the commercial farming of sea cucumbers. However, few studies have examined the epilithic biofilms on the artificial reefs. To gain a better understanding of the succession of epilithic biofilms and their ecological processes in sea cucumber culture waters, two experiments were conducted in culture waters of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus in Rongcheng, China, using artificial test panels. On the test panels of succession experiment, more than 67 species were identified in the biofilms. On the test panels of seasonal variation experiment, more than 46 species were recorded in the biofilms. In both experiments, communities of epilithic biofilms were dominated by diatoms, green algae and the annelid Spirorbis sp. In the initial colonization, the dominant diatoms were Cocconeis sp., Amphora spp. and Nitzschia closterium in June, which were succeeded by species of Navicula, Cocconeis and Nitzschia (July to September), and then by Licmophora abbreviata, Nitzschia closterium and Synedra spp. in the following months. A diatom bloom in the autumn and filamentous green algae burst in the summer were also observed. Ecological indices well annotated the succession and seasonal changes in epilithic communities. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis found significant differences in diatom community composition among months and seasons. Fast growth of biofilms was observed in the summer and autumn, whereas the biomass of summer biofilms was largely made up of filamentous green algae. Present results show that the components of epilithic biofilms are mostly optimal foods of A. japonicus, suggesting that biofilms on artificial reefs may contribute important nutritional sources for sea cucumbers during their

  10. The biology and ecology of black corals (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Hexacorallia: Antipatharia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Daniel; Luck, Daniel G; Toonen, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    compete for space by using sweeper tentacles and secondary metabolites. With the exception of a few predators such as gastropods and green sea turtles, antipatharians appear to be little impacted by predation. Like other corals, antipatharians can be habitat engineers of importance to a myriad of associated organisms including arthropods, annelids, echinoderms, mollusks, sponges and cnidarians, several of which are adapted to live exclusively on black corals. Given that most black coral species inhabit remote environments, our understanding of these organisms will depend on our ability to effectively sample and study them. Future collections, particularly in deeper waters (>50m), will be needed to determine whether antipatharian species have limited biogeographical distributions or whether this has simply been an artefact of low sampling efforts away from population centres and taxonomic uncertainties within this group. Additionally, biological and ecological studies require increased sample sizes because most information is currently derived from the examination of only a handful of specimens.

  11. Investigations of a novel fauna from hydrothermal vents along the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, H.; Schander, C.; Halanych, K. M.; Levin, L. A.; Sweetman, A.; Tverberg, J.; Hoem, S.; Steen, I.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic deep ocean hosts a variety of habitats ranging from fairly uniform sedimentary abyssal plains to highly variable hard bottoms on mid ocean ridges, including biodiversity hotspots like seamounts and hydrothermal vents. Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are usually associated with a highly specialized fauna, and since their discovery in 1977 more than 400 species of animals have been described. This fauna includes various animal groups of which the most conspicuous and well known are annelids, mollusks and crustaceans. The newly discovered deep sea hydrothermal vents on the Mohns-Knipovich ridge north of Iceland harbour unique biodiversity. The Jan Mayen field consists of two main areas with high-temperature white smoker venting and wide areas with low-temperature seepage, located at 5-700 m, while the deeper Loki Castle vent field at 2400 m depth consists of a large area with high temperature black smokers surrounded by a sedimentary area with more diffuse low-temperature venting and barite chimneys. The Jan Mayen sites show low abundance of specialized hydrothermal vent fauna. Single groups have a few specialized representatives but groups otherwise common in hydrothermal vent areas are absent. Slightly more than 200 macrofaunal species have been identified from this vent area, comprising mainly an assortment of bathyal species known from the surrounding area. Analysis of stable isotope data also indicates that the majority of the species present are feeding on phytodetritus and/or phytoplankton. However, the deeper Loki Castle vent field contains a much more diverse vent endemic fauna with high abundances of specialized polychaetes, gastropods and amphipods. These specializations also include symbioses with a range of chemosynthetic microorganisms. Our data show that the fauna composition is a result of high degree of local specialization with some similarities to the fauna of cold seeps along the Norwegian margin and wood-falls in the abyssal Norwegian Sea

  12. Succession and seasonal variation in epilithic biofilms on artificial reefs in culture waters of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Du, Rongbin; Zhang, Xiaoling; Dong, Shuanglin; Sun, Shichun

    2016-04-01

    Periphytic biofilms in aquaculture waters are thought to improve water quality, provide an additional food source, and improve the survival and growth of some reared animals. In the Asia- Pacific region, particularly in China, artificial reefs are commonly used in the commercial farming of sea cucumbers. However, few studies have examined the epilithic biofilms on the artificial reefs. To gain a better understanding of the succession of epilithic biofilms and their ecological processes in sea cucumber culture waters, two experiments were conducted in culture waters of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus in Rongcheng, China, using artificial test panels. On the test panels of succession experiment, more than 67 species were identified in the biofilms. On the test panels of seasonal variation experiment, more than 46 species were recorded in the biofilms. In both experiments, communities of epilithic biofilms were dominated by diatoms, green algae and the annelid Spirorbis sp. In the initial colonization, the dominant diatoms were Cocconeis sp., Amphora spp. and Nitzschia closterium in June, which were succeeded by species of Navicula, Cocconeis and Nitzschia (July to September), and then by Licmophora abbreviata, Nitzschia closterium and Synedra spp. in the following months. A diatom bloom in the autumn and filamentous green algae burst in the summer were also observed. Ecological indices well annotated the succession and seasonal changes in epilithic communities. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis found significant diff erences in diatom community composition among months and seasons. Fast growth of biofilms was observed in the summer and autumn, whereas the biomass of summer biofilms was largely made up of filamentous green algae. Present results show that the components of epilithic biofilms are mostly optimal foods of A. japonicus, suggesting that biofilms on artificial reefs may contribute important nutritional sources for sea cucumbers during their

  13. Dioctophymosis occurrence in two dogs in Guarapuava city - Parana State/ Ocorrência da dioctofimose em dois cães no município de Guarapuava - PR

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    Marcos Aurélio Laidane Filho

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Dioctophyma renale (GOEZE, 1782 is a worldwide nematode that infects the kidneys and could be found in peritoneal cavity and other organs of dog and another species of domestic and wild animals, includes human species. The life cycle envolves one intermediate and often one paratenic host. In mustelids and in wild and domestic carnivores (DH, the adult parasite is usually located in the right kidney, like this the eggs can be eliminated with the urine. In the environment the eggs request an incubation period in half aquatic, needing to be ingested by IH (an annelid oligochaetes parasite of fish for if they turn infectantes (L3, that it can be ingested by a host paratênico (fish, crab or for HD. This paper reports the occurence of D. renale in two dogs assisted in the Veterinary Hospital in the Guarapuava city, PR.Dioctophyma renale (GOEZE, 1782 é um nematóide de ocorrência mundial que parasita os rins, podendo ser encontrado na cavidade peritoneal e outros órgãos do cão e outras espécies de animais domésticos e silvestres, inclusive o homem. O ciclo deste parasita é indireto, tendo como hospedeiro definitivo (HD os mustelídeos e canídeos; como hospedeiro intermediário (HI, um anelídeo oligoqueta parasita de brânquias de peixe. No HD, o parasita adulto localiza-se geralmente no rim direito, assim os ovos podem ser eliminados com a urina. No meio ambiente os ovos requerem um período de incubação em meio aquático, necessitando ser ingeridos pelo HI para se tornarem infectantes (L3, que pode ser ingerido por um hospedeiro paratênico (peixe, caranguejo ou pelo HD. O presente trabalho relata a ocorrência de D. renale em dois cães atendidos no Hospital Veterinário da Escola Superior de Ciências Agrárias de Guarapuava, PR.

  14. Occurrence of parasitism by Dioctophyma renale in ring-tailed coatis (Nasua nasua of the Tiete Ecological Park, São Paulo, Brazil Ocorrência de parasitismo por Dioctophyma renale em quati (Nasua nasua do Parque Ecológico Tietê, São Paulo

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    Liliane Milanelo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Dioctophymosis is a worldwide renal parasitosis caused by the Dioctophyma renale nematode, which results in progressive destruction of renal tissue. Aquatics annelids are considered the main intermediate hosts and the literature refers as permanent hosts of dogs, wild mammals and even humans. During procedures for population control of coatis (Nasua nasua in the Ecological Park of Tietê (PET, was noticed the presence of parasitosis by D. renale. From 68 animals, males and females, young and adults, submitted to exploratory laparotomy, 51 were positive for the presence of worms, 9 were found only in the right kidney. In 10 cases, in addition to right kidney parasitism, worms were also observed in the abdominal cavity. In 24 cases D. renale was found only in the abdominal cavity and in 8 animals the right kidney was reduced to a small rigid structure. The study showed that the preferred site for parasitism of the worm, considered erratic, was the abdominal cavity in 66.66% of the cases.A dioctofimose é uma parasitose renal causada pelo nematóide Dioctophyma renale conhecida por gerar a destruição progressiva do parênquima renal. Anelídeos de água doce são considerados os principais hospedeiros intermediários e a literatura refere como hospedeiros definitivos cães domésticos, mamíferos selvagens e até seres humanos. Durante procedimentos de controle populacional de quatis (Nasua nasua no Parque Ecológico do Tietê (PET, evidenciou-se a presença do parasitismo por D. renale. Sessenta e oito animais foram submetidos à laparotomia, machos e fêmeas, jovens e adultos, dos quais 51 foram positivos para presença do parasita. Em 9 animais o parasita esteve presente apenas no rim direito; em 10 animais D. renale parasitava o rim direito e a cavidade abdominal simultaneamente. Em outros 24 quatis o parasita foi encontrado apenas na cavidade abdominal e em 8 animais o rim direito foi reduzido apenas a uma pequena estrutura rígida. O estudo

  15. PRELIMINARY PALAEOSYNECOLOGICAL ANALYSES ON THE UPPER ANISIAN (MIDDLE TRIASSIC)QINGYAN FAUNA%中三叠世青岩生物群的群体古生态学初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Qingyan fauna (Upper Anisian, Middle Triassic) was found from a section located at about 30km south of Guiyang, the provincial capital of Guizhou Province, SW China. Here yields abundant well-preserved and highly diversed fossils, involving 16-17 groups of organisms, among which gastropods, frachiopods and bivalves are dominant. Some macrofossils are a eommon sight here including corals, sponges, crinoids, scaphapods, ammonoids, nautilids, bryozoaus and echinoids. whereas others such as porifers, cnidarians and annelids are rare in occurrence but visible sometimes. Among microfossils abounded in this fauna, snch groups as ostracods, foraminiferans and calcareous algae were analysed.   After a palaeosynecologic study combining with palaeogeographic analyses we believe that the Qingyan fauna might have developed in an environment of a protected shallow marine habitat, which was lacated at a position of the upper part of basin slope. The sea bottom was fine-grained and stable. The rates of sedimentation were generally relatively low. The water was relatively deep and the organisms lived in the photic zone above the storm wave base and below the fair-weather wave base.   Epibenthic forms are the main groups in this primarily benthic fauna. Shallow burrowing in fauna and semiinfauna form smaller portions. In traphic habits, suspension-feeders are the dominant group. In a ddition, there are herbivores (gastropods), detritus-feeders, scavengers, and omnivores, a few deposit-feeders and few micro- and macro-carnivores.   The high percentage of suspension-feeders in the fauna indicates that the water was clean and clear, gently moving, and rich in oxygen and nutrients. The highly diverse associations, especially bivalves and gastropods, most probablyre present selics of community which had lived in patches of macroalgae.%根据群体古生态学的初步研究,认为青岩生物群的富集是因为发育一个较为特殊的生态环境,即位于斜坡

  16. Consuming viscous prey: a novel protein-secreting delivery system in neotropical snail-eating snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficient venom delivery systems are known to occur only in varanoid lizards and advanced colubroidean snakes among squamate reptiles. Although components of these venomous systems might have been present in a common ancestor, the two lineages independently evolved strikingly different venom gland systems. In snakes, venom is produced exclusively by serous glands in the upper jaw. Within the colubroidean radiation, lower jaw seromucous infralabial glands are known only in two distinct lineages–the basal pareatids and the more advanced Neotropical dipsadines known as “goo-eating snakes”. Goo-eaters are a highly diversified, ecologically specialized clade that feeds exclusively on invertebrates (e.g., gastropod molluscs and annelids). Their evolutionary success has been attributed to their peculiar feeding strategies, which remain surprisingly poorly understood. More specifically, it has long been thought that the more derived Dipsadini genera Dipsas and Sibynomorphus use glandular toxins secreted by their infralabial glands to extract snails from their shells. Results Here, we report the presence in the tribe Dipsadini of a novel lower jaw protein-secreting delivery system effected by a gland that is not functionally related to adjacent teeth, but rather opens loosely on the oral epithelium near the tip of the mandible, suggesting that its secretion is not injected into the prey as a form of envenomation but rather helps control the mucus and assists in the ingestion of their highly viscous preys. A similar protein-secreting system is also present in the goo-eating genus Geophis and may share the same adaptive purpose as that hypothesized for Dipsadini. Our phylogenetic hypothesis suggests that the acquisition of a seromucous infralabial gland represents a uniquely derived trait of the goo-eating clade that evolved independently twice within the group as a functionally complex protein-secreting delivery system. Conclusions The acquisition by snail

  17. Studies on chaetognaths off Ubatuba region, Brazil: II. Feeding habits

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    Tsui Hua Liang

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The diet of chaetognath species were studied by examining the gut contents of 9466 specimens collected off Ubatuba region, São Paulo State. The greatest proportion of chaetognaths (7119 individuals showed their gut contents empty. Copepods, mollusc eggs, appendicularians, cladocerans and annelids were the most common food items in the gut contents of juveniles and mature stages. Cannibalism occurred in low frequency. In Summer the copepods Temora stylifera and Paracalanus spp were more abundant, whereas Oncaea spp and mollusc eggs were heavily preyed in Winter. There was a clear trend of increasing prey size with the developmental stage.O estudo dos hábitos alimentares das espécies de Chaetognatha foi realizado a partir da análise do trato digestivo de 9466 indivíduos dos estágios 0 - IV. Os quetógnatos foram coletados ao largo da região de Ubatuba, Estado de São Paulo, com o auxílio da rede Bongo (Malha 0,200 mm e 0,303 mm, nos verões de 1985 - 1987 e invernos de 1986 e 1987. Dos 9466 tratos digestivos analisados, 7119 estavam vazios e 2347 apresentaram de 1 a 3 presas. Grande quantidade de material amorfo e semi-digerido também foram detectados. A dieta esteve constituída basicamente de copépodos (Calanoida e Poecilostomatoida, cladóceros, ovos de moluscos, náuplios de crustáceos, apendiculárias e poliquetos, entre outros. O canibalismo foi observado a partir do estágio I, porém com baixa frequência. Os estágios jovens (0-1 mostraram preferência por presas de tamanho pequeno como náuplios e copépodos do gênero Oncaea, enquanto que os estágios maduros por presas maiores como Temora stylifera, Corycaeus sp e Eucalanus pileatus.

  18. Specific retention of the protostome-specific PsGEF may parallel with the evolution of mushroom bodies in insect and lophotrochozoan brains

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    Kohno Keigo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene gain and subsequent retention or loss during evolution may be one of the underlying mechanisms involved in generating the diversity of metazoan nervous systems. However, the causal relationships acting therein have not been studied extensively. Results We identified the gene PsGEF (protostome-specific GEF, which is present in all the sequenced genomes of insects and limpet but absent in those of sea anemones, deuterostomes, and nematodes. In Drosophila melanogaster, PsGEF encodes a short version of a protein with the C2 and PDZ domains, as well as a long version with the C2, PDZ, and RhoGEF domains through alternative splicing. Intriguingly, the exons encoding the RhoGEF domain are specifically deleted in the Daphnia pulex genome, suggesting that Daphnia PsGEF contains only the C2 and PDZ domains. Thus, the distribution of PsGEF containing the C2, PDZ, and RhoGEF domains among metazoans appears to coincide with the presence of mushroom bodies. Mushroom bodies are prominent neuropils involved in the processing of multiple sensory inputs as well as associative learning in the insect, platyhelminth, and annelid brains. In the adult Drosophila brain, PsGEF is expressed in mushroom bodies, antennal lobe, and optic lobe, where it is necessary for the correct axon branch formation of alpha/beta neurons in mushroom bodies. PsGEF genetically interacts with Rac1 but not other Rho family members, and the RhoGEF domain of PsGEF induces actin polymerization in the membrane, thus resulting in the membrane ruffling that is observed in cultured cells with activated forms of Rac. Conclusion The specific acquisition of PsGEF by the last common ancestor of protostomes followed by its retention or loss in specific animal species during evolution demonstrates that there are some structural and/or functional features common between insect and lophotrochozoan nervous systems (for example, mushroom bodies, which are absent in all deuterostomes

  19. Macrobenthic fauna community in the Middle Songkhla Lake, Southern Thailand

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    Angsupanich, S.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A bimonthly investigation of macrobenthic fauna at the area from Ban Pak Khat to Ban Leam Chong Thanon in the Inner Songkhla Lake from February 1998 to February 1999 was undertaken to determine the species richness and abundance. A total of 7 phyla and 161 species were identified. Annelida (58 species, Arthropoda (64 species and Mollusca (23 species were the major phyla while Nemertea (1 species, Platyhelminthes (1 species, Cnidaria (4 species and Chordata (10 species were the minor. Fifty-seven speciesof Polychaete annelids were found. The highest species richness (14 species was in the Nereididae Family, of which Ceratonereis burmensis and Namalycastis indica were predominant. Nephtys sp. and Heteromastus sp. were not so highly abundant but appeared at almost all stations through every sampling month, while Prionospio cirrifera and Pseudopolydora kempi were found in higher densities but with narrower distribution. Ficopomatus sp. and unidentified Terebellidae were not commonly found, but occasionally reached a high density. Amphipods gave the highest species richness (22 species, with Photis longicaudata distributed widely and in all months. Five species of Tanaidaceans were found with Apseudes sapensis the second most dominant (max. 5044 individuals m-2 in February in the overall fauna. Isopoda were not as densely found as tanaidaceans but there were many species (18 species. Cyathura sp.1 was the most dominant isopod. Brachidontes arcuatulus was the most dominant bivalve (max. 29449 individuals m-2 in April, especially at stations with a sand-gravel substrate. The mean density of total macrobenthic fauna among stations ranged from 920 to 10620 ind. m-2 while the monthly densities ranged from 1520 to 6160 ind.m-2. The mean density of macrobenthic fauna was highest in the dry season (April. The species richness among stations ranged from65 to 105 species while varying from 81 to 112 species during the different months. The highest species

  20. Caracterización preliminar de los invertebrados bentónicos capturados accidentalmente en la pesca de camarones en el norte del estado de Río de Janeiro, sudeste de Brasil Preliminary characterization of benthic invertebrates caught as by-catch in the shrimp fishery in the north of the Rio de Janeiro State, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor David da Costa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Para caracterizar la biodiversidad de invertebrados bentónicos que componen la fauna asociada a la pesca de camarones en el puerto del Farol de Sao Thomé, costa norte del estado de Río de Janeiro, se realizaron 11 pescas mensuales en el año 2004 con redes de arrastre de fondo, cuya área de operaciones comprende 3-5 mn desde la línea de costa, entre 22°00'S y 22°20'S. Los datos registrados de cada taxon y/o especie se refieren a la frecuencia de ocurrencia, frecuencia numérica, biomasa, índice de Importancia Relativa y abundancia. En total se registraron 27 especies de invertebrados bentónicos de Porifera, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Annelida, Crustácea, Echinodermata y Bryozoa. Crustácea fue el más representativo, tanto en número de ejemplares de Petrochirus diogenes, Hepatus pudibundus y Callinectes ornatos, como en biomasa de P. diogenes y H. pudibundas. En términos de frecuencia de ocurrencia en los muéstreos, 11 especies (40,7% fueron constantes; 6 (22,2% accesorias y 10 (37,0% accidentales.In order to characterize the biodiversity of the benthic invertebrate by-catch associated with the shrimp fishery at Farol de Sao Thome harbor, northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, in 2004, 11 monthly trawls were conducted using bottom trawl nets between 22°00'S and 22°20'S and from 3 to 5 nm from the shoreline. The analyzed data for each talon and/or species include frequency of occurrence, numeric frequency, biomass, index of Relative Importance, and abundance. In total, 27 benthic invertebrate species were recorded, including Peripheral, Cnidarians, Mollusk, Annelid, Crustacea, Echinodermata, and Bryozoa. The most representative group was Crustacea, both in number of specimens (Petrochirus diogenes, Hepatus pudibundus, Callinectes ornatus and in biomass (P. diogenes, H. pudibundus. In terms of the frequency of occurrence in the samples, 11 species (40.7% were constant, 6 species (22.2% were accessories, and 10 species (37.0% were by-catch.

  1. Ichnofossil from the Cambrian succession of Parahio Valley, Spiti Basin, India: Their stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shivani; Parcha, Suraj Kumar

    2013-04-01

    The Spiti Basin exposes an excellent section of Neoproterozoic- Cretaceous rocks in the Tethyan Himalaya of Himachal Pradesh. The diverse assemblage of ichnofossils is present in the Cambrian succession of Parahio Valley in the Spiti Basin. In the present study nineteen ichnofossils are reported from the Cambrian succession of Parahio Valley. The ichnofossils includes Bergaueria, Chondrites, Cruziana, Didymaulichnus, Dimorphichnus, Diplichnites, Helminthorhaphe, Merostomichnites, ?Monocraterion, Monomorphichnus, Nereites, Palaeopascichnus, Palaeophycus, Phycodes, Planolites, Rusophycus, Skolithos, Scolicia, Treptichnus etc. along with annelid worm, burrow and scratch marks. The described ichnofossil assemblage indicates that the ichnocenosis is dominated by a high behavioral diversity ranging from suspension to deposit feeders. It seems that the ichnofauna present in the Cambrian succession of this section were mostly produced by trilobite and arthropods, whereas some of them were produced by crustacean, priapulid worm, polychaetes and polyphyletic vermiforms. The distribution pattern of ichnofossils shows increase in taxonomic and morphological diversity up in the section. It further indicates that the availability of nutrients significantly increased their abundance as well as spatial distribution during Cambrian. The presence of Chondrites, Treptichnus, and Phycodes at the basal part of the Cambrian indicates shallow to deep environment with anaerobic condition. Whereas, the complex forms like Rusophycus, Cruziana, Monomorphichnus and Nereites represent shelf to slope environment. The appearance of Skolithos in the upper part reflects well oxygenated high energy condition. The environmental changes in the Parahio Valley during Cambrian period was distinctly marked by an anaerobic to aerobic condition and by a faunal change from endobenthic, soft - bodied, deposit feeders to epibenthic grazers. The present ichnofossils indicates that these sediments were

  2. A remarkable diversity of bone-eating worms (Osedax; Siboglinidae; Annelida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Shannon B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone-eating Osedax worms have proved to be surprisingly diverse and widespread. Including the initial description of this genus in 2004, five species that live at depths between 25 and 3,000 m in the eastern and western Pacific and in the north Atlantic have been named to date. Here, we provide molecular and morphological evidence for 12 additional evolutionary lineages from Monterey Bay, California. To assess their phylogenetic relationships and possible status as new undescribed species, we examined DNA sequences from two mitochondrial (COI and 16S rRNA and three nuclear genes (H3, 18S and 28S rRNA. Results Phylogenetic analyses identified 17 distinct evolutionary lineages. Levels of sequence divergence among the undescribed lineages were similar to those found among the named species. The 17 lineages clustered into five well-supported clades that also differed for a number of key morphological traits. Attempts to determine the evolutionary age of Osedax depended on prior assumptions about nucleotide substitution rates. According to one scenario involving a molecular clock calibrated for shallow marine invertebrates, Osedax split from its siboglinid relatives about 45 million years ago when archeocete cetaceans first appeared and then diversified during the late Oligocene and early Miocene when toothed and baleen whales appeared. Alternatively, the use of a slower clock calibrated for deep-sea annelids suggested that Osedax split from its siboglinid relatives during the Cretaceous and began to diversify during the Early Paleocene, at least 20 million years before the origin of large marine mammals. Conclusion To help resolve uncertainties about the evolutionary age of Osedax, we suggest that the fossilized bones from Cretaceous marine reptiles and late Oligocene cetaceans be examined for possible trace fossils left by Osedax roots. Regardless of the outcome, the present molecular evidence for strong phylogenetic concordance

  3. Expression of FoxA and GATA transcription factors correlates with regionalized gut development in two lophotrochozoan marine worms: Chaetopterus (Annelida and Themiste lageniformis (Sipuncula

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    Boyle Michael J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A through gut is present in almost all metazoans, and most likely represents an ancient innovation that enabled bilaterian animals to exploit a wide range of habitats. Molecular developmental studies indicate that Fox and GATA regulatory genes specify tissue regions along the gut tube in a broad diversity of taxa, although little is known about gut regionalization within the Lophotrochozoa. In this study, we isolated FoxA and GATA456 orthologs and used whole mount in situ hybridization during larval gut formation in two marine worms: the segmented, polychaete annelid Chaetopterus, which develops a planktotrophic larva with a tripartite gut, and the non-segmented sipunculan Themiste lageniformis, which develops a lecithotrophic larva with a U-shaped gut. Results FoxA and GATA456 transcripts are predominantly restricted to gut tissue, and together show regional expression spanning most of the alimentary canal in each of these lophotrochozoans, although neither FoxA nor GATA456 is expressed in the posterior intestine of Chaetopterus. In both species, FoxA is expressed at the blastula stage, transiently in presumptive endoderm before formation of a definitive gut tube, and throughout early larval development in discrete foregut and hindgut domains. GATA456 genes are expressed during endoderm formation, and in endoderm and mesoderm associated with the midgut in each species. Several species-specific differences were detected, including an overlap of FoxA and GATA456 expression in the intestinal system of Themiste, which is instead complimentary in Chaetopterus. Other differences include additional discrete expression domains of FoxA in ectodermal trunk cells in Themiste but not Chaetopterus, and expression of GATA456 in anterior ectoderm and midgut cells unique to Chaetopterus. Conclusions This study of gene expression in a sipunculan contributes new comparative developmental insights from lophotrochozoans, and shows that FoxA and

  4. Alterations in macroinvertebrate spatial patterns in coastal lagoons: Óbidos (NW coast of Portugal) 1984 versus 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Quintino, Victor; Pereira, Fábio; Freitas, Rosa

    2012-09-01

    The macroinvertebrate spatial distribution patterns in the Lagoon of Óbidos were studied in 1984 and revisited in 2002. The overall surficial sediments and benthic community patterns show consistent similarities in the two sampling periods, but also important differences. The lagoon is relatively shallow, with about 1/3 of the area covered with extensive intertidal sand banks. These are interrupted by a navigation channel bordering the northern margin (1984) and, following dredging operations, a new navigation channel was opened along the southern margin (2002). The sediments in the navigation channels were coarser and with less percentage of fines in 2002 than in 1984. Arthropods dominated the species richness and abundance in 1984, but were much less important in 2002, when the community was dominated by molluscs and annelids, both in species numbers as well as in abundance. In 1984, the structure of the macrofauna communities closely followed a general model proposed for Atlantic and Mediterranean lagoons, with the marine, the transition and the lagoon communities occupying very well defined areas. This gradient was in accordance with an increase in the fines and organic matter content directed inwards allowing for the coexistence of several characteristic lagoon species with others characteristic of organic enriched sediments. In 2002 this spatial pattern is still recognized but the marine and the transition communities are spatially mixed, occupying both the entrance region and the navigation channels, whereas the characteristic lagoon community identified in 1984 was only recognized in a group of sites located along the southern margin in 2002. Several species show very important changes in their distribution extent in the lagoon system. These changes essentially show a generalized inward expansion of the distribution range of the marine species, in agreement with a larger influence of marine conditions toward the inner areas of the lagoon. This study shows

  5. The cell's view of animal body-plan evolution.

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    Lyons, Deirdre C; Martindale, Mark Q; Srivastava, Mansi

    2014-10-01

    An adult animal's form is shaped by the collective behavior of cells during embryonic development. To understand the forces that drove the divergence of animal body-plans, evolutionary developmental biology has focused largely on studying genetic networks operating during development. However, it is less well understood how these networks modulate characteristics at the cellular level, such as the shape, polarity, or migration of cells. We organized the "Cell's view of animal body plan evolution" symposium for the 2014 The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology meeting with the explicit goal of bringing together researchers studying the cell biology of embryonic development in diverse animal taxa. Using a broad range of established and emerging technologies, including live imaging, single-cell analysis, and mathematical modeling, symposium participants revealed mechanisms underlying cells' behavior, a few of which we highlight here. Shape, adhesion, and movements of cells can be modulated over the course of evolution to alter adult body-plans and a major theme explored during the symposium was the role of actomyosin in coordinating diverse behaviors of cells underlying morphogenesis in a myriad of contexts. Uncovering whether conserved or divergent genetic mechanisms guide the contractility of actomyosin in these systems will be crucial to understanding the evolution of the body-plans of animals from a cellular perspective. Many speakers presented research describing developmental phenomena in which cell division and tissue growth can control the form of the adult, and other presenters shared work on studying cell-fate specification, an important source of novelty in animal body-plans. Participants also presented studies of regeneration in annelids, flatworms, acoels, and cnidarians, and provided a unifying view of the regulation of cellular behavior during different life-history stages. Additionally, several presentations highlighted technological

  6. Localization of Neuropeptide Gene Expression in Larvae of an Echinoderm, the Starfish Asterias rubens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorova, Tatiana D.; Tian, Shi; Cai, Weigang; Semmens, Dean C.; Odekunle, Esther A.; Zandawala, Meet; Badi, Yusef; Rowe, Matthew L.; Egertová, Michaela; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an ancient class of neuronal signaling molecules that regulate a variety of physiological and behavioral processes in animals. The life cycle of many animals includes a larval stage(s) that precedes metamorphic transition to a reproductively active adult stage but, with the exception of Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, research on neuropeptide signaling has hitherto largely focused on adult animals. However, recent advances in genome/transcriptome sequencing have facilitated investigation of neuropeptide expression/function in the larvae of protostomian (e.g., the annelid Platynereis dumerilii) and deuterostomian (e.g., the urochordate Ciona intestinalis) invertebrates. Accordingly, here we report the first multi-gene investigation of larval neuropeptide precursor expression in a species belonging to the phylum Echinodermata—the starfish Asterias rubens. Whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization was used to visualize in bipinnaria and brachiolaria stage larvae the expression of eight neuropeptide precursors: L-type SALMFamide (S1), F-type SALMFamide (S2), vasopressin/oxytocin-type, NGFFYamide, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type. Expression of only three of the precursors (S1, S2, NGFFYamide) was observed in bipinnaria larvae but by the brachiolaria stage expression of all eight precursors was detected. An evolutionarily conserved feature of larval nervous systems is the apical organ and in starfish larvae this comprises the bilaterally symmetrical lateral ganglia, but only the S1 and S2 precursors were found to be expressed in these ganglia. A prominent feature of brachiolaria larvae is the attachment complex, comprising the brachia and adhesive disk, which mediates larval attachment to a substratum prior to metamorphosis. Interestingly, all of the neuropeptide precursors examined here are expressed in the attachment complex, with distinctive

  7. Macrofaunal communities associated with chemosynthetic habitats from the U.S. Atlantic margin: A comparison among depth and habitat types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Jill R.; Robertson, Craig M.; Brooke, Sandra; Demopoulos, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps support distinct benthic communities capable of tolerating extreme environmental conditions and utilizing reduced chemical compounds for nutrition. In recent years, several locations of methane seepage have been mapped along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope. In 2012 and 2013, two newly discovered seeps were investigated in this region: a shallow site near Baltimore Canyon (BCS, 366–412 m) and a deep site near Norfolk Canyon (NCS, 1467–1602 m), with both sites containing extensive chemosynthetic mussel bed and microbial mat habitats. Sediment push cores, suction samples, and Ekman box cores were collected to quantify the abundance, diversity, and community structure of benthic macrofauna (>300 μm) in mussel beds, mats, and slope habitats at both sites. Community data from the deep site were also assessed in relation to the associated sediment environment (organic carbon and nitrogen, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, grain size, and depth). Infaunal assemblages and densities differed both between depths and among habitat types. Macrofaunal densities in microbial mats were four times greater than those present in mussel beds and slope sediments and were dominated by the annelid families Dorvilleidae, Capitellidae, and Tubificidae, while mussel habitats had higher proportions of crustaceans. Diversity was lower in BCS microbial mat habitats, but higher in mussel and slope sediments compared to NCS habitats. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed specific sediment properties as important for distinguishing the macrofaunal communities, including larger grain sizes present within NCS microbial mat habitats and depleted stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) in sediments present at mussel beds. These results suggest that habitat differences in the quality and source of organic matter are driving the observed patterns in the infaunal assemblages, including high β diversity and high variability in the macrofaunal community composition. This

  8. A physiological study of integument secretions in the marine polychaete Eulalia viridis and their potential biotechnological value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patrícia Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in marine bioproducts, especially in those with life improving potential to humans. Marine invertebrates, in particular, possess particular interest due to their high diversity, abundance and ecological importance. However, the physiology of such a wide and diverse group of organisms is far from understood. Marine annelids, in particular (Class Polychaeta, are of especial interest, in large part owing to their ecological representativity and easy handling. Still only few studies have been focusing on physiological traits of the polychaeta that may relate to the production of bioproducts of potential biotechnological applications. The secretion of substances by polychaetes is acknowledged to relate primarily with locomotion and feeding, but also thought to have an important role in egg protection, prevention against infection and even as defence mechanisms against possible predators. As such, the present work aims at identifying, isolating and analysing the nature of integumentary secretions of E. viridis, a common intertidal worm of rocky shores. Histological analyses revealed a more complex microanatomy of the skin than it could be anticipated. Several cell types were identified in the integument, each bearing different functions such as structural support, pigmentation and sensorial, to which is added secretion as one of the most important roles. Due to the great complexity of the integument, the identification of the chemical nature of all types of secretions is particularly challenging. However, more detailed histochemical analyses and electron microscopy enabled the identification of different secretory cells and their chemical nature and role. The analyses was complemented by protein isolation from mucous and homogenates trough SDS-PAGE. Extracts revealed, for instance, that peptidic substances produced by the skin are potentially biocidal, as assessed through the Microtox Assay. Overall, the results enhance the

  9. Heterogeneity of macrozoobenthic assemblages within a Zostera noltii seagrass bed: diversity, abundance, biomass and structuring factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Hugues; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Lucas, Aurélien; Chardy, Pierre

    2004-09-01

    The macrobenthic fauna community of a 70-km 2Zostera noltii seagrass bed (Arcachon bay, France) was studied by sampling 49 stations systematically. A total of 126 taxa were identified. Cluster Analysis based on χ2 distance showed that in this apparently homogeneous habitat, four distinct macrobenthic communities could be identified. Multiple Discriminant Analysis highlighted the major contribution of the overlying water mass as a forcing variable, and, to a lesser extent, of tidal level and Z. noltii's below-ground parts. Seven stations did not constitute any conspicuous group, and were characterized by a low biomass of leaf (<28 g DW m -2), considered as the lowest value to constitute a Z. noltii community. Less than 24% of the seagrass bed was situated in more oceanic waters and at a quite low tidal level. In this relatively stable environment, the macrofauna community was characterized by a high species richness (mean = 39) and a moderate density and high biomass (12 638 individuals m -2 and 25 g AFDW m -2, respectively). Annelids dominated, particularly the oligochaetes. When physical constraints increased (emersion or brackish water conditions), diversity decreased, abundance and biomass increased. The seagrass bed (55%) was flooded with highly fluctuating waters in term of temperature and salinity, here species richness was low (mean = 27) but abundance and biomass were high (24 384 individuals m -2 and 28 g AFDW m -2, respectively), with a dominance of molluscs. The meadow (7%) was in external waters but at a higher tidal level (2.4 m vs 1.8 m above medium low tide level). This community was characterized by the particularly high density (41 826 individuals m -2) and dominance of oligochaetes (79% of total abundance). Species richness was high (mean = 37) here. A fourth community, extending over 12% of the meadow was dominated by the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae but could not be linked to a specific forcing variable. This study confirmed the almost

  10. Scaling of preferential flow in biopores by parametric or non parametric transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehe, E.; Hartmann, N.; Klaus, J.; Palm, J.; Schroeder, B.

    2009-04-01

    finally assign the measured hydraulic capacities to these pores. By combining this population of macropores with observed data on soil hydraulic properties we obtain a virtual reality. Flow and transport is simulated for different rainfall forcings comparing two models, Hydrus 3d and Catflow. The simulated cumulative travel depths distributions for different forcings will be linked to the cumulative depth distribution of connected flow paths. The latter describes the fraction of connected paths - where flow resistance is always below a selected threshold that links the surface to a certain critical depth. Systematic variation of the average number of macropores and their depth distributions will show whether a clear link between the simulated travel depths distributions and the depth distribution of connected paths may be identified. The third essential step is to derive a non parametric transfer function that predicts travel depth distributions of tracers and on the long term pesticides based on easy-to-assess subsurface characteristics (mainly density and depth distribution of worm burrows, soil matrix properties), initial conditions and rainfall forcing. Such a transfer function is independent of scale ? as long as we stay in the same ensemble i.e. worm population and soil properties stay the same. Shipitalo, M.J. and Butt, K.R. (1999): Occupancy and geometrical properties of Lumbricus terrestris L. burrows affecting infiltration. Pedobiologia 43:782-794 Zehe E, and Fluehler H. (2001b): Slope scale distribution of flow patterns in soil profiles. J. Hydrol. 247: 116-132.

  11. Study on the Medication Law in Treatment of Lumbar Disc Protrusion Based on Association Rules and Complex System Entropy Cluster%基于关联规则和复杂系统熵聚类的腰椎间盘突出症用药规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨济源; 林聪; 刘军; 潘建科; 马振尉; 洪坤豪

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese herbal formulas for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusion in recent 5 years were retrieved from CNKI,Chongqing VIP and Wanfang database. The use frequency of each medicine in the formulas,the association rules among medicines and the combination of core medicines were analyzed. Based on TCMISS software,the medication law of herbal medicines was analyzed for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusion. Three hundred and ten herbal medicine formulas were screened for analysis. The use frequency of medicines,the nature and flavor,meridian tropism and the association rules among medicines were deter-mined. Sixteen core combinations were explored. The common medicines for lumbar disc protrusion were acti-vating blood circulation,resolving stasis,tonifying qi,yang and blood,expelling wind,damp and cold. The na-tures of medicines were mainly warm,neutral and cold and the flavors were mainly sweat,bitter and pungent. The liver,kidney and spleen meridians were mainly involved. The core medicines in clinical treatment of lum-bar disc protrusion were angelica sinensis,radix achyranthis bidentatae,eucommia ulmoides,liquorice,para-sitic loranthus,radix angelicae pubescentis,poria cocos,ligusticum wallichii,radix dipsaci,fraxinus bun-geana,lumbricus,radix paeoniae alba,semen persicae and safflower carthamus.%通过中国知网、重庆维普、万方数据库收集近5年治疗腰椎间盘突出症文献中的中药处方,分析处方中各种药物的使用频次、药物之间的关联规则、核心药物组合,基于中医传承辅助平台(TCMISS)软件分析腰椎间盘突出症中药处方的用药规律。对筛选出的310个中药处方进行分析,确定处方中药物的使用频次、四气五味、归经、药物之间的关联规则,挖掘出16个核心组合。腰椎间盘突出症常用的药物以活血化瘀药、补血药、补阳药、补气药、祛风湿散寒药、发散风寒药、祛湿药为主,治法主要是活血化瘀、益

  12. Hotsphere illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Soils are the most heterogeneous parts of the biosphere, with an extremely high differentiation of properties and processes at all spatial and temporal scales. Importance of the hotspheres such as rhizosphere, detritusphere, porosphere (including drilosphere and biopores), hyphasphere and spermosphere, calls for spatially explicit methods to illuminate distribution of microbial activities in these hotspheres (Kuzyakov and Blagodatskaya, 2015). Zymography technique has previously been adapted to visualize the spatial dynamics of enzyme activities in rhizosphere (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2014). Here, we further developed soil zymography to obtain a higher resolution of enzyme activities by enabling direct contact of substrate-saturated membranes with soil. For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in various hotspheres. We calculated and compared percentage of enzymatic hotspots of five hotspheres: spermosphere, rhizosphere, detritusphere, drilosphere and biopores. Spatial distribution of activities of two enzymes: β-glucosidase and leucine amino peptidase were analyzed in the spermosphere, rhizosphere and detritusphere of maize and lentil. Zymography has been done 3 days (spermosphere), 14 days (rhizosphere) after sowing and 21 days after cutting plant (detritusphere). Spatial resolution of fluorescent images was improved by direct application fluorogenically labelled substrates on the soil surface. Such improvement enabled to visualize enzyme distribution of mycorrhiza hypha on the rhizobox surface. Further, to visualize the 2D distribution of the enzyme activities in porosphere, we placed earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris), (drilosphere) and ground beetle species Platynus dorsalis Pont. (Coleoptera; Carabidae), (biopore), in transparent boxes for 2weeks. The developed in situ zymography visualized the heterogeneity of enzyme activities along and across the roots. Spatial patterns of enzyme activities as a function of distance along the

  13. Ecotoxicological characteristic of a soil polluted by radioactive elements and heavy metals before and after its bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, P.; Groudev, S.; Spasova, I.; Nikolova, M.

    2012-04-01

    containing only nutrients. The best leaching of uranium (66.3 %), radium (62.5 %), and copper (15.1 %) were measured in the variant in which the soil was subjected to mulching and irrigation with alkaline solutions containing hydocarbonate ions. Despite the higher removal of these pollutants from the soil, the acute soil toxicity towards earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) was higher in comparison to the toxicity of soil that had been treated in the other variant. Furthermore, the highly alkaline soil pH (10.47) that was determined due to the applied alkaline leaching resulted in an acute soil toxicity to oats (Avena sativa) and clover (Trifolium repens) that was even higher in comparison to the toxicity of the non-treated soil. These data revealed that the soil detoxification was depended not only on the decrease of the total concentration and on the bioavailable forms of above-mentioned pollutants but also on the changes that had taken place in chemical and geotechnical properties of the treated soil.

  14. Soil Communities of Central Park, New York City: A Biodiversity Melting Pot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, K. S.; Leff, J. W.; Wall, D. H.; Fierer, N.

    2013-12-01

    high: >540,000 bacterial and archaeal species; and >97,000 eukaryotic species (as determined using a 97% sequence similarity cutoff). The most dominant bacterial phyla include Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia and Actinobacteria, and Archaea represent 1-8% of the sequences. Additionally, the distribution patterns of Acidobacteria and consequently beta-diversity, was strongly related to soil pH. The most dominant eukaryotic taxa include many Protists (Rhizara, Gregarinia), Fungi (Basidiomycota, Ascomycota), and Metazoa (Nematodes, Rotifers, Arthropods and Annelids). No single soil factor could predict eukaryotic distribution. Central Park soil diversity was strikingly similar to the diversity of the 57 global soils. Central Park and the global soils had similarities in alpha diversity, taxon abundances. Interestingly, there was significant overlap in a number of dominant species between Central Park and the global soils. Together these results represent the most comprehensive analysis of soil biodiversity conducted to date. Our data suggest that even well-studied locations like Central Park harbor very high levels of unexplored biodiversity, and that Central Park biodiversity is comparable to soil biodiversity found globally.

  15. 西泉眼水库水源地10月大型底栖动物群落特征及其与环境因子的关系%Characteristics of Macrobenthos Communities in Xiquanyan Reservoir in Autumn and Their Relationships with Environmental Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佳娟; 于洪贤; 刘曼红; 费滕

    2011-01-01

    2010年10月,通过对西泉眼水库大型底栖动物采样调查,结合Bray-Curtis相似性系数聚类、多维尺度、典范对应分析,以及物种优势度指数、Margalef种类丰富度指数、Shannon-Wiener多样性指教、Pielou均匀度指数和Goodnight- Whitley生物指数等方法,分析了该水库秋季大型底栖动物群落结构特征及其与环境因子的关系,为水质保护与治理提供生物学依据.调查共采集到大型底栖动物50种.其中:节肢动物41种,占82%;环节动物7种,占14%;软体动物2种,占4%.水库优势种为纹石蛾(Hydropsyche sp.)1种、划蝽(Arctocorisa sp.)1种、中华摇蚊(Chironomus sinicus)度霍甫水丝蚓(Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri).13个采样点划分为4个区域:区域Ⅰ的生物多样性较差;区域Ⅱ的生物多样性最好;区域Ⅲ的生物多样性处于两者之间;区域Ⅳ没有采集到大型底栖动物.西泉眼水库大型底栖动物的空间分布主要受高锰酸盐指数、总磷、氨氮及亚硝酸盐氮等环境因子的影响.%An investigation was made in October 2010 to study the community structures of macrpbenthos in Xiquanyan reservoir and their relationships with environmental factors by the method of field investigation in combining with Bray-Curtis analysis, multi-dimensional scaling analysis and canonical correspondence analysis, and using the indices of McNaughton index, Margalef, Shannon-Wiener, Pielou and Goodnight-Whitley, aiming to provide a biological basis for water quality protection and management. A total of 50 macrobenthos species were collected, among which 41 species (82% of total) were arthropods, 7 species (14% ) were annelids, and 2 species (4%) were mollusks. The dominant species were Hydro-psyche nahaharai, Cenocorixa hungerford, Chironomus sinicus and Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri. The thirteen sites were classified into four groups. The biodiversity was poor in the first group; the second one had the highest biodiversity

  16. Some effects of pollutants in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, W.H.; McIntyre, A.D.; Mills, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    Summary: Pollutants tend to simplify plant and animal communities by causing a progressive loss of species. At the extreme, this leads to erosion and loss of soil fertility. Weedy, broadly adapted species increase. Among animals, carnivorous species and groups are often the first to suffer. This is partly because of their exposure at the top of the food chain, and partly, it appears, because of physiological differences. Species differences in susceptibility are abundant and are often critical. One result is that when one pest is controlled another is likely to flare up. Resistance appears commonly in insects and is known in other fast-breeding forms, including fishes, frogs, and rodents. Resistant individuals can carry toxicant loads that make them dangerous food for other animals. Some groups, including mollusks and annelids, are naturally resistant to many organohalogens and tend to accumulate them. Animals such as birds may carry lipophilic pollutants in large amounts with apparent safety until forced to draw upon their fat. They may then suffer delayed mortality, and no doubt suffer reproductive or behavioral effects at sublethal levels. Lipophilic pollutants in the brain rise when body lipids decrease and fall when body lipids increase. Mutagenesis can be caused by some common pollutants and the mutagenic properties of most chemicals are far too little known. Fortunately, common pesticides are not likely to be strong mutagens. Mutagenicity may be affecting certain long-lived and slow-breeding species in the wild, but most species have enough population turnover to swamp an occasional mutagenic event. Behavioral changes can be caused by relatively low levels of contaminants, but it is often hard to demonstrate them without using high dosages. Reproduction may or may not be affected adversely by low exposures. At certain exposures that are below the toxic levels of a chemical, a biostimulatory effect is to be expected. Food chain accumulations definitely do

  17. Biological assessment of water quality in Chaohu Lake watershed: A case study of benthic macroinvertebrate%巢湖流域水质生物学评价——以大型底栖动物为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁怡; 高峰; 邓建才; 胡维平; 高俊峰; 赵振华

    2012-01-01

    Due to the long-term exposure to natural environment, benthic macroinvertebrate can integrate the environmental physical, chemical, and biological information at different time scales, and reflect the damaged characteristics under the synergistic effects of pollutants, having been widely used in water health assessment. To understand the present status of water pollution in Chaohu Lake watershed, Anhui Province of East China, an investigation on the benthic macro-invertebrate in the watershed was carried out in April 2009. At 59 sampling sites, a total of 23 benthic macroinvertebrate species were identified, among which, 6 species were of annelids, occupying 26. 1% of the total, and 8 and 9 species were of arthropods and mollusks, occupying 34. 8% and 39. 1% of the total-, respectively. The dominant species varied greatly with the habitats , but Limnodrilus hoffineisteri, Branchiura sowerbyi, and Bellamya aeruginosa were the three dominant taxa. The integrated biological pollution index assessment revealed that the waters in the watershed were polluted in different degrees, and the pollution status was in the order of Nan-fei River > Baishishan River > Paihe River > Chaohu Lake > Zhegao River > Hangbu River > Yuxi River > Fengle River, which was basically in agreement with the water quality index assessment.%由于长期暴露在自然环境中,底栖动物可整合不同时间尺度的物理、化学及生物信息,能反映污染物质对其造成的协同危害特征,因而被广泛应用于水体健康评价.为了弄清巢湖流域水体污染状况,于2009年4月对巢湖流域大型底栖动物进行采样调查.59个采样点中,鉴定出大型底栖动物共23种,其中:环节动物门6种,占26.1%;节肢动物门8种,占34.8%;软体动物门9种,占39.1%.尽管不同栖息环境中底栖动物的优势种有较大变化,但霍甫水丝蚓(Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri)、苏氏尾鳃蚓(Branchiura sowerbyi)和铜锈环棱螺(Bellamya aeruginosa)为

  18. First report of the land planarian Diversibipalium multilineatum (Makino & Shirasawa, 1983) (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Continenticola) in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Giuseppe; Menchetti, Mattia; Sluys, Ronald; Solà, Eduard; Riutort, Marta; Tricarico, Elena; Justine, Jean-Lou; Cavigioli, Luca; Mori, Emiliano

    2016-01-26

    , GTR+I+G, was estimated to be the best with the software jModeltest 2.1.7 (Darriba et al. 2012; Guindon & Gascuel 2003), using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). MrBayes analyses were performed for 10-milion generation with sampling parameters every 103 and a 25% default burn-in value for the final trees. Convergence of the two runs (average standard deviation of split frequencies http://www.geneious.com, Kearse et al. 2012) and were found to be identical. These results indicate that the species introduced in both countries is the same, and most probably concerns the species D. multilineatum. The pathways of introduction of D. multilineatum are currently unknown, although a relationship between the horticultural trade and the introduction of alien land planarians is well known (Álvarez-Presas et al. 2014 and references therein). Here we report the first occurrence of individuals of D. multilineatum outside Asia. The GenBank sequence of D. multilineatum from South Korea is not yet supported by a published description of the specimen, while it is debatable whether South Korea should be considered part of the natural range of D. multilineatum, which only seems to include Japan. In the present paper, we consider the South Korean animal to be an introduced specimen. Soil moisture status, temperature, and food availability are considered to be the main factors determining the presence of terrestrial planarians (Boag et al. 1998); the microclimatic conditions of the Italian garden were similar to plant nurseries and greenhouses, while an abundance of food was available, such as isopods [Porcellionides pruinosus (Brandt, 1833)], oligochaetes [Dendrobaena attemsi (Michaelsen, 1902) and several juveniles of Lumbricus spp.] and gastropods [Cernuella cisalpina (Rossmassler, 1837), Cornu aspersum (O.F. Müller 1774), Deroceras reticulatum (O.F. Müller, 1774), Discus rotundatus (O.F. Müller, 1774), Limacus flavus (Linnaeus, 1758), Milax nigricans (Philippi, 1836

  19. Yiqihuoxue recipe induces differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards neurons in vitro%益气活血方体外诱导大鼠骨髓间充质干细胞向神经细胞的分化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张运克; 车志英

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that Yiqihuoxue recipe (Buyanghuanwu decoction) can inhibit cell apoptosis and antagonize free radical injury in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion models. However, there have been few reports regarding the effects of Yiqihuoxue recipe on stem cell differentiation. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of Yiqihuoxue recipe on the differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards neurons. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present controlled observational expedment based on cells was performed at the Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, i.e., the Third-Grade Laboratory of the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine between March 2006 and February 2008.MATERIALS: Twenty clean Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, aged 1-2 months, weighing 100-150 g, of either gender, were included in this study. The Chinese medicine compound Yiqihuoxue recipe was made in the Manufacturing Laboratory of the First Affiliated Hospital of Henan College of Traditional Chinese Medicine as follows. 60 g Danggui (Radix Angelicae Sinensis), 30 g Taoren(Semen Persicae), 30 g Chuanxiong(Szechwan Lovage Rhizome) were selected and mixed in 720 mL water for extract volatile oil for later use. The remaining gruffs and extract were supplemented with 1 200 g Huangqi(Radix Astragali), 60 g Chishao (Radix Paeoniae Rubra), 30 g Dilong(Lumbricus), 30 g Honghua(Flos Carthami) before 920 mL water was added. After I hour of decoction and filtering, the gruffs were decocted for another 1 hour after adding 8 640 mL water. Then all decocted liquid was merged and condensed to 600 mL and mixed with 3 mL of volatile oil and tween-80. After high-temperature and high-pressure stedlization, the products were preserved for future use. 1 mL of drug was equal to 2.4 g raw herbs. METHODS: Bone marrow mononuclear cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation. After culture, bone marrow MSCs were amplified and purified. Passage 10 cell

  20. Bioconcentration, bioaccumulation, and metabolism of pesticides in aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    detoxification and bioactivation. Hydrophobic pesticides that are expected to be highly stored in tissues would not be bioconcentrated if susceptible to biotic transformation by aquatic organisms to more rapidly metabolized to hydrophilic entities are generally less toxic. By analogy, pesticides that are metabolized to similar entities by aquatic species surely are les ecotoxicologically significant. One feature of fish and other aquatic species that makes them more relevant as targets of environmental studies and of regulation is that they may not only become contaminated by pesticides or other chemicals, but that they constitute and important part of the human diet. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the enzymes that are capable of metabolizing or otherwise assisting in the removal of xenobiotics from aquatic species. Many studies have been performed on the enzymes that are responsible for metabolizing xenobiotics. In addition to the use of conventional biochemical methods, such studies on enzymes are increasingly being conducted using immunochemical methods and amino acid or gene sequences analysis. Such studies have been performed in algae, in some aquatic macrophytes, and in bivalva, but less information is available for other aquatic species such as crustacea, annelids, aquatic insecta, and other species. Although their catabolizing activity is often lower than in mammals, oxidases, especially cytochrome P450 enzymes, play a central role in transforming pesticides in aquatic organisms. Primary metabolites, formed from such initial enzymatic action, are further conjugated with natural components such as carbohydrates, and this aids removal form the organisms. The pesticides that are susceptible to abiotic hydrolysis are generally also biotically degraded by various esterases to from hydrophilic conjugates. Reductive transformation is the main metabolic pathway for organochlorine pesticides, but less information on reductive enzymology processes is available. The

Earthworms are known to increase soil bulk density, soil porosity, mixing of organic matter, and to strengthen aggregation of soil particles. They perform important functions in the maintenance and stabilization of the soil matrix. So, earthworms can be used as indicators of the quality and health of soils. More emphasis on studying underground components, such as earthworms, is required in order to better understand the mechanisms of silvopastoral systems function. The purpose of this study was to examine the presence and the distribution of earthworms in a silvopastoral system (SSP with Grevillea robusta trees, planted in rows, in comparison with a pasture without trees (PNA. Sampling in six areas (five in SSP and one in the PNA was carried out in October, 2005 at Cianorte, Parana, Brazil. The samples (n=162 were collected at three distances from the tree rows and/or bulk terraces. Significant variation in earthworm quantity was found between the two pastures conditions. Sample variance was higher than average in all areas, indicating trend to negative binomial distribution and, consequently, to aggregate distribution of earthworms. The average number of earthworms and cocoons were higher in the PNA and we found significant differences (p < 0.01 between SSP and PNA employing a contrast analysis. The distribution of individuals were positively influenced by trees, whereas the number of individuals seemed to be influenced by the capacity of some species to colonize environments with scarce resources. So, to complement the present study it will be necessary to characterize the spatial and temporal distribution of individuals and species. Furthermore, the understanding of the interaction between Grevillea obusta and the population of annelids depends on studies of litterfall, other organisms and microclimatic conditions under canopies.  

  • Characteristics of macrobenthos community structure and its relationship to environmental factors within a typical plain river network%平原河网地区大型底栖动物群落结构及其与环境因子的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小华; 高伟; 刘文亮; 孙从军; 康丽娟

    2013-01-01

    quality agencies. The communities of benthic macroinvertebrate have distinct geographical characteristics, correspondingly reflecting the quality of natural environment and socio-economic development of surronding regions. To understand and characterize the benthic biota and elucidate their adaptive responses to environmental factors, we investigated benthic macroinvertebrate fauna at 83 sites in Shanghai city, which is a representative plain river network. In total, we found 20 taxa of the benthic macroinvertebrate: 10 Mollusca, 6 Arthropoda and 4 Annelida. Our data showed that macrobenthos community structure processed typical characteristics including simple composition, low species richness and high pollution-tolerant. Among all species, Arthropoda was found to be the most frequently detected one with highest population density. The spatial heterogeneity of macrobenthos community was linked to the regional extents of urbanization level, respectively. From the downtown area to suburb or rural areas, the number of species increased from 11 to 15 while habitat density decreased from 8776.3/m2 to 690.3/m2. Moreover, it exhibited high degree of correlation between the physicochemical indicators of water quality and the spatial distribution of macrobenthos fauna. Most species of Arthropoda are high pollution-tolerants and were absolutely dominant in the downtown area with heavier organic pollution and lower dissolved oxygen. In contrast, the species of Mollusca and Annelida predominated in the suburb and rural areas with lighter pollution and higher dissolved oxygen level. The significant negative correlation was found between population density of Oligochaetes and dissolved oxygen concentration. Taken together, Mollusks are indicator species showed relatively healthy aquatic environment and annelids such as oligochaetes are indicator species indentifying organic polluted and low-DO environments.

  • Diversity and distribution of benthic organisms in rocky intertidal zone of Jiushan Islands Nature Reserve%韭山列岛自然保护区岩相潮间带底栖生物多样性与分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺舟挺; 张洪亮; 徐开达; 刘子藩

    2012-01-01

    A survey on three rocky intertidal transects in Jiushan Islands was carried out from April to July in 2006, the qualitative and quantitative sampling of benthic organisms were made on Da-qingshan Island, Nanjiushan Islands and Ji-gushan Island. The results showed that 96 species were found, including 41 species of Mollusea, 24 species of Crustaeea, 16 species of Algae, 8 species of Annelids, 5 species of Coelenterate, and 2 species of Echinoderms. The average biomass and density were 2 556.82g . m-2 and 21 579 ind . m-2 respectively, the diversity index was 1. 039 1 on average. The species of Tetraclita japonica was dominant, and the dominant index amounted to 2. 589 6. Ji-gushan Island was compared with other seashore open islands with high salinity waters around, the species number of benthic organisms were less than Hua-niao Island and Bei-ji Island, while were much more than Da-chen Island and Bei-yushan Island. The horizontal distribution of quantities was related to ocean waves and ocean currents; the vertical distribution of quantities was related to the waves, tides and biological interspecies competition; but the seasonal changes were in connection with the temperature and the reproduction of animals and plants. Research data provided a reliable basis for ecological environment assessment, biological conservation, sustainable use of resources and scientific research.%于2006年4月和7月在大潮水期间对韭山列岛大青山、南韭山和积谷山的三个断面岩相潮间带底栖生物进行定性和定量采样,共鉴定出岩相潮间带生物96种,其中软体类41种,甲壳类24种,藻类16种,环节类8种,腔肠类5种,棘皮类2种。韭山列岛潮间带底栖生物平均生物量为2556.82g/m^2,平均栖息密度高达21579ind/m^2,平均多样性指数为1.0391,其中日本笠藤壶为绝对优势种,优势度高达2.5896。与同属于高盐度的浙江省其它开敞性岛屿比较,韭山列岛积谷