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Sample records for ankle prosthesis documentation

  1. Energy exchange between knee and ankle in a transfemoral prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Behrens, Sebastiaan Maria; Hekman, Edsko E.G.; Ünal, Ramazan

    2013-01-01

    In order to make an energy efficient transfemoral prosthesis, there should be energy exchange between knee and ankle of the prosthesis. A concept containing various spring elements is designed and tested for a single subject. It is shown that the concept of energy exchange can be realized; in this

  2. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an ankle...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of its...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3120 Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non...

  5. Evaluation of a Viscoelastic Ankle-Foot Prosthesis at Slow and Normal Walking Speeds on an Able-Bodied Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Safaeepour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This paper describes further improvement and preliminarily evaluation of a novel viscoelastic ankle-foot prosthesis prototype. The objective was to control the ankle hysteresis at slow and normal walking speeds. Methods: Inspired by the ankle biomechanics, in which the hysteresis differs based on the gait speeds, a manually damping control mechanism imbedded in the prosthesis for adjusting the ankle damping at slow and normal walking speeds. The prototype was then preliminarily tested on an able-bodied subject wearing an adaptor which simulates the amputee walking. The ankle joint kinetics and kinematics were measured in a gait analysis lab at different walking speeds. Results: The results suggest that the viscoelastic ankle foot prosthesis prototype could provide a smooth normal-like walking for most of the measured gait characteristics in slow and normal speeds. Discussion: Therefore, it is suggested to apply a controllable damping mechanism based on the gait speeds in the design of new prosthetic feet.

  6. Delaying Ambulation Mode Transition Decisions Improves Accuracy of a Flexible Control System for Powered Knee-Ankle Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M; Ingraham, Kimberly A; Spanias, John A; Young, Aaron J; Finucane, Suzanne B; Halsne, Elizabeth G; Hargrove, Levi J

    2017-08-01

    Powered lower limb prostheses can assist users in a variety of ambulation modes by providing knee and/or ankle joint power. This study's goal was to develop a flexible control system to allow users to perform a variety of tasks in a natural, accurate, and reliable way. Six transfemoral amputees used a powered knee-ankle prosthesis to ascend/descend a ramp, climb a 3- and 4-step staircase, perform walking and standing transitions to and from the staircase, and ambulate at various speeds. A mode-specific classification architecture was developed to allow seamless transitions at four discrete gait events. Prosthesis mode transitions (i.e., the prosthesis' mechanical response) were delayed by 90 ms. Overall, users were not affected by this small delay. Offline classification results demonstrate significantly reduced error rates with the delayed system compared to the non-delayed system (p knee-ankle prosthesis.

  7. Contributions of knee swing initiation and ankle plantar flexion to the walking mechanics of amputees using a powered prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Recently developed powered prostheses are capable of producing near-physiological joint torque at the knee and/or ankle joints. Based on previous studies of biological joint impedance and the mechanics of able-bodied gait, an impedance-based controller has been developed for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that integrates knee swing initiation and powered plantar flexion in late stance with increasing ankle stiffness throughout stance. In this study, five prosthesis configuration conditions were tested to investigate the individual contributions of each sub-strategy to the overall walking mechanics of four unilateral transfemoral amputees as they completed a clinical 10-m walk test using a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The baseline condition featured constant ankle stiffness and no swing initiation or powered plantar flexion. The four remaining conditions featured knee swing initiation alone (SI) or in combination with powered plantar flexion (SI+PF), increasing ankle stiffness (SI+IK), or both (SI+PF+IK). Self-selected walking speed did not significantly change between conditions, although subjects tended to walk the slowest in the baseline condition compared to conditions with swing initiation. The addition of powered plantar flexion resulted in significantly higher ankle power generation in late stance irrespective of ankle stiffness. The inclusion of swing initiation resulted in a significantly more flexed knee at toe off and a significantly higher average extensor knee torque following toe off. Identifying individual contributions of intrinsic control strategies to prosthesis biomechanics could help inform the refinement of impedance-based prosthesis controllers and simplify future designs of prostheses and lower-limb assistive devices alike.

  8. [Aseptic loosening of total ankle replacement : Two-stage revision with bone augmentation of osseous defects and secondary prosthesis implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, A; Wiewiorski, M; Valderrabano, V

    2017-06-01

    To remove loosened ankle prosthesis components, perform osseous defect augmentation, and reimplant definitive prosthesis components to preserve ankle range of motion. Aseptic loosening of the tibial and/or talar ankle prosthesis components with substantial bone defect. General surgical/anesthesiological risks, infections, critical soft tissue conditions, nonmanageable hindfoot instability, neurovascular impairment of the lower extremity, neuroarthropathy, substantial nonreconstructable osseous defects with or without cysts on the tibial and/or talar side, noncompliance, primary total ankle replacement (TAR) using intramedullary fixation (stem fixation), severely reduced bone quality, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, smoking, unrealistic patients' expectations, high activity in sports. Exposure of the ankle joint using the previous incision. Mobilization and removal of loosened prosthesis components. Debridement of bone stock. Assessment and measurement of osseous defects. Harvesting of iliac crest autograft. Screw fixation of iliac crest autograft. Placement of polyethylene inlay as a spacer. Wound closure in layers at the ankle and the iliac crest. Implantation of definitive prosthesis components. A soft wound dressing. Thromboprophylaxis recommended. Mobilization on postoperative day 1 using a stabilizing walking boot/cast for 6 weeks (sole contact but no weight bearing). Clinical and radiographic follow-up 3 months postoperatively including computed tomography to assess osseous consolidation. After the second surgery, patient mobilization on postoperative day 1 with 15 kg partial weight bearing using a stabilizing walking boot/cast for 6 weeks. Following clinical and radiographic follow-up at 6 weeks, full weight bearing is initiated gradually. From January 2007 to December 2012, a two-stage revision TAR was performed in 5 patients (46.8 and 71.4 years). The time between the initial TAR and revision was 2.4-11.5 years. No intra

  9. SIMULTANEOUS CONTROL OF AN ANKLE-FOOT PROSTHESIS MODEL USING A VIRTUAL CONSTRAINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjangud, Akshay; Gregg, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Amputee locomotion can benefit from recent advances in robotic prostheses, but their control systems design poses challenges. Prosthesis control typically discretizes the nonlinear gait cycle into phases, with each phase controlled by different linear controllers. Unfortunately, real-time identification of gait phases and tuning of controller parameters limit implementation. Recently, biped robots have used phase variables and virtual constraints to characterize the gait cycle as a whole. Although phase variables and virtual constraints could solve issues with discretizing the gait cycle, the virtual constraints method from robotics does not readily translate to prosthetics because of hard-to-measure quantities, like the interaction forces between the user and prosthesis socket, and prosthesis parameters which are often altered by a clinician even for a known patient. We use the simultaneous stabilization approach to design a low-order, linear time-invariant controller for ankle prostheses independent of such quantities to enforce a virtual constraint. We show in simulation that this controller produces suitable walking gaits for a simplified amputee model. PMID:25554734

  10. Configuring a Powered Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Transfemoral Amputees within Five Specific Ambulation Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M.; Ingraham, Kimberly A.; Fey, Nicholas P.; Finucane, Suzanne B.; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Young, Aaron J.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses that can generate net positive mechanical work may restore more ambulation modes to amputees. However, configuration of these devices imposes an additional burden on clinicians relative to conventional prostheses; devices for transfemoral amputees that require configuration of both a knee and an ankle joint are especially challenging. In this paper, we present an approach to configuring such powered devices. We developed modified intrinsic control strategies—which mimic the behavior of biological joints, depend on instantaneous loads within the prosthesis, or set impedance based on values from previous states, as well as a set of starting configuration parameters. We developed tables that include a list of desired clinical gait kinematics and the parameter modifications necessary to alter them. Our approach was implemented for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis in five ambulation modes (level-ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). The strategies and set of starting configuration parameters were developed using data from three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations who had previous experience using the device; this approach was then tested on three novice unilateral transfemoral amputees. Only 17% of the total number of parameters (i.e., 24 of the 140) had to be independently adjusted for each novice user to achieve all five ambulation modes and the initial accommodation period (i.e., time to configure the device for all modes) was reduced by 56%, to 5 hours or less. This approach and subsequent reduction in configuration time may help translate powered prostheses into a viable clinical option where amputees can more quickly appreciate the benefits such devices can provide. PMID:24914674

  11. A universal ankle-foot prosthesis emulator for human locomotion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Joshua M; Collins, Steven H

    2014-03-01

    Robotic prostheses have the potential to significantly improve mobility for people with lower-limb amputation. Humans exhibit complex responses to mechanical interactions with these devices, however, and computational models are not yet able to predict such responses meaningfully. Experiments therefore play a critical role in development, but have been limited by the use of product-like prototypes, each requiring years of development and specialized for a narrow range of functions. Here we describe a robotic ankle-foot prosthesis system that enables rapid exploration of a wide range of dynamical behaviors in experiments with human subjects. This emulator comprises powerful off-board motor and control hardware, a flexible Bowden cable tether, and a lightweight instrumented prosthesis, resulting in a combination of low mass worn by the human (0.96 kg) and high mechatronic performance compared to prior platforms. Benchtop tests demonstrated closed-loop torque bandwidth of 17 Hz, peak torque of 175 Nm, and peak power of 1.0 kW. Tests with an anthropomorphic pendulum "leg" demonstrated low interference from the tether, less than 1 Nm about the hip. This combination of low worn mass, high bandwidth, high torque, and unrestricted movement makes the platform exceptionally versatile. To demonstrate suitability for human experiments, we performed preliminary tests in which a subject with unilateral transtibial amputation walked on a treadmill at 1.25 ms-1 while the prosthesis behaved in various ways. These tests revealed low torque tracking error (RMS error of 2.8 Nm) and the capacity to systematically vary work production or absorption across a broad range (from -5 to 21 J per step). These results support the use of robotic emulators during early stage assessment of proposed device functionalities and for scientific study of fundamental aspects of human-robot interaction. The design of simple, alternate end-effectors would enable studies at other joints or with

  12. Improved Weight-Bearing Symmetry for Transfemoral Amputees During Standing Up and Sitting Down With a Powered Knee-Ankle Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M; Fey, Nicholas P; Ingraham, Kimberly A; Finucane, Suzanne B; Halsne, Elizabeth G; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-07-01

    To test a new user-modulated control strategy that enables improved control of a powered knee-ankle prosthesis during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements. Within-subject comparison study. Gait laboratory. Unilateral transfemoral amputees (N=7; 4 men, 3 women) capable of community ambulation. Subjects performed 10 repetitions of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit with a powered knee-ankle prosthesis and with their prescribed passive prosthesis in a randomized order. With the powered prosthesis, knee and ankle power generation were controlled as a function of weight transferred onto the prosthesis. Vertical ground reaction force limb asymmetry and durations of movement were compared statistically (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, α=.05). For sit-to-stand, peak vertical ground reaction forces were significantly less asymmetric using the powered prosthesis (mean, 19.3%±11.8%) than the prescribed prosthesis (57.9%±13.5%; P=.018), where positive asymmetry values represented greater force through the intact limb. For stand-to-sit, peak vertical ground reaction forces were also significantly less asymmetric using the powered prosthesis (28.06%±11.6%) than the prescribed prosthesis (48.2%±16%; P=.028). Duration of movement was not significantly different between devices (sit-to-stand: P=.18; stand-to-sit: P=.063). Allowing transfemoral amputees more control over the timing and rate of knee and ankle power generation enabled users to stand up and sit down with their weight distributed more equally between their lower limbs. Increased weight bearing on the prosthetic limb may make such activities of daily living easier for transfemoral amputees. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of the Ankle Moment-Angle Curve in Different Gait Speeds and Phases for Designing Ankle-Foot Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Safaei-Pour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Aim of this study was to analysis the ankle moment-angle relation and its characteristics at different gait speeds and phases for using in prosthetic ankle-foot design. Materials & Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytic study in which 20 participants were chosen with assessable sampling method. Gait analysis at different speeds was performed with two force-plates and five high speed cameras. Ankle characteristics including quasi-stiffness and work were estimated at three periods of stance phase based on moment-angle loop. Mean differences were analyzed with repeated measure ANOVA and regression analysis was performed to fit the linear model to the data. Results: Moment-angle curve was clockwise at slower speeds and turned counter-clockwise while speed increased. The best fitted line to the work-walking speed curve had R2=0.81. There were significant differences in quasi-stiffness between fast and normal speed and slower speeds (P<0.001. Conclusion: Moment-angle curve displayed ankle passive function in slower speeds and active function in faster speeds. Results showed ankle characteristics varied at different gait phases and speeds. Thus, at slower speeds a spring-damper model with regulable damping would simulate the ankle function. However, at higher speeds the active elements also should be considered.

  14. Assessment of AK (Above Knee) Prosthesis with Different Ankle Assembly Using GRF Pattern in Stance Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Sung-Jae; Bae, Ha-Suk

    In this study, ground reaction force (GRF), absolute symmetry index (ASI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assemblies were investigated by biomechanical evaluation of above knee amputees. In the experiments, 37 normal male volunteers, two male and two female Above Knee (AK) amputees GRF data were tested with fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assembly. A gait analysis was carried out to derive the ratio of GRF to weight as the percentage of total stance phase for ten points. The results showed that fixed-axis ankle assembly was superior to other two ankle assemblies for forwarding and braking forces. Multi-axis ankle was relatively superior to other two ankle assemblies for gait balancing and movement of the mass center. Single-axis ankle was relatively superior to the other two ankle assemblies for CV and ASI of GRF.

  15. The feasibility of total ankle prosthesis for severe arthropathy in haemophilia and prothrombin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, H.J. van der; Nováková, I.R.O.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de

    2006-01-01

    The standard treatment for end-stage arthropathy of the ankle joint in haemophilia has been fusion of the ankle joint. Total ankle replacement is used in osteoarthritis and especially in rheumatoid arthritis with good medium-term results. In this case series three patients are being described, in

  16. Strategies to reduce the configuration time for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis across multiple ambulation modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M; Fey, Nicholas P; Finucane, Suzanne B; Lipschutz, Robert D; Hargrove, Levi J

    2013-06-01

    Recently developed powered lower limb prostheses allow users to more closely mimic the kinematics and kinetics of non-amputee gait. However, configuring such a device, in particular a combined powered knee and ankle, for individuals with a transfemoral amputation is challenging. Previous attempts have relied on empirical tuning of all control parameters. This paper describes modified stance phase control strategies - which mimic the behavior of biological joints or depend on the instantaneous loads within the prosthesis - developed to reduce the number of control parameters that require individual tuning. Three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations walked with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis across five ambulation modes (level ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). Starting with a nominal set of impedance parameters, the modified control strategies were applied and the devices were individually tuned such that all subjects achieved comfortable and safe ambulation. The control strategies drastically reduced the number of independent parameters that needed to be tuned for each subject (i.e., to 21 parameters instead of a possible 140 or approximately 4 parameters per mode) while relative amplitudes and timing of kinematic and kinetic data remained similar to those previously reported and to those of non-amputee subjects. Reducing the time necessary to configure a powered device across multiple ambulation modes may allow users to more quickly realize the benefits such powered devices can provide.

  17. Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body or to make a part of the body work better. Diseased or missing eyes, arms, hands, legs, or joints are commonly replaced by prosthetic devices. False teeth are known as dental prostheses. ...

  18. Evaluation of a Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis during Slope Ascent Gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Rábago

    Full Text Available Passive prosthetic feet lack active plantarflexion and push-off power resulting in gait deviations and compensations by individuals with transtibial amputation (TTA during slope ascent. We sought to determine the effect of active ankle plantarflexion and push-off power provided by a powered prosthetic ankle-foot (PWR on lower extremity compensations in individuals with unilateral TTA as they walked up a slope. We hypothesized that increased ankle plantarflexion and push-off power would reduce compensations commonly observed with a passive, energy-storing-returning prosthetic ankle-foot (ESR. We compared the temporal spatial, kinematic, and kinetic measures of ten individuals with TTA (age: 30.2 ± 5.3 yrs to matched abled-bodied (AB individuals during 5° slope ascent. The TTA group walked with an ESR and separately with a PWR. The PWR produced significantly greater prosthetic ankle plantarflexion and push-off power generation compared to an ESR and more closely matched AB values. The PWR functioned similar to a passive ESR device when transitioning onto the prosthetic limb due to limited prosthetic dorsiflexion, which resulted in similar deviations and compensations. In contrast, when transitioning off the prosthetic limb, increased ankle plantarflexion and push-off power provided by the PWR contributed to decreased intact limb knee extensor power production, lessening demand on the intact limb knee.

  19. Evaluation of a Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis during Slope Ascent Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Passive prosthetic feet lack active plantarflexion and push-off power resulting in gait deviations and compensations by individuals with transtibial amputation (TTA) during slope ascent. We sought to determine the effect of active ankle plantarflexion and push-off power provided by a powered prosthetic ankle-foot (PWR) on lower extremity compensations in individuals with unilateral TTA as they walked up a slope. We hypothesized that increased ankle plantarflexion and push-off power would reduce compensations commonly observed with a passive, energy-storing-returning prosthetic ankle-foot (ESR). We compared the temporal spatial, kinematic, and kinetic measures of ten individuals with TTA (age: 30.2 ± 5.3 yrs) to matched abled-bodied (AB) individuals during 5° slope ascent. The TTA group walked with an ESR and separately with a PWR. The PWR produced significantly greater prosthetic ankle plantarflexion and push-off power generation compared to an ESR and more closely matched AB values. The PWR functioned similar to a passive ESR device when transitioning onto the prosthetic limb due to limited prosthetic dorsiflexion, which resulted in similar deviations and compensations. In contrast, when transitioning off the prosthetic limb, increased ankle plantarflexion and push-off power provided by the PWR contributed to decreased intact limb knee extensor power production, lessening demand on the intact limb knee. PMID:27977681

  20. Impact of Powered Knee-Ankle Prosthesis on Low Back Muscle Mechanics in Transfemoral Amputees: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran Jayaraman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Regular use of prostheses is critical for individuals with lower limb amputations to achieve everyday mobility, maintain physical and physiological health, and achieve a better quality of life. Use of prostheses is influenced by numerous factors, with prosthetic design playing a critical role in facilitating mobility for an amputee. Thus, prostheses design can either promote biomechanically efficient or inefficient gait behavior. In addition to increased energy expenditure, inefficient gait behavior can expose prosthetic user to an increased risk of secondary musculoskeletal injuries and may eventually lead to rejection of the prosthesis. Consequently, researchers have utilized the technological advancements in various fields to improve prosthetic devices and customize them for user specific needs. One evolving technology is powered prosthetic components. Presently, an active area in lower limb prosthetic research is the design of novel controllers and components in order to enable the users of such powered devices to be able to reproduce gait biomechanics that are similar in behavior to a healthy limb. In this case series, we studied the impact of using a powered knee-ankle prostheses (PKA on two transfemoral amputees who currently use advanced microprocessor controlled knee prostheses (MPK. We utilized outcomes pertaining to kinematics, kinetics, metabolics, and functional activities of daily living to compare the efficacy between the MPK and PKA devices. Our results suggests that the PKA allows the participants to walk with gait kinematics similar to normal gait patterns observed in a healthy limb. Additionally, it was observed that use of the PKA reduced the level of asymmetry in terms of mechanical loading and muscle activation, specifically in the low back spinae regions and lower extremity muscles. Further, the PKA allowed the participants to achieve a greater range of cadence than their predicate MPK, thus allowing them to safely

  1. Case Study: A Bio-Inspired Control Algorithm for a Robotic Foot-Ankle Prosthesis Provides Adaptive Control of Level Walking and Stair Ascent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Tahir

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Powered ankle-foot prostheses assist users through plantarflexion during stance and dorsiflexion during swing. Provision of motor power permits faster preferred walking speeds than passive devices, but use of active motor power raises the issue of control. While several commercially available algorithms provide torque control for many intended activities and variations of terrain, control approaches typically exhibit no inherent adaptation. In contrast, muscles adapt instantaneously to changes in load without sensory feedback due to the intrinsic property that their stiffness changes with length and velocity. We previously developed a “winding filament” hypothesis (WFH for muscle contraction that accounts for intrinsic muscle properties by incorporating the giant titin protein. The goals of this study were to develop a WFH-based control algorithm for a powered prosthesis and to test its robustness during level walking and stair ascent in a case study of two subjects with 4–5 years of experience using a powered prosthesis. In the WFH algorithm, ankle moments produced by virtual muscles are calculated based on muscle length and activation. Net ankle moment determines the current applied to the motor. Using this algorithm implemented in a BiOM T2 prosthesis, we tested subjects during level walking and stair ascent. During level walking at variable speeds, the WFH algorithm produced plantarflexion angles (range = −8 to −19° and ankle moments (range = 1 to 1.5 Nm/kg similar to those produced by the BiOM T2 stock controller and to people with no amputation. During stair ascent, the WFH algorithm produced plantarflexion angles (range −15 to −19° that were similar to persons with no amputation and were ~5 times larger on average at 80 steps/min than those produced by the stock controller. This case study provides proof-of-concept that, by emulating muscle properties, the WFH algorithm provides robust, adaptive control of level walking at

  2. Artroplastia total de tornozelo: experiência brasileira com a prótese HINTEGRA Total ankle replacement: Brazilian experience with the HINTEGRA prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Nery

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A artrose do tornozelo vem se tornando mais comum a cada dia. A busca por soluções que preservem a função articular fez surgir uma nova geração de próteses com três componentes e maior liberdade de movimento. Neste trabalho, apresentam-se os resultados obtidos em 10 pacientes tratados com a prótese HINTEGRA (Integra, New Deal, em ação conjunta dos Grupos do Tornozelo e Pé do DOT da Unifesp-Escola Paulista de Medicina e IOT da Faculdade de Medicina da USP-Universidade de São Paulo. Os 10 pacientes (seis mulheres e quatro homens, com idade variando de 29 a 66 anos, foram submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico segundo a técnica de Hinterman entre janeiro e junho de 2005. Foram avaliados em intervalos predeterminados e os dados foram submetidos à análise estatística. A mobilidade do tornozelo apresentou melhora significante com a cirurgia realizada. Radiologicamente, não foram detectados sinais de soltura ou falhas nos componentes prostéticos de nenhum dos pacientes estudados. A taxa de complicações nessa amostra foi alta, mas equivalente às de outros autores e representa diretamente a curva de aprendizado relacionada com esse tipo de procedimento. Ao final de quatro anos, observaram-se significativa redução da dor e melhora do padrão funcional dos pacientes com os escores da AOFAS e de Hinterman, apontando para 20% de excelentes, 70% de bons e 10% de maus resultados. O tratamento da artrose do tornozelo através da artroplastia total com o modelo HINTEGRA, foi capaz de oferecer bons resultados no tempo médio de observação de quatro anos.Ankle arthritis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved in ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal, a joint action of the Foot and Ankle Teams of DOT of Unifesp - Escola Paulista de

  3. Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the unaffected leg during level-ground walking

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowski, Alena M; D?Andrea, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Background People with a lower-extremity amputation that use conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prostheses encounter a series of stress-related challenges during walking such as greater forces on their unaffected leg, and may thus be predisposed to secondary musculoskeletal injuries such as chronic joint disorders. Specifically, people with a unilateral transtibial amputation have an increased susceptibility to knee osteoarthritis, especially in their unaffected leg. Previous studies hav...

  4. Split-belt adaptation and gait symmetry in transtibial amputees walking with a hybrid EMG controlled ankle-foot prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannape, Oliver A; Herr, Hugh M

    2016-08-01

    Our ability to automatically adapt our walking pattern to the demands of our environment is central to maintaining a steady gait. Accordingly, a large effort is being made to extend and integrate this adaptability to lower-limb prostheses. To date, the main focus of this research has been on short term adaptation, such as in response to a terrain transition or a sudden change in the environment. However, long term adaptation and underlying sensorimotor learning processes are critical to optimizing walking patterns and predictively changing our gait when faced with continued perturbations. Furthermore, investigating these processes in lower-limb amputees may provide a unique window into the interplay between sensory driven adaptation and top-down cerebellar modulation of locomotor reflexes and may potentially help alleviate gait asymmetries. In the current exploratory study, we therefore investigated adaptation, sensorimotor learning, and gait symmetry in a group of transtibial amputees walking with a hybrid-EMG controlled powered prosthesis and matched controls (both groups N=3). Participants were asked to perform a split-belt walking trial during which the belt on the affected side ran at twice the speed of the contralateral belt (1.0m/s and 0.5m/s respectively). Adaptation, sensorimotor learning, and symmetry are compared to two baseline conditions. Initial results illustrate that the amputees were readily able to use the hybrid controller, modulated their EMG depending on treadmill speed, and successfully adapted their gait during split-belt walking. However, the temporal gait parameters suggest that amputees used a different adaptation technique and showed reduced sensorimotor learning, while gait symmetry was improved, in the short term, post-adaptation.

  5. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... Ankle replacement surgery is most often done while you are under general anesthesia. This means you will ...

  6. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed. PMID:26807889

  7. Ankle pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  8. Ankle Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Ankle Sprains KidsHealth / For Teens / Ankle Sprains What's in ... she could play again. What Is a Sprained Ankle? A sprained ankle is a very common injury ...

  9. Ankle instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krips, Rover; de Vries, Jasper; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The ankle joint is the most congruent joint of the human body. Stability is provided by the bony configuration of the ankle mortise and the talar dome and by the ankle ligaments. During ankle motions, rotation and translation around and along the movement axes occur. Soft tissue stability is

  10. Stiffness Analysis of Above Knee Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ege, Mücahit; Küçük, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    While a healthy human walks, his or her legs mutually perform good repeatabilitywith high accuracy. This provides an esthetical movement and balance. Peoplewith above knee prosthesis want to perform walking as esthetical as a healthyhuman. Therefore, to achieve a healthy walking, the above knee prosthesis mustprovide a good stiffness performance. Especially stiffness values are requiredwhen adding a second axis movement to the ankle for eversion and inversion. Inthis paper, stiffness analysis...

  11. Ankle arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure of repair to heal Weakness of the ankle Injury to tendon, blood vessel, or nerve Before the ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Ankle Injuries and Disorders Read more Endoscopy Read more NIH ...

  12. Ankle Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it follows an injury. Even a relatively benign ankle injury can be quite painful, at least at first. ... improve after several weeks Self-care For many ankle injuries, self-care measures ease the pain. Examples include: ...

  13. Ankle Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Ankle ProblemsFollow this chart for more information about problems that can cause ankle pain. Our trusted Symptom Checker is written and ...

  14. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C; Emerson, Robert W; Herr, Hugh M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work.

  15. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott J Rouse

    Full Text Available Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01. This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work.

  16. Ankle arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boc, Steven F; Norem, Nathan D

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of current ankle arthrodesis techniques. Surgical indications, pathophysiology of the ankle joint, preoperative assessment of the patient, surgical techniques for ankle fusion, and complications/sequelae are discussed. The surgical techniques section focuses on crossed screws arthrodesis and intramedullary nailing for tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. Other techniques, including arthroscopic fusion, are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ankle sprain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle injury - aftercare; Ankle syndesmosis sprain - aftercare; Syndesmosis injury - aftercare; ATFL injury - aftercare; CFL injury - ...

  18. Robotic lower limb prosthesis design through simultaneous computer optimizations of human and prosthesis costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handford, Matthew L.; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2016-02-01

    Robotic lower limb prostheses can improve the quality of life for amputees. Development of such devices, currently dominated by long prototyping periods, could be sped up by predictive simulations. In contrast to some amputee simulations which track experimentally determined non-amputee walking kinematics, here, we explicitly model the human-prosthesis interaction to produce a prediction of the user’s walking kinematics. We obtain simulations of an amputee using an ankle-foot prosthesis by simultaneously optimizing human movements and prosthesis actuation, minimizing a weighted sum of human metabolic and prosthesis costs. The resulting Pareto optimal solutions predict that increasing prosthesis energy cost, decreasing prosthesis mass, and allowing asymmetric gaits all decrease human metabolic rate for a given speed and alter human kinematics. The metabolic rates increase monotonically with speed. Remarkably, by performing an analogous optimization for a non-amputee human, we predict that an amputee walking with an appropriately optimized robotic prosthesis can have a lower metabolic cost - even lower than assuming that the non-amputee’s ankle torques are cost-free.

  19. Ankle sprain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An ankle sprain is a common injury to the ankle. The most common way the ankle is injured is when ... swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle. An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many ...

  20. Ankle replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total - discharge; Total ankle arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement - discharge; Osteoarthritis - ankle ... You had an ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped ... an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were ...

  1. Ankle sprain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2007-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one per 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle

  2. Ankle sprain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter Aa; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2010-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle

  3. Sprained Ankles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... away before the ligament is injured. Types of Sprains In young children, the ankle is the most commonly sprained joint, followed by ... A walking cast may be necessary if the ankle or foot injury has been severe. Most grade 1 sprains will heal within two weeks without subsequent complications. ...

  4. Adaptive sports ankle prosthetics. Interview by Sarah A. Curran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, David K

    2012-09-01

    Participating in sport at all levels is gaining a dedicated following and this is also apparent in individuals with an amputation. Currently, there is a wide variety of ankle prostheses available which attempt to provide function, control, and comfort, as well as good aesthetic appeal. Participation in sport, however, increases the demands placed upon ankle prostheses. This can compromise function and performance, and constrain the opportunities of participation in various outdoor and water sports. In acknowledging this limitation and the need to develop more versatile ankle prostheses, this article introduces the evolution of a prototype ankle prosthesis referred to as "Adaptive Sports Ankle." The ankle prosthesis, which is compatible with any foot pyramid adapter, offers the same range of motion as the normal human ankle joint and is made up of components that are chemical and corrosion resistant. These design features that are specifically created to accommodate below-the-knee amputees provide an ideal prosthesis for those wishing to lead an active lifestyle and participate in aquatic (i.e. swimming, surfing, and scuba diving), snowboarding, and equestrian activities. Although it is acknowledged that there is a need to establish research on the Adaptive Sports Ankle, its introduction to the market will enhance and expand opportunities of those individuals with a lower limb amputation to lead an active and healthy lifestyle.

  5. VUB-CYBERLEGs CYBATHLON 2016 Beta-Prosthesis: case study in control of an active two degree of freedom transfemoral prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Louis L.; Geeroms, Joost; van der Hoeven, Tom; Vanderborght, Bram; Lefeber, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    Background Here we present how the CYBERLEGs Beta-Prosthesis was modified with a new control system to participate in the Powered Leg Prosthesis event, and to report on our experience at the CYBATHLON 2016 which was held in Zurich, Switzerland in October 2016. The prosthesis has two active degrees of freedom which assist the user with extra joint power at the knee and ankle to complete tasks. The CYBATHLON is a championship for people with disabilities competing in six disciplines, using adva...

  6. Design and Control of a Pneumatically Actuated Transtibial Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hao; Shen, Xiangrong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and control of a pneumatically actuated transtibial prosthesis, which utilizes a pneumatic cylinder-type actuator to power the prosthetic ankle joint to support the user's locomotion. The pneumatic actuator has multiple advantages over the traditional electric motor, such as light weight, low cost, and high power-to-weight ratio. The objective of this work is to develop a compact and lightweight transtibial prosthesis, leveraging the multiple advantages provided...

  7. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R; Nickel, Eric A; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users.

  8. Syndesmotic ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Sharon G

    2012-01-01

    Ankle sprain injuries are the most common type of joint sprain. The prevalence of ankle joint sprains accounts for 21% of joint injuries in the body. Although somewhat rare, high-ankle or syndesmotic ankle sprains occur in up to 15% of ankle trauma. This article will present the pathomechanics of the high-ankle or syndesmotic sprain.

  9. Finite element analysis of biomechanical effects of total ankle arthroplasty on the foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2018-01-01

    The translational potential of this article: Biomechanical variations resulted from total ankle arthroplasty may contribute to negative postoperative outcomes. The exploration of the biomechanical performance in this study might benefit the surgeons in the determination of surgical protocols to avoid complications. The analysis of the performance of the ankle prosthesis could enhance the knowledge of prosthetic design.

  10. Design and characterization of a biologically inspired quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Lai, Cara H; Rouse, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    By design, commonly worn energy storage and release (ESR) prosthetic feet cannot provide biologically realistic ankle joint torque and angle profiles during walking. Additionally, their anthropomorphic, cantilever architecture causes their mechanical stiffness to decrease throughout the stance phase of walking, opposing the known trend of the biological ankle. In this study, the design of a quasi-passive pneumatic ankle-foot prosthesis is detailed that is able to replicate the biological ankle's torque and angle profiles during walking. The prosthetic ankle is comprised of a pneumatic piston, bending spring and solenoid valve. The mechanical properties of the pneumatic ankle prosthesis are characterized using a materials testing machine and the properties are compared to those from a common, passive ESR prosthetic foot. The characterization spanned a range of ankle equilibrium pressures and testing locations beneath the foot, analogous to the location of center of pressure within the stance phase of walking. The pneumatic ankle prosthesis was shown to provide biologically appropriate trends and magnitudes of torque, angle and stiffness behavior, when compared to the passive ESR prosthetic foot. Future work will focus on the development of a control system for the quasi-passive device and clinical testing of the pneumatic ankle to demonstrate efficacy.

  11. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurdeman, Shane R., E-mail: shanewurdeman@gmail.com [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Advanced Prosthetics Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68134 (United States); Myers, Sara A. [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Stergiou, Nicholas [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed “more appropriate” and the other “less appropriate” based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a “more appropriate” prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a “less appropriate” prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  12. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed "more appropriate" and the other "less appropriate" based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a "more appropriate" prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a "less appropriate" prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  13. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed “more appropriate” and the other “less appropriate” based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a “more appropriate” prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a “less appropriate” prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users

  14. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdeman, Shane R; Myers, Sara A; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed "more appropriate" and the other "less appropriate" based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a "more appropriate" prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a "less appropriate" prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  15. Muscle and prosthesis contributions to amputee walking mechanics: a modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-08-31

    Unilateral, below-knee amputees have altered gait mechanics, which can significantly affect their mobility. Below-knee amputees lose the functional use of the ankle muscles, which are critical during walking to provide body support, forward propulsion, leg-swing initiation and mediolateral balance. Thus, either muscles must compensate or the prosthesis must provide the functional tasks normally provided by the ankle muscles. Three-dimensional (3D) forward dynamics simulations of amputee and non-amputee walking were generated to identify muscle and prosthesis contributions to amputee walking mechanics, including the subtasks of body support, forward propulsion, leg-swing initiation and mediolateral balance. Results showed that the prosthesis provided body support in the absence of the ankle muscles. The prosthesis contributed to braking from early to mid-stance and propulsion in late stance. The prosthesis also functioned like the uniarticular soleus muscle by transferring energy from the residual leg to the trunk to provide trunk propulsion. The residual-leg vasti and rectus femoris reduced their contributions to braking in early stance, which mitigated braking from the prosthesis during this period. The prosthesis did not replace the function of the gastrocnemius, which normally generates energy to the leg to initiate swing. As a result, lower overall energy was delivered to the residual leg. The prosthesis also acted to accelerate the body laterally in the absence of the ankle muscles. These results provide further insight into muscle and prosthesis function in below-knee amputee walking and can help guide rehabilitation methods and device designs to improve amputee mobility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A numerical study on stress distribution across the ankle joint: Effects of material distribution of bone, muscle force and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Subrata; Ghosh, Rajesh

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a realistic three dimensional FE model of intact ankle joint. Three dimensional FE model of the intact ankle joint was developed using computed tomography data sets. The effect of muscle force, ligaments and proper material property distribution of bone on stress distribution across the intact ankle joint was studied separately. Present study indicates bone material property, ligaments and muscle force have influence on stress distribution across the ankle joint. Proper bone material, ligaments and muscle must be considered in the computational model for pre-clinical analysis of ankle prosthesis.

  17. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficanha, Evandro M; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF), focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE) angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to -4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  18. [Eleven-Year Experience with Total Ankle Arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelka, S; Sosna, A; Vavřík, P; Jahoda, D; Barták, V; Landor, I

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Total joint replacement is one of the options in surgical treatment of advanced ankle arthritis. It allows the ankle to remain mobile but, unfortunately, it does not provide the same longevity as total knee or hip replacements. Therefore, decisions concerning the kind of treatment are very individual and depend on the clinical status and opinion of each patient. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 132 total ankle replacements were carried out in the period from 2004 to 2015. The prostheses used included the Ankle Evolutive System (AES) in 52 patients, Mobility Total Ankle System (DePuy) in 24 patients and, recently, Rebalance Total Ankle Replacement implant in 53 patients. Three patients allergic to metal received the Taric prosthesis. Revision arthroplasty using the Hintegra prosthesis was carried out in four patients. The outcome of arthroplasty was evaluated on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring scale. Indications for total ankle arthroplasty included post-traumatic arthritis in 83 patients, rheumatoid arthritis in 37 and primary arthritis in 12 patients. There were 78 women and 54 men, with an average age of 55.6 years at the time of surgery. RESULTS The average follow-up was 6.1 years (1-11 years). The average AOFAS score of the whole group increased from 33.2 before surgery to 82.5 after it. The primary indication had an important role. Arthroplasty outcomes were poorer in patients with post-traumatic arthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis or primary arthritis. In patients with post-traumatic arthritis, the average AOFAS score rose to 78.6 due to restricted motion of the ankle, and some patients continued to have pain when walking. The average AOFAS score in a total of 49 patients who had rheumatoid arthritis or primary arthritis reached a value of 86.4. Post-operative complications were recorded in ten patients (7.6%) in whom part of the wound was healing by second intention. Ossification was also a

  19. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially in the cold-weather months when most ankle injuries occur. An ankle fracture involves a crack or ... Weak ankles may be a result of previous ankle injuries, but in some cases, they are a congenital ( ...

  20. Modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuangli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To investigate the clinical outcome of modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis. Methods:Between November 2009 and June 2012, 28 patients with ankle arthritis were treated, among whom 11 had obvious foot varus deformity, and 17 were almost normal in appearance. There were 13 males and 15 females with an average age of 49.4 years (range, 23-67 years. The main symptoms included swelling, pain, and a limited range of motion of the ankles. The ankle joints functions were assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score and visual analog scale (VAS preoperatively and at 1 year follow-up. Results:Twenty-eight patients were followed up for 19.8 months on average (range, 1-2 years. Superficial wound infection occurred in 3 cases, and was cured after debridement; the other incisions healed by first intention without complications. All ankles were fused at 1 year follow-up after operation. The symptom was relieved completely in all patients at last follow-up without complication of implant failure, or nonunion. The postoperative AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score was 83.13±3.76, showing significant difference when compared with the preoperative score (45.38±3.21, P<0.01. VAS was significantly decreased from 8.01±0.63 to 2.31±1.05 at 1 year follow-up (P<0.05. Conclusion:Modified Blair ankle fusion has the advantages of high feasiblity, less cost and rigid fixation. It shows high reliability in pain relief and may obtain a good clinical effectiveness. Key words: Ankle; Arthritis; Arthrodesis; Fracture fixation, intramedullary

  1. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000548.htm Ankle fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An ankle fracture is a break in 1 or more ...

  2. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The ankle joint connects the foot with the leg. The ...

  3. LATERAL ANKLE INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background: Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. Objective: To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with ...

  4. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ankle Sprain Treatment Page Content Article Body Acute ankle and foot injuries are common in athletes and other active young ... Phase I treatment involves resting and protecting the ankle to permit healing, to prevent further injury, and to control pain and swelling. Rest, protection ( ...

  5. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  6. Ankle Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one ... muscles and tendons move it. The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is ...

  7. Advancements in ankle arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. Niek; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Important progress has been made during the past 30 years in arthroscopic ankle surgery. Ankle arthroscopy has gradually changed from a diagnostic to a therapeutic tool. Most arthroscopic procedures can be performed by using the anterior working area with the ankle in dorsiflexion or plantar

  8. The Angelchik prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fargnoli, R.; Bozza, A.; Magnoli, A.; Villari, N.; Pernice, L.M.; Andreoli, F.; Lombardi, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Angelchik prosthesis is used in the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux. Operated patients are preliminary examined with imaging techniques, but manometric and acidometric techniques are also used. Although the conventional esophagogram still maintains its diagnostic significance, Computed Tomography (CT) has become the first-choice imaging modality. CT allows the correct evaluation of both the state of the prosthesis and its relationship to the esophagus and gastric fundus. The possible postoperative complications following an incorrect placement of the prosthesis can be accurately diagnosed too. The authors report their experience in the study of 5 patients examined with both conventional radiology and CT

  9. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  11. Design and Control of a Pneumatically Actuated Transtibial Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Shen, Xiangrong

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the design and control of a pneumatically actuated transtibial prosthesis, which utilizes a pneumatic cylinder-type actuator to power the prosthetic ankle joint to support the user's locomotion. The pneumatic actuator has multiple advantages over the traditional electric motor, such as light weight, low cost, and high power-to-weight ratio. The objective of this work is to develop a compact and lightweight transtibial prosthesis, leveraging the multiple advantages provided by this highly competitive actuator. In this paper, the design details of the prosthesis are described, including the determination of performance specifications, the layout of the actuation mechanism, and the calculation of the torque capacity. Through the authors' design calculation, the prosthesis is able to provide sufficient range of motion and torque capacity to support the locomotion of a 75 kg individual. The controller design is also described, including the underlying biomechanical analysis and the formulation of the finite-state impedance controller. Finally, the human subject testing results are presented, with the data indicating that the prosthesis is able to generate a natural walking gait and sufficient power output for its amputee user.

  12. The sprained ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, J C

    2001-01-01

    The sprained ankle is the most common musculoskeletal injury seen by physicians caring for active youngsters and adults. It accounts for approximately one fourth of all sports-related injuries and is commonly seen in athletes participating in basketball, soccer, or football. It has been shown that one third of West Point cadets suffer an ankle sprain during their 4 years at the military academy. While diagnosis and management of the sprained ankle is usually straightforward, several serious injuries can masquerade as an ankle sprain, and it is important for the clinician to recognize these to prevent long-term morbidity. In this article the basic anatomy of the ankle, mechanisms by which the ankle is injured, and the differential diagnosis of the acutely injured ankle are reviewed. Appropriate evaluation of the injured ankle and the criteria that should be utilized for determining the necessity of radiographs are discussed as well as management of the acutely sprained ankle and the role of prevention in reducing the risk of ankle injury.

  13. The Effect of Prosthetic Ankle Units on Roll-Over Shape Characteristics During Walking in Persons with Bilateral Transtibial Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Steven A.; Su, Po-Fu; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Some important functions of walking are adversely affected or eliminated in prosthesis users due to reduced or absent ankle motion. The purpose of this retrospective data analysis was to determine the effect of prosthetic ankle units on the characteristics of the ankle-foot roll-over shape in persons with bilateral transtibial amputations. Seventeen subjects were fitted with Endolite Multiflex Ankles to provide ankle plantar/dorsiflexion during the stance phase of gait. Two quantitative gait analyses were performed as subjects walked with (1) Seattle Lightfoot II feet (baseline condition) and (2) with the prosthetic ankle units added. Roll-over shape radii and effective foot length ratio were calculated and compared for the two prosthetic configurations. When subjects walked with the ankle units, ankle motion increased (pprosthetic ankle units (p=0.066). Prosthetists and manufacturers are encouraged to consider the effect of combining prosthetic components on the overall characteristics of the prosthesis and the functions they impart to the user. PMID:22234709

  14. Ankle Sprains. A Round Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Types of ankle sprains, surgical versus nonsurgical treatment, tape versus brace for support, rehabilitation, exercise, and prevention of ankle sprains are discussed by a panel of experts. An acute ankle taping technique is illustrated. (MT)

  15. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  16. LATERAL ANKLE INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background: Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. Objective: To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with a review of relevant anatomy, assessment and treatment. Also included is a discussion of the efficacy of manual therapy in the treatment of ankle sprain. Discussion: A detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the ankle as well as the early recognition of factors that may delay the rate of healing are important considerations when developing a management plan for inversion sprains of the ankle. This area appears to be under-researched however it was found that movement therapy and its various forms appear to be the most efficient and most effective method of treating uncomplicated ankle injury. Future investigations should involve a study to determine the effect chiropractic treatment (manipulation) may have on the injured ankle. PMID:17987171

  17. How to Care for a Sprained Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sprained Ankle How to Care for a Sprained Ankle Page Content Ankle sprains are very common injuries. ... Grade I, II or III. Treating your Sprained Ankle Treating your sprained ankle properly may prevent chronic ...

  18. Design of a power-asymmetric actuator for a transtibial prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Harrison L; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the design and characterization of a power-asymmetric actuator for a transtibial prosthesis. The device is designed to provide the combination of: 1) joint locking, 2) high power dissipation, and 3) low power generation. This actuator functionality allows for a prosthesis to be designed with minimal mass and power consumption relative to a fully-powered robotic prosthesis while maintaining much of the functionality necessary for activities of daily living. The actuator achieves these design characteristics while maintaining a small form factor by leveraging a combination of electromechanical and hydraulic components. The design of the actuator is described herein, and results of an experimental characterization are provided that indicate that the actuator is capable of providing the functional capabilities required of an ankle prosthesis in a compact and lightweight package.

  19. Short-Term Effect of Prosthesis Transforming Sensory Modalities on Walking in Stroke Patients with Hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Owaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory impairments caused by neurological or physical disorders hamper kinesthesia, making rehabilitation difficult. In order to overcome this problem, we proposed and developed a novel biofeedback prosthesis called Auditory Foot for transforming sensory modalities, in which the sensor prosthesis transforms plantar sensations to auditory feedback signals. This study investigated the short-term effect of the auditory feedback prosthesis on walking in stroke patients with hemiparesis. To evaluate the effect, we compared four conditions of auditory feedback from plantar sensors at the heel and fifth metatarsal. We found significant differences in the maximum hip extension angle and ankle plantar flexor moment on the affected side during the stance phase, between conditions with and without auditory feedback signals. These results indicate that our sensory prosthesis could enhance walking performance in stroke patients with hemiparesis, resulting in effective short-term rehabilitation.

  20. Chronic Ankle Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments and exercises to strengthen the ankle, improve balance and range of motion and retrain your muscles. As you progress through rehabilitation, you may also receive training that relates specifically to your activities or sport. Bracing. Some patients wear an ankle brace to ...

  1. Ankle-Brachial Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... measured at your arm. A low ankle-brachial index number can indicate narrowing or blockage of the arteries in ... tell your doctor so that he or she can continue to monitor your risk. Blockage (0.9 or less). An ankle-brachial index number less than 1.0 indicates narrowing of ...

  2. The foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging of the foot and ankle can be difficult because of the complex anatomy. Familiarity with the bony and ligamentous anatomy is essential for proper evaluation of radiographic findings. Therefore, pertinent anatomy is discussed as it applies to specific injuries. Special views, tomography, arthrography, and other techniques may be indicated for complete evaluation of foot and ankle trauma

  3. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  4. Ankle sprains and instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Cory M; Tran, Elaine; Cai, Andrew N; DiPreta, John A

    2014-03-01

    Ankle injuries are among the most common injuries presenting to primary care providers and emergency departments and may cause considerable time lost to injury and long-term disability. Inversion injuries about the ankle involve about 25% of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and 50% of all sports-related injuries. Medial-sided ankle sprains occur less frequently than those on the lateral side. High ankle sprains occur less frequently in the general population, but do occur commonly in collision sports. Providers should apply the Ottawa ankle rules when radiography is indicated and refer fractures and more severe injuries to orthopedic surgery as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, pankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity (pankle instability (pankles. Injured ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (pankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Online adaptive neural control of a robotic lower limb prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanias, J. A.; Simon, A. M.; Finucane, S. B.; Perreault, E. J.; Hargrove, L. J.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an adaptive intent recognition algorithm that continuously learns to incorporate a lower limb amputee’s neural information (acquired via electromyography (EMG)) as they ambulate with a robotic leg prosthesis. Approach. We present a powered lower limb prosthesis that was configured to acquire the user’s neural information and kinetic/kinematic information from embedded mechanical sensors, and identify and respond to the user’s intent. We conducted an experiment with eight transfemoral amputees over multiple days. EMG and mechanical sensor data were collected while subjects using a powered knee/ankle prosthesis completed various ambulation activities such as walking on level ground, stairs, and ramps. Our adaptive intent recognition algorithm automatically transitioned the prosthesis into the different locomotion modes and continuously updated the user’s model of neural data during ambulation. Main results. Our proposed algorithm accurately and consistently identified the user’s intent over multiple days, despite changing neural signals. The algorithm incorporated 96.31% [0.91%] (mean, [standard error]) of neural information across multiple experimental sessions, and outperformed non-adaptive versions of our algorithm—with a 6.66% [3.16%] relative decrease in error rate. Significance. This study demonstrates that our adaptive intent recognition algorithm enables incorporation of neural information over long periods of use, allowing assistive robotic devices to accurately respond to the user’s intent with low error rates.

  7. A prosthesis-specific multi-link segment model of lower-limb amputee sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigney, Stacey M; Simmons, Anne; Kark, Lauren

    2016-10-03

    Lower-limb amputees commonly utilize non-articulating energy storage and return (ESAR) prostheses for high impact activities such as sprinting. Despite these prostheses lacking an articulating ankle joint, amputee gait analysis conventionally features a two-link segment model of the prosthetic foot. This paper investigated the effects of the selected link segment model׳s marker-set and geometry on a unilateral amputee sprinter׳s calculated lower-limb kinematics, kinetics and energetics. A total of five lower-limb models of the Ottobock ® 1E90 Sprinter were developed, including two conventional shank-foot models that each used a different version of the Plug-in-Gait (PiG) marker-set to test the effect of prosthesis ankle marker location. Two Hybrid prosthesis-specific models were then developed, also using the PiG marker-sets, with the anatomical shank and foot replaced by prosthesis-specific geometry separated into two segments. Finally, a Multi-link segment (MLS) model was developed, consisting of six segments for the prosthesis as defined by a custom marker-set. All full-body musculoskeletal models were tested using four trials of experimental marker trajectories within OpenSim 3.2 (Stanford, California, USA) to find the affected and unaffected hip, knee and ankle kinematics, kinetics and energetics. The geometry of the selected lower-limb prosthesis model was found to significantly affect all variables on the affected leg (p prosthesis-specific spatial, inertial and elastic properties from full-body models significantly affects the calculated amputee gait characteristics, and we therefore recommend the implementation of a MLS model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Talar Body Prosthesis: Results at Ten to Thirty-six Years of Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnroongroj, Thos; Harnroongroj, Thossart

    2014-07-16

    Satisfactory results of implantation of the talar body prosthesis were reported in 1997, although some complications associated with the initial design were noted. The present study evaluated outcomes of treatment with a modified talar body prosthesis. Of the thirty-six talar body prostheses implanted with use of a transmalleolar surgical approach from 1974 to 2011, thirty-three were available for follow-up at ten to thirty-six years or had failed prior to that time. The indication for implantation had been osteonecrosis in twenty-three patients, a comminuted talar fracture in eight, and a talar body tumor in two. Twenty-eight of the thirty-three prostheses were still in place at the time of final follow-up and five had failed prior to five years. The duration of follow-up was ten to twenty years in eight patients, twenty to thirty years in eleven, and thirty to thirty-six years in nine. The AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society) ankle-hindfoot score did not differ significantly among these three groups. Patients over sixty-five years of age with underlying disease that impeded walking ability had lower AOFAS scores. Early prosthesis failure occurred as a result of size mismatch in two patients, tumor recurrence in one, infection in one, and osteonecrosis of the talar head and neck in one. These failures, which occurred at eight to fifty-seven months, were treated with tibiotalar arthrodesis in three patients, prosthesis revision in one, and below-the-knee amputation in one. Although early prosthesis failure may occur, survival of the talar body prosthesis can provide satisfactory ankle and foot function. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  9. Dynamic Balance Control (DBC) in lower leg amputee subjects; contribution of the regulatory activity of the prosthesis side

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhand, Marcus Johannes; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; van der Kooij, Herman; Rietman, Johan Swanik

    2012-01-01

    Background Regaining effective postural control after lower limb amputation requires complex adaptation strategies in both the prosthesis side and the non-amputated side. The objective in this study is to determine the individual contribution of the ankle torques generated by both legs in balance

  10. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholmer, E.; Andersen, A.; Andersen, S.B.; Funder, V.; Joergensen, J.P.; Niedermann, B.; Vuust, M.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a clinical prospective investigation 102 patients with fresh ankle injuries underwent ankle arthrography and surgery for rupture of the lateral ligaments of the ankle. Three hypotheses concerning the improvement of the arthrographic diagnosis of rupture of the calcaneofibular ligament were tested. Two were rejected. Improvement in the diagnostic specificity was possible by combining arthrography with a stress inversion test, but the sensitivity of this combination was low. It was demonstrated that absence of peroneus sheath filling was a better diagnostic sign with good rather than with poor recess filling. (Auth.)

  11. Sprained ankle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sprain is caused by the twisting or bending of a joint into a position it was not designed to move. The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint. Some common symptoms of a sprain are pain around the joint, ...

  12. Ankle injuries in basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanderson, J; Nemeth, G; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the frequency of ankle sprains in basketball players. A questionnaire about previous ankle injuries, time off after such injuries, current ankle problems, personal data, number of practice hours and the use of prophylactic measures was sent out to 102 basketball players in a second division league in Sweden. Ninety-six players answered. 92% of them had suffered an ankle sprain while playing basketball, and of these 83% reported repeated sprains of one ankle. In the last two seasons, 78% of the players had injured at least one ankle. The injury frequency in the investigation was 5.5 ankle injuries per 1000 activity hours. 22% of the players used some kind of prophylactic support of their ankle joints. Because of the great number of ankle sprains and the disability in terms of time away from sports that they cause, prevention of these injuries is essential.

  13. Glossary of Foot and Ankle Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary of Foot & Ankle Terms Glossary of Foot & Ankle Terms Page Content Achilles tendon - The Achilles tendon ... research grants, humanitarian outreach and public education initiatives. Ankle instability - Chronic, repetitive sprains of the ankle. This ...

  14. Ultrasonography of the ankle joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Won; Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Kim, Sung Kwan; Gwak, Heui Chul [Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Dae Kyung Imaging Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Ankle disorders are a relatively common pathological condition, and ankle injuries account for approximately 14% of sports-related orthopedic emergency visits. Various imaging modalities can be used to make a diagnosis in cases of ankle pain; however, ultrasound (US) has several benefits for the evaluation of ankle pain, especially in the tendons, ligaments, and nerves of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to review the common causes of ankle pathology, with particular reference to US features. In addition, the importance of a dynamic evaluation and a stress test with US is emphasized.

  15. Ultrasonography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Won; Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Kim, Sung Kwan; Gwak, Heui Chul; Lee, Sung Moon

    2017-01-01

    Ankle disorders are a relatively common pathological condition, and ankle injuries account for approximately 14% of sports-related orthopedic emergency visits. Various imaging modalities can be used to make a diagnosis in cases of ankle pain; however, ultrasound (US) has several benefits for the evaluation of ankle pain, especially in the tendons, ligaments, and nerves of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to review the common causes of ankle pathology, with particular reference to US features. In addition, the importance of a dynamic evaluation and a stress test with US is emphasized

  16. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  17. [Progress of temporomandibular joint prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Quan; Li, Kaide; Liu, Lei

    2014-08-01

    The anatomically and functionally complex nature of the temporomandibularjoint (TMJ) makes its reconstruction one of the most challenging tasks faced by surgeons who operate in the head and neck. TMJ prosthesis is one of the important techniques in the reconstruction of TMJ. The main indications for TMJ prosthesis include ankylosis, fractures of condylar that can't be fixed, trauma or tumor, end-stage TMJ disturbance, and TMJ dysplasia caused by Hallermann-Streiff syndrome. TMJ replacement aims to enhance the function of TMJ, alleviate pain, and prevent serious complications. TMJ prosthesis is advantageous in oral and maxillofacial surgery because it can imitate normal anatomic morphology and adhere to the host. Moreover, the use of other materials is no longer necessary and functional training can be started postoperatively at once, among others. Prosthetic materials have leading and promoting functions in the development of joint prosthesis. Good design, fit shape, and fixation are the necessary conditions for prosthesis to serve its function. Investigation of joint biomechanics is also necessary. With the rapid developments in material science, joint biomechanics, and other related subjects, TMJ prosthesis has been significantly improved in terms of its materials, design, fit shape, and fixation techniques. In addition, the development of TMJ prosthesis would expand its applications. This review intends to provide an overview about the progress and clinical application of TMJ prosthesis.

  18. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-10

    ankle stablizers in preventing ankle injuries . American Journal of Sports Medicine. 16: 228–233. 14...Schmidt MD, Sulsky SI, and Amoroso PJ (2005). Effectiveness of an external ankle brace in reducing parachute-related ankle injuries . Injury Prevention ...and Horodyski M (1994). The efficacy of a semirigid ankle stabilizer to reduce acute ankle injury in basketball . American Journal of Sports

  19. Locomotor Adaptation by Transtibial Amputees Walking With an Experimental Powered Prosthesis Under Continuous Myoelectric Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Stephanie; Wensman, Jeffrey P; Ferris, Daniel P

    2016-05-01

    Lower limb amputees can use electrical activity from their residual muscles for myoelectric control of a powered prosthesis. The most common approach for myoelectric control is a finite state controller that identifies behavioral states and discrete changes in motor tasks. An alternative approach to state-based myoelectric control is continuous proportional myoelectric control where ongoing electrical activity has a proportional relationship to the prosthetic joint torque or power. To test the potential of continuous proportional myoelectric control for powered lower limb prostheses, we recruited five unilateral transtibial amputees to walk on a treadmill with an experimental powered prosthesis. Subjects walked using the powered prosthesis with and without visual feedback of their control signal in real time. Amputee subjects were able to adapt their residual muscle activation patterns to alter prosthetic ankle mechanics when we provided visual feedback of their myoelectric control signal in real time. During walking with visual feedback, subjects significantly increased their peak prosthetic ankle power ( p = 0.02, ANOVA) and positive work ( p = 0.02, ANOVA) during gait above their prescribed prosthesis values. However, without visual feedback, the subjects did not increase their peak ankle power during push off. These results show that amputee users were able to volitionally alter their prosthesis mechanics during walking, but only when given an explicit goal for their residual muscle motor commands. Future studies that examine the motor and learning capabilities of lower limb amputees using their residual muscles for continuous proportional myoelectric control are needed to determine the viability of integrating continuous high-level control with existing finite state prosthetic controllers.

  20. Adaptation and prosthesis effects on stride-to-stride fluctuations in amputee gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane R Wurdeman

    Full Text Available Twenty-four individuals with transtibial amputation were recruited to a randomized, crossover design study to examine stride-to-stride fluctuations of lower limb joint flexion/extension time series using the largest Lyapunov exponent (λ. Each individual wore a "more appropriate" and a "less appropriate" prosthesis design based on the subject's previous functional classification for a three week adaptation period. Results showed decreased λ for the sound ankle compared to the prosthetic ankle (F1,23 = 13.897, p = 0.001 and a decreased λ for the "more appropriate" prosthesis (F1,23 = 4.849, p = 0.038. There was also a significant effect for the time point in the adaptation period (F2,46 = 3.164, p = 0.050. Through the adaptation period, a freezing and subsequent freeing of dynamic degrees of freedom was seen as the λ at the ankle decreased at the midpoint of the adaptation period compared to the initial prosthesis fitting (p = 0.032, but then increased at the end compared to the midpoint (p = 0.042. No differences were seen between the initial fitting and the end of the adaptation for λ (p = 0.577. It is concluded that the λ may be a feasible clinical tool for measuring prosthesis functionality and adaptation to a new prosthesis is a process through which the motor control develops mastery of redundant degrees of freedom present in the system.

  1. Anterior ankle arthrodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gordon L; Sayres, Stephanie C; O’Malley, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common procedure that resolves many conditions of the foot and ankle; however, complications following this procedure are often reported and vary depending on the fixation technique. Various techniques have been described in the attempt to achieve ankle arthrodesis and there is much debate as to the efficiency of each one. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of anterior plating in ankle arthrodesis using customised and Synthes TomoFix plates. We present the outcomes of 28 ankle arthrodeses between 2005 and 2012, specifically examining rate of union, patient-reported outcomes scores, and complications. All 28 patients achieved radiographic union at an average of 36 wk; the majority of patients (92.86%) at or before 16 wk, the exceptions being two patients with Charcot joints who were noted to have bony union at a three year review. Patient-reported outcomes scores significantly increased (P plate offers added compression and provides a rigid fixation for arthrodesis stabilization. PMID:24649408

  2. Arthrography of the foot and ankle. Ankle and subtalar joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, H J; Ivanic, G; Trattnig, S

    2000-03-01

    Arthrography is the intra-articular injection of contrast media. This article reviews the normal and pathologic findings of standard arthrography and MR imaging arthrography of the ankle and subtalar joint. Standard arthrography is used primarily after acute ankle sprains, whereas MR imaging arthrography is used for staging and detecting osteochondritis dissecans of the talus, anterolateral soft tissue impingement, and chronic lateral ankle instability.

  3. Estimation of Human Ankle Impedance During the Stance Phase of Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Perreault, Eric J.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2018-01-01

    Human joint impedance is the dynamic relationship between the differential change in the position of a perturbed joint and the corresponding response torque; it is a fundamental property that governs how humans interact with their environments. It is critical to characterize ankle impedance during the stance phase of walking to elucidate how ankle impedance is regulated during locomotion, as well as provide the foundation for future development of natural, biomimetic powered prostheses and their control systems. In this study, ankle impedance was estimated using a model consisting of stiffness, damping and inertia. Ankle torque was well described by the model, accounting for 98 ± 1.2% of the variance. When averaged across subjects, the stiffness component of impedance was found to increase linearly from 1.5 Nm/rad/kg to 6.5 Nm/rad/kg between 20% and 70% of stance phase. The damping component was found to be statistically greater than zero only for the estimate at 70% of stance phase, with a value of 0.03 Nms/rad/kg. The slope of the ankle’s torque-angle curve—known as the quasi-stiffness—was not statistically different from the ankle stiffness values, and showed remarkable similarity. Finally, using the estimated impedance, the specifications for a biomimetic powered ankle prosthesis were introduced that would accurately emulate human ankle impedance during locomotion. PMID:24760937

  4. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  5. Evaluation of Gait Performance of a Hemipelvectomy Amputation Walking with a Canadian Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Karimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hemipelvectomy amputation is a surgical procedure in which lower limb and a portion of pelvic are removed. There are a few studies in the literature regarding the performance of subjects with hip disarticulation during walking. However, there is no study on gait analysis of hemipelvectomy subject. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to evaluate the gait and stability of subject with hemipelvectomy amputation. Case Description and Methods. A subject with hemipelvectomy amputation at right side was involved in this study. He used a Canadian prosthesis with single axis ankle joint, 3R21 knee joint, and 7E7 hip joint for more than 10 years. The kinetic and kinematic parameters were collected by a motion analysis system and a Kistler force platform. Findings and Outcomes. There was a significant difference between knee, hip, and ankle range of motions and their moments in the sound and prosthesis sides. In the other side, the stability of the subject in the anteroposterior direction seems to be better than that in the mediolateral direction. Conclusions. There was a significant asymmetry between the kinetic and kinematic performance of the sound and prosthesis sides, which may be due to lack of muscular power and alignment of prosthesis components.

  6. Joint prosthesis and method of bone fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterom, R.; Van der Pijl, A.J.; Bersee, H.E.N.; Van der Helm, F.C.; Herder, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a joint prosthesis (10), for example, a knee joint or shoulder joint prosthesis comprising a first, socket-holding prosthesis part (11) for attachment to a first bone (12) and a second, ball-holding prosthesis part (13) for attachment to a second bone (14) that intermates

  7. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragonez, S.D.B.; Avila, G.A. de; Calieron, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of artrography in the diagnosis of acute ligaments injuries of the ankle is discussed. The technique of examination is described. An anatomic review, diagnostic elements and the proceeding are presented emphasizing the lateral ligaments. (M.A.C.) [pt

  8. Prosthesis-patient mismatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Pibarot

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM is present when the effective orifice area of the inserted prosthetic valve is too small in relation to body size. Its main hemodynamic consequence is to generate higher than expected gradients through normally functioning prosthetic valves. The purpose of this review is to present an update on the present state of knowledge with regards to diagnosis, prognosis and prevention of PPM. PPM is a frequent occurrence (20%–70% of aortic valve replacements that has been shown to be associated with worse hemodynamics, less regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, more cardiac events, and lower survival. Moreover, as opposed to most other risk factors, PPM can largely be prevented by using a prospective strategy at the time of operation.

  9. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  10. Audit of Orthopaedic Surgical Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fionn Coughlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Royal College of Surgeons in England published guidelines in 2008 outlining the information that should be documented at each surgery. St. James’s Hospital uses a standard operation sheet for all surgical procedures and these were examined to assess documentation standards. Objectives. To retrospectively audit the hand written orthopaedic operative notes according to established guidelines. Methods. A total of 63 operation notes over seven months were audited in terms of date and time of surgery, surgeon, procedure, elective or emergency indication, operative diagnosis, incision details, signature, closure details, tourniquet time, postop instructions, complications, prosthesis, and serial numbers. Results. A consultant performed 71.4% of procedures; however, 85.7% of the operative notes were written by the registrar. The date and time of surgery, name of surgeon, procedure name, and signature were documented in all cases. The operative diagnosis and postoperative instructions were frequently not documented in the designated location. Incision details were included in 81.7% and prosthesis details in only 30% while the tourniquet time was not documented in any. Conclusion. Completion and documentation of operative procedures were excellent in some areas; improvement is needed in documenting tourniquet time, prosthesis and incision details, and the location of operative diagnosis and postoperative instructions.

  11. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  12. [Bone-anchored auricular prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bille, M; Homøe, P; Vesterhauge, S; Rixen, M; Bretlau, P

    1994-10-03

    During the period February 1989-September 1991, 15 patients with absent or defective pinna were treated with a bone-anchored auricular prosthesis at the ENT-department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. These patients were followed up from the hospital records and by means of a questionnaire. Altogether 40 titanium implants have been inserted, of which one implant was found not to be integrated at the time of the second-stage surgery. Five patients underwent additional surgery, one patient because of non-integration of a screw, and four patients on account of soft-tissue reactions. From the questionnaire replies it appears that all patients found the cosmetic result and the technique concerning mounting of the prosthesis very satisfactory. Nearly half the patients found that the care of the skin around the abutments caused considerable problems. Three patients had experienced unintended losses of the prosthesis. In conclusion, treatment with a bone anchored auricular prosthesis has considerable advantages compared to treatment with a prosthesis attached by adhesive. Furthermore the use of a bone-anchored prosthesis should be considered a viable alternative to surgical reconstruction because of the outstanding aesthetic result and because the surgical procedure puts less strain on the patient. The disadvantage of the method is the lifelong daily care of the skin and the dependence on the health services.

  13. Prótese do tornozelo híbrida em um caso de necrose avascular pós-traumática do tálus Hybrid ankle prosthesis in a case of post-traumatic avascular necrosis of the talus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jorge Gomes de Sousa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As fraturas do astrágalo originam frequentemente artrose pós-traumática tardia. Nestes casos, a utilização de próteses do tornozelo não cimentadas de última geração tem sido evitada pela presença de necrose avascular. Relatamos o caso de um paciente com 65 anos que se apresenta quatro anos após uma fratura do colo do astrágalo. Apresentava uma artrose do tornozelo dolorosa (escala AOFAS do retropé e tornozelo 19 e necrose avascular com colapso de toda a cúpula astragalina. Dada a extensão da necrose, foi decidido cimentar o componente protésico astragalino. Um ano após a cirurgia, o paciente apresenta bom resultado clínico e radiológico (escala AOFAS do retropé e tornozelo 87 e está satisfeito com o procedimento. Não temos conhecimento de nenhum relato semelhante na literatura.Talus fractures often lead to late post-traumatic arthrosis. In such cases, the use of latest generation, cementless prostheses has been hindered by the presence of avascular necrosis. We report the case of a 65-year-old patient who presented four years after a talus neck fracture. He had painful ankle arthrosis (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score 19 and avascular necrosis, with collapse of the entire talar dome. Given the extent of the necrosis, it was decided to cement the talus prosthetic component. One year after the surgery, the patient shows good clinical and radiological results (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score 87 and is satisfied with the procedure. We are not aware of any similar reports in the literature.

  14. Acute ankle sprain in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers. Because of the relative frequency of this injury and its wide acceptance as a likely part of an active lifestyle, in many individuals it may not receive the careful attention it deserves. An extreme ankle range of motion and excellent ankle stability are fundamental to success in dance. Hence, following a proper treatment protocol is crucial for allowing a dancer who suffers an ankle sprain to return to dance as soon as possible without impaired function. This article reviews the basic principles of the etiology and management of ankle sprain in dancers. Key concepts are on-site examination and treatment, early restoration, dance-specific rehabilitation, and a carefully administered safe return to dance. Additionally, injuries that may occur in conjunction with ankle sprain are highlighted, and practical, clinically relevant summary concepts for dance healthcare professionals, dance scientists, dance teachers, and dancers are provided.

  15. [Ankle braces prevent ligament injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jon

    2002-09-05

    The Cochrane collaboration has performed a meta-analysis of all studies found on the prevention of ankle ligament injuries, frequent in sports like soccer, European handball and basketball. Interventions include the use of modified footwear and associated supports, training programmes and health education. Five randomized trials totalling 3,954 participants were included. With the exception of ankle disc training, all prophylactic interventions entailed the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis, air-cast or high top shoes. The studies showed a significant reduction in the number of ankle sprains in individuals allocated to external ankle support. This reduction was greater for those with a previous history of ankle sprains.

  16. [The total shoulder prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazas, F; Gagey, O

    1990-04-11

    Prosthetic shoulder replacement is impeded by two main obstacles: the articular cavity is very shallow, and the small glenoid surface rests on a narrow neck to which prosthetic pieces are difficult to attach. The principal, currently used prostheses are non-retentive models which reproduce the anatomy of the joint. They differ from each other mainly in the glenoid piece pattern which may be sealed only to the glenoid cavity or also fixed onto the acromion. On the whole, the clinical results reported are encouraging, particularly as regards the absence of pain, but the radiological course of the glenoidal sealing is a source of concern. Obvious unsealing is rare, but cracks between bone and cement are very frequent and some of them become wider as time goes by. In addition, there is still no satisfactory solution to the problem of big rotator cuff tears. This type of prosthesis must be envisaged with caution and should be reserved to very painful shoulders, but it would be wise not to wait until the rotator cuff is destroyed. The best indications are glenohumeral osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and necrosis of the tumoral head.

  17. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle surgeons are the surgical ... every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? After completing undergraduate education, the foot ...

  18. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Soccer Season Prime time for foot and ankle injuries. Parents and coaches should think twice before coaxing ... Ankle Tennis involves much foot work. Foot and ankle injuries can occur from the continuous side-to-side ...

  19. The efficacy of the Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot prototype 4.0 during walking: Physiological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, Kevin; Cherelle, Pierre; Roelands, Bart; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2018-04-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness of a novel prosthetic device during walking is an important step in product development. To investigate the efficacy of a novel quasi-passive ankle prosthetic device, Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot 4.0, during walking at different speeds, using physiological determinants in transtibial and transfemoral amputees. Nonrandomized crossover design for amputees. Six able-bodied subjects, six unilateral transtibial amputees, and six unilateral transfemoral amputees underwent a 6-min walk test at normal speed, followed by series of 2-min walking at slow, normal, and fast speeds. The intensity of effort and subjective measures were determined. Amputees performed all walking tests on a treadmill with current and novel prostheses. Shapiro-Wilk normality tests and parametric and nonparametric tests were conducted (p < 0.05). Compared to able-bodied individuals, the rating of perceived exertion levels were significantly elevated in transtibial and transfemoral amputees for both prostheses (p ≤ 0.016). Compared to able-bodied individuals transfemoral amputees also showed significantly elevated heart rate for both prostheses at normal speed (p ≤ 0.043). Within-group comparisons demonstrated that walking with Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot significantly increased the heart rate in transfemoral amputees and transtibial compared to current prosthesis (p = 0.002). Furthermore, transfemoral amputees reached a significantly higher rating of perceived exertion levels. Intensity of effort during walking with Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot is higher compared to current prostheses. Clinical relevance Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot 4.0 is a novel quasi-passive ankle prosthesis with state-of-the-art technological parts. Subjective measures show the importance of this technology, but the intensity of effort during walking still remains higher compared to current passive prostheses, especially in transfemoral amputees.

  20. Functional Instability of the Ankle Joint: Etiopathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan ÖRSÇELİK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ankle sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. Chronic ankle instability is a common complication of ankle sprains. Two causes of chronic ankle instability are mechanical instability and functional instability. It is important to understand functional instability etiopathogenesis of the ankle joint in order to guide diagnosis and treatment. This article aims to understand the etiopathogenesis of functional ankle instability.

  1. [Endourethral prosthesis. Current indications, materials and types of prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterlini, Juan Esteban

    2014-01-01

    To update the topic of endourethral prosthesis for the treatment of recurrent urethral stenosis comprehensively, focusing on current indications, materials and types of prosthesis in use nowadays. We used the PubMed database (1995-2013) with the terms "endourethral ", "prostheses","endourethral prosthesis "and selected the most relevant articles for this publication. Results were variable depending on the series published, with great differences among them. They are not homogeneous groups, so they are not comparable to each other. Endourethral prostheses have an important role today in the treatment of recurrent urethral stenosis. More studies are required, with longer follow up to be able to establish which one is the one with the lowest complication rates and best results in terms of urethral caliber and symptom questionnaire.

  2. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the external...

  3. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis. (a) Identification. The tracheal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device made of a silicone...

  4. 21 CFR 876.3750 - Testicular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testicular prosthesis. 876.3750 Section 876.3750...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3750 Testicular prosthesis. (a) Identification. A testicular prosthesis is an implanted device that consists of a solid or gel-filled silicone...

  5. 21 CFR 878.3550 - Chin prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chin prosthesis. 878.3550 Section 878.3550 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3550 Chin prosthesis. (a) Identification. A chin prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to augment or...

  6. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device made...

  7. 21 CFR 878.3680 - Nose prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nose prosthesis. 878.3680 Section 878.3680 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3680 Nose prosthesis. (a) Identification. A nose prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to augment or...

  8. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15?h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ank...

  9. Ultrasonography of ankle ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peetrons, P.A.; Silvestre, A.; Cohen, M.; Creteur, V.

    2002-01-01

    The lateral collateral ligament of the ankle is a complex of 3 ligaments: The anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments and the calcaneofibular ligament; these ligaments work together to support the lateral aspect of the ankle. The anterior talofibular (ATF) ligament (Fig. 1) runs from the anterior of the talus. The probe is placed in a slightly oblique position from the malleolus toward the forefoot. The ligament is hyperechoic when its fibres are perpendicular to the ultrasound beam (anisotropy artifact is present in ligaments as well as in tendons). It is approximately 2 mm thick and, during examination, must be straight and tight from one insertion point to the other, as seen in Fig. 2. The posterior talofibular (PTF) ligament, which runs from the posterior part of the malleolus to the posterior part of the talus, is difficult to see on US, being partially or sometimes completely hidden by the malleolus. The calcaneofibular ligament forms the middle portion of the lateral collateral ligament. It is tight between the inferior part of the lateral malleolus and the calcaneus, and runs in a slightly posterior oblique direction toward the heel (Fig. 3). The ligament lies on the deep surface of the fibular tendons, forming a hammock to fall deep on the calcaneus surface (Fig. 4). The calcaneofibular ligament is approximately 2-3 nun thick and is hyperechoic in the distal two-thirds only because of the obliquity of the proximal part. When examining this ligament, it is mandatory that the ankle be flexed dorsally; this stretches the ligament so that it can be seen clearly. (author)

  10. Ankle Fractures: The Operative Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hafiz Z

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ankle fractures are commonly seen in orthopaedic practice. This retrospective study of patients with ankle fractures who underwent surgical treatment in our institution from January 2000 to December 2003 was undertaken to analyze the common causes and patterns of ankle fractures; and the functional outcome of operative treatment for these fractures. Eighty patients were identified and reviewed. There were 65 male (81.3% and 15 female patients (18.7% with age ranging from 13 to 71 years old (mean, 32.3y. Common causes of ankle fractures were trauma (especially motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries and the osteoporotic bones in the elderly. Weber C (64.0% was the most common pattern of fracture at presentation. The most common operative treatment for ankle fractures was open reduction and internal fixation (73 patients, 91.2%. Excellent and good outcomes were achieved in 93.8% of cases when measured using the Olerud and Molander scoring system for foot and ankle. In conclusion, operative treatment for ankle fractures restores sufficient stability and allowed mobility of the ankle joint.

  11. Step-to-Step Ankle Inversion/Eversion Torque Modulation Can Reduce Effort Associated with Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myunghee Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Below-knee amputation is associated with higher energy expenditure during walking, partially due to difficulty maintaining balance. We previously found that once-per-step push-off work control can reduce balance-related effort, both in simulation and in experiments with human participants. Simulations also suggested that changing ankle inversion/eversion torque on each step, in response to changes in body state, could assist with balance. In this study, we investigated the effects of ankle inversion/eversion torque modulation on balance-related effort among amputees (N = 5 using a multi-actuated ankle-foot prosthesis emulator. In stabilizing conditions, changes in ankle inversion/eversion torque were applied so as to counteract deviations in side-to-side center-of-mass acceleration at the moment of intact-limb toe off; higher acceleration toward the prosthetic limb resulted in a corrective ankle inversion torque during the ensuing stance phase. Destabilizing controllers had the opposite effect, and a zero gain controller made no changes to the nominal inversion/eversion torque. To separate the balance-related effects of step-to-step control from the potential effects of changes in average mechanics, average ankle inversion/eversion torque and prosthesis work were held constant across conditions. High-gain stabilizing control lowered metabolic cost by 13% compared to the zero gain controller (p = 0.05. We then investigated individual responses to subject-specific stabilizing controllers following an enforced exploration period. Four of five participants experienced reduced metabolic rate compared to the zero gain controller (−15, −14, −11, −6, and +4% an average reduction of 9% (p = 0.05. Average prosthesis mechanics were unchanged across all conditions, suggesting that improvements in energy economy might have come from changes in step-to-step corrections related to balance. Step-to-step modulation of inversion/eversion torque could be

  12. Analysis of muscle activity and ankle joint movement during the side-hop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Keigo; Katayose, Masaki

    2011-08-01

    Functional performance tests (FPTs) that consist of movements, such as hopping, landing, and cutting, provide useful measurements. Although some tests have been established for kinematic studies of the knee joint, very few tests have been established for the ankle joint. To use the FPT as a test battery for patients with an ankle sprain, it is necessary to document typical patterns of muscle activation and range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint during FPTs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of the ROM of the ankle inversion/eversion and the muscle activity of the peroneus longus muscle (PL) and the tibial anterior muscle (TA) in normal subjects during the side-hop test. To emphasize the characteristics of ROM and electromyography (EMG) at each phase, the side-hop tests were divided into 4 phases: lateral-hop contact phase (LC), lateral-hop flight phase (LF), medial hop contact phase (MC), and medial hop flight phase (MF), and the ROM of ankle inversion/eversion, a peak angle of ankle inversion, and Integral EMG (IEMG) of PL and TA compared among 4 phases. Fifteen male subjects with no symptoms of ankle joint problems participated in this research. The ROM of ankle inversion/eversion during the side-hop test was 27 ± 3.8° (mean ± SD), and there was a significant difference in the ROM of ankle inversion/eversion among 4 phases (p sprain.

  13. MRI of ankle sprain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Gen [Dokkyo Univ., Mibu, Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    We reviewed MR (magnetic resonance) studies in 54 patients with a sprained ankle. MR examination was able to depict the following injuries: lateral collateral ligamentous injuries, fluid collection in the peroneal tendon sheath, injury to the peroneal tendon, deltoid ligamentous injuries, the extent of subcutaneous soft tissue swelling, and various kinds of osseous injuries. A total of 21 patients underwent repair or reconstructive surgery to the lateral collateral ligaments, the findings of which were correlated with those on MR examination. MR diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 16/21; the discrepancy could be attributed to remodeling and/or reorganization which progressed during the time lapse between the MR examination and surgery in three, while the misdiagnosis resulted from the difficulty in distinguishing the acute tear from the injured scar in two. The calcaneofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 10/12; two false negatives were responsible for the difficulty in delineating its entire length on a single image and/or in differentiating between the attenuated star and the normal calcaneofibular ligament. MR imaging is a useful tool to use in deciding the surgical indication and predicting the prognosis of the patients with ankle sprain. (author)

  14. MRI of ankle sprain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Gen

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MR (magnetic resonance) studies in 54 patients with a sprained ankle. MR examination was able to depict the following injuries: lateral collateral ligamentous injuries, fluid collection in the peroneal tendon sheath, injury to the peroneal tendon, deltoid ligamentous injuries, the extent of subcutaneous soft tissue swelling, and various kinds of osseous injuries. A total of 21 patients underwent repair or reconstructive surgery to the lateral collateral ligaments, the findings of which were correlated with those on MR examination. MR diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 16/21; the discrepancy could be attributed to remodeling and/or reorganization which progressed during the time lapse between the MR examination and surgery in three, while the misdiagnosis resulted from the difficulty in distinguishing the acute tear from the injured scar in two. The calcaneofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 10/12; two false negatives were responsible for the difficulty in delineating its entire length on a single image and/or in differentiating between the attenuated star and the normal calcaneofibular ligament. MR imaging is a useful tool to use in deciding the surgical indication and predicting the prognosis of the patients with ankle sprain. (author)

  15. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  16. Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-09

    Jun 9, 2013 ... conditions (ultraviolet light, air pollution, temperature), fragile margins, microbial growth on the open pores of the elastomers leading to rapid degradation of color dexterity. The cheek silicone prosthesis although constructed to the patient's esthetic requirement retaining the same on the face is complicated.

  17. Knee joint replacement prosthesis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging.

  18. [Unilateral forearm agenesis and prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choumon, B; Ritz, A; Corbet, E; Gréco, J; Bérard, C

    2002-04-01

    Antebrachial agenesis is a congenital deformity which is not invalidating for the children who have a level of independence comparable to that of other children of the same age. Although the appropriateness of a prosthesis is rarely questioned by healthcarers, it is clear that it is the healthcarers' own representation of this condition (their knowledge of the deformity and of the prosthesis proposed) that leads to the indication. The purpose of this study was to better understand the respective representations of unilateral antebrachial agenesis to help determine appropriate health care proposals. An intensive survey using semi-directive interviews was conducted in 16 families. Group interviews with three healthcare teams were then conducted. Three leading topics appeared: worry about the social integration of the child, a paradoxical representation of the child perceived as independent but handicapped, and a largely negative image of the prosthesis. There was a rather important difference in the representations formulated by the parents and by the healthcarers. The discussion focused on awareness of the narcissistic content of the expectations and the plastic and functional implications of prosthesis fitting, perceived differently by parents and healthcarers. The nature of the expected result involves a change in the representation of the child more than a change in the child's body, a concept which in itself is not a true objective of healthcare. Taken the understandably difficult position of healthcarers, it might be useful to propose a different scheme for the first consultation.

  19. Optimal control for an above-knee prosthesis with two degrees of freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, D; Oğuztöreli, M N; Stein, R B

    1995-01-01

    Our previous research and clinical tests of a self-contained powered above-knee prosthesis (AKP) showed that a knee joint with one degree of freedom (DOF) increases the energy cost of walking with respect to able-bodied subjects. Better symmetry of the gait can improve performance, so we suggest here the integration of a second powered DOF into the knee joint mechanism to control the internal-external rotation of the shank-foot complex. The control for the AKP with two DOFs is based on a method of optimal tracking. The data used for analysis were collected in able-bodied subjects braced with an ankle splint to experimentally duplicate a gait like that of amputees using a two-DOF prosthesis. The simulation showed the following: (1) the technique of optimal programming can be used for simulation of the artificial leg during locomotion; (2) the optimal tracking method is an efficient tool for selection of actuators for the above-knee prosthesis, ensuring that the tracking remains within limits. Limitation of joint torque is desirable in order to reduce the size of the motor, but beyond a certain point limiting maximal torques lead to tracking errors that are associated with higher energy costs and hence the need for a larger power source. The errors are also associated with higher forces at the interface between the socket and the prosthesis. The optimal tracking method allows the optimization of tracking with constraints on the size of the motor used and its energy cost.

  20. Intraocular retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, M S

    2001-01-01

    ). In all groups, short duration pulses (40, 80, and 120 microseconds) were more efficient in terms of total charge (the product of pulse amplitude and pulse duration) than longer (500 and 1,000 microseconds) pulses (P < .05). In all groups, applying a pulse train did not lead to more efficient charge usage (P < .05). Psychophysical experiments: In high-contrast tests, facial recognition rates of over 75% were achieved for all subjects with dot sizes of up to 31.5 minutes of arc when using a 25 x 25 grid with 4.5 arc minute gaps, a 30% dropout rate, and 6 gray levels. Even with a 4 x 4 array of pixels, some subjects were able to accurately describe 2 of the objects. Subjects who were able to read the 4-pixel letter height sentences (on the 6 x 10 and 16 x 16 array) seemed to have a good scanning technique. Scanning at the proper velocity tends to bring out more contrast in the lettering. The reading speed for the 72-point font is a bit slower than for the next smaller font. This may be due to the limited number of letters (3) visible in the window with this large font. Specific parameters needed to stimulate the retina were identified. Delineating the optimum parameters will decrease the current requirements. Psychophysical tests show that with limited pixels and image processing, useful vision is possible. Both these findings should greatly simplify the engineering of an electronic retinal prosthesis.

  1. Ankle sprains and instability in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Padhraig F; Hodgkins, Christopher W; Kennedy, John G

    2008-04-01

    Ankle inversion injuries are the most common traumatic injuries in dancers. Ankle stability is integral to normal mobilization and to minimizing the risk for ankle sprain. The ability of the dynamic and static stabilizers of the ankle joint to maintain their structural integrity is a major component of the normal gait cycle. In the world of dance, this quality assumes even greater importance given the range of movement and stresses imposed on the ankle during various dance routines.

  2. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  3. The effects of total ankle replacement on ankle joint mechanics during walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Wang

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Three months after surgeries, the STAA patients experienced improvements in ankle function and gait parameters. The STAA ankle demonstrated improved ankle mechanics during daily activities such as walking.

  4. Prosthetic ankle push-off work reduces metabolic rate but not collision work in non-amputee walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Joshua M.; Collins, Steven H.

    2014-12-01

    Individuals with unilateral below-knee amputation expend more energy than non-amputees during walking and exhibit reduced push-off work and increased hip work in the affected limb. Simple dynamic models of walking suggest a possible solution, predicting that increasing prosthetic ankle push-off should decrease leading limb collision, thereby reducing overall energy requirements. We conducted a rigorous experimental test of this idea wherein ankle-foot prosthesis push-off work was incrementally varied in isolation from one-half to two-times normal levels while subjects with simulated amputation walked on a treadmill at 1.25 m.s-1. Increased prosthesis push-off significantly reduced metabolic energy expenditure, with a 14% reduction at maximum prosthesis work. In contrast to model predictions, however, collision losses were unchanged, while hip work during swing initiation was decreased. This suggests that powered ankle push-off reduces walking effort primarily through other mechanisms, such as assisting leg swing, which would be better understood using more complete neuromuscular models.

  5. Arthrography of the ankle sprains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Moon Hee

    1985-01-01

    Ankle arthrography, by direct puncture of joint cavity, is considered to be a simple and accurate diagnostic method for a precise evaluation of ligamentous injury. Forty-seven cases of ankle arthrography were successively performed in the patients of acute ankle sprains. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how ankle arthrography can delineate the pathologic anatomy in such cases. The results are as follows: 1. Thirty cases among forty seven revealed the findings of ligament tears. 2. For better diagnostic accuracy, the arthrography should be performed within 72 hrs. after injury. 3. The anterior talofibular ligament tears were the most common (twenty-nine cases) of all and seventeen of them revealed tears without association of any other ligament tears. 4. There were ten cases of calcaneofibular ligament tears and nine of them were associated with anterior talofibular ligament tears. 5. Three cases of anterior tibiofibular and one deltoid ligament tears were demonstrated

  6. Treatment of Unstable Ankle Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Yaniel Truffín Rodríguez; Gerardo Águila Tejeda

    2015-01-01

    Patients with unstable ankle fractures frequently attend the emergency rooms. It is estimated that there are 122 ankle fractures per 100 000 people a year. Surgical treatment of those that are unstable is inevitable since they can not be corrected in a conservative way. Several surgical procedures for repair of such lesions have been described and all of them constitute important tools for the orthopedic surgeon. Therefore, we conducted a literature review to discuss the current management of...

  7. A new alignment jig for quantification and prescription of three-dimensional alignment for the patellar-tendon-bearing trans-tibial prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, S W; Chow, D H; Cheng, J C

    1999-12-01

    Clinically, it is hard to achieve and reproduce prosthesis alignment at will during daily prosthesis fitting. A new alignment jig was designed and developed to facilitate quantification and prescription of prosthesis alignment for patellar-tendon-bearing (PTB) trans-tibial prostheses. The alignment jig provided instantaneous readings of the three-dimensional orientation and position of the socket relative to the prosthetic foot in standardised units. The inter- and intra-tester errors of the alignment jig in measuring prosthesis alignment were evaluated and demonstrated to have good reliability. The alignment jig was recommended to be used clinically after the conventional dynamic alignment procedure to document the prosthesis alignment. Further application of the alignment jig for systematic evaluation of the effects of prosthesis alignment on gait for trans-tibial amputees is suggested.

  8. Ultrasound Findings of the Painful Ankle and Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheil Artul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To document the prevalence and spectrum of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS findings at different parts of the foot. Materials and Methods: All MSKUS studies conducted on the foot during a 2-year period (2012-2013 at the Department of Radiology were reviewed. Demographic parameters including age, gender, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Three hundred and sixty-four studies had been conducted in the 2-year period. Ninety-three MSKUS evaluations were done for the ankle, 30 studies for the heel, and 241 for the rest of the foot. The most common MSKUS finding at the ankle was tenosynovitis, mostly in female patients; at the heel it was Achilles tendonitis, also mostly in female patients; and for the rest of the foot it was fluid collection and presence of foreign body, mainly in male patients. The number of different MSKUS abnormalities that were reported was 9 at the ankle, 9 at the heel, and 21 on the rest of the foot. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing a huge spectrum of abnormalities. The most common finding was collection/hematoma and foreign bodies at the foot, tenosynovitis at the ankle, and Achilles tendinitis at the heel.

  9. Elektra prosthesis for trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klahn, A; Nygaard, Mads; Gvozdenovic, R

    2012-01-01

    We present a prospective follow-up of 39 Elektra prostheses in 37 patients (32 women and five men), with a mean age of 56.5 (range 46-71) years; 34 patients had osteoarthritis and three had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were followed using clinical examination, including measurement of pain on a...... be the key problem in treating trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis using a total prosthesis....

  10. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Contact dermatitis from a prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Carla A; Gaspari, Anthony; Goldner, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Patients wearing a prosthesis face a wide variety of medical problems. Skin complications have long been recognized, but their prevalence is still unknown. The most frequently reported disorders are allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), acroangiodermatitis, epidermoid cysts, epidermal hyperplasia, follicular hyperkeratosis, verrucous hyperplasia, bullous diseases, hyperhidrosis, infections, malignancies, and ulcerations. Contact dermatitis represents one-third of the dermatoses in amputees wearing prostheses. All patients who are suspected of having ACD should be patch tested with standard allergen series as well as materials from the patient's own prosthesis, topical medicaments, moisturizers, and cosmetics. We report a patient with an ACD to mixed dialkyl thiourea present in the rubber parts of his below-the-knee prosthesis. Thiourea derivates are used as accelerators in the manufacture of chloroprene rubber and as fixatives in photography and photocopy paper. Allergy to thiourea is relatively uncommon; different studies have shown a prevalence of 0.7% up to 2.4% in patch-tested patients. Thiourea derivates are often the allergic sources in ACD involving high-grade rubber products made of neoprene such as diving suits, protective goggles, knee braces, and continuous positive airway pressure masks. They are also present in the rubber material of prostheses, as in the case of our patient.

  12. Dosimetry of a silicone breast prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Powell, W.R.; Bostwick, J.

    1980-01-01

    Dose measurements were conducted in a phantom which simulates breast tissue and in another phantom which simulates a breast containing a silicone prosthesis. No detectable difference was found when the irradiations were carried out with tangential beams of 60 Co radiation. The degree of backscatter and absorption of radiation by the prosthesis and phantom were also similar. A slight decrease in dose of approximately 8% was found at the interface between the prosthesis and muscle-equivalent material

  13. Cementless isoelastic RM total hip prosthesis1

    OpenAIRE

    Bombelli, Renato; Mathys, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Some surgeons are beginning to doubt the reliability of bone cement in joint replacements. In 1967 Robert Mathys conceived the idea of an isoelastic prosthesis made of plastic, which would anchor into the bone without cement. He developed the idea by extensive tests in animals and, in 1973, the first human RM cementless hip prosthesis was inserted by E Morscher. In this paper the concept of the cementless isoelastic prosthesis is developed by Robery Mathys, and Professor Bombelli records his ...

  14. The origin of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codino, Antonio; Plouin, Francois

    2007-01-01

    The differential intensity of cosmic radiation shows a sequence of depressions referred to as knees in a large energy band above 10 15 eV. The global depression entailed in the complete spectrum with respect to the extrapolated intensity based on low energy data, amounts to a maximum factor of 8, occurring at 5x10 18 eV, where flux measurements exhibit a relative minimum, referred to as the ankle. It is demonstrated by a full simulation of cosmic ray trajectories in the Galaxy that the intensity minimum around the ankle energy is primarily due to the nuclear interactions of the cosmic ions with the interstellar matter and to the galactic magnetic field. Ankles signal the onset energies of the rectilinear propagation in the Milky Way at Earth, being for example, 4x10 18 eV for helium and 6x10 19 eV for iron. The ankle, in spite of its notable importance at Earth, is a local perturbation of the universal spectrum which, between the knee and the ankle, decreases by a round factor 10 9 regaining its unperturbed status above 10 19 eV

  15. Radiography in acute ankle injuries: The Ottawa ankle rules versus local diagnostic decision rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, A. C. M.; Glas, Afina S.; de Roos, Marnix A. J.; Bogaard, Kjell; Lijmer, Jeroen G.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Butzelaar, Rudolf M. J. M.; Keeman, Johannes N.

    2002-01-01

    Study objective: We validate the Ottawa Ankle Rules and 2 Dutch ankle rules in distinguishing clinically significant fractures from insignificant fractures and other injuries in patients with a painful ankle presenting to the emergency department. Methods: This prospective comparison of 3 ankle

  16. Influence of ankle joint plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on lateral ankle sprain: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Kim, Kyungsoo; Batbaatar, Myagmarbayar; Lee, SuKyoung; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of injury involved in lateral ankle sprain is essential to prevent injury, to establish surgical repair and reconstruction, and to plan reliable rehabilitation protocols. Most studies for lateral ankle sprain posit that ankle inversion, internal rotation, and plantarflexion are involved in the mechanism of injury. However, recent studies indicated that ankle dorsiflexion also plays an important role in the lateral ankle sprain mechanism. In this study, the contributions of ankle plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on the ankle joint were evaluated under complex combinations of internal and inversion moments. A multibody ankle joint model including 24 ligaments was developed and validated against two experimental cadaveric studies. The effects of ankle plantarflexion (up to 60°) and dorsiflexion (up to 30°) on the lateral ankle sprain mechanism under ankle inversion moment coupled with internal rotational moment were investigated using the validated model. Lateral ankle sprain injuries can occur during ankle dorsiflexion, in which the calcaneofibular ligament and anterior talofibular ligament tears may occur associated with excessive inversion and internal rotational moment, respectively. Various combinations of inversion and internal moment may lead to anterior talofibular ligament injuries at early ankle plantarflexion, while the inversion moment acts as a primary factor to tear the anterior talofibular ligament in early plantarflexion. It is better to consider inversion and internal rotation as primary factors of the lateral ankle sprain mechanism, while plantarflexion or dorsiflexion can be secondary factor. This information will help to clarify the lateral ankle sprain mechanism of injury.

  17. Abiotrophia defectiva knee prosthesis infection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Pierre-Yves

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abiotrophia species have rarely been implicated in osteoarticular infections. We report one case of an A. defectiva knee prosthesis infection. Case presentation A 71-year-old man of Italian origin presented with pain and swelling of the knee four years after the implantation of a total knee replacement prosthesis. While standard culturing of the synovial fluid resulted in no isolation of microorganisms, the direct inoculation of the synovial fluid into a rich culture medium resulted in the identification of A. defectiva by polymerase chain reaction sequencing. Repeated attempts of culturing microorganisms from blood were negative, and echocardiograms and colonoscopies were unremarkable. High-dose amoxicillin for nine months and a two-stage replacement of the knee prosthesis led to full patient recovery by the time of the 12-month follow-up examination. Conclusions Because Abiotrophia spp. are fastidious microorganisms, it is likely that cases of Abiotrophia orthopedic infection are misdiagnosed as culture-negative infections. Direct inoculation of synovial fluids into rich broth medium and further polymerase chain reaction-based detection of culture-negative synovial fluids are key tests for accurate documentation and detection of these infections.

  18. Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Ankle Injuries and Disorders URL of this page: https://medlineplus. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing ...

  19. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IFFAS / AOFAS eBook ​The AOFAS and MD Conference Express invite you to enjoy complimentary access to the ... Foundation Exhibit Privacy Statement Legal Disclosure Site Map American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society ® Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Foundation ...

  20. 10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties: a report on 780 cases from the Swedish Ankle Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Carlsson, Ake

    2011-12-01

    There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis. Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint-excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus. Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79-0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67-0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons. The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements-even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results.

  1. Computed tomography in complex fractures of the ankle joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedburg, H.; Wimmer, B.; Hendrich, V.; Riede, U.N.

    1983-09-01

    Diagnostic value of conventional roentgen technique and computed tomography is proofed by examination of 50 patients with sprain fractures of the ankle joint. The dimension of destruction of the distal tibial joint surface is better documented by CT than by other radiological techniques. Additional informations like multiframentation of the distal tibia or evaluation of reposition impediment are found more frequently by CT. Therefore indication and planning of the traumatherapy can be assessed better by the traumatologist.

  2. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint

    OpenAIRE

    L?tscher, P.; Lang, T. H.; Zwicky, L.; Hintermann, B.; Knupp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ank...

  3. Prosthesis infections after orthopedic joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Borgwardt, Lotte; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore...

  4. BIORESORBABLE POLYMERIC MENISCAL PROSTHESIS: STUDY IN RABBITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Tulio Pereira; de Rezende Duek, Eliana Aparecida; Amatuzzi, Marco Martins; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To induce growth of a neomeniscus into the pores of a prosthesis in order to protect the knee joint cartilage. Methods: 70 knees of 35 New Zealand rabbits were operated. The rabbits were five to seven months old, weighed 2 to 3.8 kilograms, and 22 were male and 13 were female. Each animal underwent medial meniscectomy in both knees during a single operation. A bioabsorbable polymeric meniscal prosthesis composed of 70% polydioxanone and 30% L-lactic acid polymer was implanted in one side. The animals were sacrificed after different postoperative time intervals. The femoral condyles and neomeniscus were subjected to histological analysis. Histograms were used to measure the degradation and absorption of the prosthesis, the growth of meniscal tissue in the prosthesis and the degree of degradation of the femoral condyle joint cartilage. Results: The data obtained showed that tissue growth histologically resembling a normal meniscus occurred, with gradual absorption of the prosthesis, and the percentages of chondrocytes on the control side and prosthesis side. Conclusion: Tissue growth into the prosthesis pores that histologically resembled the normal rabbit meniscus was observed. The joint cartilage of the femoral condyles on the prosthesis side presented greater numbers of chondrocytes in all its layers. PMID:27022549

  5. Penile Prosthesis Implantation in Priapism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Ömer Barış; Pazır, Yaşar; Kadıoğlu, Ateş

    2018-04-01

    Priapism is defined as a full or partial erection lasting longer than 4 hours after sexual stimulation and orgasm or unrelated to sexual stimulation. The main goal of priapism management is to resolve the episode immediately to preserve erectile function and penile length. Corporal smooth muscle necrosis is likely to have already occurred, and medically refractory erectile dysfunction is expected in patients with a protracted episode. Penile prosthesis implantation (PPI) in the early or late phase of priapism can restore erectile function. To review the literature on PPI in priapism. A PubMed search of all English-language articles published before 2017 was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement using the following search terms: penile prosthesis implantation, priapism, and corporal fibrosis. All publications reporting on PPI during or after priapism episodes were included for review. Three types of priapism were reviewed for management using PPI. Surgical techniques, outcomes, and patient satisfaction were reported. Early implantation (during the episode) is technically easier and has lower complication rates compared with delayed (electively, after the erectile dysfunction is observed) surgery. Immediate PPI also allows preservation of penile length, which is related to higher satisfaction rates. The paradigm is shifting toward immediate PPI in the management of ischemic priapism. Patients with non-ischemic priapism or recurrent priapism, even without a major ischemic episode, are at high risk for erectile dysfunction and are candidates for PPI. Yücel ÖB, Pazır Y, Kadıoğlu A. Penile Prosthesis Implantation in Priapism. Sex Med Rev 2018;6:310-318. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Smartphone supported upper limb prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hepp D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available State of the art upper limb prostheses offer up to six active DoFs (degrees of freedom and are controlled using different grip patterns. This low number of DoFs combined with a machine-human-interface which does not provide control over all DoFs separately result in a lack of usability for the patient. The aim of this novel upper limb prosthesis is both offering simplified control possibilities for changing grip patterns depending on the patients’ priorities and the improvement of grasp capability. Design development followed the design process requirements given by the European Medical Device Directive 93/42 ECC and was structured into the topics mechanics, software and drive technology. First user needs were identified by literature research and by patient feedback. Consequently, concepts were evaluated against technical and usability requirements. A first evaluation prototype with one active DoF per finger was manufactured. In a second step a test setup with two active DoF per finger was designed. The prototype is connected to an Android based smartphone application. Two main grip patterns can be preselected in the software application and afterwards changed and used by the EMG signal. Three different control algorithms can be selected: “all-day”, “fine” and “tired muscle”. Further parameters can be adjusted to customize the prosthesis to the patients’ needs. First patient feedback certified the prosthesis an improved level of handling compared to the existing devices. Using the two DoF test setup, the possibilities of finger control with a neural network are evaluated at the moment. In a first user feedback test, the smartphone based software application increased the device usability, e.g. the change within preselected grip patterns and the “tired muscle” algorithm. Although the overall software application was positively rated, the handling of the prosthesis itself needs to be proven within a patient study to be

  7. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  8. The conservative treatment of ankle osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, A.G.H.

    2015-01-01

    In 70% to 78% of patients with ankle osteoarthritis (OA), they present themselves with the sequelae of a traumatic event in the past. Ankle trauma occurs in many patients at a relatively young age. Consequently, the expected life span of many patients with ankle OA is relatively long. Many treatment

  9. Acute Ankle Sprains in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. van Rijn (Rogier)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOf all injuries of the musculoskeletal system, 25% are acute lateral ankle sprains.1 In the USA and the UK there are about 23,000 and 5000 ankle sprains, respectively, each day. In the Netherlands approximately 600,000 people sustain an ankle injury each year, of those 120,000 occur

  10. Atypical Chronic Ankle Instability in a Pediatric Population Secondary to Distal Fibula Avulsion Fracture Nonunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ashry, Saad R; El Gamal, Tarek A; Platt, Simon R

    Chronic ankle instability is a disabling condition, often occurring as a result of traumatic ankle injury. A paucity of published data is available documenting chronic ankle instability in the pediatric population. Much of the data has been confined to the adult population. We present 2 cases of chronic ankle instability, 1 in a 12-year-old and 1 in a 9-year-old patient. Unlike the typical adult etiology, the cause of instability was a dysfunctional lateral ligamentous complex as a consequence of bony avulsion of the tip of the fibula. Both patients had sustained a twisting injury to the ankle. The fractures failed to unite. The nonunion resulted in dysfunction of the anterior talofibular ligament with consequent chronic ankle instability. At the initial clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging was requested for both patients. In patient 1 (12 years old), the fracture was fixed with 2 headless screws and was immobilized in a plaster cast for 6 weeks. In patient 2 (9 years old), because of the small size of the avulsed fragment, fixation was not possible. A modified Gould-Broström procedure was undertaken, facilitating repair of the avulsed fragment using anchor sutures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Unicondylar knee prosthesis: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Roberto; De Fabrizio, Giovanni; Piovan, Gianluca; Stasi, Alessandro

    2014-07-28

    To compare unicompartmental knee arthroplasty with "all poly" tibial component and "metal back" from a clinical and functional point of view. We evaluated prospectively 50 patients who underwent unicompartmental knee replacement at the Orthopedic Clinic of the University of Trieste. Patients were split into two groups (A and B); in patients from group A has been implanted a Mitus prosthesis (Link) with "all poly" tibial component, in patients from Group B has been implanted an Allegretto prosthesis (Zimmer) with a "metal back" tibial component. The mean follow-up was 36 months. All patients were evaluated using the Knee Society Score. The mean preoperative Knee Society Score (objective and functional) was found to be respectively 48 and 49 or the group A and group B; post-operative score was found to be of 95 and 94 respectively for Group A and group B. The average post-operative ROM was 125 degrees (range, 85-140 degrees) for group A and 130° (range 90°-145°) for group B. No differences were found between implants with "all poly" tibial component (thickness to be used must be greater than 6 mm) and those with the "metal back". We believe that to achieve positive results over time is important the carefully selection of the patients and the accurate positioning of components.

  12. Energy cost of walking: comparison of "intelligent prosthesis" with conventional mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J G; Spence, W D; Solomonidis, S E

    1997-03-01

    To determine physiological energy cost with Blatchford's "Intelligent Prosthesis" (IP) compared to energy cost with a conventional pneumatic swing phase control (PSPC) mechanism. Before-After trial: subjects fitted with IP walked on programmable treadmill at speeds: 6 min slow, 6 min fast, 8 min while speed changed, between slow, normal, and fast, every minute, and 6 min normal. Breath-by-breath analysis of subject's expired air determined average Vo2 (L/min) within each period. Procedure repeated after 1-week interval using PSPC prosthesis. Testing sessions supervised by experienced prosthetist. Rehabilitation centre. Volunteer sample. Three men, unilateral transfemoral traumatic amputee patients, ages 39 to 59 years. Normally used ischial containment socket, Blatchford Endolite Stabilised Stance Flex knee with PSPC and Multiflex foot and ankle. Fitting, programming, and alignment of IP (own socket) by Bioengineering Unit's resident prosthetist, IP's microprocessor programmed to facilitate five walking speeds. Physiological energy cost (Vo2), of using IP compared to using PSPC mechanism. Two subjects displayed reduced Vo2 of between 5.6% and 9.0% using IP compared to PSPC prosthesis at a pace either faster or slower than their normal pace. Third subject showed no significant change in oxygen consumption despite IP unit being heavier. All subjects displayed reduced Vo2 (averaging 4.1%) using IP for period of variable speed walking. Although differences were small, they tend to indicate that use of the heavier IP unit lowered the energy cost of walking at speeds other than the amputee's normal pace.

  13. Non-weight-bearing neural control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Levi J; Simon, Ann M; Lipschutz, Robert; Finucane, Suzanne B; Kuiken, Todd A

    2013-06-19

    Lower limb prostheses have traditionally been mechanically passive devices without electronic control systems. Microprocessor-controlled passive and powered devices have recently received much interest from the clinical and research communities. The control systems for these devices typically use finite-state controllers to interpret data measured from mechanical sensors embedded within the prosthesis. In this paper we investigated a control system that relied on information extracted from myoelectric signals to control a lower limb prosthesis while amputee patients were seated. Sagittal plane motions of the knee and ankle can be accurately (>90%) recognized and controlled in both a virtual environment and on an actuated transfemoral prosthesis using only myoelectric signals measured from nine residual thigh muscles. Patients also demonstrated accurate (~90%) control of both the femoral and tibial rotation degrees of freedom within the virtual environment. A channel subset investigation was completed and the results showed that only five residual thigh muscles are required to achieve accurate control. This research is the first step in our long-term goal of implementing myoelectric control of lower limb prostheses during both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities for individuals with transfemoral amputation.

  14. Expecting ankle tilts and wearing an ankle brace influence joint control in an imitated ankle sprain mechanism during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Dominic; Wissler, Sabrina; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the functional aspects of ankle joint control is essential to developing effective injury prevention. It is of special interest to understand how neuromuscular control mechanisms and mechanical constraints stabilize the ankle joint. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine how expecting ankle tilts and the application of an ankle brace influence ankle joint control when imitating the ankle sprain mechanism during walking. Ankle kinematics and muscle activity were assessed in 17 healthy men. During gait rapid perturbations were applied using a trapdoor (tilting with 24° inversion and 15° plantarflexion). The subjects either knew that a perturbation would definitely occur (expected tilts) or there was only the possibility that a perturbation would occur (potential tilts). Both conditions were conducted with and without a semi-rigid ankle brace. Expecting perturbations led to an increased ankle eversion at foot contact, which was mediated by an altered muscle preactivation pattern. Moreover, the maximal inversion angle (-7%) and velocity (-4%), as well as the reactive muscle response were significantly reduced when the perturbation was expected. While wearing an ankle brace did not influence muscle preactivation nor the ankle kinematics before ground contact, it significantly reduced the maximal ankle inversion angle (-14%) and velocity (-11%) as well as reactive neuromuscular responses. The present findings reveal that expecting ankle inversion modifies neuromuscular joint control prior to landing. Although such motor control strategies are weaker in their magnitude compared with braces, they seem to assist ankle joint stabilization in a close-to-injury situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 21 CFR 878.3530 - Silicone inflatable breast prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicone inflatable breast prosthesis. 878.3530... inflatable breast prosthesis. (a) Identification. A silicone inflatable breast prosthesis is a silicone... inflatable breast prosthesis that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or that has, on or...

  16. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... an external prosthesis adhesive to fasten it to the body, the device is exempt from the current good... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration prosthesis...

  17. Arthrography of the ankle joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi Porro, R.; Zellner, A.; Puricelli, G.; Quaglia, R.; Chelazzi, G.

    1984-02-01

    Arthrography of the ankle joint was first carried out by Johnson and Palmer at the Military Hospital in Stockholm in 1940. Arthrography can be used for judging the integrity of the articular cartilage, of osteochondritis dissecans, arthritis or adhesive capsulitis. The literature shows, however, that more than 95% of the patients on whom this examination has been performed has suffered from acute trauma.

  18. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains fall into two main categories: acute ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability, which are among the most common recurrent injuries during occupational activities, athletic events, training and army service. Acute ankle sprain is usually managed conservatively and functional rehabilitation failure by conservative treatment leads to development of chronic ankle instability, which most often requires surgical intervention. Enhancing the in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics and pathology helps greatly in deciding the management options. Cite this article: Al-Mohrej OA, Al-Kenani NS. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach? EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:34-44. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000010. PMID:28461926

  19. A novel tool for measuring ankle dorsiflexion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; B Nielsen, Henrik; Lund, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of ankle joint movement in a weight bearing position has important clinical implications. The Lunge Ankle Dorsiflexion measurement device (LAD) has been developed with the aim of facilitating ease of and standardisation of the measurement of ankle joint movement....... The literature lacks studies evaluating the reliability of weight bearing measurements of the ankle joint in study groups with ankle disabilities. The objective of this study was to examine the intra- and inter-tester reliability of ankle dorsiflexion measured with the novel LAD in patients following a fracture...... of the ankle. METHOD: This study was a randomized intra- and inter-tester reliability study with blinding of testers and participants. All participants were tested twice by each tester, with the order of testers randomized. The intra- and inter-tester reliability was assessed by the calculation of interclass...

  20. Lower limb prosthesis utilisation by elderly amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, S; Hébert, R; Desrosiers, J

    2000-08-01

    The goal of prosthetic rehabilitation is to compensate for the loss of a limb by amputation by, in the case of a lower limb, encouraging walking, and to achieve the same level of autonomy as prior to the amputation. However, because of difficulties walking, elderly amputees may use their prosthesis to a greater or lesser degree or simply stop using it during the rehabilitation period. The objective of this research was to study factors such as physical and mental health, rehabilitation, physical independence and satisfaction with the prosthesis to understand why amputees use their prosthesis or not. The sample was composed of 65 unilateral vascular amputees 60 years old or over living at home. The information was collected from medical records, by telephone interview and by mail questionnaire. Prosthesis use was measured by a questionnaire on amputee activities developed by Day (1981). Eighty-one per cent (81%) of the subjects wore their prosthesis every day and 89% of this group wore it 6 hours or more per day. Less use of the prosthesis was significantly related to age, female gender, possession of a wheelchair, level of physical disability, cognitive impairment, poorer self-perceived health and the amputee's dissatisfaction. A multiple regression analysis showed that satisfaction, not possessing a wheelchair and cognitive integrity explained 46% of the variance in prosthesis use.

  1. Possible factors for ankle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabaković Dejan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Classification of ankle fractures is commonly used for selecting an appropriate treatment and prognosing an outcome of definite management. One of the most used classifications is the Danis-Weber classification. To the best of our knowledge, in the available literature, there are no parameters affecting specific types of ankle fractures according to the Danis-Weber classification. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation of the following parameters: age, body weight, body mass index (BMI, height, osteoporosis, osteopenia and physical exercises with specific types of ankle fractures using the Danis-Weber classification. Methods. A total of 85 patients grouped by the Danis-Weber classification fracture types were analyzed and the significance of certain parameters for specific types of ankle fractures was established. Results. The proportion of females was significantly higher (p < 0.001 with a significantly higher age (59.9 years, SD ± 14.2 in relation to males (45.1 years, SD ± 12.8 (p < 0.0001. Type A fracture was most frequent in the younger patients (34.2 years, SD ± 8.6, and those with increased physical exercises (p = 0.020. In type B fracture, the risk factor was osteoporosis (p = 0.0180, while in type C fracture, body weight (p = 0.017 and osteoporosis (p = 0.004 were significant parameters. Conclusion. Statistical analysis using the Danis-Weber classification reveals that there are certain parameters suggesting significant risk factors for specific types of ankle fractures.

  2. Patients with hip prosthesis: radiotherapy treatment planning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, K.M.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2000-01-01

    The number of patients with hip prosthesis undergoing radiotherapy for pelvic cancer worldwide is increasing. This might be of importance depending on the materials in the prosthesis and whether any of the treatment fields are involved in the prosthesis. Radiotherapy planning involving the pelvic region of patients having total hip prosthesis has been found to be difficult due to the effect of the prosthesis on the dose distribution. This review is intended to project dosimetric considerations and possible solutions to this uncommon problem

  3. Nasal prosthesis rehabilitation: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Sumeet; Maru, Kavita; Shukla, Jyotsana

    2011-01-01

    , often more effectively than by surgical reconstruction as the nose is relatively immobile structure. For successful results, lot of factors such as harmony, texture, color matching and blending of tissue interface with the prosthesis are important. The aim of the presented case report is to describe...... the non-surgical rehabilitation, with polymethyl meth-acrylate resin, nasal prosthesis for a patient who received partial rhinectomy as a result of squamous cell carcinoma of the nose. The prosthesis was made to restore the esthetic appearance of the patient with a mechanical retained design using...

  4. Stretch due to Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baten

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year old patient presented to the emergency department with stretch, due to impossible deflation of the penile prosthesis, 4 years after successful implant. A CT-scan showed migration of the reservoir to the left rectus abdominis muscle. Refilling of the reservoir was inhibited by muscular compression, causing stretch. Removal and replacement of the reservoir was performed, after which the prosthesis was well-functioning again. Migration of the penile prosthesis reservoir is extremely rare but can cause several complications, such as stretch.

  5. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the S...

  6. Comparison of Multisegmental Foot and Ankle Motion Between Total Ankle Replacement and Ankle Arthrodesis in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang Gyo; Kim, Eo Jin; Lee, Doo Jae; Bae, Kee Jeong; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Dong Yeon

    2017-09-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) and ankle arthrodesis (AA) are usually performed for severe ankle arthritis. We compared postoperative foot segmental motion during gait in patients treated with TAR and AA. Gait analysis was performed in 17 and 7 patients undergoing TAR and AA, respectively. Subjects were evaluated using a 3-dimensional multisegmental foot model with 15 markers. Temporal gait parameters were calculated. The maximum and minimum values and the differences in hallux, forefoot, hindfoot, and arch in 3 planes (sagittal, coronal, transverse) were compared between the 2 groups. One hundred healthy adults were evaluated as a control. Gait speed was faster in the TAR ( P = .028). On analysis of foot and ankle segmental motion, the range of hindfoot sagittal motion was significantly greater in the TAR (15.1 vs 10.2 degrees in AA; P = .004). The main component of motion increase was hindfoot dorsiflexion (12.3 and 8.6 degrees). The range of forefoot sagittal motion was greater in the TAR (9.3 vs 5.8 degrees in AA; P = .004). Maximum ankle power in the TAR (1.16) was significantly higher than 0.32 in AA; P = .008). However, the range of hindfoot and forefoot sagittal motion was decreased in both TAR and AA compared with the control group ( P = .000). Although biomechanical results of TAR and AA were not similar to those in the normal controls, joint motions in the TAR more closely matched normal values. Treatment decision making should involve considerations of the effect of surgery on the adjacent joints. Level III, case-control study.

  7. Effects of ankle-foot orthoses on mediolateral foot-placement ability during post-stroke gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zissimopoulos, Angelika; Fatone, Stefania; Gard, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Accurate and precise mediolateral foot placement is important for balance during gait, but is impaired post stroke. Mediolateral foot placement may be improved with ankle-foot orthosis use. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an ankle-foot orthosis improves mediolateral foot-placement ability during post-stroke ambulation. Crossover trial with randomized order of conditions tested. The accuracy and precision of mediolateral foot placement was quantified while subjects targeted four different randomized step widths. Subjects were tested with and without their regular non-rigid ankle-foot orthosis in two separate visits (order randomized). While ankle-foot orthosis use corrected foot and ankle alignment (i.e. significantly decreased mid-swing plantar flexion, p = 0.000), effects of ankle-foot orthosis use on hip hiking (p = 0.545), circumduction (p = 0.179), coronal plane hip range of motion (p = 0.06), and mediolateral foot-placement ability (p = 0.537) were not significant. While ankle-foot orthosis-mediated equinovarus correction of the affected foot and ankle was not associated with improved biomechanics of walking (i.e. proximal ipsilateral hip kinematics or mediolateral foot-placement ability), it may affect other aspects of balance that were not tested in this study (e.g. proprioception, cerebellar, vestibular, and cognitive mechanisms). Studies that investigate the effect of ankle-foot orthosis on gait can help advance stroke rehabilitation by documenting the specific gait benefits of ankle-foot orthosis use. In this study, we investigated the effect of ankle-foot orthosis use on mediolateral foot-placement ability, an aspect of gait important for maintaining balance. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  8. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  9. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  10. Ankle Arthrodesis Following Trauma, a Useful Salvage Procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ankle joint which aims to relieve pain, and restores function. Ankle arthrodesis, used as surgical treatment for tuberculosis of the ankle joint, is still used for the treatment of ankle joint destruction. Arthrodesis of the ankle joint is an important operation in the treatment of painful arthrosis, chronic infection, and malalignment ...

  11. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-08-29

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis.

  12. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter DA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available David A Porter, Ryan R Jaggers, Adam Fitzgerald Barnes, Angela M Rund Methodist Sports Medicine/The Orthopedic Specialists, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains, and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on

  13. [Survivorship of the cemented hip prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Wiesław; Ceglarz, Przemysław; Kucharski, Jakub; Pietrzak, Krzysztof; Pucher, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    To asses a survival-time of the cemented hip prostheses and to find factors causing its loosening. 211 patients (282 hip prostheses) were analyzed, of the 1693 patients (2096 hip prostheses) treated between 1970-2000. The follow-up ranged from 7 to 34 years (mean: 12.2 ++/- 5.4 years). The age of the patients at the operation procedure ranged from 25 to 74 years (mean 52 +/- 12 years). Only aseptic prosthesis loosening were considered and Kaplan-Meyer method was used for the prosthesis survivorship assessment. Of the 282 prostheses, implant exchange was performed in 39 cases, where in 15 cases only cup was revised, in 5 cases the stem exclusively, and in 19 patients the whole implant was exchanged. Only 1.1% of implants were exchanged during first 5 years after surgery but from the 6th year the percentage of loosening increased several percents each year. Respectively 88.6, 70 and 65% survivorship of prosthesis was found after 10, 15, 20 years of follow-up. In the group of bilateral prosthesis implantation, the first implanted prosthesis was more susceptible for loosening. Seven cases of aseptic loosening (5.4%) of the 129 prostheses implanted between 1974 and 1995, occurred within 7 years after initial surgery where only one prosthesis (0.7%) was revised of the 152 implanted between 1996-2000 in the same time of follow-up. The age, growth, weight, BMI and sex did not influence the risk of implant loosening. The mean survivorship of the hip prosthesis is 65% in 20- years follow up. When a proper initial fixation of the cemented hip prosthesis is performed, the risk of implant loosening increases gradually especially from the 6th year after surgery. The modern implants are less susceptible for loosening.

  14. Hydrocolonotherapy ankle joints after injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Muchin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to improve efficiency of gydrokinesitherapy by means of specially designed devices and monolasts for patients after ankle joint injuries. Material & Methods: there are pedagogical methods, clinical and radiological methods, anthropometric measurements and goniometry were used. Results: the author's technique of hydrokinesitherapy with application hydrokinesimechanotherapy device in the program of physical rehabilitation which provides optimum conditions for the recovery process was developed. Conclusions: the specially designed hydrokinesomechanotherapeutic device and monolasts are allow strictly controlled movement in all planes of the ankle joint, which contributes to the acceleration of the recovery; the conducted anthropometric and goniometric studies were indicate more rapid elimination of edema, increase movement amplitude, carries opposition to the development of contractures and muscle atrophy.

  15. Difference in balance measures between patients with chronic ankle instability and patients after an acute ankle inversion trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J. S.; Kingma, I.; Blankevoort, L.; van Dijk, C. N.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromuscular control of the ankle is disturbed in patients with chronic ankle instability due to an initial ankle inversion trauma. Static balance is assumed to be a measure for this disturbance. Functional (ankle) scores are another way to evaluate ankle impairment. The hypothesis was that there

  16. Effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with floppy paretic ankle muscles : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilk, van der Dymphy; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; Postema, Klaas; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Hijmans, Juha Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with floppy ankle muscles paresis use ankle foot orthoses to improve their walking ability. Ankle foot orthoses also limit ankle range of motion thereby introducing additional problems. Insight in effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with

  17. Arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi Porro, R.; Zellner, A.; Puricelli, G.; Quaglia, R.; Chelazzi, G.

    1984-01-01

    Arthrography of the ankle joint was first carried out by Johnson and Palmer at the Military Hospital in Stockholm in 1940. Arthrography can be used for judging the integrity of the articular cartilage, of osteochondritis dissecans, arthritis or adhesive capsulitis. The literature shows, however, that more than 95% of the patients on whom this examination has been performed has suffered from acute trauma. (orig.) [de

  18. Impact of a stance phase microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis on level walking in lower functioning individuals with a transfemoral amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberly, Valerie J; Mulroy, Sara J; Gronley, JoAnne K; Perry, Jacquelin; Yule, William J; Burnfield, Judith M

    2014-12-01

    For individuals with transfemoral amputation, walking with a prosthesis presents challenges to stability and increases the demand on the hip of the prosthetic limb. Increasing age or comorbidities magnify these challenges. Computerized prosthetic knee joints improve stability and efficiency of gait, but are seldom prescribed for less physically capable walkers who may benefit from them. To compare level walking function while wearing a microprocessor-controlled knee (C-Leg Compact) prosthesis to a traditionally prescribed non-microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis for Medicare Functional Classification Level K-2 walkers. Crossover. Stride characteristics, kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic activity were recorded in 10 participants while walking with non-microprocessor-controlled knee and Compact prostheses. Walking with the Compact produced significant increase in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-limb support, and heel-rise timing compared to walking with the non-microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis. Hip and thigh extension during late stance improved bilaterally. Ankle dorsiflexion, knee extension, and hip flexion moments of the prosthetic limb were significantly improved. Improvements in walking function and stability on the prosthetic limb were demonstrated by the K-2 level walkers when using the C-Leg Compact prosthesis. Understanding the impact of new prosthetic designs on gait mechanics is essential to improve prescription guidelines for deconditioned or older persons with transfemoral amputation. Prosthetic designs that improve stability for safety and walking function have the potential to improve community participation and quality of life. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  19. Posterior ankle impingement in the dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Brad R

    2011-01-01

    Dancers spend a lot of time in the relevé position in demi-pointe and en pointe in their training and their careers. Pain from both osseous and soft tissue causes may start to occur in the posterior aspect of their ankle. This article reviews the potential causes of posterior ankle impingement in dancers. It will discuss the clinical evaluation of a dancer and the appropriate workup and radiographic studies needed to further evaluate a dancer with suspected posterior ankle impingement.

  20. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Stuart K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L.; Ioannidis, John P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:...

  1. Ankle taping can reduce external ankle joint moments during drop landings on a tilted surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nahoko; Nunome, Hiroyuki; Hopper, Luke S; Ikegami, Yasuo

    2017-09-20

    Ankle taping is commonly used to prevent ankle sprains. However, kinematic assessments investigating the biomechanical effects of ankle taping have provided inconclusive results. This study aimed to determine the effect of ankle taping on the external ankle joint moments during a drop landing on a tilted surface at 25°. Twenty-five participants performed landings on a tilted force platform that caused ankle inversion with and without ankle taping. Landing kinematics were captured using a motion capture system. External ankle inversion moment, the angular impulse due to the medio-lateral and vertical components of ground reaction force (GRF) and their moment arm lengths about the ankle joint were analysed. The foot plantar inclination relative to the ground was assessed. In the taping condition, the foot plantar inclination and ankle inversion angular impulse were reduced significantly compared to that of the control. The only component of the external inversion moment to change significantly in the taped condition was a shortened medio-lateral GRF moment arm length. It can be assumed that the ankle taping altered the foot plantar inclination relative to the ground, thereby shortening the moment arm of medio-lateral GRF that resulted in the reduced ankle inversion angular impulse.

  2. Prospective Computed Tomographic Analysis of Osteochondral Lesions of the Ankle Joint Associated With Ankle Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nosewicz, Tomasz L.; Beerekamp, M. Suzan H.; de Muinck Keizer, Robert-Jan O.; Schepers, Tim; Maas, Mario; Niek van Dijk, C.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions (OCLs) associated with ankle fracture correlate with unfavorable outcome. The goals of this study were to detect OCLs following ankle fracture, to associate fracture type to OCLs and to investigate whether OCLs affect clinical outcome. 100 ankle fractures requiring operative

  3. How to Stretch Your Ankle After a Sprain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ankle After A Sprain How to Stretch Your Ankle After A Sprain Page Content You should perform the following stretches ... Consider these home exercises when recuperating from an ankle sprain. Perform them twice per day. While seated, bring ...

  4. Total ankle arthroplasty: An imaging overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Da Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Chun, Ka Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  5. The relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Stephanie; Moore, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    The lateral ligament complex of the ankle is the most frequently injured structure in the body. Although most simple ankle sprains do not result in long-term disability, a significant number do not completely resolve, leading to residual symptoms that may persist for years. The most commonly reported symptoms, particularly among athletes, include instability, re-injury, and tendinitis. Ballet dancers are a combination of artist and high-performance athlete; consequently, they are subjected to the same types of injuries as other athletes, including lateral ankle sprains and their sequelae. Furthermore, ballet dancers perform in unusual positions such as en pointe, which places the ankle in extreme plantar flexion, requiring stabilization by surrounding muscles. Dancers' extraordinary performance demands place them at risk for other ankle injuries as well, including inflammation ofseveral tendons, especially the peroneals. This report reviews the relevant literature to characterize the scope of lateral ankle sprains and sequelae, discuss the importance of the peroneal muscles in ankle stability, and explore a relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers. Informal interviews were conducted with physical therapists who specialize in treating ballet dancers, providing a clinical context for this report. An extensive review of the literature was conducted, including electronic databases, reference lists from papers, and relevant reference texts. Numerous studies have investigated ankle sprains and residual complaints; nearly all report that lateral ankle sprains commonly lead to chronic ankle instability. Studies exploring ankle stability have demonstrated that the peroneal muscles play a crucial role in ankle stabilization; EMG studies confirm they are the first to contract during ankle inversion stress. The dancer's need for exceptional ankle stabilization may lead to peroneal overuse and tendinitis. Studies have linked peroneal

  6. Sagittal tibiotalar translation and clinical outcomes in mobile and fixed-bearing total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuelli, Federico G; Manzi, Luigi; Brusaferri, Giovanni; Neher, Robert E; Guelfi, Matteo; Maccario, Camilla

    2017-06-01

    Sagittal implant malalignment after total ankle replacement (TAR) has been considered to be a possible cause for premature implant failure. In a prior study, the change over time of the tibiotalar ratio (T-T ratio), which is the ratio between the posterior longitudinal talar length and the full longitudinal talar length, was assessed in 66 TARs where an unconstrained, mobile-bearing implant was implanted. The analysis documented an increase in the T-T ratio between 2 and 6 months post-surgery (on average from 34.6% to 37.2%). We hypothesized that this change might have been related to the presence of a mobile-bearing insert. In order to test our hypothesis, we designed a study to compare the translation of the talus in TARs performed with an unconstrained, mobile-bearing implant (designated the "Mobile ankle") and those performed with a semi-constrained, fixed-bearing implant (designated the "Fixed ankle"). The study included 71 consecutive patients (71 ankles) who underwent TAR with the Mobile ankle and 24 consecutive patients (24 ankles) who received the Fixed ankle from May 2011 to December 2014. Patients were assessed clinically and radiologically preoperatively (T 0 ), at 6 months (T 2 ) and 12 months (T 3 ) post-surgery. There was also a radiological assessment at 2 months post-surgery (T 1 ). The comparison of the T-T ratio between the two implant groups and over time indicated an interaction between time and group, therefore the changes of the T-T ratio over time were affected by the implant type factor (Pbearing interface. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Different techniques in fabrication of ocular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Pinar; Dilber, Erhan; Eraslan, Oguz

    2012-11-01

    Loss of an eye caused by cancer, trauma, or congenital defect creates a deep psychological impact on an individual's life especially social and professional life. Custom-made prosthesis, compared to stock prosthesis, provides a better fit to the eye socket, better cosmetic results, and less discomfort to the patient in the long term. The main objective of this article was to describe 3 different alternative and practical techniques of fabricating custom-made ocular prosthesis. An impression of anophthalmic socket was made with the addition of cured silicone-based precision impression material in all techniques. A master cast was prepared and duplicated with condensation silicone. A self-cure acrylic resin was polymerized in the silicone model and was fitted into the patient's eye socket. A digital photograph of the patient's iris was made using a digital camera and printed on good-quality photo paper in various shades and sizes in the first and the second techniques. Then the photo paper was coated with PVC so as not to allow any color flowing. The proper iris was then inserted to the acrylic base. The prosthesis was final processed using orthodontic heat polymerizing clear acrylic resin.In the other technique, after the trying-in process with wax pattern, an acrylic base was fabricated using heat polymerizing scleral acrylic resin. The prosthetic iris was fabricated from a transparent contact lens by painting the lens with watercolor paints and attaching it to an acrylic resin with tissue conditioner. The final process was made with heat polymerizing transparent acrylic resin. Custom-made prosthesis allows better esthetic and functional results to the patient in comparison to stock prosthesis. Further follow-up is necessary to check the condition and fit of the ocular prosthesis in such patients.

  8. Selection criteria for patients with chronic ankle instability in controlled research: a position statement of the international ankle consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribble, P.A.; Delahunt, E.; Bleakley, C.; Caulfield, B.; Docherty, C.L.; Fourchet, F.; Fong, D.; Hertel, J.; Hiller, C.; Kaminski, T.W.; McKeon, P.O.; Refshauge, K.M.; Wees, P.J. van der; Vicenzino, B.; Wikstrom, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Ankle Consortium is an international community of researchers and clinicians whose primary scholastic purpose is to promote scholarship and dissemination of research-informed knowledge related to pathologies of the ankle complex. The constituents of the International Ankle

  9. Epidemiological Patterns of Ankle Sprains in Youth, High School, and College Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Daniel R; Koldenhoven, Rachel M; Hertel, Jay; Onate, James A; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-02-01

    Variations in ankle injury rates and distributions among competition levels are unclear, but such data may help inform strategies to prevent ankle sprains during American football. To describe the epidemiological patterns of ankle sprains in youth, high school (HS), and collegiate American football. Descriptive epidemiological study. Data regarding youth, HS, and college football athletes were collected from 3 injury surveillance programs: (1) the Youth Football Safety Study (YFSS), (2) the National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network (NATION), and (3) the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP). During the 2012-2014 seasons, the YFSS, NATION, and NCAA ISP included 310, 184, and 71 football team-seasons, respectively. Athletic trainers (ATs) attended each practice and game and reported injuries and athlete-exposures (AEs) via their preferred injury documentation application. Ankle sprain rates for each type of ankle sprain were calculated overall, by event type (ie, practices and games), and specifically for severe injuries (ie, participation restriction time >21 days) and recurrent injuries (as defined by ATs). Rate ratios (RRs) were used to compare ankle sprain rates by competition level and event type. Injury proportion ratios (IPRs) were used to compare differences in severity, surgical needs, recurrence, injury mechanism, and injury activity by competition level. RRs and IPRs with 95% confidence intervals excluding 1.00 were considered statistically significant. A total of 124, 897, and 643 ankle sprains were reported in youth, HS, and college football, respectively. This led to respective rates of 0.59, 0.73, and 1.19 sprains per 1000 AEs. The ankle sprain rate in college football was higher than the rates in HS (RR = 1.64; 95% CI, 1.48-1.82) and youth (RR = 2.01; 95% CI, 1.65-2.43) football. The proportion of ankle sprains that were recurrent in youth football was higher than the proportions in HS (IPR

  10. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  11. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2015-07-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  12. Experimental Recognition of Loading Character of Transtibial Prosthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paloušek, D.; Návrat, Tomáš; Rosický, J.; Krejčí, Petr; Houfek, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2008), s. 355-364 ISSN 1802-1484 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : transtibial prosthesis * strain gauge * loading character of prosthesis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Ultrasound mammography in prosthesis-related breast augmentation complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, J. J.; van Staden, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasound mammography is presented as a safe, simple, and reliable method of assessing prosthesis and prosthesis-related complications in the augmented breast. The ability to distinguish between silicone gel, muscle, hematoma, and fluid collections has made ultrasound mammography especially

  14. 21 CFR 872.3950 - Glenoid fossa prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3950 Glenoid fossa prosthesis. (a) Identification. A glenoid fossa prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the temporomandibular...

  15. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris J.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Methods: Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study pro...

  16. Therapeutic ultrasound for acute ankle sprains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; van der Windt, D. A. W. M.; ter Riet, G.; van der Heijden, G. J.; Bouter, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Ultrasound is used in the treatment of a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders, which include acute ankle sprains. Aim. To evaluate the effects of ultrasound therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains. Methods. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group

  17. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. Niek; Reilingh, Mikel L.; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone

  18. Ankle and Other Signatures in Uhecr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezinsky, Veniamin

    2015-03-01

    The interaction signatures of UHE protons propagating through CMB are discussed. Much attention is given to ankle, which starting from 1963 is usually interpreted as a feature of transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. We argue here that this interpretation is now excluded. It gives more credit to alternative explanation of the ankle as an intrinsic part of the pair-production dip.

  19. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stuart K; Kleimeyer, John P; Ahmed, Marwa A; Avins, Andrew L; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D) that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75-2.23). A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9) that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46-1.80). The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury.

  20. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Kim

    Full Text Available Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75-2.23. A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9 that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46-1.80. The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury.

  1. Prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Linden, Arnaud; Kempfert, Jörg; Blumenstein, Johannes; Rastan, Ardawan; Holzhey, David; Lehmann, Sven; Mohr, Friedrich W; Walther, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is defined as a too small effective orifice area (EOA) of the prosthetic valve in relation to the patient's body size and has been documented to be related to adverse outcomes after conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR). Aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of PPM after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (T-AVI) using the Edwards SAPIEN prosthesis and its relation to postoperative outcome. 200 consecutive high-risk patients underwent transapical aortic valve implantation (TA-AVI) between February 2006 and January 2009 and fulfilled 1 year follow-up were included. Severe PPM was defined as indexed EOA (EOAi) <0.65 cm2/m2 and moderate PPM as EOAi = 0.65-0.85 cm2/m2, EOA was calculated from transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) measurements using the continuity equation. Total 112 patients with sufficient postoperative TTE image quality formed the study group. EOAi increased from 0.3 ± 0.1 cm2/m2 (preoperatively) to 1.1 ± 0.4 cm2/m2 after TA-AVI (p < 0.001). According to the standard definitions, PPM was seen in 38.4% of the patients and 9.8% presented with severe PPM. The occurrence of PPM had neither an effect on clinical outcome in terms of NYHA class nor on survival. Patients with PPM had significantly higher postoperative transprosthetic gradients (mean gradient 10.4 ± 4.1 versus 7.1 ± 3.0 mm Hg, p < 0.001). Based on the in vitro EOA data obtained from pulse duplicator measurements, however, none of the patients was judged to have PPM. Transcatheter AVI provides good antegrade hemodynamic function and EOAi improves significantly. According to standardized evaluations PPM occurs after TA-AVI, but it is not associated with adverse outcomes. Thus use of the continuity equation may not adequately reflect the situation after T-AVI or the current definition of PPM is not suitable for T-AVI prostheses. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Body image and prosthesis satisfaction in the lower limb amputee.

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Craig; Fox, Jezz

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the relationship between prosthesis satisfaction and body image in lower limb prosthesis users, and the gendered variations within these relationships. Method: A total of 44 valid responses were obtained to an Internet survey regarding prosthesis satisfaction, body image, and phantom pain. Spearman Rho correlations were calculated for these three domains. Results: Moderate to high negative correlations were observed between Body Image Disturbance and Prosthesis Sa...

  3. Implant-Retained Auricular Prosthesis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturk, A. Nilgun; Usumez, Aslihan; Tosun, Zekeriya

    2010-01-01

    Extraoral implant retained prosthesis have been proven to be a predictable treatment option for maxillofacial rehabilitation. This case report describes the clinical and laboratory procedures for fabricating an auricular prosthesis. In this case report, an auricular prosthesis was fabricated for a patient who lost the left and right external ear in an electrical burn. Extraoral implants and bar-and-clip retention for the proper connection of the auricular prosthesis to implant were used. This...

  4. The Prevalence of Patient-Prosthesis Mismatch Can Be Reduced Using the Trifecta Aortic Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Diaz, Rocio; Pascual, Isaac; Rozado, Jose; De la Hera, Jesus M; Leon, Victor; Avanzas, Pablo; Martín, Maria; García-Iglesias, Daniel; Calvo, David; Silva, Jacobo; Moris, César

    2018-01-01

    Some important studies have shown that patient-prosthesis mismatch is a frequent occurrence after surgical aortic valve replacement that impairs survival. The Trifecta valve (St. Jude Medical Inc, St. Paul, MN) has special architecture designed to achieve the best hemodynamic profile. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of mismatch when using this prosthesis. This study included 1,302 patients at 3 months postoperatively, 339 patients with a Trifecta prosthesis and 963 patients (the control group) with a Mitroflow aortic valve (Sorin Group Inc, Mitroflow Division, Vancouver, Canada). Multinomial multivariate logistic regression was calculated to estimate the association between the Trifecta prosthesis and moderate or severe patient-prosthesis mismatch. Any degree of mismatch was present in 5.9% of the Trifecta group and in 42.4% in the Mitroflow group. Moderate patient-prosthesis mismatch was present in 3.8% of the patients with a Trifecta valve and in 32.6% in the Mitroflow group. Severe mismatch was present in 2.1% of the patients with a Trifecta prosthesis and in 9.8% of the patients with a Mitroflow valve. All differences were statistically significant (p mismatch was 16.9 (95% confidence interval, 9.5 to 30.4) and 11.9 (95% confidence interval, 5.3 to 26.7) for moderate or severe mismatch, respectively. The prevalence of patient-prosthesis mismatch using the Trifecta aortic prosthesis is extraordinary low. This finding may have great clinical repercussions in patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Compression therapy after ankle fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, R; Bayer, L; Gottlieb, H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The main purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of compression treatment on the perioperative course of ankle fractures and describe its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, length of stay (LOS) and time to surgery (TTS). The aim...... was to suggest a recommendation to clinicians considering implementing compression therapy in the standard care of the ankle fracture patient, based on the existing literature. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of literature including studies concerning adult patients with unstable ankle fractures...... undergoing surgery, testing either intermittent pneumatic compression, compression bandage and/or compression stocking and reporting its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, LOS and TTS. To conclude on data a narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: The review included...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a...

  7. 21 CFR 884.3650 - Fallopian tube prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fallopian tube prosthesis. 884.3650 Section 884.3650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.3650 Fallopian tube prosthesis. (a) Identification. A fallopian tube prosthesis is a device...

  8. 21 CFR 874.3450 - Partial ossicular replacement prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partial ossicular replacement prosthesis. 874.3450 Section 874.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... replacement prosthesis. (a) Identification. A partial ossicular replacement prosthesis is a device intended to...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3780 Section 888.3780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3720 - Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3720 Section 888.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A toe joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of silicone...

  11. 21 CFR 890.3500 - External assembled lower limb prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External assembled lower limb prosthesis. 890.3500... External assembled lower limb prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external assembled lower limb prosthesis... the lower extremity. Examples of external assembled lower limb prostheses are the following: Knee...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3450 - Vascular graft prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vascular graft prosthesis. 870.3450 Section 870... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A vascular graft prosthesis is an implanted device intended to repair... Prostheses 510(k) Submissions.” [66 FR 18542, Apr. 10, 2001] ...

  13. 21 CFR 874.3495 - Total ossicular replacement prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total ossicular replacement prosthesis. 874.3495 Section 874.3495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... replacement prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total ossicular replacement prosthesis is a device intended to...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). (a) Identification. A laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design) is a device intended to direct...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended... generic type of device includes prostheses that consist of a single flexible across-the-joint component...

  16. 21 CFR 878.3750 - External prosthesis adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used to fasten to the body an external aesthetic restoration prosthesis, such as an artificial nose. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External prosthesis adhesive. 878.3750 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3750 External prosthesis...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to... requirement for premarket approval for any mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the human...

  18. Fabrication of temporary speech bulb prosthesis: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Kasim Mohamed, K.; Anand Kumar, V.; Devi, N.; Padmanaban, T. V.

    2010-01-01

    Maxillofacial prosthesis is an art and science which not only replaces the lost structure sometimes it restores the functions also. Pharyngeal obturator is a prosthesis which closes the palatal and pharyngeal defects and improving the speech and other function. The following case report discusses palatopharyngeal insufficiency, impression procedures, fabrication of prosthesis and improvements in speech.

  19. Panacea to lost gingival tissue architecture and spacing: Silicone gingival prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajendra S Tomar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The positive psychological effects of improving patients' smile often contribute to an improved self-image and enhanced self-esteem. Periodontal disease may lead to tooth and tissue loss that can result in esthetic problems. Combined periodontal/prosthodontic treatment for patients with advanced disease is well documented. This case report illustrates a method of treatment for an advanced tissue loss in an esthetic area using a removable silicone gingival prosthesis/mask.

  20. Smart image processing system for retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D; Parikh, Neha; Pradeep, Vivek; Medioni, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses for the blind have demonstrated the ability to provide the sensation of light in otherwise blind individuals. However, visual task performance in these patients remains poor relative to someone with normal vision. Computer vision algorithms for navigation and object detection were evaluated for their ability to improve task performance. Blind subjects navigating a mobility course had fewer collisions when using a wearable camera system that guided them on a safe path. Subjects using a retinal prosthesis simulator could locate objects more quickly when an object detection algorithm assisted them. Computer vision algorithms can assist retinal prosthesis patients and low-vision patients in general.

  1. Documentation Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnay, J.; Chosson, L.; Croize, M.; Ducloux, A.; Flores, S.; Jarroux, D.; Melka, J.; Morgue, D.; Mottin, C.

    1998-01-01

    This service assures the treatment and diffusion of the scientific information and the management of the scientific production of the institute as well as the secretariat operation for the groups and services of the institute. The report on documentation-library section mentions: the management of the documentation funds, search in international databases (INIS, Current Contents, Inspects), Pret-Inter service which allows accessing documents through DEMOCRITE network of IN2P3. As realizations also mentioned are: the setup of a video, photo database, the Web home page of the institute's library, follow-up of digitizing the document funds by integrating the CD-ROMs and diskettes, electronic archiving of the scientific production, etc

  2. Maury Documentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supporting documentation for the Maury Collection of marine observations. Includes explanations from Maury himself, as well as guides and descriptions by the U.S....

  3. Radiographic evaluation of INBONE total ankle arthroplasty: a retrospective analysis of 30 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datir, Abhijit [Emory University Hospital, Musculoskeletal Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Center, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Xing, Minzhi; Kakarala, Aparna; Terk, Michael R. [Emory University Hospital, Musculoskeletal Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Labib, Sameh A. [Emory University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The objectives of this work were to retrospectively describe the radiographic assessment of INBONE total ankle arthroplasty in 30 patients using validated linear and angular measurements and to correlate these findings with the final surgical outcome over a 2-year follow-up period. Thirty consecutive patients (21 females, nine males; mean age, 64.8 years) underwent INBONE total ankle arthroplasty during 2007-2011. After IRB approval, a retrospective pre- and post-operative radiographic analysis was performed using validated linear and angular measurements. The pre- and post-operative assessment included the tibial angle, talar angle, tibial slope, and coronal deformity. Post-operative measurements also included the talocalcaneal angle, joint space height, talar height, lateral tibial component angle, lateral talar component angle, and anteroposterior tibial component angle. The post-operative bone loss, subluxation, positioning, and subsidence were also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using two-sample t test and Fisher's exact test. Out of 30 patients, 23 had a successful clinical outcome with intact prosthesis at a 2-year follow-up. The only variables with significant correlation (p < 0.05) to the post-surgical outcome were the lateral talar component angle (p = 0.002) and the mean difference between pre- and post-operative tibial slope (p = 0.001). The coronal deformity had significant mean difference between pre- and post-operative values (p < 0.001); however, it lacked a significant correlation to the final surgical outcome. None of the categorical variables had a significant correlation with post-surgical outcome. In our retrospective study, only the lateral talar component angle and the mean difference between the pre- and post-operative tibial slope had significant correlation with post-surgical outcome in INBONE ankle arthroplasty. These measurements may be helpful in radiographic assessment of the INBONE ankle arthroplasty. (orig.)

  4. Radiographic evaluation of INBONE total ankle arthroplasty: a retrospective analysis of 30 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datir, Abhijit; Xing, Minzhi; Kakarala, Aparna; Terk, Michael R.; Labib, Sameh A.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to retrospectively describe the radiographic assessment of INBONE total ankle arthroplasty in 30 patients using validated linear and angular measurements and to correlate these findings with the final surgical outcome over a 2-year follow-up period. Thirty consecutive patients (21 females, nine males; mean age, 64.8 years) underwent INBONE total ankle arthroplasty during 2007-2011. After IRB approval, a retrospective pre- and post-operative radiographic analysis was performed using validated linear and angular measurements. The pre- and post-operative assessment included the tibial angle, talar angle, tibial slope, and coronal deformity. Post-operative measurements also included the talocalcaneal angle, joint space height, talar height, lateral tibial component angle, lateral talar component angle, and anteroposterior tibial component angle. The post-operative bone loss, subluxation, positioning, and subsidence were also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using two-sample t test and Fisher's exact test. Out of 30 patients, 23 had a successful clinical outcome with intact prosthesis at a 2-year follow-up. The only variables with significant correlation (p < 0.05) to the post-surgical outcome were the lateral talar component angle (p = 0.002) and the mean difference between pre- and post-operative tibial slope (p = 0.001). The coronal deformity had significant mean difference between pre- and post-operative values (p < 0.001); however, it lacked a significant correlation to the final surgical outcome. None of the categorical variables had a significant correlation with post-surgical outcome. In our retrospective study, only the lateral talar component angle and the mean difference between the pre- and post-operative tibial slope had significant correlation with post-surgical outcome in INBONE ankle arthroplasty. These measurements may be helpful in radiographic assessment of the INBONE ankle arthroplasty. (orig.)

  5. Computerising documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear power generation industry is faced with public concern and government pressures over safety, efficiency and risk. Operators throughout the industry are addressing these issues with the aid of a new technology - technical document management systems (TDMS). Used for strategic and tactical advantage, the systems enable users to scan, archive, retrieve, store, edit, distribute worldwide and manage the huge volume of documentation (paper drawings, CAD data and film-based information) generated in building, maintaining and ensuring safety in the UK's power plants. The power generation industry has recognized that the management and modification of operation critical information is vital to the safety and efficiency of its power plants. Regulatory pressure from the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) to operate within strict safety margins or lose Site Licences has prompted the need for accurate, up-to-data documentation. A document capture and management retrieval system provides a powerful cost-effective solution, giving rapid access to documentation in a tightly controlled environment. The computerisation of documents and plans is discussed in this article. (Author)

  6. The role of ankle bracing for prevention of ankle sprain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael T; Liu, Hsin-Yi

    2003-10-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries incurred in recreational and competitive athletics. These injuries have a significant impact in terms of cost, athletic participation, and activities of daily living. Prophylactic ankle braces are often used to reduce the risk of injury recurrence when individuals return to athletic participation. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the literature and provide our own experience relative to the use of prophylactic ankle bracing. Relatively high incidence rates of ankle sprain injury have been reported for basketball and soccer athletes, military trainees, and individuals with a previous history of ankle sprain injury. Semirigid and laced ankle braces have significantly reduced the incidence of initial and recurrent ankle sprain injuries in athletic and military samples. With few exceptions, these braces do not appear to affect functional performance adversely. The prophylactic use of semirigid ankle braces appears warranted to reduce the incidence of initial and, in particular, recurrent ankle sprain injuries for individuals who participate in activities that have the highest risk for these injuries. Additional research is needed to evaluate the many new braces that are available and in use and their influence on the incidence of ankle sprain injury and functional performance.

  7. Comparison between ankle proprioception measurements and postural sway test for evaluating ankle instability in subjects with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    It is important to establish the effective evaluation approaches that are appropriate for measuring ankle proprioception. But, only a few studies used more than one test procedure simultaneously to identify proprioceptive deficits. Further, no data are available on the correlations between the measures of ankle proprioception and postural sway (PS) test in subjects with functional ankle instability (FAI). The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between ankle proprioception measurements and PS test in subjects with FAI. Of the 79 subjects enrolled in the case-control study, 40 had FAI and 39 were control subjects. Ankle proprioception was evaluated by the angle reproduction (AR), force matching (FM), and the muscle reaction (MR) to sudden ankle inversion tests. For the AR and FM tests, absolute errors (AE) of ankle plantarflexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion directions were calculated. For the MR test, reaction times and activation of tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and peroneus brevis (PB) muscles were measured during sudden ankle inversion with a 30° tilting angle. The PS test was investigated by using a force platform during single-limb standing test. Three trials were performed and averaged in each test. Reaction time of the PL (p = 0.006), a variable of MR test, and plantarflexion (p = 0.001, p = 0.009) and eversion (p = 0.016, p = 0.039) error variables of the AR and FM tests differed significantly between the control and FAI groups. Moreover, these variables (r = -0.381 ∼ 0.788, p proprioception measurements were more sensitive and discriminative than others, and could be useful to assess ankle instability, particularly if the method is to be applied in clinical studies and laboratory settings.

  8. -Computed tomography arthrography and tendon imaging of the ankle-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybier, M; Hamze, B; Champsaur, P; Parlier, C

    1997-01-01

    Ankle opacification dramatically increases the diagnostic value of CT examination of the foot and ankle. The procedure may be entirely performed on the CT table. The main results and indications of CT-arthrography of the ankle are presented. CT-tenography of the ankle which includes the opacification of a tendon sheath on the CT table, is also described.

  9. Footwear and ankle stability in the basketball player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, O; Blocher, K; Bradbury, R L; Saxena, A; Toy, M L

    1988-04-01

    Ankle stability in basketball players is affected by footwear. Athletic shoe manufacturers have introduced specialized lacing systems and high-top performance shoes to improve ankle stability. These performance shoes not only aid in preventing ankle injuries, but also protect injured ankles.

  10. Report on the evaluation of the VA/Seattle below-knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellepola, W; Sheredos, S J

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Rehabilitation Research and Development (Rehab R&D) Service, Technology Transfer Section (TTS) with collaboration from the Prosthetic and Sensory Aids Service (PSAS) managed clinical trials to evaluate the VA/Seattle Below-Knee (BK) Prosthetic System. The clinical trials were held at the Prosthetic Treatment Center (PTC), VA Medical Center, Hines, Illinois. Five other VA medical centers participated in the outreach program of the trials as satellite stations, with PTC Hines as the central fabrication facility. The VA/Seattle BK system is the first complete prosthetic system designed and developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. It consists of a socket designed and fabricated using computer-aided, automated technology, and off-the-shelf modular components: a lightweight pylon and an ankle unit, and a lightweight, energy-storing foot. The computer-based socket design software, the modular components, and the prosthetic foot were developed with funds from the VA Rehab R&D Service. The evaluation trials were conducted to determine the efficacy of the VA/Seattle prosthesis, its reliability, and acceptance by veterans. The clinical trials began in April 1991 and were completed in August 1992. Forty-six BK amputee veterans were fitted with the VA/Seattle prosthesis. Their progress with the prosthesis was followed for a period of 6 months and data were gathered at intervals of 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Forty sets of subject data instruments were collected. In order to maintain the accuracy of the results, TTS used the 22 sets that were complete for data analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Subsidence of total ankle component associated with deterioration of an ankle scale in non-inflammatory arthritis but not in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Takahiro; Ito, Hiromu; Furu, Moritoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Azukizawa, Masayuki; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Takayuki; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-05-01

    Modern three-component total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has favorable clinical results and survival rates. However, radiographic deterioration and worsening of clinical symptoms may occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or non-inflammatory arthritis (NA). The associations between outcomes and clinical and radiological factors are not clear. We compared midterm clinical and radiographic outcomes after TAA between patients with RA and those with NA. Twenty-six TAAs were performed using a three-component prosthesis, the FINE Total Ankle System during the study period. Fourteen TAAs with 11 RA patients undergoing primary TAA were compared with twelve TAAs with 12 NA patients. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated before and after operation, and at the final follow-up. The Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot (JSSF) scale improved significantly following TAA in both groups (p = 0.0039 and 0.0156, respectively). Tibial subsidence, talar subsidence and age were significantly associated with postoperative JSSF score only in the NA group (p = 0.0027, 0.0017 and p subsidence was an independent predictor of a worse JSSF score in the NA group (F = 10.3). The final clinical outcome was negatively influenced by talar subsidence in patients with NA, but not in those with RA.

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament injury and ankle dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstedt, Charlotta; Rasmussen-Barr, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The aim was to study whether the degree of ankle dorsiflexion differs between subjects with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and uninjured controls. Another aim was to study ankle dorsiflexion between the injured and the uninjured leg and in addition between women and men with an ACL injury. Sixty subjects (ACL injury, n = 30 and controls, n = 30) were enroled consecutively at two physical therapy settings. Ankle dorsiflexion was measured with a goniometer in a standardized way in a weight-bearing lunge position. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference (p < 0.001) in ankle dorsiflexion between subjects with an ACL injury (mean 41.1° SD 5.7) and those without (mean 46.6° SD 5.3). No difference in ankle dorsiflexion was found between the injured leg and the uninjured or between women and men with ACL injury. The present findings suggest lower degree of ankle dorsiflexion in subjects with an ACL injury than in uninjured controls. A functional test measuring ankle dorsiflexion with a goniometer may be one way of identifying individuals at increased risk of ACL injury. Comparative study, Level II.

  13. Design, analysis and verification of a knee joint oncological prosthesis finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Lukáš; Kunčická, Lenka; Růžička, Pavel; Kocich, Radim

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to design a finite element model for a hinged PROSPON oncological knee endoprosthesis and to verify the model by comparison with ankle flexion angle using knee-bending experimental data obtained previously. Visible Human Project CT scans were used to create a general lower extremity bones model and to compose a 3D CAD knee joint model to which muscles and ligaments were added. Into the assembly the designed finite element PROSPON prosthesis model was integrated and an analysis focused on the PEEK-OPTIMA hinge pin bushing stress state was carried out. To confirm the stress state analysis results, contact pressure was investigated. The analysis was performed in the knee-bending position within 15.4-69.4° hip joint flexion range. The results showed that the maximum stress achieved during the analysis (46.6 MPa) did not exceed the yield strength of the material (90 MPa); the condition of plastic stability was therefore met. The stress state analysis results were confirmed by the distribution of contact pressure during knee-bending. The applicability of our designed finite element model for the real implant behaviour prediction was proven on the basis of good correlation of the analytical and experimental ankle flexion angle data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimal design and control of an electromechanical transfemoral prosthesis with energy regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani, Farbod; Richter, Hanz; van den Bogert, Antonie J

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of an electromechanical above-knee active prosthesis with energy storage and regeneration. The system consists of geared knee and ankle motors, parallel springs for each motor, an ultracapacitor, and controllable four-quadrant power converters. The goal is to maximize the performance of the system by finding optimal controls and design parameters. A model of the system dynamics was developed, and used to solve a combined trajectory and design optimization problem. The objectives of the optimization were to minimize tracking error relative to human joint motions, as well as energy use. The optimization problem was solved by the method of direct collocation, based on joint torque and joint angle data from ten subjects walking at three speeds. After optimization of controls and design parameters, the simulated system could operate at zero energy cost while still closely emulating able-bodied gait. This was achieved by controlled energy transfer between knee and ankle, and by controlled storage and release of energy throughout the gait cycle. Optimal gear ratios and spring parameters were similar across subjects and walking speeds.

  15. Optimal design and control of an electromechanical transfemoral prosthesis with energy regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbod Rohani

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the design of an electromechanical above-knee active prosthesis with energy storage and regeneration. The system consists of geared knee and ankle motors, parallel springs for each motor, an ultracapacitor, and controllable four-quadrant power converters. The goal is to maximize the performance of the system by finding optimal controls and design parameters. A model of the system dynamics was developed, and used to solve a combined trajectory and design optimization problem. The objectives of the optimization were to minimize tracking error relative to human joint motions, as well as energy use. The optimization problem was solved by the method of direct collocation, based on joint torque and joint angle data from ten subjects walking at three speeds. After optimization of controls and design parameters, the simulated system could operate at zero energy cost while still closely emulating able-bodied gait. This was achieved by controlled energy transfer between knee and ankle, and by controlled storage and release of energy throughout the gait cycle. Optimal gear ratios and spring parameters were similar across subjects and walking speeds.

  16. Comparison of Range of Motion After Total Knee Prosthesis According to Different Type of Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Seyfettinoglu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and range of motion of different type of knee prosthesis. Material and Method: This study includes 180 of 225 patients (139 F, 41 M, average age: 65, range of age: 51-82 between April 2005 and September 2007 with the diagnosis of gonarthrosis. All patients underwent to primary total knee arthroplasty. Primary osteoartrhritis is the reason of gonarthrosis. The patients with secondary osteoartrhritis were excluded from the study. All the patients were operated by the same surgical team and rehabilitated after surgery. Patella didnt change any patient. PCL was protected in some of the patients and cut some of patients. Totally seven type prosthesis in 16 subgroup were applied to the patients. All measurement were done by the same surgeon. Average follow up period was 31 months (24-49 months. Results: Patients without subgrouping were tested according to the range of motion before and after surgery to the type of the prosthesis trademark. Range of motion was decreased with the usage of Rotaglide and LCS® type of prosthesis. Range of motion didnt change with the usage of Maxim and Kinemax type. The range of motion increased in the other trademark of prosthesis. Flexion angle was increased statistically significant with nexgen® and scorpio® prosthesis (p

  17. Movement Control of a Prosthesis Forefinger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHIVU, C.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches the problem of hand prostheses. Designing of hand prostheses implies the use of many types of mechanisms. One of them is the anti-quadrilateral mechanism. The control method chosen and presented in this paper is fuzzy method, applied to a dc motor that actuates each finger of the prosthesis.

  18. Fusion around cervical disc prosthesis: case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Donk, R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Cervical arthroplasty is a relatively new method to maintain motion after cervical anterior discectomy. Two cases are presented in which bony fusion occurred around a cervical disc prosthesis. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 30-year-old man and a 49-year-old woman underwent a

  19. Catastrophic failure of a monolithic zirconia prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae-Seung; Ji, Woon; Choi, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Sunjai

    2015-02-01

    Recently, monolithic zirconia restorations have received attention as an alternative to zirconia veneered with feldspathic porcelain to eliminate chipping failures of veneer ceramics. In this clinical report, a patient with mandibular edentulism received 4 dental implants in the interforaminal area, and a screw-retained monolithic zirconia prosthesis was fabricated. The patient also received a maxillary complete removable dental prosthesis over 4 anterior roots. At the 18-month follow-up, all of the zirconia cylinders were seen to be fractured, and the contacting abutment surfaces had lost structural integrity. The damaged abutments were replaced with new abutments, and a new prosthesis was delivered with a computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing fabricated titanium framework with denture teeth and denture base resins. At the 6-month recall, the patient did not have any problems. Dental zirconia has excellent physical properties; however, care should be taken to prevent excessive stresses on the zirconia cylinders when a screw-retained zirconia restoration is planned as a definitive prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Basketball Coaches’ Utilization of Ankle Injury Prevention Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    McGuine, Timothy A.; Hetzel, Scott; Pennuto, Anthony; Brooks, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ankle injuries are the most common high school basketball injury. Little is known regarding the utilization of ankle injury prevention strategies in high school settings. Objective: To determine high school basketball coaches’ utilization of ankle injury prevention strategies, including prophylactic ankle bracing (PAB) or an ankle injury prevention exercise program (AIEPP). Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Methods: The survey was distributed to all high school basketball coac...

  1. Athletic Training Service Characteristics for Patients With Ankle Sprains Sustained During High School Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Janet E; Wikstrom, Erik A; Grooms, Dustin R; Docherty, Carrie L; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2018-01-26

      Limited information exists on the amount and type of care provided by athletic trainers (ATs) treating athletes who sustained ankle sprains in the high school setting.   To describe AT services provided for patients with ankle sprains injured in high school athletics.   Descriptive epidemiology study.   Athletic training facility (ATF) visits and AT services collected from 147 high schools in 26 states.   High school student-athletes participating in 13 boys' and 14 girls' sports who sustained a diagnosed ankle sprain during the 2011-2012 through 2013-2014 academic years. The ATs documented 3213 ankle sprains.   Number of ATF visits and individual AT services and mean ATF visits (per injury) and AT services (per injury) were calculated by sport and for time-loss injuries (participation-restriction time of at least 24 hours) and non-time-loss injuries (participation-restriction time athletes who had sustained ankle sprains, including therapeutic exercises and neuromuscular reeducation, which were supported by research. However, ATs should consider using manual therapy (use supported by grade B evidence) and therapeutic exercise more (use supported by grade A evidence).

  2. [MRI anatomy and injury of the lateral collateral ligaments of ankle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Z H; Liu, Y; Bai, R J; Zhan, H L; Zhang, H; Li, Y X; Wu, B D

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To explore the MRI features of the lateral collateral ligament injuries of the ankle and determine the value MRI in diagnosing the ligament injuries of the ankle. Methods: The study was reviewed and approved by an institutional review board of hospital. Retrospective analysised 10 healthy volunteers and 26 ankle injury cases underwent surgery since January 2013 to September 2016, the MR imaging findings of patients were compared with volunteers' and operative documents, to analysis the MRI feature of the ligament injuries of the ankle. Results: The normal anterior talofibular ligament and posterior talofibular ligament can be manifest in 3-4 layers of MRI, and can be fully displayed in 1 layer. The normal calcaneofibular ligament can be manifest in 3 layers of MRI, but can not be fully displayed in 1 layer. 26 cases of lateral ligament injury (including 1 case of ATFL injury, 1 case of CFL injury, 3 cases of ATFL conjunction with CFL injury, 3 cases of ATFL conjunction with CFL and PTFL injury) manifested the heterogeneous signal of the T(1)-weighted image, the ligament disruption, the increased signal intensity on fat-suppression PD-weighted image , the surrounding soft tissue edema and bone marrow edema. Conclusion: MR imaging is an accurate method for evaluation of the ligament injuries of the ankle, and it is a useful tool for diagnosis and treatment.

  3. WITHDRAWN: Interventions for preventing ankle ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoll, Helen Hg; Rowe, Brian H; Quinn, Kathryn M; de Bie, Rob

    2011-05-11

    Some sports, for example basketball and soccer, have a very high incidence of ankle injuries, mainly sprains. Consequently, ankle sprains are one of the most commonly treated injuries in acute care. To assess the effects of interventions used for the prevention of ankle ligament injuries or sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauam Group's specialised register, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the National Research Register and bibliographies of study reports. We also contacted colleagues and some trialists. The most recent search was conducted in July 2000. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions for the prevention of ankle sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age were included provided that ankle sprains were recorded. Interventions included use of modified footwear, external ankle supports, co-ordination training and health education. These could be applied as a supplement to treatment provided that prevention of re-injury was the primary objective. At least two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Wherever possible, results of outcome measures were pooled and sub-grouped by history of previous sprain. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are reported for individual and pooled data. In this review update, a further nine new trials were included. Overall, 14 randomised trials with data for 8279 participants were included. Twelve trials involved active, predominantly young, adults participating in organised, generally high-risk, activities. The other two trials involved injured patients who had been active in sports before their injury. The prophylactic interventions under test included the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis (three trials), air-cast brace (one trial) or high top shoes (one trial); ankle disk training; taping; muscle

  4. Interventions for preventing ankle ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoll, H H; Rowe, B H; Quinn, K M; de Bie, R

    2001-01-01

    Some sports, for example basketball and soccer, have a very high incidence of ankle injuries, mainly sprains. Consequently, ankle sprains are one of the most commonly treated injuries in acute care. To assess the effects of interventions used for the prevention of ankle ligament injuries or sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age. We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group's specialised register, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the National Research Register and bibliographies of study reports. We also contacted colleagues and some trialists. The most recent search was conducted in July 2000. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions for the prevention of ankle sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age were included provided that ankle sprains were recorded. Interventions included use of modified footwear, external ankle supports, co-ordination training and health education. These could be applied as a supplement to treatment provided that prevention of re-injury was the primary objective. At least two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Wherever possible, results of outcome measures were pooled and sub-grouped by history of previous sprain. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are reported for individual and pooled data. In this review update, a further nine new trials were included. Overall, 14 randomised trials with data for 8279 participants were included. Twelve trials involved active, predominantly young, adults participating in organised, generally high-risk, activities. The other two trials involved injured patients who had been active in sports before their injury. The prophylactic interventions under test included the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis (three trials), air-cast brace (one trial) or high top shoes (one trial); ankle disk training; taping; muscle

  5. Differences in kinematic control of ankle joint motions in people with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Kristof; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M

    2013-06-01

    People with chronic ankle instability display different ankle joint motions compared to healthy people. The purpose of this study was to investigate the strategies used to control ankle joint motions between a group of people with chronic ankle instability and a group of healthy, matched controls. Kinematic data were collected from 11 people with chronic ankle instability and 11 matched control subjects as they performed a single-leg land-and-cut maneuver. Three-dimensional ankle joint angles were calculated from 100 ms before, to 200 ms after landing. Kinematic control of the three rotational ankle joint degrees of freedom was investigated by simultaneously examining the three-dimensional co-variation of plantarflexion/dorsiflexion, toe-in/toe-out rotation, and inversion/eversion motions with principal component analysis. Group differences in the variance proportions of the first two principal components indicated that the angular co-variation between ankle joint motions was more linear in the control group, but more planar in the chronic ankle instability group. Frontal and transverse plane motions, in particular, contributed to the group differences in the linearity and planarity of angular co-variation. People with chronic ankle instability use a different kinematic control strategy to coordinate ankle joint motions during a single-leg landing task. Compared to the healthy group, the chronic ankle instability group's control strategy appeared to be more complex and involved joint-specific contributions that would tend to predispose this group to recurring episodes of instability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomason, Katherine

    2014-07-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described.

  7. The adult ball-and-socket ankle joint: surgical management of late ankle and subtalar arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John S; DeOrio, James K

    2015-04-01

    We review the surgical management of 4 adult patients with ball-and-socket ankle deformity who developed end-stage subtalar and/or ankle joint arthritis. We retrospectively reviewed a series of 4 adult patients with ball-and-socket ankle configurations who underwent surgical treatment for either end-stage tibiotalar or subtalar arthritis, with either subtalar arthrodesis or total ankle replacement (TAR). Clinical outcome, including subjective pain assessment, limitation of activities, and difficulty with shoe wear, were assessed at follow-up. A total of 5 ankles in 4 patients were identified that met the inclusion criteria. There were 3 subtalar arthrodeses in 2 patients and 2 primary TARs in 2 patients. At an average follow-up of 30.5 (range = 17 to 59) months, there were no failures, although 1 patient who underwent TAR was considered an impending failure with aseptic component loosening. Of the 4 patients, 3 resumed normal activity with minimal pain and were very pleased with their overall outcome. Standard surgical interventions for ankle and subtalar arthritis, such as total ankle arthroplasty and subtalar arthrodesis, can be successfully performed in patients with ball-and-socket ankles; clinical outcome and survivorship, however, may be inferior to that in patients with normal ankle configurations. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case Series. © 2014 The Author(s).

  8. Spontaneous resolution of posterior ankle joint loose bodies after total ankle replacement: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond P; Cheng, Sally H S

    2017-06-01

    Late stage ankle osteoarthritis often presents with debilitating pain. It is common to find osteophytes and loose body formation around the joint. Total ankle arthroplasty can preserve joint mobility and pain relieve for such patient. However, when trying to remove the osteophytes and loose bodies at the posterior ankle joint, there is risk of damaging posterior structures such as the neurovascular bundle during the procedure. We are presenting a case where the posterior loose bodies remained untouched during the operation, and patient showed spontaneous resolution of the lesions with time. Patient enjoyed good function outcome after the surgery. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Prefabricated Ankle Orthoses on Postural Stability in Basketball Players with Chronic Ankle Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Faraji, Elahe; Daneshmandi, Hassan; Atri, Ahmad Ebrahimi; Onvani, Vahid; Namjoo, Faride Rezaee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries among athletes and instability and injury to this joint is responsible for long time loss of physical and recreational activity. Also, it can impose high costs to sport teams. Prevention of this injury is an important concern of practice and rehabilitation. One way of reducing the possibility of ankle joint injury is using an ankle orthosis. The present study aimed at inspecting the effects of two ankle orthoses on dynamic and semi-dynam...

  10. Influence of Elastic Bandage and Neoprene Ankle Support on Ankle Position Sense and Pain in Subjects with Ankle Sprain (Grade I & II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basir Majdoleslami

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate whether a neoprene ankle support and elastic bandage around the ankle joint of subjects with ankle sprain (grade I&II would , in short term (a reduce pain (b improve ankle joint position sense and comparison of their effect with each other if they have. Materials & Methods: In a semi-experimental study, 30 subjects (16men, 14 women, age between 16-52 with ankle sprain grade I&II. Subjects had to have at least 2cm from 10cm visual analogue scale (VAS of ankle pain for study entry. All patients were randomly assigned to either an elastic bandage or a neoprene ankle support. One week later they were assigned to the opposite selection. Joint position sense was assessed in the sitting position using an electrogoniometer and pain by VAS where 0cm equals no pain and 10 cm equals worst pain. ankle pain and JPS were assessed for each selection one week apart. During each visit assessment were performed at baseline and after 20 min of bandage/neoprene ankle support application. Results: the mean of scores for ankle variables JPS and VAS was taken and paired-t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test was employed to calculate the different between two trails. Neoprene ankle support had significant effect on ankle JPS (P=0.034. But elastic bandage had no effect (P=0.539. Both of them had significantly reduced ankle pain. (P=0.000  Conclusion: In subjects with both neoprene ankle support and elastic bandage reduced ankle pain with more effect of neoprene ankle support. Only the neoprene ankle support had effect on knee JPS.

  11. Comparison of custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinged joints and off-the-shelf ankle braces in preventing ankle sprain in lateral cutting movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Winson C C; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Choy, Barton T S; Leung, Aaron K L

    2012-06-01

    A custom moulded ankle orthosis with hinged joints potentially offers a better control over the subtalar joint and the ankle joint during lateral cutting movements, due to total contact design and increase in material strength. To test the above hypothesis by comparing it to three other available orthoses. Repeated measures. Eight subjects with a history of ankle sprains (Grade 2), and 11 subjects without such history performed lateral cutting movements in four test conditions: 1) non-orthotic, 2) custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinges, 3) Sport-Stirrup, and 4) elastic ankle sleeve with plastic support. A VICON motion analysis system was used to study the motions at the ankle and subtalar joints. The custom-moulded ankle orthosis significantly lowered the inversion angle at initial contact (p = 0.006) and the peak inversion angle (p = 0.000) during lateral cutting movements in comparison to non-orthotic condition, while the other two orthoses did not. The three orthoses did not affect the plantarflexion motions, which had been suggested by previous studies to be important in shock wave attenuation. The custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinges could better control inversion and thus expected to better prevent ankle sprain in lateral cutting movements. Custom-moulded ankle orthoses are not commonly used in preventing ankle sprains. This study raises the awareness of the use of custom-moulded ankle orthoses which are expected to better prevent ankle sprains.

  12. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapik, Joseph J; Spiess, Anita; Darakjy, Salima; Grier, Tyson; Manning, Fred; Livingston, Elaine; Swedler, David; Amoroso, Paul; Jones, Bruce H

    2008-01-01

    ...) of the Defense Safety Oversight Council (DSOC) to evaluate the parachute ankle brace (PAB). Information provided by the questionnaire identified potential injury risk factors and comments on the PAB...

  13. Postoperative MR study of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Sander, B.; Schubeus, P.; Tepe, H.; Goudarzi, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    20 patients with acute traumatic rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament and ligamental suture were studied postoperatively by MRI. MR results were correlated with stress X-ray studies. We found a normal anterior talofibular ligament in eight cases. However, stress X-ray images showed normal stability of the ankle joint in eighteen cases. In six patients the anterior talofibular ligament was thickened, in another six cases it could not be separated from scar tissue. Therefore MR imaging of ankle ligaments did not allow a diagnosis of their function. Nevertheless, sequelae of the ankle trauma such as osteochondrosis, exsudation into the ankle joint and tendovaginitis of the flexor muscles were sensitively visualised by MR. (orig.) [de

  14. New arthroscopic assisted technique for ankle instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner Garces, Juan Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    An assisted arthroscopic technique for chronic ankle instability is presented by the author, together with his results for 27 patients treated between January 2000 and February 2004, with a minimum follow-up of six months. Indications for his technique, according to the rehabilitation protocol of the Medical Centre, included patients with chronic subjective and objective ankle instability, anteroposterior instability, associated anteromedical impingement syndromes, non competitive athletes, patients not displaying defects in the alignment of the axis of foot and ankle, or systemic disorders such as diabetes mellitus, collagenisis or hyperelasticity. Patients were evaluated according to the AOFAS scale for the outcome of ankle procedures, and followed up for a minimum period of six months. Positive results confirm an efficient and effective technique, simple and easy to reproduce, that does not hinder future open anatomical or non-anatomical reconstruction, and in which complications are minimal

  15. An epidemiological survey on ankle sprain.

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, M S; Chan, K M; So, C H; Yuan, W Y

    1994-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury and is often regarded as trivial by athletes and coaches. This epidemiological study was conducted among three categories of Hong Kong Chinese athletes: national teams, competitive athletes and recreational athletes. This study shows that as much as 73% of all athletes had recurrent ankle sprain and 59% of these athletes had significant disability and residual symptoms which led to impairment of their athletic performance. This study indicates that a pro...

  16. Postoperative infection in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Victoria O

    2012-07-01

    Our discussion highlights the commonly performed surgical procedures in the foot and ankle and reviews the various imaging modalities available for the detection of infection with graphic examples to better enable radiologists to approach the radiological evaluation of postoperative infection in the foot and ankle. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious inflammation remains a diagnostic challenge usually needing a combination of clinical assessment, laboratory investigations, and imaging studies to increase diagnostic accuracy.

  17. Clinical examination results in individuals with functional ankle instability and ankle-sprain copers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Cynthia J; Arnold, Brent L; Ross, Scott E; Ketchum, Jessica; Ericksen, Jeffrey; Pidcoe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Why some individuals with ankle sprains develop functional ankle instability and others do not (ie, copers) is unknown. Current understanding of the clinical profile of copers is limited. To contrast individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI), copers, and uninjured individuals on both self-reported variables and clinical examination findings. Cross-sectional study. Sports medicine research laboratory. Participants consisted of 23 individuals with a history of 1 or more ankle sprains and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI: Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool [CAIT] score = 20.52 ± 2.94, episodes of giving way = 5.8 ± 8.4 per month), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers: CAIT score = 27.74 ± 1.69), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain and no instability (uninjured: CAIT score = 28.78 ± 1.78). Self-reported disability was recorded using the CAIT and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports. On clinical examination, ligamentous laxity and tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and pain at end ROM were recorded. Questionnaire scores for the CAIT, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports, ankle inversion and anterior drawer laxity scores, pain with palpation of the lateral ligaments, ankle ROM, and pain at end ROM. Individuals with FAI had greater self-reported disability for all measures (P < .05). On clinical examination, individuals with FAI were more likely to have greater talar tilt laxity, pain with inversion, and limited sagittal-plane ROM than copers (P < .05). Differences in both self-reported disability and clinical examination variables distinguished individuals with FAI from copers at least 1 year after injury. Whether the deficits could be detected immediately postinjury to prospectively identify potential copers is unknown.

  18. Differentiation of ankle sprain motion and common sporting motion by ankle inversion velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Vikki Wing-Shan; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Fung, Kwai-Yau; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2010-07-20

    This study investigated the ankle inversion and inversion velocity between various common motions in sports and simulated sprain motion, in order to provide a threshold for ankle sprain risk identification. The experiment was composed of two parts: firstly, ten male subjects wore a pair of sport shoes and performed ten trials of running, cutting, jump-landing and stepping-down motions. Secondly, five subjects performed five trials of simulated sprain motion by a supination sprain simulator. The motions were analyzed by an eight-camera motion capture system at 120 Hz. A force plate was employed to record the vertical ground reaction force and locate the foot strike time for common sporting motions. Ankle inversion and inversion velocity were calculated by a standard lower extremity biomechanics calculation procedure. Profiles of vertical ground reaction force, ankle inversion angle and ankle inversion velocity were obtained. Results suggested that the ankle was kept in an everted position during the stance. The maximum ankle inversion velocity ranged from 22.5 to 85.1 degrees/s and 114.0 to 202.5 degrees/s for the four tested motions and simulated sprain motion respectively. Together with the ankle inversion velocity reported in the injury case (623 degrees/s), a threshold of ankle inversion velocity of 300 degrees/s was suggested for the identification of ankle sprain. The information obtained in this study can serve as a basis for the development of an active protection apparatus for reducing ankle sprain injury. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparatory co-activation of the ankle muscles may prevent ankle inversion injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMers, Matthew S.; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.

    2018-01-01

    Ankle inversion sprains are the most frequent acute musculoskeletal injuries occurring in physical activity. Interventions that retrain muscle coordination have helped rehabilitate injured ankles, but it is unclear which muscle coordination strategies, if any, can prevent ankle sprains. The purpose of this study was to determine whether coordinated activity of the ankle muscles could prevent excessive ankle inversion during a simulated landing on a 30-degree incline. We used a set of musculoskeletal simulations to evaluate the efficacy of two strategies for coordinating the ankle evertor and invertor muscles during simulated landing scenarios: planned co-activation and stretch reflex activation with physiologic latency (60-millisecond delay). A full-body musculoskeletal model of landing was used to generate simulations of a subject dropping onto an inclined surface with each coordination condition. Within each condition, the intensity of evertor and invertor co-activity or stretch reflexes were varied systematically. The simulations revealed that strong preparatory co-activation of the ankle evertors and invertors prior to ground contact prevented ankle inversion from exceeding injury thresholds by rapidly generating eversion moments after initial contact. Conversely, stretch reflexes were too slow to generate eversion moments before the simulations reached the threshold for inversion injury. These results suggest that training interventions to protect the ankle should focus on stiffening the ankle with muscle co-activation prior to landing. The musculoskeletal models, controllers, software, and simulation results are freely available online at http://simtk.org/home/ankle-sprains, enabling others to reproduce the results and explore new injury scenarios and interventions. PMID:28057351

  20. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted.   CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat a...

  1. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the natu...

  2. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the natur...

  3. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ General - CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. LHC Symposiums Management - CB - MB - FB - FMC Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2006 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the na...

  4. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ Management- CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management - CB - MB - FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2007 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of em¬pl...

  5. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the iCMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS/ Management- CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management - CB - MB - FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through their AFS account (ZH). However some linked documents are restricted to the Board Members. FB documents are only accessible to FB members. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2007 Annual reviews are posted. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral students upon completion of their theses. Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of employment and ...

  6. The ANKLe Score: An Audit of Otolaryngology Emergency Clinic Record Keeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Sara C; Hayashi, Daichi; Tysome, James R

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Accurate and legible medical records are essential to good quality patient care. Guidelines from The Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCSE) state the content required to form a complete medical record, but do not address legibility. An audit of otolaryngology emergency clinic record keeping was performed using a new scoring system. PATIENTS AND METHODS The Adjusted Note Keeping and Legibility (ANKLe) score was developed as an objective and quantitative method to assess both the content and legibility of case notes, incorporating the RCSE guidelines. Twenty consecutive otolaryngology emergency clinic case notes from each of 7 senior house officers were audited against standards for legibility and content using the ANKLe score. A proforma was introduced to improve documentation and handwriting advice was given. A further set of 140 notes (20 notes for each of the 7 doctors) was audited in the same way to provide feedback. RESULTS The introduction of a proforma and advice on handwriting significantly increased the quality of case note entries in terms of content, legibility and overall ANKLe score. CONCLUSIONS Accurate note keeping can be improved by the use of a proforma. The legibility of handwriting can be improved using simple advice. The ANKLe score is an objective assessment tool of the overall quality of medical note documentation which can be adapted for use in other specialties. PMID:18430339

  7. Survival of the Scandinavian total ankle replacement (STAR): results of ten to nineteen years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigg, Arno; Germann, Ursula; Huber, Martin; Horisberger, Monika

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate survival and clinical outcome of the Scandinavian total ankle replacement (STAR) prosthesis after a minimum of ten years up to a maximum of 19 years. Fifty STAR prostheses in 46 patients with end stage ankle osteoarthritis operated between 1996 and 2006 by the same surgeon (MH) were included. Minimal follow-up was ten years (median 14.6 years, 95% confidence interval [CI] 12.9-16.4). Clinical (Kofoed score) and radiological assessments were taken before the operation and at one, ten (+2), and 16 (±3) years after implantation. The primary endpoint was defined as exchange of the whole prosthesis or conversion to arthrodesis (def. 1), exchange of at least one metallic component (def. 2), or exchange of any component including the inlay (due to breakage or wear) (def. 3). Survival was estimated according to Kaplan-Meier. Further reoperations related to STAR were also recorded. The ten year survival rate was (def. 1) 94% (CI 82-98%), (def. 2) 90% (CI, 77-96%), and (def. 3) 78% (CI 64-87%). The 19-year survival rate was (def. 1) 91% (CI 78-97%), (def. 2) 75% (CI 53-88%), and (def. 3) 55% (CI 34-71%). Considering any re-operations related to STAR, 52% (26/50) of prostheses were affected by re-operations. Mean pre-operative Kofoed score was 49, which improved to 84 after one year (n = 50), to 90 after ten years (n = 46), and to 89 after 16 years (n = 28). The survival rate for def. 1 and 2 was high. However, re-operations occurred in 52% of all STAR prosthesis. Retrospective cohort study, evidence Level 4.

  8. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  9. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale; Translation and validation of the Dutch language version for ankle fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. de Boer (Annette ); Tjioe, R.J.C. (Roderik J.C.); Van Der Sijde, F. (Fleur); D.E. Meuffels (Duncan); P.Th. den Hoed (Pieter); C.H. van der Vlies (Cornelis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale is among the most commonly used instruments for measuring outcome of treatment in patients who sustained a complex ankle or hindfoot injury. It consists of a patient-reported and a physician-reported

  10. Biomechanical comparison of newly designed stemless prosthesis and conventional hip prosthesis--an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Lee, Mel S; Chen, Weng-Pin; Hsieh, Pang-Hsin; Lee, Po-Chen; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2005-01-01

    Local bone loss after implantation of traditional stem-type prostheses remains an unsolved problem during the long-term application of total hip replacement. The stress shielding effect and osteolysis were thought to be the two main factors that result in local bone loss after prosthesis implantation. A newly designed stemless cervico-trochanteric (C-T) prosthesis was thus developed to reduce stress shielding and osteolysis caused by the implantation of conventional stem-type prosthesis. Eight synthetic femora were implanted with C-T and porous coated anatomic (PCA) prostheses. Under 2,000-Newton load, the surface strains of proximal femora were compared between the intact, PCA press-fit femora and the C-T implanted femora with three different fixation modes: two-screw fixation, three-screw fixation, and three-screw combined with cement fixation. The results revealed that stress shielding in the C-T implanted femora was significantly eliminated compared to that of the PCA implanted femora (p0.1). The C-T implanted femur has more physiological strain distribution. Moreover, from the C-T prosthetic characteristic design, the localized osteolysis would be also reduced due to the overall coverage of neck-trochanteric area. The newly designed C-T prosthesis may be a useful alternative to the traditional stem-type prosthesis in the future.

  11. Prosthesis evaluation questionnaire for persons with lower limb amputations: assessing prosthesis-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legro, M W; Reiber, G D; Smith, D G; del Aguila, M; Larsen, J; Boone, D

    1998-08-01

    To develop a self-report questionnaire for persons with lower limb amputations who use a prosthesis. The resulting scales were intended to be suitable to evaluate the prosthesis and life with the prosthesis. The conceptual framework was health-related quality of life. Multiple steps of scale development, terminating with test-retest of the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ) by mail. SOURCE OF SAMPLE: Records from two Seattle hospitals. Ninety-two patients with lower limb amputations who varied by age, reason for amputation, years since amputation, and amputation level. The 10 scales used were 4 prosthesis function scales (Usefulness, Residual Limb Health, Appearance, and Sounds), 2 mobility scales (Ambulation and Transfers), 3 psychosocial scales (Perceived Responses, Frustration, and Social Burden), and 1 Well-being scale. Validation measures were the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, the Social Interaction subscale from the Sickness Impact Profile, and the Profile of Mood States-short form. Nine PEQ scales demonstrated high internal consistency. All met test-retest criteria for comparing group results. Validity was described based on methods used to gather original items, distribution of scores, and comparison of scores with criterion variables. The PEQ scales displayed good psychometric properties. Future work will assess responsiveness of PEQ scales to changes in prosthetic components. We conclude that they will be useful in evaluation of prosthetic care.

  12. A Review of 399 Total Ankle Replacements: Analysis of Ipsilateral Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis and Associated Talar Component Subsidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prissel, Mark A; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is an accepted treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis. When concurrent subtalar joint pathologic features exist, ipsilateral subtalar joint arthrodesis (STJA) can be performed either simultaneous with TAR or as a staged procedure. Limited data exist on the effect of talar component subsidence and prosthesis survivorship. The present study purpose was to evaluate the effect of STJA on talar component subsidence after primary TAR and its effect on TAR survivorship. All patients, a minimum of 18 years old, from a single institution with modern-generation TAR and 1-year minimum follow-up data available were evaluated. The study group included patients who had also undergone STJA, and the control group (no STJA) was matched 1:1 by age, gender, and prosthesis. The initial postoperative weightbearing and most recent weightbearing radiographs were compared for talar component subsidence. We reviewed 399 primary TARs from 2004 to 2012. A total of 33 patients with ipsilateral STJA met the inclusion criteria and had an appropriate control group match. In the study group, 8 patients required a return to the operating room for 4 revisions and 4 reoperations at a median follow-up point of 24.3 months. Of the controls, 9 patients required a return to the operating room, with 4 revisions and 5 reoperations at a median follow-up point of 38.4 months. No statistically significant radiographic differences were found between the 2 groups. Primary TAR and ipsilateral STJA were infrequently required (41 of 399; 10.3%). TAR did not result in decreased survivorship when performed with ipsilateral STJA at an early follow-up point. Further study is warranted to determine any differences among previous, simultaneous, and subsequent STJA with ipsilateral TAR, and a matched longitudinal analysis is needed to determine longer term survivorship. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of blood pressure, ankle blood pressure and calculation of ankle brachial index in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexøe, Jørgen; Damsbo, Bent; Lund, Jens Otto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values......BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values...

  14. Midterm results of "thrust plate" prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bernd; Wessel, Stephanie; Deuretzbacher, Georg; Protzen, Michael; Ruther, Wolfgang

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to analyze the midterm results obtained with the metaphyseal fixation principle of the thrust plate prosthesis (TPP). Survival of 214 implants in 204 patients was analyzed. Clinical (Harris hip score) and radiologic examinations were carried out on 157 of 190 TPP with a postimplantation follow-up period of at least 5 years. Failure rate was 7.0% (9 aseptic and 6 septic loosening). Harris hip score increased from 36.9 +/- 13.5 points preoperatively to 91.2 +/- 13.1 points at follow-up. Eleven TPPs showed radiolucent lines not indicating prosthetic loosening. Thrust plate prosthesis is not an alternative to stemmed endoprostheses. It may be rarely indicated in very young patients where, because of their age, several revision operations can be expected.

  15. [Effect of obturator prosthesis for partial maxillectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Toshihiko

    2005-06-01

    77-year-old completely edentulous female was treated for a malignant carcinoma with an upper left posterior maxilla resection. Existing complete dentures were modified by an immediate surgical obturator with resin. A definitive obturator was fabricated following healing of the site to recover speech and chewing function. Thermoplastic wax was used for border molding of the custom tray and conventional impression procedures were followed. A buccal flange type obturator was utilized to reduce weight. Flat cusped posterior teeth were used to reduce stress on the residual ridge and facilitate occlusal contact and balance of the prosthesis. The patient was satisfied with the recovery of chewing and pronunciation. Expected chewing function existed on the non-resected side. Speech and pronunciation were similar to the pre-operative condition with complete dentures. Prosthetic rehabilitation with a maxillary obturator prosthesis may provide good speech and adequate chewing function following partial resection of the edentulous maxilla.

  16. Tracheobronchial Foreign Body Aspiration: Dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataman Köse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to extract foreign bodies for avoiding life-threatening complications. They can lead to death if they are not treated. Different signs and symptoms could occur according to the complete or partial airway obstruction. Foreign body aspiration is a rare incident in adults. The organic foreign materials such as foods are found to be aspirated more commonly and are usually settled in the right bronchial system. However, dental prosthesis and teeth aspirations are rare in literature. In our study, a 52-year-old male patient who had aspirated the front part of his lower dental prosthesis accidentally is presented and the foreign body is extracted by using rigid bronchoscopy. There are many causes of aspiration but dental prosthetic aspirations should be kept in mind during sleep. For this reason, dental apparatus must be taken out while asleep.

  17. Fixed and mobile-bearing total ankle prostheses: Effect on tibial bone strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Alexandre; Fernandes, Caroline Sieger; Guillemin, Maïka; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2017-10-01

    Total ankle replacement is associated to a high revision rate. To improve implant survival, the potential advantage of prostheses with fixed bearing compared to mobile bearing is unclear. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that fixed and mobile bearing prostheses are associated with different biomechanical quantities typically associated to implant failure. With a validated finite element model, we compared three cases: a prosthesis with a fixed bearing, a prosthesis with a mobile bearing in a centered position, and a prosthesis with mobile bearing in an eccentric position. Both prostheses were obtained from the same manufacturer. They were tested on seven tibias with maximum axial compression force during walking. We tested the hypothesis that there was a difference of bone strain, bone-implant interfacial stress, and bone support between the three cases. We also evaluated, for the three cases, the correlations between bone support, bone strain and bone-implant interfacial stress. There were no statistically significant differences between the three cases. Overall, bone support was mainly trabecular, and less effective in the posterior side. Bone strain and bone-implant interfacial stress were strongly correlated to bone support. Even if slight differences are observed between fixed and mobile bearing, it is not enough to put forward the superiority of one of these implants regarding their reaction to axial compression. When associated to the published clinical results, our study provides no argument to warn surgeons against the use of two-components fixed bearing implants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prospective study of ankle and foot fractures in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadagiri Surender Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of ankle fractures in old people is changing as time passes on. The incidence of ankle fractures increases with advancing age. The study conducted was among a rural popula-tion which comprised of 68 women (32 women with ankle fractures & 36 women with foot fractures. Patients studied were in the age group more than 50 years. The study highlights the etiological & risk factors for fractures of ankle & foot. The commonest ankle fracture was the lateral malleolar fracture & the commonest foot fracture was the 5th Metatarsal fracture. Diabetes is a risk factor which increases the occurrence of ankle and foot injuries.

  19. Development and clinical application of a new testicular prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ye; Cai, Zhikang; Chen, Huixing; Ping, Ping; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhong; Li, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    A new type of testicular prosthesis made of silastic with an elliptical shape to mimic a normal testis was developed by our team and submitted for patenting in China. The prosthesis was produced in different sizes to imitate the normal testis of the patient. To investigate the effects and safety of the testicular prosthesis, 20 patients receiving testicular prosthesis implantation were recruited for this study. Follow-up after 6 months revealed no complications in the patients. All the patients answered that they were satisfied with their body image and the position of the implants, 19 patients were satisfied with the size and 16 patients were satisfied with the weight. These results show that the testicular prosthesis used in this study can meet patient's expectations. Patients undergoing orchiectomy should be offered the option to receive a testicular prosthesis implantation. The dimensions and weight of the available prosthetic implants should be further addressed to improve patient satisfaction. PMID:21927041

  20. Development and clinical application of a new testicular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ye; Cai, Zhikang; Chen, Huixing; Ping, Ping; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhong; Li, Zheng

    2011-11-01

    A new type of testicular prosthesis made of silastic with an elliptical shape to mimic a normal testis was developed by our team and submitted for patenting in China. The prosthesis was produced in different sizes to imitate the normal testis of the patient. To investigate the effects and safety of the testicular prosthesis, 20 patients receiving testicular prosthesis implantation were recruited for this study. Follow-up after 6 months revealed no complications in the patients. All the patients answered that they were satisfied with their body image and the position of the implants, 19 patients were satisfied with the size and 16 patients were satisfied with the weight. These results show that the testicular prosthesis used in this study can meet patient's expectations. Patients undergoing orchiectomy should be offered the option to receive a testicular prosthesis implantation. The dimensions and weight of the available prosthetic implants should be further addressed to improve patient satisfaction.

  1. Fabrication of a provisional nasal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Evan B; Golden, Marjorie; Huryn, Joseph M

    2014-11-01

    A technique for making a provisional nasal prosthesis for interim use after the ablation of a midface tumor is described. The technique is especially useful for the re-creation of a nasal form in an expedient and cost-effective manner. A preoperative definitive cast, or moulage, of the patient that includes a nasal form is used to fabricate a vacuum form of the midface. The vacuum form is evaluated on the patient, the extension is adjusted, and an external adhesive knit liner is applied to give the appearance of a contoured nasal bandage. The provisional nasal prosthesis is attached with medical adhesive tape and removed daily by the patient. The prosthesis is easily replaced during the course of treatment and has been found to be functional and esthetically acceptable to those patients receiving care from the Dental Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Laser-assisted fixation of a nitinol stapes prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrötzlmair, Florian; Suchan, Fabian; Pongratz, Thomas; Krause, Eike; Müller, Joachim; Sroka, Ronald

    2018-02-01

    Otosclerosis is an inner ear bone disease characterized by fixation of the stapes and consequently progressive hearing loss. One treatment option is the surgical replacement of the stapes by a prosthesis. When so called "smart materials" like nitinol are used, prosthesis fixation can be performed using a laser without manual crimping on the incus. However, specific laser-prosthesis interactions have not been described yet. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the thermo-mechanical properties of the NiTiBOND® prosthesis as a basis for handling instructions for laser-assisted prosthesis fixation. Closure of the NiTiBOND® prosthesis was induced ex vivo by either a diode laser emitting at λ = 940 nm or a CO 2 laser (λ = 10,600 nm). Total energy for closure was determined. Suitable laser parameters (pulse duration, power per pulse, distance between tip of the laser fiber and prosthesis) were assessed. Specific laser-prosthesis interactions were recorded. Especially the diode laser was found to be an appropriate energy source. A total energy deposit of 60 mJ by pulses in near contact application was found to be sufficient for prosthesis closure ex vivo. Energy should be transmitted through a laser fiber equipollent to the prosthesis band diameter. Specific deformation characteristics due to the zonal prosthesis composition have to be taken into account. NiTiBOND® stapes prosthesis can be closed by very little energy when appropriate energy sources like diode lasers are used, suggesting a relatively safe application in vivo. Lasers Surg. Med. 50:153-157, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Rehabilitation of amputed thumb with a silicone prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Asnani, Pooja; Shivalingappa, Chandu Giriyapura; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Somkuwar, Kirti; Khan, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Creating prosthesis, having realistic skin surface and seamless visual integration with the surrounding tissues, requires both artistic and technical skill. Anatomical design, thin margins, lifelike fingernails and realistic color/contours are essential for patient satisfaction. Prosthesis is especially useful in case of lost body parts, as reconstructive surgery cannot fully restore aesthetics. This case report describes a simple technique for fabricating silicon finger prosthesis for a pati...

  4. Self-contained inflatable penile prosthesis: magnetic resonance appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, M.F.; Munk, P.L.; Vellet, A.D.; Chin, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The appearance of an inflatable penile prosthesis, visualized on a short tau inversion recovery sequence, is reported, in a patient who had magnetic resonance imaging for pelvic pain subsequent to radical cystoprostatectomy for bladder carcinoma. With suppression of adjacent fat signal, the prosthesis is well delineated from adjacent structures. The fluid-containing cylinders of the prosthesis are of very bright signal intensity, with the relief valve assembly of low signal intensity. 5 refs., 2 figs

  5. Immediately Loaded Intraorally Welded Complete-Arch Maxillary Provisional Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiero, Alberto Maria; Benato, Renato; Fincato, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Guided implant surgery is not completely accurate when using computer-designed stereolithographic surgical guides. Complications are frequently reported when combining computer-guided flapless surgery with an immediately loaded prefabricated prosthesis. Achieving passive fit of a prefabricated prosthesis on the inserted implants the same day of the surgery can be difficult. The aim of this report is to show a new treatment approach to immediately loaded implants inserted with computer-guided surgery using an intraoral welded full-arch provisional prosthesis.

  6. Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion After Ankle Self-Stretching Using a Strap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Hwang, Ui-jae

    2015-01-01

    Context  A variety of ankle self-stretching exercises have been recommended to improve ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) in individuals with limited ankle dorsiflexion. A strap can be applied to stabilize the talus and facilitate anterior glide of the distal tibia at the talocrural joint during ankle self-stretching exercises. Novel ankle self-stretching using a strap (SSS) may be a useful method of improving ankle DFROM. Objective  To compare the effects of 2 ankle-stretching techniques (static stretching versus SSS) on ankle DFROM. Design  Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting  University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  Thirty-two participants with limited active dorsiflexion (<20°) while sitting (14 women and 18 men) were recruited. Main Outcome Measure(s)  The participants performed 2 ankle self-stretching techniques (static stretching and SSS) for 3 weeks. Active DFROM (ADFROM), passive DFROM (PDFROM), and the lunge angle were measured. An independent t test was used to compare the improvements in these values before and after the 2 stretching interventions. The level of statistical significance was set at α = .05. Results  Active DFROM and PDFROM were greater in both stretching groups after the 3-week interventions. However, ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle were greater in the SSS group than in the static-stretching group (P < .05). Conclusions  Ankle SSS is recommended to improve ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle in individuals with limited DFROM. PMID:26633750

  7. Management of foot/ankle osteoarthritis by Australian General Practitioners: an analysis of national patient-encounter records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Kade L; Harrison, Christopher; Britt, Helena; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2018-04-12

    To document the management of foot/ankle osteoarthritis/arthritis (OA) by general practitioners (GP) in Australia. We analysed data from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health Program April 2010-March 2016 inclusive. Patient and GP encounter characteristics were extracted. Data were classified by the International Classification of Primary Care, Version 2, and summarised using descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) around point estimates. The dataset included 583,900 patient-encounter records among which foot/ankle OA was managed 621 times, at a rate of 1.1 per 1,000 encounters, with an annual estimated 152,000 GP encounters nationally. The management rate was most frequent among patients aged 65-74 years (2.25 per 1,000 encounters). Comorbidities were managed at a rate of 105.8 per 100 encounters, the most common being hypertension, and few being other musculoskeletal problems. Foot/ankle OA was mostly managed using medication (64.6 per 100 problems), with prescription rates far exceeding non-pharmacological strategies such as counselling, advice or education (17.7 per 100), or allied health referral (10.1 per 100). When considering specific health/medical professionals, patients were referred to orthopaedic surgeons 8.4 times per 100 foot/ankle problems, podiatrists 6.3 times per 100 foot/ankle problems, and physiotherapists 2.6 times per 100 foot/ankle problems. Pharmacological management rates of foot/ankle OA were high and substantially exceeded non-pharmacological management such as lifestyle advice and allied health referral. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of this care compared to self-management and conservative non-drug treatment in people with foot/ankle OA. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. [Prosthesis use in pediatric patients with fibular hipoplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Omar Carlos González; García, Felipe Haces; Leonori, Romáin Capdevila; García, Víctor Rosas

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prosthesis adaptability at use of pedestal and transtibial prosthesis, recognize the average average age of amputation surgery, and the complications of the amputation in patients with fibular hemimelia. 47 patients were evaluated, initially to adjust pedestal prosthesis and when this was not tolerated, we realize amputation and adaptation of transtibial prosthesis, we valued the average age of amputation surgery, the associate complications and the prosthesis adaptability we use the K system for functional ambulation. Of the 12 patients to actually use pedestal prosthesis 9 (75%) had a K.2 level, 3 (25%) had a K-3 level, of the 35 patients to use transtibial prosthesis 1 (3%) had a K-2 level, 19 (54%) K-3 level, and 15 (43%) in the K-4 level. The average age to amputation surgery was 3.9 years old, one case had a complication. The early prosthesis adaptability provides advantages in the functional ambulation, as demonstrated on the results. The goal of the transtibial amputation is to facilitate the prosthesis adaptability, is due to take advantage of the best functional adaptation the child in the first years of life, circumstance that improves the integral rehabilitation of the patient.

  9. Improved comfort and function of arm prosthesis after implantation of a Humerus-T-Prosthesis in trans-humeral amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsø, Eivind; Kristensen, Tomm; Benum, Pål; Sivertsen, Svein; Persen, Leif; Funderud, Are; Magne, Tordis; Aursand, Hans Petter; Aamodt, Arild

    2006-12-01

    The use of arm prosthesis in trans-humeral amputees is limited; due to the cone form of the amputation stump. A Humerus-T-Prosthesis was implanted in three patients to create artificial humerus condyles. Two of the patients were successfully rehabilitated with the application of a new type trans-humeral arm prosthesis. This arm prosthesis had a socket which is suspended and stabilized by the humerus and implant only. Traction and rotational stability were secured by adjustable pressure adaptation around the artificial condyles. The third patient developed a pressure wound over the lateral part of the artificial condyle that later healed. He also was subject to a new trauma with a fracture of the ipsilateral scapula and until now has had limited the use of his new arm prosthesis. It was concluded that this new concept for prosthesis fitting of trans-humeral amputees looks promising, but alternative designs of the implant should be tested.

  10. Summit documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document gathers three declarations about the non-proliferation of massive destruction weapons, made by the G8 organization participants during their last summit held in Evian (France): declaration about the enforcement and respect of the non-proliferation measures implemented by the IAEA and by the conventions for chemical and biological weapons; declaration about the protection of radioactive sources against diversion (regulatory control, inventory, control of sources export etc..); warranty about the security of radioactive sources (G8 approach, sustain of the IAEA action, sustain to the most vulnerable states, control mechanisms, political commitment of states, implementation of the recommendations of the international conference about the security and safety of radiation sources, held in Vienna (Austria) on March 2003. (J.S.)

  11. Dynamic ankle control in athletes with ankle instability during sports maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Chin-Yang; Lin, Chia-Wei

    2011-09-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury. While the effects of static constraints in stabilizing the ankle joint are relatively well understood, those of dynamic constraints are less clear and require further investigation. This study was undertaken to evaluate the dynamic stability of the ankle joint during the landing phase of running and stop-jump maneuvers in athletes with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Controlled laboratory study. Fifteen athletes with CAI and 15 age-matched athletes without CAI performed running and stop-jump landing tasks. The dynamic ankle joint stiffness, tibialis anterior (TA)/peroneus longus (PL) and TA/gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) co-contraction indices, ankle joint angle, and root-mean-square (RMS) of the TA, PL, and GL electromyographic signals were measured during each task. During running, the CAI group exhibited a greater ankle inversion angle than the control group in the pre-landing phase (P = .012-.042) and a lower dynamic ankle joint stiffness in the post-landing phase (CAI: 0.109 ± 0.039 N·m/deg; control: 0.150 ± 0.068 N·m/deg; P = .048). In the stop-jump landing task, athletes with CAI had a significantly lower TA/PL co-contraction index during the pre-landing phase (CAI: 49.1 ± 19; control: 64.8 ± 16; P = .009). In addition, the CAI group exhibited a greater ankle inversion (P = .049), a lower peak eversion (P = .04), and a smaller RMS of the PL electromyographic signal in the post-landing phase (CAI: 0.73 ± 0.32; control: 0.51 ± 0.22; P = .04). Athletes with CAI had a relatively inverted ankle, reduced muscle co-contraction, and a lower dynamic stiffness in the ankle joint during the landing phase of sports maneuvers and this may jeopardize the stability of the ankle. Sports training or rehabilitation programs should differentiate between the pre-landing and post-landing phases of sports maneuvers, and should educate athletes to land with an appropriate ankle position and muscle recruitment.

  12. Rehabilitation of a Patient with an Intra Oral Prosthesis and an Extra Oral Orbital Prosthesis Retained with Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Pattanaik, Seema; Wadkar, Aarti P.

    2011-01-01

    This clinical case report deals with a rehabilitation of a patient with an extensive maxillary and orbital defect using an intra oral prosthesis obturating the maxillary defect and extra oral orbital prosthesis retained with rare-earth magnets for secondary retention; primary retention was derived by snug fit of the prosthesis to underlying and adjacent tissues. The rehabilitation resulted in improved function, esthetics and comfort to the patient thus enabling him to lead a normal life.

  13. Acute injury of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [de

  14. Treatment of Medial Malleolus or Pure Deltoid Ligament Injury in Patients with Supination-External Rotation Type IV Ankle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Jian-Wen; Wang, Chen; Huang, Jia-Zhang; Ma, Xin; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Xue

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of internal fixation on postoperative ankle function in patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures, including medial malleolus fractures and deltoid ligament injury. Between January 2012 and June 2014, patients with medial structure injuries were enrolled in this study and assigned to the medial malleolus fracture group or the deltoid ligament group. The surgical procedures for the two groups were documented. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate or screw was removed from the lateral ankle. The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was used to assess ankle function. A total of 84 patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures had complete medical records and were included in this study. The average age of the patients was 44.16 years (range, 15-75). The patient sample included 39 males and 45 females. Overall, 49 patients (19 males and 30 females) suffered a medial malleolus fracture. The average age of these patients was 40.20 years (range, 15-75). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 81.6% (40 patients) of these patients. Overall, 35 patients (20 males and 15 females) experienced a deltoid ligament injury. The average age of these patients was 44.21 years (range, 17-73). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 11.5% (four patients) of these patients. Open reduction was performed in patients with medial malleolus fractures, and two 4.0-mm cannulated screws were used to fixate the posterior malleolus and the medial malleolus. The suture-anchor technique was used to repair the ligaments in patients with deltoid ligament injuries. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate and screws were removed from the lateral ankle in patients. The average follow-up period was 13.4 months (range, 11-17). The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was

  15. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  16. Measurement of passive ankle stiffness in subjects with chronic hemiparesis using a novel ankle robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anindo; Bever, Christopher T.; Forrester, Larry W.; Macko, Richard F.; Hogan, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Our objective in this study was to assess passive mechanical stiffness in the ankle of chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors and to compare it with those of healthy young and older (age-matched) individuals. Given the importance of the ankle during locomotion, an accurate estimate of passive ankle stiffness would be valuable for locomotor rehabilitation, potentially providing a measure of recovery and a quantitative basis to design treatment protocols. Using a novel ankle robot, we characterized passive ankle stiffness both in sagittal and in frontal planes by applying perturbations to the ankle joint over the entire range of motion with subjects in a relaxed state. We found that passive stiffness of the affected ankle joint was significantly higher in chronic stroke survivors than in healthy adults of a similar cohort, both in the sagittal as well as frontal plane of movement, in three out of four directions tested with indistinguishable stiffness values in plantarflexion direction. Our findings are comparable to the literature, thus indicating its plausibility, and, to our knowledge, report for the first time passive stiffness in the frontal plane for persons with chronic stroke and older healthy adults. PMID:21346215

  17. Mechanical instability destabilises the ankle joint directly in the ankle-sprain mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Dominic; Faschian, Katrin; Lauber, Benedikt; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    Despite massive research efforts, it remains unclear how mechanical ankle instability (MAI) and functional ankle instability (FAI) affect joint control in the situation of ankle sprain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether individuals with MAI have deficits in stabilising their ankle joint in a close-to-injury situation compared with those with FAI and healthy controls. Ankle-joint control was assessed by means of three-dimensional motion analysis and electromyography in participants with FAI and MAI (n=19), in participants with pure FAI (n=9) and in healthy controls (n=18). Close-to-injury situations were simulated during standing, walking and jumping by means of a custom-made tilt platform. Individuals with FAI and MAI displayed significantly greater maximum ankle inversion angles (+5°) and inversion velocities (+50°/s) in the walking and jumping conditions compared to those with pure FAI and controls. Furthermore, individuals in the FAI and MAI group showed a significantly decreased pre-activation of the peroneus longus muscle during jumping compared to those with FAI. No differences between groups were found for plantar flexion and internal rotation, or for muscle activities following tilting of the platform. The present study demonstrates that MAI is characterised by impairments of ankle-joint control in close-to-injury situations. This could make these individuals more prone to recurrent ankle sprains, and suggests the need for additional mechanical support such as braces or even surgery. In addition, the study highlights the fact that dynamic experimental test conditions in the acting participant are needed to further unravel the mystery of chronic ankle instability.

  18. Biomechanical Study about Lateral Ankle Laxity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Voicu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to study the contribution of the anterior talofibular ligament to ankle laxity at 18 cadaver ankles. For this, there was made an original, bipolar transoseus system, in a monitorized test stand Mx-500N Schmidt with a digital force gauge Imada. It was measured the motion response for applied antero-posterior force, inversion-eversion moment and internal-external rotary torque, in three positions of flexion of the ankle, with an intact anterior talofibular ligament and after it’s sectioning. The results showed a significant increases in laxity in plantar flexion for the inversion and internal rotary torque, this mechanism coresponding with common modes of injury.

  19. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force...... output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force......-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased...

  20. CMS DOCUMENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS TALKS AT MAJOR MEETINGS The agenda and talks from major CMS meetings can now be electronically accessed from the ICMS Web site. The following items can be found on: http://cms.cern.ch/iCMS Management – CMS Weeks (Collaboration Meetings), CMS Weeks Agendas The talks presented at the Plenary Sessions. Management – CB – MB – FB Agendas and minutes are accessible to CMS members through Indico. LHCC The talks presented at the ‘CMS Meetings with LHCC Referees’ are available on request from the PM or MB Country Representative. Annual Reviews The talks presented at the 2008 Annual Reviews are posted in Indico. CMS DOCUMENTS It is considered useful to establish information on the first employment of CMS doctoral student upon completion of their theses.  Therefore it is requested that Ph.D students inform the CMS Secretariat about the nature of employment and name of their first employer. The Notes, Conference Reports and Theses published si...

  1. The clinimetric qualities of patient-assessed instruments for measuring chronic ankle instability: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asman Sara

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of outcomes from the patient's perspective becomes more recognized in health care. Also in patients with chronic ankle instability, the degree of present impairments, disabilities and participation problems should be documented from the perspective of the patient. The decision about which patient-assessed instrument is most appropriate for clinical practice should be based upon systematic reviews. Only rating scales constructed for patients with acute ligament injuries were systematically reviewed in the past. The aim of this study was to review systematically the clinimetric qualities of patient-assessed instruments designed for patients with chronic ankle instability. Methods A computerized literature search of Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Web of Science, Sport Discus and the Cochrane Controlled Trial Register was performed to identify eligible instruments. Two reviewers independently evaluated the clinimetric qualities of the selected instruments using a criteria list. The inter-observer reliability of both the selection procedure and the clinimetric evaluation was calculated using modified kappa coefficients. Results The inter-observer reliability of the selection procedure was excellent (k = .86. Four instruments met the eligibility criteria: the Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool (AJFAT, the Functional Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS, the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI and the Functional Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM. The inter-observer reliability of the quality assessment was substantial to excellent (k between .64 and .88. Test-retest reliability was demonstrated for the FAOS, the FADI and the FAAM but not for the AJFAT. The FAOS and the FAAM met the criteria for content validity and construct validity. For none of the studied instruments, the internal consistency was sufficiently demonstrated. The presence of floor- and ceiling effects was assessed for the FAOS but ceiling effects were present for all

  2. Predicting functional recovery after acute ankle sprain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R O'Connor

    Full Text Available Ankle sprains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal conditions presenting to primary care. Their clinical course is variable but there are limited recommendations on prognostic factors. Our primary aim was to identify clinical predictors of short and medium term functional recovery after ankle sprain.A secondary analysis of data from adult participants (N = 85 with an acute ankle sprain, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The predictive value of variables (age, BMI, gender, injury mechanism, previous injury, weight-bearing status, medial joint line pain, pain during weight-bearing dorsiflexion and lateral hop test recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks post injury were investigated for their prognostic ability. Recovery was determined from measures of subjective ankle function at short (4 weeks and medium term (4 months follow ups. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association between the aforementioned variables and functional recovery.Greater age, greater injury grade and weight-bearing status at baseline were associated with lower function at 4 weeks post injury (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.34. Greater age, weight-bearing status at baseline and non-inversion injury mechanisms were associated with lower function at 4 months (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.20. Pain on medial palpation and pain on dorsiflexion at 4 weeks were the most valuable prognostic indicators of function at 4 months (p< 0.01; adjusted R square=0.49.The results of the present study provide further evidence that ankle sprains have a variable clinical course. Age, injury grade, mechanism and weight-bearing status at baseline provide some prognostic information for short and medium term recovery. Clinical assessment variables at 4 weeks were the strongest predictors of recovery, explaining 50% of the variance in ankle function at 4 months. Further prospective research is required to highlight the factors

  3. Ankle Arthrodesis Using a Vertical Steinman's Pin in a Severely ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ankle arthrodesis is generally considered the gold standard for the treatment of a painful arthritic ankle not responding to conservative treatment. The goal is to eliminate pain and achieve a stable plantigrade foot. There are over 30 different methods of ankle fusion to date. We utilized a technique of placing one ...

  4. Ankle fusion using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, R. P. M.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Stufkens, S. A. S.; van Dijk, C. N.; Marti, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable fusion and optimal correction of the alignment of the ankle joint using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique. Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint after insufficient other treatment, severe deformity of the osteoarthritic ankle joint, or salvation procedure after failed arthroplasty.

  5. Knee and Ankle Arthroplasty in Hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Piero Solimeno

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Today, major surgical procedures can be safely performed in hemophilic patients with chronic arthropathy, using available factor concentrates. In this setting, total knee replacement is considered the “gold standard”, while the use of total ankle replacement is still debated. Indeed, the unsatisfactory results obtained with the previous available design of implants did not raise enthusiasm as knee or hip replacement. Recently, the introduction of new implant designs and better reported outcomes have renewed the interest in total ankle replacement in people with hemophilia. In this review, the role of replacement surgery in the treatment of chronic hemophilic arthropathy will be described.

  6. Foot and Ankle Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Anderson, Robert B

    Physicians need to be aware of a variety of foot and ankle injuries that commonly occur in American football, including turf toe, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, syndesmotic and deltoid disruption, and Achilles ruptures. These injuries are often complex and require early individual tailoring of treatment and rehabilitation protocols. Successful management and return to play requires early diagnosis, a thorough work-up, and prompt surgical intervention when warranted with meticulous attention to restoration of normal foot and ankle anatomy. Physicians should have a high suspicion for subtle injuries and variants that can occur via both contact and noncontact mechanisms.

  7. Simulations Results of an Ankle Rehabilitation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Doroftei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ankle structure is one of the most important structures of the human body. Due to its important role in human’s activities, this joint is the most injured part of the lower limb. For a complete recovery of the range of motion, recovery exercises are mandatory. The introduction of robotic physical recovery systems represents a modern alternative to traditional recovery. In this paper we present the development of a new ankle rehabilitation device, that aims to fully recover the range of motion required for daily activities.

  8. Latin American foot and ankle surgery today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abello, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    Latin American medical orthopedic sub specialties have evolved a lot during the past decade. Foot and ankle surgery for instance, has gained high level of proficiency and competence throughout the international scientific communities. This may be due to the availability of new technology in osteosyntheses, orthopedic devices and surgical instruments used to optimize results, regardless of the low economic resources Latin American countries possess. Also, foot and ankle surgery training is being promoted by several International Medical associations that pursuit scientific knowledge and strengthen the practice. Day to day, more Latin American universities offer Fellowships for on-going training.

  9. ANSWER: Road traffic accident ankle injury

    OpenAIRE

    Paisal HUSSIN; Kuhanrajan RAMALINGAM; Maliza MAWARDI; Mahendran SUBRAMANIAM

    2012-01-01

    (Refer to page 351)Answer: Open dislocation of talusTotal dislocation of talus is a rare injury. It is also described in the literature with other names such as pantalar dislocation, talus extrusion and talus enucleation. 1-4 It represents about 3-4 % of all ankle dislocations. In most cases, there is an open injury and is usually associated with other injuries around the ankle such as malleolar fractures, tarsal bone fractures and vascular injury. This type of injury is a result of high ener...

  10. Omega documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

  11. Omega documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos

  12. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and left ventricular remodelling after implantation of Shelhigh SuperStentless aortic valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germing, A; Lindstaedt, M; Holt, S; Reber, D; Mügge, A; Laczkovics, A; Fritz, M

    2008-08-01

    Aortic valve replacement is a standard procedure for the treatment of severe aortic valve stenosis. Due to lower flow velocities stentless valves are associated with a more effective regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison to stented valves. However, mismatch between body surface area and valve size supports unfavourable hemodynamic results. The aim of the study was to analyze hemodynamic parameters by echocardiography after implantation of the Shelhigh SuperStentless bioprosthesis and to analyze the occurrence of patient-prosthesis mismatch and left ventricular remodelling in this specific valve type. A total of 20 patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent implantation of a Shelhigh Super Stentless prosthesis. Clinical and echocardiographic assessment was done prior to, immediate after and six months after surgery. All surgical procedures were successful, no surgery-related complication was documented perioperatively. One patient died after development of multiorgan failure. Echocardiography during the first eight days after surgery showed mean gradients of 16 mmHg, mean valve orifice areas of 1.8 cm(2) and indexed effective orifice areas at 0.95 cm(2)/m(2). Six-months follow-up data were obtained in 19/20 patients. There were no relevant changes in echocardiographic hemodynamic findings at the time of follow-up measurements. Significant regression of left ventricular hypertrophy was shown (P=0.0088). A patient-prosthesis mismatch occurred in one patient (0.54 cm(2)/m(2)). No recurrent symptoms were documented. Patient-prosthesis mismatch after implantation of SuperStentless Shelhigh prosthesis is rare. A significant regression of left ventricular hypertrophy could be shown after six months. Hemodynamic valve function assessed by echocardiography may be predicted early after surgery.

  13. Treatment of femoral neck fracture by Moore Prosthesis in Cotonou ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of femoral neck fracture by Moore Prosthesis in Cotonou. AHM Akue, M Lawson, S Madougou, R Zannou, J Padonou. Abstract. Keywords: Benin; hip; Moore prosthesis; results. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  14. Fabrication of custom made ocular prosthesis with three different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loss of eye has a bad effect on the psychology of the patient. Eye prosthesis is fabricated to regain the patient's confidence by meticulous replacement of the missing eye. Immediate fitting of an anophthalmic socket with an artificial eye may not always be possible, and a delayed prosthesis delivery may result in settling and ...

  15. Risk factors associated with accidental ingestion of dental prosthesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ingestion of dental prosthesis is a challenging health problem that may result in severe and at times fatal complications. ... Most of the patients with impacted dental prosthesis did not have the habit of removing their denture before sleeping; eating or taking drugs orally, even-though the activity engaged in ...

  16. Three-piece Inflatable Penile Prosthesis: Surgical Techniques and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Penile prosthesis surgery plays a vital role in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). As far as outcome is concerned, it is one of the most rewarding procedures for both patients and surgeons. We describe our surgical technique for implantation of the three-piece inflatable penile prosthesis and point out the major surgical ...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... implant). 872.3970 Section 872.3970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3970 Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis...

  18. A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanoue, Naomi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis, with a composite resin denture tooth as a pontic, a tri-n-butylborane initiated adhesive resin, and screw posts for reinforcement, was still functioning after an observation period of 20 years. The prosthesis was found to be reliable for long-term clinical use when chemically and mechanically reinforced.

  19. Novel knee joint mechanism of transfemoral prosthesis for stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koh; Wada, Takahiro; Harada, Ryuchi; Tachiwana, Shinichi

    2013-06-01

    The stability of a transfemoral prosthesis when walking on flat ground has been established by recent advances in knee joint mechanisms and their control methods. It is, however, difficult for users of a transfemoral prosthesis to ascend stairs. This difficulty is mainly due to insufficient generation of extension moment around the knee joint of the prosthesis to lift the body to the next step on the staircase and prevent any unexpected flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase. Only a prosthesis with an actuator has facilitated stair ascent using a step-over-step gait (1 foot is placed per step). However, its use has issues associated with the durability, cost, maintenance, and usage environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a novel knee joint mechanism for a prosthesis that generates an extension moment around the knee joint in the stance phase during stair ascent, without the use of any actuators. The proposed mechanism is based on the knowledge that the ground reaction force increases during the stance phase when the knee flexion occurs. Stair ascent experiments with the prosthesis showed that the proposed prosthesis can realize stair ascent without any undesirable knee flexion. In addition, the prosthesis is able to generate a positive knee joint moment power in the stance phase even without any power source.

  20. Design and wear testing of a temporomandibular joint prosthesis articulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, JP; Verkerke, GJ; de Vries, MP; de Bont, LGM

    As part of the development of a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, a prosthesis articulation was designed. The articulation consists of a spherical head (ball) of the mandibular part, rotating against an enveloping ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disc with a flat cranial

  1. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of the Nijdam voice prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerke, GJ; deVries, MP; Schutte, HK; vandenHoogen, FJA; Rakhorst, G

    1997-01-01

    The valveless Nijdam prosthesis is a new voice prosthesis for laryngectomized patients using tracheoesophageal speech. An ''umbrella-like hat'' covers the esophageal side of the tracheoesophageal fistula and is deformed during speech by air pressure. To decrease pressure loss during speech, a good

  2. [The endo-exo prosthesis treatment concept : Improvement in quality of life after limb amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, T; Schwarze, F; Aschoff, H H

    2017-05-01

    Osseointegrated, percutaneous implants as the force bearer for exoprosthetics after limb amputation have been used in individual cases for clinical rehabilitation of amputees during the past years. Most experience in this field in Germany has been accumulated at the Sana Klinik in Lübeck with the so-called endo-exo prosthesis (EEP) system. The two-step implantation procedure can now be considered as reliable. Following a well-documented learning curve initial soft tissue problems concerning the cutaneous stoma can now be regarded as exceptions. The retrospective examination of the results concerning by now more than 100 patients provided with an endo-exo femoral prosthesis (EEFP) showed a very satisfying outcome concerning objective as well as subjective values, such as duration of daily use and wearing comfort of the exoprosthesis. Regaining the ability of osseoperception due to the intraosseous fixation is described by the patients as a great advantage. The step from a socket prosthesis to an EEP is felt to be a big increase in quality of life by nearly all patients included into the follow-up. Nearly all of the patients questioned would choose an endo-exo prosthesis again. Meanwhile, the success of the EEP resulted in the broadening of indications from above-knee amputations to transtibial as well as transhumeral amputations. The results are likewise encouraging. The use of EEP for the upper limbs leads to substantial improvement in the range of motion of the shoulder joint with the intramedullary anchored percutaneous implant. Furthermore, new pathbreaking possibilities in the fixation of myoelectrically controlled arm prostheses may arise from the EEP technique.

  3. Persistence of long term isokinetic strength deficits in subjects with lateral ankle sprain as measured with a protocol including maximal preloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Marc; Moffet, Hélène; Nadeau, Sylvie; Hébert, Luc J; Belzile, Sylvain

    2014-12-01

    The assessment of muscle function is a cornerstone in the management of subjects who have sustained a lateral ankle sprain. The ankle range of motion being relatively small, the use of preloading allows to measure maximal strength throughout the whole amplitude and therefore to better characterize ankle muscles weaknesses. This study aimed to assess muscle strength of the injured and uninjured ankles in subjects with a lateral ankle sprain, to document the timeline of strength recovery, and to determine the influence of sprain grade on strength loss. Maximal torque of the periarticular muscles of the ankle in a concentric mode using a protocol with maximal preloading was tested in 32 male soldiers at 8 weeks and 6 months post-injury. The evertor muscles of the injured ankles were weaker than the uninjured ones at 8 weeks and 6 months post-injury (Pankles at 8 weeks (P=0.0014, effect size=0.52-0.58) while at 6 months, only the subjects with a grade II sprain displayed such weaknesses (Pankle sprain in very active individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Penile Corporeal Reconstruction during Difficult Placement of a Penile Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Q. Tran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For some patients with impotence and concomitant severe tunical/corporeal tissue fibrosis, insertion of a penile prosthesis is the only option to restore erectile function. Closing the tunica over an inflatable penile prosthesis in these patients can be challenging. We review our previous study which included 15 patients with severe corporeal or tunical fibrosis who underwent corporeal reconstruction with autologous rectus fascia to allow placement of an inflatable penile prosthesis. At a mean follow-up of 18 months (range 12 to 64, all patients had a prosthesis that was functioning properly without evidence of separation, herniation, or erosion of the graft. Sexual activity resumed at a mean time of 9 weeks (range 8 to 10. There were no adverse events related to the graft or its harvest. Use of rectus fascia graft for coverage of a tunical defect during a difficult penile prosthesis placement is surgically feasible, safe, and efficacious.

  5. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canzoneri, Elisa; Marzolla, Marilena; Amoresano, Amedeo; Verni, Gennaro; Serino, Andrea

    2013-10-03

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearing or not wearing their prosthesis. When patients performed the tasks on the amputated limb, without the prosthesis, the perception of arm length shrank, with a concurrent shift of PPS boundaries towards the stump. Conversely, wearing the prosthesis increased the perceived length of the stump and extended the PPS boundaries so as to include the prosthetic hand, such that the prosthesis partially replaced the missing limb.

  6. Recalcitrant Lateral Premalleolar Bursitis of the Ankle Associated with Lateral Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Naito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle is a rarely reported disorder in the English literature although it is not uncommon in Asian countries where people commonly sit on their feet. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old woman with recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis associated with lateral ankle instability which was successfully treated with surgical resection of the bursa and repair of the anterior talofibular ligament. Operative findings revealed a communication between the bursa and articular cavity of the ankle joint via the sheath of the extensor digitorum longus tendon, which was considered to act as a check valve leading to a large and recalcitrant bursitis. This report provides a novel concept about the etiology of recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle.

  7. Validation of the foot and ankle outcome score for ankle ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, E M; Brandsson, S; Karlsson, J

    2001-10-01

    We studied the validity and reliability of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) when used to evaluate the outcome of 213 patients (mean age 40 years, 85 females) who underwent anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments with an average postoperative follow-up of 12 years (range, three to 24 years). The FAOS is a 42-item questionnaire assessing patient-relevant outcomes in five separate subscales (Pain, Other Symptoms, Activities of Daily Living, Sport and Recreation Function, Foot- and Ankle-Related Quality of Life). The FAOS met set criteria of validity and reliability. The FAOS appears to be useful for the evaluation of patient-relevant outcomes related to ankle reconstruction.

  8. Talofibular interval changes after acute ankle sprain: a stress ultrasonography study of ankle laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Theodore; Saliba, Susan; Saliba, Ethan; Anderson, Mark W; Hertel, Jay

    2013-11-01

    Quantifying talocrural joint laxity after ankle sprain is problematic. Stress ultrasonography (US) can image the lateral talocrural joint and allow the measurement of the talofibular interval, which may suggest injury to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). The acute talofibular interval changes after lateral ankle sprain are unknown. Twenty-five participants (9 male, 16 female; age 21.8 ± 3.2 y, height 167.8 ± 34.1 cm, mass 72.7 ± 13.8 kg) with 27 acute, lateral ankle injuries underwent bilateral stress US imaging at baseline (ankle at 3 wk and 6 wk from injury in 3 ankle conditions: neutral, anterior drawer, and inversion. Talofibular interval (mm) was measured using imaging software and self-reported function (activities of daily living [ADL] and sports) by the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM). The talofibular interval increased with anterior-drawer stress in the involved ankle (22.65 ± 3.75 mm; P = .017) over the uninvolved ankle (19.45 ± 2.35 mm; limb × position F1,26 = 4.9, P = .035) at baseline. Inversion stress also resulted in greater interval changes (23.41 ± 2.81 mm) than in the uninvolved ankles (21.13 ± 2.08 mm). A main effect for time was observed for inversion (F2,52 = 4.3, P = .019, 21.93 ± 2.24 mm) but not for anterior drawer (F2,52 = 3.1, P = .055, 21.18 ± 2.34 mm). A significant reduction in the talofibular interval took place between baseline and week 3 inversion measurements only (F1,26 = 5.6, P = .026). FAAM-ADL and sports results increased significantly from baseline to wk 3 (21.9 ± 16.2, P ankle sprain. Stress US provides a safe, repeatable, and quantifiable method of measuring the talofibular interval and may augment manual stress examinations in acute ankle injuries.

  9. Therapeutic interventions for increasing ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masafumi; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Gribble, Phillip A

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians perform therapeutic interventions, such as stretching, manual therapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, and exercises, to increase ankle dorsiflexion. However, authors of previous studies have not determined which intervention or combination of interventions is most effective. To determine the magnitude of therapeutic intervention effects on and the most effective therapeutic interventions for restoring normal ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain. We performed a comprehensive literature search in Web of Science and EBSCO HOST from 1965 to May 29, 2011, with 19 search terms related to ankle sprain, dorsiflexion, and intervention and by cross-referencing pertinent articles. Eligible studies had to be written in English and include the means and standard deviations of both pretreatment and posttreatment in patients with acute, subacute, or chronic ankle sprains. Outcomes of interest included various joint mobilizations, stretching, local vibration, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, and mental-relaxation interventions. We extracted data on dorsiflexion improvements among various therapeutic applications by calculating Cohen d effect sizes with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and evaluated the methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. In total, 9 studies (PEDro score = 5.22 ± 1.92) met the inclusion criteria. Static-stretching interventions with a home exercise program had the strongest effects on increasing dorsiflexion in patients 2 weeks after acute ankle sprains (Cohen d = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.12, 2.42). The range of effect sizes for movement with mobilization on ankle dorsiflexion among individuals with recurrent ankle sprains was small (Cohen d range = 0.14 to 0.39). Static-stretching intervention as a part of standardized care yielded the strongest effects on dorsiflexion after acute ankle sprains. The existing evidence suggests that clinicians need to consider what may be the limiting factor of

  10. Difficult factors in Management of Impacted Dental Prosthesis in Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efiaty A. Soepardi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A dental prosthesis which ingested and impacted in esophagus, is an emergency case and life threatening, so require immediate esophagoscopy intervention for removing. The objective of this study is to assess some factors can caused dtfficulties in diagnosing and treating the ingested and impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus and their complications. This retrospective study analyzed patient’s chart whose underwent esophagoscopy for removing the impacted dental prosthesis in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia during a period between January 1997 and December 2003. Neck-chest X-ray and esophagoscopy were performed in all patients to identify the existence of the dental prosthesis as a diagnostic and treatment procedure. The length of time for removing the dental prosthesis was recorded and stated as a less difficult esophagoscopy when it takes time less than 60 minutes and as a difficult  esophagoscopy takes 60 minutes or longer. Some risk difficulties factors were statistically analyzed. There were 53 patients of ingested dental prosthesis in esophagus. Only 51 cases were analyzed According to the length of time for removing the dental prosthesis by esophagoscopy, 22 patients were recorded as less difficult cases and 29 patients as difficult cases. Two cases among the cases needed cervicotomy after unsuccessful esophagoscopy removal. The difficulties to diagnose an impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus caused by unreliable clinical history, unclear signs and symptoms, unable to be detected by X-ray and was not found during esophagoscopy. The difficulties in treating due to mucosal laceration, edema, bleeding, failure of the first extraction and conformity with the size and shape, the wire outside the dental prosthesis and the length of time stayed in the esophagus. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 33-6Keywords: ingested dental prosthesis, radioluscent foreign body, length of time of esophagoscopy

  11. The effects of prosthetic ankle stiffness on ankle and knee kinematics, prosthetic limb loading, and net metabolic cost of trans-tibial amputee gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Matthew J; Twiste, Martin; Kenney, Laurence P J; Howard, David

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of commercially-available trans-tibial prosthetic components have been unable to provide clear insight into the relationships between prosthetic mechanical properties and user performance (i.e., gait quality and energy expenditure), the understanding of which is key to improving prosthesis design and prescription. Many of these studies have been limited by not characterising the mechanical properties of the tested prostheses and/or only considered level walking at self-selected speeds. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic investigation of the effects of ankle rotational stiffness on trans-tibial amputee gait during various walking conditions reflective of those encountered during daily ambulation. Ankle and knee kinematics, prosthetic limb normal ground reaction forces, and net metabolic cost were measured in five traumatic unilateral trans-tibial amputees during treadmill walking on the level, a 5% incline and a 5% decline whilst using an experimental articulated prosthetic foot with four different rotational stiffness setups and without changes in alignment between conditions. Overall, lower dorsiflexion stiffness resulted in greater prosthetic side dorsiflexion motion and sound side knee flexion, reduced normal ground reaction force during the loading phase of prosthetic stance and reduced net metabolic cost. Few differences were observed with changes in plantarflexion stiffness, most likely due to the foot achieving early foot flat. Low dorsiflexion stiffness generally improved gait performance seemingly due to easier tibial progression during stance. However, observed differences were small, suggesting that a wider range of walking and stiffness conditions would be useful to fully explore these effects in future studies. © 2013.

  12. The Nijdam voice prosthesis : A self-retaining valveless voice prosthesis for vocal rehabilitation after total laryngectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, Frank J. A.; Nijdam, Hoite F.; Veenstra, Aalze; Manni, JJ

    1996-01-01

    Voice prosthesis-assisted speech rehabilitation after total laryngectomy has proven to be successful in the majority of patients and exceeds the results of traditional oesophageal speech. Nevertheless 10-30% failure rates are still reported. In part this is due to prosthesis-related problems, in

  13. An in Silico Analysis of Ankle Joint Loads in Secondary Ankle Osteoarthritis. Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Mrzygłód, Mirosław W; Grzegorowska, Oliwia; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Secondary, post-traumatic, degenerative lesions of the ankle joint remain a serious clinical challenge. This paper presents the case of a 66-year-old patient with secondary, post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis and subchondral cysts. The use of rapid computer modelling FEM 2D enabled optimization of surgical treatment. A FEM 2D model of biomechanical changes in bones may help in streamlining treatment as well as improve our understanding of the pathomechanism of osteoarthritis.

  14. Concept of a Series-Parallel Elastic Actuator for a Powered Transtibial Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Vanderborght

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the commercial transtibial prostheses are purely passive devices. They store energy in an elastic element during the beginning of a step and release it at the end. A 75 kg human, however, produces on average 26 J of energy during one stride at the ankle joint when walking at normal cadence and stores/releases 9 J of energy, contributing to energy efficient locomotion. According to Winter, a subject produces on average of 250W peak power at a maximum joint torque of 125 Nm. As a result, powering a prosthesis with traditional servomotors leads to excessive motors and gearboxes at the outer extremities of the legs. Therefore, research prototypes use series elastic actuation (SEA concepts to reduce the power requirements of the motor. In the paper, it will be shown that SEAs are able to reduce the power of the electric motor, but not the torque. To further decrease the motor size, a novel human-centered actuator concept is developed, which is inspired by the variable recruitment of muscle fibers of a human muscle. We call this concept series-parallel elastic actuation (SPEA, and the actuator consists of multiple parallel springs, each connected to an intermittent mechanism with internal locking and a single motor. As a result, the motor torque requirements can be lowered and the efficiency drastically increased. In the paper, the novel actuation concept is explained, and a comparative study between a stiff motor, an SEA and an SPEA, which all aim at mimicking human ankle behavior, is performed.

  15. Y-balance test performance and BMI are associated with ankle sprain injury in collegiate male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Emily M; Hoch, Matthew C; Boling, Michelle C

    2017-10-25

    To determine if static balance, dynamic balance, ankle range of motion, body mass index (BMI), or history of an ankle sprain were associated with ankle sprain injuries within male and female collegiate athletes. Prospective cohort. Three hundred and eighty-four male (age=19.79±1.80 years, height=178.02±10.39cm, mass=85.71±17.59kg) and one hundred and sixty seven female (age=19.80±1.52 years, height=165.61±7.08cm, mass=66.16±10.53kg) collegiate athletes involved in a variety of sports at a NCAA Division II or NAIA institution participated. Baseline measures of the Y-Balance (YBT), modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS), weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT), BMI, and history of ankle sprain were recorded. Participants were followed prospectively for two years and incidence of ankle sprain injury was documented. The average of the WBLT, mBESS, and YBT measures were used for analysis. Male and female participants were analyzed separately. Mann-Whitney U tests were utilized to identify variables which may be significantly associated with ankle sprain injury for logistic regression analysis. A total of 59 (38 males and 21 females) individuals sustained an ankle sprain during the follow up period. The binary logistic regression revealed BMI (Nagelkerke R 2 =0.069; X 2 =12.89; p<0.001; OR=3.85; 95% CI, 1.90-7.79; p<0.001) and anterior reach of the YBT (Nagelkerke R 2 =0.074; X 2 =13.70, p<0.001; OR=3.64; 95% CI=1.83-7.23; p=0.01) were significantly associated with ankle sprain injury in male athletes. No variables were associated with ankle sprain injury within female athletes. Male collegiate athletes with greater BMI and lesser YBT anterior reach were at a greater risk of sustaining an ankle sprain injury. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound therapy for acute ankle sprains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Windt, D. A.; Van Der Heijden, G. J.; Van Den Berg, S. G.; Ter Riet, G.; De Winter, A. F.; Bouter, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasound is used in the treatment of a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of ultrasound therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains. SEARCH STRATEGY: MEDLINE and EMBASE up to December 1998 and databases of the Cochrane Rehabilitation and

  17. Ultrasound therapy for acute ankle sprains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Windt, D. A.; Van Der Heijden, G. J.; Van Den Berg, S. G.; Ter Riet, G.; De Winter, A. F.; Bouter, L. M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasound is used in the treatment of a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of ultrasound therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group specialised register (November

  18. Therapeutic ultrasound for acute ankle sprains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; van der Windt, Daniëlle A. W. M.; ter Riet, Gerben; van der Heijden, Geert J.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ultrasound is used in the treatment of a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders, which include acute ankle sprains. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 1999, and previously updated in 2004. Objectives To evaluate the effects of ultrasound therapy in the treatment

  19. Vibration training improves balance in unstable ankles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloak, R; Nevill, A M; Clarke, F; Day, S; Wyon, M A

    2010-12-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) is a common condition following ankle injury characterised by increased risk of injury. Ankle sprains are a common acute form of injury suffered in dancing and loss of balance can affect not only risk of injury risk but also performance aesthetics. Whole body vibration training (WBVT) is a new rehabilitation method that has been linked with improving balance and muscle function. 38 female dancers with self reported unilateral FAI were randomly assigned in 2 groups: WBVT and control. Absolute centre of mass (COM) distribution during single leg stance, SEBT normalised research distances and Peroneus longus mean power frequency (f(med)) where measured pre and post 6-week intervention. There was a significant improvement in COM distribution over the 6 weeks from 1.05 ± 0.57 to 0.33 ± 0.42 cm² (Ptraining intervention. There was no evidence of improvement in peroneus longus (f(med)) over time (P=0.915) in either group. WBVT improved static balance and SEBT scores amongst dancers exhibiting ankle instability but did not affect peroneus longus muscle fatigue. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Ambulatory assessment of ankle and foot dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    Ground reaction force (GRF) measurement is important in the analysis of human body movements. The main drawback of the existing measurement systems is the restriction to a laboratory environment. This paper proposes an ambulatory system for assessing the dynamics of ankle and foot, which integrates

  1. Tumors of the ankle and foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankman, S; Cisa, J; Present, D

    1994-02-01

    Although tumor and tumor-like conditions of the foot and ankle are unusual, certain bone and soft tissue lesions are more common than others. Conventional radiographs remain essential in all such cases and are especially specific for intraosseous tumors. MR imaging is more sensitive to the presence and extent of both bone and soft tissue lesions.

  2. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Golanó, P.; Clavero, J.A.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly

  3. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [de

  4. Medial ankle pain after lateral ligament rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Marti, R. K.

    1996-01-01

    After a severe ankle sprain the incidence of residual complaints, particularly on the medial side of the joint, is high. We studied a consecutive series of 30 patients who had operative repair of acute ruptures of lateral ligaments. During operation, arthroscopy revealed a fresh injury to the

  5. Prosthetics in antiquity-An early medieval wearer of a foot prosthesis (6th century AD) from Hemmaberg/Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, M; Eitler, J; Deutschmann, J; Ladstätter, S; Glaser, F; Fiedler, D

    2016-03-01

    Even though the earliest prosthetic devices date to the Ancient Egyptian Empire and iconographic sources attest their use in the Greco-Roman world, archaeological evidence for this practice prior to 2nd millennium AD is very scant. In 2013, a skeleton dating to the Frankish period (6th century AD) was excavated at the Hemmaberg in southern Austria. The middle adult male was missing his left foot from above the ankle. In its place, an iron-ring and wooden remains were recovered and interpreted as a prosthesis replacing the lost foot. This represents one of the oldest examples of prosthetic limb replacement associated with the skeleton of its wearer in Europe to date. Analysis through macroscopic assessment, radiography and CT-scanning revealed healing of the lesion even though it may have initially been complicated by osteomyelitis. Atrophy of the left lower leg further indicates immobilisation and suggests survival of several years. Osteoarthritis in the knees and shoulder girdle provides tentative indications towards the functionality of the prosthesis, perhaps aided through a crutch. These findings are set against the historic, archaeological, bioarchaeological and social context of the man in order to discuss whether removal of the foot was due to medical, punitive or traumatic causes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of prefabricated ankle orthoses on postural stability in basketball players with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Elahe; Daneshmandi, Hassan; Atri, Ahmad Ebrahimi; Onvani, Vahid; Namjoo, Faride Rezaee

    2012-12-01

    Ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries among athletes and instability and injury to this joint is responsible for long time loss of physical and recreational activity. Also, it can impose high costs to sport teams. Prevention of this injury is an important concern of practice and rehabilitation. One way of reducing the possibility of ankle joint injury is using an ankle orthosis. The present study aimed at inspecting the effects of two ankle orthoses on dynamic and semi-dynamic postural stability in athletes with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Twenty basketball players with CAI and fifteen non-injured athletes volunteered to participate in this study. Biodex Balance System was used to assess the participants' postural stability in bilateral position at level 8 and level 2. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed in order to examine the effects of ankle orthoses. Statistical significance level was determined at Pankle supports on dynamic and semi-dynamic postural stability in the two groups and results indicated there wasn't significant difference between groups. According to our results the orthoses improved both dynamic and semi-dynamic postural stability. Therefore, orthoses can prevent injury and its reoccurrence.

  7. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography delineates ankle symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Yukihiro; Tamura, Maasa; Kirino, Yohei; Sugiyama, Yumiko; Tsuchida, Naomi; Kunishita, Yosuke; Kishimoto, Daiga; Kamiyama, Reikou; Miura, Yasushi; Minegishi, Kaoru; Yoshimi, Ryusuke; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    To clarify the use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) of ankle joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Consecutive RA patients with or without ankle symptoms participated in the study. The US, clinical examination (CE), and patients' visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) for ankles were assessed. Prevalence of tibiotalar joint synovitis and tenosynovitis were assessed by grayscale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) US using a semi-quantitative grading (0-3). The positive US and CE findings were defined as GS score ≥2 and/or PD score ≥1, and joint swelling and/or tenderness, respectively. Multivariate analysis with the generalized linear mixed model was performed by assigning ankle pVAS as a dependent variable. Among a total of 120 ankles from 60 RA patients, positive ankle US findings were found in 21 (35.0%) patients. The concordance rate of CE and US was moderate (kappa 0.57). Of the 88 CE negative ankles, US detected positive findings in 9 (10.2%) joints. Multivariate analysis revealed that ankle US, clinical disease activity index, and foot Health Assessment Questionnaire, but not CE, was independently associated with ankle pVAS. US examination is useful to illustrate RA ankle involvement, especially for patients who complain ankle pain but lack CE findings.

  8. Ankle Lead Arthropathy and Systemic Lead Toxicity Secondary to a Gunshot Wound After 49 Years: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramji, Zahra; Laflamme, Mélissa

    Intra-articular bullet wounds have been found to cause both local and systemic consequences, in particular, when retained over many years. Only a few such cases have been described in published reports, each with different implications, depending on the joint involved and whether the patient experienced lead toxicity. We report the rare case of a 63-year-old male with lead arthropathy of the ankle secondary to a gunshot wound 49 years earlier. In addition to his severe tibiotalar arthritis, he presented with significantly elevated blood lead levels. Although he remained asymptomatic of lead toxicity, the patient was treated with preoperative chelator therapy and arthroscopic debridement, excision of accessible bullet fragments, and partial synovectomy to alleviate his ankle pain. However, he continued to experience ankle pain, and his blood lead levels remained elevated. He, therefore, underwent arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis with preoperative chelator therapy to prevent a further increase in blood lead levels secondary to surgical manipulation. Although lead arthropathy and toxicity secondary to retained intra-articular bullets has been documented in various joints during the past decades, to the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first adult case of an affected ankle reported in published English studies in 40 years. The standard of care has evolved since then, in particular, in regard to chelator therapy and the necessity for removal of intra-articular lead fragments to prevent further lead toxicity. The present case serves as an example of lead arthropathy of the ankle and highlights the importance of balancing the standard of care with symptomatic care to optimize patient well-being. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A surgical ankle sprain pain model in the rat: Effects of morphine and indomethacin

    OpenAIRE

    Young Kim, Hee; Wang, Jigong; Chung, Kyungsoon; Mo Chung, Jin

    2008-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a frequent injury in humans that results in pain, swelling and difficulty in walking on the affected ankle. Currently a suitable animal model resembling human ankle sprain is lacking. Here, we describe an animal ankle sprain model induced by ankle ligament injury (ALI) in rats. Cutting combinations of the lateral ankle ligament complex produced pain, edema and difficulty of weight bearing, thereby mimicking severe (grade III) ankle sprain in humans. Analgesic compounds, morphi...

  10. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. 21 CFR 878.3540 - Silicone gel-filled breast prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicone gel-filled breast prosthesis. 878.3540...-filled breast prosthesis. (a) Identification—(1) Single-lumen silicone gel-filled breast prosthesis. A single-lumen silicone gel-filled breast prosthesis is a silicone rubber shell made of polysiloxane(s...

  12. Impact of hip prosthesis on dose distribution of pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Jiangping; Zhang Songfang; Zhu Qibao; Guo Jianxin; Zha Yuanzi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the scattering effect of Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis which was high Z material for patients undergoing pelvic irradiation. Methods: The hip prosthesis was set in water phantom (30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm), determining points were chosen on the entrance side of both 6 MV and 10 MV beams at the distance of 0.5 cm, 1.0 cm, 2.0 cm to the hip prosthesis, and also on the exit side of both 6 MV and 10 MV beams at the distance of 3.0 cm, 5.0 cm, 7.0 cm to the hip prostheses. Dose behind the hip prosthesis at depths of 5.0 cm and 10.0 cm for 6 MV and 10 MV beams are also measured. Results: The dose deviation on the beams' entrance side is between 0 to 5.0%, the backscatter effect was more obviously with the higher energy beam. The dose deviation on the beams' exit side was between 21.6%-30.8%. With the same field size and depth, dose deviation becomes smaller when the beam energy was higher; while with the same energy and depth, dose deviation becomes smaller when the field size was bigger. Dose profiles behind the head of the hip prosthesis indicate obvious attenuation of the beam. Conclusions: Beam arrangements that avoid the prosthesis should be considered first or we should at least reduce the weight of the beam that pass through the prosthesis. (authors)

  13. Disassembly and Dislocation of a Bipolar Hip Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh-Hsing Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation of a hip prosthesis is a common complication. In usual cases of hip prosthesis dislocation, the prosthetic femoral head comes out from either the natural acetabular cavity in a bipolar hemiarthroplasty or the prosthetic acetabulum in a total hip arthroplasty. Only a few cases of bipolar hip prosthesis dislocation due to dissociation between the polyethylene and inner head of the prosthesis have been reported. We describe a rare case of disassembly of the inner head from the bipolar outer prosthesis in an osteoarthritic acetabulum. A 72-year-old woman had undergone bipolar hemiarthroplasty due to fracture of the left femoral neck about 10 years previously. Recently, she sustained an injury after falling from a chair, and examinations revealed an unusual disassembly−dislocation of the bipolar hip prosthesis. We classified this failure in our patient as a type II failure, representing extreme varus position of the outer head in the acetabulum, dislocation of the inner head from the outer head, and a detached locking ring around the stem neck. This mechanism of failure as shown in our patient rarely occurs in the bipolar prosthesis of the self-centering system. Osteoarthritic change of the acetabulum would place the outer head in the varus position, increasing wear on the beveled rim by impinging the femoral stem neck and causing dislodgment of the inner locking ring and consequent disassembly−dislocation of the inner head.

  14. Adjustment to finger amputation and silicone finger prosthesis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuret, Zala; Burger, Helena; Vidmar, Gaj; Maver, Tomaz

    2018-01-11

    Finger amputations are the most common amputations of upper limbs. They influence hand function, general functioning and quality of life. One of the possibilities for rehabilitation after finger amputation is fitting a silicone finger prosthesis. We wanted to evaluate the adjustment to amputation and prosthesis use in patients after finger amputation. We included 42 patients with partial or complete single or multiple finger amputation of one hand who visited the outpatient clinic for prosthetics and orthotics at our institute and received a silicone prosthesis. We assessed their adjustment to amputation and prosthesis with the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales (TAPES). Most of the patients (28, 67%) had a single finger amputated. The average scores on all TAPES subscales (except adjustment to limitation) were above 50% of the maximum possible score. On average, the scores were the highest on the general adjustment and satisfaction with the prosthesis subscales. Silicone prostheses for finger amputation of upper limb play an important role in the process of adaptation to amputation. They offer aesthetically satisfying results and alleviate social interactions, which influences overall quality of life. Implications for Rehabilitation Silicone prostheses for finger amputation of upper limb offer an aesthetically satisfying result and alleviate problems with social interactions. Their influence on hand function is not optimal, but the prosthesis improves the amputee's quality of life.

  15. Minor or occult ankle instability as a cause of anterolateral pain after ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jordi; Peña, Fernando; Golanó, Pau

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which intra-articular injuries are associated with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. From 2008 to 2010, records of all patients who underwent ankle joint arthroscopy with anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain were reviewed. A systematic arthroscopic examination of the intra-articular structures of the ankle joint was performed. Location and characteristics of the injuries were identified and recorded. A total of 36 ankle arthroscopic procedures were reviewed. A soft-tissue occupying mass over the lateral recess was present in 18 patients (50%). A partial injury of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was observed in 24 patients (66.6%). Cartilage abrasion due to the distal fascicle of the anteroinferior tibiofibular ligament coming into contact with the talus was seen in 21 patients (58.3%), but no thickening of the ligament was observed. Injury to the intra-articular posterior structures, including the transverse ligament in 19 patients (52.7%) and the posterior surface of the distal tibia in 21 patients (58.3%), was observed. Intra-articular pathological findings have been observed in patients affected by anterolateral pain after an ankle sprain. Despite no demonstrable abnormal lateral laxity, morphologic ATFL abnormality has been observed on arthroscopic evaluation. An injury of the ATFL is present in patients with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. A degree of microinstability due to a deficiency of the ATFL could explain the intra-articular pathological findings and the patients' complaints. IV.

  16. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  17. The G.F.S. Mark II inflatable penile prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fein, R L

    1992-01-01

    The G.F.S. Mark II inflatable penile prosthesis was implanted in 80 men who were followed for up to 27 months. In this study there have been no mechanical problems. Of the patients 6 required repositioning of the reservoir pump and 4 required postoperative addition of fluid to the reservoir pump. This study indicates that the revised connectorless G.F.S. Mark II inflatable penile prosthesis has eliminated the previous problems with connectors and tubings. The G.F.S. Mark II inflatable penile prosthesis reservoir pump provides a means of postoperative fluid adjustment within the system performed as an office procedure.

  18. A new approach towards hip-prosthesis design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggler, A H; Jacob, H A

    1980-01-01

    A new femoral prosthesis with a stemless design, different from conventional types, has been conceived in an effort to preserve the physiological stress distribution in magnitude and direction within the living bone as far as possible. The most important feature is that the hip joint forces are transmitted directly to the cortical bone of the resected femoral neck by means of a thrust plate, which maintains the physiological stress an the proximal end of the femur. The prosthesis, the instruments required for its implantation and the surgical technique are described in detail. Up to now, 3 patients have received this new prosthesis.

  19. Radiological and clinical effect of prosthesis design in varus knees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isyar, Mehmet; Guler, Olcay; Cakmak, Selami; Kara, Adnan; Yalcin, Sercan; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to investigate the efficacy of the prosthesis design used in total knee arthroplasty in patients with varus malalignment. Methods After exclusion criteria we classified 90 patients underwent total knee arthroplasty according to prosthesis used into two groups: posterior cruciate ligament substituting and retaining. Mean follow up period was 25–98 months. We evaluated preoperative and postoperative radiological and as well as clinical parameters such as pain, knee function, flexion deformity. Results We found statistically significant difference in both groups in terms of deformity correction (p = 0.000). Conclusion Prosthesis design affects radiological outcomes in varus knees. PMID:26566321

  20. Dosimetric influence of hip prosthesis during radiotherapeutic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschwind, R.; Buffard, E.; Masset, H.; Makovicka, L.; David, C.; David, C.; Buffard, E.

    2008-01-01

    As the population become aged, many patients with hip prosthesis are treated for a pelvic cancer. The recommended ballistic must avoid to pass in the prosthesis, but sometimes it is inevitable. So it is essential to quantify with accuracy the dose modifications linked to the presence of metallic implant. The aim of this study is to analyze by Monte Carlo method these modifications in simple and complex models (anthropomorphic phantom) which take into account the geometry and the composition of the prosthesis and its coatings. Then, this methodology was used to study the behaviour of a treatment planning system in theses extreme conditions. (authors)

  1. A modified technique for retention of orbital prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera R Shaikh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An orbital defect (congenital or acquired causes severe facial asymmetry and disfigurement, which results in psychological and social disturbances to the patient. It becomes a challenging task for a maxillofacial prosthodontist to fabricate a prosthesis that replicates the healthy side of the face. Success of the prosthesis depends primarily on satisfactory retention of the same. This clinical report illustrates rehabilitation of a patient with an orbital defect by fabricating a hollow orbital prosthesis, utilizing anatomical undercuts for retention using an acrylic resin template relined by a resilient denture liner.

  2. A modified technique for retention of orbital prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Sameera R; Patil, Pravinkumar G; Puri, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    An orbital defect (congenital or acquired) causes severe facial asymmetry and disfigurement, which results in psychological and social disturbances to the patient. It becomes a challenging task for a maxillofacial prosthodontist to fabricate a prosthesis that replicates the healthy side of the face. Success of the prosthesis depends primarily on satisfactory retention of the same. This clinical report illustrates rehabilitation of a patient with an orbital defect by fabricating a hollow orbital prosthesis, utilizing anatomical undercuts for retention using an acrylic resin template relined by a resilient denture liner.

  3. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study protocol. An additional group of non-injured individuals were also recruited to act as a control group. All participants completed the anterior, posterior-lateral and posterior-medial reach directions of the star excursion balance test. Sagittal plane kinematics of the lower extremity and associated fractal dimension of the centre of pressure path were also acquired. Participants with chronic ankle instability displayed poorer performance in the anterior, posterior-medial and posterior-lateral reach directions compared with controls bilaterally, and in the posterior-lateral direction compared with lateral ankle sprain copers on their 'involved' limb only. These performance deficits in the posterior-lateral and posterior-medial directions were associated with reduced flexion and dorsiflexion displacements at the hip, knee and ankle at the point of maximum reach, and coincided with reduced complexity of the centre of pressure path. In comparison with lateral ankle sprain copers and controls, participants with chronic ankle instability were characterised by dynamic balance deficits as measured using the SEBT. This was attested to reduced sagittal plane motions at the hip, knee and ankle joints, and reduced capacity of the stance limb to avail of its supporting base. III.

  4. Concomitant Contracture of the Knee and Ankle Joint After Gastrocnemius Muscle Rupture: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dong Jin; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Bom Soo

    Injury of the medial head of the gastrocnemius, also called "tennis leg," is known to heal uneventfully in most cases with compression and immobilization therapy. Failure to heal or long-term complications, including ongoing pain and pes equinus, have been documented in only a limited number of case reports. To the best of our knowledge, a severe concomitant contracture of the knee and ankle joint as a consequence of a maltreated gastrocnemius muscle rupture has not been previously reported in English-language reports. The purpose of the present study was to report a serious complication of neglected tennis leg with a review of the published data. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Systematic Review on the Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain Brace versus Other Functional Treatment Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, Ingrid; Backx, Frank; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2011-01-01

    Ankle injuries, especially ankle sprains, are a common problem in sports and medical care. Ankle sprains result in pain and absenteeism from work and/or sports participation, and can lead to physical restrictions such as ankle instability. Nowadays, treatment of ankle injury basically consists of

  6. The Parachute Ankle Brace: Entanglements and Injuries After Controlling for Extrinsic Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-10

    Preventive Medicine THE PARACHUTE ANKLE BRACE: ENTANGLEMENTS AND INJURIES AFTER CONTROLLING FOR EXTRINSIC RISK...Amoroso P.J. (2005). Effectiveness of an external ankle brace in reducing parachute-related ankle injuries . Injury Prevention . 11: 163- 168. 25...M. (1994). The efficacy of a semirigid ankle stabilizer to reduce acute ankle injury in basketball . American Journal of Sports Medicine. 22:

  7. Multisegmental Foot and Ankle Motion Analysis After Hallux Valgus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canseco, Karl; Long, Jason; Smedberg, Thomas; Tarima, Sergey; Marks, Richard M.; Harris, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gait changes in patients with hallux valgus, including altered kinematic and temporal-spatial parameters, have been documented in the literature. Although operative treatment can yield favorable clinical and radiographic results, restoration of normal gait in this population remains unclear. Segmental kinematic changes within the foot and ankle during ambulation after operative correction of hallux valgus have not been reported. The aim of this study was to analyze changes in multisegmental foot and ankle kinematics in patients who underwent operative correction of hallux valgus. Methods A 15-camera Vicon Motion Analysis System was used to evaluate 24 feet in 19 patients with hallux valgus preoperatively and postoperatively. The Milwaukee Foot Model was used to characterize segmental kinematics and temporal-spatial parameters (TSPs). Preoperative and postoperative kinematics and TSPs were compared using paired nonparametric methods; comparisons with normative data were performed using unpaired nonparametric methods. Outcomes were evaluated using the SF-36 assessment tool. Results Preoperatively, patients with hallux valgus showed significantly altered temporal-spatial and kinematic parameters. Postoperatively, kinematic analysis demonstrated restoration of hallux position to normal. Hallux valgus angles and intermetatarsal angles were significantly improved, and outcomes showed a significant increase in performance of physical activities. Temporal-spatial parameters and kinematics in the more proximal segments were not significantly changed postoperatively. Conclusion Postoperative results demonstrated significant improvement in foot geometry and hallux kinematics in the coronal and transverse planes. However, the analysis did not identify restoration of proximal kinematics. Clinical Relevance Further investigation is necessary to explore possible causes/clinical relevance and appropriate treatment interventions for the persistently altered kinematics

  8. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  9. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost.

  10. [Results after replacement of femoral neck prostheses - thrust plate prosthesis (TPP) versus ESKA cut prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaque, B A; Gils, J; Wienbeck, S; Donle, E; Basad, E; Stürz, H

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse and evaluate comparatively loosening mechanisms, failure frequency, surgical changing strategies and results after replacement of thrust plate prostheses (TPP) and ESKA Cut prostheses. Between 1993 und 2007, 465 TPP and in the years 2000 and 2001 82 ESKA Cut prostheses were performed and evaluated prospectively. Until 2007 46 change interventions of the TPP and 35 of the CUT prosthesis became necessary. All patients who received a stem revision procedure in our hospital were included within this study. Besides the evaluation of clinical results according to the criteria of the Harris Hip Score on the average at 15.6 months (+/- 14.4) postoperatively, radiological loosening processes and surgical difficulties were registered. Furthermore, an analysis of perioperative data was performed according to some criteria of the German Federal Office of Quality Assurance (BQS), such as duration of the surgery, intraoperative blood loss and complications. Statistical investigations for comparative analysis as well as survival analysis of both groups were calculated using SPSS for Windows 13.0. The mean age of the 46 patients who had to undergo revision surgery after TPP was 60.1 years, that of 35 patients in whom revision surgery was necessary after receiving an ESKA Cut femoral neck stem was 56.6 years. The survival rate analysis according to Kaplan-Meier at 13 years was 89.4 % (TPP) and 53.6 % at 66 months (ESKA Cut). In all cases the partial osteointegration of the tripod surface of the loosened Cut prosthesis complicated the explantation. It led on the one hand to a significant difference of the surgery duration and on the other hand to an increased frequency of fractures of the trochanteric region. The conversion of the TPP on standard type stems was usually free of problems. The HHS increased significantly to the averages of 86.6 (TPP) or, respectively, 91.69 (ESKA Cut) after revision. In comparison with the usually problem

  11. MR arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Rand, T.; Breitenseher, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Schick, S.; Imhof, H.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its superior soft tissue contrast conventional MRI is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of ankle joint disorders. Conventional MR imaging can accurately demonstrate normal or acutely injured ligaments; however, in subacute and chronic injury joint fluid necessary for delineation of injured ligaments is absent and MR arthrography should be performed. MR arthrography uses the intraarticular injection of contrast material to distend the joint, yielding improved discrimination of intraarticular structures. This joint distension with MR arthrography is also helpful in the staging of osteochondritis dissecans, since in cases of unstable lesions tracking of contrast material into the interface can be more easily demonstrated. Finally, high contrast and joint distension by MR arthrography improves the detection of intraarticular loose bodies, which often require surgery. MR artrography, although invasive, may provide additional information in various ankle joint disorders. (orig.) [de

  12. The Influence of Mulligan Ankle Taping on Dynamic Balance in the Athletes with and without Chronic Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Pourkhani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The ankle joint is the most frequently injured anatomical site in athletes. Ankle instability is responsible for 25% of all time lost from sport. Clinical efficacy of the effect of taping in athletes with chronic ankle instability is unknown. So the purpose of this investigation is the study of the influence of Mulligan ankle taping on dynamic balance in the athletes with and without chronic ankle instability. Materials & Methods: 32 athletes participated in this investigation: 16 subjects with chronic ankle instability, 6 women and 10 men (age 23.5±0.3 years, height 175.4±10.3 cm, weight 73.6±14.5 kg, Foot Ankle Disability Index 74.5±8.62% and Foot Ankle Disability Index Sport 63.5±7.86% and 16 healthy subjects, 6 women and 10 men (age 22.81±7.1 years, height 173.6±12.26 cm, weight 66.4±11.4 kg, Foot Ankle Disability Index and Foot Ankle Disability Index Sport 100%. Dynamic balance was assessed with Star Excursion Balance Test in 3 reaching directions (medial, antero-medial and postero-medial before and after Mulligan ankle taping. Independent and paired t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Dynamic balance in healthy group significantly was better than injured group (P&le0.05. Application of taping caused significantly improvement in dynamic balance in both groups (reaching in media, antero-medial and postero-medial directions (P&le0.05 (except reaching in antero-medial direction in healthy group (P>0.05. Conclusion: So it seems that Mulligan ankle taping can improve dynamic balance in the athletes with and without chronic ankle instability.

  13. Ankle Plantarflexor Spasticity Does Not Restrict the Recovery of Ankle Plantarflexor Strength or Ankle Power Generation for Push-Off During Walking Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gavin; Banky, Megan; Olver, John

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this project was to determine the impact of plantarflexor spasticity on muscle performance for ambulant people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A large metropolitan rehabilitation hospital. Seventy-two ambulant people with TBI who were attending physiotherapy for mobility limitations. Twenty-four participants returned for a 6-month follow-up reassessment. Cross-sectional cohort study. Self-selected walking speed, Tardieu scale, ankle plantarflexor strength, and ankle power generation (APG). Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity had significantly lower self-selected walking speed; however, there was no significant difference in ankle plantarflexor strength or APG. Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity were not restricted in the recovery of self-selected walking speed, ankle plantarflexor strength, or APG, indicating equivalent ability to improve their mobility over time despite the presence of spasticity. Following TBI, people with ankle plantarflexor spasticity have significantly greater mobility limitations than those without spasticity, yet retain the capacity for recovery of self-selected walking speed, ankle plantarflexor strength, and APG.

  14. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-07-11

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required.

  15. Modern cartilage imaging of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Marc-Andre; Wuennemann, Felix; Rehnitz, Christoph; Jungmann, Pia M.; Kuni, Benita

    2017-01-01

    Talar osteochondral lesions are an important risk factor for the development of talar osteoarthritis. Furthermore, osteochondral lesions might explain persistent ankle pain. Early diagnosis of accompanying chondral defects is important to establish the optimal therapy strategy and thereby delaying or preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this review is to explain modern cartilage imaging with emphasis of MR imaging as well as the discussion of more sophisticated imaging studies like CT-arthrography or functional MR imaging. Pubmed literature search concerning: osteochondral lesions, cartilage damage, ankle joint, talus, 2 D MR imaging, 3 D MR imaging, cartilage MR imaging, CT-arthrography, cartilage repair, microfracture, OATS, MACT. Dedicated MR imaging protocols to delineate talar cartilage and the appearance of acute and chronic osteochondral lesions were discussed. Recent developments of MR imaging, such as isotropic 3 D imaging that has a higher signal-to noise ratio when compared to 2 D imaging, and specialized imaging methods such as CT-arthrography as well as functional MR imaging were introduced. Several classifications schemes and imaging findings of osteochondral lesions that influence the conservative or surgical therapy strategy were discussed. MRI enables after surgery the non-invasive assessment of the repair tissue and the success of implantation. Key points: Modern MRI allows for highly resolved visualization of the articular cartilage of the ankle joint and of subchondral pathologies. Recent advances in MRI include 3 D isotropic ankle joint imaging, which deliver higher signal-to-noise ratios of the cartilage and less partial volume artifacts when compared with standard 2 D sequences. In case of osteochondral lesions MRI is beneficial for assessing the stability of the osteochondral fragment and for this discontinuity of the cartilage layer is an important factor. CT-arthrography can be used in case of contraindications of MRI and

  16. Osteoarthritis after osteosynthesis of ankle injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, S.; Mechsner, K.; Langenscheidt, P.; Krankenhaus Spandau, Berlin

    1984-01-01

    98 patients were clinically and radiographically examined 2 to 9 years following the osteosynthesis of ankle fractures. The rate of secondary osteoarthritis was 70% including 40% of minor, 17% of medium and 13% of serious changes. Depending on the injured structures the frequency of posttraumatic osteoarthritis varies. Medium and serious radiology changes cause obvious dysfunction in 56% and 62% respectively. Joints free of Osteoarthritis one year after the injury will not develop secondary osteoarthritis later. (orig.) [de

  17. [Indirect bonded prosthesis. Use of an impacted central incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaia, A M; Manfio, A P; Moraes, C J; Dutra, D A; Isaia, V G; Moncada, A C

    1990-01-01

    The authors presents a case about right central superior incisor impacted. After surgical remotion of the retain tooth, this was utilized like pontic in the confeccion of the indirect adhesive prosthesis for the patient.

  18. Towards a Completely Implantable, Light-Sensitive Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humayun, M

    2001-01-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis is under development to treat retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, two presently incurable diseases of the outer retina that afflict millions world-wide...

  19. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint.

  20. Diagnosis of ligament injuries in the superior ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebing, R.; Fiedler, V.

    1991-01-01

    Nearly 40 years after ankle arthrography was first introduced, the anterior and inversion stress views of the ankle are still widely preferred as a noninvasive method of evaluating ligament injuries in the upper ankle. We consider the stress test, bilaterally performed using a standardized stress apparatus, as a basic examination by which to differentiate between slight and severe sprain. Intensive muscel splinting due to painful swelling can sometimes be treated by injection of local anesthetic. Like many authors, we perform ankle arthrography in cases where there is a significant difference between the clinical findings and the stress test. The technique of ankle arthrography can be readily learned and is extremely accurate in delineating the extent of ligamentous injury produced by moderate or severe ankle sprains. It can be performed in any X-ray department. (orig.) [de

  1. Orthopedic rehabilitation using the "Rutgers ankle" interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girone, M; Burdea, G; Bouzit, M; Popescu, V; Deutsch, J E

    2000-01-01

    A novel ankle rehabilitation device is being developed for home use, allowing remote monitoring by therapists. The system will allow patients to perform a variety of exercises while interacting with a virtual environment (VE). These game-like VEs created with WorldToolKit run on a host PC that controls the movement and output forces of the device via an RS232 connection. Patients will develop strength, flexibility, coordination, and balance as they interact with the VEs. The device will also perform diagnostic functions, measuring the ankle's range of motion, force exertion capabilities and coordination. The host PC transparently records patient progress for remote evaluation by therapists via our existing telerehabilitation system. The "Rutgers Ankle" Orthopedic Rehabilitation Interface uses double-acting pneumatic cylinders, linear potentiometers, and a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) force sensor. The controller contains a Pentium single-board computer and pneumatic control valves. Based on the Stewart platform, the device can move and supply forces and torques in 6 DOFs. A proof-of-concept trial conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) provided therapist and patient feedback. The system measured the range of motion and maximum force output of a group of four patients (male and female). Future medical trials are required to establish clinical efficacy in rehabilitation.

  2. Clinical and functional outcomes of the saddle prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Donati, D.; D’Apote, G.; Boschi, M.; Cevolani, L.; Benedetti, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The implantation of a saddle prosthesis after resection of a pelvic tumor has been proposed as a simple method of reconstruction that provides good stability and reduces the surgical time, thus limits the onset of intraoperative complications. There are no studies in the literature of patients evaluated using gait analysis after being implanted with a saddle prosthesis. The present study is a retrospective case review aimed at illustrating long-term clinical and functional findings...

  3. A cortical neural prosthesis for restoring and enhancing memory

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Theodore W; Hampson, Robert E; Song, Dong; Goonawardena, Anushka; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Deadwyler, Sam A

    2011-01-01

    A primary objective in developing a neural prosthesis is to replace neural circuitry in the brain that no longer functions appropriately. Such a goal requires artificial reconstruction of neuron-to-neuron connections in a way that can be recognized by the remaining normal circuitry, and that promotes appropriate interaction. In this study, the application of a specially designed neural prosthesis using a multi-input/multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear model is demonstrated by using trains of electr...

  4. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  5. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fred A. de Laat, MD, PhD; Mark J. van der Pluijm, CPO; Annette A. van Kuijk, MD, PhD; Jan H. Geertzen, MD, PhD; Leo D. Roorda, MD, PT, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengtheni...

  6. Septic complication following porous hydroxyapatite cranioplasty: prosthesis retention management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaccarino, Corrado; Mattogno, Pier P; Zanotti, Bruno; Bellocchi, Silvio; Verlicchi, Angela; Viaroli, Edoardo; Pastorello, Giulia; SGULò, Francesco; Ghadirpour, Reza; Servadei, Franco

    2016-05-13

    After failing of autologous cranioplasty or when the bone flap is unavailable, the alloplastic (heterologous) materials are the choice for cranial reconstruction. No agreement has been reported about the material with a significant lower risk of septic complications. This is due to extremely heterogeneous prognostic factors related not only to the material used but also to the surgical procedures and/or to the timing of the procedure. More attention should be focused on the material whose characteristic could enable a delay in bacterial colonization, where an antibiotic therapy could be effective, without need of prosthesis removal. Four cases of severe septic complication following cranioplasty with porous hydroxyapatite (HA) prosthesis are presented. Patients were conservatively treated, without heterologous bone flap removal. All of our patients presented reasons for delaying HA cranioplasty removal: Patients 1, 3 and 4 had an associated shunted hydrocephalus and the need for non- removing the prosthesis was related to the predictable recurrence of overshunting and/or sinking skin flap syndrome. In case 4 the revision surgery would have also damaged the microvascular flap with latissimus dorsi muscle used by plastic surgeon for skin reconstruction. In case 2 the patient refused revision surgery. In all cases systemic and/or radiological signs of infection were observed. In Case 2 the infective process surrounded completely the HA prosthesis, while it was located in the epidural region in Case 1 and 4. In Case 3 a surgical curettage of the infected wound was performed over the HA prosthesis. Following prosthesis retention management with antibiotic therapy, all patients revealed systemic and/or radiological signs of sepsis resolution at follow-up. The possibility to avoid a prosthesis removal with effective antibiotic treatment is mainly due to the combination of three factors: targeted antibiotic therapy, good anatomical area revascularization (resulting of an

  7. Biocompatible membrane of PDMS for the new chamber prosthesis stapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasik, Katarzyna; Kwacz, Monika

    2016-06-30

    Stapes protheses are designed for patients with otosclerosis resulting immobilization or significant reduction of the stapes mobility. All currently used prostheses are called - piston prosthesis. However, its use to stimulate the cochlea is still imperfect. New chamber stapes prosthesis allows the perilymph excitation more effective than the piston prothesis. Moreover, the chamber prosthesis eliminates the common causes of piston-stapedotomy failures. The most important element of the new prosthesis is a flexible membrane. The membrane stiffness should be close to the stiffness of normal annular ligament. This work presents the process of selection of the membrane's thickness and its manufacturing technology. Method A 3D model of the chamber stapes prosthesis was build using Autodesk Inventor 2015. The model was imported to Abacus 6.13 computing environment. During numerical simulations, displacements corresponding to applied loads were calculated and the membrane thickness was adjusted so that its stiffness was the same as the ligament stiffness (~ 120 N/m). The compliance ratios calculated from the load-displacement curves for the membrane and the annular ligament were verified using linear regression analysis. After determining the thickness, the manufacturing technology of the membrane was developed. Results The best similarity between the membrane's and annular ligament's stiffness was achieved for PDMS membrane with the 0,15- mm thickness (similarity ratio R2=0,997752). In this work, the technological parameters of spin-coating process for membrane manufacture are also presented. Summary The proper functioning of the chamber stapes prosthesis requires the PDMS membrane with a thickness of 0,15 mm. The 0,15-mm membrane has the tiffness close to the stiffness of the normal annular ligament. Therefore, the chamber stapes prosthesis provides the perilymph stimulation at the level comparable to the healthy ear. New prosthesis is currently under pre

  8. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xin Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0-135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee′s kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, "rollback" compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis.

  9. Open medial ankle dislocation without associated fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlimi, F; Mahfoud, M; Berrada, M S; El Bardouni, A; El Yaacoubi, M

    2011-12-01

    Tibiotalar dislocation without associated fracture is a rare injury. We report a case of an unusual open medial ankle dislocation without any associated bony injury. After reduction and debridement under general anaesthesia, capsule suture and ligaments repair were performed. An external fixator was applied for ankle immobilization. After 3 years follow-up, functional results were excellent without signs of instability or degenerative arthritis. Copyright © 2011 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  11. Developing a Framework for Ankle Function: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kelli R.; Evans, Todd A.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Addressing clinical outcomes is paramount to providing effective health care, yet there is no consensus regarding the appropriate outcomes to address after ankle injuries. Compounding the problem is the repetitive nature of lateral ankle sprains, referred to as functional (FAI) or chronic (CAI) ankle instability. Although they are commonly used terms in practice and research, FAI and CAI are inconsistently defined and assessed. Objective: To establish definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, FAI, and CAI, as well as their characteristics and assessment techniques. Design: Delphi study. Setting: Telephone interviews and electronic surveys. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen experts representing the fields of ankle function and treatment, ankle research, and outcomes assessment and research were selected as panelists. Data Collection and Analysis: A telephone interview produced feedback regarding the definition of, functional characteristics of, and assessment techniques for a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and FAI/CAI. Those data were compiled, reduced, and returned through electronic surveys and were either included by reaching consensus (80% agreement) or excluded. Results: The definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI reached consensus. Experts did not agree on a definition of CAI. Eleven functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, 32 functional characteristics of an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and 13 characteristics of FAI were agreed upon. Conclusions: Although a consensus was reached regarding the definitions and functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI, the experts could only agree on 1 characteristic to include in the FAI definition. Several experts did, however, provide additional comments that reinforced the differences in the interpretation of those concepts. Although the experts could not agree on the definition of CAI, its

  12. Review of common and unusual causes of lateral ankle pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Surabhi [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); McNally, Eugene [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre and University of Oxford, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Lateral ankle pain is a common clinical presentation having several important causes, including lateral ligament injury, peroneal tendon injury, sinus tarsi syndrome, and nerve entrapments. However, other causes should be kept in mind in patients with unusual patterns of pain or intractable symptoms. We present a review of common and some unusual causes of lateral ankle pain including a review of post-operative imaging findings following surgery for lateral ankle ligament and peroneal tendon injuries. (orig.)

  13. Review of ankle inversion sprain simulators in the biomechanics laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Sophia Chui-Wai; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ankle inversion ligamentous sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. The most direct way is to investigate real injury incidents, but it is unethical and impossible to replicate on test participants. Simulators including tilt platforms, trapdoors, and fulcrum devices were designed to mimic ankle inversion movements in laboratories. Inversion angle was the only element considered in early designs; however, an ankle sprain is composed of inversion and plantarflexion in clinical observa...

  14. Review of common and unusual causes of lateral ankle pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Surabhi; McNally, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Lateral ankle pain is a common clinical presentation having several important causes, including lateral ligament injury, peroneal tendon injury, sinus tarsi syndrome, and nerve entrapments. However, other causes should be kept in mind in patients with unusual patterns of pain or intractable symptoms. We present a review of common and some unusual causes of lateral ankle pain including a review of post-operative imaging findings following surgery for lateral ankle ligament and peroneal tendon injuries. (orig.)

  15. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprai...

  16. Clinical and functional outcomes of the saddle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, D; D'Apote, G; Boschi, M; Cevolani, L; Benedetti, M G

    2012-06-01

    The implantation of a saddle prosthesis after resection of a pelvic tumor has been proposed as a simple method of reconstruction that provides good stability and reduces the surgical time, thus limits the onset of intraoperative complications. There are no studies in the literature of patients evaluated using gait analysis after being implanted with a saddle prosthesis. The present study is a retrospective case review aimed at illustrating long-term clinical and functional findings in tumor patients reconstructed with a saddle prosthesis. A series of 15 patients who received pelvic reconstruction with a saddle prosthesis were retrospectively reviewed in terms of clinical, radiographic, and functional evaluations. Two patients were additionally assessed by gait analysis. Long-term functional follow-up was achieved in only 6 patients, and ranged from 97 to 167 months. Function was found to be rather impaired, as a mean of only 57 % of normal activity was restored. Gait analysis demonstrated that the implant had poor biomechanics, as characterized by very limited hip motion. Though the saddle prosthesis was proposed as advance in tumor-related pelvic surgery, the present study indicates that it yields unsatisfactory clinical and functional results due to both clinical complications and the poor biomechanics of the device. The use of a saddle prosthesis in tumor surgery did not provide satisfactory results in long-term follow-up. It is no longer implanted at our institute, and is currently considered a "salvage technique."

  17. Availability of Dental Prosthesis Procedures in Brazilian Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Gonçalves Melo Cunha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To describe dental prosthesis provision in the Brazilian public health service and report the performance of dental prosthesis procedures according to the Brazilian macroregions. Methods. A structured interview was conducted with senior-level health professionals from each of the 18,114 oral health teams (OHT. The dependent variables were performance of removable prostheses and prosthesis procedures, including provision of fixed prostheses by OHT. Descriptive statistics were produced together with performing a cluster analysis using SPSS version 19.0. Results. The manufacture of any type of prosthesis was done by a minority of OHT (43%. The most commonly provided types of dental prosthesis were removable full and partial dentures. Cluster 1 (teams that performed prosthesis procedures the most was composed of a smaller number of teams (n = 5,531, and Cluster 2 (composed of teams that do not perform prosthetics or that perform them in small amounts consisted of 12,583 teams. The geographic distribution of clusters reveals that the largest proportion of Cluster 1 teams is located in the Northeast (33.9% and Southeast (33.6%. Conclusions. A minority of OHT produce dental prostheses. There is an unequal geographical distribution of clusters.

  18. Penile Prosthesis Implantation in Acute and Chronic Priapism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaffa, Giulio; Ralph, David J

    2013-07-01

    To review the current literature regarding penile prosthesis implantation in acute and chronic priapism. A nonstructured Pubmed base search using the terms ischemic priapism, penile prosthesis, and refractory erectile dysfunction has been carried out. Surgical outcome and patient satisfaction following penile prosthesis implantation are reported. Implantation of a penile prosthesis in acute and chronic ischemic priapism is associated with increased complication rates, when compared with virgin implants. Implantation in acute priapism allows the painful priapic episode to settle and to preserve penile length, while implantation in chronic priapism is technically much more challenging and often requires the use of downsized shorter cylinders. Implantation of a penile prosthesis in acute refractory ischemic priapism should be the solution of choice, as the dilatation is easier and allows the preservation of penile length, which is one of the main factors influencing postoperative patient's satisfaction in prosthetic surgery. Garaffa G and Ralph D. Penile prosthesis implantation in acute and chronic priapism. Sex Med Rev 2013;1:76-82. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Glans Necrosis Following Penile Prosthesis Implantation: Prevention and Treatment Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Steven K; Mora-Estaves, Cesar; Egydio, Paulo; Ralph, David; Habous, Mohamad; Love, Christopher; Shamsodini, Ahmad; Valenzuela, Robert; Yafi, Faysal A

    2017-09-01

    To examine possible etiology and treatment outcomes in 21 patients with glans necrosis following penile prosthesis implantation. Glans necrosis typically presented with a dusky glans on the first postoperative day following prosthesis implantation. The blood supply to the glans penis consists of the dorsal arteries and the terminal branches of the spongiosal arteries. Using the cohort in our study, we compiled preoperative comorbidities and adjunctive surgical maneuvers that might compromise glans vascularity, leading to glans necrosis. Preoperative risk factors were arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease (90%), diabetes mellitus (81%), smoking (81%), previous prosthesis explantation (57%), and previous radiation therapy (48%). The most prevalent intraoperative and postoperative factor was subcoronal incision for reasons as simple as coincident circumcision or as complex as for penile degloving (86%). Other factors detected were penile wrapping with an occlusive elastic bandage (62%), use of a sliding technique for penile lengthening (33%), and coincident distal urethral injury repair (29%). Seventeen patients (81%) managed expectantly with preservation of implanted prosthesis sustained significant glandular loss. Four patients managed with immediate prosthesis removal healed without sequelae. Patients with preoperative risk factors undergoing penile prosthesis implantation should avoid high-risk adjunctive surgical maneuvers. Upon development of signs of glans necrosis postoperatively, in the setting of these high-risk factors, immediate implant removal may prevent subsequent glans necrosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ischemic Gangrene of the Glans following Penile Prosthesis Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Gómez, Borja; Romero Otero, Javier; Díez Sicilia, Laura; Jiménez Alcaide, Estibaliz; García-Cruz, Eduardo; Rodríguez Antolín, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The development of ischemic gangrene of the penis following implantation of prosthesis is unusual, and very few cases are available in the literature. As a result, no established treatment protocol is available. We report our experience within a case of gangrene of the glans following implantation of a three-component prosthesis. We present a 53-year-old male, smoker with diabetes and hypercholesterolemia, who underwent surgery for the insertion of a penile prosthesis with 3 components to correct his erectile dysfunction and severe Peyronie's disease. The procedure was carried out without incidents. During the postoperative period, the patient began to complain from penile and perineal pain. He developed avascular necrosis of the glans. The necrosed area was excised. Four weeks later, he developed fever and perineal pain arriving to the emergency room with the prosthesis extruding through the glans. He had emergency surgery to remove the prosthesis plus surgical lavage and was prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Four weeks later, the penis was completely revascularized and reepithelialized. Ischemic gangrene following penile prosthesis implantation takes place in patients with poor peripheral vascularisation. Diabetes mellitus has been the common denominator to all of the reported cases. PMID:23956919

  1. Failed total carpometacarpal joint prosthesis of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Homilius, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis. T...... in eight of 10 patients, but the mean Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores, self-reported pinch-grip-related function, and pain were comparable with our earlier published results with the Elektra carpometacarpal total joint prosthesis.......Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis....... The male:female ratio was 1:4 and the mean duration of observation 32 months (range 6-52). In three patients the revised implant was a MOJE uncemented carpometacarpal joint prosthesis and in seven patients an Elektra uncemented one. At follow-up grip strength was reduced to less than 90% of the other hand...

  2. Design and Optimization of Sinusoidal Formed Femur Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Zafer ŞENALP

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major problems in hip replacement surgery is the hip replacement loosening. Hip replacement loosening occurs over time after the surgery and it is related to the discretization between the bone cement and prosthesis. The underlying factors of this situation are the stress occurring in the bone cement and the shape of the prosthesis. In this study, cortical and trabecular layers of the femur, bone cement and prosthesis were modeled. The models of bone cement and prosthesis were constructed parametrically and two different sinusoidal formed prostheses were developed unlike the former prostheses shapes. Analyses were conducted for these two different sinusoidal forms by using finite element method and optimization was conducted to obtain the appropriate prosthesis stem shape and bone cement thickness by using parametric modeling in finite element analyses. For finite element analyses and optimization, Ansys Workbench software was used and analyses were conducted for 316LS stainless steel material. Finally, the optimum prosthesis stem shape and bone cement thickness was determined by using the results of the analyses in the first stage

  3. Mastication improvement after partial implant-supported prosthesis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, T M S V; Campos, C H; Gonçalves, G M; de Moraes, M; Rodrigues Garcia, R C M

    2013-12-01

    Partially edentulous patients may be rehabilitated by the placement of removable dental prostheses, implant-supported removable dental prostheses, or partial implant fixed dental prostheses. However, it is unclear the impact of each prosthesis type over the masticatory aspects, which represents the objective of this paired clinical trial. Twelve patients sequentially received and used each of these 3 prosthesis types for 2 months, after which maximum bite force was assessed by a strain sensor and food comminution index was determined with the sieving method. Masseter and temporal muscle thicknesses during rest and maximal clenching were also evaluated by ultrasonography. Each maxillary arch received a new complete denture that was used throughout the study. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance for repeated measures, followed by the Tukey test (p dental prosthesis and implant fixed dental prosthesis use, with the higher improvement found after the latter's use. Regardless of implant-retained prosthesis type, masseter muscle thickness during maximal clenching also increased (p prosthesis type.

  4. The effects of tibiofibularis anterior ligaments on ankle joint biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaşlı, Ahmet; Erduran, Mehmet; Baktıroğlu, Lütfü; Büdeyri, Aydın; Yıldız, Didem Venüs; Havıtçıoğlu, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of anterior inferior tibiofibularis ligament (AITFL) deficient human ankle under axial loading of ankle at stance phase of gait. In order to investigate the contribution of AITFL to ankle stability, an in vitro sequential experimental setup was simulated. The measurement of posterior displacement of distal tibia and anterior displacement of the foot, in neutral position, secondary to axial compression, was performed by two non-contact video extensometers. Eight freshly frozen, anatomically intact, cadaveric human ankle specimens were included and tested. An axial compression test machine was utilized from 0 to 800 Newtonswith a loading speed of 5 mm/min in order to simulate the axial weight-bearing sequence of the ankle at stance phase of human gait. There was a statistically significant difference between anteroposterior displacement values for AITFL-Intact and AITFL-Dissected specimens (p≤0.05). Mean AITFL-Intact and mean AITFL-Dissected ankle anteroposterior displacement was 1.28±0.47 mm and 2.06±0.7 mm, respectively. This study determined some numerical and quantitative data about the biomechanical properties of AITFL in neutral foot position. In the emergency department, diagnosis and treatment of AITFL injury, due to ankle distortion, is important. In AITFL injuries, ankle biomechanics is affected, and ankle instability occurs.

  5. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Datir, Abhijit; Langley, Travis [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tresley, Jonathan [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Clifford, Paul D.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of different outcome instruments following foot and ankle trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Christina L; Schemitsch, Emil; Bhandari, Mohit; Mathew, George; Petrisor, Brad A

    2010-12-01

    Identifying optimal treatment strategies in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries has been hampered by the use of multiple available outcome measures with unproven reliability and validity. This prospective observational study aimed to measure the correlation between six functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries. Patients 18 years of age or older with a traumatic foot or ankle injury completed the Short Form-12 (SF-12), Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA), Foot Function Index (FFI), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), Foot and Ankle Questionnaire and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale at a single followup visit. Raw scores for each of the outcome measures were calculated. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in our study. Pearson correlation coefficients provided measures of correlation. Moderate to strong correlations were found for most pairwise comparisons of raw scores and functional categorical rankings (ρ=|0.5243 to 0.92|, p Foot and Ankle Questionnaire. High correlations between scores on six commonly used functional outcome instruments suggest it is likely unnecessary to use more than one instrument when examining functional outcome in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries. However, inconsistencies between measures in the same patient population suggest a need for further validation and scrutiny.

  7. Effect of Ankle Taping and Fatigue on Dynamic Stability in Athletes With and Without Chronic Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Pourkhani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion In the athletes with chronic ankle instability, taping without fatigue improved dynamic balance in the vertical direction. Taping after fatigue could not improve dynamic stability in the athletes with and without chronic ankle instability. Future researchers should examine injured and uninjured participants tested under these conditions to determine if these results are useful in selecting appropriate prophylactic method that can treat or prevent injury to the ankle during functional activities.

  8. Development and evaluation of a new measure for muscle tone of ankle plantar flexors: the ankle plantar flexors tone scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Nobuyuki; Kuwabara, Takeya; Usuda, Shigeru

    2009-12-01

    Takeuchi N, Kuwabara T, Usuda S. Development and evaluation of a new measure for muscle tone of ankle plantar flexors: the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale. To develop and evaluate the reliability and concurrent validity of a clinically feasible measure for muscle tone of the ankle plantar flexors. Cross-sectional reliability and validity study of the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale. Department of rehabilitation in a general hospital. Patients (N=74) with cerebrovascular disease. Not applicable. Muscle tone of the ankle plantar flexors was measured using the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale, the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), quality of muscle reaction with the Modified Tardieu Scale, and passive resistive joint torque with a handheld dynamometer. Intrarater and interrater reliabilities were assessed using the Cohen kappa coefficient (kappa). Internal consistency was assessed using the Cronbach alpha (alpha). Concurrent validity was assessed with the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (rho). The Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale included 3 items: stretch reflex, middle range resistance, and final range resistance. Intrarater and interrater reliabilities and internal consistency of the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale showed moderate to excellent agreement (kappa=.63-.94; alpha=.81). Concurrent validity of the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale was low to very high among the 3 items of the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale and existing measures. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient showed high to very high correlation between stretch reflex and quality of muscle reaction as indices of the central component (rho=.85-.94). Middle range resistance and final range resistance as indices of the peripheral component had low to moderate correlation with passive resistive joint torque using a handheld dynamometer and MAS (rho=.44-.68). The Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale allows measurement of ankle plantar flexor tone in greater detail than existing subjective measures

  9. A three-dimensional model to assess the effect of ankle joint axis misalignments in ankle-foot orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatone, Stefania; Johnson, William Brett; Tucker, Kerice

    2016-04-01

    Misalignment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis joint axis with the anatomic joint axis may lead to discomfort, alterations in gait, and tissue damage. Theoretical, two-dimensional models describe the consequences of misalignments, but cannot capture the three-dimensional behavior of ankle-foot orthosis use. The purpose of this project was to develop a model to describe the effects of ankle-foot orthosis ankle joint misalignment in three dimensions. Computational simulation. Three-dimensional scans of a leg and ankle-foot orthosis were incorporated into a link segment model where the ankle-foot orthosis joint axis could be misaligned with the anatomic ankle joint axis. The leg/ankle-foot orthosis interface was modeled as a network of nodes connected by springs to estimate interface pressure. Motion between the leg and ankle-foot orthosis was calculated as the ankle joint moved through a gait cycle. While the three-dimensional model corroborated predictions of the previously published two-dimensional model that misalignments in the anterior -posterior direction would result in greater relative motion compared to misalignments in the proximal -distal direction, it provided greater insight showing that misalignments have asymmetrical effects. The three-dimensional model has been incorporated into a freely available computer program to assist others in understanding the consequences of joint misalignments. Models and simulations can be used to gain insight into functioning of systems of interest. We have developed a three-dimensional model to assess the effect of ankle joint axis misalignments in ankle-foot orthoses. The model has been incorporated into a freely available computer program to assist understanding of trainees and others interested in orthotics. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  10. Prosthetic replacement of the medial meniscus in cadaveric knees - Does the prosthesis mimic the functional behavior of the native meniscus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, TG; Verdonschot, N; Heijkants, RGJC; Buma, R; Scholten, JGF; van Kampen, A; Veth, RPH

    2004-01-01

    Meniscus replacement by a polymer meniscus prosthesis in dogs resulted in generation of new meniscal tissue. Hypothesis: Optimal functioning of the prosthesis would involve realistic deformation and motion patterns of the prosthesis during knee joint motion. Study Design: Controlled laboratory

  11. Prosthetic replacement of the medial meniscus in cadaveric knees: does the prosthesis mimic the functional behavior of the native meniscus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, T.G. van; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Heijkants, R.G.J.C.; Buma, P.; Scholten, J.G.; Kampen, A. van; Veth, R.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    Meniscus replacement by a polymer meniscus prosthesis in dogs resulted in generation of new meniscal tissue. HYPOTHESIS: Optimal functioning of the prosthesis would involve realistic deformation and motion patterns of the prosthesis during knee joint motion. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory

  12. Ultrasonography in the Assessment of Lateral Ankle Ligament Injury, Instability, and Anterior Ankle Impingement: A Diagnostic Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Patrick J; Craig, Kate; Kettner, Norman W

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the diagnostic value of ultrasonography (US) in a patient with injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle with concomitant ankle joint osteoarthritis and anterior impingement. A 28-year-old male had a history of an inversion injury of the left ankle. Diagnostic US of the left ankle using an 8- to 15-MHz linear array transducer demonstrated a full thickness tear of the anterior talofibular ligament, partial thickness tearing of the calcaneofibular ligament, and laxity of the ankle with varus stress testing. In addition, US was able to demonstrate degeneration of the ankle and talonavicular joints and anterior impingement with dorsiflexion. Osteoarthritic changes were confirmed with radiography. Other US findings included remote deltoid ligamentous complex injury, multiple sites of tenosynovitis, and a large ankle joint effusion with synovial hypertrophy and synovitis. Using US, an accurate diagnosis was established with respect to the pathology and functional impairments of the patient's ankle. This case report exemplifies the value and utility of US in diagnosing derangement in ligamentous, tendinous, articular, and osseous injuries of the ankle.

  13. Influence of Passive Joint Stiffness on Proprioceptive Acuity in Individuals With Functional Instability of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Hellen Veloso Rocha; Amaral, Giovanna Mendes; de Souza Moreira, Bruno; Araújo, Vanessa Lara; Souza, Thales Rezende; Ocarino, Juliana Melo; da Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2017-12-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, cross-sectional. Background Deficits in ankle proprioceptive acuity have been reported in persons with functional instability of the ankle. Passive stiffness has been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying proprioceptive acuity. Objective To compare proprioceptive acuity and passive ankle stiffness in persons with and without functional ankle instability, and to assess the influence of passive joint stiffness on proprioceptive acuity in persons with functional ankle instability. Methods A sample of 18 subjects with and 18 without complaints of functional ankle instability following lateral ankle sprain participated. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to compare motion perception threshold, passive position sense, and passive ankle stiffness between groups. To evaluate the influence of passive stiffness on proprioceptive acuity, individuals in the lateral functional ankle instability group were divided into 2 subgroups: "high" and "low" passive ankle stiffness. Results The functional ankle instability group exhibited increased motion perception threshold when compared with the corresponding limb of the control group. Between-group differences were not found for passive position sense and passive ankle stiffness. Those in the functional ankle instability group with higher passive ankle stiffness had smaller motion perception thresholds than those with lower passive ankle stiffness. Conclusion Unlike motion perception threshold, passive position sense is not affected by the presence of functional ankle instability. Passive ankle stiffness appears to influence proprioceptive acuity in persons with functional ankle instability. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):899-905. Epub 7 Oct 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7030.

  14. Joint stability characteristics of the ankle complex in female athletes with histories of lateral ankle sprain, part II: clinical experience using arthrometric measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, John E; Heitman, Robert J; Gurchiek, Larry R; Hollis, J M; Liu, Wei; Pearsall, Albert W

    2014-01-01

    This is part II of a 2-part series discussing stability characteristics of the ankle complex. In part I, we used a cadaver model to examine the effects of sectioning the lateral ankle ligaments on anterior and inversion motion and stiffness of the ankle complex. In part II, we wanted to build on and apply these findings to the clinical assessment of ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with a history of unilateral ankle sprain. To examine ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with reported history of lateral ankle sprain. Cross-sectional study. University research laboratory. Twenty-five female college athletes (age = 19.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 170.2 ± 7.4 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 10.0 kg) with histories of unilateral ankle sprain. All ankles underwent loading with an ankle arthrometer. Ankles were tested bilaterally. The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Anterior displacement of the ankle complex did not differ between the uninjured and sprained ankles (P = .37), whereas ankle-complex rotation was greater for the sprained ankles (P = .03). The sprained ankles had less anterior and inversion end-range stiffness than the uninjured ankles (P ankle-complex laxity and end-range stiffness were detected in ankles with histories of sprain. These results indicate the presence of altered mechanical characteristics in the soft tissues of the sprained ankles.

  15. Total hip arthroplasty in young patients using the thrust plate prosthesis: clinical and radiological results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Gerich, Torsten G; Bastian, Leonard; Shuler, Franklin D; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Krettek, Christian

    2004-06-01

    The standard treatment for patients who require total hip replacement is the implantation of an intramedullary diaphyseal anchored hip prosthesis. A bone-sparing thrust plate hip prosthesis (TPP) can be used as an alternative device for young patients. The TPP relies on proximal femoral metaphyseal fixation. The theoretical advantage of leaving diaphyseal bone intact is easier conversion to a stemmed prosthesis. This retrospective study evaluated the medium- and short-term results after total joint replacement using the third generation TPP. Between 1997 and 2001, 58 TPPs were used for 52 patients. Clinical and demographic data were obtained from the patients' charts and our electronic database. Their average age at time of surgery was 40.9+/-11.4 years. At follow-up, the Harris hip score, residual pain, required pain medication, and the ability to lie on the operated side were documented. Radiographic evaluation included standardized radiographs of the hip joint and the pelvis. Four patients required revision surgery (6.9%). For 51 of the remaining 54 TPPs, a postoperative functional and radiological status was obtained. The average follow-up was 26+/-11.0 months. 88% of the patients experienced some or complete relief of pain. The median Harris hip score at follow-up was 73+/-20.5 points. A postoperative hip dislocation occurred in 5 patients (8.6%). Since many patients experienced some or complete relief of pain, the TPP can be recommended as a feasible implant for the treatment of hip disorders requiring total hip arthroplasty in young patients. Revision surgeries are facilitated by the good bone stock remaining in the proximal femur.

  16. Gastrocnemius operating length with ankle foot orthoses in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwan; Wren, Tishya Anne Leong; Steele, Katherine Muterspaugh

    2017-06-01

    Many individuals with cerebral palsy wear ankle foot orthoses during daily life. Orthoses influence joint motion, but how they impact muscle remains unclear. In particular, the gastrocnemius is commonly stiff in cerebral palsy. Understanding whether orthoses stretch or shorten this muscle during daily life may inform orthosis design and rehabilitation. This study investigated the impact of different ankle foot orthoses on gastrocnemius operating length during walking in children with cerebral palsy. Case series, within subject comparison of gastrocnemius operating length while walking barefoot and with two types of ankle foot orthoses. We performed gait analyses for 11 children with cerebral palsy. Each child was fit with two types of orthoses: a dynamic ankle foot orthosis (Cascade dynamic ankle foot orthosis) and an adjustable dynamic response ankle foot orthosis (Ultraflex ankle foot orthosis). Musculoskeletal modeling was used to quantify gastrocnemius musculotendon operating length and velocity with each orthosis. Walking with ankle foot orthoses could stretch the gastrocnemius more than barefoot walking for some individuals; however, there was significant variability between participants and orthoses. At least one type of orthosis stretched the gastrocnemius during walking for 4/6 and 3/5 of the Gross Motor Functional Classification System Level I and III participants, respectively. AFOs also reduced peak gastrocnemius lengthening velocity compared to barefoot walking for some participants, with greater reductions among the Gross Motor Functional Classification System Level III participants. Changes in gastrocnemius operating length and lengthening velocity were related to changes in ankle and knee kinematics during gait. Ankle foot orthoses impact gastrocnemius operating length during walking and, with proper design, may assist with stretching tight muscles in daily life. Clinical relevance Determining whether ankle foot orthoses stretch tight muscles can

  17. Automated estimation of hip prosthesis migration: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemeulebroucke, Jef; Deklerck, Rudi; Temmermans, Frederik; Van Gompel, Gert; Buls, Nico; Scheerlinck, Thierry; de Mey, Johan

    2013-09-01

    A common complication associated with hip arthoplasty is prosthesis migration, and for most cemented components a migration greater than 0.85 mm within the first six months after surgery, are an indicator for prosthesis failure. Currently, prosthesis migration is evaluated using X-ray images, which can only reliably estimate migrations larger than 5 mm. We propose an automated method for estimating prosthesis migration more accurately, using CT images and image registration techniques. We report on the results obtained using an experimental set-up, in which a metal prosthesis can be translated and rotated with respect to a cadaver femur, over distances and angles applied using a combination of positioning stages. Images are first preprocessed to reduce artefacts. Bone and prosthesis are extracted using consecutive thresholding and morphological operations. Two registrations are performed, one aligning the bones and the other aligning the prostheses. The migration is estimated as the difference between the found transformations. We use a robust, multi-resolution, stochastic optimization approach, and compare the mean squared intensity differences (MS) to mutual information (MI). 30 high-resolution helical CT scans were acquired for prosthesis translations ranging from 0.05 mm to 4 mm, and rotations ranging from 0.3° to 3° . For the translations, the mean 3D registration error was found to be 0.22 mm for MS, and 0.15 mm for MI. For the rotations, the standard deviation of the estimation error was 0.18° for MS, and 0.08° for MI. The results show that the proposed approach is feasible and that clinically acceptable accuracies can be obtained. Clinical validation studies on patient images will now be undertaken.

  18. Postoperative migration of short stem prosthesis of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Paweł; Szmyd, Jakub; Ambroży, Jarosław; Jurek, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery is a popular procedure that provides predictable, long-lasting and good effects. The use of short stem prostheses helps preserve an intact medullary cavity and proximal diaphysis. It has been demonstrated that the use of short stem prostheses leads to better clinical results compared to standard stem prostheses. The study aimed to assess the migration of the stem of the Proxima hip prosthesis. Migration was defined as a change in the angle of stem position towards a varus deformity. The study involved 164 patients (83 women, 81 men) who underwent hip replacement surgery with a total of 185 Proxima prostheses in the Cracow Rehabilitation Centre between 2007 and 2012. Radiographic analysis included a series of three radiographs obtained for each patient on Day 0 and after 6 and 12 months. Stem migration towards a varus deformity was reported during the follow-up period. There was a correlation between the change in the angle of varus prosthesis alignment and the length of follow-up. The mean change of the varus angle was 8.21° after 12 months. There was a statistically significant difference in the angle of the varus prosthesis alignment between the sexes. After 12 months the total change was 6.82° in women and 9.65° in men. There was no significant correlation between a patient's BMI, age, the total length of the neck of the implant and the progression of the angle of varus prosthesis alignment. 1. The greatest displacement of the Proxima short stem implant towards a varus deformity is seen within the first 6 months following implantation. 2. The change of the angle of varus prosthesis alignment depends on the initial positioning of the prosthesis and the sex of the patient. 3. The change of the angle of varus prosthesis alignment is independent from the patient's age and BMI.

  19. The Effect of Ankle Kinesio Tape on Ankle Muscle Activity During a Drop Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2015-11-01

    The use of Kinesio Tape among health care professional has grown recently in efforts to efficiently prevent and treat joint injuries. However, limited evidence exists regarding the efficacy of this technique in enhancing joint stability and neuromuscular control. To determine how Kinesio Tape application to the ankle joint alters forces and muscle activity during a drop-jump maneuver. Single-group pretest- posttest. University laboratory. 22 healthy adults with no previous history of ankle injury. Participants were instrumented with electromyography on the lower-leg muscles as they jumped from a 35-cm platform onto force plates. Test trials were performed without tape (BL), immediately after application of Kinesio Tape to the ankle (KT-I), and after 24 h of continued use (KT-24). Peak ground-reaction forces (GRFs) and time to peak GRF were compared across taping conditions, and the timing and amplitude of muscle activity from the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and lateral gastrocnemius were compared across taping conditions. No significant differences in amplitude or timing of GRFs were observed (P > .05). However, muscle activity was observed to decrease from BL to KT-I in the tibialis anterior (P = .027) and from BL to KT-24 in the PL (P = .022). The data suggest that Kinesio Tape decreases muscle activity in the ankle during a drop-jump maneuver, although no changes in GRFs were observed. This is contrary to the proposed mechanisms of Kinesio Tape. Further research might investigate how this affects participants with a history of injury.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of the ankle joint complex in patients suffering from ankle sprain by the anterior drawer test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Shau, Yio-Wha; Wang, Chung-Li; Chai, Huei-Ming; Kang, Jiunn-Horng

    2013-06-01

    Biological tissues such as ligaments exhibit viscoelastic behaviours. Injury to the ligament may induce changes of these viscoelastic properties, and these changes could serve as biomarkers to detect the injury. In the present study, a novel instrument was developed to non-invasive quantify the viscoelastic properties of the ankle in vivo by the anterior drawer test. The purpose of the study was to investigate the reliability of the instrument and to compare the viscoelastic properties of the ankle between patients suffering from ankle sprain and controls. Eight patients and eight controls participated in the present study. The reliability test was performed on three randomly chosen subjects. In patient and control test, both ankles of each subject were tested to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of the ankle. The viscosity index was defined for quantitatively evaluating the viscosity of the ankle. Greater viscosity index was associated with lower viscosity. Injured and uninjured ankles of patient and both ankles of controls were compared. The instrument exhibited excellent test-retest reliability (r > 0.9). Injured ankles exhibited significantly less viscosity than uninjured ankles, since injured ankles of patients had significantly higher viscosity index (8,148 ± 5,266) compared with uninjured ankles of patients (948 ± 617; p = 0.008) and controls (1,326 ± 613; p ankle can serve as sensitive and useful clinical biomarkers to differentiate between injured and uninjured ankles. The method may provide a clinical examination for objectively evaluating lateral ankle ligament injuries.

  1. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  2. Boston ocular surface prosthesis: An Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Madanlal Rathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Boston ocular surface prosthesis (BOSP is a scleral contact lens used in the management of patients who are rigid gas permeable (RGP failures as with corneal ectasias such as keratoconus and in those patients who have ocular surface disease such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS. Aim: To report utilization of BOSP in a tertiary eye care center in India. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed charts of 32 patients who received BOSP from July 2008 to May 2009. Indications for fitting these lenses, improvement in visual acuity (VA before and after lens fitting and relief of symptoms of pain and photophobia were noted. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis using SPSS version 16.0 for Windows. Results: Thirty-two patients (43 eyes received these lenses. These consisted of 23 eyes of 17 patients who failed RGP trials for irregular astigmatism and corneal ectasia such as keratoconus and post radial keratotomy and scar and 20 eyes of 15 patients with SJS. Mean age of RGP failures was 27.94 years. Pre- and post-BOSP wear mean LogMAR VA was 1.13 and 0.29, respectively, in RGP failures. The P value was statistically significant (P 2 lines in 7/20 eyes (35% with SJS, with improvement in symptoms. Conclusion: BOSP improves VA in patients who have irregular astigmatism as in ectasias and RGP failures and improves vision and symptoms in patients with SJS.

  3. Boston ocular surface prosthesis: An Indian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Varsha Madanlal; Mandathara, Preeji Sudharman; Dumpati, Srikanth; Vaddavalli, Pravin K; Sangwan, Virender S

    2011-01-01

    Context: Boston ocular surface prosthesis (BOSP) is a scleral contact lens used in the management of patients who are rigid gas permeable (RGP) failures as with corneal ectasias such as keratoconus and in those patients who have ocular surface disease such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS). Aim: To report utilization of BOSP in a tertiary eye care center in India. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed charts of 32 patients who received BOSP from July 2008 to May 2009. Indications for fitting these lenses, improvement in visual acuity (VA) before and after lens fitting and relief of symptoms of pain and photophobia were noted. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis using SPSS version 16.0 for Windows. Results: Thirty-two patients (43 eyes) received these lenses. These consisted of 23 eyes of 17 patients who failed RGP trials for irregular astigmatism and corneal ectasia such as keratoconus and post radial keratotomy and scar and 20 eyes of 15 patients with SJS. Mean age of RGP failures was 27.94 years. Pre- and post-BOSP wear mean LogMAR VA was 1.13 and 0.29, respectively, in RGP failures. The P value was statistically significant (P 2 lines in 7/20 eyes (35%) with SJS, with improvement in symptoms. Conclusion: BOSP improves VA in patients who have irregular astigmatism as in ectasias and RGP failures and improves vision and symptoms in patients with SJS. PMID:21666311

  4. Finite element modeling of retinal prosthesis mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, B. C.; Rowley, A. P.; Chen, K.; Humayun, M. S.; Weiland, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Epiretinal prostheses used to treat degenerative retina diseases apply stimulus via an electrode array fixed to the ganglion cell side of the retina. Mechanical pressure applied by these arrays to the retina, both during initial insertion and throughout chronic use, could cause sufficient retinal damage to reduce the device's effectiveness. In order to understand and minimize potential mechanical damage, we have used finite element analysis to model mechanical interactions between an electrode array and the retina in both acute and chronic loading configurations. Modeling indicates that an acute tacking force distributes stress primarily underneath the tack site and heel edge of the array, while more moderate chronic stresses are distributed more evenly underneath the array. Retinal damage in a canine model chronically implanted with a similar array occurred in correlating locations, and model predictions correlate well with benchtop eyewall compression tests. This model provides retinal prosthesis researchers with a tool to optimize the mechanical electrode array design, but the techniques used here represent a unique effort to combine a modifiable device and soft biological tissues in the same model and those techniques could be extended to other devices that come into mechanical contact with soft neural tissues.

  5. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  6. Golf hand prosthesis performance of transradial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Stephanie L; Wernke, Matthew M; Lura, Derek J; Kahle, Jason T; Dubey, Rajiv V; Highsmith, M Jason

    2015-06-01

    Typical upper limb prostheses may limit sports participation; therefore, specialized terminal devices are often needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of transradial amputees to play golf using a specialized terminal device. Club head speed, X-factor, and elbow motion of two individuals with transradial amputations using an Eagle Golf terminal device were compared to a non-amputee during a golf swing. Measurements were collected pre/post training with various stances and grips. Both prosthesis users preferred a right-handed stance initially; however, after training, one preferred a left-handed stance. The amputees had slower club head speeds and a lower X-factor compared to the non-amputee golfer, but increased their individual elbow motion on the prosthetic side after training. Amputees enjoyed using the device, and it may provide kinematic benefits indicated by the increase in elbow flexion on the prosthetic side. The transradial amputees were able to swing a golf club with sufficient repetition, form, and velocity to play golf recreationally. Increased elbow flexion on the prosthetic side suggests a potential benefit from using the Eagle Golf terminal device. Participating in recreational sports can increase amputees' health and quality of life. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  7. Interim Prosthesis Options for Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Hakimeh; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh

    2017-06-01

    Dental implants have become a popular treatment modality for replacing missing teeth. In this regard, the importance of restoring patients with function during the implant healing period has grown in recent decades. Esthetic concerns, especially in the anterior region of the maxilla, should also be considered until the definitive restoration is delivered. Another indication for such restorations is maintenance of the space required for esthetic and functional definitive restorations in cases where the implant site is surrounded by natural teeth. Numerous articles have described different types of interim prostheses and their fabrication techniques. This article aims to briefly discuss all types of implant-related interim prostheses by different classification including provisional timing (before implant placement, after implant placement in unloading and loading periods), materials, and techniques used for making the restorations, the type of interim prosthesis retention, and definitive restoration. Furthermore, the abutment torque for such restorations and methods for transferring the soft tissue from interim to definitive prostheses are addressed. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Concerns About Ankle Injury Prophylaxis and Acceptance of the Parachute Ankle Brace Among Jumpmaster Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, Jeffrey D; Jannings, Aaron C; Gross, Michael T; Scheuring, Richard A; Crist, Joshua

    2018-02-06

    Several studies have shown that the parachute ankle brace (PAB) is safe, cost-effective, and reduces the rates of ankle injuries during military parachuting. However, the acceptability and usability of the PAB has not been well established in units that regularly do airborne exercises. Many anecdotal concerns in the past may be limiting common use. The purpose of the study is to ascertain the attitudes toward the PAB among experienced paratroopers. One hundred experienced paratroopers training to be jumpmasters at the Advanced Airborne School (Fort Bragg, NC) voluntarily responded to a 13-item, paper questionnaire to assess attitudes toward the PAB, its use, and concerns about future ankle injuries. The survey was offered to all 100 students enrolled in an Advanced Airborne School course. Results were input into an online database using Qualtrics and qualitative responses were evaluated for thematic content and categorized appropriately. Analysis was performed using Qualtrics and SPSS for descriptive statistics, two-sample t-tests, and chi-square tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to evaluate Likert-type responses. Of the 100 paratroopers who responded to the survey 32% had over 10 yr of military service, 58% had over 5 yr of service, and 32% had over 5 yr on active jump status. Results show that none of the respondents had ever used the PAB; 62% had never heard of the PAB, and 72% had never observed use of the PAB. A majority of respondents (87%) had never injured an ankle during a parachute landing fall (PLF), but 79% believed that an ankle injury could affect their career potential as a paratrooper. Almost one-half of the respondents (47%) had seen that ankle injuries affect another paratrooper's career. A third of the respondents (35%) said that they had concerns that would keep them from using the PAB, whereas 21% were uncertain, as they had never heard of it. Only 19% of the respondents were willing to use measures such as taping, lace-up bracing

  9. [Influence of Ankle Braces on the Prevalence of Ankle Inversion Injuries in the Swiss Volleyball National League A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, J; Kneubühler, S; Rogan, S

    2016-06-01

    Ankle inversion is a common injury among volleyball players. The injury rate during a game is 2.1 times higher than during training. As a result, the preventive use of ankle braces is frequently observed in Swiss volleyball leagues. Studies have shown that ankle braces have a preventive effect on the prevalence of ankle inversion. In Switzerland there has been no investigation into the preventive use of braces and their influence on prevalence. For this reason, the goals of this study are 1) to determine when, why and by whom ankle braces are worn and 2) to evaluate the injury rate of users and non-users of ankle braces. A modified questionnaire was sent to 18 men's and women's teams of the Swiss National League A. The questionnaire included questions about injury rates and the circumstances of ankle inversion injuries. The data were statistically analysed with Microsoft Excel 2012 and SPSS Version 20. The overall response rate was 61 %, allowing data from 181 players to be analysed. 33 % (59 of 181) of the players used an ankle brace. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of ankle inversion between users (12 injured) and non-users (8 injured) (p = 0.006). Wearing an ankle brace during training or during a game made no difference in the prevention of injuries (p = 0.356). More athletes were injured during training (n = 13) than during a game (n = 7). The results of the present study indicate that volleyball players preferably wear ankle braces to prevent injury. More than one third of the players in the study wore an ankle brace, 60 % for primary prevention and 40 % for secondary prevention due to a previous injury. The study shows that significantly more users than non-users of ankle braces were injured. This is contrary to literature. Furthermore it was shown that more injuries occur during training than during a game. This finding results from the fact that ankle braces were rarely worn during training. It is

  10. Immobilisation for acute ankle sprain. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Rowe, B. H.; Assendelft, W. J.; Kelly, K. D.; Struijs, P. A.; van Dijk, C. N.

    2001-01-01

    The variation of practice with respect to the treatment of the acutely sprained ankle suggests a lack of evidence-based management strategies for this problem. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of the various methods of immobilisation for acute ankle sprain. An electronic

  11. Rehabilitation of the Ankle after Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines rehabilitation concepts applicable to acute and chronic ankle injury, providing evidence for current techniques used in ankle rehabilitation and describing a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into account empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. The article notes that…

  12. Gait analysis after successful mobile bearing total ankle replacement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doets, H.C.; van Middelkoop, M.; Houdijk, J.H.P.; Nelissen, R.G.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The effect of total ankle replacement on gait is not fully known in terms of joint kinematics, ground reaction force, and activity of the muscles of the lower leg. Methods: A comparative gait study was done in 10 patients after uneventful unilateral mobile-bearing total ankle replacement

  13. THE EFFECTS OF KINESIO TAPING ON PROPRIOCEPTION AT THE ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark DeBeliso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was designed to determine if KinesioTM taping the anterior and lateral portion of the ankle would enhance ankle proprioception compared to the untaped ankle. 30 subjects, 15 men, 15 women, ages 18-30 participated in this study. Exclusion criteria: Ankle injury < 6 months prior to testing, significant ligament laxity as determined through clinical evaluation by an ATC, or any severe foot abnormality. Experiment utilized a single group, pretest and posttest. Plantar flexion and inversion with 20° of plantar flexion reproduction of joint position sense (RJPS was determined using an ankle RJPS apparatus. Subjects were barefooted, blindfolded, and equipped with headphones playing white noise to eliminate auditory cues. Subjects had five trials in both plantar flexion and inversion with 20° plantar flexion before and after application of the KinesioTM tape to the anterior/lateral portion of the ankle. Constant error and absolute error were determined from the difference between the target angle and the trial angle produced by the subject. The treatment group (KinesioTM taped subjects showed no change in constant and absolute error for ankle RJPS in plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion when compared to the untaped results using the same motions. The application of KinesioTM tape does not appear to enhance proprioception (in terms of RJPS in healthy individuals as determined by our measures of RJPS at the ankle in the motions of plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion.

  14. Effect of Functional Rehabilitation Exercise on Chronic Ankle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FE included the Cumberland ankle instability tool (CAIT), stability (static and dynamic), gait (single limb support time; %SLST), isokinetic ankle strength, and kinematic rear foot inversion (RFI) as measured at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, and 6. Descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA was applied to identify differences ...

  15. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon-Sun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  16. Dislocated ankle fracture complicated by near total distal ischaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygun, Fatih; Sertkaya, Omer; Aldemir, Cengiz; Dogan, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Total arterial ischaemia is rarely seen following a dislocated ankle fracture but if it does and intervention is not made, it can lead to serious morbidity. We present a 39-year-old woman with almost total occlusion in the arteria tibialis and arteria dorsalis pedis following a dislocated ankle fracture as a result of a bicycle fall. PMID:24248319

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in anterolateral impingement of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, L.K. III.; Cooperman, A.E.; Helms, C.A.; Speer, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the MR imaging findings of anterolateral impingement (ALI) of the ankle.Design and patients. Nine patients with a history of ankle inversion injury and chronic lateral ankle pain were imaged with MR imaging, and the findings correlated with the results of arthroscopy. Three additional patients with clinically suspected ALI of the ankle were also included. Ankle MR imaging studies from 20 control patients in whom ALI was not suspected clinically were examined for similar findings to the patient group.Results. MR imaging findings in the patients with ALI included a soft tissue signal mass in the anterolateral gutter of the ankle in 12 of 12 (100%) cases, corresponding to the synovial hypertrophy and soft tissue mass found at arthroscopy in the nine patients who underwent arthroscopy. Disruption, attenuation, or marked thickening of the anterior talofibular ligament was seen in all cases. Additional findings included signs of synovial hypertrophy elsewhere in the tibiotalar joint in seven of 12 patients (58%) and bony and cartilaginous injuries to the tibiotalar joint in five of 12 (42%). None of the control patients demonstrated MR imaging evidence of a soft tissue mass in the anterolateral gutter.Conclusions. ALI of the ankle is a common cause for chronic lateral ankle pain. It has been well described in the orthopedic literature but its imaging findings have not been clearly elucidated. The MR imaging findings, along with the appropriate clinical history, can be used to direct arthroscopic examination and subsequent debridement. (orig.)

  18. Ottawa Ankle Rules and Subjective Surgeon Perception to Evaluate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Foot and ankle injuries are frequent in emergency departments. Although only a few patients with foot and ankle sprain present fractures and the fracture patterns are almost always simple, lack of fracture diagnosis can lead to poor functional outcomes. Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the ...

  19. Comparative ultrasound study of acute lateral ankle ligament ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to establish the difference in rehabilitation outcomes between the Jump Stretch Flex Band (JSFB) programme and conventional ankle rehabilitation programmes of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. This study compares the process of healing under the guidance of ultrasound in both groups.

  20. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  1. Ottawa ankle rules and subjective surgeon perception to evaluate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Foot and ankle injuries are frequent in emergency departments. Although only a few patients with foot and ankle sprain present fractures and the fracture patterns are almost always simple, lack of fracture diagnosis can lead to poor functional outcomes. Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the reliability of ...

  2. Blood pressure measurements in the ankle are not equivalent to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Blood pressure (BP) is often measured on the ankle in the emergency department (ED), but this has never been shown to be an acceptable alternative to measurements performed on the arm. Objective. To establish whether the differences between arm and ankle non-invasive BP measurements were clinically ...

  3. Common types and countermeasures of ankle ligament injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize injury types, analyze the causes of injury, and put forward corresponding control measures. Methods: The author selected 3100 basketball players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to ...

  4. Acute lateral ankle sprains: from functional treatment to prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemler, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Ankle sprains are common in daily life and often considered to be minor injuries. The objective in this thesis was to provide more evidence on the burden and optimal management of ankle sprains in terms of the magnitude of the problem, the prognostic consequences and ways to improve treatment and

  5. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed.

  6. Safety and efficiency of posterior arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, Roel P. M.; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Golano, Pau; van Dijk, C. Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    To study the safety and efficiency of posterior arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis. Ten fresh-frozen human lower leg specimens without evidence of previous surgery to the foot and ankle were selected. Arthroscopic debridement of the tibiotalar joint was performed in all specimens using a standardized

  7. Ankle Arthrodesis Following Trauma, a Useful Salvage Procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three patients with severe open ankle injuries between January 2007 and December 2009 were seen and had wound debridement done and compressive ankle arthrodesis with a Charnley's arthrodesis clamp. Tibiotalar and tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis was the procedure carried out. Patients were followed up for 3–12 ...

  8. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  9. Gait assessment in patients with thrust plate prosthesis and intramedullary stemmed prosthesis implanted to each hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Salih; Karatosun, Vasfi; Unver, Bayram; Gunal, Izge

    2007-02-01

    There has not been any study regarding comparative gait analysis in patients with intramedullary stemmed prosthesis (ISP) and thrust plate prosthesis (TPP) implanted to each hip. Four patients (three females and one male) who had undergone operation due to coxarthrosis were selected. The mean age was 60.5 (37-78) years. TPP and ISP had been implanted to the left and right hip, respectively, in three patients, and one patient received TPP to the right and ISP to the left hip. Gait was analyzed with a BTS Elite System consisting six cameras and two Kistler force plates using Helen Hayes marker set to assess the gait parameters. The clinical outcome was also evaluated according to Harris hip score (HHS). The average HHS was 95.0 (82-100) points after a mean follow-up of 45.0 (30-50) months for TPP and 94.5 (80-100) points after a follow-up of 60.0 (14-122) months for ISP. Neither of the HHS scores and follow-up time nor gait parameters obtained from the TPP-implanted side were statistically different when compared to those of the ISP-implanted side. TPP and ISP as the implants with their own biomechanical specifications did not produce any remarkable difference in gait.

  10. A comparison of tumor prosthesis implantation and pasteurized autograft-prosthesis composite for proximal tibial tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won Seok; Cho, Wan Hyeong; Jeon, Dae-Geun; Kong, Chang-Bae; Duo, Jian; Lee, Soo-Yong

    2012-07-01

    Although previous reports on composite biologic reconstruction in the proximal tibial location vary, we hypothesized that this type of reconstruction may reduce the late infection rate and have advantages in terms of longevity by restoring bone stock. Primary analysis addressed differences between 62 tumor prosthesis (TP) and 25 pasteurized autograft-prosthesis composite (PPC) reconstructions in terms of survival rates, functional outcomes, and temporal patterns of infection. The 10-year survival rates of the TP and PPC groups were 73.9 ± 11.7 and 68.7 ± 20.1 %, respectively (P = 0.64). Reconstructive failure occurred in 16 (25.8 %) in the TP and in 7 (28 %) in the PPC group. The cause of failures in the TP group was infection (16), whereas those of PPC group were infection (5), loosening (1), and local recurrence (1). The mean functional scores of TP (52) and PPC (20) patients that maintained a mobile joint were 24.2 (81 %) and 25.1 (83.6 %), respectively. Infection rates in the two groups were similar (P = 0.328), but infections occurred earlier in the PPC group (P = 0.011). This comparative study suggests composite biological reconstruction shows a comparable long-term survival rate to TP reconstruction; however, the composite method has a tendency to a lower rate of late infection.

  11. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  12. Informative document waste plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelhout D; Sein AA; Duvoort GL

    1989-01-01

    This "Informative document waste plastics" forms part of a series of "informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the indstruction of the Directorate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behalf of the program of

  13. Informative document packaging waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten JM; Nagelhout D; Duvoort GL; Weerd M de

    1989-01-01

    This "informative document packaging waste" forms part of a series of "informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the instructions of the Direcotrate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behalf of the program of

  14. CAED Document Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compliance Assurance and Enforcement Division Document Repository (CAEDDOCRESP) provides internal and external access of Inspection Records, Enforcement Actions, and National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) documents to all CAED staff. The respository will also include supporting documents, images, etc.

  15. MRI of injuries of the lateral ankle ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent sport injury of the ankle is located in the lateral ankle ligaments. The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and stress radiography, allowing a fair diagnosis for the daily routine. For the direct visualization and precise diagnosis of the lateral ankle ligaments MRI provides the best answer. MRI is used with controlled positioning of the foot, correct angulation of sequenzes, and distinct analysis of MR findings. Sinus tarsi ligaments and ligaments of the distal syndesmosis should be included to the report. In selected patients MRI allows the best evaluation of the extent of the lateral ankle ligaments. MRI is the method of choice for combined osteochondral injuries and soft tissue lesions too. (orig.)

  16. Kinematic analysis of a televised medial ankle sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca E. Wade

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ankle sprains are one of the most prevalent athletic injuries. Prior work has investigated lateral ankle sprains, but research on generally more severe medial sprains is lacking. This case report performs a kinematic analysis using novel motion analysis methods on a non-contact medial ankle sprain. Peak eversion (50° occurred 0.2 seconds following ground contact, maximum velocity of 426°/s, while peak dorsiflexion (64° occurred with a greater maximum velocity (573°/s. The combination of dorsiflexion at ground contact and rapid eversion is associated with a non-contact eversion sprain. This study provides a quantitative analysis of the eversion ankle sprain injury mechanism. Keywords: Athletic injury, Biomechanics, Ankle injury, Kinematics

  17. Generic safety documentation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    This document is intended to be a resource for preparers of safety documentation for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico facilities. It provides standardized discussions of some topics that are generic to most, if not all, Sandia/NM facilities safety documents. The material provides a ``core`` upon which to develop facility-specific safety documentation. The use of the information in this document will reduce the cost of safety document preparation and improve consistency of information.

  18. Generic safety documentation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    This document is intended to be a resource for preparers of safety documentation for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico facilities. It provides standardized discussions of some topics that are generic to most, if not all, Sandia/NM facilities safety documents. The material provides a ''core'' upon which to develop facility-specific safety documentation. The use of the information in this document will reduce the cost of safety document preparation and improve consistency of information

  19. Outcome of total knee arthroplasty with insall burstein-11 prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiq, M.Z.; Qayum, H.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with severe degenerative knee joint disease often require knee arthroplasty to reduce pain, improve stability and restore function. Insall Burstein II prosthesis is posteriorly stabilized condylar prosthesis, which provide posterior cruciate ligament substitution. It was designed to improve range of motion, stair climbing ability and to prevent posterior subluxation. Evaluate the functional outcome of total knee arthroplasty with IB II prosthesis and Evaluate the alignment of prosthetic components by radiological parameters and its correlation with functional outcome. Sixty knees of sixty patients were replaced by using Insall Burstein II prosthesis. Postoperative radiographs were evaluated for alignment of knee and prosthetic components by criteria selected from knee society roentogenographic evaluation system. Functional outcome was evaluated by rationale of knee society knee rating system. Prosthetic component was aligned in 93% and mal-alignment in 7% of the cases. There was significant improvement in functions core from mean score 33.83 +-15.5 to 59.5+-17.7 and knee score from 37 +- 12.5 to 76.4 +-2.2. Postoperative functional score was found correlated with alignment significantly. Conclusion: Total knee arthroplasty with I-B-II prosthesis is a safe durable and predictable procedure with proper surgical technique and expertise good alignment and satisfactory functional out come can be achieved. (author)

  20. Closed-eye orbital prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watson, Jason; Srinivasan, Dilip

    2015-03-01

    One of the most challenging prostheses to fabricate is an acceptable orbital prosthesis. Successful reconstruction of the complex missing tissues, the globe, muscle, skin, and bony elements requires time and high levels of practical skill. A good match to the contralateral nondefect side will help mask the underlying defect and give the patient confidence to return to normal, routine life. The contralateral eye opening will commonly dictate the eye opening of such a prosthesis, but because of the expressive nature of the eye and its high levels of mobility, this can be difficult to achieve. This clinical report presents a patient who had an extended orbital exenteration and right maxillectomy to remove a maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. An alternative approach to constructing an orbital prosthesis was undertaken with the eye closed. Compared to the normal method of fabrication, this process was less complex and quicker, made the prosthesis less "staring," camouflaged the defect, and reduced the detection of the prosthesis because of movements in the remaining eye. The patient engaged in his routine daily life, which reinforced his self-esteem, confidence, and reintegration into the community. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Split-Framework in Mandibular Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Omar Mendoza Marin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with an implant-supported prosthesis, mandibular flexure must be considered an important biomechanical factor when planning the metal framework design, especially if implants are installed posterior to the interforaminal region. When an edentulous mandible is restored with a fixed implant-supported prosthesis connected by a fixed full-arch framework, mandibular flexure may cause needless stress in the overall restorative system and lead to screw loosening, poor fit of prosthesis, loss of the posterior implant, and patient’s discomfort due to deformation properties of the mandible during functional movements. The use of a split-framework could decrease the stress with a precise and passive fit on the implants and restore a more natural functional condition of the mandible, helping in the longevity of the prosthesis. Therefore, the present clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient by a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis with a split-framework to compensate for mandibular flexure. Clinical Significance. The present clinical report shows that the use of a split-framework reduced the risk of loss of the posterior implants or screws loosening with acceptable patient comfort over the period of a year. The split-framework might have compensated for the mandibular flexure during functional activities.

  2. Intermanual Transfer Effects in Below-Elbow Myoelectric Prosthesis Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Errit; Romkema, Sietske; Cutti, Andrea G; Brouwers, Michael A; Bongers, Raoul M; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2016-11-01

    To determine intermanual transfer effects in patients with a below-elbow amputation using a myoelectric prosthesis and to establish whether laterality affects these effects. Case-control. A standardized setting in a rehabilitation clinic. A convenience sample (N=44) of experienced myoelectric prosthesis users (n=22) and matched controls (n=22). Controls were matched on sex, age (±5y), and hand dominance. Both the experienced group and the control group performed several tasks using a prosthesis simulator attached to their nonaffected arm. Movement time, force control, Box and Block test (BBT) scores, and duration of hand opening. Movement times of myoelectric prosthesis users were shorter, and these users had significantly higher BBT scores and shorter hand opening durations than those of controls. No intermanual transfer effects on force control and no laterality effects were found. Intermanual transfer effects were present in experienced myoelectric prosthesis users with a below-elbow amputation, independent of laterality. These findings support the clinical relevance of intermanual transfer training, which may facilitate persons with an upper limb amputation to start training directly after the amputation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional improvement with digital prosthesis use after multiple digit amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifchez, Scott D; Marchant-Hanson, Judith; Matloub, Hani S; Sanger, James R; Dzwierzynski, William W; Nguyen, Hanh H

    2005-07-01

    Patients who sustain traumatic amputation of multiple fingers suffer both a functional and psychologic loss. Previous studies of prosthesis use for finger amputees have focused primarily on the psychologic benefits. Clinically our group noticed a functional improvement on hand function tests when patients with multiple digit amputations used a prosthesis. Given the expense of multiple finger prostheses we sought to determine if they led to a consistent functional improvement in these patients. Ten consecutive patients performed a battery of hand function tests and rated their ability to perform a variety of activities of daily living both with and without their prosthesis using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire. Our results show a significant improvement in 3-finger-pinch strength and grip strength and a trend of improvement of tip-pinch, lateral-pinch, and grip strength in dynamometer positions 1, 2, 3, and 4 in these patients when tested with and without their prostheses. Function in activities of daily living, as assessed by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire, was improved globally with prosthesis use. In addition, significant improvement was noted in several specific activities including opening a jar, writing, and turning a key, among others. These results show that prosthesis use provides a functional benefit to these patients in multiple activities.

  4. Exploiting Document Level Semantics in Document Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Rafi; Muhammad Naveed Sharif; Waleed Arshad; Habibullah Rafay

    2016-01-01

    Document clustering is an unsupervised machine learning method that separates a large subject heterogeneous collection (Corpus) into smaller, more manageable, subject homogeneous collections (clusters). Traditional method of document clustering works around extracting textual features like: terms, sequences, and phrases from documents. These features are independent of each other and do not cater meaning behind these word in the clustering process. In order to perform semantic viable clusteri...

  5. Numerical analysis of an osseointegrated prosthesis fixation with reduced bone failure risk and periprosthetic bone loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomaszewski, P. M.; van Diest, M.; Bulstra, S. K.; Verdonschot, N.; Verkerke, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Currently available implants for direct attachment of prosthesis to the skeletal system after transfemoral amputation (OPRA system. Integrum AB, Sweden and ISP Endo/Exo prosthesis, ESKA Implants AG, Germany) show many advantages over the conventional socket fixation. However, restraining

  6. Intraoral framework pick-up technique to improve fit of a metal-resin implant prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Rustum Baig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The achievement of passive fit is an important prerequisite for the prevention of complications in full-arch screw-retained implant prosthesis. With cemented prosthesis, the cementation compensates for the discrepancies in the cast framework, but the lack of retrievability seems undesirable. The aim of this paper is to propose a modified screw-retained prosthesis design for complete arch implant fixed rehabilitation. A technique for the fabrication of a full-arch metal-resin implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis is described. Cementation of the framework to the abutments intraorally improves the passivity of fit of the prosthesis on the implants. Maintenance of screw-access channels in the final prosthesis ensures retrievability. The metal-resin design allows for easy repair and maintenance. The prosthesis is cost-effective compared to conventional options and can be employed as a viable treatment alternative when considering metal-acrylic resin complete arch fixed prosthesis.

  7. What is the evidence for chemical thromboprophylaxis in foot and ankle surgery? Systematic review of the English literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangwani, Jitendra; Sheikh, Nomaan; Cichero, Matthew; Williamson, David

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a well documented complication following lower limb trauma and surgery. The incidence of VTE in hip and knee surgery has been well studied, whereas the incidence in foot and ankle surgery is less clear. There is debate as to which cases require prophylaxis and what is the most effective means by which this is achieved. We performed a systematic review of the published English literature on VTE prophylaxis in foot and ankle surgery using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL, Cochrane Library, without date restrictions up to December 2012. From 988 citations, 25 papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Conclusions were drawn on the incidence (symptomatic and asymptomatic VTE), location (distal vs. proximal), associated risk factors, timing of VTE, role of mechanical and pharmacological prophylaxis and cost effectiveness of the treatment. Our review showed that the overall incidence of symptomatic VTE in foot and ankle surgery is low (0-0.55%). There is increased incidence in foot and ankle trauma patients with the highest incidence reported in tendo-achilles surgery. The reported risk factors include previous history of VTE, immobilisation, high BMI, age, co morbidities, contraceptive pill, and air-travel. There is a cumulative effect resulting in higher risk when two or more risk factors are present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion torques measured by dynamometry in healthy subjects from 5 to 80 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraux, Amélie; Canal, Aurélie; Ollivier, Gwenn; Ledoux, Isabelle; Doppler, Valérie; Payan, Christine; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2013-03-22

    Ankle strength is often impaired in some of the most common neuromuscular disorders. Consequently, strength generated around this joint is important to assess, because it has a great impact on balance and gait. The objectives of this study were to establish normative data and predictive equations for both ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion strength from a population of healthy subjects (children and adults), to assess the reliability of the measurements and to study the feasibility of using a novel dynamometer on a group of patients with a neuromuscular disorder. Measurements of maximal isometric torque for dorsi- and plantar-flexion were performed on 345 healthy subjects from 5 to 80 years of age. The feasibility of the method was tested on nine patients diagnosed with type 2A limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The results documented normal strength values depending on gender and age on ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion. The reliability of the technique was good with no evaluator effect and a small learning effect. The dynamometer was found suitable in the group of patients, even very weak. The device developed was both reliable and accurate in assessing both ankle dorsi-flexion and plantar-flexion torque measurements from weak patients and children to strong healthy adults. Norms and predictive equations are provided for these two muscle functions.

  9. Effects of visual feedback balance training on the balance and ankle instability in adult men with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seung-Min; Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Do Youn

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of visual feedback balance training on the balance and ankle instability in adult men with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty eight adults with functional ankle instability, divided randomly into an experimental group, which performed visual feedback balance training for 20 minutes and ankle joint exercises for 10 minutes, and a control group, which performed ankle joint exercise for 30 minutes. Exercises were completed three times a week for 8 weeks. Bio rescue was used for balance ability. It measured limit of stability at one minute. For ankle instability was measured using Cumberland ankle instability tool (CAIT). This measure was performed before and after the experiments in each group. [Results] The experimental group had significant increase in the Limit of Stability and CAIT score. The control group had significant increase in CAIT score. While the Limit of Stability increased without significance. [Conclusion] In conclusion, visual feedback balance training can be recommended as a treatment method for patients with functional ankle instability.

  10. The course of the superficial peroneal nerve in relation to the ankle position: anatomical study with ankle arthroscopic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Golanó, Pau; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that the superficial peroneal nerve is the only nerve in the human body that can be made visible; iatrogenic damage to this nerve is the most frequently reported complication in anterior ankle arthroscopy. One of the methods to visualize the nerve is combined ankle plantar flexion

  11. Clinical predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Astudillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to ascertain predictors of Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, an independent predictor of mortality, in patients with aortic stenosis using bioprosthetic valves. METHOD: We analyzed 2,107 sequential surgeries. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was calculated using the effective orifice area of the prosthesis divided by the patient's body surface area. We defined nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch as effective orifice area indexes of .0.85 cm²/m, 0.85-0.66 cm²/m², and <0.65 cm²/m², respectively. RESULTS: A total of 311 bioprosthetic patients were identified. The incidence of nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 41%, 42, and 16%, respectively. Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was significantly more prevalent in females (82%. In severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, the perfusion and the crossclamp times were considerably lower when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch and moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. Patients with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch had a significantly higher likelihood of spending time in the intensive care unit and a significantly longer length of stay in the hospital. Body surface area was not different in severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. In-hospital mortality in patients with nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 2.3%, 6.1%, and 8%, respectively. Minimally invasive surgery was significantly associated with moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch in 49% of the patients, but not with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. CONCLUSION: Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch is more common in females, but not in those with minimal available body surface area. Though operative times were shorter in these patients, intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay were longer. Surgeons and cardiologists should be cognizant of these clinical

  12. [Posttraumatic complications after pediatric ankle injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F J; Linhart, W E

    2013-08-01

    Ankle sprains are common injuries in childhood and are generally harmless. However, fractures of the ankle joint are rare, but complications (persistent rotational or axial deformity, alteration of growth of the distal tibia or fibula, or joint deformity) can lead to serious problems during growth. The clinical relevance of growth disturbances at the distal tibia or fibula depends on the age at the time of fracture more than on the fracture type, severity of dislocation, or interponated material in the fracture gap. Both stimulation and inhibition of growth are possible. Inhibition of growth at the distal tibial growth plate regularly leads to varus deformity and shortening. This is of clinical importance as this type of growth disturbance is the most common. Valgus deformity is rare, mostly due to persistent axial deviation of an insufficiently reduced fracture. Transitional fractures always occur at the time of growth plate closure; thus, growth disturbances do not play a role. Transitional fractures could be overlooked or treated insufficiently, leading to a step or gap of the joint surface.

  13. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ankle and subtalar synovitis in a ball-and-socket ankle joint causing posterolateral painful coarse crepitus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ka Yuk; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl with bilateral ball-and-socket ankles reported left medial heel pain. Her left heel had gone into a varus position on tiptoeing, and a painful clunk had occurred when returning to normal standing. The clunk persisted after physiotherapy and treatment with an orthosis. Subtalar arthroscopy and peroneal tendoscopy showed mild diffuse synovitis of the ankle joint, especially over the posterior capsule, and a patch of inflamed and fibrotic synovium at the posterolateral corner of the subtalar joint. The clunk subsided immediately after arthroscopic synovectomy and had not recurred during 5 years of follow-up. We found no other reported cases of ankle and subtalar synovitis occurring in patients with a ball-and-socket ankle joint. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint bone in the classification of the ankle joint trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun; Zhang Qiang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint bone in the classification of the ankle joint trauma. Methods: Measure fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint in 217 adult cases of fracture and dislocation of ankle joint. And the cases were classified by the results of the measurement. Results: Measurement was unavailable in 9 cases of tearing fracture. In 31 cases, the lesions could not be particularly classified. And in the rest 176 cases the trauma were precisely classified. The over all successful rate was 81.6%. Conclusion: Fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint bone are valuable in classification of the trauma of the angle joint. While the specificity of this method is low in differentiating the adducting and abducting fracture of the medial angle, in which a combined investigation is recommended

  16. Active Bone Conduction Prosthesis: BonebridgeTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zernotti, Mario E.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Bone conduction implants are indicated for patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss, as well as for patients with single-sided deafness (SSD. The transcutaneous technology avoids several complications of the percutaneous bone conduction implants including skin reaction, skin growth over the abutment, and wound infection. The Bonebridge (MED-EL, Austria prosthesis is a semi-implantable hearing system: the BCI (Bone Conduction Implant is the implantable part that contains the Bone Conduction-Floating Mass Transducer (BC-FMT, which applies the vibrations directly to the bone; the external component is the audio processor Amadé BB (MED-EL, Austria, which digitally processes the sound and sends the information through the coil to the internal part. Bonebridge may be implanted through three different approaches: the transmastoid, the retrosigmoid, or the middle fossa approach. Objective This systematic review aims to describe the world́s first active bone conduction implant system, Bonebridge, as well as describe the surgical techniques in the three possible approaches, showing results from implant centers in the world in terms of functional gain, speech reception thresholds and word recognition scores. Data Synthesis The authors searched the MEDLINE database using the key term Bonebridge. They selected only five publications to include in this systematic review. The review analyzes 20 patients that received Bonebridge implants with different approaches and pathologies. Conclusion Bonebridge is a solution for patients with conductive/mixed hearing loss and SSD with different surgical approaches, depending on their anatomy. The system imparts fewer complications than percutaneous bone conduction implants and shows proven benefits in speech discrimination and functional gain.

  17. The making of indigenous vascular prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madathipat Unnikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Vascular illnesses are on the rise in India, due to increase in lifestyle diseases and demographic transition, requiring intervention to save life, organ or limbs using vascular prosthesis. The aim of this study was to develop indigenous large diameter vascular graft for treatment of patients with vascular pathologies. Methods: The South India Textile Research Association, at Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India, developed seamless woven polyester (Polyethylene terephthalate graft at its research wing. Further characterization and testing followed by clinical trials were conducted at Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. Fifteen in vivo experiments were carried out in 1992-1994 in pigs as animal model. Controlled (phase I clinical trial in ten patients was performed along with control graft. Thereafter, phase II trial involved 22 patients who underwent multi-centre clinical trial in four centres across India. Results: Laboratory testing showed that polyester graft was non-toxic, non-leeching and non-haemolytic with preserved long-term quality, further confirming in pigs by implanting in thoracic aorta, comparable to control Dacron grafts. Perigraft incorporation and smooth neointima formation which are prime features of excellent healing characteristics, were noted at explantation at planned intervals. Subsequently in the phase I and II clinical trials, all patients had excellent recovery without mortality or device-related adverse events. Patients receiving the test graft were followed up for 10 and 5 years, respectively. Serial clinical, duplex scans and CT angiograms performed periodically confirmed excellent graft performance. Interpretation & conclusions: Indigenously developed Chitra vascular graft was comparable to commercially available Dacron graft, ready for clinical use at affordable cost to patients as against costly imported grafts.

  18. Research, design and development project Myoelectric Prosthesis of Upper Limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiano, L; Montaner, E; Flecha, A

    2007-01-01

    A Research Design and Development Project was developed of a myoelectric prosthesis for a pediatric patient presenting congenital amputation of the left forearm below the elbow. A multidisciplinary work-team was formed for this goal, in order to solve the several (/various) aspects regarding this project (mechanical, ergonomics, electronics, physical). The prosthesis as an electromechanical device was divided in several blocks, trying to achieve a focused development for each stage, acording to requisites. A mechanical prototype of the prothesis was designed and built along with the circuitry needed for EMG aquisition, control logic and drivers. Having acomplished the previuos stages, the project is now dealing with the definitions of the interface between the prosthesis and the patient, with promising perspectives

  19. Research, design and development project Myoelectric Prosthesis of Upper Limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galiano, L; Montaner, E; Flecha, A [Bioparx, J Hernandez 1101, Parana, ERios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    A Research Design and Development Project was developed of a myoelectric prosthesis for a pediatric patient presenting congenital amputation of the left forearm below the elbow. A multidisciplinary work-team was formed for this goal, in order to solve the several (/various) aspects regarding this project (mechanical, ergonomics, electronics, physical). The prosthesis as an electromechanical device was divided in several blocks, trying to achieve a focused development for each stage, acording to requisites. A mechanical prototype of the prothesis was designed and built along with the circuitry needed for EMG aquisition, control logic and drivers. Having acomplished the previuos stages, the project is now dealing with the definitions of the interface between the prosthesis and the patient, with promising perspectives.

  20. Orbital exenteration and placement of a prosthesis in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadelstein, B; Bakal, R; Lewbart, G A

    1997-09-01

    To develop a procedure for orbital exenteration and prosthesis placement in fish. Prospective study. 5 cultured hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x M chrysops) ranging from 30 to 50 cm in length. Exenteration was performed, using a dorsal approach in which blunt dissection was performed in the circumorbital sulcus. The orbit was then dried, and simple interrupted sutures were placed, leaving 2 suture loops within the orbit. The orbit was filled with polyvinylsiloxane, and a prosthetic glass eye was seated in the polyvinylsiloxane. All fish retained the prosthesis and had satisfactory cosmetic results at the end of the 8-week study period. The increase in popularity of pet fish and abundance of valuable aquarium and show fish have led to heightened awareness of piscine ocular disease. Aquarium fish are often euthanatized because of disfiguring ocular problems. The technique described here for surgical exenteration and cosmetic orbital prosthesis placement in fish may extend the captive life of public display fish.