WorldWideScience

Sample records for ankle prosthesis documentation

  1. [Ankle joint prosthesis for bone defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, C

    2011-11-01

    Large defects of the talus, i.e. due to tumors, large areas of osteolysis in total ankle replacement (TAR) and posttraumatic talus body necrosis are difficult to manage. The gold standard in these circumstances is still tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis with all the negative aspects of a completely rigid hindfoot. We started 10 years ago to replace the talus by a custom-made, all cobalt-chrome implant (laser sintering). The first patient with a giant cell tumor did very well but the following patients showed all subsidence of the metal talus into the tibia due to missing bony edges. Therefore, we constructed a custom-made talus (mirrored from the healthy side) and combined it with a well functioning total ankle prosthesis (Hintegra). So far we have implanted this custom-made implant into 3 patients: the first had a chondrosarcoma of the talus (1 year follow-up), the second had massive osteolysis/necrosis of unknown origin (6 months follow-up) and the third massive osteolysis following a correct TAR (2 months follow-up). The results are very encouraging as all of the patients are practically pain free and have a good range of movement (ROM): D-P flexion 15°-0-20° but less motion in the lower ankle joint: ROM P-S 5°-0-5°. No subsidence was detected in the tibia or the calcaneus. The custom-made talus combined with the Hintegra total ankle replacement will probably be an interesting alternative to a tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis in selected cases with massive defects of the talus.

  2. The International Documentation and Evaluation System IDES: a single center observational case series for development of an ankle prosthesis documentation questionnaire and study of its feasibility and face validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudda Marcel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of implanted total ankle replacements is increasing and most articles present short- and mid-term results. Comparison of outcomes is difficult because of inconsistent terminology and different use of parameters. Materials and methods We created a module for total ankle prostheses in the framework of the International Documentation and Evaluation System (IDES. Content development was conducted with an iterative process based on a single surgeon series of 74 HINTEGRA© total ankle replacements and expert opinions. Results The IDES ankle module comprises three forms A, B and C for recording of primary (A, revision (B and followup (C procedures. 74 primary interventions, 28 revisions and 92 followups could be documented in detail with the final version of the questionnaires. Conclusion The IDES-forms facilitate a structured and standardized data collection for total ankle arthroplasties. Implemented on the academic MEMdoc portal http://www.memdoc.org of the University of Bern, all registered users can make use of IDES in its online or paper based versions.

  3. Conversion of ankle autofusion to total ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Emilie R C; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-09-01

    Few reports in the literature have described the conversion of a surgically fused ankle to a total ankle replacement. The takedown of an autofusion and conversion to a prosthesis has not been described. We report the case of a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis with an ankle autofusion fixed in equinus and severe talonavicular arthritis that was converted to ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision system. We describe the reasons why the decision was made to perform total ankle arthroplasty while concomitantly fusing the talonavicular joint, and discuss the rationale of the various surgical treatment options considered. We describe the clinical and radiographic outcomes achieved in this case. At 12 months post-operatively the patient reported significant reduction of pain, increased FAOS scores and had increased ankle range of motion.

  4. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2010-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years.

  5. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3100 Section 888.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3110 Section 888.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3120 Section 888.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an ankle joint. The...

  8. Running with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Amanda H; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a running control architecture for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that enables a transfemoral amputee to run with a biomechanically appropriate running gait and to intentionally transition between a walking and running gait. The control architecture consists firstly of a coordination level controller, which provides gait biomechanics representative of healthy running, and secondly of a gait selection controller that enables the user to intentionally transition between a running and walking gait. The running control architecture was implemented on a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints, and the efficacy of the controller was assessed in a series of running trials with a transfemoral amputee subject. Specifically, treadmill trials were conducted to assess the extent to which the coordination controller provided a biomechanically appropriate running gait. Separate trials were conducted to assess the ability of the user to consistently and reliably transition between walking and running gaits.

  9. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis for the improvement of amputee ambulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Samuel K; Herr, Hugh; Weber, Jeff; Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, control scheme, and clinical evaluation of a novel, motorized ankle-foot prosthesis, called MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis. Unlike a conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prosthesis, this prosthesis can provide active mechanical power during the stance period of walking. The basic architecture of the prosthesis is a unidirectional spring, configured in parallel with a force-controllable actuator with series elasticity. With this architecture, the anklefoot prosthesis matches the size and weight of the human ankle, and is also capable of delivering high mechanical power and torque observed in normal human walking. We also propose a biomimetic control scheme that allows the prosthesis to mimic the normal human ankle behavior during walking. To evaluate the performance of the prosthesis, we measured the rate of oxygen consumption of three unilateral transtibial amputees walking at self-selected speeds to estimate the metabolic walking economy. We find that the powered prosthesis improves amputee metabolic economy from 7% to 20% compared to the conventional passive-elastic prostheses (Flex-Foot Ceterus and Freedom Innovations Sierra), even though the powered system is twofold heavier than the conventional devices. This result highlights the benefit of performing net positive work at the ankle joint to amputee ambulation and also suggests a new direction for further advancement of an ankle-foot prosthesis.

  10. Estimation of ground reaction force and zero moment point on a powered ankle-foot prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C; Herr, Hugh; Farrell, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The ground reaction force (GRF) and the zero moment point (ZMP) are important parameters for the advancement of biomimetic control of robotic lower-limb prosthetic devices. In this document a method to estimate GRF and ZMP on a motorized ankle-foot prosthesis (MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis) is presented. The method proposed is based on the analysis of data collected from a sensory system embedded in the prosthetic device using a custom designed wearable computing unit. In order to evaluate the performance of the estimation methods described, standing and walking clinical studies were conducted on a transtibial amputee. The results were statistically compared to standard analysis methodologies employed in a gait laboratory. The average RMS error and correlation factor were calculated for all experimental sessions. By using a static analysis procedure, the estimation of the vertical component of GRF had an averaged correlation coefficient higher than 0.94. The estimated ZMP location had a distance error of less than 1 cm, equal to 4% of the anterior-posterior foot length or 12% of the medio-lateral foot width.

  11. Total ankle replacement. Early experiences with STAR prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnaghan, J. M.; Warnock, D. S.; Henderson, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Early designs of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) had a high failure rate. More recent experience with the 3-piece, meniscal bearing, total ankle replacement has been more promising. We report a review of the early results of our first 22 prostheses in 20 patients undergoing Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) in Northern Ireland. There was a mean follow-up time of 26 months. Seventeen patients are pain-free at the ankle joint during normal daily activities. Two of the early cases have required revision surgery due to technical errors. Other complications have included malleolar fractures, poor wound healing and postoperative stiffness. These early results show high levels of patient satisfaction, and we are encouraged to continue with total ankle arthroplasty. There is a steep initial learning curve and use of TAR should be restricted to foot and ankle surgeons. Images Fig 1 Figs 2a and b Figs 2 c and d PMID:16022128

  12. Simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement using a 3-component prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle replacement is an established surgical procedure in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. We analyzed complications and medium-term results in patients with simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement. Patients and methods 10 women and 16 men, mean age 60 (SD 13) years, were followed for a median of 5 (2–10) years. Results There were no intraoperative or perioperative complications, with the exception of 1 patient with prolonged wound healing. Major revision surgery was necessary in 6 of the 52 ankles, including 4 revisions of prosthetic components. The average pain score decreased from 6.9 (4−10) to 1.8 (0−4) points. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score increased from 32 (SD 14) points preoperatively to 74 (SD 12) points postoperatively. The average range of motion increased from 28° (SD 12) preoperatively to 38° (SD 9) postoperatively. All 8 categories of SF-36 score improved. Interpretation Simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement is a suitable method for restoration of function and attainment of pain relief in patients with bilateral end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. The results of this procedure, including complication rates, revision rates, and functional outcome, are comparable to those reported in patients with unilateral total ankle replacement. PMID:21999622

  13. Anatomic Total Talar Prosthesis Replacement Surgery and Ankle Arthroplasty: An Early Case Series in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about specific outcomes and early experiences of total talar prosthesis replacement surgery in the current literature, and ankle arthroplasty in Southeast Asia. This study reported on four patients with talar loss or ankle arthritis. Patients were treated with a custom total talar prosthesis (anatomic-metallic version) replacement (TPR, n=1) or with total ankle replacement (TAR, n=3). Baseline data, including Visual-Analog-Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS-FA) and Quality of Life scores via Short-Form-36 (SF-36), were collected for all patients. Mean follow-up time was 7.6 months. From preoperative to postoperative, VAS-FA score increased from 6.0 to 57.5, and SF-36 score increased from 19.3 to 73.7 in a patient with TPR. Mean VAS-FA scores increased from 51.5±15.6 to 85.7±4.7 (P=0.032), and mean SF-36 scores tended to increase from 65.2±13.3 to 99.3±1.2 (P=0.055) in TAR group. This study is the first report of anatomic-metallic TPR which appears to provide satisfactory outcomes for treatment of talar loss at a short-term follow-up. TAR also provides acceptable results for treatment of ankle arthritis at this point. PMID:25317313

  14. Design and development of ankle-foot prosthesis with delayed release of plantarflexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mitchell, MSc

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A computer-controlled mechanism that fits a standard ankle-foot prosthesis was designed to capture the absorbed energy in the ankle and delay its release until specific times in the gait cycle. This mechanism used a direct current motor to take up and hold the compression of a carbon-fiber ankle joint. Based on the timing of the contact forces between the foot and the ground, a microprocessor released the spring at preset times later in the gait cycle. This mechanism was added to a Talux prosthetic foot and was employed by a user of a conventional energy-storage ankle-foot prosthesis. His gait was recorded using a motion analysis system. Five settings: 0, 55, 65, 75, and 85 ms delay were tested on separate days, and the standard kinematic and kinetic gait data were recorded. The user reported some settings were more comfortable than others. When these preferences were tested with a randomized double-blind trial, the preferences were not consistent. A second user showed a preference for the 55 ms delay. The modifications to the device resulted in changes to the gait of the subjects, including increased cadence and kinematics of the unaffected joints and a longer, slower push from the ankle, which was noticed by both of the subjects.

  15. Anatomic total talar prosthesis replacement surgery and ankle arthroplasty: an early case series in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chayanin Angthong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about specific outcomes and early experiences of total talar prosthesis replacement surgery in the current literature, and ankle arthroplasty in Southeast Asia. This study reported on four patients with talar loss or ankle arthritis. Patients were treated with a custom total talar prosthesis (anatomic-metallic version replacement (TPR, n=1 or with total ankle replacement (TAR, n=3. Baseline data, including Visual-Analog-Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS-FA and Quality of Life scores via Short-Form-36 (SF-36, were collected for all patients. Mean follow-up time was 7.6 months. From preoperative to postoperative, VAS-FA score increased from 6.0 to 57.5, and SF-36 score increased from 19.3 to 73.7 in a patient with TPR. Mean VAS-FA scores increased from 51.5±15.6 to 85.7±4.7 (P=0.032, and mean SF-36 scores tended to increase from 65.2±13.3 to 99.3±1.2 (P=0.055 in TAR group. This study is the first report of anatomic-metallic TPR which appears to provide satisfactory outcomes for treatment of talar loss at a short-term follow-up. TAR also provides acceptable results for treatment of ankle arthritis at this point.

  16. Design and development of ankle-foot prosthesis with delayed release of plantarflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael; Craig, Katelynn; Kyberd, Peter; Biden, Edmund; Bush, Greg

    2013-01-01

    A computer-controlled mechanism that fits a standard ankle-foot prosthesis was designed to capture the absorbed energy in the ankle and delay its release until specific times in the gait cycle. This mechanism used a direct current motor to take up and hold the compression of a carbon-fiber ankle joint. Based on the timing of the contact forces between the foot and the ground, a microprocessor released the spring at preset times later in the gait cycle. This mechanism was added to a Talux prosthetic foot and was employed by a user of a conventional energy-storage ankle-foot prosthesis. His gait was recorded using a motion analysis system. Five settings: 0, 55, 65, 75, and 85 ms delay were tested on separate days, and the standard kinematic and kinetic gait data were recorded. The user reported some settings were more comfortable than others. When these preferences were tested with a randomized double-blind trial, the preferences were not consistent. A second user showed a preference for the 55 ms delay. The modifications to the device resulted in changes to the gait of the subjects, including increased cadence and kinematics of the unaffected joints and a longer, slower push from the ankle, which was noticed by both of the subjects.

  17. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-07

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation.

  18. Prosthesis preference is related to stride-to-stride fluctuations at the prosthetic ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane R. Wurdeman, CP, MSPO

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between stride-to-stride fluctuations and prosthesis preference. Thirteen individuals with unilateral, transtibial amputation consented to participate. Individuals walked on a treadmill for 3 min with their prescribed and an alternate prosthesis. Stride-to-stride fluctuations were quantified with the largest Lyapunov exponent (LyE of each joint flexion/extension time series. The change in the LyE was calculated for each major lower-limb joint for both conditions. Participants indicated preference between the prostheses on a continuous visual analog scale. The change in the LyE was correlated with the degree of preference between the two prostheses at the prosthetic ankle. The change in the LyE of the prosthetic ankle was strongly related to the degree of preference (r = 0.629, p = 0.02. Thus, stride-to-stride fluctuations, quantified by the LyE, are strongly related to the patient’s perception of the prosthesis. As a result, the LyE is the first objective measure to detect changes in gait that relate to the patient’s perception of the prosthesis. The LyE should be further examined as a potentially effective prescriptive and outcome measure in prosthetic rehabilitation.

  19. Proportional EMG control of ankle plantar flexion in a powered transtibial prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Kannape, Oliver A; Herr, Hugh M

    2013-06-01

    The human calf muscle generates 80% of the mechanical work to walk throughout stance-phase, powered plantar flexion. Powered plantar flexion is not only important for walking energetics, but also to minimize the impact on the leading leg at heel-strike. For unilateral transtibial amputees, it has recently been shown that knee load on the leading, intact limb decreases as powered plantar flexion in the trailing prosthetic ankle increases. Not surprisingly, excessive loads on the leading, intact knee are believed to be causative of knee osteoarthritis, a leading secondary impairment in lower-extremity amputees. In this study, we hypothesize that a transtibial amputee can learn how to control a powered ankle-foot prosthesis using a volitional electromyographic (EMG) control to directly modulate ankle powered plantar flexion. We here present preliminary data, and find that an amputee participant is able to modulate toe-off angle, net ankle work and peak power across a broad range of walking speeds by volitionally modulating calf EMG activity. The modulation of these key gait parameters is shown to be comparable to the dynamical response of the same powered prosthesis controlled intrinsically (No EMG), suggesting that transtibial amputees can achieve an adequate level of powered plantar flexion controllability using direct volitional EMG control.

  20. Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the contralateral limb: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David; Herr, Hugh

    2013-06-01

    Lower-extremity amputees encounter a series of stress-related challenges. Among them is an increased risk of chronic joint disorders. For unilateral, transtibial amputees, we hypothesize that increasing the power output of the trailing, ankle-foot prosthesis during powered plantar flexion could mitigate kinetic loading applied to the leading, contralateral leg during walking. Here, we present a case series that analyzes kinetic factors of unilateral, transtibial amputee gait and forms a comparison between two types of ankle prostheses with varying power outputs. The factors examined here are impact resultant force, peak foot pressure at heel-strike, step-to-step transition work, and knee external adduction moment. The two prostheses are the amputee participant's daily-use passive ankle-foot prosthesis and the BiOM powered ankle-foot prosthesis capable of biologically accurate powered plantar flexion during late stance. In a preliminary study on two transtibial amputees walking over level terrain at a controlled speed (1.25 m/s), we observed average reductions of 8% in peak impact resultant force, 18% in impact resultant force loading rate, 8% in peak heel-strike foot pressure, and 15% in the 1(st) peak knee external adduction moment when the powered ankle-foot prosthesis was compared to the conventional passive prosthesis. Overall, our preliminary results suggest that more biomimetic prosthetic ankle-foot push-off during late stance may limit leading-leg musculoskeletal stress in walking.

  1. Within-socket myoelectric prediction of continuous ankle kinematics for control of a powered transtibial prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Samuel; Silver-Thorn, Barbara; Voglewede, Philip; Beardsley, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Powered robotic prostheses create a need for natural-feeling user interfaces and robust control schemes. Here, we examined the ability of a nonlinear autoregressive model to continuously map the kinematics of a transtibial prosthesis and electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded within socket to the future estimates of the prosthetic ankle angle in three transtibial amputees. Approach. Model performance was examined across subjects during level treadmill ambulation as a function of the size of the EMG sampling window and the temporal ‘prediction’ interval between the EMG/kinematic input and the model’s estimate of future ankle angle to characterize the trade-off between model error, sampling window and prediction interval. Main results. Across subjects, deviations in the estimated ankle angle from the actual movement were robust to variations in the EMG sampling window and increased systematically with prediction interval. For prediction intervals up to 150 ms, the average error in the model estimate of ankle angle across the gait cycle was less than 6°. EMG contributions to the model prediction varied across subjects but were consistently localized to the transitions to/from single to double limb support and captured variations from the typical ankle kinematics during level walking. Significance. The use of an autoregressive modeling approach to continuously predict joint kinematics using natural residual muscle activity provides opportunities for direct (transparent) control of a prosthetic joint by the user. The model’s predictive capability could prove particularly useful for overcoming delays in signal processing and actuation of the prosthesis, providing a more biomimetic ankle response.

  2. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis to assist level-ground and stair-descent gaits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Samuel; Berniker, Max; Herr, Hugh

    2008-05-01

    The human ankle varies impedance and delivers net positive work during the stance period of walking. In contrast, commercially available ankle-foot prostheses are passive during stance, causing many clinical problems for transtibial amputees, including non-symmetric gait patterns, higher gait metabolism, and poorer shock absorption. In this investigation, we develop and evaluate a myoelectric-driven, finite state controller for a powered ankle-foot prosthesis that modulates both impedance and power output during stance. The system employs both sensory inputs measured local to the external prosthesis, and myoelectric inputs measured from residual limb muscles. Using local prosthetic sensing, we first develop two finite state controllers to produce biomimetic movement patterns for level-ground and stair-descent gaits. We then employ myoelectric signals as control commands to manage the transition between these finite state controllers. To transition from level-ground to stairs, the amputee flexes the gastrocnemius muscle, triggering the prosthetic ankle to plantar flex at terminal swing, and initiating the stair-descent state machine algorithm. To transition back to level-ground walking, the amputee flexes the tibialis anterior muscle, triggering the ankle to remain dorsiflexed at terminal swing, and initiating the level-ground state machine algorithm. As a preliminary evaluation of clinical efficacy, we test the device on a transtibial amputee with both the proposed controller and a conventional passive-elastic control. We find that the amputee can robustly transition between the finite state controllers through direct muscle activation, allowing rapid transitioning from level-ground to stair walking patterns. Additionally, we find that the proposed finite state controllers result in a more biomimetic ankle response, producing net propulsive work during level-ground walking and greater shock absorption during stair descent. The results of this study highlight the

  3. Control of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis based on a neuromuscular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilenberg, Michael F; Geyer, Hartmut; Herr, Hugh

    2010-04-01

    Control schemes for powered ankle-foot prostheses rely upon fixed torque-ankle state relationships obtained from measurements of intact humans walking at target speeds and across known terrains. Although effective at their intended gait speed and terrain, these controllers do not allow for adaptation to environmental disturbances such as speed transients and terrain variation. Here we present an adaptive muscle-reflex controller, based on simulation studies, that utilizes an ankle plantar flexor comprising a Hill-type muscle with a positive force feedback reflex. The model's parameters were fitted to match the human ankle's torque-angle profile as obtained from level-ground walking measurements of a weight and height-matched intact subject walking at 1 m/s. Using this single parameter set, clinical trials were conducted with a transtibial amputee walking on level ground, ramp ascent, and ramp descent conditions. During these trials, an adaptation of prosthetic ankle work was observed in response to ground slope variation, in a manner comparable to intact subjects, without the difficulties of explicit terrain sensing. Specifically, the energy provided by the prosthesis was directly correlated to the ground slope angle. This study highlights the importance of neuromuscular controllers for enhancing the adaptiveness of powered prosthetic devices across varied terrain surfaces.

  4. Contributions of knee swing initiation and ankle plantar flexion to the walking mechanics of amputees using a powered prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Recently developed powered prostheses are capable of producing near-physiological joint torque at the knee and/or ankle joints. Based on previous studies of biological joint impedance and the mechanics of able-bodied gait, an impedance-based controller has been developed for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that integrates knee swing initiation and powered plantar flexion in late stance with increasing ankle stiffness throughout stance. In this study, five prosthesis configuration conditions were tested to investigate the individual contributions of each sub-strategy to the overall walking mechanics of four unilateral transfemoral amputees as they completed a clinical 10-m walk test using a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The baseline condition featured constant ankle stiffness and no swing initiation or powered plantar flexion. The four remaining conditions featured knee swing initiation alone (SI) or in combination with powered plantar flexion (SI+PF), increasing ankle stiffness (SI+IK), or both (SI+PF+IK). Self-selected walking speed did not significantly change between conditions, although subjects tended to walk the slowest in the baseline condition compared to conditions with swing initiation. The addition of powered plantar flexion resulted in significantly higher ankle power generation in late stance irrespective of ankle stiffness. The inclusion of swing initiation resulted in a significantly more flexed knee at toe off and a significantly higher average extensor knee torque following toe off. Identifying individual contributions of intrinsic control strategies to prosthesis biomechanics could help inform the refinement of impedance-based prosthesis controllers and simplify future designs of prostheses and lower-limb assistive devices alike.

  5. [Three-dimensional analysis of the foot following implantation of a HINTEGRA ankle prosthesis: evaluation with the Heidelberg foot model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, S; Wolf, S; Döderlein, L

    2006-05-01

    Detailed foot kinematics after total ankle replacement has not yet been investigated. In this study 11 patients with unilateral Hintegra ankle prosthesis were analysed with the Heidelberg Foot Model. This model measures the kinematics of the fore-, mid- and hindfoot in three clinical planes. Moreover, the kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle was captured. A diminished ROM was found in all foot segments investigated. The timing of the kinematics between sound and involved side appeared similar. A limitation in the hindfoot mobility, as experienced after ankle arthrodesis, was not observed. However, a careful hindfoot alignment is essential for optimal foot function, and previous malalignments should be corrected. Concerning the kinetics, the replaced ankle showed a decreased power generation compensated by an increase in power in the ipsilateral knee. For a more detailed evaluation, further studies are required which include pre- and postoperative data and also take into account different types of prostheses.

  6. 主动型仿生踝关节假肢的设计%Design of powered bionic ankle prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵改平; 曹帅; 尚昆; 阮超; 赵伟钦; 王祯祥; 郭丹

    2011-01-01

    背景:与髋、膝关节假肢设计相对比较成熟的技术相比,踝关节作为人体下肢关节的重要组成部分,也是最为灵活的部分,一直以来研究都比较滞后,相关的假肢踝关节产品未能很好的满足假肢患者的需求.目的:从生物力学、解剖学和生理学角度出发,设计和研制出能在矢状面内做屈伸运动的主动型仿生踝关节假肢装置.方法:根据仿生学原理和人体踝关节在步态行走时的受力特点和生理功能,建立二自由度的主动型仿生踝关节的力学模型,设计假肢踝关节的机械结构与控制系统,其主要部件包括仿生踝关节系统、辅助装置、数据控制系统和数据采集系统.结果与结论:利用研制出的踝关节装置进行系统测试,使用正常人行走时的踝关节角度数据作为输入信号,以步进电机作为动力驱动实现模拟踝关节的运动,通过数据采集系统获得输出的角度数据.测试结果表明仿生踝关节能够跟随输入角度数据运动,实现了仿生踝关节跟随运动的预期目标.%BACKGROUND: Ankle prosthesis has been researched as a focus point for improving living quality of disabled persons suffers from lower limb.OBJECTIVE: To design and manufacture the powered bionic ankle prosthesis based on biomechanics, anatomy and physiology theories.METHODS: According to bionics principle, the stress characteristics and physiological functions of the human ankle joint during gait analysis, mechanics model of ankle prosthesis with two-degree-of-freedom motion is established and mechanical structure and control system of ankle prosthesis are designed. The bionic ankle prosthesis, which includes bionic ankle system, auxiliary devices, data control and data acquisition systems, can do flexion and extension in the sagittal plane.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A system testing was performed based on the ankle prosthesis device. The normal human ankle walking gait data as the input signal

  7. Configuring a powered knee and ankle prosthesis for transfemoral amputees within five specific ambulation modes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M Simon

    Full Text Available Lower limb prostheses that can generate net positive mechanical work may restore more ambulation modes to amputees. However, configuration of these devices imposes an additional burden on clinicians relative to conventional prostheses; devices for transfemoral amputees that require configuration of both a knee and an ankle joint are especially challenging. In this paper, we present an approach to configuring such powered devices. We developed modified intrinsic control strategies--which mimic the behavior of biological joints, depend on instantaneous loads within the prosthesis, or set impedance based on values from previous states, as well as a set of starting configuration parameters. We developed tables that include a list of desired clinical gait kinematics and the parameter modifications necessary to alter them. Our approach was implemented for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis in five ambulation modes (level-ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent. The strategies and set of starting configuration parameters were developed using data from three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations who had previous experience using the device; this approach was then tested on three novice unilateral transfemoral amputees. Only 17% of the total number of parameters (i.e., 24 of the 140 had to be independently adjusted for each novice user to achieve all five ambulation modes and the initial accommodation period (i.e., time to configure the device for all modes was reduced by 56%, to 5 hours or less. This approach and subsequent reduction in configuration time may help translate powered prostheses into a viable clinical option where amputees can more quickly appreciate the benefits such devices can provide.

  8. Configuring a powered knee and ankle prosthesis for transfemoral amputees within five specific ambulation modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M; Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Finucane, Suzanne B; Lipschutz, Robert D; Young, Aaron J; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses that can generate net positive mechanical work may restore more ambulation modes to amputees. However, configuration of these devices imposes an additional burden on clinicians relative to conventional prostheses; devices for transfemoral amputees that require configuration of both a knee and an ankle joint are especially challenging. In this paper, we present an approach to configuring such powered devices. We developed modified intrinsic control strategies--which mimic the behavior of biological joints, depend on instantaneous loads within the prosthesis, or set impedance based on values from previous states, as well as a set of starting configuration parameters. We developed tables that include a list of desired clinical gait kinematics and the parameter modifications necessary to alter them. Our approach was implemented for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis in five ambulation modes (level-ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). The strategies and set of starting configuration parameters were developed using data from three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations who had previous experience using the device; this approach was then tested on three novice unilateral transfemoral amputees. Only 17% of the total number of parameters (i.e., 24 of the 140) had to be independently adjusted for each novice user to achieve all five ambulation modes and the initial accommodation period (i.e., time to configure the device for all modes) was reduced by 56%, to 5 hours or less. This approach and subsequent reduction in configuration time may help translate powered prostheses into a viable clinical option where amputees can more quickly appreciate the benefits such devices can provide.

  9. Passive Ankle-Foot Prosthesis Prototype with Extended Push-Off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Brackx

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Current commercially available prosthetic feet have succeeded in decreasing the metabolic cost and increasing the speed of walking compared to walking with conventional, mostly solid prosthetic feet. However, there is still a large discrepancy when compared with a non‐disabled gait, and the walking pattern remains strongly disturbed. During the stance phase of the leg, these prostheses store and return energy using a spring element. This spring returns to its neutral position, which generates a push‐off, but the foot extends much less than with a non‐disabled gait. The walking pattern may improve with a more extended push‐off. In this paper, we present a passive ankle‐foot prosthesis that aims to deliver an extended ankle push‐off using a specific planetary gearbox arrangement and locking mechanisms in order to release the energy in the spring over the full natural stretching of the ankle. In recent years, both powered and passive prosthetic devices have been developed. The prosthetic foot presented in this paper is a passive system, such that it has the possibility to be made lighter and more robust than, for example, one driven by an electric motor. Preliminary walking experiments were conducted with a transfemoral amputee.

  10. A universal ankle-foot prosthesis emulator for human locomotion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Joshua M; Collins, Steven H

    2014-03-01

    Robotic prostheses have the potential to significantly improve mobility for people with lower-limb amputation. Humans exhibit complex responses to mechanical interactions with these devices, however, and computational models are not yet able to predict such responses meaningfully. Experiments therefore play a critical role in development, but have been limited by the use of product-like prototypes, each requiring years of development and specialized for a narrow range of functions. Here we describe a robotic ankle-foot prosthesis system that enables rapid exploration of a wide range of dynamical behaviors in experiments with human subjects. This emulator comprises powerful off-board motor and control hardware, a flexible Bowden cable tether, and a lightweight instrumented prosthesis, resulting in a combination of low mass worn by the human (0.96 kg) and high mechatronic performance compared to prior platforms. Benchtop tests demonstrated closed-loop torque bandwidth of 17 Hz, peak torque of 175 Nm, and peak power of 1.0 kW. Tests with an anthropomorphic pendulum "leg" demonstrated low interference from the tether, less than 1 Nm about the hip. This combination of low worn mass, high bandwidth, high torque, and unrestricted movement makes the platform exceptionally versatile. To demonstrate suitability for human experiments, we performed preliminary tests in which a subject with unilateral transtibial amputation walked on a treadmill at 1.25 ms-1 while the prosthesis behaved in various ways. These tests revealed low torque tracking error (RMS error of 2.8 Nm) and the capacity to systematically vary work production or absorption across a broad range (from -5 to 21 J per step). These results support the use of robotic emulators during early stage assessment of proposed device functionalities and for scientific study of fundamental aspects of human-robot interaction. The design of simple, alternate end-effectors would enable studies at other joints or with

  11. Increasing ankle push-off work with a powered prosthesis does not necessarily reduce metabolic rate for transtibial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Roberto E; Caputo, Joshua M; Collins, Steven H

    2016-10-03

    Amputees using passive ankle-foot prostheses tend to expend more metabolic energy during walking than non-amputees, and reducing this cost has been a central motivation for the development of active ankle-foot prostheses. Increased push-off work at the end of stance has been proposed as a way to reduce metabolic energy use, but the effects of push-off work have not been tested in isolation. In this experiment, participants with unilateral transtibial amputation (N=6) walked on a treadmill at a constant speed while wearing a powered prosthesis emulator. The prosthesis delivered different levels of ankle push-off work across conditions, ranging from the value for passive prostheses to double the value for non-amputee walking, while all other prosthesis mechanics were held constant. Participants completed six acclimation sessions prior to a data collection in which metabolic rate, kinematics, kinetics, muscle activity and user satisfaction were recorded. Metabolic rate was not affected by net prosthesis work rate (p=0.5; R(2)=0.007). Metabolic rate, gait mechanics and muscle activity varied widely across participants, but no participant had lower metabolic rate with higher levels of push-off work. User satisfaction was affected by push-off work (p=0.002), with participants preferring values of ankle push-off slightly higher than in non-amputee walking, possibly indicating other benefits. Restoring or augmenting ankle push-off work is not sufficient to improve energy economy for lower-limb amputees. Additional necessary conditions might include alternate timing or control, individualized tuning, or particular subject characteristics.

  12. Walking cycle control for an active ankle prosthesis with one degree of freedom monitored from a personal computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero Andrés, Guzhñay; Arévalo Luis, Calle; Abad Julio, Zambrano

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a fuzzy control algorithm for human walking cycle of an active ankle prosthesis for people who have suffered amputation of the lower limb, the system has one degree of freedom in the sagittal plane. Also, a biomechanical analysis of foot and ankle is shown to define the phases of plantar support and swinging. The used actuator is an intelligent servomotor, Dynamixel MX-106T which has torque, current and position feedback, among others, allowing real-time telemetry of the prototype implemented in a microcontroller system.

  13. Design and Preliminary Evaluation of a Two DOFs Cable-Driven Ankle-Foot Prosthesis with Active Dorsiflexion-Plantarflexion and Inversion-Eversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Dallali, Houman; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an ankle-foot robotic prosthesis controllable in the sagittal and frontal planes. The prosthesis was designed to meet the mechanical characteristics of the human ankle including power, range of motion, and weight. To transfer the power from the motors and gearboxes to the ankle-foot mechanism, a Bowden cable system was used. The Bowden cable allows for optimal placement of the motors and gearboxes in order to improve gait biomechanics such as the metabolic energy cost and gait asymmetry during locomotion. Additionally, it allows flexibility in the customization of the device to amputees with different residual limb sizes. To control the prosthesis, impedance controllers in both sagittal and frontal planes were developed. The impedance controllers used torque feedback from strain gages installed on the foot. Preliminary evaluation was performed to verify the capability of the prosthesis to track the kinematics of the human ankle in two degrees of freedom (DOFs), the mechanical efficiency of the Bowden cable transmission, and the ability of the prosthesis to modulate the impedance of the ankle. Moreover, the system was characterized by describing the relationship between the stiffness of the impedance controllers to the actual stiffness of the ankle. Efficiency estimation showed 85.4% efficiency in the Bowden cable transmission. The prosthesis was capable of properly mimicking human ankle kinematics and changing its mechanical impedance in two DOFs in real time with a range of stiffness sufficient for normal human walking. In dorsiflexion-plantarflexion (DP), the stiffness ranged from 0 to 236 Nm/rad and in inversion-eversion (IE), the stiffness ranged from 1 to 33 Nm/rad.

  14. Assessment of AK (Above Knee) Prosthesis with Different Ankle Assembly Using GRF Pattern in Stance Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Sung-Jae; Bae, Ha-Suk

    In this study, ground reaction force (GRF), absolute symmetry index (ASI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assemblies were investigated by biomechanical evaluation of above knee amputees. In the experiments, 37 normal male volunteers, two male and two female Above Knee (AK) amputees GRF data were tested with fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assembly. A gait analysis was carried out to derive the ratio of GRF to weight as the percentage of total stance phase for ten points. The results showed that fixed-axis ankle assembly was superior to other two ankle assemblies for forwarding and braking forces. Multi-axis ankle was relatively superior to other two ankle assemblies for gait balancing and movement of the mass center. Single-axis ankle was relatively superior to the other two ankle assemblies for CV and ASI of GRF.

  15. The feasibility of total ankle prosthesis for severe arthropathy in haemophilia and prothrombin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, H.J. van der; Nováková, I.R.O.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de

    2006-01-01

    The standard treatment for end-stage arthropathy of the ankle joint in haemophilia has been fusion of the ankle joint. Total ankle replacement is used in osteoarthritis and especially in rheumatoid arthritis with good medium-term results. In this case series three patients are being described, in wh

  16. Strategies to reduce the configuration time for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis across multiple ambulation modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M; Fey, Nicholas P; Finucane, Suzanne B; Lipschutz, Robert D; Hargrove, Levi J

    2013-06-01

    Recently developed powered lower limb prostheses allow users to more closely mimic the kinematics and kinetics of non-amputee gait. However, configuring such a device, in particular a combined powered knee and ankle, for individuals with a transfemoral amputation is challenging. Previous attempts have relied on empirical tuning of all control parameters. This paper describes modified stance phase control strategies - which mimic the behavior of biological joints or depend on the instantaneous loads within the prosthesis - developed to reduce the number of control parameters that require individual tuning. Three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations walked with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis across five ambulation modes (level ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). Starting with a nominal set of impedance parameters, the modified control strategies were applied and the devices were individually tuned such that all subjects achieved comfortable and safe ambulation. The control strategies drastically reduced the number of independent parameters that needed to be tuned for each subject (i.e., to 21 parameters instead of a possible 140 or approximately 4 parameters per mode) while relative amplitudes and timing of kinematic and kinetic data remained similar to those previously reported and to those of non-amputee subjects. Reducing the time necessary to configure a powered device across multiple ambulation modes may allow users to more quickly realize the benefits such powered devices can provide.

  17. Evaluation of a Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis during Slope Ascent Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Passive prosthetic feet lack active plantarflexion and push-off power resulting in gait deviations and compensations by individuals with transtibial amputation (TTA) during slope ascent. We sought to determine the effect of active ankle plantarflexion and push-off power provided by a powered prosthetic ankle-foot (PWR) on lower extremity compensations in individuals with unilateral TTA as they walked up a slope. We hypothesized that increased ankle plantarflexion and push-off power would reduce compensations commonly observed with a passive, energy-storing-returning prosthetic ankle-foot (ESR). We compared the temporal spatial, kinematic, and kinetic measures of ten individuals with TTA (age: 30.2 ± 5.3 yrs) to matched abled-bodied (AB) individuals during 5° slope ascent. The TTA group walked with an ESR and separately with a PWR. The PWR produced significantly greater prosthetic ankle plantarflexion and push-off power generation compared to an ESR and more closely matched AB values. The PWR functioned similar to a passive ESR device when transitioning onto the prosthetic limb due to limited prosthetic dorsiflexion, which resulted in similar deviations and compensations. In contrast, when transitioning off the prosthetic limb, increased ankle plantarflexion and push-off power provided by the PWR contributed to decreased intact limb knee extensor power production, lessening demand on the intact limb knee. PMID:27977681

  18. Proportional EMG control of ankle plantar flexion in a powered transtibial prosthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing; Kannape, Oliver; Herr, Hugh M.

    2013-01-01

    The human calf muscle generates 80% of the mechanical work to walk throughout stance-phase, powered plantar flexion. Powered plantar flexion is not only important for walking energetics, but also to minimize the impact on the leading leg at heel-strike. For unilateral transtibial amputees, it has recently been shown that knee load on the leading, intact limb decreases as powered plantar flexion in the trailing prosthetic ankle increases. Not surprisingly, excessive loads on the leading, intac...

  19. 人工全踝关节置换假体类型及其评价系统%Prosthesis type and evaluation system of artificial total ankle replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴剑; 刘艳西; 郑勇; 鲍同柱

    2011-01-01

    背景:人工全踝关节置换在国内外已相继开展,其中远期疗效不甚满意.人工踝关节假体的设计研究与开发、疗效评价系统的优化和规范与其中远期疗效密切相关.目的:分析近年来人工踝关节假体设计与开发及踝关节置换后疗效评价系统的研究进展.方法:电子检索CNKI数据库、万方数据库、维普数据库等中文数据库和PubMed数据库中1980/2010关于人工踝关节置换假体类型与评价系统的相关综述和研究报告,在标题和关键词中以"踝关节,置换术,假体,评价系统"或"ankle joint,replacement,prosthesis,evaluation system"为检索词进行检索.选择文章内容与人工踝关节置换相关,同一领域文献则选择近期发表或发表在权威杂志上的文章,分析踝关节置换假体类型与评价系统,适应症与禁忌症的研究进展.结果与结论:共纳入人工踝关节置换假体研究与评价系统的相关文献33篇.人工关节置换治疗疼痛踝关节是一直探索不辍的课题,人工踝关节置换术的中远期疗效有赖于踝关节假体的设计研究与开发、疗效评价系统的优化和规范,人工踝关节应该有较大的改进和提高,使人工全踝关节置换达到更优的疗效和更高的生存率,同时应有更合理和规范的评价系统来评价疗效.%BACKGROUND: Artificial total ankle joint replacement has carried out progressively at home and abroad, it does not give satisfactory medium -long term effect. The design and development of ankle joint prosthesis and optimization of efficacy evaluation system are closely related to medium-long term effect.OBJECTIVE: To explore the advance of design and development of artificial ankle joint prosthesis, and the advance of efficacy evaluation system in ankle joint replacement.METHODS: A computer online search was performed to find papers concerning review and research report of type of artificial an kle joint prosthesis and efficacy

  20. Poor prosthesis survival and function after component exchange of total ankle prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricsson, Anders; Karlsson, Magnus K; Magnusson, Håkan; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Carlsson, Åke; Rosengren, Björn E

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In failed total ankle replacements (TARs), fusion is often the procedure of preference; the outcome after exchanging prosthetic components is debated. We analyzed prosthetic survival, self-reported function, and patient satisfaction after component exchange. Patients and methods We identified patients in the Swedish Ankle Registry who underwent exchange of a tibial and/or talar component between January 1, 1993 and July 1, 2013 and estimated prosthetic survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis. We evaluated the patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) SEFAS, EQ-5D, EQ-VAS, SF-36, and patient satisfaction by direct questions. Results 69 patients underwent revision TAR median 22 (0–110) months after the primary procedure. 24 of these failed again after median 26 (1–110) months. Survival analysis of revision TAR showed a 5-year survival rate of 76% and a 10-year survival of 55%. 29 patients with first revision TAR in situ answered the PROMs at mean 8 (1–17) years after revision and had the following mean scores: SEFAS 22, SF-36 physical 37 and mental 49, EQ-5D index 0.6, and EQ-VAS 64. 15 of the patients were satisfied, 5 were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, and 9 were dissatisfied. Interpretation Revision TAR had a 10-year survival of 55%, which is lower than the 10-year survival of 74% for primary TAR reported from the same registry. Only half of the patients were satisfied. Future studies should show which, if any, patients benefit from revision TAR and which patients should rather be fused directly. PMID:25673048

  1. Total ankle arthroplasty in end-stage ankle arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Demetracopoulos, Constantine A.; Halloran, James P.; Maloof, Paul; Samuel B Adams; Parekh, Selene G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in ankle prosthesis design, combined with improved surgical techniques for correction of coronal plane deformity and ligamentous balancing, have led to a resurgence of interest in total ankle arthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. Although ankle arthrodesis has long been considered the gold standard treatment for ankle arthritis, recent studies have shown that patients who undergo total ankle replacement have equivalent pain relief and improved functi...

  2. Myoelectric neural interface enables accurate control of a virtual multiple degree-of-freedom foot-ankle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, D C; Lipschutz, R D; Finucane, S B; Hargrove, L J

    2013-06-01

    Technological advances have enabled clinical use of powered foot-ankle prostheses. Although the fundamental purposes of such devices are to restore natural gait and reduce energy expenditure by amputees during walking, these powered prostheses enable further restoration of ankle function through possible voluntary control of the powered joints. Such control would greatly assist amputees in daily tasks such as reaching, dressing, or simple limb repositioning for comfort. A myoelectric interface between an amputee and the powered foot-ankle prostheses may provide the required control signals for accurate control of multiple degrees of freedom of the ankle joint. Using a pattern recognition classifier we compared the error rates of predicting up to 7 different ankle-joint movements using electromyographic (EMG) signals collected from below-knee, as well as below-knee combined with above-knee muscles of 12 trans-tibial amputee and 5 control subjects. Our findings suggest very accurate (5.3 ± 0.5%SE mean error) real-time control of a 1 degree of freedom (DOF) of ankle joint can be achieved by amputees using EMG from as few as 4 below-knee muscles. Reliable control (9.8 ± 0.7%SE mean error) of 3 DOFs can be achieved using EMG from 8 below-knee and above-knee muscles.

  3. Artroplastia total de tornozelo: experiência brasileira com a prótese HINTEGRA Total ankle replacement: Brazilian experience with the HINTEGRA prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Nery

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A artrose do tornozelo vem se tornando mais comum a cada dia. A busca por soluções que preservem a função articular fez surgir uma nova geração de próteses com três componentes e maior liberdade de movimento. Neste trabalho, apresentam-se os resultados obtidos em 10 pacientes tratados com a prótese HINTEGRA (Integra, New Deal, em ação conjunta dos Grupos do Tornozelo e Pé do DOT da Unifesp-Escola Paulista de Medicina e IOT da Faculdade de Medicina da USP-Universidade de São Paulo. Os 10 pacientes (seis mulheres e quatro homens, com idade variando de 29 a 66 anos, foram submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico segundo a técnica de Hinterman entre janeiro e junho de 2005. Foram avaliados em intervalos predeterminados e os dados foram submetidos à análise estatística. A mobilidade do tornozelo apresentou melhora significante com a cirurgia realizada. Radiologicamente, não foram detectados sinais de soltura ou falhas nos componentes prostéticos de nenhum dos pacientes estudados. A taxa de complicações nessa amostra foi alta, mas equivalente às de outros autores e representa diretamente a curva de aprendizado relacionada com esse tipo de procedimento. Ao final de quatro anos, observaram-se significativa redução da dor e melhora do padrão funcional dos pacientes com os escores da AOFAS e de Hinterman, apontando para 20% de excelentes, 70% de bons e 10% de maus resultados. O tratamento da artrose do tornozelo através da artroplastia total com o modelo HINTEGRA, foi capaz de oferecer bons resultados no tempo médio de observação de quatro anos.Ankle arthritis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved in ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal, a joint action of the Foot and Ankle Teams of DOT of Unifesp - Escola Paulista de

  4. 全踝关节置换治疗创伤性踝关节炎%Total ankle replacement with a STAR prosthesis for post-traumatic ankle arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武勇; 王岩; 王金辉; 龚晓峰; 王满宜

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨全踝关节置换治疗创伤性踝关节炎的早期临床疗效.方法 2005年1月至2010年1月采用全踝关节置换治疗55例创伤性踝关节炎患者,其中52例获得随访,男28例,女24例;平均年龄56.2岁(36~79岁).手术采用STAR假体.52例患者术前和末次随访时均行Kofoed踝关节评分和美国足踝外科协会(AOFAS)踝与后足评分,并对比术前与末次随访时的评分结果. 结果 52例患者术后获6~60个月(平均32个月)随访.3例患者术后出现切口皮缘浅表坏死,经换药后愈合;4例术中截骨时发生内、外踝骨折;1例术后出现假体滑动半月板失效断裂.末次随访时踝关节活动度较术前增加0~10°.52例患者末次随访时Kofoed踝关节评分平均为(86.0±9.3)分,与术前[(51.0±13.5)分]比较差异有统计学意义(t=28.10,P=0.000);AOFAS踝与后足评分平均为(88.0±8.2)分,与术前[(66.0±13.5)分]比较差异有统计学意义(t=21.60,P=0.000).52例患者中,术后无疼痛19例,轻度疼痛27例,中度疼痛6例.42例患者表示满意或一般,10例表示不满意,满意率为80.8%. 结论 全踝关节置换治疗创伤性踝关节炎在减轻疼痛等方面取得了令人鼓舞的结果,但在临床使用上尚存争议.%Objective To explore the clinical results of total ankle replacement with a STAR prosthesis for the treatment of post-traumatic ankle arthritis. Methods From January 2005 to January 2010,55 patients with post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis were treated by total ankle replacement. Fifty-two patients,28 males and 24 females with an average age of 56. 2 years (range, 36 to 79 years), obtained follow-up. The STAR prosthesis was used in the operation. They were evaluated by Kofoed and American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score systems preoperatively and at the last follow-up. Results The patients got an avenge follow-up of 32 months (range, 6 to 60 months). Three patients had minor wound edge necroses and healed

  5. Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the unaffected leg during level-ground walking

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowski, Alena M.; D’Andrea, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Background People with a lower-extremity amputation that use conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prostheses encounter a series of stress-related challenges during walking such as greater forces on their unaffected leg, and may thus be predisposed to secondary musculoskeletal injuries such as chronic joint disorders. Specifically, people with a unilateral transtibial amputation have an increased susceptibility to knee osteoarthritis, especially in their unaffected leg. Previous studies hav...

  6. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections in ...

  7. Does it pay to have a damper in a powered ankle prosthesis? A power-energy perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamy, Mahdy; Grimmer, Martin; Rinderknecht, Stephan; Seyfarth, Andre

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we investigated on peak power (PP) and energy (ER) requirements for different active ankle actuation concepts that can have both elasticity and damping characteristics. A lower PP or ER requirement is an important issue because it will lead to a smaller motor or battery. In addition to spring, these actuation concepts are assumed to have (passive) damper in series (series elastic-damper actuator SEDA) or parallel (parallel elastic-damper actuator PEDA) to the motor. For SEA (series elastic actuator), SEDA and PEDA, we calculated the required minimum motor PP and ER in different human gaits: normal level walking, ascending and descending the stairs. We found that for level walking and ascending the stairs, the SEA concept, and for descending, the SEDA, were the favorable concepts to reduce required minimum PP and ER in comparison to a DD (direct drive) concept. In SEDA concept, the minimum PP could be reduced to half of what SEA would require. Nevertheless, it was found that spring was always required, however damper showed 'task specific' advantages. As a result, if a simple design perspective is in mind, from PP-ER viewpoint, SEA could be the best compromise to be used for different above-mentioned gaits. For SEDA or PEDA concepts, a controllable damper should be used. In addition, our results show that it is beneficial to select spring stiffness in SEA, based on level walking gait. The PP and ER requirements would increase very slightly for stairs ascending, and to some extent (10.5%) for descending as a consequence of this selection. In contrast, stiffness selection based on stair ascending or descending, increases the PP requirements of level walking more noticeably (17-24%).

  8. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed.

  9. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Ingraham

    Full Text Available Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed.

  10. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed. PMID:26807889

  11. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. Mann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ankle fusion has long been the standard of treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis, and a successful arthroplasty has been a long sought alternative. It is a motion sparing procedure and may greatly reduce the potential for adjacent level degeneration as seen with arthrodesis. The typical candidate for arthroplasty is a healthy low demand patient, although the indications are widening as the success of the procedure has increased. Nevertheless, it is not fail-safe, technical expertise and experience are necessary to achieve a successful result. We have been treating ankle arthritis with the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR ankle replacement prosthesis for over ten years. We believe that arthroplasty will surpass arthrodesis as the standard of care for severe ankle arthritis.

  12. Total ankle replacement using HINTEGRA, an unconstrained, three-component system: surgical technique and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, Alexej; Knupp, Markus; Henninger, Heath B; Zwicky, Lukas; Hintermann, Beat

    2012-12-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) has become a valuable treatment option in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. One popular 3-component system, the HINTEGRA TAR, is an unconstrained system that provides inversion-eversion stability. More natural biomechanics of the replaced ankle may be expected when anatomic considerations drive prosthesis design. The HINTEGRA prosthesis includes 2 anatomically contoured metal components and a polyethylene insert, providing axial rotation and physiologic flexion-extension mobility. This article describes the HINTEGRA TAR design and surgical technique. Use of the prosthesis for complex hindfoot reconstruction in patients with an osteoarthritic, varus, or valgus ankle deformity is described.

  13. FATIGUE DEVICE FOR TESTING ANKLE JOINT ENDOPROSTHESES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian TOADER-PASTI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a model of a fatigue device for testing dedicated to ankle prostheses. The concept of the testing device relies on two aspects: almost any type of ankle prosthesis can be tested on it and it has to work on INSTRON axial-torsion testing machine. Starting from these requirements, a 3D functional assembly that reproduces the real movement of the ankle joint during gait cycle has been designed. The device is based on a cam-follower mechanism.

  14. Design and Control of a Powered Transfemoral Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sup, Frank; Bohara, Amit; Goldfarb, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the design and control of a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints. The initial prototype is a pneumatically actuated powered-tethered device, which is intended to serve as a laboratory test bed for a subsequent self-powered version. The prosthesis design is described, including its kinematic optimization and the design of a three-axis socket load cell that measures the forces and moments of interaction between the socket and prosthesis. A gait controll...

  15. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott J Rouse

    Full Text Available Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01. This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work.

  16. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C.; Emerson, Robert W.; Herr, Hugh M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work. PMID:26285201

  17. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C; Emerson, Robert W; Herr, Hugh M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work.

  18. Ankle pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which cushions joints) Infection in the ankle joint Osteoarthritis , gout , rheumatoid arthritis , Reiter syndrome , and other types ... Ma, MD, assistant professor, chief, sports medicine and shoulder service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  19. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Overview of the Canadian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Warren C W; Lau, Johnny T C

    2016-06-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty use has increased across Canada over the last two decades. Multiple implant designs are readily available and implanted across Canada. Although arthrodesis is a reliable procedure for treating end-stage ankle arthritis, ankle replacement is often the preferred surgical treatment by patients. A recent prospective study evaluated intermediate-term outcomes of ankle replacement and arthrodesis at multiple centers across Canada, with variability in prosthesis type, surgeon, and surgical technique. Intermediate-term clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis were comparable in a diverse cohort in which treatment was tailored to patient presentation; however, rates of reoperation and major complications were higher after ankle replacement.

  20. Robotic lower limb prosthesis design through simultaneous computer optimizations of human and prosthesis costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handford, Matthew L.; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2016-02-01

    Robotic lower limb prostheses can improve the quality of life for amputees. Development of such devices, currently dominated by long prototyping periods, could be sped up by predictive simulations. In contrast to some amputee simulations which track experimentally determined non-amputee walking kinematics, here, we explicitly model the human-prosthesis interaction to produce a prediction of the user’s walking kinematics. We obtain simulations of an amputee using an ankle-foot prosthesis by simultaneously optimizing human movements and prosthesis actuation, minimizing a weighted sum of human metabolic and prosthesis costs. The resulting Pareto optimal solutions predict that increasing prosthesis energy cost, decreasing prosthesis mass, and allowing asymmetric gaits all decrease human metabolic rate for a given speed and alter human kinematics. The metabolic rates increase monotonically with speed. Remarkably, by performing an analogous optimization for a non-amputee human, we predict that an amputee walking with an appropriately optimized robotic prosthesis can have a lower metabolic cost – even lower than assuming that the non-amputee’s ankle torques are cost-free.

  1. Bionic prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    МЫЛЬНИКОВ А.М.

    2015-01-01

    The real achievement in the prosthetics has become artificial joints that function as well as natural joints. Bionic limbs are the most advanced type of prosthesis at the moment. These electronic devices are made from synthetic materials, but the person can manage them using his/her own nervous system through the targeted muscle reinnervation (recovery disturbed innervation of organs and tissues surgically).Principle of operation of bionic prosthesis. After the amputation because of a serious...

  2. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R; Nickel, Eric A; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users.

  3. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Eric A.; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users. PMID:28278172

  4. Design and Control of a Powered Transfemoral Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sup, Frank; Bohara, Amit; Goldfarb, Michael

    2008-02-01

    The paper describes the design and control of a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints. The initial prototype is a pneumatically actuated powered-tethered device, which is intended to serve as a laboratory test bed for a subsequent self-powered version. The prosthesis design is described, including its kinematic optimization and the design of a three-axis socket load cell that measures the forces and moments of interaction between the socket and prosthesis. A gait controller is proposed based on the use of passive impedance functions that coordinates the motion of the prosthesis with the user during level walking. The control approach is implemented on the prosthesis prototype and experimental results are shown that demonstrate the promise of the active prosthesis and control approach in restoring fully powered level walking to the user.

  5. Design and Control of a Pneumatically Actuated Transtibial Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hao; Shen, Xiangrong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and control of a pneumatically actuated transtibial prosthesis, which utilizes a pneumatic cylinder-type actuator to power the prosthetic ankle joint to support the user's locomotion. The pneumatic actuator has multiple advantages over the traditional electric motor, such as light weight, low cost, and high power-to-weight ratio. The objective of this work is to develop a compact and lightweight transtibial prosthesis, leveraging the multiple advantages provided...

  6. Conversion of failed ankle arthroplasty to an arthrodesis. Technique using an arthrodesis nail and a cage filled with morsellized bone graft.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bullens, P.H.J.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Louwerens, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Arthrodesis of the ankle joint after a failed ankle prosthesis is most often demanding because of bone loss. The bone loss is also responsible for limb length discrepancy. Intramedullary nail fixation has been described to be successful for arthrodesis of the arthritic ankle joint. We report the use

  7. [Revision arthroplasty of the ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermann, B; Barg, A; Knupp, M

    2011-11-01

    In the last 20 years total ankle replacement has become a viable alternative to arthrodesis for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle. Numerous ankle prosthesis designs have appeared on the market in the past and attracted by the encouraging intermediate results reported in the literature, many surgeons have started to perform this procedure. With increased availability on the market the indications for total ankle replacement have also increased in recent years. In particular, total ankle replacement may now be considered even in younger patients. Therefore, despite progress in total ankle arthroplasty the number of failures may increase. Up to now, arthrodesis was considered to be the gold standard for salvage of failed ankle prostheses. Because of extensive bone loss on the talar side, in most instances tibiocalcaneal fusion is the only reliable solution. An alternative to such extended hindfoot fusions would be revision arthroplasty. To date, however, there are no reported results of revision arthroplasty for salvage of a failed ankle replacement.Based on our experience prosthetic components with a flat undersurface are most likely to be able to find solid support on remaining bone stock. The first 83 cases (79 patients, 46 males, 33 females, average age 58.9 years, range 30.6-80.7 years) with a average follow-up of 5.4 years (range 2-11 years) showed excellent to good results in 69 cases (83%), a satisfactory result in 12 cases (15%) and a fair result in 2 cases (2%) and 47 patients (56%) were pain free. Primary loosening was noted in three cases and of these two cases were successfully revised by another total ankle replacement and in one case with arthrodesis. Another case with hematogenous infection was also revised by arthrodesis. At the last follow-up control two components were considered to be loose and the overall loosening rate was thus 6%.This series has proven that revision arthroplasty can be a promising option for patients with failed total

  8. Design and characterization of a biologically inspired quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Lai, Cara H; Rouse, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    By design, commonly worn energy storage and release (ESR) prosthetic feet cannot provide biologically realistic ankle joint torque and angle profiles during walking. Additionally, their anthropomorphic, cantilever architecture causes their mechanical stiffness to decrease throughout the stance phase of walking, opposing the known trend of the biological ankle. In this study, the design of a quasi-passive pneumatic ankle-foot prosthesis is detailed that is able to replicate the biological ankle's torque and angle profiles during walking. The prosthetic ankle is comprised of a pneumatic piston, bending spring and solenoid valve. The mechanical properties of the pneumatic ankle prosthesis are characterized using a materials testing machine and the properties are compared to those from a common, passive ESR prosthetic foot. The characterization spanned a range of ankle equilibrium pressures and testing locations beneath the foot, analogous to the location of center of pressure within the stance phase of walking. The pneumatic ankle prosthesis was shown to provide biologically appropriate trends and magnitudes of torque, angle and stiffness behavior, when compared to the passive ESR prosthetic foot. Future work will focus on the development of a control system for the quasi-passive device and clinical testing of the pneumatic ankle to demonstrate efficacy.

  9. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurdeman, Shane R., E-mail: shanewurdeman@gmail.com [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Advanced Prosthetics Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68134 (United States); Myers, Sara A. [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Stergiou, Nicholas [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed “more appropriate” and the other “less appropriate” based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a “more appropriate” prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a “less appropriate” prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  10. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed "more appropriate" and the other "less appropriate" based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a "more appropriate" prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a "less appropriate" prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  11. Development of an internally braced prosthesis for total talus replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regauer, Markus; Lange, Mirjam; Soldan, Kevin; Peyerl, Steffen; Baumbach, Sebastian; Böcker, Wolfgang; Polzer, Hans

    2017-03-18

    Total loss of talus due to trauma or avascular necrosis, for example, still remains to be a major challenge in foot and ankle surgery with severely limited treatment options. Implantation of a custom made total talar prosthesis has shown promising results so far. Most important factors for long time success are degree of congruence of articular surfaces and ligamentous stability of the ankle. Therefore, our aim was to develop an optimized custom made prosthesis for total talus replacement providing a high level of primary stability. A custom made hemiprosthesis was developed using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging data of the affected and contralateral talus considering the principles and technology for the development of the S.T.A.R. prosthesis (Stryker). Additionally, four eyelets for fixation of artificial ligaments were added at the correspondent footprints of the most important ligaments. Two modifications can be provided according to the clinical requirements: A tri-articular hemiprosthesis or a bi-articular hemiprosthesis combined with the tibial component of the S.T.A.R. total ankle replacement system. A feasibility study was performed using a fresh frozen human cadaver. Maximum range of motion of the ankle was measured and ligamentous stability was evaluated by use of standard X-rays after application of varus, valgus or sagittal stress with 150 N. Correct implantation of the prosthesis was technically possible via an anterior approach to the ankle and using standard instruments. Malleolar osteotomies were not required. Maximum ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion were measured as 22-0-28 degrees. Maximum anterior displacement of the talus was 6 mm, maximum varus tilt 3 degrees and maximum valgus tilt 2 degrees. Application of an internally braced prosthesis for total talus replacement in humans is technically feasible and might be a reasonable procedure in carefully selected cases with no better alternatives left.

  12. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  13. Salto Talaris fixed-bearing total ankle replacement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Shannon M; Todd, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement is an anatomically designed fixed bearing prosthesis available in the United States based on the successful design of the mobile-bearing Salto prosthesis available outside the United States. The original mobile-bearing design was modified and the mobile-bearing was transferred to the precision instrumentation at the trial phase evaluation. Instrumentation and technique allow the surgeon to determine the functional joint axis before final implantation. The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement design blends minimal bone resection and optimizes surface area, cortical contact, and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene conformity. The authors present an overview of the Salto Talaris total ankle replacement surgical technique and pearls for successful application.

  14. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficanha, Evandro M; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF), focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE) angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to -4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  15. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro M. Ficanha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF, focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to –4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  16. Recycling energy to restore impaired ankle function during human walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven H Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and "recycles" it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost.

  17. A Prosthesis to Train the Proprioceptive Capabilities of the Residual Limb of Military Personnel Recovering from Lower Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    feedback from the ankle and foot poses challenge. To compensate for the lack of afferent feedback, amputees look down at the prosthesis to sense...10-1-0573 TITLE: A prosthesis to train the proprioceptive capabilities of the residual limb of military personnel recovering from lower limb...To) 1September2011-31August2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Prosthesis to Train the Proprioceptive Capabilities of the 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  18. The Effect of Prosthetic Ankle Units on Roll-Over Shape Characteristics During Walking in Persons with Bilateral Transtibial Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Steven A.; Su, Po-Fu; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Some important functions of walking are adversely affected or eliminated in prosthesis users due to reduced or absent ankle motion. The purpose of this retrospective data analysis was to determine the effect of prosthetic ankle units on the characteristics of the ankle-foot roll-over shape in persons with bilateral transtibial amputations. Seventeen subjects were fitted with Endolite Multiflex Ankles to provide ankle plantar/dorsiflexion during the stance phase of gait. Two quantitative gait analyses were performed as subjects walked with (1) Seattle Lightfoot II feet (baseline condition) and (2) with the prosthetic ankle units added. Roll-over shape radii and effective foot length ratio were calculated and compared for the two prosthetic configurations. When subjects walked with the ankle units, ankle motion increased (p<0.001), peak ankle plantarflexion moment during stance decreased slightly, and ankle-foot roll-over shape radii were significantly less (p<0.001) compared to the baseline condition. The effective foot length ratio of the roll-over shape was found to increase with walking speed (p<0.001), but it was not significantly affected by the prosthetic ankle units (p=0.066). Prosthetists and manufacturers are encouraged to consider the effect of combining prosthetic components on the overall characteristics of the prosthesis and the functions they impart to the user. PMID:22234709

  19. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergencies > Sports Injuries > Ankle Sprain Treatment Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Ankle Sprain Treatment Page Content Article Body Acute ankle and foot injuries are common in athletes and other active young people. Sprains account for the greatest number ...

  20. Modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shuangli; Huang Zhang; Xiong Gaoxin; Chen Guang; Yin Zhongxiang; Jiang Hua

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical outcome of modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis.Methods:Between November 2009 and June 2012,28 patients with ankle arthritis were treated,among whom 11 had obvious foot varus deformity,and 17 were almost normal in appearance.There were 13 males and 15 females with an average age of 49.4 years (range,23-67 years).The main symptoms included swelling,pain,and a limited range of motion of the ankles.The ankle joints functions were assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score and visual analog scale (VAS) preoperatively and at 1 year follow-up.Results:Twenty-eight patients were followed up for 19.8 months on average (range,1-2 years).Superficial wound infection occurred in 3 cases,and was cured after debridement; the other incisions healed by first intention without complications.All ankles were fused at 1 year follow-up after operation.The symptom was relieved completely in all patients at last follow-up without complication of implant failure,or nonunion.The postoperative AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score was 83.13±3.76,showing significant difference when compared with the preoperative score (45.38±3.21,P<0.01).VAS was significantly decreased from 8.01±0.63 to 2.31±1.05 at 1 year follow-up (P<0.05).Conclusion:Modified Blair ankle fusion has the advantages of high feasiblity,less cost and rigid fixation.It shows high reliability in pain relief and may obtain a good clinical effectiveness.

  1. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  2. The mid-term outcome of total ankle arthroplasty and ankle fusion in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background While arthrodesis is the standard treatment of a severely arthritic ankle joint, total ankle arthroplasty has become a popular alternative. This review provides clinical outcomes and complications of both interventions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Studies were obtained from Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science (January 1980 – June 2011) and additional manual search. Inclusion criteria: original clinical study, > 5 rheumatoid arthritis (population), internal fixation arthrodesis or three-component mobile bearing prosthesis (intervention), ankle scoring system (outcome). The clinical outcome score, complication- and failure rates were extracted and the methodological quality of the studies was analysed. Results 17 observational studies of 868 citations were included. The effect size concerning total ankle arthroplasty ranged between 1.9 and 6.0, for arthrodesis the effect sizes were 4.0 and 4.7. Reoperation due to implant failure or reoperation due to non-union, was 11% and 12% for respectively total ankle arthroplasty and arthrodesis. The methodological quality of the studies was low (mean 6.4 out of a maximum of 14 points) and was lower for arthrodesis (mean 4.8) as compared to arthroplasty (mean 7.8) (p = 0.04). Conclusions 17 observational and no (randomized) controlled clinical trials are published on the effectiveness of arthroplasty or arthrodesis of the ankle in rheumatoid arthritis. Regardless of the methodological limitations it can be concluded that both interventions show clinical improvement and in line with current literature neither procedure is superior to the other. PMID:24161014

  3. Intraoperative Radiation Exposure During Revision Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Iceman, Kelli; Elliott, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative C-arm image intensification is required for primary total ankle replacement implantation. Significant radiation exposure has been linked to these procedures; however, the radiation exposure during revision total ankle replacement remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the radiation exposure encountered during revision total ankle replacement. The data from 41 patients were retrospectively analyzed from a prospective database: 19 Agility(™) to Agility(™); 4 Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™); 9 Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II; 5 Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT; 2 Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT; and 2 INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II revision total ankle replacements were performed. Two broad categories were identified: partial revision (Agility(™) to Agility(™), Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™), INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II) and complete conversion (Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT, Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT). The mean radiation exposure per case was significant at 3.49 ± 2.21 mGy. Complete conversions, specifically Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, exhibited the greatest radiation exposure and C-arm time. Revision implant selection and revision type (complete or partial) directly contributed to radiation exposure. Accordingly, revision systems requiring less radiation exposure are preferable. Surgeons should strive to minimize intraoperative complications and limit additional procedures to those necessary, because both lead to additional radiation exposure.

  4. Retractable Prosthesis for Transfemoral Amputees Using Series Elastic Actuators and Force Control

    OpenAIRE

    Galbally, Elena; Small, Frank; Zanco, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We present a highly functional and cost-effective prosthesis for transfemoral amputees that uses series elastic actuators. These actuators allow for accurate force control, low impedance and large dynamic range. The design involves one active joint at the knee and a passive joint at the ankle. Additionally, the socket was designed using mirroring of compliances to ensure maximum comfort.

  5. Modified Evans peroneus brevis lateral ankle stabilization for balancing varus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, I have described a modification of the Evans peroneus brevis tendon lateral ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis is then transferred either to the anterior distal tibia concomitantly with total ankle replacement or through the tibia when performed after total ankle replacement and secured with plate and screw fixation. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon is useful in providing lateral ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  6. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  7. Estimation of crank angle for cycling with a powered prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, B E; Shultz, A; Ledoux, E; Goldfarb, M

    2014-01-01

    In order for a prosthesis to restore power generation during cycling, it must supply torque in a manner that is coordinated with the motion of the bicycle crank. This paper outlines an algorithm for the real time estimation of the angular position of a bicycle crankshaft using only measurements internal to an intelligent knee and ankle prosthesis. The algorithm assumes that the rider/prosthesis/bicycle system can be modeled as a four-bar mechanism. Assuming that a prosthesis can generate two independent angular measurements of the mechanism (in this case the knee angle and the absolute orientation of the shank), Freudenstein's equation can be used to synthesize the mechanism continuously. A recursive least-squares algorithm is implemented to estimate the Freudenstein coefficients, and the resulting link lengths are used to reformulate the equation in terms of input-output relationships mapping both measured angles to the crank angle. Using two independent measurements allows the algorithm to uniquely determine the crank angle from multi-valued functions. In order to validate the algorithm, a bicycle was mounted on a trainer and configured with the prosthesis using an artificial hip joint attached to the seat post. Motion capture was used to monitor the mechanism for forward and backward pedaling and the results are compared to the output of the presented algorithm. Once the parameters have converged, the algorithm is shown to predict the crank angle within 15° of the externally measured value throughout the entire crank cycle during forward rotation.

  8. The aesthetic hand prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, J

    1981-10-01

    The high-quality aesthetic prosthesis can be equally helpful to those with acquired amputation and to those whose loss is due to agenesis. Restoring near-normal appearance improves patients' function in a global sense, enabling them to better utilize what they have in the complex socioeconomic environment of today's mobile society. The aesthetic prosthesis often also gives some prehensile assistance, providing an opposition part for remaining digits or thumb. The needs of each patient must be carefully considered, and the prosthesis must conform to the high standards of quality outlined. Its use is primarily for the unilateral amputee who is making a good adjustment to the loss with realistic expectations.

  9. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  10. Stresses in the ankle joint and total ankle replacement design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Rahul; Siddique, M S

    2011-06-01

    The ankle is a highly congruent joint with a surface area of 11-13 cm(2). Total ankle replacements have been attempted since the early 1970s and design has continually evolved as the early designs were a failure. This was because the stresses involved and the mutiaxial motion of the ankle has not been understood until recently. It has been shown that the talus slides as well as rolls during the ankle arc of motion from plantarflexion to dorsiflexion. Furthermore, the articular surfaces and the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligaments have been shown to form a four bar linkage dictating ankle motion. A new design ankle replacement has been suggested recently which allows multiaxial motion at the ankle while maintaining congruency throughout the arc of motion. The early results of this ankle replacement have been encouraging without any reported failures due to mechanical loosening.

  11. 10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis. Patients and methods Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint—excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus. Results Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79–0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67–0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons. Interpretation The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements—even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results. PMID:22066551

  12. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  13. Intraoral-extraoral combination prosthesis: improving retention using interconnecting magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Marloes; van Heumen, Celeste C M; Merkx, Matthias A W; Meijer, Gert J

    2014-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants have been well documented for retaining an obturator prosthesis as well as a facial prosthesis. However, when the defect extends to both the facial area and the maxilla, it is difficult to rehabilitate those defects to the satisfaction of the patient, especially in cases where implants cannot be placed on both sites. This case report describes the use of magnets to connect two prostheses, thereby increasing retention and patient comfort.

  14. Short-Term Effect of Prosthesis Transforming Sensory Modalities on Walking in Stroke Patients with Hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Owaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory impairments caused by neurological or physical disorders hamper kinesthesia, making rehabilitation difficult. In order to overcome this problem, we proposed and developed a novel biofeedback prosthesis called Auditory Foot for transforming sensory modalities, in which the sensor prosthesis transforms plantar sensations to auditory feedback signals. This study investigated the short-term effect of the auditory feedback prosthesis on walking in stroke patients with hemiparesis. To evaluate the effect, we compared four conditions of auditory feedback from plantar sensors at the heel and fifth metatarsal. We found significant differences in the maximum hip extension angle and ankle plantar flexor moment on the affected side during the stance phase, between conditions with and without auditory feedback signals. These results indicate that our sensory prosthesis could enhance walking performance in stroke patients with hemiparesis, resulting in effective short-term rehabilitation.

  15. Footballer's ankle: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Footballer' s ankle is anterior bony spur or anterior impingement symptom of the ankle with anterior ankle pain, limited and painful dorsiflexion. The cause is commonly seen in athletes and dancers, and is probably due to repetitive minor trauma. The condition was firstly described by Morris;1 McMurray2 reported good results from excision of the spurs, naming it footballer's ankle. Opening resection of osteophytes of the anterior tibial and superior talar is an effective treatment for anterior impingement of the ankle.

  16. Dynamic Balance Control (DBC) in lower leg amputee subjects; contribution of the regulatory activity of the prosthesis side

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhand, M.J.; Asseldonk, van E.H.F.; Kooij, van der H.; Rietman, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Regaining effective postural control after lower limb amputation requires complex adaptation strategies in both the prosthesis side and the non-amputated side. The objective in this study is to determine the individual contribution of the ankle torques generated by both legs in balance co

  17. A prosthesis-specific multi-link segment model of lower-limb amputee sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigney, Stacey M; Simmons, Anne; Kark, Lauren

    2016-10-03

    Lower-limb amputees commonly utilize non-articulating energy storage and return (ESAR) prostheses for high impact activities such as sprinting. Despite these prostheses lacking an articulating ankle joint, amputee gait analysis conventionally features a two-link segment model of the prosthetic foot. This paper investigated the effects of the selected link segment model׳s marker-set and geometry on a unilateral amputee sprinter׳s calculated lower-limb kinematics, kinetics and energetics. A total of five lower-limb models of the Ottobock(®) 1E90 Sprinter were developed, including two conventional shank-foot models that each used a different version of the Plug-in-Gait (PiG) marker-set to test the effect of prosthesis ankle marker location. Two Hybrid prosthesis-specific models were then developed, also using the PiG marker-sets, with the anatomical shank and foot replaced by prosthesis-specific geometry separated into two segments. Finally, a Multi-link segment (MLS) model was developed, consisting of six segments for the prosthesis as defined by a custom marker-set. All full-body musculoskeletal models were tested using four trials of experimental marker trajectories within OpenSim 3.2 (Stanford, California, USA) to find the affected and unaffected hip, knee and ankle kinematics, kinetics and energetics. The geometry of the selected lower-limb prosthesis model was found to significantly affect all variables on the affected leg (p variables on the affected leg, and none of the unaffected leg variables. The results indicate that the omission of prosthesis-specific spatial, inertial and elastic properties from full-body models significantly affects the calculated amputee gait characteristics, and we therefore recommend the implementation of a MLS model.

  18. Stomatitis sub-prosthesis in patients with superior dental prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Martina Francisco Local

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The stomatitis sub-prosthesis is one of the most frequent changes in hard palate mucous membrane in patients with mucous-supported dental prosthesis. It can be caused by multiple factors, which makes its study and prognosis more difficult. Objective: To describe the occurrence of stomatitis sub-prosthesis and its causes in patients with superior dental prosthesis. Method: Descriptive study including all the patients with superior dental prosthesis examined in the odontology consultation “Barrio Adentro” in the state of Miranda, Venezuela, from November, 2005 to March, 2006. The analysed variables were: age, sex, stomatitis level, teeth brushing frequency, prosthesis condition and use, palate mucous condition and frequency of odontology consultations. Results: 89 patients were attended, more 50% of them had superior dental prosthesis and presented stomatitis sub-prosthesis; the group between 35 and 59 years was the most affected, mainly females. Sub-prosthesis stomatitis type II was the most common and the main causes included constant use of the prosthesis and loose prosthesis. Buccal hygiene was not adequate in these patients. Most of them declared never attending to the dentist, or just when presenting some particular problem. Conclusion: Stomatitis prevalence was related with incorrect hygiene habits and lack of knowledge; it shows the importance of performing educative tasks to reduce this disease incidence.  

  19. Aesthetic finger prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganathan, N; Maheswari, M Uma; Anandkumar, V; Padmanabhan, T V; Swarup, Shailee; Jibran, Ahmed Hasan

    2011-12-01

    Complete or partial fingers are the most commonly encountered forms of partial hand losses. Though finger amputations are commonly due to traumatic injuries, digit loss may also be attributed to congenital malformations and disease. Irrespective of the etiology, the loss of a finger has a considerable functional and psychological impact on an individual. In order to alleviate these problems, partial or complete finger prosthesis may be fabricated. This clinical report portrays a method to fabricate silicone rubber prosthesis for a patient who has a partial finger loss caused due to trauma.

  20. Tehran Silicon Partial Foot Prosthesis New Method of Making Silicon Partial Foot Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Khaghani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Partial foot amputation includes many surfaces from severing toe to Chopart amputation, and each surface has its own characteristic and creates a particular level of disability, which would require prosthesis to compensate the missing functionality and aesthetics. On the other hand, with regard to materials and style of structure according to the facilities of clinics and the experience of prosthetists a vast scope of prostheses are made for patients, and practically the process of prescription and Production of a prosthesis is an interaction between the patient and the prosthetist ,based on the needs and expectations of the patient and the ability of prosthetist to reach a point of equilibrium which often requires employing the maximum ability of prosthetist in the construction technique. The resulting diversity is the outcome of successful experiences of various prosthetists over the years, and it is natural that when considering the extent of various materials used in the making of prostheses and also the methods of their synthesis and linkage, and also better understanding of the developed biomechanical disorder, we can achieve new designs that would bring better performance and comfort to patients, as well as more aestheticism in appearance. If the amputation is proximal to the metatarsal heads, the individual will lose tolerance for weight bearing of fore foot and will face difficulty in the terminal stance stage for doing the push-off. For Trans-metatarsal and Lisfranc areas which are considered mid foot area, high profile prosthesis have not been well acceptance by patients because a rigid prosthesis continues till near tibia tuberose and more important than that, creates restriction of movement in ankle and subtalar joints, despite having biomechanical advantages in restoring the lever arm for doing the push off .Perimalleolar prostheses which enjoy great variety with regard to design and material used in their structure, mostly are not

  1. Adaptation and prosthesis effects on stride-to-stride fluctuations in amputee gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane R Wurdeman

    Full Text Available Twenty-four individuals with transtibial amputation were recruited to a randomized, crossover design study to examine stride-to-stride fluctuations of lower limb joint flexion/extension time series using the largest Lyapunov exponent (λ. Each individual wore a "more appropriate" and a "less appropriate" prosthesis design based on the subject's previous functional classification for a three week adaptation period. Results showed decreased λ for the sound ankle compared to the prosthetic ankle (F1,23 = 13.897, p = 0.001 and a decreased λ for the "more appropriate" prosthesis (F1,23 = 4.849, p = 0.038. There was also a significant effect for the time point in the adaptation period (F2,46 = 3.164, p = 0.050. Through the adaptation period, a freezing and subsequent freeing of dynamic degrees of freedom was seen as the λ at the ankle decreased at the midpoint of the adaptation period compared to the initial prosthesis fitting (p = 0.032, but then increased at the end compared to the midpoint (p = 0.042. No differences were seen between the initial fitting and the end of the adaptation for λ (p = 0.577. It is concluded that the λ may be a feasible clinical tool for measuring prosthesis functionality and adaptation to a new prosthesis is a process through which the motor control develops mastery of redundant degrees of freedom present in the system.

  2. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M.

    2012-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75–1.75 m s−1 and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation. PMID:21752817

  3. Failure to restore sagittal tibiotalar alignment in total ankle arthroplasty: Its relationship to the axis of the tibia and the positioning of the talar component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J; Yi, Y; Ahn, T K; Choi, H J; Park, C H; Chun, D I; Lee, J S; Lee, W C

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the change in sagittal tibiotalar alignment after total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) for osteoarthritis and to investigate factors affecting the restoration of alignment. This retrospective study included 119 patients (120 ankles) who underwent three component TAA using the Hintegra prosthesis. A total of 63 ankles had anterior displacement of the talus before surgery (group A), 49 had alignment in the normal range (group B), and eight had posterior displacement of the talus (group C). Ankles in group A were further sub-divided into those in whom normal alignment was restored following TAA (41 ankles) and those with persistent displacement (22 ankles). Radiographic and clinical results were assessed. Pre-operatively, the alignment in group A was significantly more varus than that in group B, and the posterior slope of the tibial plafond was greater (p < 0.01 in both cases). The posterior slope of the tibial component was strongly associated with restoration of alignment: ankles in which the alignment was restored had significantly less posterior slope (p < 0.001). An anteriorly translated talus was restored to a normal position after TAA in most patients. We suggest that surgeons performing TAA using the Hintegra prosthesis should aim to insert the tibial component at close to 90° relative to the axis of the tibia, hence reducing posterior soft-tissue tension and allowing restoration of normal tibiotalar alignment following surgery.

  4. Aesthetic Finger Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Complete or partial fingers are the most commonly encountered forms of partial hand losses. Though finger amputations are commonly due to traumatic injuries, digit loss may also be attributed to congenital malformations and disease. Irrespective of the etiology, the loss of a finger has a considerable functional and psychological impact on an individual. In order to alleviate these problems, partial or complete finger prosthesis may be fabricated. This clinical report portrays a method to fab...

  5. Evaluation of Gait Performance of a Hemipelvectomy Amputation Walking with a Canadian Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Karimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hemipelvectomy amputation is a surgical procedure in which lower limb and a portion of pelvic are removed. There are a few studies in the literature regarding the performance of subjects with hip disarticulation during walking. However, there is no study on gait analysis of hemipelvectomy subject. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to evaluate the gait and stability of subject with hemipelvectomy amputation. Case Description and Methods. A subject with hemipelvectomy amputation at right side was involved in this study. He used a Canadian prosthesis with single axis ankle joint, 3R21 knee joint, and 7E7 hip joint for more than 10 years. The kinetic and kinematic parameters were collected by a motion analysis system and a Kistler force platform. Findings and Outcomes. There was a significant difference between knee, hip, and ankle range of motions and their moments in the sound and prosthesis sides. In the other side, the stability of the subject in the anteroposterior direction seems to be better than that in the mediolateral direction. Conclusions. There was a significant asymmetry between the kinetic and kinematic performance of the sound and prosthesis sides, which may be due to lack of muscular power and alignment of prosthesis components.

  6. Reverse Evans peroneus brevis medial ankle stabilization for balancing valgus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Medial ankle instability secondary to deltoid ligament insufficiency is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, we describe a "reverse" Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction for medial ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis tendon is brought through a drill hole in the talus from laterally to medially, aiming for the junction of the talar neck and body plantar to the midline. The tendon is the brought superiorly and obliquely to the anterior medial aspect of the distal tibia where it is secured under a plate and screw construct. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction is useful in providing medial ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  7. Total ankle replacement or ankle fusion in painful advanced hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2015-12-01

    In advanced painful hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle, the last resort is surgical treatment (ankle arthrodesis [AA] or total ankle replacement [TAR]). There is a controversy in the literature on which of the two procedures is more appropriate. A review of the literature was performed to clarify such a controversy. The first search engine was MedLine (keywords: total ankle replacement, ankle arthrodesis). Seventy articles were found in MedLine. Of these, only 16 were selected and reviewed because they were strictly focused on the topic of this article. The second search engine was the Cochrane Library, where only nine systematic reviews were found on the role of TAR and AA in non-hemophilia patients. TAR and AA provide pain relief and patient satisfaction in hemophilia patients in the short term. The available non-hemophilia literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. My current view is that AA may be preferable in most hemophilia patients.

  8. Prótese do tornozelo híbrida em um caso de necrose avascular pós-traumática do tálus Hybrid ankle prosthesis in a case of post-traumatic avascular necrosis of the talus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jorge Gomes de Sousa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As fraturas do astrágalo originam frequentemente artrose pós-traumática tardia. Nestes casos, a utilização de próteses do tornozelo não cimentadas de última geração tem sido evitada pela presença de necrose avascular. Relatamos o caso de um paciente com 65 anos que se apresenta quatro anos após uma fratura do colo do astrágalo. Apresentava uma artrose do tornozelo dolorosa (escala AOFAS do retropé e tornozelo 19 e necrose avascular com colapso de toda a cúpula astragalina. Dada a extensão da necrose, foi decidido cimentar o componente protésico astragalino. Um ano após a cirurgia, o paciente apresenta bom resultado clínico e radiológico (escala AOFAS do retropé e tornozelo 87 e está satisfeito com o procedimento. Não temos conhecimento de nenhum relato semelhante na literatura.Talus fractures often lead to late post-traumatic arthrosis. In such cases, the use of latest generation, cementless prostheses has been hindered by the presence of avascular necrosis. We report the case of a 65-year-old patient who presented four years after a talus neck fracture. He had painful ankle arthrosis (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score 19 and avascular necrosis, with collapse of the entire talar dome. Given the extent of the necrosis, it was decided to cement the talus prosthetic component. One year after the surgery, the patient shows good clinical and radiological results (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score 87 and is satisfied with the procedure. We are not aware of any similar reports in the literature.

  9. Effects of prosthetic foot forefoot flexibility on gait of unilateral transtibial prosthesis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klodd, Elizabeth; Hansen, Andrew; Fatone, Stefania; Edwards, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Five solid-ankle experimental prosthetic feet were used in this double-blind randomized crossover study to determine the effects of forefoot flexibility on gait of 14 unilateral transtibial prosthesis users. Flexibility in experimental feet was altered by changing the number of flexural hinges in their forefoot sections. When experimental prosthetic foot conditions were compared, measured prosthetic ankle dorsiflexion range of motion increased as much as 3.3° with increasing flexibility (p foot's anterior moment arm (measured as the effective foot length ratio) increased as much as 23% of the foot length with decreasing flexibility (p foot with the greatest flexibility (p = 0.001). The results of this study suggest solid-ankle prosthetic foot designs with overly flexible forefoot sections can cause a "drop-off" effect in late stance phase and during the transition of loading between prosthetic and contralateral limbs.

  10. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  11. Triceps surae contracture: implications for foot and ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmassih, Sami; Phisitkul, Phinit; Femino, John E; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-07-01

    Restricted ankle dorsiflexion secondary to contracture of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex is frequently encountered in patients with foot and ankle pain and is well documented in the literature. During gait, decreased dorsiflexion shifts weight-bearing pressures from the heel to the forefoot, which may result in or exacerbate one of several pathologic conditions. Modest success has been achieved with nonsurgical management of triceps surae contracture, including splinting and stretching exercises. Surgical lengthening of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex at multiple levels has been described, and early clinical results have been promising. Additional research is required to further elucidate the long-term outcomes of various lengthening techniques.

  12. Treatment of Unstable Ankle Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniel Truffín Rodríguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients with unstable ankle fractures frequently attend the emergency rooms. It is estimated that there are 122 ankle fractures per 100 000 people a year. Surgical treatment of those that are unstable is inevitable since they can not be corrected in a conservative way. Several surgical procedures for repair of such lesions have been described and all of them constitute important tools for the orthopedic surgeon. Therefore, we conducted a literature review to discuss the current management of unstable ankle fractures based on the analysis of the published literature and the experiences in the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital of Cienfuegos.

  13. The stump and the prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, H J

    1980-03-01

    In performing amputations the surgeon must bear in mind the biomechanical and other constraints of the prosthesis likely to be fitted and, so far as possible, should fashion the stump accordingly. The various types of prosthesis and their features are discussed in relation to amputations of the lower and upper limbs at all levels.

  14. Joint prosthesis and method of bone fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterom, R.; Van der Pijl, A.J; Bersee, H.E.N.; Van der Helm, F.C.; Herder, J.L

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a joint prosthesis (10), for example, a knee joint or shoulder joint prosthesis comprising a first, socket-holding prosthesis part (11) for attachment to a first bone (12) and a second, ball-holding prosthesis part (13) for attachment to a second bone (14) that intermates wi

  15. Design and validation of a platform robot for determination of ankle impedance during ambulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J; Hargrove, Levi J; Peshkin, Michael A; Kuiken, Todd A

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide natural, biomimetic control to recently developed powered ankle prostheses, we must characterize the impedance of the ankle during ambulation tasks. To this end, a platform robot was developed that can apply an angular perturbation to the ankle during ambulation and simultaneously acquire ground reaction force data. In this study, we detail the design of the platform robot and characterize the impedance of the ankle during quiet standing. Subjects were perturbed by a 3° dorsiflexive ramp perturbation with a length of 150 ms. The impedance was defined parametrically, using a second order model to map joint angle to the torque response. The torque was determined using the inverted pendulum assumption, and impedance was identified by the least squares best estimate, yielding an average damping coefficient of 0.03 ± 0.01 Nms/° and an average stiffness coefficient of 3.1 ± 1.2 Nm/°. The estimates obtained by the proposed platform robot compare favorably to those published in the literature. Future work will investigate the impedance of the ankle during ambulation for powered prosthesis controller development.

  16. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability. PMID:26311206

  17. Chopart prosthesis and semirigid foot orthosis in traumatic forefoot amputation. Comparative gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, G; McBride, M E; Murray, D D; Sanderson, D J; Dukes, I; Menard, M R

    1996-01-01

    Gait was analyzed in seven otherwise healthy males at least 11 mo after they had recovered from a traumatic unilateral transmetatarsal amputation incurred during the course of their usual occupation. All seven were fitted with a semirigid foot orthosis. Four were also fitted with a Chopart prosthesis. Gait was evaluated with forceplate measurements of ground reaction force during free walking, by clinical observation of such ambulation on videotape, and by the subjective impression of the men as obtained by a questionnaire. In all men, with unmodified footwear, with the orthosis, and with the prosthesis, the forceplate data showed an abnormal pattern characterized by reduced stance duration and deficient forward propulsion on the amputated side. The abnormality and asymmetry of ground-reaction forces were less with greater preserved stump length and for a given stump length were with the above-ankle concept (Chopart) prosthesis than with the below-ankle concept. These features were recognized during the clinical analysis of all footwear, but there was an extra irregularity of weight progression noted with the fixed ankle of the Chopart prosthesis. The questionnaire reported stump problems to be the principal difficulty, and the follow-up revealed persistent attempts at surgical management including consideration of amputation at a higher level. It was concluded that the patient and the surgeons are likely to choose preservation of limb length over considerations of function during acute care and that the prosthetic concept best suited to deal with the resulting stump should emphasize unloading the distal part of the stump and smoothing out the impulsive force peak on the stump in late stance to minimize pain and to enhance ambulation capacity.

  18. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  19. Ankle Brachial Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikstroem, J.; Hansen, T.; Johansson, L.; Lind, L.; Ahlstroem, H. (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Medical Sciences, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (SE))

    2008-03-15

    Background: Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA) permits noninvasive vascular assessment, which can be utilized in epidemiological studies. Purpose: To assess the relation between a low ankle brachial index (ABI) and high-grade stenoses in the pelvic and leg arteries in the elderly. Material and Methods: WBMRA was performed in a population sample of 306 subjects aged 70 years. The arteries below the aortic bifurcation were graded after the most severe stenosis according to one of three grades: 0-49% stenosis, 50-99% stenosis, or occlusion. ABI was calculated for each side. Results: There were assessable WBMRA and ABI examinations in 268 (right side), 265 (left side), and 258 cases (both sides). At least one >=50% stenosis was found in 19% (right side), 23% (left side), and 28% (on at least one side) of the cases. The corresponding prevalences for ABI <0.9 were 4.5%, 4.2%, and 6.6%. An ABI cut-off value of 0.9 resulted in a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 20%, 99%, 83%, and 84% on the right side, and 15%, 99%, 82%, and 80% on the left side, respectively, for the presence of a >= 50% stenosis in the pelvic or leg arteries. Conclusion: An ABI <0.9 underestimates the prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in the general elderly population

  20. Passive prosthetic ankle-foot mechanism for automatic adaptation to sloped surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Nickel, MS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of a prototype prosthetic ankle-foot system that passively adapts to surface slopes on each step of walking. Engineering analyses were performed to design the cam clutch and clutch engagement and disengagement mechanism. The prototype was tested by a veteran with a unilateral transtibial amputation. Kinematic and kinetic data were recorded while the subject walked on a treadmill at slopes ranging from −10 to +10 degrees. After each slope condition, the subject rated his level of exertion and socket comfort. The subject reported increased comfort and reduced exertion for downhill slopes when using the prototype compared with his usual prosthesis. The subject also expressed that when walking downhill on the prototype, it was the most comfortable he had ever been in a prosthesis. The prosthetic ankle torque-angle relationship shifted toward dorsiflexion for uphill and toward plantar flexion for downhill slopes when using the prototype, indicating slope adaptation, but this effect did not occur when the subject walked with his usual prosthesis. The prototype also demonstrated late-stance plantar flexion, suggesting the potential for storing and returning more energy than standard lower-limb prostheses.

  1. Conus hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, H; Wagner, M

    2001-01-01

    50 years ago, prosthetic replacement of the hip joint ushered in a new epoch in orthopaedics. Total hip replacement made it possible to remove a severely diseased, painful hip and restore normal function and a normal quality of life to the afflicted patient. The early results of total hip replacement are almost all spectacular and hip replacement has become the most successful type of orthopaedic surgery. These good results using an approach that was technically relatively simple resulted in a temptation to implant prosthetic hip joints with ever increasing frequency in ever younger patients. This led to the emergence of new problems, which were not so clearly recognised at the outset: it emerged that the stability of prosthetic hip joints was of limited duration. This had the following consequence: If a total hip prosthesis is implanted in an elderly person whose remaining life-expectancy is shorter than the longevity of the prosthesis, hip replacement is a life-long solution. We can therefore say that, for a patient who has only 10 to 15 years left to live, their hip problem is solved by total hip replacement. For young people, who still have a long life expectancy in front of them, it is different. They will experience failure of the artificial joint and require further surgery. The commonest and most important type of failure in total hip prostheses is aseptic loosening, which is associated with resorption of bone at the site of the prosthesis. The cause of this phenomenon has only gradually been recognised in the course of the years. Initially, the unanimous opinion was that the methacrylate cement, used to fix the components of the prosthesis in the bone, was the definitive cause of aseptic loosening because fissures and fractures of the cement were almost always found during surgical revision of loosened joints. There was talk of "cement disease" and great efforts were made to improve the quality of the cement and the cementing technique. Moreover, even

  2. Ultrasound Findings of the Painful Ankle and Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheil Artul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To document the prevalence and spectrum of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS findings at different parts of the foot. Materials and Methods: All MSKUS studies conducted on the foot during a 2-year period (2012-2013 at the Department of Radiology were reviewed. Demographic parameters including age, gender, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Three hundred and sixty-four studies had been conducted in the 2-year period. Ninety-three MSKUS evaluations were done for the ankle, 30 studies for the heel, and 241 for the rest of the foot. The most common MSKUS finding at the ankle was tenosynovitis, mostly in female patients; at the heel it was Achilles tendonitis, also mostly in female patients; and for the rest of the foot it was fluid collection and presence of foreign body, mainly in male patients. The number of different MSKUS abnormalities that were reported was 9 at the ankle, 9 at the heel, and 21 on the rest of the foot. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing a huge spectrum of abnormalities. The most common finding was collection/hematoma and foreign bodies at the foot, tenosynovitis at the ankle, and Achilles tendinitis at the heel.

  3. Prosthetic ankle push-off work reduces metabolic rate but not collision work in non-amputee walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Joshua M.; Collins, Steven H.

    2014-12-01

    Individuals with unilateral below-knee amputation expend more energy than non-amputees during walking and exhibit reduced push-off work and increased hip work in the affected limb. Simple dynamic models of walking suggest a possible solution, predicting that increasing prosthetic ankle push-off should decrease leading limb collision, thereby reducing overall energy requirements. We conducted a rigorous experimental test of this idea wherein ankle-foot prosthesis push-off work was incrementally varied in isolation from one-half to two-times normal levels while subjects with simulated amputation walked on a treadmill at 1.25 m.s-1. Increased prosthesis push-off significantly reduced metabolic energy expenditure, with a 14% reduction at maximum prosthesis work. In contrast to model predictions, however, collision losses were unchanged, while hip work during swing initiation was decreased. This suggests that powered ankle push-off reduces walking effort primarily through other mechanisms, such as assisting leg swing, which would be better understood using more complete neuromuscular models.

  4. Audit of Orthopaedic Surgical Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fionn Coughlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Royal College of Surgeons in England published guidelines in 2008 outlining the information that should be documented at each surgery. St. James’s Hospital uses a standard operation sheet for all surgical procedures and these were examined to assess documentation standards. Objectives. To retrospectively audit the hand written orthopaedic operative notes according to established guidelines. Methods. A total of 63 operation notes over seven months were audited in terms of date and time of surgery, surgeon, procedure, elective or emergency indication, operative diagnosis, incision details, signature, closure details, tourniquet time, postop instructions, complications, prosthesis, and serial numbers. Results. A consultant performed 71.4% of procedures; however, 85.7% of the operative notes were written by the registrar. The date and time of surgery, name of surgeon, procedure name, and signature were documented in all cases. The operative diagnosis and postoperative instructions were frequently not documented in the designated location. Incision details were included in 81.7% and prosthesis details in only 30% while the tourniquet time was not documented in any. Conclusion. Completion and documentation of operative procedures were excellent in some areas; improvement is needed in documenting tourniquet time, prosthesis and incision details, and the location of operative diagnosis and postoperative instructions.

  5. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  6. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management.

  7. [Fracture of macroporous hydroxyapatite prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetchessi, A T; Pech-Gourg, G; Metellus, P; Fuentes, S

    2012-12-01

    Different prosthesis implants are offered to perform a cranioplasty after a decompressive craniectomy when autologous bone graft cannot be used. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old man who benefited a unilateral decompressive craniectomy after a severe head trauma. Seven months later, a cranioplasty using custom macroporous hydroxyapatite prosthesis was performed. The postoperative course was marked by a generalized seizure leading to a traumatic head injury. The CT-scan showed a comminutive fracture of the prosthesis and an extradural hematoma. The patient underwent a removal of the fractured prosthesis and an evacuation of the extradural clot. The postoperative course was uneventful with a Glasgow outcome scale score at 5. A second cranioplasty using a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) implant was performed. Among cranioplasty prosthesis solutions, hydroxyapatite implants seem to have similar property to the bone. However, its weak mechanic resistance is an actual problem in patients susceptible to present generalized seizures with consecutive head impact. Hence, in patients with decompressive craniectomy who are exposed to potential brain injury, we favor the use of more resistant implant as PEEK prosthesis.

  8. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  9. Acute Ankle Sprains in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. van Rijn (Rogier)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOf all injuries of the musculoskeletal system, 25% are acute lateral ankle sprains.1 In the USA and the UK there are about 23,000 and 5000 ankle sprains, respectively, each day. In the Netherlands approximately 600,000 people sustain an ankle injury each year, of those 120,000 occur duri

  10. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  11. 21 CFR 878.3550 - Chin prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chin prosthesis. 878.3550 Section 878.3550 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3550 Chin prosthesis. (a) Identification. A chin prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to augment...

  12. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis. (a) Identification. The tracheal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device made of a...

  13. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device...

  14. 21 CFR 878.3680 - Nose prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nose prosthesis. 878.3680 Section 878.3680 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3680 Nose prosthesis. (a) Identification. A nose prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to augment...

  15. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  16. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a) Identification. A testicular prosthesis is an implanted device that consists of a solid or gel-filled...

  17. Choosing a Breast Prosthesis: A Survivor's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Choosing a Breast Prosthesis: A Survivor’s Perspective Choosing a Breast Prosthesis: A Survivor’s Perspective Andrea Zinn June 16, 2015 · Amber ... preferences. Q: Why did you decide to wear a breast form/prosthesis rather than have a reconstruction? ...

  18. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-03-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met.

  19. Effects of prosthetic foot forefoot flexibility on gait of unilateral transtibial prosthesis users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Klodd, MS

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Five solid-ankle experimental prosthetic feet were used in this double-blind randomized crossover study to determine the effects of forefoot flexibility on gait of 14 unilateral transtibial prosthesis users. Flexibility in experimental feet was altered by changing the number of flexural hinges in their forefoot sections. When experimental prosthetic foot conditions were compared, measured prosthetic ankle dorsiflexion range of motion increased as much as 3.3° with increasing flexibility (p < 0.001 and the foot's anterior moment arm (measured as the effective foot length ratio increased as much as 23% of the foot length with decreasing flexibility (p < 0.001. Subjects also showed increases in the difference between sound and prosthetic ankle moments as high as 0.53 Nm/kg in late stance phase of walking as flexibility decreased (p < 0.001. The difference between first peaks of the vertical ground reaction forces on the sound and prosthetic sides increased as much as 9% of body weight when subjects used the foot with the greatest flexibility (p = 0.001. The results of this study suggest solid-ankle prosthetic foot designs with overly flexible forefoot sections can cause a "drop-off" effect in late stance phase and during the transition of loading between prosthetic and contralateral limbs.

  20. Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a neuromuscular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Jared; Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Eilenberg, Michael F.; Endo, Ken; Barnhart, Chris; Herr, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Control schemes for powered ankle–foot prostheses would benefit greatly from a means to make them inherently adaptive to different walking speeds. Towards this goal, one may attempt to emulate the intact human ankle, as it is capable of seamless adaptation. Human locomotion is governed by the interplay among legged dynamics, morphology and neural control including spinal reflexes. It has been suggested that reflexes contribute to the changes in ankle joint dynamics that correspond to walking at different speeds. Here, we use a data-driven muscle–tendon model that produces estimates of the activation, force, length and velocity of the major muscles spanning the ankle to derive local feedback loops that may be critical in the control of those muscles during walking. This purely reflexive approach ignores sources of non-reflexive neural drive and does not necessarily reflect the biological control scheme, yet can still closely reproduce the muscle dynamics estimated from biological data. The resulting neuromuscular model was applied to control a powered ankle–foot prosthesis and tested by an amputee walking at three speeds. The controller produced speed-adaptive behaviour; net ankle work increased with walking speed, highlighting the benefits of applying neuromuscular principles in the control of adaptive prosthetic limbs. PMID:21502131

  1. Hydrocolonotherapy ankle joints after injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Muchin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to improve efficiency of gydrokinesitherapy by means of specially designed devices and monolasts for patients after ankle joint injuries. Material & Methods: there are pedagogical methods, clinical and radiological methods, anthropometric measurements and goniometry were used. Results: the author's technique of hydrokinesitherapy with application hydrokinesimechanotherapy device in the program of physical rehabilitation which provides optimum conditions for the recovery process was developed. Conclusions: the specially designed hydrokinesomechanotherapeutic device and monolasts are allow strictly controlled movement in all planes of the ankle joint, which contributes to the acceleration of the recovery; the conducted anthropometric and goniometric studies were indicate more rapid elimination of edema, increase movement amplitude, carries opposition to the development of contractures and muscle atrophy.

  2. Annular lipoatrophy of the ankles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimson, Otobia G; Esterly, Nancy B

    2006-02-01

    Lipoatrophic panniculitis likely represents a group of disorders characterized by an inflammatory panniculitis followed by lipoatrophy. It occurs locally in a variety of settings and has been reported in the literature under various terms, including annular atrophic connective tissue panniculitis of the ankles, annular and semicircular lipoatrophy, abdominal lipoatrophy, and connective tissue panniculitis. Herein, a case of annular lipoatrophy of the ankles is described in a 6-year-old girl with autoimmune thyroid disease. Histologically, a mixed lobular panniculitis with lipophages was present. This pattern resembles that seen in lipoatrophic panniculitis. After a single, acute episode of an inflammatory process with subsequent lipoatrophy, her skin lesions have stabilized for 2 years requiring no treatment.

  3. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter DA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available David A Porter, Ryan R Jaggers, Adam Fitzgerald Barnes, Angela M Rund Methodist Sports Medicine/The Orthopedic Specialists, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains, and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on

  4. Hydrocolonotherapy ankle joints after injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Volodymyr Muchin; Oleksandr Zviriaka

    2016-01-01

    Muchin V., Zviriaka O. Purpose: to improve efficiency of gydrokinesitherapy by means of specially designed devices and monolasts for patients after ankle joint injuries. Material & Methods: there are pedagogical methods, clinical and radiological methods, anthropometric measurements and goniometry were used. Results: the author's technique of hydrokinesitherapy with application hydrokinesimechanotherapy device in the program of physical rehabilitation which provides optimum conditions for...

  5. Elektra prosthesis for trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klahn, A; Nygaard, Mads; Gvozdenovic, R

    2012-01-01

    We present a prospective follow-up of 39 Elektra prostheses in 37 patients (32 women and five men), with a mean age of 56.5 (range 46-71) years; 34 patients had osteoarthritis and three had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were followed using clinical examination, including measurement of pain...... be the key problem in treating trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis using a total prosthesis....

  6. Development and experimental validation of a finite element model of total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Alexandre; Larrea, Xabier; Guerdat, Jonas; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2014-02-07

    Total ankle replacement remains a less satisfactory solution compared to other joint replacements. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model of total ankle replacement, for future testing of hypotheses related to clinical issues. To validate the finite element model, an experimental setup was specifically developed and applied on 8 cadaveric tibias. A non-cemented press fit tibial component of a mobile bearing prosthesis was inserted into the tibias. Two extreme anterior and posterior positions of the mobile bearing insert were considered, as well as a centered one. An axial force of 2kN was applied for each insert position. Strains were measured on the bone surface using digital image correlation. Tibias were CT scanned before implantation, after implantation, and after mechanical tests and removal of the prosthesis. The finite element model replicated the experimental setup. The first CT was used to build the geometry and evaluate the mechanical properties of the tibias. The second CT was used to set the implant position. The third CT was used to assess the bone-implant interface conditions. The coefficient of determination (R-squared) between the measured and predicted strains was 0.91. Predicted bone strains were maximal around the implant keel, especially at the anterior and posterior ends. The finite element model presented here is validated for future tests using more physiological loading conditions.

  7. Maisonneuve-hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Tran, Wesley H; Lorich, Dean G

    2014-11-01

    Maisonneuve fractures are rare ankle injuries, accounting for up to 7% of all ankle fractures. They consist of a proximal third fibula fracture, syndesmotic disruption, and medial ankle injury (either a deltoid ligament disruption or a medial malleolus fracture), and are often successfully managed with nonoperative treatment of the proximal fibula fracture and open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of the medial ankle injury and syndesmotic disruption. The hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture comprises approximately 7% of all ankle fractures and features dual posterior tibial lip fractures featuring a posterolateral fragment and a posteromedial fragment. Good functional results have been reported in the literature after ORIF of both the posterolateral and posteromedial fragments of this variant fracture that is not described by the Lauge-Hansen classification. In this report, the authors present the unique case of an isolated ankle fracture demonstrating characteristics of both a Maisonneuve fracture and a hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture. They also highlight the diagnostic imaging characteristics, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and preoperative radiograph findings, surgical treatment, and postoperative clinical outcome for this patient with a Maisonneuve-hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture. To the authors' knowledge, this unique fracture pattern has not been reported previously in the literature. The authors conclude that although good results were seen postoperatively in this case, the importance of ORIF of both the posteromedial and posterolateral fragments of variant fractures cannot be overstated. They also found MRI to be a particularly helpful adjunct in formulating the correct diagnosis and treatment plan.

  8. Fusion following failed total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünschel, Markus; Leichtle, Ulf G; Leichtle, Carmen I; Walter, Christian; Mittag, Falk; Arlt, Eva; Suckel, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Although mid- to long-term results after total ankle replacement have improved because of available second- and third-generation devices, failure of total ankle replacement is still more common compared with total hip replacement and total knee replacement. The portfolio of available total ankle replacement revision component options is small. Furthermore, the bone stock of the tibiotalar region is scarce making it difficult and in some situations impossible to perform revision total ankle replacement. In these cases tibiotalar and tibiotalocalcaneal fusions are valuable options. This article describes which surgical procedures should be performed depending on the initial situation and gives detailed advice on surgical technique, postoperative care, and clinical results.

  9. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da-Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Potter, Hollis G; Li, Angela E; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  10. Total ankle arthroplasty: An imaging overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Da Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Chun, Ka Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  11. Measurement device for ankle joint kinematic and dynamic characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomozzi, C; Cesinaro, S; Basile, F; De Angelis, G; Giansanti, D; Maccioni, G; Masci, E; Panella, A; Paolizzi, M; Torre, M; Valentini, P; Macellari, V

    2003-07-01

    The paper describes a measurement device for obtaining the kinematic characterisation and isometric loading of ankle joints under different working conditions. Non-invasive, in vivo experiments can be conducted with this experimental apparatus, the potential of which could be usefully exploited in basic biomedical research, prosthesis design, clinical applications, sports medicine and rehabilitation. The device determines the 3D movement of the foot with respect to the shank and evaluates the torques and moments around the three articular axes in relation to any desired angular position of the ankle complex. When integrated with superficial electromyographic techniques and electrical stimulation, it allows the assessment of the functionality of the lower leg in both mechanical and myo-electrical terms. The paper reports the main mechanical and electronic features of the device (high linearity; maximum moment ranges +/- 300 Nm for flexion-extension, +/- 35 Nm for both pronation-supination and internal-external rotation; angular ranges: +/- 100 degrees of dorsi-plantar flexion, +/- 50 degrees of internal-external rotation and prono-supination; linear ranges: +/- 25 mm along each axis). Results from a healthy volunteer, under voluntary or stimulated conditions, helped in testing its operatability, reliability, robustness, repeatability and effectiveness. Preliminary simplified protocols have been also applied to 20 healthy volunteers, and the main results were 80.8 +/- 11.9 degrees of internalexternal rotation, 46.2 +/- 9.1 degrees of prono-supination and 74.6 +/- 13.1 degrees of flexion-extension. Torques and moments were normalised with respect to a body mass index of 30. The maximum plantar flexion moment (57.5 + 21.3 Nm) was measured with the foot at 150 of dorsal flexion; the maximum dorsal flexion moment (50.2 + 20.3 Nm) was measured with the foot at 150 of plantar flexion.

  12. Total ankle replacement: a population-based study of 515 cases from the Finnish Arthroplasty Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivu, Helka; Eskelinen, Antti; Ikävalko, Mikko; Paavolainen, Pekka; Remes, Ville

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Although total ankle replacement (TAR) is a recognized procedure for treatment of the painful arthritic ankle, the best choice of implant and the long-term results are still unknown. We evaluated the survival of two TAR designs and factors associated with survival using data from the nationwide arthroplasty registry in Finland. Methods 573 primary TARs were performed during the period 1982–2006 because of rheumatic, arthritic, or posttraumatic ankle degeneration. We selected contemporary TAR designs that were each used in more than 40 operations, including the S.T.A.R. (n = 217) and AES (n = 298), to assess their respective survival rates. The mean age of the patients was 55 (17–86) years and 63% of operations were performed in women. Kaplan-Meier analysis and the Cox regression model were used for survival analysis. The effects of age, sex, diagnosis, and hospital volume were also studied. Results The annual incidence of TAR was 1.5 per 105 inhabitants. The 5-year overall survivorship for the whole TAR cohort was 83% (95% CI: 81–86), which agrees with earlier reports. The most frequent reasons for revision were aseptic loosening of one or both of the prosthesis components (39%) and instability (39%). We found no difference in survival rate between the S.T.A.R. and AES designs. Furthermore, age, sex, diagnosis, and hospital volume ( 100 replacements in each of 17 hospitals) did not affect the TAR survival. Interpretation Based on our findings, we cannot conclude that any prosthesis was superior to any other. A high number of technical errors in primary TARs suggests that this low-volume field of implant arthroplasty should be centralized to fewer units. PMID:20180720

  13. Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle treated by total ankle replacement: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, A; Elsner, A; Hefti, D; Hintermann, B

    2010-07-01

    The standard treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint in haemophilic patients has been fusion of the ankle joint. Total ankle replacement is still controversial as a treatment option. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the mid-term outcome in patients treated with total ankle replacement using an unconstrained three-component ankle implant. Ten haemophilic ankles in eight patients (mean age: 43.2 years, range 26.7-57.5) treated with total ankle replacement were followed up for a minimum of 2.7 years (mean: 5.6, range 2.7-7.6). The outcome was measured with clinical and radiological evaluations. There were no intra- or peri-operative complications. The AOFAS-hindfoot-score increased from 38 (range 8-57) preoperatively to 81 (range 69-95) postoperatively. All patients were satisfied with the results. Four patients became pain free; in the whole patient cohort pain level decreased from 7.1 (range 4-9) preoperatively to 0.8 (range 0-3) postoperatively. All categories of SF-36 score showed significant improvements in quality of life. In one patient, open ankle arthrolysis was performed because of painful arthrofibrosis. For patients with haemophilic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint, total ankle replacement is a valuable alternative treatment to ankle fusion.

  14. Current concepts review: ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arastu, M H; Demcoe, R; Buckley, R E

    2012-01-01

    Ankle fractures are common injuries that require meticulous technique in order to optimise outcome. The Lauge-Hansen and Danis-Weber classifications in addition to careful evaluation of the injury mechanism can help guide treatment but surgeons must be aware that there are injury patterns that will not always fit the afore mentioned patterns. The principles of atraumatic soft tissue handling, rigid internal fixation and early range of motion exercises are critical for successfully treating these injuries. There are still areas of treatment uncertainty and future directed research is needed in order to address some of these questions.

  15. Tracheostomy cannulas and voice prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Burkhard; Dommerich, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Cannulas and voice prostheses are mechanical aids for patients who had to undergo tracheotomy or laryngectomy for different reasons. For better understanding of the function of those artificial devices, first the indications and particularities of the previous surgical intervention are described in the context of this review. Despite the established procedure of percutaneous dilatation tracheotomy e.g. in intensive care units, the application of epithelised tracheostomas has its own position, especially when airway obstruction is persistent (e.g. caused by traumata, inflammations, or tumors) and a longer artificial ventilation or special care of the patient are required. In order to keep the airways open after tracheotomy, tracheostomy cannulas of different materials with different functions are available. For each patient the most appropriate type of cannula must be found. Voice prostheses are meanwhile the device of choice for rapid and efficient voice rehabilitation after laryngectomy. Individual sizes and materials allow adaptation of the voice prostheses to the individual anatomical situation of the patients. The combined application of voice prostheses with HME (Head and Moisture Exchanger) allows a good vocal as well as pulmonary rehabilitation. Precondition for efficient voice prosthesis is the observation of certain surgical principles during laryngectomy. The duration of the prosthesis mainly depends on material properties and biofilms, mostly consisting of funguses and bacteries. The quality of voice with valve prosthesis is clearly superior to esophagus prosthesis or electro-laryngeal voice. Whenever possible, tracheostoma valves for free-hand speech should be applied. Physicians taking care of patients with speech prostheses after laryngectomy should know exactly what to do in case the device fails or gets lost.

  16. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C.N.; Reilingh, M.L.; Zengerink, M.; van Bergen, C.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone pl

  17. Radiological aspects of sprained ankle syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandij, E.S.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis addresses several problems related to sprained ankle syndrome. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the imaging features of sprained ankles, found on new radiological modalities, and to assess the additional diagnostic understanding and treatment planning of helical CT as well as M

  18. Assessment of acute foot and ankle sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Louise

    2006-07-01

    Acute ankle and foot trauma is a regular emergency presentation and prompt strategic assessment skills are required to enable nurses to categorise and prioritise these injuries appropriately. This article provides background information on the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb to help nurses to identify various grades of ankle sprain as well as injuries that are limb threatening

  19. Total ankle replacement - surgical treatment and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting.

  20. Chinese Massage Therapy for Ankle Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming-xia; LI Nian-qun; HUANG Guo-qi

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the therapeutic methods and effects in the treatment of acute and chronic injuries of the ankle joint by Chinese massage therapy in combination with external application of Chinese herbal drugs and functional exercises. Methods: Totally, 36 cases of the patients with acute soft tissue injury, chronic soft tissue injury and post-fracture sequelae of the ankle joint were treated by Chinese massage therapy, external application or external wash of Chinese herbal drugs, and exercises of dorsal flexion and extension of the ankle joint, to observe the restoration of the ankle functions.Results: In 36 cases of the patients, the results showed remarkable effect in 18 cases, effect in 16 cases, failure in 2 cases and the effective rate in 94.4%. Conclusion: The combined use of Chinese massage therapy, external application of Chinese herbal drugs and functional exercises can produce precise effect in the treatment of soft tissue injury of the ankle joint.

  1. [The vocal rehabilitation with ESKA-Herrmann voice prosthesis. a report of a 10 years' experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldt, T; Kramp, B; Dommerich, S

    2012-10-01

    ESKA-Herrmann voice prosthesis are available for almost 30 years and are used for the vocal rehabilitation of laryngectomees. Nevertheless there are no studies about this voice prosthesis. Especially because of the smaller external diameter of 5.5 mm differents to other voice prostheses may be expected.We analyzed the 10-year patient documentation in retrospect.67 patients (63 m/4f) got the ESKA-Herrmann voice prosthesis, which could be used with a mean lifetime of 131.4 days. The main reason of changing the prostheses were dislocation (34/119), loss by coughing (34/119) and the leakage around the prostheses. In total a good voice was documented in 83.9% of the prostheses.ESKA-Herrmann voice prostheses are an alternative to other prostheses. Because of the smaller external diameter the dislocation and loss of the prosthesis occur more often than other models. But it's the only model that allows a designated spontaneous closure of the trachea-esophageal fistula after prosthesis removal.

  2. Abiotrophia defectiva knee prosthesis infection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Pierre-Yves

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abiotrophia species have rarely been implicated in osteoarticular infections. We report one case of an A. defectiva knee prosthesis infection. Case presentation A 71-year-old man of Italian origin presented with pain and swelling of the knee four years after the implantation of a total knee replacement prosthesis. While standard culturing of the synovial fluid resulted in no isolation of microorganisms, the direct inoculation of the synovial fluid into a rich culture medium resulted in the identification of A. defectiva by polymerase chain reaction sequencing. Repeated attempts of culturing microorganisms from blood were negative, and echocardiograms and colonoscopies were unremarkable. High-dose amoxicillin for nine months and a two-stage replacement of the knee prosthesis led to full patient recovery by the time of the 12-month follow-up examination. Conclusions Because Abiotrophia spp. are fastidious microorganisms, it is likely that cases of Abiotrophia orthopedic infection are misdiagnosed as culture-negative infections. Direct inoculation of synovial fluids into rich broth medium and further polymerase chain reaction-based detection of culture-negative synovial fluids are key tests for accurate documentation and detection of these infections.

  3. Behaviour of Sub Prosthesis Stomatitis in Patients with Upper Dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoel González Beriau

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Foundation: Sub prosthesis stomatitis is one of the most frequent affections in patients who wear dental prosthesis and constitutes a risk factor for the appearance of pre malignant and malignant lesions in the oral cavity.Objective: To describe the behaviour of sub prosthesis stomatitis in patients with upper dental prosthesis.Methods: A descriptive study was carried out, of all the patients who wear upper dental prosthesis (N=61 who came to the consultation due to sub prosthesis stomatitis, in the period from September 2014 to September 2015. The variables analyzed were: Age groups, sex, degree of the lesion, state of the prosthesis, toxic habits, location of the lesion and frequency of visits to the dentist.Results: Old adults predominated (54.1% and sub prosthesis Stomatitis degree II, represented by 77%. Unadjusted prosthesis was observed in most patients and the lesions were located more frequently in mix zones. The most frequent toxic habits were continuous use and deficient oral hygiene. 85.2% of the patients reported to have visited the dentist only when they felt discomforts.Conclusion: Some results show patients ignorance about this ailment, among them a high frequency of toxic habits so as the use of continuous use of prosthesis and deficient oral hygiene, factors which condition the appearance of sub prosthesis stomatitis.

  4. [Single- and double-coated star total ankle replacements: a clinical and radiographic follow-up study of 109 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, A

    2006-05-01

    An up to 12-year follow-up of 51 single-coated STAR revealed that 15 ankles had undergone fusion. The mean time from primary surgery to the first revision was median 51 months. In a series of 58 double-coated STAR ankles followed up to 5 years only one ankle had to be revised for component loosening. In this series the clinical survival rate was 98% and the radiographic survival rate 94% at 5 years. The radiographic survival rate, with component loosening as endpoint, was significantly better for the last 31 cases in the series of the single-coated prostheses. However, the loosening rate did not differ when these latter 31 cases were compared with the cases operated on with a double-coated prosthesis. One may conclude that improvement of the anchoring surfaces has had a limited influence on the radiographic survival of the STAR ankle. However, from the clinical survivorship figures it is obvious that the learning process continues as the difference in revision rate between the 31 last implanted single-coated and the later on implanted double-coated prostheses approached significance.

  5. Non-weight-bearing neural control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Levi J; Simon, Ann M; Lipschutz, Robert; Finucane, Suzanne B; Kuiken, Todd A

    2013-06-19

    Lower limb prostheses have traditionally been mechanically passive devices without electronic control systems. Microprocessor-controlled passive and powered devices have recently received much interest from the clinical and research communities. The control systems for these devices typically use finite-state controllers to interpret data measured from mechanical sensors embedded within the prosthesis. In this paper we investigated a control system that relied on information extracted from myoelectric signals to control a lower limb prosthesis while amputee patients were seated. Sagittal plane motions of the knee and ankle can be accurately (>90%) recognized and controlled in both a virtual environment and on an actuated transfemoral prosthesis using only myoelectric signals measured from nine residual thigh muscles. Patients also demonstrated accurate (~90%) control of both the femoral and tibial rotation degrees of freedom within the virtual environment. A channel subset investigation was completed and the results showed that only five residual thigh muscles are required to achieve accurate control. This research is the first step in our long-term goal of implementing myoelectric control of lower limb prostheses during both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities for individuals with transfemoral amputation.

  6. Penile prosthesis implantation: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, M; Montague, D K

    2008-01-01

    Penile prosthesis implantation is the oldest effective treatment for erectile dysfunction. This review examines the past, present and future of penile prosthesis implantation. Advances in prosthetic design and implantation techniques have resulted today in devices that produce nearly normal flaccid and erect states, and have remarkable freedom from mechanical failure. The future of prosthetic design holds promises for even more improvements.

  7. Nasal prosthesis rehabilitation: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Sumeet; Maru, Kavita; Shukla, Jyotsana

    2011-01-01

    Facial defects resulting from neoplasm, congenital malformation or trauma can be restored with facial prosthesis using different materials and retention methods to achieve life-like look and function. A nasal prosthesis can re-establish esthetic form and anatomic contours for mid-facial defects...

  8. Revision of the aseptic and septic total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Norman; Wirth, Stephan Hermann

    2013-04-01

    Total ankle replacement has become a popular treatment of symptomatic end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Contemporary total ankle replacement systems provide more anatomic and biomechanically sound function. However, longevity is still limited and long-term results of modern total ankle replacement designs are not available. In the case of failure, conversion into arthrodesis has remained the treatment of choice but at the cost of hindfoot function and potential degeneration of the adjacent joints. Thus, revision total ankle replacement by exchange of the prosthetic components represents an attractive solution. This article focuses on revision total ankle replacement and conversion to ankle arthrodesis.

  9. Radiographic evaluation of INBONE total ankle arthroplasty: a retrospective analysis of 30 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datir, Abhijit [Emory University Hospital, Musculoskeletal Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Center, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Xing, Minzhi; Kakarala, Aparna; Terk, Michael R. [Emory University Hospital, Musculoskeletal Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Labib, Sameh A. [Emory University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The objectives of this work were to retrospectively describe the radiographic assessment of INBONE total ankle arthroplasty in 30 patients using validated linear and angular measurements and to correlate these findings with the final surgical outcome over a 2-year follow-up period. Thirty consecutive patients (21 females, nine males; mean age, 64.8 years) underwent INBONE total ankle arthroplasty during 2007-2011. After IRB approval, a retrospective pre- and post-operative radiographic analysis was performed using validated linear and angular measurements. The pre- and post-operative assessment included the tibial angle, talar angle, tibial slope, and coronal deformity. Post-operative measurements also included the talocalcaneal angle, joint space height, talar height, lateral tibial component angle, lateral talar component angle, and anteroposterior tibial component angle. The post-operative bone loss, subluxation, positioning, and subsidence were also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using two-sample t test and Fisher's exact test. Out of 30 patients, 23 had a successful clinical outcome with intact prosthesis at a 2-year follow-up. The only variables with significant correlation (p < 0.05) to the post-surgical outcome were the lateral talar component angle (p = 0.002) and the mean difference between pre- and post-operative tibial slope (p = 0.001). The coronal deformity had significant mean difference between pre- and post-operative values (p < 0.001); however, it lacked a significant correlation to the final surgical outcome. None of the categorical variables had a significant correlation with post-surgical outcome. In our retrospective study, only the lateral talar component angle and the mean difference between the pre- and post-operative tibial slope had significant correlation with post-surgical outcome in INBONE ankle arthroplasty. These measurements may be helpful in radiographic assessment of the INBONE ankle arthroplasty. (orig.)

  10. Parametric modelling of a knee joint prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, L P; Goh, J C; Chow, S L

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the establishment of a parametric model of knee joint prosthesis. Four different sizes of a commercial prosthesis are used as an example in the study. A reverse engineering technique was employed to reconstruct the prosthesis on CATIA, a CAD (computer aided design) system. Parametric models were established as a result of the analysis. Using the parametric model established and the knee data obtained from a clinical study on 21 pairs of cadaveric Asian knees, the development of a prototype prosthesis that suits a patient with a very small knee joint is presented. However, it was found that modification to certain parameters may be inevitable due to the uniqueness of the Asian knee. An avenue for rapid modelling and eventually economical production of a customized knee joint prosthesis for patients is proposed and discussed.

  11. [Biomechanics of the ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwipp, H

    1989-03-01

    According to Fick, the tree-dimensional patterns of foot motion are best characterized as jawlike movement. Anatomically and biomechanically, this process represents conjoined, synchronous motion within the three mobile segments of the hindfoot: the ankle joint, the posterior subtalar joint, and the anterior subtalar joint. Foot kinematics can be described more completely if the anterior subtalar joint is defined not only as the talocalcaneal navicular joint, but as including the calcaneocuboid joint, thus representing the transverse joint of the tarsus, i.e., the Chopart joint. The axes of these three joints can be defined precisely. In some parts they represent a screwlike motion, clockwise or counter-clockwise, around the central ligamentous structures (fibulotibial ligament, talocalcaneal interosseous ligament, bifurcate ligament). The individual anatomy and structure of these ligaments provide variations in the degree and direction of foot motion. A precise knowledge of foot kinematics is important in surgical ligament and joint reconstruction and in selective foot arthrodeses.

  12. Biomechanics of the ankle joint and clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Junitha M; Golshani, Ashkahn; Gargac, Shawn; Goswami, Tarun

    2008-10-01

    Until the 1970s ankle arthrodesis was considered to be the "gold-standard" to treat arthritis. But the low fusion rate of ankle arthrodeses along with the inability to achieve normal range of motion led to the growing interest in the development of total ankle replacements. Though the short-term outcomes were good, their long-term outcomes were not as promising. To date, most models do not exactly mimic the anatomical functionality of a natural ankle joint. Therefore, research is being conducted worldwide to either enhance the existing models or develop new models while understanding the intricacies of the joint more precisely. This paper reviews the anatomical and biomechanical aspects of the ankle joint. Also, the evolution and comparison of clinical outcomes of various total ankle replacements are presented.

  13. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  14. Foot and ankle injuries in theatrical dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardaker, W T; Margello, S; Goldner, J L

    1985-10-01

    The theatrical dancer is a unique combination of athlete and artist. The physical demands of dance class, rehearsal, and performance can lead to injury, particularly to the foot and ankle. Ankle sprains are the most common acute injury. Chronic injuries predominate and relate primarily to the repeated impact loading of the foot and ankle on the dance floor. Contributing factors include anatomic variation, improper technique, and fatigue. Early and aggressive conservative management is usually successful and surgery is rarely indicated. Orthotics play a limited but potentially useful role in treatment. Following treatment, a structured rehabilitation program is fundamental to the successful return to dance.

  15. Smartphone supported upper limb prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hepp D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available State of the art upper limb prostheses offer up to six active DoFs (degrees of freedom and are controlled using different grip patterns. This low number of DoFs combined with a machine-human-interface which does not provide control over all DoFs separately result in a lack of usability for the patient. The aim of this novel upper limb prosthesis is both offering simplified control possibilities for changing grip patterns depending on the patients’ priorities and the improvement of grasp capability. Design development followed the design process requirements given by the European Medical Device Directive 93/42 ECC and was structured into the topics mechanics, software and drive technology. First user needs were identified by literature research and by patient feedback. Consequently, concepts were evaluated against technical and usability requirements. A first evaluation prototype with one active DoF per finger was manufactured. In a second step a test setup with two active DoF per finger was designed. The prototype is connected to an Android based smartphone application. Two main grip patterns can be preselected in the software application and afterwards changed and used by the EMG signal. Three different control algorithms can be selected: “all-day”, “fine” and “tired muscle”. Further parameters can be adjusted to customize the prosthesis to the patients’ needs. First patient feedback certified the prosthesis an improved level of handling compared to the existing devices. Using the two DoF test setup, the possibilities of finger control with a neural network are evaluated at the moment. In a first user feedback test, the smartphone based software application increased the device usability, e.g. the change within preselected grip patterns and the “tired muscle” algorithm. Although the overall software application was positively rated, the handling of the prosthesis itself needs to be proven within a patient study to be

  16. 21 CFR 878.3530 - Silicone inflatable breast prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicone inflatable breast prosthesis. 878.3530... inflatable breast prosthesis. (a) Identification. A silicone inflatable breast prosthesis is a silicone... inflatable breast prosthesis that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or that has, on...

  17. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration prosthesis... external prosthesis adhesive. The device is not intended to be implanted. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis: A novel method for ankle fusion - A short term retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Muthukumar Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle arthrodesis has long been the traditional operative treatment for posttraumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infection, neuromuscular conditions, and salvage of failed ankle arthroplasty. It remains the treatment of choice for patients in whom heavy and prolonged activity is anticipated. We present our short term followup study of functional outcome of patients who underwent transfibular ankle arthrodesis for arthritis of ankle due to various indications. Materials and Methods: 29 transfibular ankle arthrodesis in 29 patients performed between April 2009 and April 2014 were included in this study. The mean age was 50 years (range 22-75 years. The outcome analysis with a minimum of 1-year postoperative followup were included. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Hindfoot scale. Results: All cases of ankle fusions (100% progressed to solid union in a mean postoperative duration of 3.8 months (range 3-6 months. All patients had sound arthrodesis. The mean followup period was 32.52 months (standard deviation ± 10.34. The mean AOFAS score was 74 (pain score = 32, functional score = 42. We found that twenty patients (68.96% out of 29, had excellent results, 7 (24.13% had good, and 2 (6.89% showed fair results. Conclusion: Transfibular ankle arthrodesis is a simple and effective procedure for ankle arthritis. It achieves a high rate of union and good functional outcome on midterm followup.

  19. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis: A novel method for ankle fusion – A short term retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, S Muthukumar; Selvaraj, V; Devadoss, Sathish; Devadoss, Annamalai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ankle arthrodesis has long been the traditional operative treatment for posttraumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infection, neuromuscular conditions, and salvage of failed ankle arthroplasty. It remains the treatment of choice for patients in whom heavy and prolonged activity is anticipated. We present our short term followup study of functional outcome of patients who underwent transfibular ankle arthrodesis for arthritis of ankle due to various indications. Materials and Methods: 29 transfibular ankle arthrodesis in 29 patients performed between April 2009 and April 2014 were included in this study. The mean age was 50 years (range 22-75 years). The outcome analysis with a minimum of 1-year postoperative followup were included. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot scale. Results: All cases of ankle fusions (100%) progressed to solid union in a mean postoperative duration of 3.8 months (range 3–6 months). All patients had sound arthrodesis. The mean followup period was 32.52 months (standard deviation ± 10.34). The mean AOFAS score was 74 (pain score = 32, functional score = 42). We found that twenty patients (68.96%) out of 29, had excellent results, 7 (24.13%) had good, and 2 (6.89%) showed fair results. Conclusion: Transfibular ankle arthrodesis is a simple and effective procedure for ankle arthritis. It achieves a high rate of union and good functional outcome on midterm followup. PMID:28216754

  20. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomason, Katherine

    2014-07-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described.

  1. Volitional control of ankle plantar flexion in a powered transtibial prosthesis during stair-ambulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kannape, Oliver; Herr, Hugh M.

    2014-01-01

    Although great advances have been made in the design and control of lower extremity prostheses, walking on different terrains, such as ramps or stairs, and transitioning between these terrains remains a major challenge for the field. In order to generalize biomimetic behaviour of active lower-limb prostheses top-down volitional control is required but has until recently been deemed unfeasible due to the difficulties involved in acquiring an adequate electromyographic (EMG) signal. In this stu...

  2. Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle: Lichen simplex chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. A minor itch may encourage scratching which increases the irritation, leading to more scratching. This ...

  3. American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Practice Management Education Opportunities Practice Management e-Learning e-Learning CME Transcripts Corporate Relations Faculty Application Research & Publications Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery ACFAS Update Read ...

  4. Retinal prosthesis for the blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Eyal; Maia, Mauricio; Weiland, James D; Greenberg, Robert J; Fujii, Gildo Y; Torres, Gustavo; Piyathaisere, Duke V; O'Hearn, Thomas M; Liu, Wentai; Lazzi, Gianluca; Dagnelie, Gislin; Scribner, Dean A; de Juan, Eugene; Humayun, Mark S

    2002-01-01

    Most of current concepts for a visual prosthesis are based on neuronal electrical stimulation at different locations along the visual pathways within the central nervous system. The different designs of visual prostheses are named according to their locations (i.e., cortical, optic nerve, subretinal, and epiretinal). Visual loss caused by outer retinal degeneration in diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration can be reversed by electrical stimulation of the retina or the optic nerve (retinal or optic nerve prostheses, respectively). On the other hand, visual loss caused by inner or whole thickness retinal diseases, eye loss, optic nerve diseases (tumors, ischemia, inflammatory processes etc.), or diseases of the central nervous system (not including diseases of the primary and secondary visual cortices) can be reversed by a cortical visual prosthesis. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of current and future concepts of retinal and optic nerve prostheses. This article will begin with general considerations that are related to all or most of visual prostheses and then concentrate on the retinal and optic nerve designs. The authors believe that the field has grown beyond the scope of a single article so cortical prostheses will be described only because of their direct effect on the concept and technical development of the other prostheses, and this will be done in a more general and historic perspective.

  5. An epidemiological survey on ankle sprain.

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, M S; Chan, K. M.; So, C H; Yuan, W Y

    1994-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury and is often regarded as trivial by athletes and coaches. This epidemiological study was conducted among three categories of Hong Kong Chinese athletes: national teams, competitive athletes and recreational athletes. This study shows that as much as 73% of all athletes had recurrent ankle sprain and 59% of these athletes had significant disability and residual symptoms which led to impairment of their athletic performance. This study indicates that a pro...

  6. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: A Brief Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Roger A.; Harrison, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Ankle fusion has long been the standard of treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis, and a successful arthroplasty has been a long sought alternative. It is a motion sparing procedure and may greatly reduce the potential for adjacent level degeneration as seen with arthrodesis. The typical candidate for arthroplasty is a healthy low demand patient, although the indications are widening as the success of the procedure has increased. Nevertheless, it is not fail-safe, technical expertise and exp...

  7. Salvage arthrodesis for failed total ankle arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürcher, Arthur W

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has gained popularity in recent years. If it fails, however, salvage arthrodesis must be reliable as a rescue procedure. We therefore investigated the clinical, radiographic, and subjective outcome after salvage arthrodesis in a consecutive group of patients, and concentrated on the influence of the method of fixation on union rate and on salvage in inflammatory joint disease. Patients and methods Between 1994 and 2005, salvage arthrodesis was performed on 18 ankles (18 patients). Diagnosis was inflammatory joint disease (IJD) in 15 cases and osteoarthritis (OA) in 3. Tibio-talar fusion was performed in 7 ankles, and tibio-talocalcaneal fusion in 11. Serial radiographs were studied for time to union. Clinical outcome at latest follow-up was measured by the AOFAS score, the foot function index (FFI) and by VAS scores for pain, function, and satisfaction. Results Blade plates were used in 7 ankles (4 IJD, 3 OA); all united. Nonunion developed in 7 of the 11 rheumatic ankles stabilized by other methods. 11 patients (8 fused ankles, 3 nonunions) were available for clinical evaluation. Their mean AOFAS score was 62 and mean overall FFI was 70. VAS score for pain was 20, for function 64, and for satisfaction 74. The scores were similar in united and non-united ankles. Interpretation Blade plate fixation is successful in salvage arthrodesis for failed TAA. A high nonunion rate was found after salvage ankle arthrodesis in IJD with other methods of fixation. Clinical results were fair to good. PMID:20175648

  8. Postoperative infection in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Victoria O

    2012-07-01

    Our discussion highlights the commonly performed surgical procedures in the foot and ankle and reviews the various imaging modalities available for the detection of infection with graphic examples to better enable radiologists to approach the radiological evaluation of postoperative infection in the foot and ankle. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious inflammation remains a diagnostic challenge usually needing a combination of clinical assessment, laboratory investigations, and imaging studies to increase diagnostic accuracy.

  9. TOTAL ANKLE REPLACEMENT: WHY, WHEN AND HOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Dettoni, Federico; Femino, John E; Phisitkul, Phinit; Germano, Margherita; Amendola, Annunziato

    2010-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) was first attempted in the 1970s, but poor results led to its being considered inferior to ankle fusion until the late 1980s and early 1990s. By that time, newer designs which more closely replicated the natural anatomy of the ankle, showed improved clinical outcomes.1 Currently, even though controversy still exists about the effectiveness of TAR compared to ankle fusion, TAR has shown promising mid-term results and should no longer be considered an experimental procedure. Factors related to improved TAR outcomes include: 1) better patient selection, 2) more precise knowledge and replication of ankle biomechanics, 3) the introduction of less-constrained designs with reduced bone resection and no need for cementation, and 4) greater awareness of soft-tissue balance and component alignment. When TAR is performed, a thorough knowledge of ankle anatomy, pathologic anatomy and biomechanics is needed along with a careful pre-operative plan. These are fundamental in obtaining durable and predictable outcomes. The aim of this paper is to outline these aspects through a literature review. PMID:21045984

  10. Total ankle replacement for posttraumatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weme, Rebecca A Nieuwe; van Solinge, Guido; N Doornberg, Job; Sierevelt, Inger; Haverkamp, Daniël; Doets, H Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Most studies on total ankle replacement (TAR) have used a case mix of patients. We evaluated the outcome of TAR performed for end-stage arthritis either because of fracture or ligamentous injury. Patients and methods We prospectively followed 88 consecutive patients (50 postfracture ankles and 40 ankles with instability arthritis (2 bilateral)) who underwent TAR between 2001 and 2009. Mean follow-up for both groups was 5 years. Results Preoperative varus deformity of 10° or more was present in 23 ankles in the instability group. At 6 years, survival with revision or salvage fusion as an endpoint was 87% (95% CI: 74–99) in the postfracture group and 79% (95% CI: 63–94) in the instability group. Progressive periprosthetic osteolysis was seen in 23 ankles, and required salvage fusion in 6. The number of reoperations was similar in both groups. Clinical outcome, as assessed with 2 ankle scores and 2 questionnaires, showed good results and was similar at the latest follow-up. Interpretation The outcome was similar in the postfracture and instability groups and also similar to that reported in series including a case mix of patients. In contrast to earlier reports, preoperative frontal plane deformity in this series was not identified as a risk factor for failure. PMID:25772269

  11. Lower limb prosthesis utilisation by elderly amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, S; Hébert, R; Desrosiers, J

    2000-08-01

    The goal of prosthetic rehabilitation is to compensate for the loss of a limb by amputation by, in the case of a lower limb, encouraging walking, and to achieve the same level of autonomy as prior to the amputation. However, because of difficulties walking, elderly amputees may use their prosthesis to a greater or lesser degree or simply stop using it during the rehabilitation period. The objective of this research was to study factors such as physical and mental health, rehabilitation, physical independence and satisfaction with the prosthesis to understand why amputees use their prosthesis or not. The sample was composed of 65 unilateral vascular amputees 60 years old or over living at home. The information was collected from medical records, by telephone interview and by mail questionnaire. Prosthesis use was measured by a questionnaire on amputee activities developed by Day (1981). Eighty-one per cent (81%) of the subjects wore their prosthesis every day and 89% of this group wore it 6 hours or more per day. Less use of the prosthesis was significantly related to age, female gender, possession of a wheelchair, level of physical disability, cognitive impairment, poorer self-perceived health and the amputee's dissatisfaction. A multiple regression analysis showed that satisfaction, not possessing a wheelchair and cognitive integrity explained 46% of the variance in prosthesis use.

  12. Prosthesis infections after orthopedic joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Borgwardt, Lotte; Høiby, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore...... and the host immune responses. The authors reviewed the related literature in the context of their clinical experience, and discussed the possible etiology and mechanism leading to the infections, especially problems related to bacterial biofilm, and prophylaxis and treatment of infection, including both...... microbiological and surgical measures. Recent progress in research into bacterial biofilm and possible future treatment options of prosthesis-related infections are discussed....

  13. Stemless shoulder prosthesis versus conventional anatomic shoulder prosthesis in patients with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Berth, Alexander; Pap, Géza

    2012-01-01

    Background The stemless shoulder prosthesis is a new concept in shoulder arthroplasty. To date, only a few studies have investigated the results of this prosthesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and radiological midterm results of this implant in comparison with a standard anatomic stemmed shoulder prosthesis. Materials and methods The Constant score, the DASH score, the active range of motion (abduction, anteversion, external rotation), and the radiological results we...

  14. Do Ankle Orthoses Improve Ankle Proprioceptive Thresholds or Unipedal Balance in Older Persons with Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jaebum; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Richardson, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether ankle orthoses that provide medial and lateral support, and have been found to decrease gait variability in older persons with peripheral neuropathy, decrease (improve) frontal plane ankle proprioceptive thresholds or increase unipedal stance time in that same population. Design Observational study in which unipedal stance time was determined with a stopwatch, and frontal plane ankle (inversion and eversion) proprioceptive thresholds were quantified during bipedal stance with and without the ankle orthoses, in 11 older diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy (8 men; age 72 ± 7.1 years) using a foot cradle system which presented a series of 100 rotational stimuli. Results The subjects demonstrated no change in combined frontal plane (inversion + eversion) proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time with versus without the orthoses (1.06 ± 0.56 versus 1.13 ± 0.39 degrees, respectively; p = 0.955 and 6.1 ± 6.5 versus 6.2 ± 5.4 seconds, respectively; p = 0.922). Conclusion Ankle orthoses which provide medial-lateral support do not appear to change ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time in older persons with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Previously identified improvements in gait variability using orthoses in this population are therefore likely related to an orthotically-induced stiffening of the ankle rather than a change in ankle afferent function. PMID:20407302

  15. The results of ankle arthrodesis with screws for end stage ankle arthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torudom, Yingyong

    2010-02-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the results of ankle arthrodesis with screws in patients with ankle arthrosis. The author studied 19 patients (20 feet) who had been treated by ankle arthrodesis with screws from 2003 to 2008. Ten patients were men (11 feet) and nine (9 feet) were women. Their mean age was 56 years (30 to 65), and the average duration of follow-up was four years (2 to 6). Two compression screws were used in all feet. Union was achieved in 19 of the 20 feet (95%). Average scores for pain and clinical condition are increase after operation. One re-operation was performed for nonunion. Author conclude that ankle arthrodesis with screws was effective treatment for ankle arthrosis.

  16. Prospective study of ankle and foot fractures in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadagiri Surender Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of ankle fractures in old people is changing as time passes on. The incidence of ankle fractures increases with advancing age. The study conducted was among a rural popula-tion which comprised of 68 women (32 women with ankle fractures & 36 women with foot fractures. Patients studied were in the age group more than 50 years. The study highlights the etiological & risk factors for fractures of ankle & foot. The commonest ankle fracture was the lateral malleolar fracture & the commonest foot fracture was the 5th Metatarsal fracture. Diabetes is a risk factor which increases the occurrence of ankle and foot injuries.

  17. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  18. [Ankle joint arthritis--etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri, Ofir; Haim, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Ankle joint arthritis causes functional limitation and affects the quality of life many patients. It follows traumatic injuries, inflammatory joint arthritis, primary osteoarthritis, hemochromatosis and infections. Understanding the unique anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle is important for diagnosis and treatment of ankle joint pathology. The treatment of ankle joint arthritis has advanced considerably in recent years and it is still a surgical challenge. Total ankle replacement seems to be a promising form of treatment, even though current data does not demonstrate advantages over ankle joint arthrodesis.

  19. Custom ocular prosthesis: A palliative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi Thakkar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of palliative care is the achievement of the best quality of life for patients and their families. Eyes are generally the first features of the face to be noticed. Loss of an eye is a traumatic event which has a crippling effect on the psychology of the patient. Several ocular and orbital disorders require surgical intervention that may result in ocular defects. An ocular prosthesis is fabricated to restore the structure, function, and cosmetics of the defects created by such conditions. Although an implant eye prosthesis has a superior outcome, due to economic factors it may not be a feasible option for all patients. Therefore, a custom-made ocular prosthesis is a good alternative. This case report presents a palliative treatment for a patient with an enucleated eye by fabricating a custom ocular prosthesis which improved his psychological, physical, social, functional, emotional and spiritual needs.

  20. Penile prosthesis implantation in a transsexual neophallus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-MengTAN

    2000-01-01

    Reconstruction surgery for a female to male transsexual usually involves mastectomy, hysterectomy and creating an aesthetically appealing neophallus. We have successfully inserted an inflatable prosthesis using the AMS CX prosthesis in a 45 year old transsexual, who had a large bulky neophallus constructed from the anterior abdominal subcutaneous fat, about 9 years ago. The single cylinder CX prosthesis was well anchored to the symphysis pubis using a dacron windsock tubing, the activation pump was placed in the dependent pouch of the right labium and the reservior in the usual perivesical space. The patient subsequently had debulking procedure using liposuction to create a more aesthetic and functional phallus. To date, the inflatable neophallus prosthesis is functioning well. (Asian J Androl 2000 Dec;2:304-306)

  1. Aesthetic finger prosthesis with silicone biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, K M; Gururaju, C R; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication of finger prosthesis is as much an art as it is science. The ideally constructed prosthesis must duplicate the missing structures so precisely that patients can appear in public without fear of attracting unwanted attraction. A 65-years-old patient reported with loss of his right index finger up to the second phalanx and wanted to get it replaced. An impression of the amputated finger and donor were made. A wax pattern of the prosthesis was fabricated using the donor impression; a trial was performed and flasked. Medical grade silicone was intrinsically stained to match the skin tone, following which it was packed, processed and finished. This clinical report describes a method of attaining retention by selective scoring of the master cast of partially amputated finger to enhance the vacuum effect at par with the proportional distribution of the positive forces on the tissues exerted by the prosthesis. PMID:23975917

  2. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-08-29

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis.

  3. Updating upper extremity temporary prosthesis: thermoplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletchall, S; Tran, T; Ungaro, V; Hickerson, W

    1992-01-01

    Since 1989 amputees with upper-extremity burns have been fitted with a temporary prosthesis fabricated from low-temperature thermoplastic. Before 1989 conventional temporary prostheses were fabricated with plaster. The use of the thermoplastic material has produced a lightweight, cost-effective, modular system. No patients exhibited skin breakdown with the thermoplastic material. It appears that thermoplastics may be the next major breakthrough in terms of a design for a temporary upper-extremity prosthesis.

  4. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging of healthy paediatric ankles and knees: a baseline for comparison with haemophilic joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshava, S N; Gibikote, S V; Mohanta, A; Poonnoose, P; Rayner, T; Hilliard, P; Lakshmi, K M; Moineddin, R; Ignas, D; Srivastava, A; Blanchette, V; Doria, A S

    2015-05-01

    The study was undertaken to document cartilage and soft tissue changes/findings in ankles and knees of normal children of different age groups to be used for comparison in the assessment of children with haemophilia. Cartilage thickness and soft tissue changes were recorded at predetermined sites of ankles/knees on both US and MRI in healthy boys in three age groups: 7-9; 10-14; and 15-18 years. To assess the validity of the ultrasound and MRI measurements, an ex vivo study was done using agar phantoms with techniques and scanners similar to those applied in vivo. Twenty (48%) knees and 22 (52%) ankles of 42 boys, were evaluated. There was a reduction in the thickness of joint cartilage with age. A difference in cartilage measurements was noted in most sites between the age groups on both US and MRI (P ankles or knees (P = 0.20, P = 0.68 or P = 0.75, P = 0.63 for US, MRI, respectively). Although cartilage measurements were smaller on US than on MRI for both ankles and knees (P US measurements were smaller than corresponding phantom's measurements, P = 0.02. Age-related measurements were noted for cartilage thickness on US and MRI in ankles and knees. US measurements were smaller than corresponding MRI measurements at most joint sites, which were supported by results on small-diameter phantoms.

  5. Radiographic Evaluation of the Ankle Mortise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mirbagheri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The ankle joint is the most frequently injured joint in adults. Decisions on management are usually based on clinical examination and interpretation of the x-rays. Stability of the ankle mortise relies on the configuration of the osseous structures and the ligaments. A basic radiographic examination consists of a mortise-view and a lateral view. Some add the AP-view. The Mortise view is an AP-view with 15-25 degrees endorotation of the foot. "nThe view clearly demonstrates both lateral and medial joint spaces. On a true AP-view the talus overlaps a portion of the lateral malleolus obscuring the lateral aspect of the ankle joint. However, the AP-view will give you an extra view on both malleoli from a different angle. The lateral radiograph of the ankle should include the base of the fifth metatarsal because of the frequency of fractures at this side that clinically mimic a fracture of the ankle.

  6. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  7. Bilateral ankle edema with bilateral iritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil

    2007-07-01

    I report two patient presented to me with bilateral symmetrical ankle edema and bilateral acute iritis. A 42-year-old female of Indian origin and 30-year-old female from Somalia both presented with bilateral acute iritis. In the first patient, bilateral ankle edema preceded the onset of bilateral acute iritis. Bilateral ankle edema developed during the course of disease after onset of ocular symptoms in the second patient. Both patients did not suffer any significant ocular problem in the past, and on systemic examination, all clinical parameters were within normal limit. Lacrimal gland and conjunctival nodule biopsy established the final diagnosis of sarcoidosis in both cases, although the chest x-rays were normal.

  8. Management of Osseous and Soft-Tissue Ankle Equinus During Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Simonson, Devin C

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining functional alignment of a total ankle replacement, including physiologic sagittal plane range of motion, is paramount for a successful outcome. This article reviews the literature on techniques available for correction of osseous and soft-tissue equinus at the time of index total ankle replacement. These techniques include anterior tibiotalar joint cheilectomy, posterior superficial muscle compartment lengthening, posterior ankle capsule release, and release of the posterior portions of the medial and lateral collateral ligament complexes. The rationale for these procedures and the operative sequence of events for these procedures are presented.

  9. Kinematics of hip, knee, ankle of the young and elderly Chinese people during kneeling activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai ZHOU; Dong-mei WANG; Tao-ran LIU; Xiang-sen ZENG; Cheng-tao WANG

    2012-01-01

    Objective:The purpose of this study was to measure the kinematics of the lower limbs of Chinese people during normal kneeling activity,as such data could be valuable in designing joint prosthesis and arthroplasty that meet the needs of Chinese citizens' daily activities.Methods:Thirty young and twenty elderly Chinese participants with no personal history of joint diseases were recruited,and matched by age (average age:23.8 years for the young group,60.8 years for the elderly group).Each participant performed six trials during which three-dimensional (3D) kinematics data were collected and the means of the 3D angles of the ankle,knee,and hip joints of two groups were calculated.Results:There were no obvious differences between the two groups in the knee and ankle joints.The mean range of knee flexion was 139.6° for the young group and 140.9° for the elderly group.The mean range of ankle flexion was 35.7° for the young group and 37.6° for the elderly group.The maximal eccentric flexion at the hip joint was 67.5° for the young group compared to 100.5° for the elderly group.Conclusions:The elderly uses more hip flexion angles than the young when assuming the kneeling posture.The ranges of motion obtained during kneeling activity are greater than the reported mean ranges of motion achieved following joint arthroplasty.The data could be valuable in establishing criteria for lower limb prosthetics and rehabilitation protocol for the Chinese population.

  10. Characterization of ankle function during stair ambulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Deanna H.; Lelas, Jennifer L.; Della Croce, Ugo; Herr, Hugh; Bonato, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ankle joint during level walking, stair ascent, and stair descent to determine models for use in the design of prosthetic and orthotic systems. Ten healthy subjects were asked to walk (1) across a level walkway, (2) up, and (3) down an instrumented stairway. Sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic data were analyzed to obtain ankle biomechanics during the stance phase of each task. Each stance phase was broken down into sub-phases based on the power traje...

  11. Ankle fusion using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.M. Hendrickx; G.M.M.J. Kerkhoffs; S.A.S. Stufkens; C.N. van Dijk; R.K. Marti

    2011-01-01

    Reliable fusion and optimal correction of the alignment of the ankle joint using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique. Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint after insufficient other treatment, severe deformity of the osteoarthritic ankle joint, or salvation procedure after failed arthroplasty. Ac

  12. The clinimetric qualities of patient-assessed instruments for measuring chronic ankle instability: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asman Sara

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of outcomes from the patient's perspective becomes more recognized in health care. Also in patients with chronic ankle instability, the degree of present impairments, disabilities and participation problems should be documented from the perspective of the patient. The decision about which patient-assessed instrument is most appropriate for clinical practice should be based upon systematic reviews. Only rating scales constructed for patients with acute ligament injuries were systematically reviewed in the past. The aim of this study was to review systematically the clinimetric qualities of patient-assessed instruments designed for patients with chronic ankle instability. Methods A computerized literature search of Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Web of Science, Sport Discus and the Cochrane Controlled Trial Register was performed to identify eligible instruments. Two reviewers independently evaluated the clinimetric qualities of the selected instruments using a criteria list. The inter-observer reliability of both the selection procedure and the clinimetric evaluation was calculated using modified kappa coefficients. Results The inter-observer reliability of the selection procedure was excellent (k = .86. Four instruments met the eligibility criteria: the Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool (AJFAT, the Functional Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS, the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI and the Functional Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM. The inter-observer reliability of the quality assessment was substantial to excellent (k between .64 and .88. Test-retest reliability was demonstrated for the FAOS, the FADI and the FAAM but not for the AJFAT. The FAOS and the FAAM met the criteria for content validity and construct validity. For none of the studied instruments, the internal consistency was sufficiently demonstrated. The presence of floor- and ceiling effects was assessed for the FAOS but ceiling effects were present for all

  13. Documenting localities

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Richard J

    1996-01-01

    Now in paperback! Documenting Localities is the first effort to summarize the past decade of renewed discussion about archival appraisal theory and methodology and to provide a practical guide for the documentation of localities.This book discusses the continuing importance of the locality in American historical research and archival practice, traditional methods archivists have used to document localities, and case studies in documenting localities. These chapters draw on a wide range of writings from archivists, historians, material culture specialists, historic preservationists

  14. BELOW-ELBOW COSMETIC CONDYLE-SUSPENDED PROSTHESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    particular appeal to those amputees who desire a prosthesis for cosmetic reasons. However this type of prosthesis can be so built to provide a means for operating the active mechanical terminal device. (Author)

  15. A Cyber Expert System for Auto-Tuning Powered Prosthesis Impedance Control Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Crouch, Dustin L; Liu, Ming; Sawicki, Gregory S; Wang, Ding

    2016-05-01

    Typically impedance control parameters (e.g., stiffness and damping) in powered lower limb prostheses are fine-tuned by human experts (HMEs), which is time and resource intensive. Automated tuning procedures would make powered prostheses more practical for clinical use. In this study, we developed a novel cyber expert system (CES) that encoded HME tuning decisions as computer rules to auto-tune control parameters for a powered knee (passive ankle) prosthesis. The tuning performance of CES was preliminarily quantified on two able-bodied subjects and two transfemoral amputees. After CES and HME tuning, we observed normative prosthetic knee kinematics and improved or slightly improved gait symmetry and step width within each subject. Compared to HME, the CES tuning procedure required less time and no human intervention. Hence, using CES for auto-tuning prosthesis control was a sound concept, promising to enhance the practical value of powered prosthetic legs. However, the tuning goals of CES might not fully capture those of the HME. This was because we observed that HME tuning reduced trunk sway, while CES sometimes led to slightly increased trunk motion. Additional research is still needed to identify more appropriate tuning objectives for powered prosthetic legs to improve amputees' walking function.

  16. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  17. THE ENDO-EXO-FEMORAL PROSTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aschoff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with above knee amputation (AKA face many challenges to mobility including difficulty with socket fit and fatigue due to high energy consumption. The aim of the Endo-Exo-Femur Prosthesis (EEFP is to avoid problems at the interface between the sleeve of the socket-prosthesis and the soft tissue coat of the femur stump which often impedes an inconspicuous and harmonic gait. In 1999 we began using a transcutaneous, press-fit distal femoral intramedullary device whose most distal external aspect serves as a hard point for AKA prosthesis attachment. The bone guided prosthesis enables an advanced gait via osseoperception and leads to a decreased oxygen consumption of the patient. Thirty two patients underwent the procedure between 1999 and 2008. Their indication for surgery was persistent AKA prosthesis difficulties with a history of AKA for trauma. The paper presents the patient data regarding the design of the implant, the operative procedure, patient satisfaction, gait analysis and oxygen consumption.

  18. Short-term ankle motor performance with ankle robotics training in chronic hemiparetic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindo Roy, PhD

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accident (stroke often results in impaired motor control and persistent weakness that may lead to chronic disability, including deficits in gait and balance function. Finding ways to restore motor control may help reduce these deficits; however, little is known regarding the capacity or temporal profile of short-term motor adaptations and learning at the hemiparetic ankle. Our objective was to determine the short-term effects of a single session of impedance-controlled ankle robot (“anklebot” training on paretic ankle motor control in chronic stroke. This was a double-arm pilot study on a convenience sample of participants with chronic stroke (n = 7 who had residual hemiparetic deficits and an equal number of age- and sex-matched nondisabled control subjects. Training consisted of participants in each group playing a target-based video game with the anklebot for an hour, for a total of 560 movement repetitions in dorsiflexion/plantar flexion ranges followed by retest 48 hours later. Task difficulty was adjusted to ankle range of motion, with robotic assistance decreased incrementally across training. Assessments included robotic measures of ankle motor control on unassisted trials before and after training and at 48 hours after training. Following exposure to the task, subjects with stroke improved paretic ankle motor control across a single training session as indexed by increased targeting accuracy (21.6 +/– 8.0 to 31.4 +/– 4.8, p = 0.05, higher angular speeds (mean: 4.7 +/– 1.5 degrees/s to 6.5 +/– 2.6 degrees/s, p 0.05 at 48 hours in both groups. Robust maintenance of motor adaptation in the robot-trained paretic ankle over 48 hours may be indicative of short-term motor learning. Our initial results suggest that the anklebot may be a flexible motor learning platform with the potential to detect rapid changes in ankle motor performance poststroke.

  19. An examination of ankle, knee, and hip torque production in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Phillip A; Robinson, Richard H

    2009-03-01

    There is some debate in the literature as to whether strength deficits exist at the ankle in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Additionally, there is evidence to suggest that knee and hip performance is altered in those with CAI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether CAI is associated with deficits in ankle, knee, and hip torque. Fifteen subjects with unilateral CAI and fifteen subjects with healthy ankles participated. Subjects reported to the laboratory for one session during which the torque production of ankle plantar flexion/dorsiflexion, knee flexion/extension, and hip flexion/extension were measured with an isokinetic device. Subjects performed 5 maximum-effort repetitions of a concentric/concentric protocol at 60 degrees .s for both extremities. Average peak torque (APT) values were calculated. The subjects with CAI demonstrated significantly less APT production for knee flexion (F1,28 = 5.40; p = 0.03) and extension (F1,28 = 5.34; p = 0.03). Subjects with CAI exhibited significantly less APT for ankle plantar flexion in the injured limb compared with their noninjured limb (F1,28 = 6.51; p = 0.02). No significant difference in ankle dorsiflexion or hip flexion/extension APT production existed between the 2 groups. Individuals with CAI, in addition to deficits in ankle plantar flexion torque, had deficits in knee flexor and extensor torque, suggesting that distal joint instability may lead to knee joint neuromuscular adaptations. There were no similar deficits at the hip. Future research should determine what implications this has for prevention and rehabilitation of lower-extremity injury. Clinicians may need to consider including rehabilitation efforts to address these deficits when rehabilitating patients with CAI.

  20. Malignant melanoma of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, K J; Hayes, D W; Green, D R; Dickerson, J

    2000-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is a serious and devastating skin disease that podiatrists may be called upon to treat. It is pertinent that delays in diagnosis and treatment of malignant melanoma be avoided. Some of the topics discussed in this article are causes, clinical features, classification, and treatment of malignant melanoma, focusing on the foot and ankle.

  1. SPARKy-Spring Ankle with Regenerative Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    89-93215-02-1 98560/10/$15 ©ICROS 142 1 BIONIC RUNNING FOR UNILATERAL TRANSTIBIAL MILITARY AMPUTEES Joseph Hitt, James Merlo, and Jonathan...ankle joint, and n optical switch embedded at the heel provides the necessary ensor feedback. Advantech’s 650MHZ PC-104 with 512MB on oard memory is

  2. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2013-07-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased cutaneous sensory function as evidenced by increased touch threshold. Absolute dorsiflexion force error increased without visual feedback during peroneal nerve stimulation. This was not a general effect of stimulation because force error did not increase during plantar nerve stimulation. The effects of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases.

  3. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that creates an increased risk of arthritis. Symptoms People with osteoarthritis in the foot or ankle experience, in varying degrees, one or more of the following: Pain and stiffness in the joint Swelling in or near the joint Difficulty walking or bending the joint Some patients with osteoarthritis ...

  4. Report on the evaluation of the VA/Seattle below-knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellepola, W; Sheredos, S J

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Rehabilitation Research and Development (Rehab R&D) Service, Technology Transfer Section (TTS) with collaboration from the Prosthetic and Sensory Aids Service (PSAS) managed clinical trials to evaluate the VA/Seattle Below-Knee (BK) Prosthetic System. The clinical trials were held at the Prosthetic Treatment Center (PTC), VA Medical Center, Hines, Illinois. Five other VA medical centers participated in the outreach program of the trials as satellite stations, with PTC Hines as the central fabrication facility. The VA/Seattle BK system is the first complete prosthetic system designed and developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. It consists of a socket designed and fabricated using computer-aided, automated technology, and off-the-shelf modular components: a lightweight pylon and an ankle unit, and a lightweight, energy-storing foot. The computer-based socket design software, the modular components, and the prosthetic foot were developed with funds from the VA Rehab R&D Service. The evaluation trials were conducted to determine the efficacy of the VA/Seattle prosthesis, its reliability, and acceptance by veterans. The clinical trials began in April 1991 and were completed in August 1992. Forty-six BK amputee veterans were fitted with the VA/Seattle prosthesis. Their progress with the prosthesis was followed for a period of 6 months and data were gathered at intervals of 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Forty sets of subject data instruments were collected. In order to maintain the accuracy of the results, TTS used the 22 sets that were complete for data analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. 21 CFR 870.3450 - Vascular graft prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vascular graft prosthesis. 870.3450 Section 870... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A vascular graft prosthesis is an implanted device intended to repair... Prostheses 510(k) Submissions.”...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glenoid fossa prosthesis. 872.3950 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3720 - Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3720 Section 888.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of...

  8. 21 CFR 890.3500 - External assembled lower limb prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External assembled lower limb prosthesis. 890.3500... External assembled lower limb prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external assembled lower limb prosthesis... the lower extremity. Examples of external assembled lower limb prostheses are the following:...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3780 Section 888.3780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  10. 21 CFR 874.3450 - Partial ossicular replacement prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partial ossicular replacement prosthesis. 874.3450 Section 874.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... replacement prosthesis. (a) Identification. A partial ossicular replacement prosthesis is a device intended...

  11. 21 CFR 884.3650 - Fallopian tube prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fallopian tube prosthesis. 884.3650 Section 884.3650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.3650 Fallopian tube prosthesis. (a) Identification. A fallopian tube prosthesis is a...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended... generic type of device includes prostheses that consist of a single flexible across-the-joint...

  13. 21 CFR 874.3495 - Total ossicular replacement prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total ossicular replacement prosthesis. 874.3495 Section 874.3495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... replacement prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total ossicular replacement prosthesis is a device intended...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular implant facial prosthesis is a device that...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to... requirement for premarket approval for any mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  17. Contact dermatitis to a limb prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Apra; Taylor, James S; Billock, John N

    2003-09-01

    PROSTHESIS USERS commonly develop various skin problems on the residual limb, directly under the prosthetic device when the device is in direct contact with the skin. Prolonged occlusion and humidity increase the likelihood of developing contact sensitivity to moisturizing creams, medicaments, and materials in the prosthesis itself.1 Allergic contact dermatitis to various prosthetic design materials is uncommon, and the relevance of positive patch-test results to chemicals present in prostheses may be difficult to establish. Most reports of allergic contact dermatitis to prostheses have been concerned with surgical amputees and not congenital amputees. We report a 5-year-old boy with a transverse partial hemimelia who developed allergic contact dermatitis to an adhesive used in his myoelectric prosthesis. Unlike most prostheses, myoelectric prostheses are worn directly against the skin, for surface electromyography electrode contact.

  18. Groningen prosthesis for voice rehabilitation after laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annyas, A A; Nijdam, H F; Escajadillo, J R; Mahieu, H F; Leever, H

    1984-02-01

    Singer and Blom's endoscopic technique, using a single valved silicone prosthesis, constituted a dramatic advance in speech rehabilitation following total laryngectomy. Since 1980, we have developed a silicone biflanged prosthesis that overcomes some of the inconveniences of previous prostheses. Insertion via the mouth and the oesophagus, or as a primary procedure during total laryngectomy is easily done with the use of specially developed instruments. The success rate in 36 patients in which the voice button was inserted at the time of total laryngectomy was 86.2%.

  19. Fabrication of a custom ocular prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Sethi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Defects of the eye may follow removal of a part of or the entire orbit. This results in the patient becoming visually, esthetically and psychologically handicapped. Restoring the defect with a silicone- or acrylic-based prosthesis not only restores esthetics but also gives back the lost confidence to the patient. This is a case report of a patient with a `pthisical eye` and details the steps in fabrication of an ocular prosthesis. Particular attention has been given to the laboratory process in this technique to minimize the residual monomer content in the artificial eye.

  20. Capitate pyrocarbon prosthesis in radiocarpal osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubier, Jean-Noël; Vogels, Jérome; Teboul, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    Scapholunate dissociation or scaphoid pseudarthrosis may lead to osteoarthritis of the wrist. When osteoarthritis affects the midcarpal joint, proximal row carpectomy is no longer possible and only 4 corners fusion or capitolunate arthrodesis may be indicated. However, in some cases, osteoarthritis or bone necrosis may involve the lunatum, making partial arthrodeses impossible. Total arthrodesis may be proposed in such cases, but with a loss of range-of-motion. Total prosthesis may be considered but the results of this procedure are not always encouraging. Consequently, in these situations, we perform pyrocarbon prosthesis implant, replacing the head of the capitatum. This article describes the procedure and the results of a preliminary study.

  1. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  2. Predicting functional recovery after acute ankle sprain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R O'Connor

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ankle sprains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal conditions presenting to primary care. Their clinical course is variable but there are limited recommendations on prognostic factors. Our primary aim was to identify clinical predictors of short and medium term functional recovery after ankle sprain. METHODS: A secondary analysis of data from adult participants (N = 85 with an acute ankle sprain, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The predictive value of variables (age, BMI, gender, injury mechanism, previous injury, weight-bearing status, medial joint line pain, pain during weight-bearing dorsiflexion and lateral hop test recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks post injury were investigated for their prognostic ability. Recovery was determined from measures of subjective ankle function at short (4 weeks and medium term (4 months follow ups. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association between the aforementioned variables and functional recovery. RESULTS: Greater age, greater injury grade and weight-bearing status at baseline were associated with lower function at 4 weeks post injury (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.34. Greater age, weight-bearing status at baseline and non-inversion injury mechanisms were associated with lower function at 4 months (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.20. Pain on medial palpation and pain on dorsiflexion at 4 weeks were the most valuable prognostic indicators of function at 4 months (p< 0.01; adjusted R square=0.49. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study provide further evidence that ankle sprains have a variable clinical course. Age, injury grade, mechanism and weight-bearing status at baseline provide some prognostic information for short and medium term recovery. Clinical assessment variables at 4 weeks were the strongest predictors of recovery, explaining 50% of the variance in ankle function at 4 months. Further

  3. Termination Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mike; Hill, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined 11 workplaces to determine how they handle termination documentation, an empirically unexplored area in technical communication and rhetoric. We found that the use of termination documentation is context dependent while following a basic pattern of infraction, investigation, intervention, and termination. Furthermore,…

  4. Comparison of Range of Motion After Total Knee Prosthesis According to Different Type of Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Seyfettinoglu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and range of motion of different type of knee prosthesis. Material and Method: This study includes 180 of 225 patients (139 F, 41 M, average age: 65, range of age: 51-82 between April 2005 and September 2007 with the diagnosis of gonarthrosis. All patients underwent to primary total knee arthroplasty. Primary osteoartrhritis is the reason of gonarthrosis. The patients with secondary osteoartrhritis were excluded from the study. All the patients were operated by the same surgical team and rehabilitated after surgery. Patella didnt change any patient. PCL was protected in some of the patients and cut some of patients. Totally seven type prosthesis in 16 subgroup were applied to the patients. All measurement were done by the same surgeon. Average follow up period was 31 months (24-49 months. Results: Patients without subgrouping were tested according to the range of motion before and after surgery to the type of the prosthesis trademark. Range of motion was decreased with the usage of Rotaglide and LCS® type of prosthesis. Range of motion didnt change with the usage of Maxim and Kinemax type. The range of motion increased in the other trademark of prosthesis. Flexion angle was increased statistically significant with nexgen® and scorpio® prosthesis (p

  5. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have demonstrated altered neuromuscular function and decreased muscle strength when compared with healthy counterparts without a history of ankle sprain. Up to this point, muscle volumes have not been analyzed in patients with CAI to determine whether deficits in muscle size are present following recurrent sprain. Purpose: To analyze intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle muscle volumes and 4-way ankle strength in young adults with and without CAI. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with CAI (mean age, 23.0 ± 4 years; 1 male, 4 females) and 5 healthy controls (mean age, 23.8 ± 4.5 years; 1 male, 4 females) volunteered for this study. Novel fast-acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan from above the femoral condyles through the foot and ankle. The perimeter of each muscle was outlined on each axial slice and then the 2-dimensional area was multiplied by the slice thickness (5 mm) to calculate the muscle volume. Plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion isometric strength were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Patients with CAI were compared with healthy controls on all measures of muscle volume and strength. Extrinsic muscle volumes of patients with CAI were also compared with a normative database of healthy controls (n = 24) by calculating z scores for each muscle individually for each CAI subject. Results: The CAI group had smaller total shank, superficial posterior compartment, soleus, adductor hallucis obliqus, and flexor hallucis brevis muscle volumes compared with healthy controls as indicated by group means and associated 90% CIs that did not overlap. Cohen d effect sizes for the significant group differences were all large and ranged from 1.46 to 3.52, with 90% CIs that did not cross zero. The CAI group had lower eversion, dorsiflexion, and 4-way composite ankle strength, all with group means and associated 90

  6. Simplified, low cost below-knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijkusol, D

    1986-08-01

    Problems are encountered in using standard prostheses in developing countries, especially when the prostheses need repair and the amputees cannot come back to the workshop. Very simple, low cost and durable prostheses can solve this problem. The solution described has worked well with villagers in some rural areas of Thailand, where the inexpensive prosthesis permits walking bare-foot and through water and mud.

  7. Prosthesis fabrication using electrical discharge machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roekel, N B

    1992-01-01

    Fixed-removable implant prostheses provide solutions for some of the problems associated with implant dentistry, especially in the maxilla. The technique for using electrical discharge machining to create a precise passive fit between the substructure bar and the removable suprastructure is presented. The advantages, disadvantages, and complications associated with this type of prosthesis are discussed.

  8. Movement Control of a Prosthesis Forefinger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHIVU, C.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches the problem of hand prostheses. Designing of hand prostheses implies the use of many types of mechanisms. One of them is the anti-quadrilateral mechanism. The control method chosen and presented in this paper is fuzzy method, applied to a dc motor that actuates each finger of the prosthesis.

  9. Catastrophic failure of a monolithic zirconia prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae-Seung; Ji, Woon; Choi, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Sunjai

    2015-02-01

    Recently, monolithic zirconia restorations have received attention as an alternative to zirconia veneered with feldspathic porcelain to eliminate chipping failures of veneer ceramics. In this clinical report, a patient with mandibular edentulism received 4 dental implants in the interforaminal area, and a screw-retained monolithic zirconia prosthesis was fabricated. The patient also received a maxillary complete removable dental prosthesis over 4 anterior roots. At the 18-month follow-up, all of the zirconia cylinders were seen to be fractured, and the contacting abutment surfaces had lost structural integrity. The damaged abutments were replaced with new abutments, and a new prosthesis was delivered with a computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing fabricated titanium framework with denture teeth and denture base resins. At the 6-month recall, the patient did not have any problems. Dental zirconia has excellent physical properties; however, care should be taken to prevent excessive stresses on the zirconia cylinders when a screw-retained zirconia restoration is planned as a definitive prosthesis.

  10. Argus II retinal prosthesis system: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Yuan, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This review focuses on a description of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system (Argus II; Second Sight Medical Products, Sylmar, CA) that was approved for humanitarian use by the FDA in 2013 in patients with retinitis pigmentosa with bare or no light perception vision. The article describes the components of Argus II, the studies on the implant, and future directions.

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Penile Prosthesis Implantation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Dede

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to evaluating the outcomes of in­flatable penile prosthesis implantations and partner sat­isfaction. Methods: Data of 52 patients who underwent penile prosthesis implantation in single center between May 2010 and December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Types of prosthesis, complication and satisfaction rates of patients were recorded by EDITS (Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction questionnaire was used. Results: The mean age was 49.2±14.7 years for patients. The mean follow-up durations for 34.3±12.5 months. The mean hospital stay was 3.84±1.52 days. Evaluating of the couples satisfaction revealed that 44 (84% of the patient were very satisfied. There was not any complication and no patient need to underwent revision surgery. Conclusion: Inflatable penile prosthesis implants, with high levels of treatment success, patient and partner sat­isfaction, are effective and safe options for treatment of organic erectile dysfunction with acceptable complication and revision rates.

  12. A Systematic Review on the Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain Brace versus Other Functional Treatment Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Kemler; I. van de Port; F. Backx; C.N. van Dijk

    2011-01-01

    Ankle injuries, especially ankle sprains, are a common problem in sports and medical care. Ankle sprains result in pain and absenteeism from work and/or sports participation, and can lead to physical restrictions such as ankle instability. Nowadays, treatment of ankle injury basically consists of ta

  13. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  14. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force...... of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle...... joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases....

  15. Charcot foot and ankle with osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Donegan, Ryan; Sumpio, Bauer; Peter A. Blume

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the current literature discussing topics of Charcot osteoarthropathy, osteomyelitis, diagnosing osteomyelitis, antibiotic management of osteomyelitis, and treatment strategies for management of Charcot osteoarthropathy with concurrent osteomyelitis.Keywords: Charcot foot; osteomyelitis; diabetes mellitus; infection; neuropathy(Published: 1 October 2013)Citation: Diabetic Foot & Ankle 2013, 4: 21361 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/dfa.v4i0.21361

  16. Reading visual braille with a retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Thomas Z; Harris, Jordan; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, Jose A; Dorn, Jessy D; McClure, Kelly; Greenberg, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 × 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 × 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera) to create visual percepts of individual braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm, and short 2-4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time) in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual braille in retinal prosthesis patients.

  17. Reading visual Braille with a retinal prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zaccarin Lauritzen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual Braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 x 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the Braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual Braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 x 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera to create visual percepts of individual Braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC paradigm, and short 2-4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual Braille in retinal prosthesis patients.

  18. Forces predicted at the ankle during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, R G

    1982-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the ankle joint was developed and was used to predict the forces at the ankle during the stance phase of running. Measurements from five cadavers were averaged to obtain insertion points and directions of pull of equivalent tendons with respect to the assumed center of the ankle joint. A minimum joint force solution was obtained by assuming that only two equivalent muscle groups could exert force at one time. Three subjects ran at 4.47 m/s across a force platform that recorded the external forces and moments acting on the foot. Cinematography was used to measure the foot and leg positions during stance. Peak resultant joint forces ranging from 9.0 to 13.3 times body weight and peak Achilles tendon forces ranging from 5.3 to 10.0 times body weight were predicted. Small variations in some cases resulted in large differences in predicted forces. The highest tendon forces predicted exceeded those reported to cause damage to cadaver tendons in other studies.

  19. Control method for exoskeleton ankle with surface electromyography signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen; WANG Zhen; JIANG Jia-xin; QIAN Jin-wu

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a control method for an exoskeleton ankle with clectromyography (EMG) signals.The EMG signals of human ankle and the exoskeleton ankle are introduced.Then a control method is proposed to control the exoskeleton ankle using the EMG signals.The feed-forward neural network model applied here is composed of four layers and uses the back-propagation training algorithm.The output signals from neural network are processed by the wavelet transform.Finally the control orders generated from the output signals are passed to the motor controller and drive the exoskeleton to move.Through experiments,the equality of neural network prediction of ankle movement is evaluated by giving the correlation coefficient.It is shown from the experimental results that the proposed method can accurately control the movement of ankle joint.

  20. Talar Osteochondroma Fracture Presenting as Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondromas are the most common benign bone tumors. They are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. When symptomatic, the symptoms are usually due to its location and size. Fracture of an osteochondroma presenting as posterior ankle impingement is a rare condition. We describe a 22-year-old man with solitary exostosis who presented with a posterior ankle mass and posterior ankle impingement with 2 years of follow-up. Surgical intervention was the treatment of choice in this patient, and histologic examination revealed a benign osteochondroma. Osteochondromas found in the posterior aspect of the talus can be complicated by fracture due to persistent motion of the ankle. Talar osteochondroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement causes. Posterior talar osteochondromas, especially when a stalk is present, should be treated surgically before it is more complicated by a fracture and posterior ankle impingement.

  1. Maury Documentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supporting documentation for the Maury Collection of marine observations. Includes explanations from Maury himself, as well as guides and descriptions by the U.S....

  2. Total Ankle Replacement Survival Rates Based on Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis of National Joint Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Annette F P; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    National joint registry data provides unique information about primary total ankle replacement (TAR) survival. We sought to recreate survival curves among published national joint registry data sets using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Overall, 5152 primary and 591 TAR revisions were included over a 2- to 13-year period with prosthesis survival for all national joint registries of 0.94 at 2-years, 0.87 at 5-years and 0.81 at 10-years. National joint registry datasets should strive for completion of data presentation including revision definitions, modes and time of failure, and patients lost to follow-up or death for complete accuracy of the Kaplan-Meier estimator.

  3. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  4. Assessment and management of patients with ankle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennie

    2014-08-19

    Foot and ankle injuries are common and can have a significant effect on an individual's daily activities. Nurses have an important role in the assessment, management, ongoing care and support of patients with ankle injuries. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the ankle enables nurses to identify significant injuries, which may result in serious complications, and communicate effectively with the multidisciplinary team to improve patient care and outcomes.

  5. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Datir, Abhijit; Langley, Travis [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tresley, Jonathan [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Clifford, Paul D.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  6. 基于有限状态机控制的智能假肢踝关节*☆%Intelligent prosthetic ankle based on the finite state machine control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨鹏; 柏健; 王欣然; 耿艳利

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At present, intel igent prosthesis only focuses on the function of knee joint, while ankle joint prosthesis is only used as the aid of prosthetic knee joint. So the normal gait cannot be realized according to the change of external environment and gait. OBJECTIVE: To develop a reliable intel igent prosthetic ankle in order to improve the gait of amputees effectively. METHODS: Based on the variable damping ankle-foot prosthesis, the control method of finite state machine was proposed. The ankle joint gait was planned in detail, and the relevant control strategy was developed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Results indicate that the intel igent prosthetic ankle based on the finite state machine control can effectively fol ow health limb lateral movement, and can adapt to different paces, which lays an experimental basement for later knee ankle coordinated movement.%  背景:目前智能假肢只是考虑了膝关节的作用,假肢踝关节只是作为假肢膝关节的辅助工具,无法根据外部环境和步态的变化实现假肢自然的行走。目的:研制出可靠的智能假肢踝关节,有效改善截肢者的步态。方法:在阻尼可变式踝足假肢的基础上,提出了有限状态机的控制方法,对踝足步态进行了详细的划分,在每个步态内制定了相关的控制策略。结果与结论:实验结果表明,基于有限状态机控制的智能假肢踝关节能够有效的跟随健肢侧运动,能够适应不同的步速,为以后膝踝协调运动奠定了一定的实验基础。

  7. Documentation Service; Service de Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charnay, J.; Chosson, L.; Croize, M.; Ducloux, A.; Flores, S.; Jarroux, D.; Melka, J.; Morgue, D.; Mottin, C. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1998-12-31

    This service assures the treatment and diffusion of the scientific information and the management of the scientific production of the institute as well as the secretariat operation for the groups and services of the institute. The report on documentation-library section mentions: the management of the documentation funds, search in international databases (INIS, Current Contents, Inspects), Pret-Inter service which allows accessing documents through DEMOCRITE network of IN2P3. As realizations also mentioned are: the setup of a video, photo database, the Web home page of the institute`s library, follow-up of digitizing the document funds by integrating the CD-ROMs and diskettes, electronic archiving of the scientific production, etc 1 fig.

  8. Comparison of total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis in patients with haemophilia using gait analysis: two case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Dauty, Marc; Gross, Raphael; Leboeuf, Fabien; Trossaert, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe hemophilia is an inherited, lifelong bleeding disorder characterized by spontaneous bleeding, which results in painful joint deformities. Currently two surgical treatments are available to treat haemophilia-related ankle joint destruction: ankle arthrodesis and total ankle replacement. The aim of the present study was to compare these two surgical procedures in haemophiliac subjects. Case presentation Kinematic and dynamic parameters were quantified using a three-dimensional...

  9. Is End-Stage Ankle Arthrosis Best Managed with Total Ankle Replacement or Arthrodesis? A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Robert W.; Chahal, Gurdip S.; Anna Chapman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. End-stage ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition. Traditionally, ankle arthrodesis (AA) has been the surgical intervention of choice but the emergence of total ankle replacement (TAR) has challenged this concept. This systematic review aims to address whether TAR or AA is optimal in terms of functional outcomes. Methods. We conducted a systematic review according to PRISMA checklist using the online databases Medline and EMBASE after January 1, 2005. Participants must ...

  10. Development and clinical application of a new testicular prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Ning; Zhikang Cai; Huixing Chen; Ping Ping; Peng Li; Zhong Wang; Zheng Li

    2011-01-01

    A new type of testicular prosthesis made of silastic with an elliptical shape to mimic a normal testis was developed by our team and submitted for patenting in China.The prosthesis was produced in different sizes to imitate the normal testis of the patient.To investigate the effects and safety of the testicular prosthesis,20 patients receiving testicular prosthesis implantation were recruited for this study.Follow-up after 6 months revealed no complications in the patients.All the patients answered that they were satisfied with their body image and the position of the implants,19 patients were satisfied with the size and 16 patients were satisfied with the weight.These results show that the testicular prosthesis used in this study can meet patient's expectations.Patients undergoing orchiectomy should be offered the option to receive a testicular prosthesis implantation.The dimensions and weight of the available prosthetic implants should be further addressed to improve patient satisfaction.

  11. Tracheobronchial Foreign Body Aspiration: Dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataman Köse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to extract foreign bodies for avoiding life-threatening complications. They can lead to death if they are not treated. Different signs and symptoms could occur according to the complete or partial airway obstruction. Foreign body aspiration is a rare incident in adults. The organic foreign materials such as foods are found to be aspirated more commonly and are usually settled in the right bronchial system. However, dental prosthesis and teeth aspirations are rare in literature. In our study, a 52-year-old male patient who had aspirated the front part of his lower dental prosthesis accidentally is presented and the foreign body is extracted by using rigid bronchoscopy. There are many causes of aspiration but dental prosthetic aspirations should be kept in mind during sleep. For this reason, dental apparatus must be taken out while asleep.

  12. Correlation analysis between the interface membrane and loose hip prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze the cause of prosthesis loosening by observing the interface membranes harvested during the hip restoration operation. Methods A total of 28 specimens of interface membrane around the loose prosthesis were harvested from 28 patients undergoing the restoration of total hip replacement. All the specimens underwent the observation of appearance, light microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy(SEM). Results All the gaps around the loose prosthesis were filled with interface membrane of ...

  13. Dental prosthesis and buccal lesions in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz García Alpizar; Mikhail Benet Rodíguez; Eduardo Enrique Castillo Betancourt

    2010-01-01

    Fundament: Buccal lesions in the elderly are very frequent and they constitute a problem of health due to the consequences that cause. Objective: to describe the characteristics of the removable prosthesis used by the population of 60 and more years age and their relationship with the lesions of the oral mucosa. Methods: We carried out a study descriptive of cross section in 125 elderly with oral prosthesis. The characteristics of the removable prosthesis were described and their relationship...

  14. Ischemic Gangrene of the Glans following Penile Prosthesis Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Borja García Gómez; Javier Romero Otero; Laura Díez Sicilia; Estibaliz Jiménez Alcaide; Eduardo García-Cruz; Alfredo Rodríguez Antolín

    2013-01-01

    The development of ischemic gangrene of the penis following implantation of prosthesis is unusual, and very few cases are available in the literature. As a result, no established treatment protocol is available. We report our experience within a case of gangrene of the glans following implantation of a three-component prosthesis. We present a 53-year-old male, smoker with diabetes and hypercholesterolemia, who underwent surgery for the insertion of a penile prosthesis with 3 components to cor...

  15. Control of dental prosthesis system with microcontroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapidere, M; Müldür, S; Güler, I

    2000-04-01

    In this study, a microcontroller-based electronic circuit was designed and implemented for dental prosthesis curing system. Heater, compressor and valve were controlled by 8-bit PIC16C64 microcontroller which is programmed using MPASM package. The temperature and time were controlled automatically by preset values which were inputted from keyboard while the pressure was kept constant. Calibration was controlled and the working range was tested. The test results showed that the system provided a good performance.

  16. Orofacial Space Infection Due to Faulty Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pramod Krishna, B.; Batra, Ranmeet; Chopra, Sumit; Sethi, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Orofacial space infections are commonly treated by oral and maxillofacial surgeons, even in the post antibiotic era. Pre existing systemic conditions such as diabetes mellitus makes a person more vulnerable to space infection. A prosthesis which is poorly designed often jeopardises the oral health and makes a person susceptible to ulcers of mucosa, which can result in necrosis of mucosa. The sequel of such ulcerations and necrosis would be life threatening Orofacial space infections in medica...

  17. Gingival prosthesis: A treatment modality for recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Samatha Yalamanchili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival recession caused due to periodontal disease disturbs patients because of sensitivity and esthetics. Gingival prosthesis may be fixed or removable and can be made from silicones, acrylics, composite resins or ceramics according to what is best suited for the case. The gingival veneer is esthetically appealing and easy to maintain. This case report describes the use of gingival veneer as a treatment modality for recession.

  18. Gingival prosthesis: A treatment modality for recession

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavi Samatha Yalamanchili; Hemchand Surapaneni; Arunima Padmakumar Reshmarani

    2013-01-01

    Gingival recession caused due to periodontal disease disturbs patients because of sensitivity and esthetics. Gingival prosthesis may be fixed or removable and can be made from silicones, acrylics, composite resins or ceramics according to what is best suited for the case. The gingival veneer is esthetically appealing and easy to maintain. This case report describes the use of gingival veneer as a treatment modality for recession.

  19. Performance Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Paula

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with experts on performance documentation. Suggests that educators should strive to represent performance appraisal writing to students in a way that reflects the way it is perceived and evaluated in the workplace. Concludes that educators can enrich their pedagogy with practice by helping students understand the importance…

  20. Total ankle prostheses in rheumatoid arthropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Bernard; Louwerens, Jan Willem K; van den Hoogen, Frank H J; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose The first generations of total ankle replacements (TARs) showed a high rate of early failure. In the last decades, much progress has been made in the development of TARs, with the newer generation showing better results. We evaluated TARs implanted with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or juvenile inflammatory arthritis (JIA) as indication. Patients and methods 58 total ankle prostheses (Buechel-Pappas and STAR type) were implanted in patients with RA (n = 53) or JIA (n = 5) in 54 patients (4 bilateral). After a mean follow-up of 2.7 (1–9) years, all patients were reviewed by two orthopedic surgeons who were not the surgeons who performed the operation. Standard AP and lateral radiographs were taken and a Kofoed ankle score was obtained; this is a clinical score ranging from 0–100 and consists of sub-scores for pain, disability, and range of motion. Results 2 patients died of unrelated causes. Of the 52 patients who were alive (56 prostheses), 51 implants were still in place and showed no signs of loosening on the most recent radiographs. The mean Kofoed score at follow-up was 73 points (SD 16, range 21–92). 4 patients showed a poor result (score < 50) with persistent pain for which no obvious reason could be found. 5 implants were removed, 4 because of infection and 1 because of aseptic loosening. Interpretation Medium-term results of the STAR and BP types of TAR in RA were satisfactory. The main reason for failure of the implant was infection. PMID:19634020

  1. Clinical measurement of mechanical ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasher, Raju K; Nagy, Dawn R; Em, April L; Phillips, Howard J; Mc Donough, Andrew L

    2012-10-01

    Clinicians commonly use the anterior draw test (ligament laxity) and distal fibular position (lateral malleolus displacement), to measure ankle instability. The purpose of this study was to establish intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for the anterior draw test and distal fibular position in a clinical setting. The anterior draw test (AD) was measured with a plastic Goniometer, and was defined as the linear displacement of the foot as it is drawn anteriorly with the ankle held in 20 degrees of plantar-flexion. Distal fibular position (DFP) was measured in standing using a digital vernier caliper and was the relative linear distance between the lateral and the medial malleoli. 20 participants aged 21-28 volunteered for the study and were measured on both ankles. It was found that Intra-tester reliability (ICC) ranged from 0.88 to 0.97 for AD and DFP; while inter-tester reliability (ICC) was 0.6 for AD and 0.77 for DFP. In addition for measures across trials, the standard error of the measurement (SEM) was, on average 0.66 mm for AD and 1.7 mm for DFP. While the limits of agreement (LOA) was ±0.17 mm for AD and ±4.03 mm for DFP. However, the SEM and LOA between testers was 2.27 mm and ±2.27 mm respectively for AD; and for 3.1 mm and ±10.4 mm for DFP. Overall the results suggest that both measures, as defined in this study exhibit moderate to good reliability and low standard error of measurement, suggesting a high degree of repeatability across trials.

  2. A Method to Analyze Dynamics Properties of Transfemoral Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Tuan Le

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.The methodto compute gait cycle forces and moments acting on the hip and knee joints of a lower limb with a trans-femoral prosthesis were investigated. A 3D model of the lower limb with prosthesis was created using CAD software and based on MRI data and real size dimension. The transfemoral prosthesis was modelled as a coupled of links with two revolution joints at hip and knee joint. This coupled link was connected to a bar with translation joint to description the distance walked of people in gait cycle. All parts of the prosthesis were measured and a full-size 3D model was created.The kinematics parameters of a lower limb with a prosthesis were determined from motion-captured system data. The reaction force was measured with a force sensor in the footplate. The 3D model of the prosthesis was exported to MatlabSimmechanics. The input data which are kinematic parameters were applied to calculate the forces and moments acting on the joints. The results of this study present a method to analyse the dynamic properties of transfemoral prosthesis including speed of the gait. It could be used to calculate the load transferred from the socket to the residual limb. They could also be used to design the structure of a prosthesis and optimize the dynamic characteristics of such a prosthesis.

  3. Development of Receiver Stimulator for Auditory Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raja Kumar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Auditory Prosthesis (AP is an electronic device that can provide hearing sensations to people who are profoundly deaf by stimulating the auditory nerve via an array of electrodes with an electric current allowing them to understand the speech. The AP system consists of two hardware functional units such as Body Worn Speech Processor (BWSP and Receiver Stimulator. The prototype model of Receiver Stimulator for Auditory Prosthesis (RSAP consists of Speech Data Decoder, DAC, ADC, constant current generator, electrode selection logic, switch matrix and simulated electrode resistance array. The laboratory model of speech processor is designed to implement the Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS speech processing algorithm which generates the information required for electrode stimulation based on the speech / audio data. Speech Data Decoder receives the encoded speech data via an inductive RF transcutaneous link from speech processor. Twelve channels of auditory Prosthesis with selectable eight electrodes for stimulation of simulated electrode resistance array are used for testing. The RSAP is validated by using the test data generated by the laboratory prototype of speech processor. The experimental results are obtained from specific speech/sound tests using a high-speed data acquisition system and found satisfactory.

  4. 脑性瘫痪患儿踝足矫形器配戴前后对运动功能的量化评价%Quantitative assessment of motor function on children with cerebral palsy before and after wearing ankle foot orthopedic instruments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李润洁

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess motor function quantitatively on children with cerebral palsy before and after wearing ankle foot orthopedic instruments.Method Ankle foot orthopedic instruments were made by Dalian Prosthesis Factory.Children' motor function was assessed with self made quantitative assessment scale according to the forth,fifth function area of motor assessment scale of children with cerebral palsy after one week of wearing orthopedic instruments. Result In all 23 patients, orthopedic instruments proved effective in controlling leg muscular tension,correcting equines,genu recurvatum,talips valgus and talipes varus,keeping erect posture and modifying gait.Motor function assessed show significant difference before and one week after wearing orthopedic instruments (P< 0.001).Conclusion Ankle foot orthopedic instruments play a positive role in improving motor function of lower extremity in cerebral palsy patients.

  5. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  6. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-10

    reduced since it was subject to abrasion from the concrete in the harness shed, asphalt on the loading ramp, and dirt on the drop zone. b. DJ...strap was also directly under the heel and subject to abrasion from concrete in the harness shed, asphalt on the loading ramp, and dirt on the drop...airborne injuries), airborne students who did not wear the brace were 1.90 times more likely to experience an ankle sprain, 1.47 times more likely to

  7. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet

  8. Medium- to long-term outcome of ankle arthrodesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.M. Hendrickx; S.A.S. Stufkens; E.E. de Bruijn; I.N. Sierevelt; C.N. van Dijk; G.M.M.J. Kerkhoffs

    2011-01-01

    Despite improvement in outcome after ankle arthroplasty, fusion of the ankle joint is still considered the gold standard. A matter of concern is deterioration of clinical outcome as a result of loss of motion and advancing degeneration of adjacent joints. We performed a long-term study to address th

  9. THE EFFECTS OF KINESIO TAPING ON PROPRIOCEPTION AT THE ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark DeBeliso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was designed to determine if KinesioTM taping the anterior and lateral portion of the ankle would enhance ankle proprioception compared to the untaped ankle. 30 subjects, 15 men, 15 women, ages 18-30 participated in this study. Exclusion criteria: Ankle injury < 6 months prior to testing, significant ligament laxity as determined through clinical evaluation by an ATC, or any severe foot abnormality. Experiment utilized a single group, pretest and posttest. Plantar flexion and inversion with 20° of plantar flexion reproduction of joint position sense (RJPS was determined using an ankle RJPS apparatus. Subjects were barefooted, blindfolded, and equipped with headphones playing white noise to eliminate auditory cues. Subjects had five trials in both plantar flexion and inversion with 20° plantar flexion before and after application of the KinesioTM tape to the anterior/lateral portion of the ankle. Constant error and absolute error were determined from the difference between the target angle and the trial angle produced by the subject. The treatment group (KinesioTM taped subjects showed no change in constant and absolute error for ankle RJPS in plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion when compared to the untaped results using the same motions. The application of KinesioTM tape does not appear to enhance proprioception (in terms of RJPS in healthy individuals as determined by our measures of RJPS at the ankle in the motions of plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion.

  10. Dislocated ankle fracture complicated by near total distal ischaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygun, Fatih; Sertkaya, Omer; Aldemir, Cengiz; Dogan, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Total arterial ischaemia is rarely seen following a dislocated ankle fracture but if it does and intervention is not made, it can lead to serious morbidity. We present a 39-year-old woman with almost total occlusion in the arteria tibialis and arteria dorsalis pedis following a dislocated ankle fracture as a result of a bicycle fall. PMID:24248319

  11. Hindfoot endoscopy for posterior ankle impingement. Surgical technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C.N.; de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Scholten, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical treatment of posterior ankle impingement is associated with a high rate of complications and a substantial time to recover. An endoscopic approach to the posterior ankle (hindfoot endoscopy) may lack these disadvantages. We hypothesized that hindfoot endoscopy causes less mo

  12. Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, S.H.; Kuo, A.D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is nec

  13. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  14. Modular Tumor Resection Prosthesis in Osteosarcoma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Cirakli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the cases who underwent tumor resection prosthesis due to osteosarcoma. Material and Method: 14 cases who underwent tumor resection prosthesis due to osteosarcoma in our clinic between 2000 and 2012 and who had sufficient follow-ups were evaluated. The cases were examined in terms of gender, age, direction, tumor location, follow-up time, success of the treatment, complication, recurrence, and survival. The data obtained were transferred to the SPSS 15.0 program and analyzed. Normality distributions of the data were analyzed with the Shapiro-Wilk test. Results: 8 of the 14 cases were male, 6 were female, and the average age of the cases was 21.9±7.02. Osteosarcoma was in the distal femur in 9 (64.3% of the patients, in the proximal tibia in 5 (35.7% of the patients, in the right lower extremity in 5 of the patients, and in the left lower extremity in 9 of the patients. Average follow-up time was 33 months (3-144 months range. Average MSTS score was found as 81.9 (53-96 range, perfect results were taken in 11 (78.6% patients while insufficient results were taken in 3 (21.4% patients. As for complications, aseptic softening was observed in 3 cases, peroneal nerve paralysis was observed in 2 cases, skin necrosis was observed in 2 cases, periprostatic fracture was observed in 2 cases, prosthesis infection was observed in 1 case, and local recurrence was observed in 1 case. Except for the two cases with peroneal nerve paralysis, cases with complications recovered without any problems. The patient who developed local recurrence was lost due to lung metastasis. Discussion: Treatment of osteosarcoma through tumor resection prosthesis raises question marks due to possible complications that can affect the survival of the prosthesis in the long term. However, this treatment method is favorable in terms of stability, early load efficiency, and causing less anxiety than osteosynthesis; it is also psychologically

  15. Technique of Arthroscopic Treatment of Impingement After Total Ankle Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Christopher E; Neumann, Julie A; Godin, Jonathan A; DeOrio, James K

    2016-04-01

    Rates of medial and/or lateral gutter impingement after total ankle replacement are not insignificant. If impingement should occur, it typically arises an average of 17 months after total ankle replacement. Our patient underwent treatment for right ankle medial gutter bony impingement with arthroscopic debridement 5 years after her initial total ankle replacement. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals and a 30° 2.7-mm-diameter arthroscope were used. An aggressive soft-tissue and bony resection was performed using a combination of curettes, a 3.5-mm shaver, a 5.5-mm unsheathed burr, a drill, and a radiofrequency ablator. This case shows that arthroscopic treatment is an effective and potentially advantageous alternative to open treatment of impingement after total ankle replacement. In addition, symptoms of impingement often improve in a short amount of time after arthroscopic debridement of the medial and/or lateral gutter.

  16. Total ankle replacement – surgical treatment and rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting. PMID:27407223

  17. Finite element analysis of a composite artificial ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Leigh Ann; Johnston, Lawrence; Denniston, Charles; Czekalski, Blaise E.

    1993-01-01

    Ultra-light carbon fiber composite materials are being utilized in artificial limbs with increasing frequency in recent years. Dr. Arthur Copes, an orthotist from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has developed a graphite expoxy composite material artificial ankle (Copes/Bionic Ankle) that is intended to be used by amputees who require the most advanced above-and-below-the-knee prosthetic devices. The Copes/Bionic Ankle is designed to reproduce the function of the natural ankle joint by allowing the composite material to act as a spring mechanism without the use of metal mechanical parts. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has agreed to participate in the design effort by providing the structural analysis of the artificial ankle design.

  18. Gait propulsion in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and ankle plantarflexor weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, N H M; van Engelen, B G M; de Rooy, J W J; Weerdesteyn, V; Geurts, A C H

    2015-02-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is a slowly progressive hereditary disorder resulting in fatty infiltration of eventually most skeletal muscles. Weakness of trunk and leg muscles causes problems with postural balance and gait, and is associated with an increased fall risk. Although drop foot and related tripping are common problems in FSHD, gait impairments are poorly documented. The effect of ankle plantarflexor involvement on gait propulsion has never been addressed. In addition to ankle plantarflexion, gait propulsion is generated through hip flexion and hip extension. Compensatory shifts between these propulsion sources occur when specific muscles are affected. Such a shift may be expected in patients with FSHD since the calves may show early fatty infiltration, whereas iliopsoas and gluteus maximus muscles are often spared for a longer time. In the current study, magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the percentage of unaffected calf, iliopsoas and gluteus maximus muscles. Joint powers were analyzed in 10 patients with FSHD at comfortable and maximum walking speed to determine the contribution of ankle plantarflexor, hip flexor and hip extensor power to propulsion. Associations between muscle morphology, power generation and gait speed were assessed. Based on multivariate regression analysis, ankle plantarflexor power was the only factor that uniquely contributed to the explained variance of comfortable (R(2)=80%) and maximum (R(2)=86%) walking speed. Although the iliopsoas muscles were largely unaffected, they appeared to be sub-maximally recruited. This submaximal recruitment may be related to poor trunk stability, resulting in a disproportionate effect of calf muscle affliction on gait speed in patients with FSHD.

  19. Documenting Spreadsheets

    CERN Document Server

    Payette, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses spreadsheets documentation and new means to achieve this end by using Excel's built-in "Comment" function. By structuring comments, they can be used as an essential tool to fully explain spreadsheet. This will greatly facilitate spreadsheet change control, risk management and auditing. It will fill a crucial gap in corporate governance by adding essential information that can be managed in order to satisfy internal controls and accountability standards.

  20. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the na...

  1. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ Management- CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management - CB - MB - FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2007 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of em¬pl...

  2. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ Management- CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management - CB - MB - FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2007 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of employment and ...

  3. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the natu...

  4. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the natur...

  5. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted.   CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat a...

  6. Osteonecrosis of the distal tibia after a pronation external rotation ankle fracture: literature review and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, S; Lloyd, J; Upadhyay, Vishal; Sangar, A; Taylor, H P

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic osteonecrosis of the distal tibia is a rare but recognized complication of Weber C ankle fractures. To our knowledge, we report the first documented case managed with early percutaneous drilling of the defect. The patient noticed an improvement in symptoms, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed resolution of the avascular area. The previously reported complication of secondary periarticular collapse and subsequent osteoarthritis was avoided. We advocate that a high index of suspicion, early detection, and drilling can encourage neovascularisation and prevent secondary joint destruction.

  7. Establishment of digital instrumental library and operative simulation of Scandinavian total ankle replacement%STAR人工踝关节数字器械库的建立和手术模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐洪璋; 余斌

    2011-01-01

    [目的]探讨数字模拟(Scandinavian total ankle replacement,STAR)人工踝关节置换术的可行性和方法.[方法]应用Mimics 10.01、Geomagic studio 10.0、PRO/E 2.0软件模拟建立三维踝关节、STAR常用手术器械库、STAR人工关节假体模型库,利用PRO/E 2.0软件的强大建模及装配功能,对STAR人工踝关节手术步骤进行逐步模拟.[结果]成功模拟STAR人工踝关节置换术手术步骤.[结论]数字模拟STAR人工踝关节置换术可行,有助于熟悉及掌握该手术,对STAR人工踝关节置换术的术前准备、术中都有指导意义.%[Objective] To investigate the feasibility and method of establishing digital analogical Scandinavian total ankle replacement. [ Methods] 3D models of ankle, frequently used surgical instruments and joint prosthesis were established through the softwares of Mimics 10. 01, Geomagic studio 10. 0 and PRO/E 2. 0, then operating procedures of Scandinavian total ankle replacement were gradually simulated through the software of PRO/E 2. 0. [ Results] Operating procedures of Scandinavian total ankle replacement have been successfully simulated. [ Conclusion] Estalishment of digital analogical Scandinavian total ankle replacement is feasible. It is beneficial to know and mast the surgical operation, and guide the preoperative preparation and procedures at operation.

  8. Effects of prosthetic foot forefoot flexibility on oxygen cost and subjective preference rankings of unilateral transtibial prosthesis users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Edwards, MHPE, CP

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The investigators conducted a double-blind randomized crossover study to determine the effects of prosthetic foot forefoot flexibility on oxygen cost and subjective preference rankings of 13 unilateral transtibial prosthesis users. Five experimental feet were fabricated for use in the study: F1, F2, F3, F4, and F5. F1 was most flexible, F5 was least flexible, and F3 was designed to conform to a biomimetic ankle-foot roll-over shape. The experimental feet were modeled after the Shape&Roll prosthetic foot (originally produced by Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; now in public domain but had different numbers of saw cuts within the forefoot members, allowing more or less flexibility during walking. Participants walked at the same comfortable, freely selected speed on the treadmill for 7 min with each foot while energy expenditure was measured. No significant difference was found in oxygen cost (mL O2/kg/m between the different feet (p = 0.17, and the order of use was also not significant (p = 0.94. However, the preference ranking was significantly affected by the flexibility of the feet (p = 0.002, with the most flexible foot (F1 ranking significantly poorer than feet F3 (p = 0.003 and F4 (p = 0.004. Users may prefer prosthetic feet that match the flexibility of an intact ankle-foot system, even though we did not detect an energetic benefit at freely selected speeds.

  9. Comparison of gait of persons with partial foot amputation wearing prosthesis to matched control group: observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Michael P; Barker, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of the gait mechanics of persons with partial foot amputation and the influence of prosthetic intervention has been limited by the reporting of isolated gait parameters in specific amputation levels and limited interpretation and discussion of results. This observational study aimed to more completely describe the gait patterns of persons with partial foot amputation wearing their existing prosthesis and footwear in comparison with a nonamputee control group. Major adaptations occurred once the metatarsal heads were compromised. Persons with transmetatarsal and Lisfranc amputation who were wearing insoles and slipper sockets maintained the center of pressure behind the end of the residuum until after contralateral heel contact. This gait pattern may be a useful adaptation to protect the residuum, moderate the requirement of the calf musculature, or compensate for the compliance of the forefoot. Power generation across the affected ankle was virtually negligible, necessitating increased power generation across the hip joints. The clamshell devices fitted to the persons with Chopart amputation restored their effective foot length and normalized many aspects of gait. These persons' ability to adopt this gait pattern may be the result of the broad anterior shell of the socket, a relatively stiff forefoot, and immobilization of the ankle. The hip joints still contributed significantly to the power generation required to walk.

  10. Effects of prosthetic foot forefoot flexibility on oxygen cost and subjective preference rankings of unilateral transtibial prosthesis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klodd, Elizabeth; Hansen, Andrew; Fatone, Stefania; Edwards, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The investigators conducted a double-blind randomized crossover study to determine the effects of prosthetic foot forefoot flexibility on oxygen cost and subjective preference rankings of 13 unilateral transtibial prosthesis users. Five experimental feet were fabricated for use in the study: F1, F2, F3, F4, and F5. F1 was most flexible, F5 was least flexible, and F3 was designed to conform to a biomimetic ankle-foot roll-over shape. The experimental feet were modeled after the Shape&Roll prosthetic foot (originally produced by Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; now in public domain) but had different numbers of saw cuts within the forefoot members, allowing more or less flexibility during walking. Participants walked at the same comfortable, freely selected speed on the treadmill for 7 min with each foot while energy expenditure was measured. No significant difference was found in oxygen cost (mL O(2)/kg/m) between the different feet (p = 0.17), and the order of use was also not significant (p = 0.94). However, the preference ranking was significantly affected by the flexibility of the feet (p = 0.002), with the most flexible foot (F1) ranking significantly poorer than feet F3 (p = 0.003) and F4 (p = 0.004). Users may prefer prosthetic feet that match the flexibility of an intact ankle-foot system, even though we did not detect an energetic benefit at freely selected speeds.

  11. Design and wear testing of a temporomandibular joint prosthesis articulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; Verkerke, GJ; de Vries, MP; de Bont, LGM

    2000-01-01

    As part of the development of a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, a prosthesis articulation was designed. The articulation consists of a spherical head (ball) of the mandibular part, rotating against an enveloping ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disc with a flat cranial sid

  12. Linking of total elbow prosthesis during surgery; a biomechanical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.J. de; Wagener, M.L.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Eygendaal, D.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Presently, 2 types of elbow prostheses are used: unlinked and linked. The Latitude total elbow prosthesis allows the surgeon to decide during the implantation whether the prosthesis is placed unlinked or linked, and whether the native radial head is retained, resected, or replaced. The p

  13. Novel knee joint mechanism of transfemoral prosthesis for stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koh; Wada, Takahiro; Harada, Ryuchi; Tachiwana, Shinichi

    2013-06-01

    The stability of a transfemoral prosthesis when walking on flat ground has been established by recent advances in knee joint mechanisms and their control methods. It is, however, difficult for users of a transfemoral prosthesis to ascend stairs. This difficulty is mainly due to insufficient generation of extension moment around the knee joint of the prosthesis to lift the body to the next step on the staircase and prevent any unexpected flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase. Only a prosthesis with an actuator has facilitated stair ascent using a step-over-step gait (1 foot is placed per step). However, its use has issues associated with the durability, cost, maintenance, and usage environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a novel knee joint mechanism for a prosthesis that generates an extension moment around the knee joint in the stance phase during stair ascent, without the use of any actuators. The proposed mechanism is based on the knowledge that the ground reaction force increases during the stance phase when the knee flexion occurs. Stair ascent experiments with the prosthesis showed that the proposed prosthesis can realize stair ascent without any undesirable knee flexion. In addition, the prosthesis is able to generate a positive knee joint moment power in the stance phase even without any power source.

  14. 21 CFR 878.3750 - External prosthesis adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External prosthesis adhesive. 878.3750 Section 878.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... adhesive. (a) Identification. An external prosthesis adhesive is a silicone-type adhesive intended to...

  15. 基于中枢模式产生器的主动式智能踝关节控制的研究%Study on the Control of Dynamic Artificial Limb Ankle Based on Central Pattern Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭欣; 徐彩玉; 李明月; 苏龙涛

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain the normal gait for the prosthesis-carrier with the change of external environment and gait,we designed a model of dynamic ankle prosthesis and control system and introduced the strategy of central pattern generator (CPG) about the moving trail of dynamic ankle prosthesis.The dynamic parts,which are incorporated in the model of dynamic ankle prosthesis,provide power in order to have anthropic function and character.The tool of Matlab/simulink was used to simulate the strategy.The simulation results showed that the strategy of CPG learning control in this study was effective and could track the reference trail rapidly and fit the moving trail of a person's normal limb.It can make the prosthetic timely regulation and action,enhance the prosthetic intelligence.It has important practical value for intelligent prosthesis development based on this analysis of technology.%为了使主动式踝关节假肢携带者能更好地根据外部环境和步态的变化实现假肢自然行走,设计了主动式智能踝关节假肢的机械结构和控制系统,提出了主动式踝关节假肢运动轨迹的中枢模式产生器(CPG)控制策略.主动式踝关节假肢通过动力机构为人体提供了运动动力,可实现人体运动的主要功能和特性.通过Matlab/simulink仿真,有效验证了基于生物中枢模式产生器控制机制的主动式踝关节的运动控制方法,能够使主动式踝关节假肢的输出轨迹准确快速地跟踪期望轨迹.因此该主动式踝关节假肢能实现及时调节和动作,智能性增强,同时本文提出的该项技术对智能假肢的发展具有重要的实用价值.

  16. Mobile-bearing total ankle arthroplasty : a fundamental assessment of the clinical, radiographic and functional outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doets, Hendrik Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    Ankle arthritis often leads to significant impairments for the patient. As total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) with use of fixed-bearing (2-component) total ankle prostheses has a high rate of early failures, fusion of the ankle joint is, until today, considered to be the standard surgical treatment for

  17. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canzoneri, Elisa; Marzolla, Marilena; Amoresano, Amedeo; Verni, Gennaro; Serino, Andrea

    2013-10-03

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearing or not wearing their prosthesis. When patients performed the tasks on the amputated limb, without the prosthesis, the perception of arm length shrank, with a concurrent shift of PPS boundaries towards the stump. Conversely, wearing the prosthesis increased the perceived length of the stump and extended the PPS boundaries so as to include the prosthetic hand, such that the prosthesis partially replaced the missing limb.

  18. Penile Corporeal Reconstruction during Difficult Placement of a Penile Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Q. Tran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For some patients with impotence and concomitant severe tunical/corporeal tissue fibrosis, insertion of a penile prosthesis is the only option to restore erectile function. Closing the tunica over an inflatable penile prosthesis in these patients can be challenging. We review our previous study which included 15 patients with severe corporeal or tunical fibrosis who underwent corporeal reconstruction with autologous rectus fascia to allow placement of an inflatable penile prosthesis. At a mean follow-up of 18 months (range 12 to 64, all patients had a prosthesis that was functioning properly without evidence of separation, herniation, or erosion of the graft. Sexual activity resumed at a mean time of 9 weeks (range 8 to 10. There were no adverse events related to the graft or its harvest. Use of rectus fascia graft for coverage of a tunical defect during a difficult penile prosthesis placement is surgically feasible, safe, and efficacious.

  19. Influence of distal tibiofibular synostosis on ankle function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Zhen-hai; ZHOU Ji-hong; YE Hong; SHI Jian-guo; ZHENG Long-bao; YAO Jun; NI Zhi-ming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence distal tibiofibular synostosis on ankle function.Methods: From October 1998 to October 2004,a total of 281 consecutive patients underwent operations because of ankle fractures or distal fractures of the tibia and fibula.Distal tibiofibular synostosis occurred after operation in 8 Patients.The duration of follow-up averaged 20.6 months (14-44 months).The ankle function was assessed on the basis of functional rating system described by Mazur.1Results: According to Mazur's ankle evaluation system,4 patients achieved an excellent result,2 a good result and 2 a fair result.The dorsiflexion of the synostosis ankle reduced by 8.26 degrees as compared with that of the contralateral ankle.and there was little influence on the plantar flexion.All the Patients had a normal gait.Conclusion: The distal tibiofibular synostosis after the operation of ankle fractures or distal fractures of the tibia and fibula usually gives rise to few symptoms and needs no specific treatment.

  20. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  1. [Aortoenteric fistula secondary to aortobifemoral prosthesis infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel Botella, F; Labiós Gómez, M; Ibáñez Gadea, L; Fácila Rubio, L; Carbonell Cantí, C

    2002-05-01

    We present the case of a 76 year-old man, intervened of an obstruction bilateral iliac by means of placement of a prosthesis aortobifemoral that presented pain in the grave left iliac and fever in needles of 39 degrees C to the five years of the intervention. In the physical exploration it highlighted a painful abdomen in the grave left iliac with signs of peritoneal irritation. In the laboratory tests a leukocytosis was detected with neutrophilia and negative culture. The computed thomography (CT) show the presence of gas bubbles around the prosthesis, as well as a liquid collection with areas necrotics in their interior that affected to the psoas and iliac muscles. In the same exploration the aspirative puncture with drainage of the absces demonstrated in the cultivations carried out in aerobic means the presence of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterobacter cloacae. When presenting a high gastrointestinal hemorrhage abruptly, he was practiced and gastroduodenal endoscope in which a aortoduodenal fistula was evidenced with having bled active. When a bypass extra-anatomic, the sick person will practice it died when presenting a shock abrupt hipovolemic that he didn't respond to the pertinent treatment. We analyze the approaches current diagnoses of infection of the vascular prosthesis and their more serious complication, the aortoenteric fistula (AEF) that either appears in the 0.3-5.9% of the patients who undergo prosthetic reconstruction of the abdominal aorta, for occlusive or aneurismal disease. We highlight the importance of carrying out a precocious diagnosis of the infection of the portion retroperitoneal of the vascular graft that, often, it is manifested with subtle and not specific clinical signs, with the techniques at the moment available as: the CT, fine needle aspiration guided by her, and to diminish the rates of mortality, from the current of 43%, until the most optimistic estimated in 19%.

  2. Registry data trends of total ankle replacement use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty registry data are meaningful when evaluating the outcomes of total joint replacement, because they provide unbiased objective information regarding survivorship and incidence of use. Critical evaluation of the registry data information will benefit the surgeon, patient, and industry. However, the implementation and acceptance of registry data for total ankle replacement has lagged behind that of hip and knee implant arthroplasty. Currently, several countries have national joint arthroplasty registries, with only some procuring information for total ankle replacement. We performed an electronic search to identify publications and worldwide registry databanks with pertinent information specific to total ankle replacement to determine the type of prostheses used and usage trends over time. We identified worldwide registry data from 33 countries, with details pertinent to total ankle replacement identified in only 6 countries. The obtained information was arbitrarily stratified into 3 distinct periods: 2000 to 2006, 2007 to 2010, and 2011. Within these study periods, the data from 13 total ankle replacement systems involving 3,980 ankles were identified. The vast majority (97%) of the reported ankle replacements were 3-component, mobile-bearing, uncemented prostheses. Three usage trends were identified: initial robust embracement followed by abrupt disuse, minimal use, and initial embracement followed by sustained growth in implantation. Before the widespread acceptance of new total ankle replacements, the United States should scrutinize and learn from the international registry data and develop its own national joint registry that would include total ankle replacement. Caution against the adoption of newly released prostheses, especially those without readily available revision components, is recommended.

  3. Preoperative gait characterization of patients with ankle arthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazzam, Michael; Long, Jason T; Marks, Richard M; Harris, Gerald F

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematic changes that occur about the foot and ankle during gait in patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD). By comparing a normal adult population with what was found in the DJD population we determined how the motion of theses groups differed, thereby characterizing how this pathology affects foot and ankle motion. A 15-camera Vicon Motion Analysis System was used in conjunction with weight bearing radiographs to obtain three-dimensional motion of the foot and ankle during ambulation. The study was comprised of 34 patients and 35 ankles diagnosed with DJD (19 men and 15 women) of the ankle and 25 patients with normal ankles (13 men and 12 women). Dynamic foot and ankle motion was analyzed using the four-segment Milwaukee Foot Model (MFM). The data from this model resulted in three-dimensional (3D) kinematic parameters in the sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes as well as spatial-temporal parameters. Patient health status was evaluated using the SF-36 Health Survey and American Orthopaedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores. The DJD group showed significant differences (pgait. This decreased range of motion may be related to several factors including bony deformity, muscle weakness, and attempts to decrease the pain associated with weight bearing. To date there has not been a study which describes the effect of this disease process on motion of the foot and ankle. These findings may prove to be useful in the pre-operative assessment of these patients.

  4. Agility to INBONE: anterior and posterior approaches to the difficult revision total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, J George; Scott, Ryan T; Berlet, Gregory C; Hyer, Christopher F; Lee, Thomas H; DeOrio, James K

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement is now acknowledged as a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis for end-stage ankle arthritis. The authors present a series of 14 patients who were converted from the Agility total ankle replacement to an INBONE total ankle replacement. This report is unique in that anterior and posterior approaches are discussed and detailed. Although the authors present successful conversion of the Agility total ankle replacement to an INBONE total ankle replacement, the difficulty of this procedure is demonstrated by the high complication rate and 2 early failures.

  5. Outcome of unilateral ankle arthrodesis and total ankle replacement in terms of bilateral gait mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Swati; Rouhani, Hossein; Assal, Mathieu; Aminian, Kamiar; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies assessed the outcome of ankle arthrodesis (AA) and total ankle replacement (TAR) surgeries; however, the extent of postoperative recovery towards bilateral gait mechanics (BGM) is unknown. We evaluated the outcome of the two surgeries at least 2 years post rehabilitation, focusing on BGM. 36 participants, including 12 AA patients, 12 TAR patients, and 12 controls were included. Gait assessment over 50 m distance was performed utilizing pressure insoles and 3D inertial sensors, following which an intraindividual comparison was performed. Most spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters in the TAR group were indicative of good gait symmetry, while the AA group presented significant differences. Plantar pressure symmetry among the AA group was also significantly distorted. Abnormality in biomechanical behavior of the AA unoperated, contralateral foot was observed. In summary, our results indicate an altered BGM in AA patients, whereas a relatively fully recovered BGM is observed in TAR patients, despite the quantitative differences in several parameters when compared to a healthy population. Our study supports a biomechanical assessment and rehabilitation of both operated and unoperated sides after major surgeries for ankle osteoarthrosis.

  6. Use of a trabecular metal implant in ankle arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement is complicated and delayed union, nonunion, and shortening of the leg often occur—especially with large bone defects. We investigated the use of a trabecular metal implant and a retrograde intramedullary nail to obtain fusion. Patients and methods 13 patients with a migrated or loose total ankle implant underwent arthrodesis with the use of a retrograde intramedullary nail through a trabecular metal Tibial Cone. The mean follow-up time was 1.4 (0.6–3.4) years. Results At the last examination, 7 patients were pain-free, while 5 had some residual pain but were satisfied with the procedure. 1 patient was dissatisfied and experienced pain and swelling when walking. The implant-bone interfaces showed no radiographic zones or gaps in any patient, indicating union. Interpretation The method is a new way of simplifying and overcoming some of the problems of performing arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement. PMID:21067435

  7. The Nijdam voice prosthesis: A self-retaining valveless voice prosthesis for vocal rehabilitation after total laryngectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Nijdam, H.F.; Veenstra, A.; Manni, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Voice prosthesis-assisted speech rehabilitation after total laryngectomy has proven to be successful in the majority of patients and exceeds the results of traditional oesophageal speech. Nevertheless 10 -30% failure rates are still reported. in part this is due to prosthesis-related problems, in pa

  8. The Nijdam voice prosthesis : A self-retaining valveless voice prosthesis for vocal rehabilitation after total laryngectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, Frank J. A.; Nijdam, Hoite F.; Veenstra, Aalze; Manni, JJ

    1996-01-01

    Voice prosthesis-assisted speech rehabilitation after total laryngectomy has proven to be successful in the majority of patients and exceeds the results of traditional oesophageal speech. Nevertheless 10-30% failure rates are still reported. In part this is due to prosthesis-related problems, in par

  9. Strategies for Revision Total Ankle Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. Roukis, DPM, PhD, FACFAS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As the frequency of primary total ankle replacement (TAR continues to build, revision will become more commonplace. At present there are no “standard principles” associated with revision TAR. What is clear is that the current approaches are technically complex, fraught with complications and no one approach represents the only answer. Exchange of TAR metallic components to the same system standard or dedicated revision components are viable options with limited occurrence of complications. Explantation and conversion to custom-design long stemmed components has limited availability. Explantation and conversion to another TAR system is high-risk and has strong potential for complications. The use of metal reinforced polymethylmethacrylate cement augmentation of failed TAR systems and tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis should be reserved for very select situations where other options are not possible. There is a real need for long-term survivorship following revision TAR and future efforts ought to be directed in this area.

  10. Internal Fixation of Open Ankle Fracture. Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniel Truffin Rodríguez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Open ankle fracture is sporadically seen in the orthopedic practice. Its clinical course is subject to multiple factors, showing a propensity to cause ankle osteoarthritis over the years. Two cases treated at the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos are presented. The patients underwent emergency surgical treatment consisting of surgical cleaning of the open wound, reduction of the dislocation and internal fixation of the fracture. These cases are presented due to the infrequency of this type of ankle injury and its importance for the medical staff, especially orthopedic doctors.

  11. Multicenter follow-up study of ankle fracture surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hai-lin; WANG Gang; WANG Guang-lin; WU Xin-bao; LIU Li-min; LI Xuan; ZHANG Dian-ying; FU Zhong-guo; WANG Tian-bing; ZHANG Pei-xun; JIANG Bao-guo; SHEN Hui-liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Few data on ankle fractures in China from large multicenter epidemiological and clinical studies are available.The aim of this research was to evaluate the epidemiological features and surgical outcomes of ankle fractures by reviewing 235 patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five hospitals in China.Methods This study included patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five Chinese hospitals from January 2000 to July 2009.Age,gender,mechanism of injury,Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) fracture type,fracture pattern,length of hospital stay and treatment outcome were recorded.Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS software.The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale,visual analogue scale (VAS),and arthritis scale were used to evaluate outcome.Results Of 235 patients with ankle fractures,105 were male with an average age of 37.8 years and 130 were female with an average age of 47.3 years.The average follow-up period was 55.7 months.There were significant differences in the ratios of patients in different age groups between males and females,and in mechanisms of injury among different age groups.There were also significant differences in the length of hospital stay among different fracture types and mechanisms of injury.In healed fractures,the average AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score was 95.5,with an excellence rate of 99.6%,the average VAS score was 0.17,and the average arthritis score was 0.18.Movement of the injured ankle was significantly different to that of the uninjured ankle.There were no significant differences between AO fracture types,fracture patterns or follow-up periods and AOFAS score,but there were some significant differences between these parameters and ankle joint movements,pain VAS score and arthritis score.Conclusions Ankle fractures occur most commonly in middle-aged and young males aged 20-39 years and in elderly females aged 50-69 years.The most common mechanisms of

  12. Early intra-articular complement activation in ankle fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Salzmann, Gian M; Niemeyer, Philipp;

    2014-01-01

    osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1 β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture...... and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures....

  13. Ultrasound-guided interventions of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Corrie M

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) provides excellent delineation of tendons and ligaments in the foot and ankle and provides real-time visualization of a needle during interventions, yielding greater accuracy and efficacy than the traditional blind approach using anatomical landmarks. For this reason, US is rapidly gaining acceptance as the preferred modality for guiding interventions in the foot and ankle where the anatomy is complex, neurovascular structures should be identified, and precise technique is demanded. In the foot and ankle, US is especially useful to guide tendon sheath, bursal, and Achilles paratenon injections, Morton neuroma injections, plantar fascial injections, and joint aspirations and injections.

  14. Review of ankle inversion sprain simulators in the biomechanics laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Chui-Wai Ha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ankle inversion ligamentous sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. The most direct way is to investigate real injury incidents, but it is unethical and impossible to replicate on test participants. Simulators including tilt platforms, trapdoors, and fulcrum devices were designed to mimic ankle inversion movements in laboratories. Inversion angle was the only element considered in early designs; however, an ankle sprain is composed of inversion and plantarflexion in clinical observations. Inversion velocity is another parameter that increased the reality of simulation. This review summarised the simulators, and aimed to compare and contrast their features and settings.

  15. Seasonality of Ankle Swelling: Population Symptom Reporting Using Google Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangwei; Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Kolber, Michael; Flook, Nigel; Sternberg, Harvey; Garrison, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In our experience, complaints of ankle swelling are more common in summer, typically from patients with no obvious cardiovascular disease. Surprisingly, this observation has never been reported. To objectively establish this phenomenon, we sought evidence of seasonality in the public's Internet searches for ankle swelling. Our data, obtained from Google Trends, consisted of all related Google searches in the United States from January 4, 2004, to January 26, 2016. Consistent with our expectations and confirmed by similar data for Australia, Internet searches for information on ankle swelling are highly seasonal (highest in midsummer), with seasonality explaining 86% of search volume variability.

  16. Diabetic charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle with osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    One of the most devastating foot and/or ankle complications in the diabetic population with peripheral neuropathy is the presence of Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN). In recent years, diabetic limb salvage has been attempted more frequently as opposed to major lower extremity amputation for CN of the foot and ankle with ulceration and/or deep infection. Treatment strategies for osteomyelitis in the diabetic population have evolved. This article reviews some of the most common surgical strategies recommended for the diabetic patient with CN of the foot and/or ankle and concomitant osteomyelitis.

  17. 21 CFR 878.3540 - Silicone gel-filled breast prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicone gel-filled breast prosthesis. 878.3540...-filled breast prosthesis. (a) Identification—(1) Single-lumen silicone gel-filled breast prosthesis. A single-lumen silicone gel-filled breast prosthesis is a silicone rubber shell made of...

  18. Effects of hip and head position on ankle range of motion, ankle passive torque, and passive gastrocnemius tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, R J; Lacourpaille, L; Freitas, S R; McNair, P J; Nordez, A

    2016-01-01

    Ankle joint range of motion (ROM) is notably influenced by the position of the hip joint. However, this result remains unexplained. Thus, the aim of this study was to test if the ankle passive torque and gastrocnemius muscle tension are affected by the hip and the head positions. The torque and the muscle shear elastic modulus (measured by elastography to estimate muscle tension) were collected in nine participants during passive ankle dorsiflexions performed in four conditions (by combining hip flexion at 90 or 150°, and head flexed or neutral). Ankle maximum dorsiflexion angle significantly decreased by flexing the hip from 150 to 90° (P  0.05). Maximal passive torque and shear elastic modulus were higher with the hip flexed at 90° (P  0.05) were found for both torque and shear elastic modulus at a given common ankle angle among conditions. Shifts in maximal ankle angle due to hip angle manipulation are not related neither to changes in passive torque nor tension of the gastrocnemius. Further studies should be addressed to better understand the functional role of peripheral nerves and fasciae in the ankle ROM limits.

  19. Effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle osteoarthritis commonly involves sagittal malalignment with anterior translation of the talus relative to the tibia. Total ankle arthroplasty has become an increasingly popular treatment for patients with symptomatic ankle osteoarthritis. However, no comprehensive study has been conducted on the outcomes of total ankle arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with preoperative sagittal malalignment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty. Methods One hundred and four osteoarthritic ankles in 104 patients who underwent three-component total ankle arthroplasty were included in this study. The 104 ankles were divided into 2 groups: ankles with anteriorly translated talus (50 ankles), and ankles with non-translated talus (54 ankles). Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed in both groups. The mean follow-up duration was 42.8 ± 17.9 months (range, 24 to 95 months). Results Forty-six (92%) of 50 ankles with anterior translation of the talus showed relocation of the talus within the mortise at 6 months, and 48 (96%) ankles were relocated at 12 months after total ankle arthroplasty. But, 2 (4%) ankles were not relocated until the final follow-up. The AOFAS scores, ankle range of motion, and radiographic outcomes showed no significant difference between the two groups at the final follow-up (p > 0.05 for each). Conclusions In majority of cases, the anteriorly translated talus in osteoarthritic ankles was restored to an anatomical position within 6 months after successful three-component total ankle arthroplasty. The clinical and radiographic outcomes in the osteoarthritic ankles with anteriorly translated talus group were comparable with those in non-translated talus group. PMID:24007555

  20. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle b...

  1. Treatment of Isolated Ankle Osteoarthritis with Arthrodesis or the Total Ankle Replacement: A Comparison of Early Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Charles L.; Kadoko, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Ankle arthrodesis and replacement are two common surgical treatment options for end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. However, the relative value of these alternative procedures is not well defined. This study compared the clinical and radiographic outcomes as well as the early perioperative complications of the two procedures. Methods Between January 2, 1998 and May 31, 2002, 138 patients were treated with ankle fusion or replacements. Seventy one patients had isolated posttraumatic or primary ankle arthritis. However, patients with inflammatory arthritis, neuropathic arthritis, concomitant hind foot fusion, revision procedures and two component system ankle replacement were excluded. Among them, one group of 42 patients had a total ankle replacement (TAR), whereas the other group of 29 patients underwent ankle fusion. A complete follow-up could be performed on 89% (37/42) and 73% (23/29) of the TAR and ankle fusion group, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 4.2 years (range, 2.2 to 5.9 years). Results The outcomes of both groups were compared using a student's t-test. Only the short form heath survery mental component summary score and Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale pain scale showed significantly better outcomes in the TAR group (p < 0.05). In the radiographic evaluation, there was no significant difference in preoperative and postoperative osteoarthritis between the TAR and fusion groups. Conclusions The clinical results of TAR are similar to those of fusion at an average follow-up of 4 years. However, the arthroplasty group showed better pain relief and more postoperative complications that required surgery. PMID:20190994

  2. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Keith; Loudin, James; Goetz, Georges; Huie, Philip; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore I.; Galambos, Ludwig; Smith, Richard; Harris, James S.; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the `image capturing' photoreceptors, while neurons in the `image-processing' inner retinal layers are relatively well preserved. Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight by electrically stimulating the surviving neurons. Most implants are powered through inductive coils, requiring complex surgical methods to implant the coil-decoder-cable-array systems that deliver energy to stimulating electrodes via intraocular cables. We present a photovoltaic subretinal prosthesis, in which silicon photodiodes in each pixel receive power and data directly through pulsed near-infrared illumination and electrically stimulate neurons. Stimulation is produced in normal and degenerate rat retinas, with pulse durations of 0.5-4 ms, and threshold peak irradiances of 0.2-10 mW mm-2, two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. Neural responses were elicited by illuminating a single 70 µm bipolar pixel, demonstrating the possibility of a fully integrated photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density.

  3. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the ICMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS Management – CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management – CB – MB – FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through Indico. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2008 Annual Reviews are posted in Indico. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral student upon completion of their theses.  Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of employment and name of their first employer. The Notes, Conference Reports and Theses published si...

  4. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AAOS). Selecting a Medical Provider When selecting a medical provider to care for your feet and ankles, be sure to ask him/her about: Medical school education Accredited residency training Areas of practice ...

  5. Ultrasound of ankle and foot: overuse and sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Viviane; Guillin, Raphaël; Dhanju, Jag; Cardinal, Etienne

    2007-06-01

    Sports and overuse injuries of the ankle and foot are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ultrasound (US) has been established as an excellent diagnostic modality for foot and ankle injuries, providing a rapid noninvasive, economical, and readily available tool that is well tolerated by the patient with acute or chronic pain. The opportunity for dynamic examination is another advantage of US in evaluating ankle and foot pathology, where maneuvers such as muscle contraction and stressing of the joint may be particularly helpful. In many cases, US can be used as a first-line and only imaging modality for diagnosis. This article focuses on ankle disorders related to sports or overuse that affect tendons, including tendinosis, tenosynovitis, paratendinitis, rupture, dislocation, and ligaments that are commonly torn. The sonographic features of certain common foot disorders related to physical activity and overuse are also discussed, including plantar fasciitis, Morton's neuroma, stress fractures, and plantar plate injury.

  6. Dental prosthesis and buccal lesions in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz García Alpizar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fundament: Buccal lesions in the elderly are very frequent and they constitute a problem of health due to the consequences that cause. Objective: to describe the characteristics of the removable prosthesis used by the population of 60 and more years age and their relationship with the lesions of the oral mucosa. Methods: We carried out a study descriptive of cross section in 125 elderly with oral prosthesis. The characteristics of the removable prosthesis were described and their relationship with the lesions of the oral mucosa. The square chi tests and the analysis of relative risk were use to determine the association between the variables, also we used a logistical regression model to determine the independent relationship of each factor with the presence of the lesions. Results: We was a 12% of the people with stomatitis sub prosthesis, 8% presented lesions growth hyperplasic and 5,6% they were have angular queilitis. The lesions in the oral mucosa increased in people with prosthesis in not well state, bad hygiene this and in the female sex. Conclusion: the chronic lesions were the more prevalence in this study and they were very related with factors like: state of the conservation the prosthesis, time use, hygiene this and sex of the individual; but when determining the independent influence from each factor with the presence lesions, we established that only the state of conservation of the prosthesis and their hygiene affected of the important way to the old men of this study.

  7. Active upper limb prosthesis based on natural movement trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-García, Alfredo; Leija, Lorenzo; Muñoz, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    The motion of the current prostheses is sequential and does not allow natural movements. In this work, complex natural motion patterns from a healthy upper limb were characterized in order to be emulated for a trans-humeral prosthesis with three degrees of freedom at the elbow. Firstly, it was necessary to define the prosthesis workspace, which means to establish a relationship using an artificial neural network (ANN), between the arm-forearm (3-D) angles allowed by the prosthesis, and its actuators length. The 3-D angles were measured between the forearm and each axis of the reference system attached at the elbow. Secondly, five activities of daily living (ADLs) were analyzed by means of the elbow flexion (EF), the forearm prono-supination (FPS) and the 3-D angles, from healthy subjects, by using a video-based motion analysis system. The 3-D angles were fed to the prosthesis model (ANN) in order to analyze which ADLs could be emulated by the prosthesis. As a result, a prosthesis kinematics approximation was obtained. In conclusion, in spite of the innovative mechanical configuration of the actuators, it was possible to carry out only three of the five ADLs considered. Future work will include improvement of the mechanical configuration of the prosthesis to have greater range of motion.

  8. Ultrasound-guided intervention in the ankle and foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gina M; Watura, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In this comprehensive review, we discuss the main interventions performed in the foot and ankle for Achilles tendinopathy, Morton's neuromas and Plantar fasciitis as well as techniques for intra-articular and peritendinous injections. We present the different imaging techniques and injectable agents that can be used in clinical practice, trying to help the reader decide the most appropriate way of managing the patient with a problem in the ankle and foot. PMID:26537692

  9. Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance with relaxed muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2014-11-01

    Neurological or biomechanical disorders may distort ankle mechanical impedance and thereby impair locomotor function. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of multivariable ankle mechanical impedance of young healthy subjects when their muscles were relaxed, to serve as a baseline to compare with pathophysiological ankle properties of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. Measurements using a highly backdrivable wearable ankle robot combined with multi-input multi-output stochastic system identification methods enabled reliable characterization of ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) simultaneously, the sagittal and frontal planes. The characterization included important ankle properties unavailable from single DOF studies: coupling between DOFs and anisotropy as a function of frequency. Ankle impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both seated (knee flexed) and standing (knee straightened) postures. Stiffness in the sagittal plane was greater than in the frontal plane and furthermore, was greater when standing than when seated, most likely due to the stretch of bi-articular muscles (medial and lateral gastrocnemius). Very low off-diagonal partial coherences implied negligible coupling between dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion. The directions of principal axes were tilted slightly counterclockwise from the original joint coordinates. The directional variation (anisotropy) of ankle impedance in the 2-D space formed by rotations in the sagittal and frontal planes exhibited a characteristic "peanut" shape, weak in inversion-eversion over a wide range of frequencies from the stiffness dominated region up to the inertia dominated region. Implications for the assessment of neurological and biomechanical impairments are discussed.

  10. Supramalleolar osteotomy for realignment of the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Noman A; Herzenberg, John E; Lamm, Bradley M

    2012-10-01

    Ankle replacement systems have not been as reliable as hip replacements in providing long-term relief of pain, increased motion, and return to full activity. Supramalleolar Osteotomy is an extraarticular procedure that realigns the mechanical axis, thereby restoring ankle function. The literature discussing knee arthritis has shown that realignment osteotomies of the tibia improve function and prolong total knee replacement surgery. The success of the procedure is predicated on understanding the patient's clinical and radiographic presentation and proper preoperative assessment and planning.

  11. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, me...

  12. Microbial colonization of Provox voice prosthesis in the Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Chaturvedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tracheoesophageal speech using the voice prosthesis is considered to be the "gold standard" with success rates as high as 90%. Despite significant developments, majority eventually develop dysfunction due to microbial deterioration. We did a pilot study of 58 laryngectomy patients who developed prosthesis dysfunction. Materials and Methods: A total of 58 laryngectomy patients who had their dysfunctional prosthesis removed were included in this study. Dysfunctional prostheses were removed and examined. Esophageal and tracheal flanges were examined separately. After obtaining pure fungal and bacterial cultures, the yeast strains were identified. Bacteria were identified with the light microscope and gram staining. We analyzed prosthesis lifespan and probable factors affecting it. Results: Central leak was found in 43% cases while in 57% peri-prosthetic leakage was the most common reason for prosthesis replacement. Microbial analysis revealed a combination of yeast and bacteria in approximately 55% culture samples. Out of these, almost 90% had the presence of single yeast species with bacteria. Pure fungal culture was identified in rest of the 45% cultures while none detected pure bacterial forms. Candida tropicalis was the solitary yeast in 81% while Candida albicans was seen in 10% as the solitary yeast. Bacterial isolates revealed Klebsiella pneumonia in 19%, Escherichia coli in 8% while Staphylococcus aureus was grown in 1% cultures. The consumption of curd (P = 0.036, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 2.292-64.285 to have a significant correlation of the mean prosthesis lifespan. Consumption of curd (P = 0.001, 95% CI: 0.564-2.008 and history of prior radiotherapy (P = 0.015, 95% CI: 0.104-0.909 had a significant bearing on the Provox prosthesis lifespan. Conclusions: Candida is the most common organism grown on voice prosthesis in Indian scenario. Consumption of curd and history of prior radiotherapy significantly affect Provox

  13. Omega documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

  14. Syndesmotic Malreduction after Ankle ORIF; Is Radiography Sufficient?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Manafi Rasi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle fractures, especially those resulting from external rotation mechanisms are associated with injury to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. Some authors have recommended performing CT scanning after open ankle surgery to evaluate the reduction of syndesmosis. In this current study, we aimed to investigate the sensitivity of plain radiography in diagnosing syndesmosis malreduction after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF in patients with ankle fractures.   Methods: Thirty patients with ankle fractures participated in this prospective study. ORIFs were performed with respect to all of the technical guidelines shown in orthopedic literature for exact syndesmosis reduction, such as fibular length and proper settings. In the operating room, plain radiography was performed in anteroposterior, mortise and lateral views to assess whether syndesmosis was malreduced. If malreduction was detected, the patient was revised. As the gold standard, patients underwent postoperative bilateral CT scanning to investigate the syndesmosis reduction which was then compared to the healthy side. Finally, the sensitivity of plain radiography in the diagnosis of syndesmosis malreduction was determined by comparing this method to CT scanning. Results: In both of the methods we did not find any patient with syndesmosis malreduction. Hence, the sensitivity of plain radiography was determined 100%. Conclusion: Based on our findings, there is no need to perform CT scanning to evaluate syndesmosis reduction after ankle ORIF in patients with ankle fractures. Plain radiography is sufficient and has satisfactory sensitivity in these patients.

  15. Syndesmotic Malreduction after Ankle ORIF; Is Radiography Sufficient?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Manafi Rasi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Ankle fractures, especially those resulting from external rotation mechanisms are associated with injury to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. Some authors have recommended performing CT scanning after open ankle surgery to evaluate the reduction of syndesmosis. In this current study, we aimed to investigate the sensitivity of plain radiography in diagnosing syndesmosis malreduction after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF in patients with ankle fractures.   Methods: Thirty patients with ankle fractures participated in this prospective study. ORIFs were performed with respect to all of the technical guidelines shown in orthopedic literature for exact syndesmosis reduction, such as fibular length and proper settings. In the operating room, plain radiography was performed in anteroposterior, mortise and lateral views to assess whether syndesmosis was malreduced. If malreduction was detected, the patient was revised. As the gold standard, patients underwent postoperative bilateral CT scanning to investigate the syndesmosis reduction which was then compared to the healthy side. Finally, the sensitivity of plain radiography in the diagnosis of syndesmosis malreduction was determined by comparing this method to CT scanning. Results: In both of the methods we did not find any patient with syndesmosis malreduction. Hence, the sensitivity of plain radiography was determined 100%. Conclusion: Based on our findings, there is no need to perform CT scanning to evaluate syndesmosis reduction after ankle ORIF in patients with ankle fractures. Plain radiography is sufficient and has satisfactory sensitivity in these patients.

  16. Flap surgery in treatment of patients with pathology of ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Kutyanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the capabilities and perspectives of flap surgery in treatment of patients with traumas and diseases of ankle joint region. Material and methods. The results of surgical treatment of 88 such patients. All the patients were treated in the Vreden Russian Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics within the period from 2000 to 2011. All the patients had pedicled flap transfer (46 cases or free tissue transfer (45 cases. 11 patients had additional need in other open orthopedic operations of ankle joint. Besides this, scientific works dealing with the studied problem have been analyzed. Results and conclusions. It has been stated that flap surgery is predominantly used as the only and exhaustive method of treatment of such patients (87,5%. In these situations pedicled flap transfer and free tissue transfer tend to be used in comparatively equal quantities. Flap surgery is now seldom used as a component of complex surgical treatment. It is used only in some cases of bone reconstruction of distal tibia by Ilizarov bone transport, in some cases of tumors of ankle joint as well as in some cases of local infectious complications after internal fixation and total ankle arthroplasty. Patients with the pathology of this kind have a high need in free tissue transfer (from 66,7% to 83,3%. Progressing technology of total ankle arthroplasty will contribute to the frequency of use of flap surgery for patients with pathology of ankle joint.

  17. A modified technique for retention of orbital prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera R Shaikh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An orbital defect (congenital or acquired causes severe facial asymmetry and disfigurement, which results in psychological and social disturbances to the patient. It becomes a challenging task for a maxillofacial prosthodontist to fabricate a prosthesis that replicates the healthy side of the face. Success of the prosthesis depends primarily on satisfactory retention of the same. This clinical report illustrates rehabilitation of a patient with an orbital defect by fabricating a hollow orbital prosthesis, utilizing anatomical undercuts for retention using an acrylic resin template relined by a resilient denture liner.

  18. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains--A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Wilson

    Full Text Available To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies.A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of "kinesiotape" and "ankle" in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science.Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included.Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings.Most studies (n=7 had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants.It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely.

  19. Electronic stimulators for surface neural prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broderick Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the technological advancements in neural prosthesis devices using Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES. FES refers to the restoration of motor functions lost due to spinal cord injury (SCI, stroke, head injury, or diseases such as Cerebral Palsy or Multiple Sclerosis by eliciting muscular contractions through the use of a neuromuscular electrical stimulator device. The field has developed considerably since its inception, with the miniaturisation of circuity, the development of programmable and adaptable stimulators and the enhancement of sensors used to trigger the application of stimulation to suit a variety of FES applications. This paper discusses general FES system design requirements in the context of existing commercial and research FES devices, focusing on surface stimulators for the upper and lower limbs. These devices have demonstrated feasible standing and stepping in a clinical setting with paraplegic patients, improvements in dropped foot syndrome with hemiplegic patients and aided in the restoration of grasping function in patients with upper limb motor dysfunction.

  20. Galvanic gold plating for fixed dental prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelik, Tuncer Burak; Yilmaz, Burak

    2013-07-01

    Metal ceramic partial fixed dental prostheses have been commonly used for the replacement of missing teeth for many years. Because of an increase in the price of gold, base metal alloys have been the choice of alloy for the fabrication of metal ceramic restorations in many dental clinics. Some major disadvantages of base metals are their corrosion and the dark coloration they may cause at the crown margins. This article describes a galvanic gold-plating technique, which is used to minimize corrosion and improve the esthetics of metal ceramic restorations fabricated with Cr-Co base metal alloys. This technique involves the deposition of a 6 μm to 8 μm 24 K gold layer directly onto the Cr-Co cast prosthesis framework. The technique improves metal surface properties, making them more biocompatible and usable, however, requires additional equipment and experienced laboratory technicians. Clinical studies should be performed to corroborate the long term success of this technique.

  1. A laboratory silicone for preclinical training in ear prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vijay; Haribabu; Vimala; Gnanasamband, Vimala

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an industrial elastic silicone as a material for the laboratory fabrication of ear prosthesis. It has been tested for toxicity in lab animals by the SGS India Pvt. Ltd and approved as a material to pass the parameter of abnormal toxicity. This material therefore can be safely recommended for laboratory exercise to fabricate facial prosthesis. The high cost of the maxillo facial silicone materials prohibits their use for facial prosthesis in pre-clinical training of post-graduate students in maxillofacial prosthodontics. For this reason, pre-clinical laboratory exercise in facial prosthesis is inadequate. A few institutions use polymethyl methacrylate resins which are rigid and do not have elastic characteristics of silicone, which is used for facial defects. This cost-effective industrial silicone material which mimics the elastic and color characteristics of the conventional silicones can be recommended for preclinical exercises. PMID:23956609

  2. Failed total carpometacarpal joint prosthesis of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Homilius, Morten

    2010-01-01

    . The male:female ratio was 1:4 and the mean duration of observation 32 months (range 6-52). In three patients the revised implant was a MOJE uncemented carpometacarpal joint prosthesis and in seven patients an Elektra uncemented one. At follow-up grip strength was reduced to less than 90% of the other hand...... in eight of 10 patients, but the mean Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores, self-reported pinch-grip-related function, and pain were comparable with our earlier published results with the Elektra carpometacarpal total joint prosthesis.......Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis...

  3. Characterization of an eye prosthesis using monopoly syrup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinki Bankoti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The eye is a vital organ and an important component of facial expression. Loss of an eye has a crippling effect on the psychology of the patient. Maxillofacial prostheses restore and replace stomatognathic and associated facial structures with artificial substitutes. The objectives of eye prosthesis is to improve the patient esthetics, restore and maintain the health of the remaining associated structures, consequently provide physical and mental well-being. The primary purpose of an ocular prosthesis is to maintain the volume of eye socket and create the illusion of a healthy eye and surrounding tissue. A custom ocular prosthesis is a good option when reconstruction is done by plastic surgery, and osseointegrated implants are either not possible or not desired. A case of a custom-made ocular acrylic prosthesis is presented with acceptable fit, good retention, and esthetics.

  4. Retinal Prosthesis: A Potential Benefit for the Blind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-jie

    2009-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases may induce the degeneration of outer retina and in turn, blindness. Nevertheless, due to the maintenance of inner retina, the coding and processing of visual neurons responses are still able to be executed naturally. Therefore,an effective retinal prosthesis device may be developed by mimicking the function of outer retina: transferring the visual light into artificial stimulus and delivering the stimulus to the retina aiming to evoke the neural responses. As two main developing directions for current retinal prosthesis,epiretinal (ER) and subretinal (SR) prosthesis are both undergoing experimental stage and possessing advantages and limitations. Further investigations in power supply, biocompatibility, etc.are still required. Additionally, suprachoroidal transretinal stimulation (STS) and neurotransmitter-induced stimulation as some other alternatives in retinal prosthesis are also considered as promising research directions, although they are not mature enough to be applied commercially, either.

  5. Association between dental prosthesis need, nutritional status and quality of life of elderly subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Rajath; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Jain, Veena;

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of prosthesis need on nutritional status and oral health-related quality of life (OHrQoL) in elderly and to check the disparity between prosthesis need and prosthesis want in the Indian elderly. METHODS: A total of 946 geriatric participants reporting to a geriatric medicine...... need (r = -0.460). Participants with some prosthesis need had significantly lower MNA and GOHAI scores as compared to those with no prosthesis need. Though prosthesis need was high (79.7 %), demand was low (39.3 %). CONCLUSION: Prosthesis need affects nutritional status and OHrQoL in elderly...... clinic were recruited in the study. Mini-nutritional assessment (MNA), geriatric oral health assessment (GOHAI) indices, prosthesis need according to WHO criteria, and prosthesis want was recorded along with age, gender, socioeconomic status and posterior occluding pair. RESULTS: Significant associations...

  6. Total ankle replacement in 35 cases%人工全踝关节置换35例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖翔; 高志增; 黄山虎; 杨述华

    2008-01-01

    treatments were performed in these patients. Postoperatively, injury of superficial peroneal nerve occurred in 1 patient, but this did not cause an obvious motor dysfunction, so no special treatment was given. In addition, infection of incisional wound appeared in 2 patients and late healed subsequent to another dressing. Thirty-three cases presented with primary healing of incision. Among 35 total ankle arthroplasties, 28 had detained 43.5-month follow up (range 3-80 months). The ankles were scored with Kofoed total scoring system. The average postoperative ankle score was 85.5 (range 58-95), pain degree score was 48.3 (range 35-50), joint function score was 20.7 (range 18-30), and range-of-motion score was 17.2 (range 16-20). There was significant difference in these scores as compared to preoperative scores (P < 0.01). None of prosthetic loosening and migration was found radiologically. All these indicated that standardized and normalized operative technique as well as operative tools closely matched to the prosthesis and used to prevent and treat postoperative infection, dislocation, and prosthetic loosening as well as histocompatibility between material and host are the essential conditions for enhancing the success rate of prosthetic replacement.

  7. Biocompatible membrane of PDMS for the new chamber prosthesis stapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasik, Katarzyna; Kwacz, Monika

    2016-06-30

    Stapes protheses are designed for patients with otosclerosis resulting immobilization or significant reduction of the stapes mobility. All currently used prostheses are called - piston prosthesis. However, its use to stimulate the cochlea is still imperfect. New chamber stapes prosthesis allows the perilymph excitation more effective than the piston prothesis. Moreover, the chamber prosthesis eliminates the common causes of piston-stapedotomy failures. The most important element of the new prosthesis is a flexible membrane. The membrane stiffness should be close to the stiffness of normal annular ligament. This work presents the process of selection of the membrane's thickness and its manufacturing technology. Method A 3D model of the chamber stapes prosthesis was build using Autodesk Inventor 2015. The model was imported to Abacus 6.13 computing environment. During numerical simulations, displacements corresponding to applied loads were calculated and the membrane thickness was adjusted so that its stiffness was the same as the ligament stiffness (~ 120 N/m). The compliance ratios calculated from the load-displacement curves for the membrane and the annular ligament were verified using linear regression analysis. After determining the thickness, the manufacturing technology of the membrane was developed. Results The best similarity between the membrane's and annular ligament's stiffness was achieved for PDMS membrane with the 0,15- mm thickness (similarity ratio R2=0,997752). In this work, the technological parameters of spin-coating process for membrane manufacture are also presented. Summary The proper functioning of the chamber stapes prosthesis requires the PDMS membrane with a thickness of 0,15 mm. The 0,15-mm membrane has the tiffness close to the stiffness of the normal annular ligament. Therefore, the chamber stapes prosthesis provides the perilymph stimulation at the level comparable to the healthy ear. New prosthesis is currently under pre

  8. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xin Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0-135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee′s kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, "rollback" compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis.

  9. Penile prosthesis surgery in the management of erectile dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We reviewed retrospectively the use of penile prostheses, including the indications and complications of penile prosthesis surgery. Methods We identified publications and the reported advances in penile prosthesis surgery between 1987 and 2012 in Pub-Med, and published information from American Medical Systems, Inc. (Minnetonka, MN, USA) and Coloplast Corporation (Humlebaek, Denmark), using the keywords ‘penile prosthesis’, ‘erectile dysfunction’, ‘mechanical reliability’, ‘compl...

  10. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Xin Zhao; Liang Wen; Tie-Bing Qu; Li-Li Hou; Dong Xiang; Jia Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background:The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics.Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration.Here,kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data.Methods:Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy,anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs,including the femur,tibia,patella,fibula,distal femur cartilage,and medial and lateral menisci,as well as the anterior cruciate,posterior cruciate,medial collateral,and lateral collateral ligaments.The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis,which was then validated by comparison with a previous study.The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0-135° flexion.Results:Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study,suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses.The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient,or insufficiently aggressive,"rollback" compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee.In addition,a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis.Conclusions:There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee,suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis.The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis.

  11. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengtheni...

  12. A digital patient for computer-aided prosthesis design

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, Giorgio; Facoetti, Giancarlo; Rizzi, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    This article concerns the design of lower limb prosthesis, both below and above knee. It describes a new computer-based design framework and a digital model of the patient around which the prosthesis is designed and tested in a completely virtual environment. The virtual model of the patient is the backbone of the whole system, and it is based on a biomechanical general-purpose model customized with the patient's characteristics (e.g. anthropometric measures). The software platform adopts com...

  13. Literature Review on Needs of Upper Limb Prosthesis Users

    OpenAIRE

    Cordella, Francesca; Ciancio, Anna Lisa; Sacchetti, Rinaldo; Davalli, Angelo; Cutti, Andrea Giovanni; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Zollo, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    The loss of one hand can significantly affect the level of autonomy and the capability of performing daily living, working and social activities. The current prosthetic solutions contribute in a poor way to overcome these problems due to limitations in the interfaces adopted for controlling the prosthesis and to the lack of force or tactile feedback, thus limiting hand grasp capabilities. This paper presents a literature review on needs analysis of upper limb prosthesis users, and points out ...

  14. Ischemic Gangrene of the Glans following Penile Prosthesis Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Gómez, Borja; Romero Otero, Javier; Díez Sicilia, Laura; Jiménez Alcaide, Estibaliz; García-Cruz, Eduardo; Rodríguez Antolín, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The development of ischemic gangrene of the penis following implantation of prosthesis is unusual, and very few cases are available in the literature. As a result, no established treatment protocol is available. We report our experience within a case of gangrene of the glans following implantation of a three-component prosthesis. We present a 53-year-old male, smoker with diabetes and hypercholesterolemia, who underwent surgery for the insertion of a penile prosthesis with 3 components to correct his erectile dysfunction and severe Peyronie's disease. The procedure was carried out without incidents. During the postoperative period, the patient began to complain from penile and perineal pain. He developed avascular necrosis of the glans. The necrosed area was excised. Four weeks later, he developed fever and perineal pain arriving to the emergency room with the prosthesis extruding through the glans. He had emergency surgery to remove the prosthesis plus surgical lavage and was prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Four weeks later, the penis was completely revascularized and reepithelialized. Ischemic gangrene following penile prosthesis implantation takes place in patients with poor peripheral vascularisation. Diabetes mellitus has been the common denominator to all of the reported cases. PMID:23956919

  15. Ischemic Gangrene of the Glans following Penile Prosthesis Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja García Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of ischemic gangrene of the penis following implantation of prosthesis is unusual, and very few cases are available in the literature. As a result, no established treatment protocol is available. We report our experience within a case of gangrene of the glans following implantation of a three-component prosthesis. We present a 53-year-old male, smoker with diabetes and hypercholesterolemia, who underwent surgery for the insertion of a penile prosthesis with 3 components to correct his erectile dysfunction and severe Peyronie's disease. The procedure was carried out without incidents. During the postoperative period, the patient began to complain from penile and perineal pain. He developed avascular necrosis of the glans. The necrosed area was excised. Four weeks later, he developed fever and perineal pain arriving to the emergency room with the prosthesis extruding through the glans. He had emergency surgery to remove the prosthesis plus surgical lavage and was prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Four weeks later, the penis was completely revascularized and reepithelialized. Ischemic gangrene following penile prosthesis implantation takes place in patients with poor peripheral vascularisation. Diabetes mellitus has been the common denominator to all of the reported cases.

  16. Ideas on the suspension of the below-knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevsten, S

    1978-04-01

    Comparative studies with the PTB-suction prosthesis and the ordinary PTB prosthesis have provided opportunities to analyze and understand some functional differences in the suspension of below-knee prostheses. In a roentgenological study of the stump-socket contact signficantly less vertical displacement in the PTB-suction prosthesis has been shown. A study of the pressure variations in the suction socket verified the theory of the necessary pressure gradient in the PTB-suction socket. Added negative pressure by muscle action was also observed. An electromyographic study suggested a muscular activity pattern in the suction prosthesis similar to that of a normal leg, as a contrast to the ordinary PTB prosthesis where simultaneous contractions of antagonistic muscles seemed to be the usual pattern. The latter is interpreted as a defence reaction. An optimal prosthesis has been deduced. It shall have a soft prosthetic socket with a perfect fit, a suction, adhesion and friction fixation and a pressure gradient between the skin and the socket wall with minimum compression distally. The plaster casting shall be done in a downward modelling manner making available space for soft tissue without compression.

  17. A new porous tracheal prosthesis sealed with collagen sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramachi, M; Kiyotani, T; Takimoto, Y; Nakamura, T; Shimizu, Y

    1995-01-01

    We have designed a new tracheal prosthesis to overcome problems with an earlier device, which included stenosis and exposure of its constituent mesh. A polypropylene mesh cylinder, reinforced with a polypropylene spiral, is sealed with collagen sponge made from porcine dermal collagen. Using this prosthesis, we performed cervical tracheal reconstructions on 11 dogs. Three dogs died within 3 months of reconstruction. Their causes of death were anesthetic accident, diarrhea, and suffocation, respectively. Bronchoscopically, the inner surface of the prosthesis was almost covered with host tissue by 2 months. However, in one dog, a relatively large area of the mesh was exposed in the tracheal lumen at 6 months; a smaller area was exposed in two other dogs. The appearance of the inner surface rapidly became lustrous, and central stenosis was not significant, even after 12 months. Histologically, an incomplete epithelial lining at 6 months was seen on the reconstructed surface and included ciliated columnar, cuboidal, and squamous epithelium. These observations have revealed that this prosthesis has high biocompatibility and the potential to overcome problems of stenosis of the prosthesis lumen. However, because ulceration persists with this prosthesis, additional improvement is needed to reduce the incidence of mesh exposure.

  18. Total ankle replacement--evolution of the technology and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, John J; Sheskier, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty was developed to reduce pain and retain motion of the ankle joint in patients with osteoarthritis much like its total hip and knee counterparts. Orthopaedic surgeons are well equipped to evaluate and treat patients with end-stage hip or knee arthritis; however, the management of patients with ankle arthritis represents a challenge to both general orthopaedic surgeons and to the foot and ankle surgeons to whom these patients are often referred. Although techniques for both hip and knee arthroplasty have evolved to provide long-term pain relief and functional improvement, neither ankle arthrodesis nor arthroplasty has demonstrated comparably favorable outcomes in long-term follow-up studies. Early ankle arthroplasty designs with highly constrained cemented components were abandoned due to unacceptably high failure rates and complications. While arthrodesis is still considered the "gold standard" for treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis, progression of adjacent joint arthrosis and diminished gait efficiency has led to a resurgence of interest in ankle arthroplasty. Long-term outcome studies for total ankle replacement found excellent or good results in 82% of patients who received a newer generation ankle device compared with 72% if undergoing ankle fusion. Continued long-term follow-up studies are necessary, but total ankle arthroplasty has become a viable option for surgical treatment of ankle arthritis.

  19. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Fixed Interim Prosthesis Using a Duplicate Denture: An Alternative Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thobity, Ahmad M

    2016-06-22

    The fabrication of an implant-supported fixed complete denture prosthesis involves multiple clinical and laboratory steps. One of the main steps is to provide the patient with an interim fixed prosthesis to evaluate the patient's esthetic and functional needs as well as to enhance the patient's psychology before proceeding to the definitive prosthesis. Different techniques for fabricating interim prostheses have been described in the literature. This report describes an alternative technique that uses a duplicate denture made of self-curing acrylic resin to fabricate an implant-supported fixed interim prosthesis. The interim prosthesis was later used as a blueprint for the definitive implant-supported hybrid prosthesis.

  20. The Eccentric Torque Production Capacity of the Ankle, Knee, and Hip Muscle Groups in Patients with Unilateral Chronic Ankle Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Moradi-Bousari, Aida; Naghibi, Saeed; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Shaterzadeh-Yazdi, Mohammad-Jafar; Goharpey, Shahin; Etemadi, Malihe; Mazaheri, Masood; Feizi, Awat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate eccentric torque production capacity of the ankle, knee and hip muscle groups in patients with unilateral chronic ankle instability (CAI) as compared to healthy matched controls. Methods In this case-control study, 40 participants (20 with CAI and 20 controls) were recruited based on convenient non-probability sampling. The average peak torque to body weight (APT/BW) ratio of reciprocal eccentric contraction of ankle dorsi flexor/plantar flexor, ankle evertor/invertor, knee flexor/extensor, hip flexor/extensor and hip abductor/adductor was determined using an isokinetic dynamometer. All subjects participated in two separate sessions with a rest interval of 48 to 72 hours. In each testing session, the torque production capacity of the ankle, knee, and hip muscle groups of only one lower limb was measured. At first, 3 repetitions of maximal eccentric-eccentric contraction were performed for the reciprocal muscles of a joint in a given movement direction. Then, the same procedure of practice and testing trials was repeated for the next randomly-ordered muscle group or joint of the same limb. Results There was no significant interaction of group (CAI and healthy controls) by limb (injured and non-injured) for any muscle groups. Main effect of limb was not significant. Main effect of group was only significant for eccentric torque production capacity of ankle dorsi flexor and hip flexor muscle groups. The APT/BW ratio of these muscles was significantly lower in the CAI group than the healthy controls (P<0.05). Conclusion CAI is associated with eccentric strength deficit of ankle dorsi flexor and hip flexor muscles as indicated by reduction in torque production capacity of these muscles compared to healthy controls. This strength deficit appeared to exist in both the injured and non-injured limbs of the patients. PMID:23802057

  1. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains – A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brendan; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Study Selection Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings. Data Syntheses Most studies (n=7) had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants. Conclusions It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control) and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely. PMID

  2. FIBULAR MOTOR NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES AND ANKLE SENSORIMOTOR CAPACITIES*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James K.; Allet, Lara; Kim, Hogene; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nerve conduction studies provide information regarding the status of the peripheral nerve, but relationships with sensorimotor capacities that influence mobility have not been defined. Methods A secondary analysis was conducted of data from 41 older subjects (20 women, age 69.1 ± 8.3 years), 25 with diabetic neuropathy of varying severity, and 16 without diabetes or neuropathy. Measurements included routine fibular motor nerve conduction studies and laboratory-based determination of ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds and ankle inversion/eversion motor function. Results Independent of age, fibular amplitude correlated robustly with ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds (R2 = .591, p < .001), moderately with ankle inversion and eversion rates of torque generation (R2 = .216; p = .004 and R2 = .200; p = .006, respectively), and more strongly when fibular motor amplitude was normalized for body mass index (R2 = .350; p < .001 and R2 = .275; p = .001). Discussion Fibular motor amplitude was strongly associated with ankle sensorimotor capacities that influence lateral balance and recovery from perturbations during gait. The results suggest that nerve conduction study measures have potential for an expanded clinical role in evaluating mobility function in the population studied. PMID:23225524

  3. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off.

  4. [Arthrodesis versus total joint replacement of the ankle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlmeier, T

    2013-06-01

    In general, for the treatment of end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint arthrodesis is considered to be the gold standard based on its versatility and eligibility for numerous indications. Nowadays, total ankle arthroplasty represents a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis taking into account distinct premises as both procedures provide a calculable reduction of the preoperative pain level and a comparable functional gain. Furthermore, current 10-year-survival rates of total ankle replacement are reported to range between 76 % and 89 %. Revision rates of up to 10 % for both techniques have been reported with manifest differences within the respective spectrum of complications. Due to the fact that more than two thirds of patients suffer from post-traumatic osteoarthritis with a relatively low average of age concomitant malalignment, soft tissue damage or instability may frequently occur. A restoration of anatomic axes and an adequate centering of the talus under the tibia appear to be crucial for the outcome as well as an adequate soft tissue balancing, in particular in total ankle replacement. Thus, the selection of the correct indication and the right choice of treatment on the basis of complete preoperative diagnostics considering necessary additive surgical measures are of paramount importance for the final outcome.

  5. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients.

  6. Early Intra-Articular Complement Activation in Ankle Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokine regulation possibly influences long term outcome following ankle fractures, but little is known about synovial fracture biochemistry. Eight patients with an ankle dislocation fracture were included in a prospective case series and matched with patients suffering from grade 2 osteochondritis dissecans (OCD of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture and collection of effusion were only significantly associated with synovial aggrecan and C5b-9 levels (P<0.001. Furthermore, synovial expressions of both proteins correlated with each other (P<0.001. Although IL-1β expression was relatively low, intra-articular levels correlated with C5a (P<0.01 and serological C-reactive protein concentrations 2 days after surgery (P<0.05. Joint effusions were initially dominated by neutrophils, but the portion of monocytes constantly increased reaching 50% at day 6 after fracture (P<0.02. Whereas aggrecan and IL-1β concentrations were not different in fracture and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P<0.01. Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures.

  7. Characteristics of flexed knee gait and functional outcome of a patient who underwent knee reconstruction with a hingeless prosthesis for bone tumor resection: a case report with gait analysis and comparison with healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Y; Tatematsu, N; Nagai, K; Nakayama, T; Nakamata, T; Okamoto, T; Toguchida, J; Ichihashi, N; Tsuboyama, T

    2013-12-01

    We report on a patient after knee reconstruction for osteosarcoma in the distal femur using a hingeless prosthesis K-MAX KNEE system K-5 who walked without ipsilateral knee extension in the latter half of the stance phase (flexed knee gait). We evaluated the patient using three-dimensional gait analysis and isokinetic knee strength measurement, and compared the patient with five healthy subjects. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score was also used for evaluation. The patient kept his operated knee flexed during mid stance. The maximal ankle plantarflexion internal moment was lower on the ipsilateral side than on the contralateral side, and lower than in the healthy subjects. The negative ankle power during the stance phase was generally stronger on the ipsilateral side than on the contralateral side, and also in the healthy subjects. Unusual contralateral hip flexion occurred after the initial contact, indicating increased joint load on the ipsilateral ankle and the contralateral hip. The ratios of the peak knee extension/flexion torque were 0.7 on the ipsilateral side, 1.9 on the contralateral side, and 1.7 in the healthy subjects. The MSTS score of the patient was 23/30 (76.6%). Flexed knee gait might account for the reduction of ipsilateral hip flexion and ankle plantarflexion moment during the late stance phase. These results suggest the importance of focusing more on the ipsilateral ankle joint and the contralateral hip joint to maintain the function of the entire limb joints of the patients with flexed knee gait.

  8. 78 FR 34708 - Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... Control No. 2900--NEW (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-2. OMB Control Number: 2900--NEW...

  9. 78 FR 68908 - Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB... Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie, Enterprise Records... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Ankle Conditions Disability...

  10. The Effects of Anesthetic Technique on Postoperative Opioid Consumption in Ankle Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kristian P; Møller, Ann M; Nielsen, Jesper Kjær;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of common anesthetic techniques on postoperative opioid consumption in ankle fracture surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study on 622 patients with isolated ankle fractures undergoing primary reconstructive surgery. Patients...

  11. Study Casts Doubt on Need for Physical Therapy After Ankle Sprain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 162090.html Study Casts Doubt on Need for Physical Therapy After Ankle Sprain Rates of 'excellent recovery' similar ... a sprained ankle often involves some kind of physical therapy, but a new study questions the usefulness of ...

  12. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults ... on Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) ...

  13. Is End-Stage Ankle Arthrosis Best Managed with Total Ankle Replacement or Arthrodesis? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. End-stage ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition. Traditionally, ankle arthrodesis (AA has been the surgical intervention of choice but the emergence of total ankle replacement (TAR has challenged this concept. This systematic review aims to address whether TAR or AA is optimal in terms of functional outcomes. Methods. We conducted a systematic review according to PRISMA checklist using the online databases Medline and EMBASE after January 1, 2005. Participants must be skeletally mature and suffering from ankle arthrosis of any cause. The intervention had to be an uncemented TAR comprising two or three modular components. The comparative group could include any type of ankle arthrodesis, either open or arthroscopic, using any implant for fixation. The study must have reported at least one functional outcome measure. Results. Of the four studies included, two reported some significant improvement in functional outcome in favour of TAR. The complication rate was higher in the TAR group. However, the quality of studies reviewed was poor and the methodological weaknesses limited any definitive conclusions being drawn. Conclusion. The available literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. Further research is indicated and should be in the form of an adequately powered randomised controlled trial.

  14. Is End-Stage Ankle Arthrosis Best Managed with Total Ankle Replacement or Arthrodesis? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Robert W.; Chahal, Gurdip S.; Chapman, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. End-stage ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition. Traditionally, ankle arthrodesis (AA) has been the surgical intervention of choice but the emergence of total ankle replacement (TAR) has challenged this concept. This systematic review aims to address whether TAR or AA is optimal in terms of functional outcomes. Methods. We conducted a systematic review according to PRISMA checklist using the online databases Medline and EMBASE after January 1, 2005. Participants must be skeletally mature and suffering from ankle arthrosis of any cause. The intervention had to be an uncemented TAR comprising two or three modular components. The comparative group could include any type of ankle arthrodesis, either open or arthroscopic, using any implant for fixation. The study must have reported at least one functional outcome measure. Results. Of the four studies included, two reported some significant improvement in functional outcome in favour of TAR. The complication rate was higher in the TAR group. However, the quality of studies reviewed was poor and the methodological weaknesses limited any definitive conclusions being drawn. Conclusion. The available literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. Further research is indicated and should be in the form of an adequately powered randomised controlled trial. PMID:25215242

  15. Perineural fibrosis of superficial peroneal nerve complicating ankle sprain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acus, R W; Flanagan, J P

    1991-02-01

    The peroneal nerve is susceptible to traction injury during inversion ankle sprains. Previously, these traction lesions have been identified only at the fibular neck and popliteal fossa level. This report illustrates a previously unreported condition of perineural fibrosis of the superficial peroneal nerve at the level of the ankle following an inversion ankle sprain. Perineural fibrosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent pain after ankle sprain.

  16. Acute paediatric ankle trauma: MRI versus plain radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohman, M. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Radiological Dept., Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Kallio, P.; Puntila, J. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Vehmas, T. [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland)

    2001-09-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnosis of acute physeal ankle fractures on plain radiographs using MRI as the gold standard. Methods: Sixty consecutive children, 29 with a clinical diagnosis of lateral ligament injury and 31 with physeal ankle fractures, were examined using both radiographs and MRI in the acute period. The imaging data were reviewed by three ''masked'' radiologists. The fracture diagnosis and Slater-Harris classification of radiographs were compared with findings on MRI. Results: Plain radiography produced five of 28 (18%) false negative and 12 of 92 (13%) false positive fracture diagnoses compared with MRI. Six of the 12 false positive fractures were due to a misclassification of lateral ligament disruption as SH1 fractures. Altogether a difference was found in 21% of cases in either the diagnosis or the classification of the fractures according to Salter- Harris. All bone bruises in the distal tibia and fibula and 64% of bone bruises in the talus were seen in association with lateral ligament injuries. Talar bone bruises in association with fractures occurred on the same side as the malleolar fracture; talar bone bruises in association with lateral ligament disruption were seen in different locations. The errors identified on radiographs by MRI did not affect the management of the injury. Conclusions: The incidence of false negative ankle fractures in plain radiographs was small and no complex ankle fractures were missed on radiographs. The total extent of complex fractures was, however, not always obvious on radiographs. In an unselected series of relatively mild ankle injuries, we were unable to show a single case where the treatment or prognosis based on plain radiography should have been significantly altered after having done a routine MRI examination. Plain radiography is still the diagnostic cornerstone of paediatric ankle injuries. (orig.)

  17. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  18. Motion Simulation of a New Ankle Rehabilitation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Racu (Cazacu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ankle structure holds one of the most important role in the human biomechanics. Due to complexity of everyday activities this joint is the most prone to be injured part of the lower limb. For a complete recovery of the locomotion function, recovery exercises are mandatory. The introduction of robotic physical recovery systems represents a modern alternative to traditional recovery. Based on the 3D virtual model and a previous dimensional synthesis of a new ankle rehabilitation device, its motion simulation is presented in this paper, to prove that it may fully recover the range of motion required for this joint.

  19. Functional bandage for ankle sprains. Recommendations for nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Isabel Arcos Cirauqui

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Three quarters of ankle injuries are diagnosed as sprains. For the most part sprains are caused by a forced inversion movement with involvement of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL. One of the recommended guidelines is immobilization by taping. The aim of this article is to unify the recommendations for nursing, on taping in the treatment of ankle sprains. The methodology used was a literature review, analyzing the information found in books and journals in hospital libraries and nursing databases on the Internet. The main results are a set of guidelines for the most accurate and therapeutic taping.

  20. Imaging of Soft Tissue Lesions of the Foot and Ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of soft tissue lesions of the foot may be narrowed with imaging. The cystic nature of ganglia, synovial cysts, and bursitis can be confirmed with MR imaging or sonography. Location and signal characteristics of noncystic lesions may suggest Morton's neuroma, giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath and plantar fibromatosis. Synovial-based lesions of the foot and ankle can be differentiated based on presence or absence of mineralization, lesion density, signal intensity, and the enhancement pattern. Knowledge of the incidence of specific neoplasms of the foot and ankle based on patient age aids in providing a limited differential diagnosis

  1. The effect of ankle foot orthosis stiffness on the energy cost of walking: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bregman, D.J.J.; Van der Krogt, M.M.; De Groot, V.; Harlaar, J.; Wisse, M.; Collins, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background In stroke and multiple sclerosis patients, gait is frequently hampered by a reduced ability to push-off with the ankle caused by weakness of the plantar-flexor muscles. To enhance ankle push-off and to decrease the high energy cost of walking, spring-like carbon-composite Ankle Foot Ortho

  2. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains: an evidence-based clinical guideline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G.M.; Bekerom, M. van den; Elders, L.A.; Beek, P.A. van; Hullegie, W.A.; Bloemers, G.M.; Heus, E.M. de; Loogman, M.C.; Rosenbrand, K.C.; Kuipers, T.; Hoogstraten, J.W.; Dekker, R.; Duis, H.J. Ten; Dijk, C.N. van; Tulder, M.W. van; Wees, P.J. van der; Bie, R.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical cost

  3. Use of an acrylic mold for mortise view improvement in ankle fractures: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donken, C.C.; Verhofstad, M.H.J.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Schoemaker, M.C.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van

    2011-01-01

    We investigated an acrylic mold for use in obtaining ankle radiographs in 31 consecutive patients with ankle fracture. The radiologic examination consisted of routine lateral and mortise views, with the same views procured with the use of the acrylic mold to position the ankle. Radiographic evidence

  4. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains : an evidence-based clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M.; van den Bekerom, Michel; Elders, Leon A. M.; van Beek, Peter A.; Hullegie, Wim A. M.; Bloemers, Guus M. F. M.; de Heus, Elly M.; Loogman, Masja C. M.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J. G. M.; Kuipers, Ton; Hoogstraten, J. W. A. P.; Dekker, Rienk; ten Duis, Henk-Jan; van Dijk, C. Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van der Wees, Philip J.; de Bie, Rob A.

    2012-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical cost

  5. Intraoral framework pick-up technique to improve fit of a metal-resin implant prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Rustum Baig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The achievement of passive fit is an important prerequisite for the prevention of complications in full-arch screw-retained implant prosthesis. With cemented prosthesis, the cementation compensates for the discrepancies in the cast framework, but the lack of retrievability seems undesirable. The aim of this paper is to propose a modified screw-retained prosthesis design for complete arch implant fixed rehabilitation. A technique for the fabrication of a full-arch metal-resin implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis is described. Cementation of the framework to the abutments intraorally improves the passivity of fit of the prosthesis on the implants. Maintenance of screw-access channels in the final prosthesis ensures retrievability. The metal-resin design allows for easy repair and maintenance. The prosthesis is cost-effective compared to conventional options and can be employed as a viable treatment alternative when considering metal-acrylic resin complete arch fixed prosthesis.

  6. Cortical bone total ossicular replacement prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Malhotra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Evaluate an autologous cortical bone total ossicular replacement prosthesis (B TORP made of cortical bone for cost effective and sustainable hearing results. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken in the patients who underwent tympanoplasty with new B-TORP from January 2011 to December 2011. All patients had an absent superstructure of the stapes and long process of the incus due to chronic otitis media. Totally 40 patients were evaluated. Hearing results were evaluated using four-frequency average pure tone air conduction and air-bone gap (ABG measured at 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz after a period of 12 months. Pre- and post-operative continuous variables were compared using a paired t-test and data from unequal groups were assessed for significant differences using unpaired t-test. Results: Successful rehabilitation of the ABG to 20 dB or less was achieved in 95% of patients. Overall mean improvement in ABG was 25.8 ± 5.6 dB, which was statistically significant (t = 26.8, P 0.5. Conclusion: The new autologous B-TORP provides sustainable hearing improvement and is bio-compatible, stable, and magnetic resonance imaging compatible.

  7. [Avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2006-04-01

    To minimize the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), we have routinely adopted aortic root enlargement to avoid PPM for patients with small aortic annulus. The aim of this study was to review our strategy of avoiding PPM. The Carpentier-Edwards Perimount (CEP) valves were implanted in 53 patients who were mostly aged over 65 and the St. Jude Medical (SJM) mechanical valves were used in 128 patients aged under 65. A standard 21-mm SJM valve was used in only 3 patients and no 19-mm valves were employed. However, 19-mm CEP valves were used in 12 patients with a small body surface area (1.43 +/- 0.14 m2). Of these, 26 patients (14.4%) who had a small aortic annulus and 24 patients aged under 65 underwent aortic root enlargement. No patient receiving an SJM valve had an projected indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) small annulus, the first choice for avoiding PPM is aortic annular enlargement, which may be avoided by high performance mechanical valves with larger EOA.

  8. Boston ocular surface prosthesis: An Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Madanlal Rathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Boston ocular surface prosthesis (BOSP is a scleral contact lens used in the management of patients who are rigid gas permeable (RGP failures as with corneal ectasias such as keratoconus and in those patients who have ocular surface disease such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS. Aim: To report utilization of BOSP in a tertiary eye care center in India. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed charts of 32 patients who received BOSP from July 2008 to May 2009. Indications for fitting these lenses, improvement in visual acuity (VA before and after lens fitting and relief of symptoms of pain and photophobia were noted. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis using SPSS version 16.0 for Windows. Results: Thirty-two patients (43 eyes received these lenses. These consisted of 23 eyes of 17 patients who failed RGP trials for irregular astigmatism and corneal ectasia such as keratoconus and post radial keratotomy and scar and 20 eyes of 15 patients with SJS. Mean age of RGP failures was 27.94 years. Pre- and post-BOSP wear mean LogMAR VA was 1.13 and 0.29, respectively, in RGP failures. The P value was statistically significant (P 2 lines in 7/20 eyes (35% with SJS, with improvement in symptoms. Conclusion: BOSP improves VA in patients who have irregular astigmatism as in ectasias and RGP failures and improves vision and symptoms in patients with SJS.

  9. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  10. Finite element modeling of retinal prosthesis mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, B. C.; Rowley, A. P.; Chen, K.; Humayun, M. S.; Weiland, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Epiretinal prostheses used to treat degenerative retina diseases apply stimulus via an electrode array fixed to the ganglion cell side of the retina. Mechanical pressure applied by these arrays to the retina, both during initial insertion and throughout chronic use, could cause sufficient retinal damage to reduce the device's effectiveness. In order to understand and minimize potential mechanical damage, we have used finite element analysis to model mechanical interactions between an electrode array and the retina in both acute and chronic loading configurations. Modeling indicates that an acute tacking force distributes stress primarily underneath the tack site and heel edge of the array, while more moderate chronic stresses are distributed more evenly underneath the array. Retinal damage in a canine model chronically implanted with a similar array occurred in correlating locations, and model predictions correlate well with benchtop eyewall compression tests. This model provides retinal prosthesis researchers with a tool to optimize the mechanical electrode array design, but the techniques used here represent a unique effort to combine a modifiable device and soft biological tissues in the same model and those techniques could be extended to other devices that come into mechanical contact with soft neural tissues.

  11. [The treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms by use of endovascular prosthesis and classic vascular prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupka, Artur; Szyber, Przemysław P; Janczak, Dariusz; Pawłowski, Stanisław; Szyber, Piotr

    2006-01-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm is a dilatation of infrarenal part of aorta. Its ethiology is still unknown. An infection and congenital disorders of conjunctive tissue are regarded as the main risc factors. Other factors could be a perimural thrombus and elastin and colagen degradation. It's not proved that atheromatosis is a risc factor. The disease concerns mainly the old males. Not treated aneurysm grows until rupture. The aneurysms are usually asympthomatic. Majority of them are found incidentally. Ultrasonography and computed tomography are used to extended diagnosis. The open surgery or endovascular surgery are only possible ways of treatment. The aneurysm with diameter over 55 milimeters, sympthomatic or rupted is an indication for surgery. The aim of the open surgery is implantation of the vascular prosthesis into retroperitoneal space. Endovascular method consist in placement of stent-graft in the lumen of aneurysm through small incision in a peripherial vessel. Stent-graft consists of metal chassis covered by classic vascular prosthesis. This method still requires the long-term assessment.

  12. [Design and study of carbon fiber tracheal prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, L; Liu, D; Han, Z; Wang, F

    1998-12-01

    32 healty adult dogs were selected for this experiment. 10 of them were subjected to the tracheal biomechanics test using indices including the relation between stretcher ratio (lambda) and stress (T), the squeeze stress (delta jy) of medical silk thread on trachea, the side stress (Ts) inducing the tracheal collapse, the functional maximum angle (psi max) of tracheal, and the sever area torsion angle (theta max) of tracheal functional maximum curved. According to the indices measured, two types of tracheal prosthesis were designed, and were made of carbon fiber and silicon. They were the straight tube type tracheal prosthesis and the bifurcate type tracheal prosthesis. The straight tube type tracheal prosthesis was studied with a design of two groups comprising a total of 11 dogs. In the experiment group (n = 6), the outer surface of the tube was not coated with silicon, the average survival period was 379.8 days. In the control group (n = 5), the outer surface of the tube was coated with silicon, the average survival period was 90.4 days. The bifurcate type tracheal prosthesis was studied in 11 dogs, the average survival period was 4.32 days. The main causes of death in the experiment were infection and anastomotic dehiscent.

  13. Correlation analysis between the interface membrane and loose hip prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-bing Ma; Yu-ming Zhang; Xiang-dong Meng; Miao Liu

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze the cause of prosthesis loosening by observing the interface membranes harvested during the hip restoration operation. Methods A total of 28 specimens of interface membrane around the loose prosthesis were harvested from 28 patients undergoing the restoration of total hip replacement. All the specimens underwent the observation of appearance, light microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy(SEM). Results All the gaps around the loose prosthesis were filled with interface membrane of different thickness. The color of the most interface membrane was madder red, and the other one third of membrane was black. The comparatively thicker membrane was similar to scar connective tissue while the thinner was similar to fiber membrane. A large number of wear debris, macrophages and foreign-body giant cells were found under light microscope. With SEM observation a large number of different diameter collagen fibra structures that looked like scar tissues were arranged disorderly in a great mass, foreign particles and bone debris of different size were distributed unevenly, and the fibroblast was distributed in the collagen fiber. Conclusion Wear debris is related to inflammatory cell response around the interface membrane of the loose prosthesis. The wear debris engulfed by macrophage stimulates the interface membrane to release bone resorption factors (such as TNF) which lead to osteolysis, and this is one of the most important causes of the prosthesis loosening.

  14. A digital patient for computer-aided prosthesis design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Giorgio; Facoetti, Giancarlo; Rizzi, Caterina

    2013-04-06

    This article concerns the design of lower limb prosthesis, both below and above knee. It describes a new computer-based design framework and a digital model of the patient around which the prosthesis is designed and tested in a completely virtual environment. The virtual model of the patient is the backbone of the whole system, and it is based on a biomechanical general-purpose model customized with the patient's characteristics (e.g. anthropometric measures). The software platform adopts computer-aided and knowledge-guided approaches with the goal of replacing the current development process, mainly hand made, with a virtual one. It provides the prosthetics with a set of tools to design, configure and test the prosthesis and comprehends two main environments: the prosthesis modelling laboratory and the virtual testing laboratory. The first permits the three-dimensional model of the prosthesis to be configured and generated, while the second allows the prosthetics to virtually set up the artificial leg and simulate the patient's postures and movements, validating its functionality and configuration. General architecture and modelling/simulation tools for the platform are described as well as main aspects and results of the experimentation.

  15. Split-Framework in Mandibular Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Omar Mendoza Marin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with an implant-supported prosthesis, mandibular flexure must be considered an important biomechanical factor when planning the metal framework design, especially if implants are installed posterior to the interforaminal region. When an edentulous mandible is restored with a fixed implant-supported prosthesis connected by a fixed full-arch framework, mandibular flexure may cause needless stress in the overall restorative system and lead to screw loosening, poor fit of prosthesis, loss of the posterior implant, and patient’s discomfort due to deformation properties of the mandible during functional movements. The use of a split-framework could decrease the stress with a precise and passive fit on the implants and restore a more natural functional condition of the mandible, helping in the longevity of the prosthesis. Therefore, the present clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient by a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis with a split-framework to compensate for mandibular flexure. Clinical Significance. The present clinical report shows that the use of a split-framework reduced the risk of loss of the posterior implants or screws loosening with acceptable patient comfort over the period of a year. The split-framework might have compensated for the mandibular flexure during functional activities.

  16. Maxillary cement retained implant supported monolithic zirconia prosthesis in a full mouth rehabilitation: a clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Sadid-Zadeh, Ramtin; Liu, Perng-Ru; Aponte-Wesson, Ruth; O'Neal, Sandra J

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report presents the reconstruction of a maxillary arch with a cement retained implant supported fixed prosthesis using a monolithic zirconia generated by CAD/CAM system on eight osseointegrated implants. The prosthesis was copy milled from an interim prosthesis minimizing occlusal adjustments on the definitive prosthesis at the time of delivery. Monolithic zirconia provides high esthetics and reduces the number of metal alloys used in the oral cavity.

  17. Maxillary cement retained implant supported monolithic zirconia prosthesis in a full mouth rehabilitation: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadid-Zadeh, Ramtin; Liu, Perng-Ru; Aponte-Wesson, Ruth; O'Neal, Sandra J

    2013-05-01

    This clinical report presents the reconstruction of a maxillary arch with a cement retained implant supported fixed prosthesis using a monolithic zirconia generated by CAD/CAM system on eight osseointegrated implants. The prosthesis was copy milled from an interim prosthesis minimizing occlusal adjustments on the definitive prosthesis at the time of delivery. Monolithic zirconia provides high esthetics and reduces the number of metal alloys used in the oral cavity.

  18. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3400 Section 888.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a portion of the hip...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a... as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, and is limited to those prostheses intended for use with bone...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3170 - Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis... (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of medical grade silicone elastomer used to replace...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3220 Section 888.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3690 Section 888.3690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3210 Section 888.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal (finger)...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3370 Section 888.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a portion of the hip...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3350 - Hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3350 Section 888.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a hip joint. The device...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3800 Section 888.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3300 - Hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3300 Section 888.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a hip joint. The...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3340 Section 888.3340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a two-part device intended to be implanted to replace...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3360 Section 888.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3680 - Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3680 Section 888.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis is a device that has a glenoid (socket)...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3160 - Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3160 Section 888.3160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3180 - Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3180 Section 888.3180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3660 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3660 Section 888.3660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3200 Section 888.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal...

  18. 78 FR 79308 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final order... mandibular condyle prosthesis, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and rename... section 513(b) of the FD&C Act with respect to temporary mandibular condyle prosthesis (the 1997...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3310 Section 888.3310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  20. Changes in performance over time while learning to use a myoelectric prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Training increases the functional use of an upper limb prosthesis, but little is known about how people learn to use their prosthesis. The aim of this study was to describe the changes in performance with an upper limb myoelectric prosthesis during practice. The results provide a basis t

  1. A short-term study in sheep with the Groningen temporomandibular joint prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; de Bont, LGM; Spijkervet, FKL; Verkerke, GJ; Liem, RSB

    2000-01-01

    As part of the pre-clinical testing process of a newly developed temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis, animal experiments were performed. In 14 sheep, the right TMJ was replaced by the developed TMJ prosthesis. The prosthesis consisted of a skull part, a mandibular part and an intervening polyet

  2. The LP-ESP(®) lumbar disc prosthesis with 6 degrees of freedom: development and 7 years of clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazennec, Jean-Yves; Aaron, Alain; Brusson, Adrien; Rakover, Jean-Patrick; Rousseau, Marc-Antoine

    2013-02-01

    The viscoelastic lumbar disk prosthesis-elastic spine pad (LP-ESP(®)) is an innovative one-piece deformable but cohesive interbody spacer providing 6 full degrees of freedom about the 3 axes, including shock absorption. A 20-year research program has demonstrated that this concept provides mechanical properties very close to those of a natural disk. Improvements in technology have made it possible to solve the problem of the bond between the elastic component and the titanium endplates and to obtain an excellent biostability. The prosthesis geometry allows limited rotation and translation with resistance to motion (elastic return property) aimed at avoiding overload of the posterior facets. The rotation center can vary freely during motion. It thus differs substantially from current prostheses, which are 2- or 3-piece devices involving 1 or 2 bearing surfaces and providing 3 or 5 degrees of freedom. This design and the adhesion-molding technology differentiate the LP-ESP prosthesis from other mono-elastomeric prostheses, for which the constraints of shearing during rotations or movement are absorbed at the endplate interface. Seven years after the first implantation, we can document in a solid and detailed fashion the course of clinical outcomes and the radiological postural and kinematic behavior of this prosthesis.

  3. International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB: past, present and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbaum Dieter

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB is an international collaborative activity which will have an important impact on the foot and ankle biomechanics community. It was launched on July 2nd 2007 at the foot and ankle session of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB meeting in Taipei, Taiwan. i-FAB is driven by the desire to improve our understanding of foot and ankle biomechanics as it applies to health, disease, and the design, development and evaluation of foot and ankle surgery, and interventions such as footwear, insoles and surfaces.

  4. Analysis and simulation of fully ankle actuated planar bipedal robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Michel; Oort, van Gijs; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of planar bipedal robots, based on passive dynamic walkers, which are actuated only by actuation of the ankle joints. An overview of the major design characteristics of such robots and their influence on the feasibility of a stable limit cycle is presented. It is s

  5. Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Translations Spanish (español) Lesiones y enfermedades del tobillo Ukrainian (Українська) Ankle Sprain Розтягування зв'язок гомілковостопного ...

  6. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  7. Dorsiflexion deficit during jogging with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Lindsay K; McKeon, Patrick O; Kerrigan, D Casey; Hertel, Jay

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) demonstrate altered dorsiflexion/plantar flexion range of motion (ROM) compared to controls during jogging. The case control study took place in a university motion analysis laboratory. Fourteen volunteers participated in the study, seven suffered from CAI (age 25+/-4.2 years, height 173+/-9.4 cm, mass 71+/-8.1kg) and seven were healthy, matched controls (age 25+/-4.5 years, height 168+/-5.9 cm, mass 67+/-9.8kg). All subjects jogged on an instrumented treadmill while a ten-camera motion analysis system collected three-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremities. The main outcome measure was sagittal plane (dorsiflexion/plantar flexion) range of motion of the ankle throughout the gait cycle. CAI subjects had significantly less dorsiflexion compared to the control group from 9% to 25% during jogging (4.83+/-0.55 degrees ). CAI subjects demonstrated limited ankle dorsiflexion ROM during the time of maximal dorsiflexion during jogging. Limited dorsiflexion ROM during gait among individuals with CAI may be a risk factor for recurrent ankle sprains. These deficits should be treated appropriately by rehabilitation clinicians.

  8. An Irreducible Ankle Fracture Dislocation: The Bosworth Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); T. Hagenaars (Tjebbe); D. den Hartog (Dennis)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIrreducible fracture dislocations of the ankle are rare and represent true orthopedic emergencies. We present a case of a fracture dislocation that was irreducible owing to a fixed dislocation of the proximal fibular fragment posterior to the lateral ridge of the tibia. This particular t

  9. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pablo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion.

  10. A controlled-release ergometer for the human ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL

    1997-01-01

    A hydraulic ergometer for the human foot is described that can apply ankle rotations up to 1 rad at a constant high speed of 10-20 rad/s against moments up to 200 N m. The initial acceleration is damped, so as not to exceed a preset value. With the presented set-up the series elasticity of the intac

  11. Genetic determinants of the ankle-brachial index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassel, Christina L; Lamina, Claudia; Nambi, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Candidate gene association studies for peripheral artery disease (PAD), including subclinical disease assessed with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), have been limited by the modest number of genes examined. We conducted a two stage meta-analysis of ∼50,000 SNPs across ∼2100 candidate genes to iden...... to identify genetic variants for ABI....

  12. Gait Training and Ankle Dorsiflexors in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at University of Copenhagen, Denmark, evaluated whether 4 weeks of 30 min daily treadmill training with an incline may facilitate corticospinal transmission and improve control of the ankle joint in 16 children, aged 5-14 years, with cerebral palsy.

  13. Long-term Results After Ankle Syndesmosis Injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, N. van; Denk, K.; Kampen, A. van; Jaarsma, R.L.

    2015-01-01

    Syndesmotic disruption occurs in more than 10% of ankle fractures. Operative treatment with syndesmosis screw fixation has been successfully performed for decades and is considered the gold standard of treatment. Few studies have reported the long-term outcomes of syndesmosis injuries. This study in

  14. Reconstructive foot and ankle surgeries in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Kumar Varma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot and ankle deformities are secondary to long-standing diabetes and neglected foot care. The concept of surgical correction for these deformities is quite recent. The primary objective of reconstructive foot and ankle surgery is the reduction of increased plantar pressures, reduction of pain and the restoration of function, stability and proper appearance. Foot and ankle deformities can result in significant disability, loss of life style, employment and even the loss of the lower limb. Therefore, restoration of normal, problem free foot function and activities will have a significant impact on peoples′ lives. Reconstructive surgical procedures are complex and during reconstruction, internal and external fixation devices, including pins, compression screws, staples, and wires, may be used for repair and stabilization. The surgeries performed depend on the type and severity of the condition. Surgery can involve any part of the foot and ankle, and may involve tendon, bone, joint, tissue or skin repair. Corrective surgeries can at times be performed on an outpatient basis with minimally invasive techniques. Recovery time depends on the type of condition being treated.

  15. New ankle actuation mechanism for a humanoid robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van Gijs; Reinink, Roelof; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    In this article we discuss the design of a new ankle actuation mechanism for the humanoid robot TUlip. The new mechanism consists of two coupled series-elastic systems. We discuss the choice of actuators according to calculations for maximum achievable walking speed. Some control issues, MIMO and no

  16. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least nine training sessions for three neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood.

  17. Wear prediction on total ankle replacement effect of design parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Saad, Amir Putra Bin Md; Harun, Muhamad Noor; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    2016-01-01

    This book develops and analyses computational wear simulations of the total ankle replacement for the stance phase of gait cycle. The emphasis is put on the relevant design parameters. The book presents a model consisting of three components; tibial, bearing and talar representing their physiological functions.

  18. Radiographic evaluation of foot and ankle injuries in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, A C; Shelbourne, K D; Beltz, H F; Robertson, D W; Arfken, P

    1987-10-01

    Injuries of the ankle and foot in athletes are quite common. They range from the extremely simple sprain to the difficult stress fracture, and may result in long-term disability. In all cases, the athlete is best treated after an accurate diagnosis is achieved.

  19. Normal values of patellar and ankle tendon reflex latencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijns, CJM; Laman, DM; vanDuijn, MAJ; vanDuijn, H

    1997-01-01

    The clinical value of latency measurement of tendon reflexes in neurological patients has been reported by several authors. However, normal values are not readily comparable. In the present study, latencies and amplitudes of patellar (PTR) and ankle tendon reflexes (ATR) were measured at rest and af

  20. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Cusimano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs. A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM. The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action that may affect an athlete’s decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36, as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37. Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players’ willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs.

  1. Research, design & development project Myoelectric Prosthesis of Upper Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano, L.; Montaner, E.; Flecha, A.

    2007-11-01

    A Research Design and Development Project was developed of a myoelectric prosthesis for a pediatric patient presenting congenital amputation of the left forearm below the elbow. A multidisciplinary work-team was formed for this goal, in order to solve the several (/various) aspects regarding this project (mechanical, ergonomics, electronics, physical). The prosthesis as an electromechanical device was divided in several blocks, trying to achieve a focused development for each stage, acording to requisites. A mechanical prototype of the prothesis was designed and built along with the circuitry needed for EMG aquisition, control logic and drivers. Having acomplished the previuos stages, the project is now dealing with the definitions of the interface between the prosthesis and the patient, with promising perspectives.

  2. Preliminary functional assessment of a multigrasp myoelectric prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalley, Skyler A; Bennett, Daniel A; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The authors have previously described a multigrasp hand prosthesis prototype, and a two-site surface EMG based multigrasp control interface for its control. In this paper, the authors present a preliminary assessment of the efficacy of the prosthesis and multigrasp controller in performing tasks requiring interaction and manipulation. The authors use as a performance measure the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP), which entails manipulation of various objects designed to emulate activities of daily living, and provides a set of scores that indicate level of functionality in various types of hand function. In this preliminary assessment, a single non-amputee subject performed the SHAP while wearing the multigrasp prosthesis via an able-bodied adaptor. The results from this testing are presented, and compared to recently published SHAP results obtained with commercially available single-grasp and multigrasp prosthetic hands.

  3. Nasal prosthesis for a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Rajtilak, G.; Rajasekar, V.; Kumar, Muthu

    2013-01-01

    Acquired facial defects caused by extirpation of neoplasms, congenital malformations or traumatic injury results in a huge functional, cosmetic and psychological handicap in those patients. These defects can be restored by facial prosthesis using different materials and retention methods to achieve a lifelike appearance and function. This clinical report describes a treatment schedule using silicone nasal prosthesis, which is mechanically retained for a patient who has undergone a partial rhinectomy due to basal cell carcinoma of the nose. The prosthesis was made to restore the esthetic appearance of patient with a mechanically retained design using a spectacle glass frame without any prosthetic adhesives so that the patient is more comfortable and confident to resume daily activities. PMID:23956602

  4. Komposit Laminate Rami Epoksi Sebagai Bahan Alternatif Socket Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustinus P. Irawan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available pure plant oil, biofuel, coconut oil, palm oil, jatropha oilSocket is the most important component in a prosthesis making. Performance criteria for prosthetic socket material include strength, durability, minimal weight, comfort, and minimal fabrication cost. This research attempts to analyze the strength of ramie fiber reinforced epoxy laminate composite as an alternative of socket prosthesis. The research based on ASTM D 3039/D 3039M for tensile strength and ASTM D 695 for compressive strength. The ramie fiber used was a continuous fiber 100 % Ne14'S, with Epoxy Resin Bakelite EPR 174 and Epoxy Hardener V-140. The sample test was created using a hand lay-up method. The result of this research is presented in a correlation of finsile strength (st, compression strength (sc, elasticity modulus (E versus fraction volume of fiber (Vf. The result is then being compared with some of the prosthesis material’s strength produced by Otto Bock. The analysis was completed with the mode of the failure observation by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The result concludes that the ramie fiber reinforced epoxy laminate composite is potentially developed further as a socket prosthesis material on Vf 40 – 50 %. Tensile strength and specific strength that has been generated was higher than that of several materias for socket prosthesis, including fiberglass. The mode of the failure found were a brittle failure on Vf: 10-30%, debonding and delamination on Vf: 40-50%. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Socket merupakan bagian terpenting dalam pembuatan prosthesis. Kriteria bahan socket prosthesis antara lain kekuatan, ketahanan, ringan, kenyamanan dan biaya produksi yang rendah. Penelitian ini bertujuan menganalisis kekuatan komposit laminate berpenguat serat rami epoksi sebagai bahan alternatif socket prosthesis. Pengujian kekuatan mengacu standar ASTM D 3039/D 3039M uji tarik dan ASTM D 695 uji tekan. Serat rami yang digunakan berupa serat kontinyu jenis

  5. [Tests of hand functionality in upper limb amputation with prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzini, G; Orlandini, D; Moscato, T A; Nicita, D; Panigazzi, M

    2007-01-01

    The need for standardized instruments for clinical measurements has become pressing in the fields of occupational rehabilitation and ergonomics. This is particularly the case for instruments that allow a quantitative evaluation of upper limb function, and especially hand function in patients who have undergone an amputation and then application of an upper limb prosthesis. This study presents a review of the main tests used to evaluate hand function, with a critical analysis of their use in subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. The tests are divided into: tests to evaluate strength, tests to evaluate co-ordination and dexterity, tests of global or overall function, and tests proposed specifically for subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. Of the various tests presented, the authors give their preference to the Bimanual Functional Assessment, Abilhand and/or the ADL Questionnaire, because of the practical usefulness, clinimetric features, simplicity and ease of administration of these tests.

  6. An electronic prosthesis mimicking the dynamic vestibular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkel, Andrei M.

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports our progress toward development of a unilateral vestibular prosthesis. The sensing element of the prosthesis is a custom designed one-axis MEMS gyroscope. Similarly to the natural semicircular canal, the microscopic gyroscope senses angular motion of the head and generates voltages proportional to the corresponding angular accelerations. Then, voltages are sent to the pulse generating unit where angular motion is translated into voltage pulses. The voltage pulses are converted into current pulses and are delivered through specially designed electrodes, conditioned to stimulate the corresponding vestibular nerve branch. Our preliminary experimental evaluations of the prosthesis on a rate table indicate that the device's output matches the average firing rate of vestibular neurons to those in animal models reported in the literature. The proposed design is scalable; the sensing unit, pulse generator, and the current source can be potentially implemented on a single chip using integrated MEMS technology.

  7. Combined total ankle replacement and modified bridle tendon transfer for end-stage ankle joint arthrosis with paralytic dropfoot: report of an unusual case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbo, Christopher; Baronofsky, Hyim J; Jaffe, Leland

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, total ankle replacement has become a reasonable option for many patients with end-stage ankle arthrosis. In order to be successful, total ankle replacement requires a relatively balanced alignment of the foot in relation to the leg. Such alignment is traditionally achieved surgically by means of stabilization of the hindfoot in conjunction with relocation osteotomy of the calcaneus and/or tibia. In this report, we describe the unconventional combination of total ankle replacement in an adult patient with concomitant paralysis that was addressed by means of tendon transfer.

  8. Comparison of Titanium vs. Polycel Total Ossicular Replacement Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faramarzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Even though modern technology progresses so rapidly, annals of otology are replete with so many challenging article, which often compare various types of prosthesis. Since there has not been a prospective randomized clinical trial study which compares the hearing result of total ossicular replacement prosthesis made of Titanium with omega connector and Polycel in the literature, we decided to perform a study encompassing this issue.   Materials and Methods: 105 patients, who were in the 2nd stage of their operation and who needed total ossicular replacement prosthesis, were included in this prospective single blind randomized clinical trial study. Patients were classified in two groups: titanium Kurz (TTP™ -Vario system, Kurz GmbH, Dusslingen, Germany with omega connector and Polycel (Sheehy Plastipore Polycel, Medtronic Xomed Inc. The duration of the follow up was 6-12 months. In order to evaluate hearing results, pure tone audiometric in 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz were checked. In addition, speech reception threshold was recorded. A successful surgery was defined as having a postoperative air–bone gap within 20 dB.   Results: We accomplished successful hearing in 64.4% of patients with titanium and 65% of patients with a Polycel prosthesis.Improvement in speech reception threshold was 11.5 dB in the titanium group and 13 dB in the Polycel group. In other words, there was no significant difference between the two groups. In addition, air-bone gap improvement after ossiculoplasty was 11.2 dB in the patients with a titanium prosthesis and 12.4 dB in the Polycel group. In fact, the difference was not significant.   Conclusion: We found that both the titanium and the Polycel prosthesis improve speech reception threshold and air-bone gap closure in a similar manner.

  9. Potential savings of a program to prevent ankle sprain recurrence: Economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hupperets, M.D.W.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Heymans, M.W.; Bosmans, J.E.; Tulder, M.W. van; Mechelen, W. van

    2010-01-01

    Background: The most common ankle injury is the lateral ankle sprain. Dutch annual sports-related ankle sprain costs can roughly be estimated at 187,200,000. Research has shown that proprioceptive training accounts for an approximated overall 50% reduction in ankle sprain recurrence rate. Hypothesis

  10. [Arthrodesis and endoprostheses of the ankle joint: indications, techniques and pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, S H; Klammer, G; Espinosa, N

    2013-09-01

    If adequate conservative measures for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis have failed, surgery may be taken into consideration. After exorbitant failure rates in the beginning of total ankle replacement, nowadays this kind of treatment has regained lot of interest and has become a viable alternative to ankle fusion. The correct indication and a precise explanation of the surgical procedure, outcomes and potential complications provide a solid base for future success.Currently, there is no doubt that total ankle replacement has become an important player in the treatment of symptomatic and debilitating end-stage ankle arthritis. With increasing number of patients who undergo total ankle replacement the experience with this kind of procedure increases too. As a consequence several surgeons have started to stretch indications favoring total ankle replacement. However, it must be mentioned here, despite progress in terms of improved anatomical and biomechanical understanding of the hindfoot and improved surgical techniques and instruments, total ankle replacement and ankle fusion remain challenging and difficult procedures. We provide a review article including an overview of the relevant techniques. This article should serve as rough guide for surgeons and help in decision-making regarding total ankle replacement and ankle fusion.

  11. Activation of brain areas following ankle dorsiflexion versus plantar flexion Functional magnetic resonance imaging verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianyu Jiang; Weiping Wu; Xinglin Wang; Changshui Weng; Qiuhua Wang; Yanmei Guo

    2012-01-01

    Changes in activated areas of the brain during ankle active dorsiflexion and ankle active plantar flexion were observed in six healthy subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging.Excited areas of ankle active dorsiflexion involved the bilateral primary motor area and the primary somatosensory area, as well as the bilateral supplementary sensory area, the primary visual area, the right second visual area, and the vermis of cerebellum.Excited areas of ankle active plantar flexion included the ipsilateral supplementary motor area, the limbic system, and the contralateral corpus striatum.Fine movements of the cerebral cortex control the function of the ankle dorsiflexion to a larger extent than ankle plate flexion, and the function of ankle plate flexion is more controlled by the subcortical area.

  12. Evaluation of flexibility of the ankle in elementary students with mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrou V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to measure and evaluate the flexibility of the legs, namely the ankle by measuring the maximum values in flexion and extension of both legs. Method: The study included twelve students with mental retardation. Measured and recorded values of ankle-bending extent of both legs and assign the average of each test. Calculated and measurement the temperature of space and time. The measurement flexion and extension of the ankle was a plastic protractor. Results: The flexion presents decrease at the right ankle relationship with the left ankle by 1.86. The extension presents decrease at the left ankle relationship with the right ankle by 11.43. Conclusions: The results found that the normal range of motion of joints has a significant role in improving efficiency and thus on quality of life of persons with mental retardation. The flexibility is a determinant of performance and therefore should be evaluated at regular intervals.

  13. The postoperative COFAS end-stage ankle arthritis classification system: interobserver and intraobserver reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Fabian G; Di Silvestro, Matthew; Penner, Murray J; Wing, Kevin J; Glazebrook, Mark A; Daniels, Timothy R; Lau, Johnny T C; Younger, Alastair S E

    2012-02-01

    End-stage ankle arthritis is operatively treated with numerous designs of total ankle replacement and different techniques for ankle fusion. For superior comparison of these procedures, outcome research requires a classification system to stratify patients appropriately. A postoperative 4-type classification system was designed by 6 fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeons. Four surgeons reviewed blinded patient profiles and radiographs on 2 occasions to determine the interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the classification. Excellent interobserver reliability (κ = .89) and intraobserver reproducibility (κ = .87) were demonstrated for the postoperative classification system. In conclusion, the postoperative Canadian Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (COFAS) end-stage ankle arthritis classification system appears to be a valid tool to evaluate the outcome of patients operated for end-stage ankle arthritis.

  14. Ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical and ultrasonographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Naves Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients, regarding its presence, the kind of tendon involved and the concordance between clinical and ultrasound findings. Methods: Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis and pain or swollen ankle joint were evaluated. Tendon involvement was evaluated with ultrasound imaging. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ was performed for disability evaluation. Age, sex, disease duration, and vocational activity levels were also obtained. The statistical analysis included Fisher’s exact test. The significance level was 0.05. Results: Tenosynovitis was found in 13 of 20 (65.0% patients in 19 joints, in which 6 were bilaterally (46.1% and unilateral in 7 (53.8%. Tibialis posterior tenosynovitis was seen in nine (45.0% patients, Achilles tenosynovitis in seven (35.0%, tibialis anterior tenosynovitis in three (15.0%, and peroneal tenosynovitis in three (15.0% patients. We found concordance between symptomatic ankle and ultrasonographic findings in 92.3% of the patients with tenosynovitis. Association between severe HAQ with tendon involvement was not found (p>0.05. Disease duration was not associated with tenosynovitis. Patients were predominantly older, female, with mean age around 50.8 years. The long disease duration of patients presented a mean of 11.4 years and, most of them, with no vocational activity (65.0%. Conclusions: The results indicate that ankle tenosynovitis is very common in rheumatoid arthritis patients, both unilateral and bilateral. Tibialis posterior was the most common tendon involvement found. Finally, we found concordance between the clinical and ultrasound findings in almost all rheumatoid arthritis patients with ankle tenosynovitis.

  15. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  16. Heterotopic ossification associated with myelopathy following cervical disc prosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2016-04-01

    This case report presents a 37-year-old man with clinical signs of myelopathy almost 9 years after implantation of a Bryan disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) for C5/C6 soft disc herniation. As demonstrated on MRI and CT scan, spinal cord compression was caused by bony spurs due to heterotopic ossification posterior to the still moving prosthesis. The device, as well as the ectopic bone deposits, had to be removed because of myelopathy and its imminent aggravation. Conversion to anterior spondylodesis was performed.

  17. Improving esthetics of finger prosthesis by glove silicone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Singh Kaira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Finger and partial finger amputations are some of the most frequently encountered forms of partial hand loss. A high quality esthetic prosthesis with passive function can be helpful to the patient since loss or congenital absence or malformation have both a social and psychological impact on the patient. Prosthetics is an art and science, which provides lifelike appearance to the lost structures of the patient. This case report presents the fabrication of a silicone finger prosthesis, which had good suspension, adequate function, was comfortable to use and esthetically acceptable to the patient.

  18. [Prosthetic treatment of mandibular pseudarthrosis using an articulated prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidibe, C A; Razouk, O; Dichamp, J; Bertrand, J C; Vaillant, J M

    1994-01-01

    Two cases with complete loss of the tooth-bearing portion of the mandible were repaired with a prosthesis. This type of defect can involve the loss of a large number of teeth and aggression to the remaining teeth must be limited as much as possible. A two-part "articulated" prosthesis with two rings appears to be the best adapted system. This method takes into account the requirements of for additional conventional prostheses and thus makes it possible to save the remaining teeth.

  19. Design and characterization of a powered elbow prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Daniel A; Mitchell, Jason; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a powered elbow prosthesis, which incorporates a belt and cable drive transmission with a brushless DC motor to achieve an output torque of approximately 18.4 Nm, a backdrive torque of 1.5 Nm, and a speed of up to 360 deg/s while remaining within the anthropomorphic envelope with regard to mass and size. The measured torque and speed of the prosthesis is commensurate with nominal capability of the natural limb (for purposes of performing activities of daily living).

  20. Aspiration of tracheoesophageal prosthesis in a laryngectomized patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conte Sergio C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The voice prosthesis inserted into a tracheoesophageal fistula has become the most widely used device for voice rehabilitation in patients with total laryngectomy. Case presentation We describe a case of tracheoesophageal prosthesis’ (TEP aspiration in a laryngectomized patient, with permanent tracheal stoma, that appeared during standard cleaning procedure, despite a programme of training for the safe management of patients with voice prosthesis. Conclusions The definitive diagnosis and treatment were performed by flexible bronchoscopy, that may be considered the procedure of choice in these cases, also on the basis of the literature.

  1. Exploiting Document Level Semantics in Document Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rafi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Document clustering is an unsupervised machine learning method that separates a large subject heterogeneous collection (Corpus into smaller, more manageable, subject homogeneous collections (clusters. Traditional method of document clustering works around extracting textual features like: terms, sequences, and phrases from documents. These features are independent of each other and do not cater meaning behind these word in the clustering process. In order to perform semantic viable clustering, we believe that the problem of document clustering has two main components: (1 to represent the document in such a form that it inherently captures semantics of the text. This may also help to reduce dimensionality of the document and (2 to define a similarity measure based on the lexical, syntactic and semantic features such that it assigns higher numerical values to document pairs which have higher syntactic and semantic relationship. In this paper, we propose a representation of document by extracting three different types of features from a given document. These are lexical , syntactic and semantic features. A meta-descriptor for each document is proposed using these three features: first lexical, then syntactic and in the last semantic. A document to document similarity matrix is produced where each entry of this matrix contains a three value vector for each lexical , syntactic and semantic . The main contributions from this research are (i A document level descriptor using three different features for text like: lexical, syntactic and semantics. (ii we propose a similarity function using these three, and (iii we define a new candidate clustering algorithm using three component of similarity measure to guide the clustering process in a direction that produce more semantic rich clusters. We performed an extensive series of experiments on standard text mining data sets with external clustering evaluations like: FMeasure and Purity, and have obtained

  2. Staged bilateral ankle arthroplasty for the treatment of patient with severe defect of the talus (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Mikhaylov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankle arthroplasty is known to become more successful procedure versus ankle fusion in patients with ankle osteoarthritis. This article represents a clinical case of performing three-staged bilateral ankle arthroplasty by means of HINTEGRA and Mobility implants in a patient with severe defect of the talus. The patient was followed up for 2 years for right ankle and 4 years - for left ankle. The correct treatment strategy gave the patient a new lease of life. He resumed sports activities, being pain-free in both the ankle joints.

  3. Generic safety documentation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    This document is intended to be a resource for preparers of safety documentation for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico facilities. It provides standardized discussions of some topics that are generic to most, if not all, Sandia/NM facilities safety documents. The material provides a ``core`` upon which to develop facility-specific safety documentation. The use of the information in this document will reduce the cost of safety document preparation and improve consistency of information.

  4. Comparing Arc-shaped Feet and Rigid Ankles with Flat Feet and Compliant Ankles for a Dynamic Walker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlemann, Ilyas; Matthias Braun, Jan; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2014-01-01

    walking robot RunBot, controlled by an reflexive neural network, uses only few sensors for generating its stable gait. The results show that at feet and compliant ankles extend RunBot's parameter range especially to more leaning back postures. They also allow the robot to stably walk over obstacles...

  5. Three-dimensional computer graphics-based ankle morphometry with computerized tomography for total ankle replacement design and positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chien-Chung; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Leardini, Alberto; Lu, Tung-Wu; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2014-05-01

    Morphometry of the bones of the ankle joint is important for the design of joint replacements and their surgical implantations. However, very little three-dimensional (3D) data are available and not a single study has addressed the Chinese population. Fifty-eight fresh frozen Chinese cadaveric ankle specimens, 26 females, and 32 males, were CT-scanned in the neutral position and their 3D computer graphics-based models were reconstructed. The 3D morphology of the distal tibia/fibula segment and the full talus was analyzed by measuring 31 parameters, defining the relevant dimensions, areas, and volumes from the models. The measurements were compared statistically between sexes and with previously reported data from Caucasian subjects. The results showed that, within a general similarity of ankle morphology between the current Chinese and previous Caucasian subjects groups, there were significant differences in 9 out of the 31 parameters analyzed. From a quantitative comparison with available prostheses designed for the Caucasian population, few of these designs have both tibial and talar components suitable in dimension for the Chinese population. The current data will be helpful for the sizing, design, and surgical positioning of ankle replacements and for surgical instruments, especially for the Chinese population.

  6. Multi-segment foot kinematics after total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis during relatively long-distance gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, H; Favre, J; Aminian, K; Crevoisier, X

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of ankle osteoarthritis (AOA) treatments, i.e., ankle arthrodesis (AA) and total ankle replacement (TAR), on the kinematics of multi-segment foot and ankle complex during relatively long-distance gait. Forty-five subjects in four groups (AOA, AA, TAR, and control) were equipped with a wearable system consisting of inertial sensors installed on the tibia, calcaneus, and medial metatarsals. The subjects walked 50-m twice while the system measured the kinematic parameters of their multi-segment foot: the range of motion of joints between tibia, calcaneus, and medial metatarsals in three anatomical planes, and the peaks of angular velocity of these segments in the sagittal plane. These parameters were then compared among the four groups. It was observed that the range of motion and peak of angular velocities generally improved after TAR and were similar to the control subjects. However, unlike AOA and TAR, AA imposed impairments in the range of motion in the coronal plane for both the tibia-calcaneus and tibia-metatarsals joints. In general, the kinematic parameters showed significant correlation with established clinical scales (FFI and AOFAS), which shows their convergent validity. Based on the kinematic parameters of multi-segment foot during 50-m gait, this study showed significant improvements in foot mobility after TAR, but several significant impairments remained after AA.

  7. Penile prosthesis implantation in the era of medical treatment for erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Drogo K

    2011-05-01

    Penile prosthesis implantation, the oldest of the modern treatments for erectile dysfunction (ED), still plays an important role despite the advent of less invasive alternatives. For some men with ED, penile prosthesis implantation is the only effective or acceptable treatment. Penile prosthesis implantation remains a viable option in the contemporary management of ED as evidenced by annual penile prosthesis implantation cases in the United States rising from 17,540 in 2000 to 22,420 in 2009. Improvements in prosthesis design and implantation techniques have resulted in significant increases in device survival and patient satisfaction.

  8. Percutaneous Revision of a Testicular Prosthesis is Safe, Cost-effective, and Provides Good Patient Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene B. Cone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Office-based percutaneous revision of a testicular prosthesis has never been reported. A patient received a testicular prosthesis but was dissatisfied with the firmness of the implant. In an office setting, the prosthesis was inflated with additional fluid via a percutaneous approach. Evaluated outcomes included patient satisfaction, prosthesis size, recovery time, and cost savings. The patient was satisfied, with no infection, leak, or complication after more than 1 year of follow-up, at significantly less cost than revision surgery. Percutaneous adjustment of testicular prosthesis fill-volume can be safe, inexpensive, and result in good patient satisfaction.

  9. Management of long span partially edentulous maxilla with fixed removable denture prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahilan I Jeyavalan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of a long span partially edentulous maxilla with tooth supported prosthesis is challenging because of inherent anatomic limitations and unfavourable biomechanics present after the loss of teeth. A tooth supported fixed-removable prosthesis is a treatment option for restoration of such long span partially edentulous maxillary arches. This prosthesis meets the requirements for esthetics, phonetics, comfort, and hygiene, as well as favourable biomechanical stress distribution to the remaining natural tooth abutments. This article presents a procedure for fabrication of a fixed-removable prosthesis that has cement-retained custom cast bar metal substructure and a ball attachment retained removable superstructure prosthesis.

  10. Rehabilitation of orbital defect with silicone orbital prosthesis retained by dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Desai, Jhanvi; Kudva, Adarsh; Patil, Basavaraj R

    2016-01-01

    Orbital defects can result from cancer, birth anomalies, or trauma leading to an onslaught of problems in the function and psyche of the patient. These defects are restored by surgical reconstruction and followed by placement of orbital prosthesis for cosmetic makeup. The use of dental implants in retaining orbital prosthesis improves patient acceptance of the prosthesis owing to better retention and stability than conventional adhesive retained prosthesis. This case report describes a custom-made magnetic retentive assembly anchored by a dental implant which offers the orbital prosthesis the simplicity of self-alignment and ease of use. PMID:26953033

  11. [An obturator prosthesis in a patient with perfect dentition. Functional, esthetic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razouk, O; Sidibe, C A; Dichamp, J; Bertrand, J C

    1994-01-01

    A prosthesis was implanted immediately after operation for a velo-palatal tissue defect in an active young female patient in order to avoid function, psychological and social complications involved with this mutilation. The three classical steps of the process were performed: immediate implantation of the prosthesis, temporary prosthesis, definitive prosthesis. Anchoring to the teeth maintained the prosthesis in position. A functional print is always needed to obtain perfect closure. A metallic bridge links the retention part and the obstructive part. The device is effective, discrete, functional and well-tolerated by the patient.

  12. Italian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the "American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society's (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigheb, Massimiliano; Janicka, Paulina; Andorno, Silvano; Marcuzzi, Augusto; Magnani, Corrado; Grassi, Federico

    2016-05-06

    Background and Aim of the workAnkle and hindfoot injuries are common and may lead to functional impairment, disability, exclusion from occupational and daily activities. It's necessary a standardized method for assessing treatment outcomes in people with same condition and disease.American-Orthopaedics-Foot-and-Ankle-Society's-Ankle-Hindfoot-Evaluation-Scale (AOFAS-AHES) is specific to estimate clinical problems of the ankle-hindfoot.Outcome evaluation scales should be translated and culturally adapted into the language of the investigated patient.Our purpose was to translate and culturally adapt into Italian AOFAS-AHES, and to check its reproducibility and validity.MethodsAn Italian translation of the AOFAS-scale was retranslated into English by a native English and compared to the original to define a second correct Italian-version, that was submitted to 50 randomized patients operated at their ankle or hindfoot with a minimum follow-up of 6 months for cultural adaptation, and to 10 healthcare professionals to check comprehension of the medical part.To check intra and inter-observer reproducibility each patient underwent 2 interviews by interviewer-A and 1 by B. ShortForm(SF)-36-questionnaire for quality of life and Visual-Analogue-Scale (VAS) for pain were also compared for validation. The Pearson's-Correlation-Coefficient and the Intra-Class-Correlation coefficient were calculated to check inter and intra-observer reproducibility for validation.ResultsCultural adaptation revealed to be good. We obtained a good correlation of the inter and intra-observer reproducibility. Further validation of the Italian-AOFAS-AHES was obtained comparing AOFAS results to SF-36.ConclusionsItalian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the AOFAS-AHES has been performed successfully and could be useful to improve assistance quality in care practice.

  13. Autograft-prosthesis composite for aggressive giant cell tumor of bone around knee%自体骨复合旋转铰链膝关节治疗骨巨细胞瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuchun Yu; Ming Xu; Zhihou Fu; Songfeng Xu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the research was to study the clinical feasibility of autograft-prosthesis composite for aggressive giant cell tumor of bone around knee. Methods: Seven patients (5 males and 2 females, the mean age of 30.5 years old) with giant cell tumor of bone around knee underwent tumor resection and reconstructed with autograft-prosthesis composites since January 2006. Five lesions located at the distal femur and 2 at the proximal tibia. There were 3 patients with primary tumor and 4 with recurrent. Three patients with pathological fracture and all patients were of Campanacci Ⅲ. Results:All patients were done follow-up from 12 to 36 months. No recurrence, metastasis, and prosthesis loosening were found. The mean healing time between autograft and host bone was 5 months. The mean motion range of affected knee were 90° (70°-110°). Conclusion: Our data documented the clinical feasibility of autograft-prosthesis composite for giant cell tumor of bone around knee which should be performed tumor resection and reconstructed with prosthesis. The long-term outcomes remain to be further proven.

  14. Cognitive Temporal Document Priors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetz, M.H.; de Rijke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Temporal information retrieval exploits temporal features of document collections and queries. Temporal document priors are used to adjust the score of a document based on its publication time. We consider a class of temporal document priors that is inspired by retention functions considered in cogn

  15. [Choice of hip prosthesis in patients younger than 50 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, B.W.; Busch, V.J.; Veth, R.P.H.

    2007-01-01

    There is no agreement about the most ideal type of hip prosthesis to be used in patients younger than 50 years. The most commonly used hip prostheses in patients younger than 50 years are uncemented or resurfacing prostheses and to a lesser extent cemented prostheses. A good result of a hip prosthes

  16. Transfemoral prosthesis suspension systems: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Hossein; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Eshraghi, Arezoo; Ali, Sadeeq

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the scientific evidence pertaining to various transfemoral suspension systems to provide selection criteria for clinicians. To this end, databases of PubMed, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect were explored. The following key words, as well as their combinations and synonyms, were used for the search: transfemoral prosthesis, prosthetic suspension, lower limb prosthesis, above-knee prosthesis, prosthetic liner, transfemoral, and prosthetic socket. The study design, research instrument, sampling method, outcome measures, and protocols of articles were reviewed. On the basis of the selection criteria, 16 articles (11 prospective studies and 5 surveys) were reviewed. The main causes of reluctance to prosthesis, aside from energy expenditure, were socket-related problems such as discomfort, perspiration, and skin problems. Osseointegration was a suspension option, yet it is rarely applied because of several drawbacks, such as extended rehabilitation process, risk for fracture, and infection along with excessive cost. In conclusion, no clinical evidence was found as a "standard" system of suspension and socket design for all transfemoral amputees. However, among various suspension systems for transfemoral amputees, the soft insert or double socket was favored by most users in terms of function and comfort.

  17. Task-Oriented Gaming for Transfer to Prosthesis Use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Ludger; Sluis, van der Corry K.; van Dijk, Hylke W.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the effect of task-oriented video gaming on using a myoelectric prosthesis in a basic activity of daily life (ADL). Forty-one able-bodied right-handed participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups. In three of these groups the participants trained to

  18. Verge of Collapse: The Pros/thesis of Art Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoian, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores "prosthesis" as a metaphor of embodiment in art-based research to challenge the utopian myth of wholeness and normality in art and the human body. Bearing in mind the correspondences between amputated bodies and the cultural dislocations of art, I propose "prosthetic epistemology" and "prosthetic ontology" as embodied knowing…

  19. Intermanual transfer effects in below-elbow myoelectric prosthesis users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Errit; Romkema, Sietske; Cutti, Andrea G; Brouwers, Michael A H; Bongers, Raoul M; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine intermanual transfer effects in patients with a below-elbow amputation using a myoelectric prosthesis, and to establish whether laterality affects these effects. DESIGN: Case-control. SETTING: A standardized setting in a rehabilitation clinic. PARTICIPANTS: A convenience samp

  20. [Medial unicompartmental knee prosthesis for patients with unicompartmental gonarthrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, N.P.; Deutman, R.; Raay, J.J. van; Horn, J.R. van

    2004-01-01

    The function and survival time of unicompartmental knee prostheses for patients with severe gonarthrosis have been improved the past few years by developments in their design, the instrumentarium and the surgical technique. A medial unicompartmental knee prosthesis may be indicated in patients with