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Sample records for ankle injuries

  1. LATERAL ANKLE INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background: Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. Objective: To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with ...

  2. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  3. LATERAL ANKLE INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background: Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. Objective: To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with a review of relevant anatomy, assessment and treatment. Also included is a discussion of the efficacy of manual therapy in the treatment of ankle sprain. Discussion: A detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the ankle as well as the early recognition of factors that may delay the rate of healing are important considerations when developing a management plan for inversion sprains of the ankle. This area appears to be under-researched however it was found that movement therapy and its various forms appear to be the most efficient and most effective method of treating uncomplicated ankle injury. Future investigations should involve a study to determine the effect chiropractic treatment (manipulation) may have on the injured ankle. PMID:17987171

  4. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  5. Ankle injuries in basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanderson, J; Nemeth, G; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the frequency of ankle sprains in basketball players. A questionnaire about previous ankle injuries, time off after such injuries, current ankle problems, personal data, number of practice hours and the use of prophylactic measures was sent out to 102 basketball players in a second division league in Sweden. Ninety-six players answered. 92% of them had suffered an ankle sprain while playing basketball, and of these 83% reported repeated sprains of one ankle. In the last two seasons, 78% of the players had injured at least one ankle. The injury frequency in the investigation was 5.5 ankle injuries per 1000 activity hours. 22% of the players used some kind of prophylactic support of their ankle joints. Because of the great number of ankle sprains and the disability in terms of time away from sports that they cause, prevention of these injuries is essential.

  6. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Soccer Season Prime time for foot and ankle injuries. Parents and coaches should think twice before coaxing ... Ankle Tennis involves much foot work. Foot and ankle injuries can occur from the continuous side-to-side ...

  7. Ankle Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one ... muscles and tendons move it. The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is ...

  8. [Ankle braces prevent ligament injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jon

    2002-09-05

    The Cochrane collaboration has performed a meta-analysis of all studies found on the prevention of ankle ligament injuries, frequent in sports like soccer, European handball and basketball. Interventions include the use of modified footwear and associated supports, training programmes and health education. Five randomized trials totalling 3,954 participants were included. With the exception of ankle disc training, all prophylactic interventions entailed the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis, air-cast or high top shoes. The studies showed a significant reduction in the number of ankle sprains in individuals allocated to external ankle support. This reduction was greater for those with a previous history of ankle sprains.

  9. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  10. Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Ankle Injuries and Disorders URL of this page: https://medlineplus. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing ...

  11. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint

    OpenAIRE

    L?tscher, P.; Lang, T. H.; Zwicky, L.; Hintermann, B.; Knupp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ank...

  12. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Stuart K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L.; Ioannidis, John P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:...

  13. Hydrocolonotherapy ankle joints after injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Muchin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to improve efficiency of gydrokinesitherapy by means of specially designed devices and monolasts for patients after ankle joint injuries. Material & Methods: there are pedagogical methods, clinical and radiological methods, anthropometric measurements and goniometry were used. Results: the author's technique of hydrokinesitherapy with application hydrokinesimechanotherapy device in the program of physical rehabilitation which provides optimum conditions for the recovery process was developed. Conclusions: the specially designed hydrokinesomechanotherapeutic device and monolasts are allow strictly controlled movement in all planes of the ankle joint, which contributes to the acceleration of the recovery; the conducted anthropometric and goniometric studies were indicate more rapid elimination of edema, increase movement amplitude, carries opposition to the development of contractures and muscle atrophy.

  14. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stuart K; Kleimeyer, John P; Ahmed, Marwa A; Avins, Andrew L; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D) that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75-2.23). A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9) that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46-1.80). The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury.

  15. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Kim

    Full Text Available Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75-2.23. A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9 that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46-1.80. The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury.

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament injury and ankle dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstedt, Charlotta; Rasmussen-Barr, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The aim was to study whether the degree of ankle dorsiflexion differs between subjects with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and uninjured controls. Another aim was to study ankle dorsiflexion between the injured and the uninjured leg and in addition between women and men with an ACL injury. Sixty subjects (ACL injury, n = 30 and controls, n = 30) were enroled consecutively at two physical therapy settings. Ankle dorsiflexion was measured with a goniometer in a standardized way in a weight-bearing lunge position. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference (p < 0.001) in ankle dorsiflexion between subjects with an ACL injury (mean 41.1° SD 5.7) and those without (mean 46.6° SD 5.3). No difference in ankle dorsiflexion was found between the injured leg and the uninjured or between women and men with ACL injury. The present findings suggest lower degree of ankle dorsiflexion in subjects with an ACL injury than in uninjured controls. A functional test measuring ankle dorsiflexion with a goniometer may be one way of identifying individuals at increased risk of ACL injury. Comparative study, Level II.

  17. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Basketball Coaches’ Utilization of Ankle Injury Prevention Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    McGuine, Timothy A.; Hetzel, Scott; Pennuto, Anthony; Brooks, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ankle injuries are the most common high school basketball injury. Little is known regarding the utilization of ankle injury prevention strategies in high school settings. Objective: To determine high school basketball coaches’ utilization of ankle injury prevention strategies, including prophylactic ankle bracing (PAB) or an ankle injury prevention exercise program (AIEPP). Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Methods: The survey was distributed to all high school basketball coac...

  19. ANSWER: Road traffic accident ankle injury

    OpenAIRE

    Paisal HUSSIN; Kuhanrajan RAMALINGAM; Maliza MAWARDI; Mahendran SUBRAMANIAM

    2012-01-01

    (Refer to page 351)Answer: Open dislocation of talusTotal dislocation of talus is a rare injury. It is also described in the literature with other names such as pantalar dislocation, talus extrusion and talus enucleation. 1-4 It represents about 3-4 % of all ankle dislocations. In most cases, there is an open injury and is usually associated with other injuries around the ankle such as malleolar fractures, tarsal bone fractures and vascular injury. This type of injury is a result of high ener...

  20. Foot and Ankle Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Anderson, Robert B

    Physicians need to be aware of a variety of foot and ankle injuries that commonly occur in American football, including turf toe, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, syndesmotic and deltoid disruption, and Achilles ruptures. These injuries are often complex and require early individual tailoring of treatment and rehabilitation protocols. Successful management and return to play requires early diagnosis, a thorough work-up, and prompt surgical intervention when warranted with meticulous attention to restoration of normal foot and ankle anatomy. Physicians should have a high suspicion for subtle injuries and variants that can occur via both contact and noncontact mechanisms.

  1. Interventions for preventing ankle ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoll, H H; Rowe, B H; Quinn, K M; de Bie, R

    2001-01-01

    Some sports, for example basketball and soccer, have a very high incidence of ankle injuries, mainly sprains. Consequently, ankle sprains are one of the most commonly treated injuries in acute care. To assess the effects of interventions used for the prevention of ankle ligament injuries or sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age. We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group's specialised register, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the National Research Register and bibliographies of study reports. We also contacted colleagues and some trialists. The most recent search was conducted in July 2000. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions for the prevention of ankle sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age were included provided that ankle sprains were recorded. Interventions included use of modified footwear, external ankle supports, co-ordination training and health education. These could be applied as a supplement to treatment provided that prevention of re-injury was the primary objective. At least two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Wherever possible, results of outcome measures were pooled and sub-grouped by history of previous sprain. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are reported for individual and pooled data. In this review update, a further nine new trials were included. Overall, 14 randomised trials with data for 8279 participants were included. Twelve trials involved active, predominantly young, adults participating in organised, generally high-risk, activities. The other two trials involved injured patients who had been active in sports before their injury. The prophylactic interventions under test included the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis (three trials), air-cast brace (one trial) or high top shoes (one trial); ankle disk training; taping; muscle

  2. WITHDRAWN: Interventions for preventing ankle ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoll, Helen Hg; Rowe, Brian H; Quinn, Kathryn M; de Bie, Rob

    2011-05-11

    Some sports, for example basketball and soccer, have a very high incidence of ankle injuries, mainly sprains. Consequently, ankle sprains are one of the most commonly treated injuries in acute care. To assess the effects of interventions used for the prevention of ankle ligament injuries or sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauam Group's specialised register, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the National Research Register and bibliographies of study reports. We also contacted colleagues and some trialists. The most recent search was conducted in July 2000. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions for the prevention of ankle sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age were included provided that ankle sprains were recorded. Interventions included use of modified footwear, external ankle supports, co-ordination training and health education. These could be applied as a supplement to treatment provided that prevention of re-injury was the primary objective. At least two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Wherever possible, results of outcome measures were pooled and sub-grouped by history of previous sprain. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are reported for individual and pooled data. In this review update, a further nine new trials were included. Overall, 14 randomised trials with data for 8279 participants were included. Twelve trials involved active, predominantly young, adults participating in organised, generally high-risk, activities. The other two trials involved injured patients who had been active in sports before their injury. The prophylactic interventions under test included the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis (three trials), air-cast brace (one trial) or high top shoes (one trial); ankle disk training; taping; muscle

  3. Radiography in acute ankle injuries: The Ottawa ankle rules versus local diagnostic decision rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, A. C. M.; Glas, Afina S.; de Roos, Marnix A. J.; Bogaard, Kjell; Lijmer, Jeroen G.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Butzelaar, Rudolf M. J. M.; Keeman, Johannes N.

    2002-01-01

    Study objective: We validate the Ottawa Ankle Rules and 2 Dutch ankle rules in distinguishing clinically significant fractures from insignificant fractures and other injuries in patients with a painful ankle presenting to the emergency department. Methods: This prospective comparison of 3 ankle

  4. Acute injury of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [de

  5. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-07-11

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required.

  6. The role of ankle bracing for prevention of ankle sprain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael T; Liu, Hsin-Yi

    2003-10-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries incurred in recreational and competitive athletics. These injuries have a significant impact in terms of cost, athletic participation, and activities of daily living. Prophylactic ankle braces are often used to reduce the risk of injury recurrence when individuals return to athletic participation. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the literature and provide our own experience relative to the use of prophylactic ankle bracing. Relatively high incidence rates of ankle sprain injury have been reported for basketball and soccer athletes, military trainees, and individuals with a previous history of ankle sprain injury. Semirigid and laced ankle braces have significantly reduced the incidence of initial and recurrent ankle sprain injuries in athletic and military samples. With few exceptions, these braces do not appear to affect functional performance adversely. The prophylactic use of semirigid ankle braces appears warranted to reduce the incidence of initial and, in particular, recurrent ankle sprain injuries for individuals who participate in activities that have the highest risk for these injuries. Additional research is needed to evaluate the many new braces that are available and in use and their influence on the incidence of ankle sprain injury and functional performance.

  7. Common types and countermeasures of ankle ligament injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize injury types, analyze the causes of injury, and put forward corresponding control measures. Methods: The author selected 3100 basketball players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to ...

  8. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [de

  9. Osteoarthritis after osteosynthesis of ankle injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, S.; Mechsner, K.; Langenscheidt, P.; Krankenhaus Spandau, Berlin

    1984-01-01

    98 patients were clinically and radiographically examined 2 to 9 years following the osteosynthesis of ankle fractures. The rate of secondary osteoarthritis was 70% including 40% of minor, 17% of medium and 13% of serious changes. Depending on the injured structures the frequency of posttraumatic osteoarthritis varies. Medium and serious radiology changes cause obvious dysfunction in 56% and 62% respectively. Joints free of Osteoarthritis one year after the injury will not develop secondary osteoarthritis later. (orig.) [de

  10. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprai...

  11. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter DA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available David A Porter, Ryan R Jaggers, Adam Fitzgerald Barnes, Angela M Rund Methodist Sports Medicine/The Orthopedic Specialists, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains, and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on

  12. The Parachute Ankle Brace: Entanglements and Injuries After Controlling for Extrinsic Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-10

    Preventive Medicine THE PARACHUTE ANKLE BRACE: ENTANGLEMENTS AND INJURIES AFTER CONTROLLING FOR EXTRINSIC RISK...Amoroso P.J. (2005). Effectiveness of an external ankle brace in reducing parachute-related ankle injuries . Injury Prevention . 11: 163- 168. 25...M. (1994). The efficacy of a semirigid ankle stabilizer to reduce acute ankle injury in basketball . American Journal of Sports Medicine. 22:

  13. Tibial shaft fracture and ankle injury - Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Caio; Campos, Felipe Augusto Garcez de; Foni, Noel Oizerovici; Souza, Rafael Carboni; Christian, Ralph Walter; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2016-01-01

    The authors report on a case of tibial shaft fracture associated with ankle injury. The clinical, radiological and surgical characteristics are discussed. Assessment of associated injuries is often overlooked and these injuries are hard to diagnose. When torque occurs in the lower limb, the ankle becomes susceptible to simultaneous injury. It is essential to make careful assessment based on clinical, radiographic, intraoperative and postoperative characteristics in order to attain functional recovery.

  14. Tibial shaft fracture and ankle injury - Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Zamboni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The authors report on a case of tibial shaft fracture associated with ankle injury. The clinical, radiological and surgical characteristics are discussed. Assessment of associated injuries is often overlooked and these injuries are hard to diagnose. When torque occurs in the lower limb, the ankle becomes susceptible to simultaneous injury. It is essential to make careful assessment based on clinical, radiographic, intraoperative and postoperative characteristics in order to attain functional recovery.

  15. Management of acute lateral ankle ligament injury in the athlete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; McCollum, Graham A.; Calder, James D. F.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2013-01-01

    Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. This article reviews the acute lateral ankle injuries with special emphasis on a rationale for treatment of these injuries in athletes. A narrative review was

  16. Ankle sprain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle injury - aftercare; Ankle syndesmosis sprain - aftercare; Syndesmosis injury - aftercare; ATFL injury - aftercare; CFL injury - ...

  17. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  18. Preparatory co-activation of the ankle muscles may prevent ankle inversion injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMers, Matthew S.; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.

    2018-01-01

    Ankle inversion sprains are the most frequent acute musculoskeletal injuries occurring in physical activity. Interventions that retrain muscle coordination have helped rehabilitate injured ankles, but it is unclear which muscle coordination strategies, if any, can prevent ankle sprains. The purpose of this study was to determine whether coordinated activity of the ankle muscles could prevent excessive ankle inversion during a simulated landing on a 30-degree incline. We used a set of musculoskeletal simulations to evaluate the efficacy of two strategies for coordinating the ankle evertor and invertor muscles during simulated landing scenarios: planned co-activation and stretch reflex activation with physiologic latency (60-millisecond delay). A full-body musculoskeletal model of landing was used to generate simulations of a subject dropping onto an inclined surface with each coordination condition. Within each condition, the intensity of evertor and invertor co-activity or stretch reflexes were varied systematically. The simulations revealed that strong preparatory co-activation of the ankle evertors and invertors prior to ground contact prevented ankle inversion from exceeding injury thresholds by rapidly generating eversion moments after initial contact. Conversely, stretch reflexes were too slow to generate eversion moments before the simulations reached the threshold for inversion injury. These results suggest that training interventions to protect the ankle should focus on stiffening the ankle with muscle co-activation prior to landing. The musculoskeletal models, controllers, software, and simulation results are freely available online at http://simtk.org/home/ankle-sprains, enabling others to reproduce the results and explore new injury scenarios and interventions. PMID:28057351

  19. Diagnosis of ligament injuries in the superior ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebing, R.; Fiedler, V.

    1991-01-01

    Nearly 40 years after ankle arthrography was first introduced, the anterior and inversion stress views of the ankle are still widely preferred as a noninvasive method of evaluating ligament injuries in the upper ankle. We consider the stress test, bilaterally performed using a standardized stress apparatus, as a basic examination by which to differentiate between slight and severe sprain. Intensive muscel splinting due to painful swelling can sometimes be treated by injection of local anesthetic. Like many authors, we perform ankle arthrography in cases where there is a significant difference between the clinical findings and the stress test. The technique of ankle arthrography can be readily learned and is extremely accurate in delineating the extent of ligamentous injury produced by moderate or severe ankle sprains. It can be performed in any X-ray department. (orig.) [de

  20. [Posttraumatic complications after pediatric ankle injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F J; Linhart, W E

    2013-08-01

    Ankle sprains are common injuries in childhood and are generally harmless. However, fractures of the ankle joint are rare, but complications (persistent rotational or axial deformity, alteration of growth of the distal tibia or fibula, or joint deformity) can lead to serious problems during growth. The clinical relevance of growth disturbances at the distal tibia or fibula depends on the age at the time of fracture more than on the fracture type, severity of dislocation, or interponated material in the fracture gap. Both stimulation and inhibition of growth are possible. Inhibition of growth at the distal tibial growth plate regularly leads to varus deformity and shortening. This is of clinical importance as this type of growth disturbance is the most common. Valgus deformity is rare, mostly due to persistent axial deviation of an insufficiently reduced fracture. Transitional fractures always occur at the time of growth plate closure; thus, growth disturbances do not play a role. Transitional fractures could be overlooked or treated insufficiently, leading to a step or gap of the joint surface.

  1. Ankle pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  2. Aftermath of Ankle Inversion Injuries: Spectrum of MR Imaging Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Timothy M; Martinez-Salazar, Edgar Leonardo; Torriani, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Acute and chronic ankle inversion injuries are a common source of pain and a diagnostic challenge. Several studies have shown a variety of injury patterns after inversion injury both in acute and chronic settings. Although traditional assessment with clinical examination and radiographs is generally accepted for inversion injuries, MR imaging is a useful tool to detect occult injuries and in patients with chronic symptoms. This article examines a range of MR imaging findings that may be present in patients with lateral ankle pain following an acute or chronic inversion injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ankle and Foot Injuries in the Young Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Nancy A; Jaimes, Camilo; Khwaja, Asef

    2018-02-01

    Injuries to the ankle and foot are common in the young athlete, especially with increasing participation and high levels of competitiveness in youth sports programs. Knowledge of the normal development of the foot and ankle is crucial to understand age-specific injury patterns because acute or chronic/repetitive stress to the developing skeleton results in injuries that differ from those seen in adults. Congenital abnormalities may also predispose children to increased risk of injury and pain. Radiologists must be aware of these distinctions to diagnose and classify injuries correctly for optimum treatment. We describe common and unique foot and ankle injuries in the young athlete. Throughout the article we focus not only on imaging findings but also on the mechanism of injury. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. MRI of injuries of the lateral ankle ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent sport injury of the ankle is located in the lateral ankle ligaments. The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and stress radiography, allowing a fair diagnosis for the daily routine. For the direct visualization and precise diagnosis of the lateral ankle ligaments MRI provides the best answer. MRI is used with controlled positioning of the foot, correct angulation of sequenzes, and distinct analysis of MR findings. Sinus tarsi ligaments and ligaments of the distal syndesmosis should be included to the report. In selected patients MRI allows the best evaluation of the extent of the lateral ankle ligaments. MRI is the method of choice for combined osteochondral injuries and soft tissue lesions too. (orig.)

  5. Multistation proprioceptive exercise program prevents ankle injuries in basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eils, Eric; Schröter, Ralph; Schröder, Marc; Gerss, Joachim; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a multistation proprioceptive exercise program for the prevention of ankle injuries in basketball players using a prospective randomized controlled trial in combination with biomechanical tests of neuromuscular performance. A total of 232 players participated in the study and were randomly assigned to a training or control group following the CONSORT statement. The training group performed a multistation proprioceptive exercise program, and the control group continued with their normal workout routines. During one competitive basketball season, the number of ankle injuries was counted and related to the number of sports participation sessions using logistic regression. Additional biomechanical pre–post tests (angle reproduction and postural sway) were performed in both groups to investigate the effects on neuromuscular performance. In the control group, 21 injuries occurred, whereas in the training group, 7 injuries occurred. The risk for sustaining an ankle injury was significantly reduced in the training group by approximately 65%. [corrected] The corresponding number needed to treat was 7. Additional biomechanical tests revealed significant improvements in joint position sense and single-limb stance in the training group. The multistation proprioceptive exercise program effectively prevented ankle injuries in basketball players. Analysis of number needed to treat clearly showed the relatively low prevention effort that is necessary to avoid an ankle injury. Additional biomechanical tests confirmed the neuromuscular effect and confirmed a relationship between injury prevention and altered neuromuscular performance. With this knowledge, proprioceptive training may be optimized to specifically address the demands in various athletic activities.

  6. Common Types and Countermeasures of Ankle Ligament Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... reduce serious injury to players in training or competition, so as to stimulate passion of more professional basketball sports students for basketball, which also has a positive meaning for their future career. Keywords: Ankle ligament injury, basketball movement, intense, prevention, type. Common Types and ...

  7. Basketball coaches' utilization of ankle injury prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuine, Timothy A; Hetzel, Scott; Pennuto, Anthony; Brooks, Alison

    2013-09-01

    Ankle injuries are the most common high school basketball injury. Little is known regarding the utilization of ankle injury prevention strategies in high school settings. To determine high school basketball coaches' utilization of ankle injury prevention strategies, including prophylactic ankle bracing (PAB) or an ankle injury prevention exercise program (AIEPP). Cross-sectional survey. The survey was distributed to all high school basketball coaches in Wisconsin. Fisher exact and Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to determine if the injury prevention strategies utilized differed according to school size, sex of the team, years of coaching experience, and the coach's education level. Four hundred eighty (55%) coaches from 299 (74%) high schools completed the survey. Thirty-seven percent of the coaches encouraged or required their players to use PAB. School enrollment of the coaches' teams did not affect their stance on the use of PAB (P = 0.30), neither did the sex of the team (P = 0.16), years coaching (P = 0.09), nor the coach's education (P = 0.49). Fifty percent (n = 242) of the coaches indicated they do not utilize an AIEPP, with no difference based on school enrollment (P = 0.47), team sex (P = 0.41), years coaching (P = 0.78), or the education level (P = 0.44). Barriers to utilization of AIEPP included a lack of time, awareness, and expertise. Coaches preferred an AIEPP that was specific to basketball, combined injury prevention and performance enhancement components, was performed 2 to 3 days per week, and lasted 5 to 15 minutes. Less than half of the coaches encouraged use of PAB, and half did not utilize an AIEPP. Coaches had specific preferences for the type of AIEPP they would implement. Sports medicine providers should promote ankle injury prevention strategies but need to address why prevention strategies may not be utilized in high school basketball settings.

  8. Proprioceptive exercises for ankle ligament injury: a CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Aguilera Eguía

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This CAT (Critically Appraised Topic answered the question: In recreational athletes suffering from chronic ankle sprain, can proprioceptive exercises reduce its recurrence?The clinical question was analyzed in three parts: patient, intervention and outcome. The purpose was to test the validity, results and effectiveness of proprioceptive exercises in recreational athletes suffering from chronic ankle sprain to reduce its recurrence from the article "Effectiveness of proprioceptive exercises for ankle ligament injury in adults: A systematic literature and meta-analisys "Postle”1 (2012.

  9. Exercise and ankle sprain injuries: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Colado, Juan Carlos; Flandez, Jorge; Page, Phil; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-02-01

    Ankle sprains are common in team sports and sports played on courts, and often result in structural and functional alterations that lead to a greater reinjury risk. Specific exercises are often used to promote neuromuscular improvements in the prevention and rehabilitation of ankle injuries. This literature review summarizes the neuromuscular characteristics of common ankle sprains and the effectiveness of exercise as an intervention for improving neuromuscular function and preventing reinjury. Our review found that appropriate exercise prescription can increase static and dynamic balance and decrease injury recurrence. In particular, the addition of dynamic activities in the exercise program can be beneficial because of the anticipatory postural adjustments identified as a key factor in the injury mechanism.

  10. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  11. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  12. Ankle injuries in the Netherlands : Trends over 10-25 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, I.; Valkenberg, H.; Hoes, A. W.; Backx, F. J G

    2015-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a common health problem; data on ankle injury rates and time trends in the population at large are scarce. Our aim was to investigate the incidence of and time trends in population-based and emergency department-treated ankle injuries related to sports activities and other

  13. Concerns About Ankle Injury Prophylaxis and Acceptance of the Parachute Ankle Brace Among Jumpmaster Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, Jeffrey D; Jannings, Aaron C; Gross, Michael T; Scheuring, Richard A; Crist, Joshua

    2018-02-06

    Several studies have shown that the parachute ankle brace (PAB) is safe, cost-effective, and reduces the rates of ankle injuries during military parachuting. However, the acceptability and usability of the PAB has not been well established in units that regularly do airborne exercises. Many anecdotal concerns in the past may be limiting common use. The purpose of the study is to ascertain the attitudes toward the PAB among experienced paratroopers. One hundred experienced paratroopers training to be jumpmasters at the Advanced Airborne School (Fort Bragg, NC) voluntarily responded to a 13-item, paper questionnaire to assess attitudes toward the PAB, its use, and concerns about future ankle injuries. The survey was offered to all 100 students enrolled in an Advanced Airborne School course. Results were input into an online database using Qualtrics and qualitative responses were evaluated for thematic content and categorized appropriately. Analysis was performed using Qualtrics and SPSS for descriptive statistics, two-sample t-tests, and chi-square tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to evaluate Likert-type responses. Of the 100 paratroopers who responded to the survey 32% had over 10 yr of military service, 58% had over 5 yr of service, and 32% had over 5 yr on active jump status. Results show that none of the respondents had ever used the PAB; 62% had never heard of the PAB, and 72% had never observed use of the PAB. A majority of respondents (87%) had never injured an ankle during a parachute landing fall (PLF), but 79% believed that an ankle injury could affect their career potential as a paratrooper. Almost one-half of the respondents (47%) had seen that ankle injuries affect another paratrooper's career. A third of the respondents (35%) said that they had concerns that would keep them from using the PAB, whereas 21% were uncertain, as they had never heard of it. Only 19% of the respondents were willing to use measures such as taping, lace-up bracing

  14. Diagnostic imaging of ankle syndesmosis injuries: A general review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, John J; Lovell, Gregory A; Eriksen, David A; Sampson, Matthew J

    2018-02-05

    Literature on the various techniques for imaging injuries to the ankle syndesmosis to determine the most appropriate imaging modality for diagnosing syndesmosis ligament disruption and instability was reviewed using the following data sources: Pubmed, Google scholar, SportsDiscus, E-journals and PLOSone. Search terms used were: syndesmosis paired with injury, imaging, radiology, X-ray, stress X-ray, arthrography, ultrasound, nuclear medicine scan, CT scan, MRI and arthroscopy. Articles were selected by reading abstracts and the full article if indicated. Further articles were derived from the references of the primary articles. Plain x-rays of the ankle will detect approximately half on AP view to two-thirds on mortise view of syndesmosis injuries. Syndesmosis injuries frequently occur in association with tibial or fibular fractures. Intra-operative stress radiography failed to detect approximately half of instabilities confirmed at arthroscopy. The current benchmark imaging techniques to diagnose syndesmosis injury and diastasis are arthroscopy and high-power (3T) MRI. Ultrasound is a promising, developing, cost-effective imaging technique which is yet to reach its full diagnostic potential. CT and nuclear medicine scans have limited roles. MRI (3T) scanning in the plane of the syndesmotic ligaments is the investigation of choice to detect ankle syndesmosis injuries. In the presence of associated injuries requiring surgery, arthroscopic viewing with stress examination is the diagnostic benchmark when available. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  15. approach to and management of acute ankle ligamentous injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Sports Medicine Association, the South. African Osteoporosis Society, and the. South African Rheumatology and Arthritis. Association. She accompanied the South. African team to the Commonwealth and All. Africa Games as a Medical Officer in. 2002 and 2003 respectively. ANKLE INJURIES. 112 CME March 2004 Vol.22 ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of ankle ligaments and tendon injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.; Trattnig, S.; Kukla, C.; Daebler, C.; Helbich, T.; Haller, J.; Imhof, H.

    1995-01-01

    Today MRI allows evaluation of the integrity of injured ankle ligaments. The major difficulty in MRI is inconsistency in visualization by inadequate appreciation of the three-dimensional orientation of each ankle ligament. Using this technique, 52 patients with sprained ankles underwent MRI. The integrity of rupture of the collateral lateral ligaments was obtained in all 52 ankles. Full-lenght visualization is essential for evaluation of the ankle ligaments with MRI. In these 52 patients the angle of tilt on the stress X-ray was compared with the rate of MRI findings showing an injury affecting two ligaments. We found that none of the patients in whom the angle of lateral tilt was less than 5 had rupture of two laterial ligaments, while 32% of patients with angles of tilt of 6-14 and 42% of those with angles of tilt over 15 on stress X-ray had two ruptured lateral ligaments. The advantages of MRI are that it offers the best visualization of the extent of the tendon lesion. MRI, however, seems to be superior to US in detecting and quantifying lesions of the Achilles tendon. Therefore, MRI may be indicated in particularly difficult cases of tendons injuries in the foot. (orig.) [de

  17. [Influence of Ankle Braces on the Prevalence of Ankle Inversion Injuries in the Swiss Volleyball National League A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, J; Kneubühler, S; Rogan, S

    2016-06-01

    Ankle inversion is a common injury among volleyball players. The injury rate during a game is 2.1 times higher than during training. As a result, the preventive use of ankle braces is frequently observed in Swiss volleyball leagues. Studies have shown that ankle braces have a preventive effect on the prevalence of ankle inversion. In Switzerland there has been no investigation into the preventive use of braces and their influence on prevalence. For this reason, the goals of this study are 1) to determine when, why and by whom ankle braces are worn and 2) to evaluate the injury rate of users and non-users of ankle braces. A modified questionnaire was sent to 18 men's and women's teams of the Swiss National League A. The questionnaire included questions about injury rates and the circumstances of ankle inversion injuries. The data were statistically analysed with Microsoft Excel 2012 and SPSS Version 20. The overall response rate was 61 %, allowing data from 181 players to be analysed. 33 % (59 of 181) of the players used an ankle brace. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of ankle inversion between users (12 injured) and non-users (8 injured) (p = 0.006). Wearing an ankle brace during training or during a game made no difference in the prevention of injuries (p = 0.356). More athletes were injured during training (n = 13) than during a game (n = 7). The results of the present study indicate that volleyball players preferably wear ankle braces to prevent injury. More than one third of the players in the study wore an ankle brace, 60 % for primary prevention and 40 % for secondary prevention due to a previous injury. The study shows that significantly more users than non-users of ankle braces were injured. This is contrary to literature. Furthermore it was shown that more injuries occur during training than during a game. This finding results from the fact that ankle braces were rarely worn during training. It is

  18. Ultrasonography in the Assessment of Lateral Ankle Ligament Injury, Instability, and Anterior Ankle Impingement: A Diagnostic Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Patrick J; Craig, Kate; Kettner, Norman W

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the diagnostic value of ultrasonography (US) in a patient with injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle with concomitant ankle joint osteoarthritis and anterior impingement. A 28-year-old male had a history of an inversion injury of the left ankle. Diagnostic US of the left ankle using an 8- to 15-MHz linear array transducer demonstrated a full thickness tear of the anterior talofibular ligament, partial thickness tearing of the calcaneofibular ligament, and laxity of the ankle with varus stress testing. In addition, US was able to demonstrate degeneration of the ankle and talonavicular joints and anterior impingement with dorsiflexion. Osteoarthritic changes were confirmed with radiography. Other US findings included remote deltoid ligamentous complex injury, multiple sites of tenosynovitis, and a large ankle joint effusion with synovial hypertrophy and synovitis. Using US, an accurate diagnosis was established with respect to the pathology and functional impairments of the patient's ankle. This case report exemplifies the value and utility of US in diagnosing derangement in ligamentous, tendinous, articular, and osseous injuries of the ankle.

  19. [A rare injury of the ankle in competition skiiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschy, D

    1994-01-01

    Ankle ligamentous injuries have become rare since high and rigid boots are used in alpine skiing because tibio-talar and foot movements are almost impossible. However, in extreme competition conditions, external rotation of the ankle is possible in the ski boot. These are slalom accidents where the leg is forced suddenly in external rotation when straddling a gate. This movement leads to a collision between talus and distal fibula opening the tibio-fibular joint. The anterior tibio-fibular ligament is first torn. We report a series of 13 cases collected in a 17 years experience in the FIS-World Cup.

  20. Football injuries of the ankle: A review of injury mechanisms, diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Raymond J; Ross, Keir A; Fraser, Ethan J; Hodgkins, Christopher W; Smyth, Niall A; Egan, Christopher J; Calder, James; Kennedy, John G

    2016-01-01

    Football is the most popular sport worldwide and is associated with a high injury rate, most of which are the result of trauma from player contact. Ankle injuries are among the most commonly diagnosed injuries in the game. The result is reduced physical activity and endurance levels, lost game time, and considerable medical cost. Sports medicine professionals must employ the correct diagnostic tools and effective treatments and rehabilitation protocols to minimize the impact of these injuries on the player. This review examines the diagnosis, treatment, and postoperative rehabilitation for common football injuries of the ankle based on the clinical evidence provided in the current literature. PMID:26807351

  1. Football injuries of the ankle: A review of injury mechanisms, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Raymond J; Ross, Keir A; Fraser, Ethan J; Hodgkins, Christopher W; Smyth, Niall A; Egan, Christopher J; Calder, James; Kennedy, John G

    2016-01-18

    Football is the most popular sport worldwide and is associated with a high injury rate, most of which are the result of trauma from player contact. Ankle injuries are among the most commonly diagnosed injuries in the game. The result is reduced physical activity and endurance levels, lost game time, and considerable medical cost. Sports medicine professionals must employ the correct diagnostic tools and effective treatments and rehabilitation protocols to minimize the impact of these injuries on the player. This review examines the diagnosis, treatment, and postoperative rehabilitation for common football injuries of the ankle based on the clinical evidence provided in the current literature.

  2. Ankle Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Ankle Sprains KidsHealth / For Teens / Ankle Sprains What's in ... she could play again. What Is a Sprained Ankle? A sprained ankle is a very common injury ...

  3. Epidemiological study of foot and ankle injuries in recreational sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Alexandre de Paiva; Lara, Luiz Carlos Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    This is a retrospective study showing the incidence, type and extent of injuries occurring in the foot and/or ankle as a result of recreational sports practice. We treated 131 patients, of which 123 were male and 8 female, with a history of trauma and pain in the foot and/or ankle after the practicing recreational sports. The average age of the male patients was 24.53 years. The evaluation was done through a research protocol, which contained the variables age, sex, diagnosis, and type of recreational sport. The sports were classified according to the American Medical Association, which divides them into contact and non-contact sports. 82.4% of the sample practiced contact sports, while 17.6% practiced sports classified as non-contact. The sprained ankle was the most frequent type of injury, especially those of grade I and II. Soccer was the sport responsible for the highest incidence of injuries and among its various forms the indoor soccer presented the highest frequency of injuries (35%). In the non-contact sports, the highest incidence was found in running. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series.

  4. Ankle Joint Contact Loads and Displacement With Progressive Syndesmotic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kenneth J; Goeb, Yannick; Behn, Anthony W; Criswell, Braden; Chou, Loretta

    2015-09-01

    Ligamentous injuries to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis are predictive of long-term ankle dysfunction. Mild and moderate syndesmotic injuries are difficult to stratify, and the impact of syndesmosis injury on the magnitude and distribution of forces within the ankle joint during athletic activities is unknown. Eight below-knee cadaveric specimens were tested in the intact state and after sequential sectioning of the following ligaments: anterior-inferior tibiofibular, anterior deltoid (1 cm), interosseous/transverse (IOL/TL), posterior-inferior tibiofibular, and whole deltoid. In each condition, specimens were loaded in axial compression to 700 N and then externally rotated to 20 N·m torque. During axial loading and external rotation, both the fibula and the talus rotated significantly after each ligament sectioning as compared to the intact condition. After IOL/TL release, a significant increase in posterior translation of the fibula was observed, although no syndesmotic widening was observed. Mean tibiotalar contact pressure increased significantly after IOL/TL release, and the center of pressure shifted posterolaterally, relative to more stable conditions, after IOL/TL release. There were significant increases in mean contact pressure and peak pressure along with a reduction in contact area with axial loading and external rotation as compared to axial loading alone for all 5 conditions. Significant increases in tibiotalar contact pressures occur when external rotation stresses are added to axial loading. Moderate and severe injuries are associated with a significant increase in mean contact pressure combined with a shift in the center of pressure and rotation of the fibula and talus. Considerable changes in ankle joint kinematics and contact mechanics may explain why moderate syndesmosis injuries take longer to heal and are more likely to develop long-term dysfunction and, potentially, ankle arthritis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Knee and ankle injuries from playing football

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.; Scheurecker, G.

    2010-01-01

    Soccer is the most common sport activity worldwide. Over the last two decades the increase in soccer players has mainly been due to increased interest by females. In general, soccer is a relatively safe sport activity, especially if minor injuries resulting in short periods of absence from playing or training are neglected. However, due to the high number of soccer players severe injuries are also frequent. These are a problem not only for the injured player and the team but may also become problematic for the socio-economic system. In up to 80-90% structures of the lower extremities are injured. For sufficient radiological diagnosis knowledge of the biomechanics of the soccer game and some details about the history of the injury may be of help. To prevent soccer injuries or keep the degree of injury low, special programs had been developed. (orig.) [de

  6. PROSPECTIVE EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF BASKETBALL INJURIES DURING ONE COMPETITIVE SEASON: ANKLE SPRAINS AND OVERUSE KNEE INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Cumps

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This prospective cohort study aims to assess the overall incidence of acute and overuse basketball injuries and identifies risk factors associated with ankle sprains and knee overuse injuries. In total, 164 senior players (23.7 years ± 7.0 of all levels of play, and including both men and women, participated voluntarily during one season. A total of 139 acute and 87 overuse injuries were reported, resulting in an overall injury incidence of 9.8 (8.5 to 11.1 per 1,000 hours. The incidence of acute injuries was 6.0/1,000 hours. Ankle sprains (n = 34 accounted for most acute injuries, and 52.9% of all players with ankle sprains reported a previous ankle sprain. Relative Risks (RR and Odds Ratio (OR with their 95% Confidence Intervals (CI were calculated to determine significant differences. Landing on an opponent's foot was the major inciting event, significantly more so than non contact mechanisms (RR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2]. Acute knee injuries resulted in the highest playing absence (7 weeks 2 days ± 9 weeks 1 day. Overuse injury incidence was 3.8/1,000 hours. The knee (1.5/1,000 hours was the most common site. Forward players sustained less knee overuse injuries than players of all other playing positions, and significantly less than center players (OR=0.5 [95% CI: 0.2-0.9]. This study showed that ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries are the most common injuries in basketball, both accounting for 14.8%. Injury prevention programmes however should not concentrate on those injuries only, but might one to consider that acute knee injuries, in spite of the fact that they occur less frequently, also merit further research.

  7. Ankle sprain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An ankle sprain is a common injury to the ankle. The most common way the ankle is injured is when ... swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle. An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many ...

  8. Prospective epidemiological study of basketball injuries during one competitive season: ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to assess the overall incidence of acute and overuse basketball injuries and identifies risk factors associated with ankle sprains and knee overuse injuries. In total, 164 senior players (23.7 years ± 7.0) of all levels of play, and including both men and women, participated voluntarily during one season. A total of 139 acute and 87 overuse injuries were reported, resulting in an overall injury incidence of 9.8 (8.5 to 11.1) per 1,000 hours. The incidence of acute injuries was 6.0/1,000 hours. Ankle sprains (n = 34) accounted for most acute injuries, and 52.9% of all players with ankle sprains reported a previous ankle sprain. Relative Risks (RR) and Odds Ratio (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated to determine significant differences. Landing on an opponent's foot was the major inciting event, significantly more so than non contact mechanisms (RR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2]). Acute knee injuries resulted in the highest playing absence (7 weeks 2 days ± 9 weeks 1 day). Overuse injury incidence was 3.8/1,000 hours. The knee (1.5/1,000 hours) was the most common site. Forward players sustained less knee overuse injuries than players of all other playing positions, and significantly less than center players (OR=0.5 [95% CI: 0.2-0.9]). This study showed that ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries are the most common injuries in basketball, both accounting for 14.8%. Injury prevention programmes however should not concentrate on those injuries only, but might one to consider that acute knee injuries, in spite of the fact that they occur less frequently, also merit further research. Key pointsAnkle sprains are the most common acute injuries in basketball with the inciting event being landing on an opponent's foot or changing direction.Anterior knee pain is the most common overuse injury. Etiologic factors are well described in literature, but prevention strategies are lacking.Acute knee injuries account for the

  9. Time-trends and circumstances surrounding ankle injuries in men's professional football: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldén, Markus; Hägglund, Martin; Ekstrand, Jan

    2013-08-01

    Ankle injury is common in football, but the circumstances surrounding them are not well characterised. To investigate the rates, especially time-trends, and circumstances of ankle injuries in male professional football. 27 European clubs with 1743 players were followed prospectively between 2001/2002 and 2011/2012. Time loss injuries and individual-player exposure during training sessions and matches were recorded. Injury rate was defined as the number of injuries/1000 h. A total of 1080 ankle injuries were recorded (13% of all injuries) with lateral ligament ankle sprain being the most common injury subtype (51% of all ankle injuries). The rates of ankle injury and ankle sprain were 1/1000 h and 0.7/1000 h, respectively. The ankle sprain rate declined slightly over time during the 11-year study period (on average 3.1%/season) with a statistically significant seasonal trend (p=0.041). Foul play according to the referee was involved in 40% of the match-related ankle sprains. Syndesmotic sprains and ankle impingement were uncommon causes of time loss (3% each of all ankle injuries). Lateral ligament ankle sprain constituted half of all ankle injuries in male professional football, whereas ankle impingement syndromes were uncommon. The ankle sprain rate decreased slightly over time, but many ankle sprains were associated with foul play. Our data extend the body of literature that provides football policy makers with a foundation to review existing rules and their enforcement.

  10. Ankle Injuries: Reduce the Risk by Using a Soccer-Specific Warm-up Routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Steven; Ellis, Margery; Combs, Sue; Hunt Long, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the ankle are among the most common injuries for soccer players at any age. Soccer coaches should be aware of current research and best practices that suggest it is possible to decrease the incidence of soccer players' ankle injuries by providing an appropriate warm-up to utilize prior to practices and games. This article introduces…

  11. Application of low field intensity joint MRI in ankle injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhenyu; Wang Wei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the diagnostic value of the low field intensity joint magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in traumatic ankles. Methods: Through a retrospective examination and collection of 50 cases with complete information and checked by arthroscope or/and operated from Jan 2007 to Jun 2010, the diagnostic value ligament of the ankle joint, bone contusion,occult fracture, talus cartilage, and tendon could be evaluated. Cases of fracture for which could be diagnosed by X rays and CT were not included in this research. Results: The special low field intensity joint MRI had a high diagnostic sensitivity of 88.9% to ligamentum talofibulare anterius, but was only 50% sensitive to ligamentum calcaneofibulare. Its sensitivity to injury of ligamentum deltoideum and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis was up to 100%. Tendon injury, bone contusion and occult fracture could be exactly diagnosed. Its total sensitivity on talus cartilage traumatism was 70.6%. Its diagnosis sensitivity to talus cartilage traumatism at the 3rd-5th period by Mintz was 90%, with a lower one of 42.9% at the 1st-2nd period. Talus cartilage traumatism could be exactly predicted by osseous tissue dropsy below cartilage. Conclusion: The special low field intensity joint MRI is highly applicable to the diagnosis on ankle joint traumatism and facilitates clinical treatment. (authors)

  12. Range of motion and ankle injury history association with sex in pediatric and adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Dai; McCartney, Ronald E; Parisien, Robert L; Dashe, Jesse; Borg, Dennis R; Meehan, William P

    2018-02-01

    Ankle sprain is one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries among young athletes, and there remains a gap in the literature regarding susceptibility to such injuries among physically active youth. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the associations between sex, a history of ankle sprain, and ankle range of motion (ROM) in pediatric and adolescent athletes. Athletes under the age of 18 years old who presented to a sports injury prevention center underwent ankle ROM measurements including plantarflexion (PF), inversion (IV), and eversion (EV). A two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to examine effect of sex and a history of ankle sprain on ROMs. Also, a binary logistic regression was performed to investigate variables that are associated with a history of ankle injury. Among 452 pediatric and adolescent athletes [268 females (13.6 ± 2.3 years old) and 184 males (13.3 ± 2.5 years old)], 128 reported a history of previous ankle sprain. Females demonstrated significantly increased ROMs (PF and IV bilaterally, and right EV) compared to males while there was no effect of a history of ankle sprain on ROMs. Female sex was independently associated with a history of ankle sprain. There was a strong effect of female sex on ROMs rather than a history of ankle injury history. Additionally, pediatric and adolescent females have greater odds of a history of ankle sprain when compared to their male counterparts.

  13. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments; Bandverletzungen des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Institut fuer Radiologie, Landesklinikum Waldviertel Horn, Horn (Austria); Karl Landsteiner Institut, St. Poelten (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnose einer lateralen Bandverletzung nach einem Sprunggelenktrauma basiert auf der Anamnese, der klinischen Untersuchung und klinischen Stresstests. Bei positiven klinischen Stresstests kann eine Stressradiographie durchgefuehrt werden. Es gibt keine Uebereinstimmung hinsichtlich des Stellenwerts der Stressradiographie beim frischen Supinationstrauma des Sprunggelenks, insbesondere fuer den Winkel der Aufklappbarkeit bei einer Zweibandverletzung, der von 5 -30 reicht. Die MRT wird bei dieser Indikation zurzeit nur in Einzelfaellen benutzt, obwohl sie mit definierter Fusspositionierung und Ausrichtung der Untersuchungsebene eine ausgezeichnete Beurteilung der Sprunggelenkbaender erlaubt. Sie ist im besonderen Masse geeignet, akute und chronische Verletzungen des Sinus tarsi zu beurteilen. Bei chronischen Beschwerden nach Bandverletzung ist die MRT zur

  14. A higher association of medial collateral ligament injury of the knee in pronation injuries of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyu-Tae; Sung, Il-Hoon; Choi, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Jin Kyu

    2018-02-22

    To evaluate the prevalence of medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury of the knee among ankle-fracture patients and to determine the risk factors associated with MCL injury in this patient group. 303 patients (303 affected ankles) who underwent surgical treatment for an ankle fracture were assessed. Supination versus pronation injury, Danis-Weber classification, age, sex, body mass index (BMI), limb dominance, and mechanism of injury were reviewed to identify factors related to MCL injury. Prevalence of MCL injury of the knee among the total number of patients with an ankle fracture was 3.96% (12 out of 303 injuries). Multivariable logistic and linear regression analysis with adjustment of possible confounding factors confirmed that female sex and pronation injury were associated significantly (p < 0.05) with MCL injury. The prevalence of MCL injury among females and the pronation type of ankle injury was 8.19% (10 out of 122 females) and 10.75% (10 out of 93 pronation injuries), respectively. More careful physical examination of the knee joint is strongly recommended in patients with ankle fractures, especially if the patient is female or the ankle-fracture pattern corresponds to the pronation type of injury.

  15. Ankle Sprain Injuries: A 2-Year Prospective Cohort Study in Female Greek Professional Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofotolis, Nikolaos; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2007-01-01

    Context: Ankle sprains are a common basketball injury. Therefore, examination of risk factors for injury in female professional basketball players is worthwhile. Objective: To examine rates of ankle sprains, associated time missed from participation, and risk factors for injury during 2 consecutive seasons. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Eighteen professional basketball facilities. Patients or Other Participants: We observed 204 players from 18 female professional basketball teams for 2 consecutive seasons during a 2-year period. Main Outcome Measure(s): Using questionnaires, we recorded the incidence of ankle sprains, participation time missed, and mechanisms of injury in games and practice sessions. Potential risk factors, such as age, body mass, height, training experience, and history of ankle sprain, were examined using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Fifty of the 204 participants sustained ankle injuries; injuries included 32 ankle sprains, which translated to an ankle sprain rate of 1.12 per 1000 hours of exposure to injury. The 32 players missed 224.4 training and game sessions and an average of 7.01 sessions per injury. Most injuries occurred in the key area of the basketball court and were the result of contact. Injury rates during games were higher than injury rates during practice sessions. Centers, followed by guards and forwards, had the highest rate of injury. Players who did not wear an external ankle support had an odds ratio of 2.481 for sustaining an ankle sprain. Conclusions: Female professional basketball athletes who did not wear an external ankle support, who played in the key area, or who functioned as centers had a higher risk for ankle sprain than did other players. PMID:18059995

  16. Ankle sprain injuries: a 2-year prospective cohort study in female Greek professional basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofotolis, Nikolaos; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2007-01-01

    Ankle sprains are a common basketball injury. Therefore, examination of risk factors for injury in female professional basketball players is worthwhile. To examine rates of ankle sprains, associated time missed from participation, and risk factors for injury during 2 consecutive seasons. Prospective cohort study. Eighteen professional basketball facilities. We observed 204 players from 18 female professional basketball teams for 2 consecutive seasons during a 2-year period. Using questionnaires, we recorded the incidence of ankle sprains, participation time missed, and mechanisms of injury in games and practice sessions. Potential risk factors, such as age, body mass, height, training experience, and history of ankle sprain, were examined using multivariate logistic regression. Fifty of the 204 participants sustained ankle injuries; injuries included 32 ankle sprains, which translated to an ankle sprain rate of 1.12 per 1000 hours of exposure to injury. The 32 players missed 224.4 training and game sessions and an average of 7.01 sessions per injury. Most injuries occurred in the key area of the basketball court and were the result of contact. Injury rates during games were higher than injury rates during practice sessions. Centers, followed by guards and forwards, had the highest rate of injury. Players who did not wear an external ankle support had an odds ratio of 2.481 for sustaining an ankle sprain. Female professional basketball athletes who did not wear an external ankle support, who played in the key area, or who functioned as centers had a higher risk for ankle sprain than did other players.

  17. Acute injury of the ankle joint; Akutes Trauma des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Univ. Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Abt. fuer Osteologie und Besondere Klinische Einrichtung Magnet Resonanz, AKH, Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologisch-Physikalische Tumordiagnostik, Vienna (Austria)

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Diagnose einer lateralen Bandverletzung beim frischen Sprunggelenkstrauma fusst auf der Anamnese, der klinischen Untersuchung und klinischen Stresstests. Bei positiven klinischen Stresstests kann eine Stressradiographie durchgefuehrt werden. Es gibt keine Uebereinstimmung fuer den Wert der Stressradiographie beim frischen Supinationstrauma des Sprunggelenks, insbesonders fuer den Winkel der Aufklappbarkeit bei einer Zweibandverletzung, der von 5 -30 reicht. Die MRT wird zur Zeit bei dieser Indikation nur in Einzelfaellen benutzt, obwohl sie mit definierter Fusspositionierung und Ausrichtung der Untersuchungsebene eine ausgezeichnete Beurteilung der Sprunggelenksbaende erlaubt. Bei knoecherner Sprunggelenksverletzungen ist die Verwendung des konventionellen Roentgen die etablierte Methode und meist

  18. Predictive radiographic markers for concomitant ipsilateral ankle injuries in tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schottel, Patrick C; Berkes, Marschall B; Little, Milton T M; Lazaro, Lionel E; Nguyen, Joseph T; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2014-02-01

    To quantify the radiographic tibia and fibula shaft fracture characteristics that are associated with a concomitant ipsilateral ankle injury. Retrospective case-control study. Academic level I trauma center. Seventy-one adult patients with an operatively treated tibial shaft fracture met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were categorized according to tibia and fibula fracture pattern, location and spatial relationship to each other. Preoperative computed tomographic scans were then evaluated to assess for the presence of an articular ankle injury. (1) incidence of concomitant tibial shaft fracture and ipsilateral ankle injury; and (2) statistical association between tibia and fibula fracture characteristics in patients with and without an ipsilateral ankle fracture. Thirty-five of 71 (49.3%) tibial shaft fracture patients had a concomitant ipsilateral ankle injury. Of these, 31 (88.6%) ankle injuries occurred in patients with a spiral pattern tibia fracture of the distal third diaphysis (P fracture, a distal one-third tibial shaft fracture location, or a spiral pattern fibula fracture all were significantly associated with the presence of an ipsilateral ankle injury (P ≤ 0.001; P = 0.001; and P = 0.002, respectively). Patients with either a transverse pattern or absent fibula fracture, a nonspiral pattern tibia fracture, or a midshaft diaphyseal tibia fracture location were significantly less likely to have an associated ankle injury (P ≤ 0.001; P ≤ 0.001; and P = 0.012, respectively). Ipsilateral ankle fractures are commonly associated with tibial shaft fractures, specifically distal one-third spiral type injuries. Recognition of an associated ankle injury is important as it can alter operative and postoperative management. Clinical studies are needed to examine patient outcomes with or without ipsilateral ankle injury to determine the clinical significance of this entity. Prognostic level IV. See instructions for authors for a

  19. Ankle Plantarflexor Spasticity Does Not Restrict the Recovery of Ankle Plantarflexor Strength or Ankle Power Generation for Push-Off During Walking Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gavin; Banky, Megan; Olver, John

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this project was to determine the impact of plantarflexor spasticity on muscle performance for ambulant people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A large metropolitan rehabilitation hospital. Seventy-two ambulant people with TBI who were attending physiotherapy for mobility limitations. Twenty-four participants returned for a 6-month follow-up reassessment. Cross-sectional cohort study. Self-selected walking speed, Tardieu scale, ankle plantarflexor strength, and ankle power generation (APG). Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity had significantly lower self-selected walking speed; however, there was no significant difference in ankle plantarflexor strength or APG. Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity were not restricted in the recovery of self-selected walking speed, ankle plantarflexor strength, or APG, indicating equivalent ability to improve their mobility over time despite the presence of spasticity. Following TBI, people with ankle plantarflexor spasticity have significantly greater mobility limitations than those without spasticity, yet retain the capacity for recovery of self-selected walking speed, ankle plantarflexor strength, and APG.

  20. Variants and pitfalls in MR imaging of foot and ankle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Mohamad Isham Bin; Chew, Kian Ming; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2014-02-01

    Foot and ankle injuries are very common, particularly among young active athletic individuals. MR imaging has become one of the modalities of choice in the assessment of foot and ankle injuries. Accurate interpretation of MR images and diagnosis of pathology requires familiarity with normal anatomical variants and common diagnostic pitfalls. This article describes the common anatomical variants and technical pitfalls in MR imaging of the foot and ankle. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Foot and Ankle Injuries in Professional Soccer Players: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Caio; Raduan, Fernando; Baumfeld, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Soccer is one of the most popular sports in the world. It has undergone many changes in recent years, mainly because of increased physical demands, and this has led to an increased injury risk. Direct contact accounts for half of all injuries in both indoor and outdoor soccer and ankle sprains are the most common foot and ankle injury. There is a spectrum of foot and ankle injuries and their treatment should be individualized in these high-demand patients. An injury prevention program is also important and should the players, the trainer, responsible physician, and physical therapists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ankle Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it follows an injury. Even a relatively benign ankle injury can be quite painful, at least at first. ... improve after several weeks Self-care For many ankle injuries, self-care measures ease the pain. Examples include: ...

  3. Epidemiology of ankle and foot overuse injuries in sports : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, S.; Dekker, R.; Postema, K.; Dijkstra, P. U.

    2013-01-01

    Studies regarding ankle and foot overuse injuries are quite diverse in research methodology, data reporting, and outcomes. The aims of this systematic review were to analyze the methodology of published studies regarding ankle and foot overuse injuries in different sports disciplines and to

  4. Predisposing factors to lateral ankle injury in male comrades marathon runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hiemstra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: More than two million people experience ankle ligament traumaeach year in the United States. Half of these are severe ligament sprains, however verylittle is known about the factors that predispose individuals to these injuries. The purpose of this study, (which was conducted as an undergraduate research project,was to find a correlation between the characteristics of height, weight and limbdominance and lateral ankle ligament injuries. Method: A  retrospective study was conducted on 114 ultra distance runners whoparticipated in the 2006 Comrades Marathon. During race registration, the runners’ height and weight were measuredafter answering a questionnaire regarding their training. Results: 114 runners responded to the questionnaire. From this cohort, 38 (33.3% had sustained previous lateral ankle injuries. Of these 38 injuries, 47.4% of the injuries occurred on the runner’s dominant limb and 36.8% occurred on thenon-dominant side. 15.8% of the runners sustained previous ankle injuries to both ankles. There was a low negative correlation coefficient of 0.24 with regards to weight as a risk factor. This indicated that the power of the correlationwas 5.93%. The study demonstrates that there is no correlation between an increase in weight and an increase in theincidence of ankle injury. The correlation coefficient indicated a low correlation between an increase in height and the incidence of ankle injury. However, the power of the correlation at 18.37% makes inaccurate any attempt to predict the height at which a runner would be at most risk for lateral ankle injury. Conclusion: Height and weight are not risk factors predisposing subjects to lateral ankle injury. In addition, the studyillustrated that there was no effect of limb dominance on the incidence of lateral ankle injury.

  5. A one year prospective study on ankle stability and landing technique : The occurrence of ankle and knee injuries in elite ball team athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Msc Henrike van der Does; M.S. Brink; Koen A.P.M. Lemmink

    2014-01-01

    Background: In team sports lower extremity injuries account for more than 50% of all injuries, indicating the importance of early detection of athletes at risk. Objective: To investigate the predictive value of ankle stability and landing technique at baseline for ankle and knee injury occurrence

  6. Rotational stiffness of American football shoes affects ankle biomechanics and injury severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Keith D; Braman, Jerrod E; Davison, Mark A; Wei, Feng; Schaeffer, Maureen C; Haut, Roger C

    2015-06-01

    While previous studies have investigated the effect of shoe-surface interaction on injury risk, few studies have examined the effect of rotational stiffness of the shoe. The hypothesis of the current study was that ankles externally rotated to failure in shoes with low rotational stiffness would allow more talus eversion than those in shoes with a higher rotational stiffness, resulting in less severe injury. Twelve (six pairs) cadaver lower extremities were externally rotated to gross failure while positioned in 20 deg of pre-eversion and 20 deg of predorsiflexion by fixing the distal end of the foot, axially loading the proximal tibia, and internally rotating the tibia. One ankle in each pair was constrained by an American football shoe with a stiff upper, while the other was constrained by an American football shoe with a flexible upper. Experimental bone motions were input into specimen-specific computational models to examine levels of ligament elongation to help understand mechanisms of ankle joint failure. Ankles in flexible shoes allowed 6.7±2.4 deg of talus eversion during rotation, significantly greater than the 1.7±1.0 deg for ankles in stiff shoes (p = 0.01). The significantly greater eversion in flexible shoes was potentially due to a more natural response of the ankle during rotation, possibly affecting the injuries that were produced. All ankles failed by either medial ankle injury or syndesmotic injury, or a combination of both. Complex (more than one ligament or bone) injuries were noted in 4 of 6 ankles in stiff shoes and 1 of 6 ankles in flexible shoes. Ligament elongations from the computational model validated the experimental injury data. The current study suggested flexibility (or rotational stiffness) of the shoe may play an important role in both the severity of ankle injuries for athletes.

  7. Prospective Epidemiological Study of Basketball Injuries During One Competitive Season: Ankle Sprains and Overuse Knee Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to assess the overall incidence of acute and overuse basketball injuries and identifies risk factors associated with ankle sprains and knee overuse injuries. In total, 164 senior players (23.7 years ± 7.0) of all levels of play, and including both men and women, participated voluntarily during one season. A total of 139 acute and 87 overuse injuries were reported, resulting in an overall injury incidence of 9.8 (8.5 to 11.1) per 1,000 hours. The incidence of...

  8. JOURNAL CLUB: MRI Evaluation of Midtarsal (Chopart) Sprain in the Setting of Acute Ankle Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, William R; Hirschmann, Anna; Alaia, Erin F; Garwood, Elisabeth R; Rosenberg, Zehava S

    2018-02-01

    This study determined the frequency and MRI appearance of osseous and ligamentous injuries in midtarsal (Chopart) sprains and their association with ankle sprains after acute ankle injuries. Prospective diagnosis of and interobserver agreement regarding midtarsal injury among musculoskeletal radiologists were also assessed. Two cohorts with ankle MRI were identified via a digital PACS search: patients who had undergone MRI within 8 weeks after ankle injury and control subjects who had not sustained ankle trauma. Studies were retrospectively reviewed in consensus as well as independently, assessing ligamentous and osseous injury to the Chopart joint (calcaneocuboid and talonavicular joints) and associated lateral collateral and deltoid ligamentous injury. Interobserver agreement was calculated, and prospective radiology reports were reviewed to determine the musculoskeletal radiologist's familiarity with Chopart joint injury. MR images of control subjects (n = 16) and patients with ankle injury (n = 47) were reviewed. The normal dorsal calcaneocuboid and calcaneocuboid component of bifurcate ligaments were variably visualized; the remaining normal ligaments were always seen. Eleven patients (23%) had midtarsal ligamentous and osseous injury consistent with midtarsal sprain (eight acute or subacute, one probable, and two old). Six (75%) of eight acute or subacute cases had coexisting lateral collateral ligament injury. Eighty-nine percent of osseous injuries were reported prospectively, but 83% of ligamentous injuries were missed. Substantial interobserver agreement was achieved regarding diagnosis of midtarsal sprain. Midtarsal sprains are commonly associated with acute ankle injury and with ankle sprains. Presently, midtarsal sprains may be underrecognized by radiologists; thus, greater familiarity with the MRI spectrum of ligamentous and osseous injuries at the Chopart joint is important for accurate diagnosis and clinical management.

  9. The role of fibular tape in the prevention of ankle injury in basketball: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiler, Kym; Hall, Toby; Robinson, Kim

    2006-09-01

    Prospective nonrandomized controlled trial. To determine the effect of fibular repositioning tape (FRT) on incidence and severity of ankle injury. Pain and functional disability is common following ankle sprain and a major problem in sport. A novel method of taping, FRT, which has been described to prevent ankle sprain, requires less tape than traditional methods and is easier to apply. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of FRT on the incidence and severity of ankle injury in basketball. One hundred twenty-five male basketball players were assigned at time of play to either the control (209 exposures) or FRT (224 exposures) condition in a manner of convenience. Control participants had the choice on the use and type of prophylaxis, excluding FRT. FRT participants were taped using the method described by Mulligan. Ankle injury data were collected after each exposure. Injury severity was determined by functional limitation, pain levels, and days to return to play. Four hundred forty-three measured basketball exposures resulted in 11 ankle injuries. All injuries occurred in subjects with a history of previous ankle sprain. Significantly less ankle injuries were sustained by members of the FRT condition (n = 2), compared to members of the control condition (n = 9) (Fisher exact test, P = .03). The odds ratio of sustaining an ankle injury was 0.20 (P = .04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.04, 0.93) when taped with FRT and the number needed to treat was 22 (95% CI, 12-312). This study provides preliminary data regarding the prophylactic effects of FRT on ankle injury in male basketball players.

  10. Parametric analysis of occupant ankle and tibia injuries in frontal impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuhao Mo

    Full Text Available Non-fatal tibia and ankle injuries without proper protection from the restraint system has gotten wide attention from researchers. This study aimed to investigate occupant tibia and ankle injuries under realistic frontal impact environment that is rarely considered in previous experimental and simulant studies.An integrated occupant-vehicle model was established by coupling an isolated car cab model and a hybrid occupant model with a biofidelic pelvis-lower limb model, while its loading conditions were extracted from the realistic full-frontal impact test. A parametric study was implemented concerning instrument panel (IP design and pedal intrusion/rotation parameters.The significant influences of the IP angle, pedal intrusion and pedal rotation on tibia axial force, tibia bending moment and ankle dorsiflexion angle are noted. By coupling their effects, a new evaluation index named CAIEI (Combined Ankle Injury Evaluation Index is established to evaluate ankle injury (including tibia fractures in ankle region risk and severity in robustness.Overall results and analysis indicate that ankle dorsiflexion angle should be considered when judging the injury in lower limb under frontal impact. Meanwhile, the current index with coupling effects of tibia axial force, bending moment and ankle dorsiflexion angle is in a good correlation with the simulation injury outcomes.

  11. Number of knee and ankle injuries is associated with poor physical but not mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Casey M; Gribble, Phillip A; Turner, Michael J; Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Simon, Janet E; Thomas, Abbey C

    2017-05-01

    The knee and ankle are among the most commonly injured joints in the body. Long-term strength and neuromuscular control deficits are common following these injuries, yielding lifelong disability and poor quality of life. However, it is unknown how the number of injuries sustained influences quality of life. Determine the association between the number of ankle or knee injuries sustained and physical and mental quality of life. A total of 806 ankle-injured (age:45.2 ± 15.3 yrs; body mass index [BMI]:28.6 ± 7.4 kg/m 2 ), 658 knee-injured (age:49.3 ± 16.1 yrs; BMI:28.4 ± 7.4 kg/m 2 ), and 996 uninjured (age:43.4 ± 16.1 yrs; BMI:26.9 ± 6.5 kg/m 2 ) adults completed the SF-8 survey to determine the physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) contributions to quality of life. Respondents were categorized by injury history (ankle, knee, none) and number of injuries (0, 1, 2, or 3 or more [3+]) to the same joint. Backward linear regression models were used to determine the association between quality of life, age, and injury history separately for SF-8 PCS and MCS, as well as ankle versus knee injury. Reporting 1, 2, or 3+ ankle injuries along with age predicted SF-8 PCS (P ankle injuries and age (P injuries along with age significantly predicted SF-8 PCS (P ankle injury. However, mental quality of life was predicted most consistently by age. Efforts to reduce injuries should be employed to improve quality of life, but more research is needed to determine what other factors contribute to quality of life across the lifespan.

  12. Diagnosis of ligament injuries in the superior ankle joint. Roentgendiagnostik der Bandlaesionen des oberen Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebing, R.; Fiedler, V. (Staedtische Krankenanstalten Krefeld (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik)

    1991-12-01

    Nearly 40 years after ankle arthrography was first introduced, the anterior and inversion stress views of the ankle are still widely preferred as a noninvasive method of evaluating ligament injuries in the upper ankle. We consider the stress test, bilaterally performed using a standardized stress apparatus, as a basic examination by which to differentiate between slight and severe sprain. Intensive muscel splinting due to painful swelling can sometimes be treated by injection of local anesthetic. Like many authors, we perform ankle arthrography in cases where there is a significant difference between the clinical findings and the stress test. The technique of ankle arthrography can be readily learned and is extremely accurate in delineating the extent of ligamentous injury produced by moderate or severe ankle sprains. It can be performed in any X-ray department. (orig.).

  13. Risk Factors for Noncontact Ankle Injuries in Amateur Male Soccer Players: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Thomas; Evans, Karrin; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Miller, Andrew; Callister, Robin

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether nonmodifiable and modifiable risk factors [ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), lower limb power output, and balance], as identified in preseason screening, predict the risk of sustaining a noncontact ankle injury in amateur male soccer players during the training and competitive season. Prospective cohort study. Amateur soccer competition (club and area representative teams). Amateur soccer players (n = 210) aged ≥15 years. Height, weight, ankle dorsiflexion ROM, power (vertical jump) and balance (time of double-leg balanced stance on an electronic wobble board, maximum 20 seconds) measured in preseason screening. Incidence of noncontact ankle injury and exposure to both training and games, monitored during the competitive season following baseline measurement. Noncontact ankle injury was defined as any ankle injury not caused by a collision (with another player or object) resulting in a participant missing at least 1 game or training session. Fourteen of the 210 participants (6.7%) sustained a noncontact ankle injury yielding an injury rate of 0.484 injuries per 1000 player hours. Lower limb power output scores soccer players. These deficits can potentially be identified by screening, providing opportunities to investigate prevention strategies.

  14. Ankle Arthritis Combined With Chronic Instability of the Syndesmosis After Ankle Fracture With Syndesmotic Injury: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Bi O; Baek, Jong Hun; Song, Wook Jae

    2018-03-28

    Syndesmotic injuries associated with ankle fractures are commonly treated with reduction and fixation using a transfixing screw. On rare occasions, however, progression to chronic instability of the syndesmosis is observed. Several surgical techniques have been applied in such cases but usually without a report on the results. We report a case of chronic syndesmotic instability and ankle joint osteoarthritis after ankle fracture-dislocation in a 21-year-old male patient who underwent distal tibiofibular arthrodesis. During the relatively long 4-year, 1-month follow-up period, the pain and activity improved from the patient's preoperative condition. Radiographs demonstrated cessation of arthritic changes in the ankle that had initially displayed joint space narrowing. Our findings suggest distal tibiofibular arthrodesis as an option to consider for the treatment of young and active patients with arthritic changes in the ankle joint with concomitant chronic instability of the syndesmosis. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of foot and ankle injuries in pediatric and adolescent athletes: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill LE

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Laura E Gill,1,2 Kevin E Klingele,1,2 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: In this review, we focus on the treatment of injuries to the foot and ankle in the adolescent athlete. While many injuries in the adolescent foot and ankle are similar to or overlap with their counterparts in the adult population, the anatomy of the adolescent ankle, especially the presence of growth plates, results in different injury patterns in many cases and calls for specific management approaches. We discuss the unique anatomy of the pediatric patient as well as the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of common injuries in the young athlete. Keywords: foot, ankle, lower extremity, pediatric athlete, growth plate, Lisfranc injury 

  16. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Khalid Faqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lauge-Hansen (LH classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed.

  17. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faqi, Mohammed Khalid; AlJawder, Abdulla; Alkhalifa, Fahad; Almajed, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The Lauge-Hansen (LH) classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed.

  18. Comparison of Plain MRI and MR Arthrography in the Evaluation of Lateral Ligamentous Injury of the Ankle Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chun Chou

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: For evaluating ankle disability, using plain MRI alone is not adequate for correctly detecting lateral collateral ligamentous injury of the ankle joint. MR arthrography improves the sensitivity and the accuracy for ATaF and CF ligament injuries. It also helps in assessing coexisting pathologic lesions of ankle joints, especially impingement syndromes and osteochondral lesions, and provides more information for therapeutic decision making.

  19. Ankle arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure of repair to heal Weakness of the ankle Injury to tendon, blood vessel, or nerve Before the ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Ankle Injuries and Disorders Read more Endoscopy Read more NIH ...

  20. Bone bruises associated with acute ankle ligament injury: do they need treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Romeo, Giovanni; van Dijk, C. Niek; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to analyse the current knowledge, incidence, relevance, and need for treatment of bone bruises associated with acute ankle ligament injury. A search was made of PubMed, OVID/Medline, Cochrane databases using the keyword "bone bruises" in combination with "ankle",

  1. Ankle syndesmosis injuries: anatomy, biomechanics, mechanism of injury, and clinical guidelines for diagnosis and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Gross, Michael L; Weinhold, Paul

    2006-06-01

    Syndesmosis injuries are rare, but very debilitating and frequently misdiagnosed. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the mechanisms of syndesmotic injuries, clinical examination methods, diagnosis, and management of the injuries. Cadaveric studies of the syndesmosis and deltoid ligaments are also reviewed for further understanding of stress transmission and the roles of different structures in stabilizing the distal syndesmosis. External rotation and excessive dorsiflexion of the foot on the leg have been reported as the most common mechanisms of injury. The injury is most often incurred by individuals who participate in skiing, football, soccer, and other sport activities played on turf. The external rotation and squeeze tests are reliable tests to detect this injury. The ability of imaging studies to assist in an accurate diagnosis may depend on the severity of the injury. The results of cadaveric studies indicate the importance of the deltoid ligament in maintaining stability of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis and the congruency of the ankle mortise. Intervention programs with early rigid immobilization and pain relief strategies, followed by strengthening and balance training are recommended. Heel lift and posterior splint intervention can be used to avoid separation of the distal syndesmosis induced by excessive dorsiflexion of the ankle joint. Application of a rigid external device should be used with caution to prevent medial-lateral compression of the leg superior to the ankle mortise, thereby inducing separation of the distal syndesmosis articulation. Surgical intervention is an option when a complete tear of the syndesmotic ligaments is present or when fractures are observed.

  2. [MRI anatomy and injury of the lateral collateral ligaments of ankle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Z H; Liu, Y; Bai, R J; Zhan, H L; Zhang, H; Li, Y X; Wu, B D

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To explore the MRI features of the lateral collateral ligament injuries of the ankle and determine the value MRI in diagnosing the ligament injuries of the ankle. Methods: The study was reviewed and approved by an institutional review board of hospital. Retrospective analysised 10 healthy volunteers and 26 ankle injury cases underwent surgery since January 2013 to September 2016, the MR imaging findings of patients were compared with volunteers' and operative documents, to analysis the MRI feature of the ligament injuries of the ankle. Results: The normal anterior talofibular ligament and posterior talofibular ligament can be manifest in 3-4 layers of MRI, and can be fully displayed in 1 layer. The normal calcaneofibular ligament can be manifest in 3 layers of MRI, but can not be fully displayed in 1 layer. 26 cases of lateral ligament injury (including 1 case of ATFL injury, 1 case of CFL injury, 3 cases of ATFL conjunction with CFL injury, 3 cases of ATFL conjunction with CFL and PTFL injury) manifested the heterogeneous signal of the T(1)-weighted image, the ligament disruption, the increased signal intensity on fat-suppression PD-weighted image , the surrounding soft tissue edema and bone marrow edema. Conclusion: MR imaging is an accurate method for evaluation of the ligament injuries of the ankle, and it is a useful tool for diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Higher frequency of hamstring injuries in elite track and field athletes who had a previous injury to the ankle - a 17 years observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Bikos, Georgios; Meke, Maria; Vasileios, Korakakis; Valle, Xavier; Lohrer, Heinz; Maffulli, Nicola; Padhiar, Nat

    2018-01-01

    Inversion injury to the ankle and hamstring injuries are common problems in most sports. It is not known whether these injuries constitute a predisposing factor or a precursor of injury or re-injury of these anatomical locations. Therefore, we wished to test the hypothesis that a previous inversion ankle injury exerted a significant effect on the chance of an athlete suffering from a subsequent ipsilateral hamstring injury and vice versa. In an observational cohort study over 17 years (1998-2015), 367 elite track and field athletes, were grouped according to their first traumatic isolated ankle or hamstring injury. Fifty athletes experienced both injuries. The Mann-Whitney U and Chi-square tests ( p  < 0.05) were performed to test possible associations of ankle and hamstring injury with age, gender, athletics discipline, grade, and type of antecedent injury. Athletes with a preceding ankle injury had a statistically significantly higher chance of experiencing a subsequent hamstring injury compared with athletes who had experienced a hamstring injury as their first traumatic event (x 2  = 4.245, p  = 0.039). The proportion of both ankle and hamstring injury events was not statistically different between female (18%) and male (11%) athletes. Age and grade of injury did not influence the proportion of ankle and/or hamstring injury events. There is a statistically significantly higher frequency of hamstring injuries in elite track and field athletes having experienced a previous ankle ligament injury.

  4. Tightrope fixation of ankle syndesmosis injuries: clinical outcome, complications and technique modification.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naqvi, Gohar A

    2012-06-01

    Ankle syndesmotic injuries are complex and require anatomic reduction and fixation. Tightrope fixation is a relatively new technique and we present the largest series of syndesmosis fixation using Arthrex Tightrope™ (Naples, FL, USA).

  5. Risk Factors for Parachute Injuries and Airborne Student Observations on the Parachute Ankle Brace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapik, Joseph J; Spiess, Anita; Darakjy, Salima; Grier, Tyson; Manning, Fred; Livingston, Elaine; Swedler, David; Amoroso, Paul; Jones, Bruce H

    2007-01-01

    ...) of the Defense Safety Oversight Council (DSOC) to evaluate the parachute ankle brace (PAB). Information provided by the questionnaire identified potential injury risk factors and comments on the PAB...

  6. Open Reduction Internal Fixation of a Bimalleolar Ankle Fracture With Syndesmotic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrum, Robert F; Avery, Matthew C

    2016-08-01

    Rotational ankle fractures are incredibly common, resulting in a wide spectrum of bony and ligamentous injury patterns. After open reduction of an ankle fracture, the treating surgeon must always evaluate syndesmotic stability. If the syndesmosis is determined to be unstable, a reduction of the distal tibiofibular joint should be performed. Failure to adequately identify and treat injuries to the syndesmosis may result in continued ankle instability and poor patient outcomes. Lateral fluoroscopic images are necessary to assess a closed reduction of the syndesmosis before stabilization, although the accuracy of this tool has been questioned in several studies. Significant controversy surrounds many aspects of this injury and its treatment, including methods of diagnosis, ideal reduction clamp positioning, diameter and number of syndesmotic screws, and number of tibial cortices to be engaged. In the accompanying video, we describe our approach for the treatment of a bimalleolar ankle fracture with syndesmotic injury, using a posterior fibular plate and single tricortical syndesmotic screw.

  7. Common types and countermeasures of ankle ligament injury caused by intense basketball movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H

    2017-08-01

    To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize injury types, analyze the causes of injury, and put forward corresponding control measures. The author selected 3100 basketball players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to different hospitals from June 2011 to June 2015 for stochastic analysis. Through the literature, investigation, and observation, etc., common types of injuries of basketball players are analyzed, and damage preventive measures of basketball players are discussed, so as to find measures to prevent and treat ankle ligament injury of basketball players and promote physical rehabilitation of players, which is in favor of their better career development. Basketball players are prone to ankle ligament injury in training or competition, which has a direct relationship with players' poor safety consciousness and insufficient preparation during movement. Basketball players will often have serious ankle ligament injury in the process of movement. Basketball coaches and players should reduce serious injury to players in training or competition, so as to stimulate passion of more professional basketball sports students for basketball, which also has a positive meaning for their future career.

  8. Imaging in the assessment and management of overuse injuries in the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, James; Suppiah, Ravi; Sharp, Robert; Newton, Julia

    2011-02-01

    Overuse injuries of the ankle and foot are common in the general and athletic populations. The wide spectrum of overuse injuries includes ligamentous injuries, soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, tendon injuries, and stress fractures. Some conditions such as impingement syndromes and stress fractures may be missed on initial physical examination, and patients with such injuries often present to a sports or orthopedic clinic with persistent symptoms. With the increasing participation in sports, health-care professionals involved in the care of athletes at all levels must have a thorough understanding of overuse conditions of the foot and ankle, and the use of imaging in the management of these conditions. This article covers the clinical presentation, pertinent anatomy, imaging features, and management of overuse injuries of the foot and ankle. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  9. Landing-related ankle injuries do not occur in plantarflexion as once thought: a systematic video analysis of ankle injuries in world-class volleyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skazalski, Christopher; Kruczynski, Jacek; Bahr, Martin Aase; Bere, Tone; Whiteley, Rod; Bahr, Roald

    2018-01-01

    Ankle injuries are prevalent in elite volleyball and suggested to result from player contact at the net. Traditionally, ankle sprains are thought to happen in a plantarflexed position, but case studies suggest plantarflexion may not be involved. Describe the injury situations and mechanisms of ankle injuries in world-class volleyball based on systematic video analysis of injuries reported through the Fédération Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB) Injury Surveillance System. Videos of 24 injuries from major FIVB tournaments were included for analysis (14 men, 10 women). Five analysts reviewed the videos to determine specific situations and mechanisms leading to injuries. The majority of injuries occurred during two volleyball situations, blocking (n=15) and attacking (n=6). Injuries to blockers were the result of landing on an opponent (n=11) or teammate (n=4). Attacking injuries most frequently occurred when a back-row player landed on a front-row teammate (n=4 of 6). When landing on an opponent under the net, the attacker landed into the opponent's court in 11 of 12 situations but without violating the centre line rule. Injuries mostly resulted from rapid inversion without any substantial plantarflexion. The majority of injuries occur while blocking, often landing on an opponent. The attacker is overwhelmingly to blame for injuries at the net secondary to crossing the centre line. Injuries while attacking often result from a back-row player landing on a front-row teammate. Landing-related injuries mostly result from rapid inversion with the absence of plantarflexion. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Neuromuscular Risk Factors for Knee and Ankle Ligament Injuries in Male Youth Soccer Players

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Paul J.; Oliver, Jon L.; De Ste Croix, Mark B. A.; Myer, Gregory D.; Lloyd, Rhodri S.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries reported in male youth soccer players most commonly occur in the lower extremities, and include a high proportion of ligament sprains at the ankle and knee with a lower proportion of overuse injuries. There is currently a paucity of available literature that examines age-and sex-specific injury risk factors for such injuries within youth soccer players. Epidemiological data have reported movements that lead to non-contact ligament injury include running, twisting and turning, over-re...

  11. Soluble Flt-1 improves the repair of ankle joint injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Xie, Bing; Xiang, Liangbi; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    The ankle injuries create great pain to a great number of patients worldwide. Past studies have focused on the development of practical treatments to relieve pain and improve recovery, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the ankle injuries, especially the local inflammation in the damaged ankle joint, have been rarely studied. Moreover, although reduction of production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines may reduce the pain and promote the recovery, a practical approach is currently lacking. Here, we detected significantly higher levels of placental growth factor (PLGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joint fluid from the patients of acute ankle joint injury (AAJI). Interestingly, the levels of PLGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joint fluid strongly correlated. In order to examine whether PLGF may regulate the production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the injured joint, we used a rat carrageenan-induced ankle injury model for AAJI in humans. We injected soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) into the articular cavity of the injured ankle joint to block PLGF signaling and found that injection of sFlt-1 significantly improved the rat behavior in activity wheels test, which appeared to result from reduced secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the ankle joint. Thus, our study suggests that blocking PLGF signaling may be a novel therapeutic approach for treating AAJI in humans.

  12. Risk-factor analysis of high school basketball-player ankle injuries: a prospective controlled cohort study evaluating postural sway, ankle strength, and flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Kuo; Chen, Chia-Hong; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang; Jan, Mei-Hwa; Lin, Kwan-Hwa

    2006-06-01

    To analyze risk factors, including postural sway, ankle strength, and flexibility, for the prediction of ankle injuries in men's high school basketball players. A cohort study with follow-up duration of 1 basketball season. Biomechanics laboratory. Forty-two (age, 16.5+/-1.1y) players competing in first league of the High School Basketball Association without history of injury in the lower extremities within 6 months before recruitment and without significant malalignment in the lower extremities were included. None of these players met exclusion criteria such as using ankle braces or taping or failed in wearing low-top sports shoes during the follow-up season. Not applicable. Biomechanic measurements including isokinetic ankle strength, 1-leg standing postural sway, and ankle joint dorsiflexion flexibility were performed before the basketball season by 1 physical therapist. The subsequent monthly follow-up questionnaires were sent and returned by mail to prospectively record the incidence of ankle injury occurring in the season. Results of these preseason measurements were analyzed to correlate if any of these measured variables could predict future ankle injuries. Eighteen ankle sport injuries were recorded for 42 players during the follow-up season. High variation of postural sway in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions corresponded to occurrences of ankle injuries (P=.01, odds ratio [OR]=1.220; P< .001, OR=1.216, respectively). All other variables were not associated with injury. High variations of postural sway in 1-leg standing test could explain partly the increased prevalence of ankle injury in basketball players. It may be used as a screening tool to recommend balance training before basketball season.

  13. Kinematics analysis of ankle inversion ligamentous sprain injuries in sports: five cases from televised tennis competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Ha, Sophia Chui-Wai; Mok, Kam-Ming; Chan, Christie Wing-Long; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Ankle ligamentous sprain is common in sports. The most direct way to study the mechanism quantitatively is to study real injury cases; however, it is unethical and impractical to produce an injury in the laboratory. A recently developed, model-based image-matching motion analysis technique allows quantitative analysis of real injury incidents captured in televised events and gives important knowledge for the development of injury prevention protocols and equipment. To date, there have been only 4 reported cases, and there is a need to conduct more studies for a better understanding of the mechanism of ankle ligamentous sprain injury. This study presents 5 cases in tennis and a comparison with 4 previous cases for a better understanding of the mechanism of ankle ligamentous sprain injury. Case series; level of evidence, 4. Five sets of videos showing ankle sprain injuries in televised tennis competition with 2 camera views were collected. The videos were transformed, synchronized, and rendered to a 3-dimensional animation software. The dimensions of the tennis court in each case were obtained to build a virtual environment, and a skeleton model scaled to the injured athlete's height was used for the skeleton matching. Foot strike was determined visually, and the profiles of the ankle joint kinematics were individually presented. There was a pattern of sudden inversion and internal rotation at the ankle joint, with the peak values ranging from 48°-126° and 35°-99°, respectively. In the sagittal plane, the ankle joint fluctuated between plantar flexion and dorsiflexion within the first 0.50 seconds after foot strike. The peak inversion velocity ranged from 509 to 1488 deg/sec. Internal rotation at the ankle joint could be one of the causes of ankle inversion sprain injury, with a slightly inverted ankle joint orientation at landing as the inciting event. To prevent the foot from rolling over the edge to cause a sprain injury, tennis players who do lots of sideward

  14. Ankle Injury Prevention Programs for Soccer Athletes Are Protective: A Level-I Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Nathan L; Jacobs, John C; Kim, Jaewhan; Amendola, Annunziato; Shea, Kevin G

    2016-09-07

    Soccer has one of the highest rates of ankle injury in sports for both males and females. Several injury prevention programs have been developed to address this concern. The purposes of this study were to conduct a meta-analysis of ankle injury prevention programs for soccer players, assess the heterogeneity among the studies, and evaluate the reported effectiveness of the prevention programs. A systematic search of the literature was conducted in PubMed (MEDLINE), Embase, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) database. Studies were limited to clinical investigations of injury prevention programs specific to the ankle in soccer players. Title, abstract, and full-text review were utilized to identify articles that met the inclusion criteria. The Cochrane Q test and I(2) index were independently used to assess heterogeneity among the studies. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess heterogeneity. The pooled risk difference was calculated by random-effects models with use of the DerSimonian-Laird method. Publication bias was assessed with a funnel plot and Egger weighted regression technique. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria as randomized controlled trials. A total of 4,121 female and male soccer athletes were analyzed for ankle injuries. Significant heterogeneity was found among studies of ankle injury prevention (p = 0.002), with an I(2) index of 65.2%. For studies of ankle injury prevention programs, the risk ratio was 0.60 (95% confidence interval, 0.40 to 0.92) and a significant reduction in the risk of ankle injury was found in the prevention group (p = 0.002). No evidence of publication bias was found among the included studies. This meta-analysis of studies regarding ankle injury prevention programs identified a significant reduction in the risk of ankle injury. Future high-quality research designs with a low risk of bias are necessary to further evaluate the

  15. Diagnostic Value of Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Acute Lateral Ankle Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jason R; Dunn, Karl W; Ciliberti, Louis J; Eldridge, Stephanie W; Reed, Lauren D

    We report a retrospective study of 171 consecutive patients with a lateral ankle sprain. All the patients with direct or blunt force trauma were excluded. Within 21 days of injury, 115 (67.25%) patients had undergone magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate for more serious or significant injuries. The average patient age was 44.09 years. Of the 115 patients, 75 (65.23%) had findings noted to be "significant." MRI can serve as a valuable and underused tool in the evaluation of acute lateral ankle injuries. The underuse of MRI might explain the high degree of variability in patients recovering from a lateral ankle sprain. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Syndesmotic ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Sharon G

    2012-01-01

    Ankle sprain injuries are the most common type of joint sprain. The prevalence of ankle joint sprains accounts for 21% of joint injuries in the body. Although somewhat rare, high-ankle or syndesmotic ankle sprains occur in up to 15% of ankle trauma. This article will present the pathomechanics of the high-ankle or syndesmotic sprain.

  17. Use of tightrope fixation in ankle syndesmotic injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maempel Julian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Conventional fixation of syndesmotic injuries with screws remains problematic. A novel fibrewire device (Tightrope® has suggested advantages. However, small case series have reported high soft tissue complication rates. The purpose of our study was to quantify complication rates and further procedures in patients treated with Tightropes. A secondary objective was to determine incidence of complications and further procedures in those treated with syndesmotic screws over the same period. Methods: All patients undergoing syndesmotic fixation for ankle fracture between May 2008 and October 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Incidence of complications, secondary procedures, maintenance of syndesmotic reduc- tion and time spent on non-weight bearing were recorded. Family doctors were contacted for those treated with Tight- ropes to check for any complications managed elsewhere. Results: Thirty-five patients required syndesmotic fixation, in which 12 were treated with Tightropes. They were followed up in clinic for a mean of 12.4 weeks. Family doctors were contacted at mean 14.6 months after treatment to determine any complications suffered. There were no complications attributable to method of fixation. In this series, 12 patients underwent 13 procedures and no patient had recurrent diastasis at discharge; 23 patients treated with screw fixation underwent 45 procedures (19 were screw removals. There was 1 case of syndesmotic diastasis. Screw removal resulted in 2 minor complications. Conclusion: Tightrope fixation provideds effective syndesmotic fixation that is maintained at discharge. We do not experience soft tissue complications reported elsewhere.

  18. Interventions preventing ankle sprains; previous injury and high-risk sport participation as predictors of compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Kasper W; van der Zwaard, Babette C; Finch, Caroline F; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert A L M

    2016-06-01

    To describe the association between participants' person-related potential predictor variables and cumulative compliance with interventions for preventing ankle sprains: neuromuscular training, wearing an ankle brace, and a combined training and bracing. Secondary analysis of compliance data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing measures preventing ankle ligament injuries. Ordinal regression with a backward selection method was used to obtain a descriptive statistical model linking participants' person-related potential predictor variables with the monthly cumulative compliance measurements for three interventions preventing ankle ligament injuries. Having had a previous ankle injury was significantly associated with a higher compliance with all of the preventive measures trialed. Overall compliance with bracing and the combined intervention was significantly lower than the compliance with NM training. Per group analysis found that participating in a high-risk sport, like soccer, basketball, and volleyball, was significantly associated with a higher compliance with bracing, or a combined bracing and NM training. In contrast, participating in a high-risk sport was significantly associated with a lower per group compliance with NM training. Future studies should include at least registration of previous ankle sprains, sport participation (high- or low-risk), experience in NM training, and hours of sport exposure as possible predictors of compliance with interventions preventing ankle sprains. Practitioners should take into account these variables when prescribing preventive neuromuscular training or bracing. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Surgical versus conservative treatment for acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Handoll, H. H. G.; de Bie, R.; Rowe, B. H.; Struijs, P. A. A.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inversion injuries, primarily sprains, of the ankle are one of the most commonly treated injuries. The three main treatment modalities for acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are immobilisation with plaster cast or splint, 'functional treatment' comprising early mobilisation and the

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries: development of an evidence-based algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Polzer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle injuries are among the most common injuries in emergency departments. However, a standardized examination and an evidence-based treatment are missing. Therefore, aim of this study was to systematically search the current literature, classify the evidence and develop an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database for randomized controlled trials, meta-analysis, systematic reviews, or if applicable observational studies and classified them according to their level of evidence. According to the currently available literature, the following recommendations are given. The Ottawa Ankle/Foot Rule should be applied in order to rule out fractures, Physical examination is sufficient for diagnosing injuries to the lateral ligament complex. Classification into stable and unstable injuries is applicable and of clinical importance. The squeeze-, crossed leg- and external rotation test are indicative for injuries of the syndesmosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is recommended to verify such injuries. Stable ankle sprains have a good prognosis, while for unstable ankle sprains conservative treatment is at least as effective as operative treatment without carrying possible complications. Early functional treatment leads to the fastest recovery and the least rate of re-injury. Supervised rehabilitation reduces residual symptoms and re-injuries. Taken these recommendations into account, we here present an applicable and evidence-based step by step decision pathway for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries, which can be implemented in any emergency department or doctor’s practice. It provides quality assurance for the patient and confidence for the attending physician.

  1. The Effect of Lace-up Ankle Braces on Injury Rates in High School Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuine, Timothy A.; Hetzel, Scott; Wilson, John; Brooks, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background Although a nkle injuries occur frequently in high school football players no prospective studies have been performed to determine if wearing lace-up ankle braces will reduce the incidence and severity of ankle and other lower extremity injuries in these athletes. Purpose Determine if lace-up ankle braces reduce the incidence and severity of lower extremity injuries sustained by high school football players. Design Cluster randomized controlled trial. Methods 2081 players from 50 high schools were randomly-assigned to braced or control group. Braced group subjects wore lace-up ankle braces during the 2010 football season. Athletic trainers recorded brace compliance, athletic exposures and injuries. Cox Proportional Hazards models were utilized to compare injury rates between groups. Injury severity (days lost) was tested with Wilcoxon Rank Sum. Results The rate of acute ankle injury (per 1,000 exposures) was 0.48 in the braced group compared to 1.12 in the control group (Cox Hazard Ratio (HR)=0.39, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.24, 0.65, pinjuries was the same (5 days) in both groups (p=0.985). The rate of acute knee injury was 0.70 in the braced group compared to 0.69 in the control group, (HR=0.92 [0.57, 1.47], p=0.721). There was no difference (p=0.242) in the severity of knee injuries between the groups (controls 11.5 days, braced =17 days. The rate of other lower extremity injuries was 0.95 in the braced group and 1.32 in the control group, (HR=0.72 [0.48, 1.09], p=0.117) while the severity was similar in both groups (6 days versus 7 days, p=0.295). Conclusions Players who used lace-up ankle braces had a lower incidence of acute ankle injuries but no difference in the incidence of acute knee or other lower extremity injuries. Braces did not reduce the severity of ankle, knee or other lower extremity injuries. PMID:21926383

  2. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jia; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport.

  3. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jia; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport. PMID:26583139

  4. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries: development of an evidence-based algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzer, Hans; Kanz, Karl Georg; Prall, Wolf Christian; Haasters, Florian; Ockert, Ben; Mutschler, Wolf; Grote, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are among the most common injuries in emergency departments. However, there are still no standardized examination procedures or evidence-based treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to systematically search the current literature, classify the evidence, and develop an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database for randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, systematic reviews or, if applicable, observational studies and classified them according to their level of evidence. According to the currently available literature, the following recommendations have been formulated: i) the Ottawa Ankle/Foot Rule should be applied in order to rule out fractures; ii) physical examination is sufficient for diagnosing injuries to the lateral ligament complex; iii) classification into stable and unstable injuries is applicable and of clinical importance; iv) the squeeze-, crossed leg- and external rotation test are indicative for injuries of the syndesmosis; v) magnetic resonance imaging is recommended to verify injuries of the syndesmosis; vi) stable ankle sprains have a good prognosis while for unstable ankle sprains, conservative treatment is at least as effective as operative treatment without the related possible complications; vii) early functional treatment leads to the fastest recovery and the least rate of reinjury; viii) supervised rehabilitation reduces residual symptoms and re-injuries. Taken these recommendations into account, we present an applicable and evidence-based, step by step, decision pathway for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries, which can be implemented in any emergency department or doctor's practice. It provides quality assurance for the patient and promotes confidence in the attending physician. PMID:22577506

  6. [Efficiency of the Modified Ottawa ankle rules for the differential diagnosis of fracture in acute foot and ankle injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, N; Liu, Y S; Xin, J Y; Ma, X L; Mei, X L; Shi, Z Q; Li, G; Sun, Z H

    2017-09-19

    Objective: To evaluate the efficiency of modified Ottawa Ankle Rules (OAR) for the differential diagnosis of fractures in acute foot and ankle injuries. Methods: From October 2016 to December 2016, 272cases (135 males and 137 females) of foot and ankle injury in emergency department of Tianjin Hospital were prospective enrolled in the study.The median age was 27.5 years (7-87); left limb 155, right 117 cases; injury time ranged from 0.3 to 24 h (median 4 h). Conventional and modified OAR was applied on physical examination, subsequently radiography performed to determine the occurrence of fractures.The efficiency of the two methods were compared and analyzed. Results: Fractures were found in 100 cases (36.8%), 49 cases of ankle and 51 cases of foot fractures.With the imaging results as the standard, the sensitivity for conventional and modified OAR were 93.0% and 100%, specificity were 9.9% and 8.7%, the positive predictive value were 37.5% and 38.9%, the negative predictive value were 70.8% and 100%, the accuracy were 40.4% and 42.3%, missed diagnosis rate were 7% and 0% respectively.The sensitivity, positive likelihood ratio, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy, negative likelihood ratio and missed diagnosis ratio were better than in modified OAR compared with Conventional OAR, while the specificity was slightly lower compared to Conventional OAR.The Kappa value of modified OAR was 0.065 ( P >0.05), which is better than conventional OAR.Conventional OAR can reduce 6.3% (17/272) X-ray and modified OAR decline 5.5% (15/272). Conclusion: Modified OAR significantly reduces the rate of missed diagnosis of foot fractures, but its specificity is poor. Ultrasound can be assisted to improve the specificity and reduce the number of unnecessary X-rays.

  7. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE treatment after injuries of the ankle ligaments: what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain? : a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witjes Suzanne

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to prove the benefit of external support devices in these types of treatment. The hypothesis of our study is that external ankle support devices will not result in better outcome in the treatment of acute ankle sprains, compared to a purely functional treatment strategy. Overall objective is to compare the results of three different strategies of functional treatment for acute ankle sprain, especially to determine the advantages of external support devices in addition to functional treatment strategy, based on balance and coordination exercises. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled multi-centre trial with one-year follow-up. Adult and healthy patients (N = 180 with acute, single sided and first inversion trauma of the lateral ankle ligaments will be included. They will all follow the same schedule of balancing exercises and will be divided into 3 treatment groups, 1. pressure bandage and tape, 2. pressure bandage and brace and 3. no external support. Primary outcome measure is the Karlsson scoring scale; secondary outcomes are FAOS (subscales, number of recurrent ankle injuries, Visual Analogue Scales of pain and satisfaction and adverse events. They will be measured after one week, 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. Discussion The ANKLE TRIAL is a randomized controlled trial in which a purely functional treated control group, without any external support is investigated. Results of this study could lead to other opinions about usefulness of external support devices in the treatment of acute ankle sprain. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR2151

  8. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE treatment after injuries of the ankle ligaments): what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain? : a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to prove the benefit of external support devices in these types of treatment. The hypothesis of our study is that external ankle support devices will not result in better outcome in the treatment of acute ankle sprains, compared to a purely functional treatment strategy. Overall objective is to compare the results of three different strategies of functional treatment for acute ankle sprain, especially to determine the advantages of external support devices in addition to functional treatment strategy, based on balance and coordination exercises. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled multi-centre trial with one-year follow-up. Adult and healthy patients (N = 180) with acute, single sided and first inversion trauma of the lateral ankle ligaments will be included. They will all follow the same schedule of balancing exercises and will be divided into 3 treatment groups, 1. pressure bandage and tape, 2. pressure bandage and brace and 3. no external support. Primary outcome measure is the Karlsson scoring scale; secondary outcomes are FAOS (subscales), number of recurrent ankle injuries, Visual Analogue Scales of pain and satisfaction and adverse events. They will be measured after one week, 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. Discussion The ANKLE TRIAL is a randomized controlled trial in which a purely functional treated control group, without any external support is investigated. Results of this study could lead to other opinions about usefulness of external support devices in the treatment of acute ankle sprain. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2151 PMID:22340371

  9. Isolated syndesmotic injury in acute ankle trauma: Comparison of plain film radiography with 3 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoennagel, B.P.; Karul, M.; Avanesov, M.; Bannas, P.; Gold, G.; Großterlinden, L.G.; Rupprecht, M.; Adam, G.; Yamamura, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Isolated syndesmotic injury is a frequent finding after acute ankle trauma. • Cut-off values and accuracy of plain film radiograph measurements were determined. • The TFCS and the MCS have the potential to detect isolated syndesmotic injury. • Appropriate cut-off values allow detection of isolated syndesmotic injury. • Only MRI reveals severity of isolated syndesmotic injury and concomitant injuries. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine cut-off values and the accuracy of plain film measurements for the detection of isolated syndesmotic injury after acute ankle trauma and to investigate MRI findings of concomitant ankle injury. Methods: Eighty-four consecutive patients with absent fracture in plain film radiographs were prospectively evaluated for isolated syndesmotic injury after acute ankle trauma. The tibiofibular clear space (TFCS), the tibiofibular overlap (TFO), and the medial clear space (MCS) were independently assessed in plain radiographs by two readers. MRI performed at 3 T within 24 h served as the reference standard. MRI was evaluated for syndesmotic injury, using a four-scale grading system (0 = normal syndesmosis, 1a = periligamentous edema, 1b = intraligamentous edema, 2 = partial rupture, 3 = complete rupture), and for concomitant ankle injury. Inter-observer variability for x-ray measurements was assessed using Bland–Altman diagrams. ROC analyses were performed to determine cut-off values and sensitivity and specificity for TFCS, TFO, and MCS. Results: Eleven of 84 patients (13.1%) revealed syndesmotic injury (Grade 2 or 3) according to MRI. Between patients with and without syndesmotic injury significantly different measurements were obtained for TFCS (p = 0.003) and MCS (p = 0.04). ROC derived cut-off values were 5.3 mm for TFCS, 2.8 mm for TFO, and 2.8 mm for MCS. Sensitivity and specificity was 82% and 75% for TFCS, 36% and 78% for TFO, and 73% and 59% for MCS. The bias and limits of agreement were −0.04 mm and [−1

  10. Isolated syndesmotic injury in acute ankle trauma: Comparison of plain film radiography with 3 T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoennagel, B.P., E-mail: b.schoennagel@uke.uni-hamburg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Karul, M.; Avanesov, M.; Bannas, P.; Gold, G. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Großterlinden, L.G. [Department of Trauma-, Hand- and Reconstructive Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Rupprecht, M. [Department of Pediatric Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital Hamburg-Altona, Bleickenallee 38, 22763 Hamburg (Germany); Adam, G.; Yamamura, J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Isolated syndesmotic injury is a frequent finding after acute ankle trauma. • Cut-off values and accuracy of plain film radiograph measurements were determined. • The TFCS and the MCS have the potential to detect isolated syndesmotic injury. • Appropriate cut-off values allow detection of isolated syndesmotic injury. • Only MRI reveals severity of isolated syndesmotic injury and concomitant injuries. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine cut-off values and the accuracy of plain film measurements for the detection of isolated syndesmotic injury after acute ankle trauma and to investigate MRI findings of concomitant ankle injury. Methods: Eighty-four consecutive patients with absent fracture in plain film radiographs were prospectively evaluated for isolated syndesmotic injury after acute ankle trauma. The tibiofibular clear space (TFCS), the tibiofibular overlap (TFO), and the medial clear space (MCS) were independently assessed in plain radiographs by two readers. MRI performed at 3 T within 24 h served as the reference standard. MRI was evaluated for syndesmotic injury, using a four-scale grading system (0 = normal syndesmosis, 1a = periligamentous edema, 1b = intraligamentous edema, 2 = partial rupture, 3 = complete rupture), and for concomitant ankle injury. Inter-observer variability for x-ray measurements was assessed using Bland–Altman diagrams. ROC analyses were performed to determine cut-off values and sensitivity and specificity for TFCS, TFO, and MCS. Results: Eleven of 84 patients (13.1%) revealed syndesmotic injury (Grade 2 or 3) according to MRI. Between patients with and without syndesmotic injury significantly different measurements were obtained for TFCS (p = 0.003) and MCS (p = 0.04). ROC derived cut-off values were 5.3 mm for TFCS, 2.8 mm for TFO, and 2.8 mm for MCS. Sensitivity and specificity was 82% and 75% for TFCS, 36% and 78% for TFO, and 73% and 59% for MCS. The bias and limits of agreement were −0.04 mm and [−1

  11. Use of infrared thermography for the diagnosis and grading of sprained ankle injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, João; Vardasca, Ricardo; Pimenta, Madalena; Gabriel, Joaquim; Torres, João

    2016-05-01

    Ankle joint sprains are a common medical condition estimated to be responsible for 15-25% of all musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. The pathophysiology of the lesion can represent considerable time lost to injury, as well as long-term disability in up to 60% of patients. A percentage between 10% and 20% may complicate with chronic instability of the ankle joint and disability in walking, contributing to morbidity and poor life quality. Ankle sprains can be classified as grade I, II, or III, based on the extent of damage and number of ligaments affected. The diagnostic grading is important for setting further treatment and rehabilitation, since more severe injuries carries risk of recurrence, added morbidity and decrease in life quality. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adequacy of infrared thermography as a potential complimentary diagnostic tool of the distinct lesions grades. Evaluation of different thermographic values of the ankle region (in both affected and non-affected foot) was conducted for this purpose. The principal results to be highlighted are that some of the regions, namely anterior view for non defined time after injury analysis, and anterior, frontal, posterior and anterior talofibular ligament regions and proximal calcaneofibular ligament regions in acute lesions (herein defined as less than 6 h post-traumatic event) presented consistent profiles of variation. The analyses were performed considering affected and non-affected ankles results on plotted graphics representing termographic evaluation and grading of these lesions performed using ultrasound by experimented medical radiologists. An increase in temperature values was observed when progressing from mild to severe ankle sprain injuries, with these regions presenting lower values for the affected ankle when compared to the non-affected ankle in all the analysis performed. The remaining analysed regions did not present the same variations. Statistical analysis using Kruskal

  12. External rotational injury of tha ankle joint with displacement of the talus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S. P.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanism of second-degree external rotational injury of the ankle, with fracture of the lower end of the fibula, is discussed with reference to experiments on an anatomical model. It is concluded that with this type of injury there is lateral displacement of the talus because the deltoid ligament is ruptured, but there is no diastasis of the inferior tibiofibular syndesmosis. The results of conservative treatment of 10 patients with second-degree external rotational injury of tha ankle are reviewed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:835983

  13. Ligamentous Injuries and the Risk of Associated Tissue Damage in Acute Ankle Sprains in Athletes: A Cross-sectional MRI Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roemer, Frank W.; Jomaah, Nabil; Niu, Jingbo; Almusa, Emad; Roger, Bernard; D'Hooghe, Pieter; Geertsema, Celeste; Tol, Johannes L.; Khan, Karim; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Ankle joint injuries are extremely common sports injuries, with the anterior talofibular ligament involved in the majority of ankle sprains. There have been only a few large magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on associated structural injuries after ankle sprains. To describe the injury pattern

  14. Isolated syndesmotic injuries in acute ankle sprains: diagnostic significance of clinical examination and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großterlinden, Lars Gerhard; Hartel, Maximilian; Yamamura, Jin; Schoennagel, Bjoern; Bürger, Nils; Krause, Mathias; Spiro, Alexander; Hoffmann, Michael; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Rueger, Johannes Maria; Rupprecht, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Acute ankle sprains are frequently accompanied by syndesmotic injuries. These injuries are often overlooked in clinical examinations. The aim of this study was (1) to evaluate the incidence of syndesmotic injuries in acute ankle sprains using MRI, (2) to determine the accuracy of common clinical diagnostic tests, (3) to analyse their inter-rater reliability, and (4) to evaluate the role of clinical symptoms in the diagnosis of syndesmotic injuries. A total of 100 patients with acute ankle sprain injury without associated fractures in plane radiographs were enrolled. The clinical assessment was performed by two independent examiners. Local findings, ankle ligament palpation, squeeze test, external rotation test, Drawer test, Cotton test, and the crossed-leg test (two examiners) were compared with MRI results (read by two blinded radiologists) as a reference standard. Ninety-six participants (57% male) met the inclusion criteria. MRI detected a ruptured anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) in 14 patients (15%); 9 partial tears and 5 complete tears were evident. Evidence of pain at rest was found to predict syndesmotic injuries most accurately (p = 0.039). The palpation test over the proximal fibula produced the highest inter-rater correlation (κ = 0.65), but the lowest sensitivity for syndesmotic injuries of 8%. All other clinical tests demonstrated moderate to fair inter-rater reliabilities (κ = 0.37-0.52). Low sensitivity values were found with all clinical tests (13.9-55.6%). In this study, clinical examination was insufficient to detect syndesmotic injuries in acute ankle sprains. MRI scanning revealed a syndesmotic lesion in 15% of patients. MRI scanning should be recommended in patients with ongoing pain at rest following ankle sprains. I.

  15. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially in the cold-weather months when most ankle injuries occur. An ankle fracture involves a crack or ... Weak ankles may be a result of previous ankle injuries, but in some cases, they are a congenital ( ...

  16. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE Treatment after Injuries of the Ankle Ligaments): what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain?: a Randomised Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, Suzanne; Gresnigt, Femke; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Olsman, Jan G.; van Dijk, Niek C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to

  17. High ankle injury rate in adolescent basketball: A 3-year prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanen, K; Ekola, T; Vasankari, T; Kannus, P; Heinonen, A; Kujala, U M; Parkkari, J

    2017-06-01

    This prospective study investigated the incidence and pattern of acute time-loss injuries in young female and male basketball players. Eight basketball teams (n=201; mean age 14.85±1.5) participated in the follow-up study (2011-2014). The coaches recorded player participation in practices and games on a team diary. A study physician contacted the teams once a week to check new injuries and interviewed the injured players. In total, 158 injuries occurred. The overall rate of injury (per 1000 hours) was 2.64 (95% CI 2.23-3.05). Injury rate was 34.47 (95% CI 26.59-42.34) in basketball games and 1.51 (95% CI 1.19-1.82) in team practices. Incidence rate ratio (IRR) between game and practice was 22.87 (95% CI 16.71-31.29). Seventy-eight percent of the injuries affected the lower limbs. The ankle (48%) and knee (15%) were the most commonly injured body sites. The majority of injuries involved joint or ligaments (67%). Twenty-three percent of the injuries were severe causing more than 28 days absence from sports. Number of recurrent injuries was high (28% of all injuries), and most of them were ankle sprains (35 of 44, 79%). No significant differences were found in injury rates between females and males during games (IRR 0.88, 0.55, to 1.40) and practices (IRR 1.06, 0.69, to 1.62). In conclusion, ankle and knee ligament injuries were the most common injuries in this study. Moreover, the rate of recurrent ankle sprains was alarming. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A narrow bimalleolar width is a risk factor for ankle inversion injury in male military recruits: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Hannah; Nunns, Michael; House, Carol; Fallowfield, Joanne; Allsopp, Adrian; Dixon, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Ankle inversion injuries are one of the most common and burdensome injuries in athletic populations. Research that prospectively identifies characteristics associated with this injury is lacking. This prospective study compared baseline anthropometric and biomechanical gait characteristics of military recruits who sustained an ankle inversion injury during training, with those who remained injury-free. Bilateral plantar pressure and three-dimensional lower limb kinematics were recorded in 1065 male, injury-free military recruits, during barefoot running. Injuries that occurred during the 32-week recruit training programme were subsequently recorded. Data were compared between recruits who sustained an ankle inversion injury during training (n=27) and a sample (n=120) of those who completed training injury-free. A logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for this injury. A narrower bimalleolar width and an earlier peak pressure under the fifth metatarsal were predictors of ankle inversion injury. Those who sustained an ankle inversion injury also had a lower body mass, body mass index, and a smaller calf girth than those who completed training injury-free. Anthropometric and dynamic gait characteristics have been identified that may predispose recruits to an ankle inversion injury during Royal Marine recruit training, allowing identification of recruits at higher risk at the start of training. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. History-dependent changes in the recovery process of the middle latency cutaneous reflex gain after ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futatsubashi, Genki; Sasada, Syusaku; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shinya; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported that suppressive middle latency cutaneous reflexes (MLRs) in the peroneus longus (PL) are exaggerated in subjects with chronic ankle instability, and the changes are related to functional instability. However, the time-varying history of these neurophysiological changes after an ankle sprain is yet to be elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the time course of the changes in the PL MLR after an ankle sprain in relation to the number of sprain recurrences. Twenty-three subjects with ankle sprain were classified into 3 groups according to their history of ankle sprain: first ankle sprain, 2-3 ankle sprains, and ≥4 ankle sprains. Twenty-three age-matched control subjects also participated. The PL MLRs were elicited by stimulating the sural nerve while the subjects performed different levels of isometric ankle eversion. Gain of MLR was estimated using linear regression analysis (slope value) of the amplitude modulation of MLRs obtained from graded isometric contractions. The gain of MLRs first increased 4 weeks after the injury. In subjects with their first ankle sprain, the MLRs returned to almost baseline levels after 3 months. In contrast, the increase in MLR gain persisted even after 3 months in subjects with recurrent ankle sprains. In addition, the MLR gains were closely related to functional recovery of the ankle joint. Our findings suggest that the recovery process of MLR gains were strongly affected by the history of ankle sprains as well as the functional recovery of the ankle joint.

  20. Health care consumption and costs due to foot and ankle injuries in the Netherlands, 1986-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. de Boer (Annette); T. Schepers (Tim); M.J.M. Panneman (Martien); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Foot and ankle injuries account for a large proportion of Emergency Department attendance. The aim of this study was to assess population-based trends in attendances due to foot and ankle injuries in the Netherlands since 1986, and to provide a detailed analysis of health

  1. Health care consumption and costs due to foot and ankle injuries in the Netherlands, 1986-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, A. Siebe; Schepers, Tim; Panneman, Martien J. M.; van Beeck, Ed F.; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Foot and ankle injuries account for a large proportion of Emergency Department attendance. The aim of this study was to assess population-based trends in attendances due to foot and ankle injuries in the Netherlands since 1986, and to provide a detailed analysis of health care costs in

  2. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Patients received oral vitamin B 12 and methylcobalamin. We examined final follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, five with superficial peroneal nerve injury, and five with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no significant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory function in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months

  3. Estimation of ligament strains and joint moments in the ankle during a supination sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feng; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Kai-Ming; Haut, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the ankle ligament strains and ankle joint moments during an accidental injury event diagnosed as a grade I anterior talofibular ligament (ATaFL) sprain. A male athlete accidentally sprained his ankle while performing a cutting motion in a laboratory setting. The kinematic data were input to a three-dimensional rigid-body foot model for simulation analyses. Maximum strains in 20 ligaments were evaluated in simulations that investigated various combinations of the reported ankle joint motions. Temporal strains in the ATaFL and the calcaneofibular ligament (CaFL) were then compared and the three-dimensional ankle joint moments were evaluated from the model. The ATaFL and CaFL were highly strained when the inversion motion was simulated (10% for ATaFL and 12% for CaFL). These ligament strains were increased significantly when either or both plantarflexion and internal rotation motions were added in a temporal fashion (up to 20% for ATaFL and 16% for CaFL). Interestingly, at the time strain peaked in the ATaFL, the plantarflexion angle was not large but apparently important. This computational simulation study suggested that an inversion moment of approximately 23 N m plus an internal rotation moment of approximately 11 N m and a small plantarflexion moment may have generated a strain of 15-20% in the ATaFL to produce a grade I ligament injury in the athlete's ankle. This injury simulation study exhibited the potentially important roles of plantarflexion and internal rotation, when combined with a large inversion motion, to produce a grade I ATaFL injury in the ankle of this athlete.

  4. Sport-related ankle injuries attending an accident and emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Man, Chi-Yin; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Cheung, Shui-Yuk; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated the sport-related ankle injuries attending an accident and emergency (A&E) department during a 1-year period. A total of 1715 sports injuries cases attending an A&E department from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2005 were prospectively recorded. Details of each classified case were recorded in a computerised record system by the triage nurse. At the end of the study period, all sport-related ankle injury cases were analysed. A total of 240 sport-related ankle injury cases were reported. Most cases were sustained from basketball (32.9%), soccer (31.7%) and hiking (5.8%) sports. The majority of the cases was ligamentous sprains (81.3%) and fractures (10.4%). The mean age of all patients was 24.6 years (S.D. = 12.3). Four fifths (80.4%) were male patients. All cases were not life threatening. Most cases (99.2%) were referred to orthopedics specialty. Radiography was routinely employed in 99.2% of the cases. Ligamentous sprains were mostly sustained in basketball (37.4%) and soccer (28.7%), and were often treated with bandaging (60.0%) and analgesics (48.7%). Most cases were discharged with or without referral to physiotherapy and specialty clinic (95.4%). Fractures were mostly sustained in soccer (52.0%), basketball (20.0%) and hiking (16.0%), and were very often admitted to hospital wards (84.0%). The estimated A&E attendance rate for all sports injuries, ankle injuries, ligamentous sprains and fractures were 1.68, 0.24, 0.19 and 0.02/1000 person-year. The results of this study together with the previous study on ankle sprain epidemiology suggested the following sports ankle injury pattern in Hong Kong-major and serious ankle ligamentous sprains and fractures were sustained from basketball, soccer and hiking, leading to A&E attendance, while minor sprains were sustained in running and jogging and racquet sports. We suggested that the Sports medicine specialists in Hong Kong should emphasise the ankle injury prevention strategies in these sports.

  5. Prevention of the knee and ankle joint injury for basketball players from the perspective of physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    KRŠKOVÁ, Adéla

    2017-01-01

    The topic of this work is about the prevention of knee and ankle injuries to basketball players from the perspective of physiotherapy. I have set two goals for this work, namely the setting up of a therapy to prevent injuries to the knee and ankle joint and then the detection of the effectiveness of this therapy. In connection with the goals, I have determined the research question: Whether the effect of the therapy will improve the monitored areas? In the theoretical part of my work, I dealt...

  6. Effects of injection--drug injury on ankle mobility and chronic venous disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Birk, Thomas J; Kirsner, Robert S

    2007-01-01

    To identify potential confounders and test a causal model of injection-site risk, chronic venous disorders (CVD), and ankle mobility. The reliability and validity of goniometry measurements of ankle mobility were also of interest because they are seldom performed in people with a history of injection-drug use. The study was a test-retest design, consisting of 104 participants from a methadone maintenance treatment center. Each participant provided demographic information, health and drug histories, and underwent bilateral ankle goniometric measures of dorsiflexion, plantar flexion, inversion, and eversion. The clinical portion of the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology (CEAP)was used to classify CVD severity. Reliability of goniometry measurements ranged from .70 to .90. Causal modeling supported hypotheses of increased risk from leg injection and reciprocal effects involving ankle mobility and disease progression. Ankle inversion mobility was the strongest indicator of ankle mobility. Injury to the lower extremities from IDU affected CVD and mobility. Further research should include assessment of comorbidity and other potential confounders. Ankle inversion should remain part of the goniometry assessment.

  7. Radiograph-Negative Lateral Ankle Injuries in Children: Occult Growth Plate Fracture or Sprain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutis, Kathy; Plint, Amy; Stimec, Jennifer; Miller, Elka; Babyn, Paul; Schuh, Suzanne; Brison, Robert; Lawton, Louis; Narayanan, Unni G

    2016-01-01

    Lateral ankle injuries without radiographic evidence of a fracture are a common pediatric injury. These children are often presumed to have a Salter-Harris type I fracture of the distal fibula (SH1DF) and managed with immobilization and orthopedic follow-up. However, previous small studies suggest that these injuries may represent ankle sprains rather than growth plate fractures. To determine the frequency of SH1DF using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compare the functional recovery of children with fractures identified by MRI vs those with isolated ligament injuries. A prospective cohort study was conducted between September 2012 and August 2014 at 2 tertiary care pediatric emergency departments. We screened 271 skeletally immature children aged 5 to 12 years with a clinically suspected SH1DF; 170 were eligible and 140 consented to participate. Children underwent MRI of both ankles within 1 week of injury. Children were managed with a removable brace and allowed to return to activities as tolerated. The proportion with MRI-confirmed SH1DF. A secondary outcome included the Activity Scale for Kids score at 1 month. Of the 135 children who underwent ankle MRI, 4 (3.0%; 95% CI, 0.1%-5.9%) demonstrated MRI-confirmed SH1DF, and 2 of these were partial growth plate injuries. Also, 108 children (80.0%) had ligament injuries and 27 (22.0%) had isolated bone contusions. Of the 108 ligament injuries, 73 (67.6%) were intermediate to high-grade injuries, 38 of which were associated with radiographically occult fibular avulsion fractures. At 1 month, the mean (SD) Activity Scale for Kids score of children with MRI-detected fibular fractures (82.0% [17.2%]) was not significantly different from those without fractures (85.8% [12.5%]) (mean difference, -3.8%; 95% CI, -1.7% to 9.2%). Salter-Harris I fractures of the distal fibula are rare in children with radiograph fracture-negative lateral ankle injuries. These children most commonly have ligament injuries (sprains

  8. An irreducible ankle fracture dislocation: the Bosworth injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Tim; Hagenaars, Tjebbe; den Hartog, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Irreducible fracture dislocations of the ankle are rare and represent true orthopedic emergencies. We present a case of a fracture dislocation that was irreducible owing to a fixed dislocation of the proximal fibular fragment posterior to the lateral ridge of the tibia. This particular type of

  9. An Irreducible Ankle Fracture Dislocation: The Bosworth Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); T. Hagenaars (Tjebbe); D. den Hartog (Dennis)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIrreducible fracture dislocations of the ankle are rare and represent true orthopedic emergencies. We present a case of a fracture dislocation that was irreducible owing to a fixed dislocation of the proximal fibular fragment posterior to the lateral ridge of the tibia. This particular

  10. Comparing Functional Outcomes After Injury-Specific Fixation of Posterior Malleolar Fractures and Equivalent Ligamentous Injuries in Rotational Ankle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levack, Ashley E; Warner, Stephen J; Gausden, Elizabeth B; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of posterior bony versus ligamentous injury pattern on functional outcomes in operatively treated rotational ankle fractures. Retrospective cohort analysis of prospective registry. Academic Level I trauma center. Operatively treated supination external rotation IV and pronation external rotation IV ankle fractures. Lateral malleolus plate fixation with either posterior malleolus (PM) plate fixation or posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL) repair. Foot and ankle outcome scores at minimum 12 months postoperatively. One hundred seventy-eight fractures were treated with injury-specific anatomic fixation of a PM fracture (n = 122) or torn PITFL (n = 56). The PM group was significantly older, contained more women, and had lower mean body mass index versus the PITFL group. There was a higher rate of medial malleolar fracture in the PM group; other fracture and baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Univariate and multivariable analysis revealed no difference in foot and ankle outcome scores for any of the 5 summary domains (symptoms, pain, activities of daily living, sports, or quality of life) at the time of most recent follow-up. The median length of follow-up was 16.3 and 12.8 months in the PM and PITFL groups, respectively. In our cohort of ankle fractures, we have demonstrated comparable outcomes in stage IV rotational ankle fractures with and without PM fractures, indicating that the presence of a PM fracture may not result in inferior outcomes compared with ligamentous equivalent injuries if these fractures are addressed in an injury-specific manner. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Incidence of hockey ankle injuries in Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the incidence and mechanism of ankle injuries amongst male adolescent hockey players in the Kwa-Zulu Natal. A descriptive survey was conducted amongst 53 male hockey players aged 16-18 years old, who by informed voluntary consent participated in the study. Data were collected by the use of ...

  12. Robotic-assisted locomotor training enhances ankle performance in adults with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vennila; Kindig, Matthew; Mirbagheri, Mehdi

    2016-10-12

    Ankle joint control plays an important role in independent walking. This study investigated the effects of robotic-assisted locomotor training on impaired ankle joint control in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. Sixteen individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury underwent 12 one-h sessions of robotic-assisted locomotor training for 4 weeks, while 16 individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury served as inactive controls. Changes in ankle control measures, torque and co-activation were evaluated during maximal voluntary contractions in dorsi- and plantar-flexion. Changes in walking performance measures using Timed Up and Go (TUG), 10-m walk (10MWT) and 6-min walk (6MWT) tests were evaluated at 2 time points: baseline and after 4 weeks. Maximal voluntary contractions torque during both dorsi- and plantar-flexion contractions improved markedly in the robotic-assisted locomotor training group compared with baseline. Furthermore, after the training, co-activation during the dorsi-flexion maximal voluntary contractions decreased in the training group compared with controls. In addition, the training group significantly improved walking mobility (TUG) and speed (10MWT) compared with baseline. Finally, correlation analysis indicated a significant linear relationship between maximal voluntary contraction torques and walking performance measures. These findings provide evidence that robotic-assisted locomotor training improves ankle joint control, which may translate into enhanced walking performance in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury.

  13. A Study of H-Reflexes in Subjects with Acute Ankle Inversion Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-09

    most common injuries in high risk sports (basketball, soccer, football , volleyball).(21, 28, 83) Ankle injuries are by far the most commonly seen...Orthop Sports Phys Ther 23(5):326-331, 1996 169 35. Hall RC, Bellew J: Reliability of the figure-of-eight method in normal male collegiate football ...Kalasinski L: Neurogenic acceleration of osteoarthritis . J Bone Joint Surg 74A:367-376, 1992 78. O’Connor BL, Palmoski MJ, Brandt KD: Neurogenic

  14. Conservative treatment of injury to the fibular ligaments of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetti, R.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with fibular ligamentous injury of the ankle are presented. The treatment consisted of complete non-weight-bearing of the affected foot by use of elbow crutches for three weeks. All patients were seen at follow-up eighteen months after the accident. The results are discussed in the light of previous literature on conservative and operative treatment of lateral ligament injuries. Images p47-a PMID:6802213

  15. Graded stress radiography in acute injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijke, A.M.; Vierhout, P.A. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville (USA). Dept. of Radiology Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Surgery)

    1990-03-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of graded stress radiography in 26 patients with acute injury to the lateral ankle ligaments has been compared with findings at arthrography and surgery. Measuring talar tilt angles and anterior talar displacement over a range of pressures applied to the distal tibia using a commercially available stress device allows diagnostic distinction between isolated anterior talofibular ligament injury and a combined lesion that involves the calcaneofibular ligament. The results compare well with arthrographic and surgical findings. (orig.).

  16. Graded stress radiography in acute injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijke, A.M.; Vierhout, P.A.; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden

    1990-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of graded stress radiography in 26 patients with acute injury to the lateral ankle ligaments has been compared with findings at arthrography and surgery. Measuring talar tilt angles and anterior talar displacement over a range of pressures applied to the distal tibia using a commercially available stress device allows diagnostic distinction between isolated anterior talofibular ligament injury and a combined lesion that involves the calcaneofibular ligament. The results compare well with arthrographic and surgical findings. (orig.)

  17. THE FEATURES OF TIBIOFIBULAR INJURY IN PATENTS WITH ANKLE FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Fomin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of interposition of soft tissues into tibiofibular syndesmosis is analyzed as a cause of unsatisfactory outcomes in the ankle joint pronation fracture treatment. The study is based on clinical (452 patients and experimental material (36 experiments including unfixed anatomic objects. The elevator for minimal invasive operative elimination of interposition of stumps of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis anterior and posterior ligaments is developed and tested.

  18. Possible precisioning of radiodiagnosis of upper ankle joint injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drasnar, V.

    1980-01-01

    The necessity is stressed of making pictures of traumas of the upper ankle joint in three projections. For this purpose a device was constructed for standard adjusting positions of the leg for two anteroposterior and one lateral projections according to the inclination of outer edge of the leg. The reliability of even the first examinations and checks of repositions of dislocations was greatly enhanced. (author)

  19. Impact of clinical decision support on radiography for acute ankle injuries: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahein Tajmir

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While only 15-20% of patients with foot and ankle injuries presenting to urgent care centers have clinically significant fractures, most undergo radiography. We examined the impact of electronic point-of-care clinical decision support (CDS on adherence to the Ottawa Ankle Rules (OAR, as well as use and yield of foot and ankle radiographs in patients with acute ankle injury. Methods: We obtained institutional review board approval for this randomized controlled study performed April 18, 2012—December 15, 2013. All ordering providers credentialed at an urgent care affiliated with a quaternary care academic hospital were randomized to either receive or not receive CDS, based on the OAR and integrated into the physician order-entry system, with feedback at the time of imaging order. If the patient met OAR low-risk criteria, providers were advised against imaging and could either cancel the order or ignore the alert. We identified patients with foot and ankle complaints via ICD-9 billing codes and electronic health records and radiology reports reviewed for those who were eligible. Chi-square was used to compare adherence to the OAR (primary outcome, radiography utilization rate and radiography yield of foot and ankle imaging (secondary outcomes between the intervention and control groups. Results: Of 14,642 patients seen at urgent care during the study period, 613 (4.2%, representing 632 visits presented with acute ankle injury and were eligible for application of the OAR; 374 (59.2% of these were seen by control-group providers. In the intervention group, CDS adherence was higher for both ankle (239/258=92.6% vs. 231/374=61.8%, p=0.02 and foot radiography (209/258=81.0% vs. 238/374=63.6%; p<0.01. However, ankle radiography use was higher in the intervention group (166/258=64.3% vs. 183/374=48.9%; p<0.01, while foot radiography use (141/258=54.6% vs. 202/374=54.0%; p=0.95 was not. Radiography yield was also higher in the intervention

  20. Comparison of diagnostic decision rules and structured data collection in assessment of acute ankle injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, Afina S.; Pijnenburg, Bas A.C.M.; Lijmer, Jeroen G.; Bogaard, Kjell; de Roos, Marnix A.J.; Keeman, Johannes N.; Butzelaar, Rudolf M.J.M.; Bossuyt, Patrick M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Ankle decision rules help to determine which patients with ankle injuries should undergo radiography. However, these rules are limited by imperfect generalizability and sensitivity. The judgement of physicians, aided by structured data collection, is a potential alternative. We compared the diagnostic performance of 2 decision rules with the performance of physicians, aided by structured data collection, in ruling out fracture in patients with acute ankle injury. Methods Consecutive patients with acute ankle injury who visited the emergency department of a teaching community hospital in Amsterdam were included in the study. After taking the patient's history and performing a physical examination, the surgical resident in each case completed a specially developed structured data form incorporating all of the variables in the Ottawa and Leiden ankle rules, as well as some additional variables. The form then asked whether the resident thought radiography was necessary. Each patient then underwent ankle and midfoot radiography. The films were independently interpreted by a radiologist and a trauma surgeon, who were both blinded to the information on the data form. Sensitivity, specificity and the percentage of patients for whom radiography was recommended were the main outcome measures. Results Of 690 consecutive patients, 647 met the inclusion criteria. Fractures were observed in 74 (11%) of these patients. Sensitivity was 89% (95% confidence interval [CI] 80% to 95%) for the Ottawa ankle rules, 80% (95% CI 69% to 88%) for the Leiden ankle rule and 82% (95% CI 72% to 90%) for physicians' judgement. Specificity was 26% (95% CI 23% to 30%), 59% (95% CI 55% to 63%) and 68% (95% CI 64% to 71%) respectively. Radiography was recommended in 76% (95% CI 72% to 79%), 46% (95% CI 42% to 50%) and 38% (95% CI 34% to 42%) of cases respectively. The Ottawa rules missed 8 fractures, of which 1 was clinically significant, the Leiden rule missed 15 fractures, of

  1. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris J.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Methods: Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study pro...

  2. Correlation between radiological assessment of acute ankle fractures and syndesmotic injury on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermans, J.J.; Wentink, N.; Beumer, A.; Moonen, A.F.C.M.; Hop, W.C.J.; Heijboer, M.P.; Ginai, A.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the shortcomings of clinical examination and radiographs, injury to the syndesmotic ligaments is often misdiagnosed. When there is no indication requiring that the fractured ankle be operated on, the syndesmosis is not tested intra-operatively, and rupture of this ligamentous complex may be missed. Subsequently the patient is not treated properly leading to chronic complaints such as instability, pain, and swelling. We evaluated three fracture classification methods and radiographic measurements with respect to syndesmotic injury. Prospectively the radiographs of 51 consecutive ankle fractures were classified according to Weber, AO-Mueller, and Lauge-Hansen. Both the fracture type and additional measurements of the tibiofibular clear space (TFCS), tibiofibular overlap (TFO), medial clear space (MCS), and superior clear space (SCS) were used to assess syndesmotic injury. MRI, as standard of reference, was performed to evaluate the integrity of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. The sensitivity and specificity for detection of syndesmotic injury with radiography were compared to MRI. The Weber and AO-Mueller fracture classification system, in combination with additional measurements, detected syndesmotic injury with a sensitivity of 47% and a specificity of 100%, and Lauge-Hansen with both a sensitivity and a specificity of 92%. TFCS and TFO did not correlate with syndesmotic injury, and a widened MCS did not correlate with deltoid ligament injury. Syndesmotic injury as predicted by the Lauge-Hansen fracture classification correlated well with MRI findings. With MRI the extent of syndesmotic injury and therefore fracture stage can be assessed more accurately compared to radiographs. (orig.)

  3. Correlation between radiological assessment of acute ankle fractures and syndesmotic injury on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, J.J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wentink, N. [Atrium Medisch Centrum, Department of Surgery, PO Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Beumer, A.; Moonen, A.F.C.M. [Amphia Ziekenhuis Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, PO Box 90158, Breda (Netherlands); Hop, W.C.J. [Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Biostatistics, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijboer, M.P. [Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Orthopaedics, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ginai, A.Z. [Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Owing to the shortcomings of clinical examination and radiographs, injury to the syndesmotic ligaments is often misdiagnosed. When there is no indication requiring that the fractured ankle be operated on, the syndesmosis is not tested intra-operatively, and rupture of this ligamentous complex may be missed. Subsequently the patient is not treated properly leading to chronic complaints such as instability, pain, and swelling. We evaluated three fracture classification methods and radiographic measurements with respect to syndesmotic injury. Prospectively the radiographs of 51 consecutive ankle fractures were classified according to Weber, AO-Mueller, and Lauge-Hansen. Both the fracture type and additional measurements of the tibiofibular clear space (TFCS), tibiofibular overlap (TFO), medial clear space (MCS), and superior clear space (SCS) were used to assess syndesmotic injury. MRI, as standard of reference, was performed to evaluate the integrity of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. The sensitivity and specificity for detection of syndesmotic injury with radiography were compared to MRI. The Weber and AO-Mueller fracture classification system, in combination with additional measurements, detected syndesmotic injury with a sensitivity of 47% and a specificity of 100%, and Lauge-Hansen with both a sensitivity and a specificity of 92%. TFCS and TFO did not correlate with syndesmotic injury, and a widened MCS did not correlate with deltoid ligament injury. Syndesmotic injury as predicted by the Lauge-Hansen fracture classification correlated well with MRI findings. With MRI the extent of syndesmotic injury and therefore fracture stage can be assessed more accurately compared to radiographs. (orig.)

  4. The impact of the Major Trauma Network: will trauma units continue to treat complex foot and ankle injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay-David, A G C; Clint, S A; Brown, R R

    2014-12-01

    April 1st 2012 saw the introduction of National Trauma Networks in England. The aim to optimise the management of major trauma. Patients with an ISS≥16 would be transferred to the regional Major Trauma Centre (level 1). Our premise was that trauma units (level 2) would no longer manage complex foot and ankle injuries thereby obviating the need for a foot and ankle specialist service. Retrospective analysis of the epidemiology of foot and ankle injuries, using the Gloucestershire trauma database, from a trauma unit with a population of 750,000. Rates of open fractures, complex foot and ankle injuries and requirement for stabilisation with external fixation were reviewed before and after the introduction of the regional Trauma Network. Secondly, using the Trauma Audit & Research Network (TARN) database, all foot and ankle injuries triaged to the regional Major Trauma Centre (MTC) were reviewed. Incidence of open foot and ankle injuries was 2.9 per 100,000 per year. There were 5.1% open injuries before the network and 3.2% after (p>0.05). Frequency of complex foot and ankle injuries was 4.2% before and 7.5% after the network commenced, showing no significant change. There was no statistically significant change in the numbers of patients with complex foot and ankle injuries treated by application of external fixators. Analysis of TARN data revealed that only 18% of patients with foot and ankle injuries taken to the MTC had an ISS≥16. The majority of these patients were identified as requiring plastic surgical intervention for open fractures (69%) or were polytrauma patients (43%). Only 4.5% of patients had isolated, closed foot and ankle injuries. We found that at the trauma unit there was no decrease in the numbers of complex foot and ankle injuries, open fractures, or the applications of external fixators, following the introduction of the Trauma Network. These patients will continue to attend trauma units as they usually have an ISScomplex foot and ankle

  5. False negative rate of syndesmotic injury in pronation-external rotation stage IV ankle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Soon Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate false negative rate in the diagnosis of diastasis on initial static anteroposterior radiograph and reliability of intraoperative external rotational stress test for detection of concealed disruption of syndesmosis in pronation external rotation (PER stage IV (Lauge-Hansen ankle fractures. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 34 PER stage IV ankle fractures between September 2001 and September 2008. Twenty (59% patients show syndesmotic injury on initial anteroposterior radiographs. We performed an intraoperative external rotation stress test in other 14 patients with suspicious PER stage IV ankle fractures, which showed no defined syndesmotic injury on anteroposterior radiographs inspite of a medial malleolar fracture, an oblique fibular fracture above the syndesmosis and fracture of the posterior tubercle of the tibia. Results: All 14 fractures showed different degrees of tibiofibular clear space (TFCS and tibiofibular overlapping (TFO on the external rotation stress test radiograph compared to the initial plain anteroposterior radiograph. It is important to understand the fracture pattern characterstic of PER stage IV ankle fractures even though it appears normal on anteroposterior radiographs, it is to be confirmed for the concealed syndesmotic injury through a routine intraoperative external rotational stress radiograph.

  6. Talonavicular ligament: prevalence of injury in ankle sprains, histological analysis and hypothesis of its biomechanical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dea, Miriam; L Loizou, Constantinos; Allen, Georgina M; Wilson, David J; Athanasou, Nick; Uchihara, Yoshinobu; Cooke, Paul; Cosker, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    To assess the prevalence of injury of the talonavicular ligament (TNL) in ankle sprains, its anatomy and the stability of the talonavicular joint (TNJ) before and after dividing the TNL in a cadaver. During a prospective study of 100 patients to assess the outcome of ankle injuries, we noted high incidence of TNL injuries; we will discuss here the TNL findings. Each patient had undergone ultrasound and cone beam CT examination of the ankle. Six TNLs were dissected off fresh-frozen cadaveric feet for histological analysis. In further six cadaveric feet, the stability of the TNJ was assessed by mechanical stress before and after division of the TNL; movement at the joint was assessed by measuring the distance between the talus and navicular bone [talonavicular distance (TD)] using ultrasound. The TD was measured on ten randomly selected ultrasound images by three independent observers and repeated twice by a single observer to determine the inter- and intraobserver reliability. 21% of the patients had an injury to the TNL. Histological examination demonstrated a dense connective tissue composed of bundles of collagen in parallel arrangement along the ligament length. The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the TD showed almost perfect agreement. Displacement at the TNJ after stress with the TNL intact measured 0.18 ± 0.08 cm and 0.29 ± 0.07 cm (p < 0.005) when divided. The TNL is surprisingly commonly injured in ankle sprains. Its anatomy and histology suggest a role in tensile force transmission during the windlass mechanism in gait. Advances in knowledge: Injury to the TNL is common and has not been described. Its anatomy suggests resistance to tensile forces and its injury allows excessive movement at the TNJ.

  7. Ankle sprain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2007-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one per 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle

  8. Ankle sprain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter Aa; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2010-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle

  9. Bone stress injury of the ankle in professional ballet dancers seen on MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Ilan; Zoga, Adam C; Raikin, Steven M; Peterson, Judith R; Besser, Marcus P; Morrison, William B; Schweitzer, Mark E

    2008-01-01

    Background Ballet Dancers have been shown to have a relatively high incidence of stress fractures of the foot and ankle. It was our objective to examine MR imaging patterns of bone marrow edema (BME) in the ankles of high performance professional ballet dancers, to evaluate clinical relevance. Methods MR Imaging was performed on 12 ankles of 11 active professional ballet dancers (6 female, 5 male; mean age 24 years, range 19 to 32). Individuals were imaged on a 0.2 T or 1.5 T MRI units. Images were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists and one orthopaedic surgeon in consensus for location and pattern of bone marrow edema. In order to control for recognized sources of bone marrow edema, images were also reviewed for presence of osseous, ligamentous, tendinous and cartilage injuries. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the strength of the correlation between bone marrow edema and ankle pain. Results Bone marrow edema was seen only in the talus, and was a common finding, observed in nine of the twelve ankles imaged (75%) and was associated with pain in all cases. On fluid-sensitive sequences, bone marrow edema was ill-defined and centered in the talar neck or body, although in three cases it extended to the talar dome. No apparent gender predilection was noted. No occult stress fracture could be diagnosed. A moderately strong correlation (phi = 0.77, p= 0.0054) was found between edema and pain in the study population. Conclusion Bone marrow edema seems to be a specific MRI finding in the talus of professional ballet dancers, likely related to biomechanical stress reactions, due to their frequently performed unique maneuvers. Clinically, this condition may indicate a sign of a bone stress injury of the ankle. PMID:18371230

  10. Bone stress injury of the ankle in professional ballet dancers seen on MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besser Marcus P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ballet Dancers have been shown to have a relatively high incidence of stress fractures of the foot and ankle. It was our objective to examine MR imaging patterns of bone marrow edema (BME in the ankles of high performance professional ballet dancers, to evaluate clinical relevance. Methods MR Imaging was performed on 12 ankles of 11 active professional ballet dancers (6 female, 5 male; mean age 24 years, range 19 to 32. Individuals were imaged on a 0.2 T or 1.5 T MRI units. Images were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists and one orthopaedic surgeon in consensus for location and pattern of bone marrow edema. In order to control for recognized sources of bone marrow edema, images were also reviewed for presence of osseous, ligamentous, tendinous and cartilage injuries. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the strength of the correlation between bone marrow edema and ankle pain. Results Bone marrow edema was seen only in the talus, and was a common finding, observed in nine of the twelve ankles imaged (75% and was associated with pain in all cases. On fluid-sensitive sequences, bone marrow edema was ill-defined and centered in the talar neck or body, although in three cases it extended to the talar dome. No apparent gender predilection was noted. No occult stress fracture could be diagnosed. A moderately strong correlation (phi = 0.77, p= 0.0054 was found between edema and pain in the study population. Conclusion Bone marrow edema seems to be a specific MRI finding in the talus of professional ballet dancers, likely related to biomechanical stress reactions, due to their frequently performed unique maneuvers. Clinically, this condition may indicate a sign of a bone stress injury of the ankle.

  11. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-10

    ankle stablizers in preventing ankle injuries . American Journal of Sports Medicine. 16: 228–233. 14...Schmidt MD, Sulsky SI, and Amoroso PJ (2005). Effectiveness of an external ankle brace in reducing parachute-related ankle injuries . Injury Prevention ...and Horodyski M (1994). The efficacy of a semirigid ankle stabilizer to reduce acute ankle injury in basketball . American Journal of Sports

  12. How to Care for a Sprained Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sprained Ankle How to Care for a Sprained Ankle Page Content Ankle sprains are very common injuries. ... Grade I, II or III. Treating your Sprained Ankle Treating your sprained ankle properly may prevent chronic ...

  13. Ankle plantarflexor spasticity is not differentially disabling for those who are weak following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gavin; Banky, Megan; McKenzie, Dean; Olver, John

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of distal lower-limb spasticity had a greater impact on mobility for those who had greater levels of muscle paresis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This was a cross-sectional cohort study of convenience. Seventy-five people attending physiotherapy for mobility limitations following TBI participated in this study. All participants had sustained a moderate-severe TBI and were grouped according to the presence or absence of ankle plantarflexor spasticity for comparison. The primary outcome measure for mobility was self-selected walking speed and the primary outcome measure for muscle strength was hand-held dynamometry. Secondary outcome measures for mobility and muscle strength were the High-level Mobility Assessment Tool (HiMAT) and ankle power generation (APG) at push-off. Spasticity was quantified with the Modified Tardieu scale. Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity (Group 2) had slower self-selected walking speeds. There was no statistically significant effect for Group and plantarflexor strength (p = 0.81). Although participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity walked significantly slower than those without, the presence of ankle plantarflexor spasticity did not lead to greater mobility limitations for those who were weak.

  14. Neuromuscular Risk Factors for Knee and Ankle Ligament Injuries in Male Youth Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Paul J; Oliver, Jon L; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Myer, Gregory D; Lloyd, Rhodri S

    2016-08-01

    Injuries reported in male youth soccer players most commonly occur in the lower extremities, and include a high proportion of ligament sprains at the ankle and knee with a lower proportion of overuse injuries. There is currently a paucity of available literature that examines age- and sex-specific injury risk factors for such injuries within youth soccer players. Epidemiological data have reported movements that lead to non-contact ligament injury include running, twisting and turning, over-reaching and landing. Altered neuromuscular control during these actions has been suggested as a key mechanism in females and adult populations; however, data available in male soccer players is sparse. The focus of this article is to review the available literature and elucidate prevalent risk factors pertaining to male youth soccer players which may contribute to their relative risk of injury.

  15. The incidence and prevalence of ankle sprain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Delahunt, Eamonn; Caulfield, Brian; Hertel, Jay; Ryan, John; Bleakley, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Ankle sprain is one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries, yet a contemporary review and meta-analysis of prospective epidemiological studies investigating ankle sprain does not exist. Our aim is to provide an up-to-date account of the incidence rate and prevalence period of ankle sprain injury unlimited by timeframe or context activity. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses of English articles using relevant computerised databases. Search terms included Medical Search Headings for the ankle joint, injury and epidemiology. The following inclusion criteria were used: the study must report epidemiology findings of injuries sustained in an observed sample; the study must report ankle sprain injury with either incidence rate or prevalence period among the surveyed sample, or provide sufficient data from which these figures could be calculated; the study design must be prospective. Independent extraction of articles was performed by two authors using pre-determined data fields. One-hundred and eighty-one prospective epidemiology studies from 144 separate papers were included. The average rating of all the included studies was 6.67/11, based on an adapted version of the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology) guidelines for rating observational studies. 116 studies were considered high quality and 65 were considered low quality. The main findings of the meta-analysis demonstrated a higher incidence of ankle sprain in females compared with males (13.6 vs 6.94 per 1,000 exposures), in children compared with adolescents (2.85 vs 1.94 per 1,000 exposures) and adolescents compared with adults (1.94 vs 0.72 per 1,000 exposures). The sport category with the highest incidence of ankle sprain was indoor/court sports, with a cumulative incidence rate of 7 per 1,000 exposures or 1.37 per 1,000 athlete exposures and 4.9 per 1,000 h. Low-quality studies tended to underestimate the incidence of ankle sprain when compared with

  16. Acupuncture Treatment for Acute Ankle Injury in the Emergency Department: A Preliminary Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantivesruangdet, Nopmanee

    2016-02-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient medical treatment that is increasingly attracting the interest of the public. It is a complementary therapy that is widely used for management of pain, especially chronic discomfort caused by migraine, low-back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee(¹⁻³). The evidence base for the effectiveness of acupuncture and its clinical applications is controversial, and although its efficacy and safety in the management of acute pain have been demonstrated, the quality of this modality is still questionable. The present study reports a case of acute ankle injury, which was treated with acupuncture. A 33-year-old man presented with acute twisted ankle injury. He had pain with swelling around the ankle, and he was experiencing difficulty in walking. His clinical diagnosis was acute ankle sprain with severe pain. Several drug treatments are used for pain control, but in this case, we used acupuncture. After treatment, his pain diminished significantly with a decrease in VAS pain level from 8 to 4 in 20 minutes. At follow-up after one month, we found no skin infection in this case.

  17. Effects of inferior tibiofibular syndesmosis injury and screw stabilization on motion of the ankle: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinghua; Zhao, Guanghui; Yu, Bin; Ma, Jianbin; Li, Zhong; Zhang, Kun

    2016-04-01

    Traditional studies of syndesmosis injury and screw stabilization have been conducted in cadaveric models, which cannot yield sufficient and exact biomechanical data about the interior of the ankle. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of inferior tibiofibular syndesmosis injury (ITSI) and screw stabilization on the motion of the ankle with finite element analysis. Three-dimensional models of the ankle complex were created with CT images of a volunteer's right ankle in three states: normal, post-ITSI, and stabilization with a screw 2.5 cm above (parallel to) the ankle. Simulated loads were applied under three conditions: neutral position with single foot standing, internal rotation, and external rotation of the ankle. Compared with the normal state, ITSI increased the relative displacement between the lower extremes of the tibia and fibula in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions and the angular motion of the tibia, fibula, and talus at internal and external rotations (ERs). However, when stabilized with syndesmotic screws, the range of motion (ROM) and all these parameters significantly decreased. ITSI can lead to internal and ER instability of the ankle joint. Screw stabilization is effective in controlling the instability, but may reduce markedly the ROM of the ankle joint. Through this study, it can be proposed that the screws should be removed once the healing is gained in order to restore normal function of the ankle joint as soon as possible.

  18. Conservative Management for Stable High Ankle Injuries in Professional Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Derrick M; Trem, Anthony; Sheehan, Joseph; Salata, Michael J; Voos, James E

    High ankle "syndesmosis" injuries are common in American football players relative to the general population. At the professional level, syndesmotic sprains represent a challenging and unique injury lacking a standardized rehabilitation protocol during conservative management. PubMed, Biosis Preview, SPORTDiscus, PEDro, and EMBASE databases were searched using the terms syndesmotic injuries, American football, conservative management, and rehabilitation. Clinical review. Level 3. When compared with lateral ankle sprains, syndesmosis injuries result in significantly prolonged recovery times and games lost. For stable syndesmotic injuries, conservative management features a brief period of immobilization and protected weightbearing followed by progressive strengthening exercises and running, and athletes can expect to return to competition in 2 to 6 weeks. Further research investigating the efficacy of dry needling and blood flow restriction therapy is necessary to evaluate the benefit of these techniques in the rehabilitation process. Successful conservative management of stable syndesmotic injuries in professional American football athletes requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy, injury mechanisms, diagnosis, and rehabilitation strategies utilized in elite athletes.

  19. [On the forensic medical estimation of the harm to health in the case of the ankle joint injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabova, Z S; Fetisov, V A

    2012-01-01

    This paper is focused on the forensic medical evaluation of the severity of the harm to health of the subjects suffering an ankle joint (AJ) injury. The retrospective data pertinent to the forensic medical evaluation of ankle joint injuries are presented in conjunction with the methods for their clinical diagnostics currently applied in traumatology and orthopedics and by the specialists in socio-medical expertise for the assessment of the efficacy of the surgical treatment, prognosis, and rehabilitation of the affected patients.

  20. MRI of injuries of the lateral ankle ligaments; MRT bei Verletzungen der lateralen und angrenzenden Baender des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, Martin [Landesklinikum Waldviertel Horn, Horn (Austria). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-09-15

    The most frequent sport injury of the ankle is located in the lateral ankle ligaments. The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and stress radiography, allowing a fair diagnosis for the daily routine. For the direct visualization and precise diagnosis of the lateral ankle ligaments MRI provides the best answer. MRI is used with controlled positioning of the foot, correct angulation of sequenzes, and distinct analysis of MR findings. Sinus tarsi ligaments and ligaments of the distal syndesmosis should be included to the report. In selected patients MRI allows the best evaluation of the extent of the lateral ankle ligaments. MRI is the method of choice for combined osteochondral injuries and soft tissue lesions too. (orig.)

  1. Accuracy of MRI findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury: Comparison with surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.-J. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, S.-D. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.S. [Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Rho, M.-H., E-mail: parkhiji@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwag, H.-J. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, N.-H. [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury in comparison with that of surgical findings. Materials and methods: Forty-eight cases (25 men, 23 women, mean age 36 years) of clinically suspected chronic ankle ligament injury underwent MRI studies and surgery. Sagittal, coronal, and axial, T1-weighted, spin-echo, proton density and T2-weighted, fast spin-echo images with fat saturation were obtained in all patients. MRI examinations were read in consensus by two fellowship-trained academic musculoskeletal radiologists who evaluated the lateral ankle ligaments, including the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) without clinical information. The results of the MRI studies were then compared with the surgical findings. Results: The MRI findings of ATFL injury showed a sensitivity of detection of complete tears of 75% and specificity of 86%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tears was 75% and the specificity was 78%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 44% and the specificity was 88%. Regarding the MRI findings of CFL injury, the sensitivity of detection of complete tears was 50% and the specificity was 98%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tear was 83% and the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 100% and the specificity was 90%. Regarding the ATFL, the accuracies of detection were 88, 58, 77, and 85% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively, and for the CFL the accuracies of detection were 90, 90, 92, and 96% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively. Conclusions: The diagnosis of a complete tear of the ATFL on MRI is more sensitive than the diagnosis of a complete tear of the CFL. MRI findings of CFL injury are diagnostically specific but are not sensitive. However, only normal findings and complete tears were statistically significant between ATFL and CFL (p

  2. Accuracy of MRI findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury: Comparison with surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.-J.; Cha, S.-D.; Kim, S.S.; Rho, M.-H.; Kwag, H.-J.; Park, N.-H.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury in comparison with that of surgical findings. Materials and methods: Forty-eight cases (25 men, 23 women, mean age 36 years) of clinically suspected chronic ankle ligament injury underwent MRI studies and surgery. Sagittal, coronal, and axial, T1-weighted, spin-echo, proton density and T2-weighted, fast spin-echo images with fat saturation were obtained in all patients. MRI examinations were read in consensus by two fellowship-trained academic musculoskeletal radiologists who evaluated the lateral ankle ligaments, including the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) without clinical information. The results of the MRI studies were then compared with the surgical findings. Results: The MRI findings of ATFL injury showed a sensitivity of detection of complete tears of 75% and specificity of 86%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tears was 75% and the specificity was 78%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 44% and the specificity was 88%. Regarding the MRI findings of CFL injury, the sensitivity of detection of complete tears was 50% and the specificity was 98%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tear was 83% and the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 100% and the specificity was 90%. Regarding the ATFL, the accuracies of detection were 88, 58, 77, and 85% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively, and for the CFL the accuracies of detection were 90, 90, 92, and 96% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively. Conclusions: The diagnosis of a complete tear of the ATFL on MRI is more sensitive than the diagnosis of a complete tear of the CFL. MRI findings of CFL injury are diagnostically specific but are not sensitive. However, only normal findings and complete tears were statistically significant between ATFL and CFL (p

  3. Semiextending Nailing for Combined Shaft and Ankle Injuries of the Leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probe, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Over recent years, orthopaedic traumatologists have been gaining experience with tibial nailing in the extended position. Originally developed to address the complexities of alignment in proximal tibial fractures, this technique has also proven valuable in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures combined with ankle injuries. Depicted in this video presentation is the surgical techniques used to simultaneously address a spiral fracture of the distal tibia associated with a large coronal plane fracture of the tibial articular surface. Discussed are leg positioning, technical aspects of the medial approach, strategies for preliminary ankle stabilization, and fine details of aligning the tibial component of the injury. With a growing body of evidence suggesting similar knee outcomes with semiextended and conventional infrapatellar approaches, it is anticipated that this technique will become increasingly popular in coming years.

  4. Randomized comparison of tape versus semi-rigid and versus lace-up ankle support in the treatment of acute lateral ankle ligament injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; van Kimmenade, Robert; Sierevelt, I. N.; Eggink, Karin; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; van Dijk, C. N.; Raven, E. E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Functional treatment is the optimal non-surgical treatment for acute lateral ankle ligament injury (ALALI) in favour of immobilization treatment. There is no single most effective functional treatment (tape, semi-rigid brace or lace-up brace) based on currently available randomized trials. This

  5. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M. [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Runkel, M. [Department of Traumatologic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Berger, S. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs.

  6. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M.; Runkel, M.; Berger, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of the results of surgical treatment of ankle fractures with the tibiofibular syndesmosis injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Golovakha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ankle fractures are the most common injuries among the damages of ankle joint. The most common complication in such fractures is the damage of the tibiofibular joint, leading to increase in the duration of treatment and adverse outcomes. Despite the large number of publications, the problem of this type injury treatment is far from solving it. The questions remain open regarding the method of surgical treatment and results evaluation. Aim. To evaluate the results of surgical treatment of ankle fractures, complicated with tibiofibular syndesmosis injury with the help of hardware-bazometric complex and make a comparison with the existing methods of assessment, such as AOFAS and OMAS. Materials and methods. This study presents an analysis of 80 patients with mentioned fractures surgical treatment results. Patients were divided into 2 groups. The first group (44 patients was treated with the help of tension band wiring for fixing tibiofibular syndesmosis in combination with the original extramedullary plate with polyaxial insertion and blocking of screw for osteosynthesis of lateral malleolus fractures. The second group (36 patients was treated according to the AO technique. The analysis of results was performed in 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery use of scales AOFAS and OMAS, as well as bazometric and stabilometric assessment using “Bazometr” complex. Results. In 3 and 6 months AOFAS and OMAS results corresponded to data of bazometric and stabilometric indicators. The analysis showed the best results among the first group of patients, especially in the early stages. In 12 months the difference between indicators reduced, but remained significantly better in the 1st group. Conclusions. The reported data of clinical observations and their analysis demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method of ankle fractures with the tibiofibular syndesmosis injury surgical treatment.

  8. Cross-sectional associations between variations in ankle shape by statistical shape modeling, injury history, and race: the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Amanda E; Golightly, Yvonne M; Lateef, Shahmeer; Renner, Jordan B; Jordan, Joanne M; Aspden, Richard M; Hillstrom, Howard; Gregory, Jennifer S

    2017-01-01

    Injury is an important risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA), a highly prevalent and disabling joint disease. Joint shape is linked to OA, but the interplay of injury and joint shape and their combined role in OA, particularly at the ankle, is not well known. Therefore, we explored cross-sectional associations between ankle shape and injury in a large community-based cohort. Ankles without radiographic OA were selected from the current data collection of the Johnston County OA Project. Ankles with self-reported prior injury were included as injury cases ( n  = 108) along with 1:1 randomly selected non-injured ankles. To define ankle shape, a 68 point model on weight-bearing lateral ankle radiographs was entered into a statistical shape model, producing a mean shape and a set of continuous variables (modes) representing variation in that shape. Nineteen modes, explaining 80% of shape variance, were simultaneously included in a logistic regression model with injury status as the dependent variable, adjusted for intra-person correlation, sex, race, body mass index (BMI), baseline OA radiographic grade, and baseline symptoms. A total of 194 participants (213 ankles) were included; mean age 71 years, BMI 30 kg/m 2 , 67% white and 71% women. Injured ankles were more often symptomatic and from whites. In a model adjusted only for intra-person correlation, associations were seen between injury status and modes 1, 6, 13, and 19. In a fully adjusted model, race strongly affected the estimate for mode 1 (which was no longer statistically significant). This study showed variations in ankle shape and history of injury as well as with race. These novel findings may indicate a change in ankle morphology following injury, or that ankle morphology predisposes to injury, and suggest that ankle shape is a potentially important factor in the development of ankle OA.

  9. [Injuries of ligaments and tendons of foot and ankle : What every radiologist should know].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierfelder, K M; Gemescu, I N; Weber, M-A; Meier, R

    2018-04-13

    Injuries of the ligaments and tendons of the ankle and foot are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries. A correct and precise description of the pathology and possible accompanying injuries is essential for treatment planning by trauma and orthopedic surgeons. While X‑ray is used to exclude fractures, ultrasound is a very useful tool to assess the ligaments and tendons. For the radiologist, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is invaluable regarding the correct assessment of (partial) ruptures, as well as for evaluating accompanying injuries. The aim of the present overview is to provide the most relevant facts for radiologists regarding injuries of ligaments and tendons of the ankle and foot. A description of expected MRI findings and possible pitfalls are presented. For each ligament complex or tendon, we review the anatomy, followed by relevant facts on biomechanics and typical findings in case of injury. The lateral and medial ligament complex, syndesmosis, spring ligament complex, and the Lisfranc ligament are shown in detail. The Achilles tendon and the peroneal tendons are also discussed.

  10. Simultaneous Reconstruction of the Medial and Lateral Collateral Ligaments for Chronic Combined Ligament Injuries of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Toshito; Shima, Hiroaki; Mori, Katsunori; Tsujinaka, Seiya; Neo, Masashi

    2017-07-01

    Objective data on chronic injuries of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the ankle are scarce. Chronic MCL injuries are frequently associated with lateral collateral ligament (LCL) injuries. For patients with chronic combined MCL and LCL injuries, the authors have performed simultaneous surgery of the 2 ligaments. Simultaneous surgery of the 2 ligaments may be effectively used to treat chronic combined MCL and LCL injuries. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Surgical outcomes were evaluated in 29 consecutive patients presenting with chronic MCL and LCL injuries (30 ankles; 15 men and 14 women; mean age, 31 years; 13 competitive and 10 recreational athletes). Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were measured with the Karlsson score and the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot (JSSF) ankle-hindfoot scale score. The patients underwent preoperative and postoperative functional measurements and a radiological examination. In addition, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results, arthroscopic findings, and histology of the MCL were evaluated. Preoperatively, the deep fibers of the MCL did not appear striated in 29 ankles, and high-intensity signal changes were observed in 23 ankles on T2-weighted or gradient echo MRI. MCL ruptures were confirmed with arthroscopic surgery. Medial impingement lesions and focal chondral lesions were confirmed in 10 and 21 ankles, respectively. Histology of the reconstructed MCL showed dense collagen fibers with vessels. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 30 months (range, 24-52 months). There was a significant change between preoperative and postoperative Karlsson scores (69.0 vs 96.1 points, respectively; P ankle instability and medial impingement lesions. Outcomes in the patients indicated that MCL reconstruction or resection of medial impingement lesions, performed in addition to LCL reconstruction, is effective for treating chronic combined MCL and LCL injuries of the ankle.

  11. The proportion of distal fibula Salter-Harris type I epiphyseal fracture in the paediatric population with acute ankle injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofsli, Mikael; Torfing, Trine; Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2016-01-01

    Ankle injuries are common among the paediatric population. There are few prospective studies utilizing MRI to diagnose a clinically suspected Salter-Harris type I of the distal fibula (SH1FDF). The aim of this study was to examine the proportion of clinically suspected SH1FDF in children. All...... paediatric patients with ankle injury, seen at the emergency room from September 2012 to May 2013 at a single institution, underwent a standardized clinical examination, and their radiographs were obtained if found necessary. All images and data were recorded prospectively and patients suspected of having SH......1FDF were referred for MRI of the ankle joint. Out of 391 paediatric patients seen at the emergency room with ankle injury, 38 patients had a clinical suspicion of SH1FDF. A total of 31 patients, 18 male and 13 female, with a mean age of 10±2.86 years, were included in the study. Only seven patients...

  12. Differences in injury pattern and prevalence of cartilage lesions in knee and ankle joints: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Aurich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA. There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints.

  13. Pseudo-aneurysm of the anterior tibial artery, a rare cause of ankle swelling following a sports injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAteer Eamon

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries are common presenting complaints to the accident and emergency department. Frequently these are diagnosed as musculoskeletal injuries, even when no definitive cause is found. Vascular injuries following trauma are uncommon and are an extremely rare cause of ankle swelling and pain. These injuries may however be limb threatening and are important to diagnose early, in order that appropriate treatment can be delivered. We highlight the steps to diagnosis of these injuries, and methods of managing these injuries. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the potential for this injury in patients with seemingly innocuous trauma from sports injuries, who have significant ankle pain and swelling. Case presentation A young, professional sportsman presented with a swollen, painful ankle after an innocuous hyper-plantar flexion injury whilst playing football, which was initially diagnosed as a ligamentous injury after no bony injury was revealed on X-Ray. He returned 2 days later with a large ulcer at the lateral malleolus and further investigation by duplex ultrasound and transfemoral arteriogram revealed a Pseudo-Aneurysm of the Anterior Tibial Artery. This was initially managed with percutaneous injection of thrombin, and later open surgery to ligate the feeding vessel. The patient recovered fully and was able to return to recreational sport. Conclusion Vascular injuries remain a rare cause of ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries, however it is important to consider these injuries when no definite musculo-skeletal cause is found. Ultrasound duplex and Transfemoral arteriogram are appropriate, sensitive modalities for investigation, and may allow novel treatment to be directed percutaneously. Early diagnosis and intervention are essential for the successful outcome in these patients.

  14. Pseudo-aneurysm of the anterior tibial artery, a rare cause of ankle swelling following a sports injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marron, Conor D; McKay, Damian; Johnston, Ruth; McAteer, Eamon; Stirling, WJ Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Background Ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries are common presenting complaints to the accident and emergency department. Frequently these are diagnosed as musculoskeletal injuries, even when no definitive cause is found. Vascular injuries following trauma are uncommon and are an extremely rare cause of ankle swelling and pain. These injuries may however be limb threatening and are important to diagnose early, in order that appropriate treatment can be delivered. We highlight the steps to diagnosis of these injuries, and methods of managing these injuries. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the potential for this injury in patients with seemingly innocuous trauma from sports injuries, who have significant ankle pain and swelling. Case presentation A young, professional sportsman presented with a swollen, painful ankle after an innocuous hyper-plantar flexion injury whilst playing football, which was initially diagnosed as a ligamentous injury after no bony injury was revealed on X-Ray. He returned 2 days later with a large ulcer at the lateral malleolus and further investigation by duplex ultrasound and transfemoral arteriogram revealed a Pseudo-Aneurysm of the Anterior Tibial Artery. This was initially managed with percutaneous injection of thrombin, and later open surgery to ligate the feeding vessel. The patient recovered fully and was able to return to recreational sport. Conclusion Vascular injuries remain a rare cause of ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries, however it is important to consider these injuries when no definite musculo-skeletal cause is found. Ultrasound duplex and Transfemoral arteriogram are appropriate, sensitive modalities for investigation, and may allow novel treatment to be directed percutaneously. Early diagnosis and intervention are essential for the successful outcome in these patients. PMID:16225679

  15. Value of ultrasonography for detecting chronic injury of the lateral ligaments of the ankle joint compared with ultrasonography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y; Cai, Y; Wang, Y

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle ligament injury. A total of 120 ankles in 120 patients with a clinical suspicion of chronic ankle ligament injury were examined by ultrasonography by using a 5- to 17-MHz linear array transducer before surgery. The results of ultrasonography were compared with the operative findings. There were 18 sprains and 24 partial and 52 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL); 26 sprains, 27 partial and 12 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL); and 1 complete tear of the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) at arthroscopy and operation. Compared with operative findings, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography were 98.9%, 96.2% and 84.2%, respectively, for injury of the ATFL and 93.8%, 90.9% and 83.3%, respectively, for injury of the CFL. The PTFL tear was identified by ultrasonography. The accuracy of identification between acute-on-chronic and subacute-chronic patients did not differ. The accuracies of diagnosing three grades of ATFL injuries were almost the same as those of diagnosing CFL injuries. Ultrasonography provides useful information for the evaluation of patients presenting with chronic pain after ankle sprain. Intraoperative findings are the reference standard. We demonstrated that ultrasonography was highly sensitive and specific in detecting chronic lateral ligments injury of the ankle joint.

  16. The Use of Model Matching Video Analysis and Computational Simulation to Study the Ankle Sprain Injury Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tik-Pui Fong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lateral ankle sprains continue to be the most common injury sustained by athletes and create an annual healthcare burden of over $4 billion in the U.S. alone. Foot inversion is suspected in these cases, but the mechanism of injury remains unclear. While kinematics and kinetics data are crucial in understanding the injury mechanisms, ligament behaviour measures – such as ligament strains – are viewed as the potential causal factors of ankle sprains. This review article demonstrates a novel methodology that integrates model matching video analyses with computational simulations in order to investigate injury-producing events for a better understanding of such injury mechanisms. In particular, ankle joint kinematics from actual injury incidents were deduced by model matching video analyses and then input into a generic computational model based on rigid bone surfaces and deformable ligaments of the ankle so as to investigate the ligament strains that accompany these sprain injuries. These techniques may have the potential for guiding ankle sprain prevention strategies and targeted rehabilitation therapies.

  17. Foot-Ankle Fractures and Injury Probability Curves from Post-mortem Human Surrogate Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Chirvi, Sajal; Pintar, Frank A; Uppal, Harmeeth; Schlick, Michael; Banerjee, Anjishnu; Voo, Liming; Merkle, Andrew; Kleinberger, Michael

    2016-10-01

    This purpose of this study was to replicate foot-ankle injuries seen in the military and derive human injury probability curves using the human cadaver model. Lower legs were isolated below knee from seventeen unembalmed human cadavers and they were aligned in a 90-90 posture (plantar surface orthogonal to leg). The specimens were loaded along the tibia axis by applying short-time duration pulses, using a repeated testing protocol. Injuries were documented using pre- and post-test X-rays, computed tomography scans, and dissection. Peak force-based risk curves were derived using survival analysis and accounted for data censoring. Fractures were grouped into all foot-ankle (A), any calcaneus (B), and any tibia injuries (C), respectively. Calcaneus and/or distal tibia/pilon fractures occurred in fourteen tests. Axial forces were the greatest and least for groups C and B, respectively. Times attainments of forces for all groups were within ten milliseconds. The Weibull function was the optimal probability distribution for all groups. Age was significant (p < 0.05) for groups A and C. Survival analysis-based probability curves were derived for all groups. Data are given in the body of paper. Age-based, risk-specific, and continuous distribution probability curves/responses guide in the creation of an injury assessment capability for military blast environments.

  18. Unlocking the talus by eversion limits medial ankle injury risk during external rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Keith D; Wei, Feng; Haut, Roger C

    2015-10-15

    Eversion prior to excessive external foot rotation has been shown to predispose the anterior tibiofibular ligament (ATiFL) to failure, yet protect the anterior deltoid ligament (ADL) from failure despite high levels of foot rotation. The purpose of the current study was to measure the rotations of both the subtalar and talocrural joints during foot external rotation at sub-failure levels in either a neutral or a pre-everted position as a first step towards understanding the mechanisms of injury in previous studies. Fourteen (seven pairs) cadaver lower extremities were externally rotated 20° in either a pre-everted or neutral configuration, without producing injury. Motion capture was performed to track the tibia, talus, and calcaneus motions, and a joint coordinate system was used to analyze motions of the two joints. While talocrural joint rotation was greater in the neutral ankle (13.3±2.0° versus 10.5±2.7°, p=0.006), subtalar joint rotation was greater in the pre-everted ankle (2.4±1.9° versus 1.1±1.0°, p=0.014). Overall, the talocrural joint rotated more than the subtalar joint (11.9±2.8° versus 1.8±1.6°, p<0.001). It was proposed that the calcaneus and talus 'lock' in a neutral position, but 'unlock' when the ankle is everted prior to rotation. This locking/unlocking mechanism could be responsible for an increased subtalar rotation, but decreased talocrural rotation when the ankle is pre-everted, protecting the ADL from failure. This study may provide information valuable to the study of external rotation kinematics and injury risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Finite Element Model of the Foot/Ankle to Evaluate Injury Risk in Various Postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Chris; Quenneville, Cheryl E

    2017-08-01

    The foot/ankle complex is frequently injured in many types of debilitating events, such as car crashes. Numerical models used to assess injury risk are typically minimally validated and do not account for ankle posture variations that frequently occur during these events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a finite element model of the foot and ankle accounting for these positional changes. A model was constructed from computed tomography scans of a male cadaveric lower leg and was evaluated by comparing simulated bone positions and strain responses to experimental results at five postures in which fractures are commonly reported. The bone positions showed agreement typically within 6° or less in all anatomical directions, and strain matching was consistent with the range of errors observed in similar studies (typically within 50% of the average strains). Fracture thresholds and locations in each posture were also estimated to be similar to those reported in the literature (ranging from 6.3 kN in the neutral posture to 3.9 kN in combined eversion and external rotation). The least vulnerable posture was neutral, and all other postures had lower fracture thresholds, indicating that examination of the fracture threshold of the lower limb in the neutral posture alone may be an underestimation. This work presents an important step forward in the modeling of lower limb injury risk in altered ankle postures. Potential clinical applications of the model include the development of postural guidelines to minimize injury, as well as the evaluation of new protective systems.

  20. Ankle passive and active movement training in children with acute brain injury using a wearable robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Xiong, Bo; Ren, Yupeng; Dvorkin, Assaf Y; Gaebler-Spira, Deboah; Sisung, Charles E; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2018-01-10

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a wearable robotic device in guiding isometric torque generation and passive-active movement training for ankle motor recovery in children with acute brain injury. Ten inpatient children with acute brain injury being treated in a rehabilitation hospital. Daily robot-guided ankle passive-active movement therapy for 15 sessions, including isometric torque generation under real-time feedback, stretch-ing, and active movement training with motivating games using a wearable ankle rehabilitation robot. Ankle biomechanical improvements induced by each training session including ankle range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, and clinical (Fugl-Meyer Lower-Extremity (FMLE), Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS)) and biomechanical (ankle ROM and muscle strength) outcomes over 15 training sessions. As training progressed, improvements in biomechanical performance measures followed logarithmic curves. Each training session increased median dorsiflexion active range of motion (AROM) 2.73° (standard deviation (SD) 1.14), dorsiflexion strength 0.87 Nm (SD 0.90), and plantarflexion strength 0.60 Nm (SD 1.19). After 15 training sessions the median FMLE score had increased from 14.0 (SD 10.11) to 23.0 (SD 11.4), PBS had increased from 33.0 (SD 19.99) to 50.0 (SD 23.13) (p < 0.05), median dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength had improved from 0.21 Nm (SD 4.45) to 4.0 Nm (SD 7.63) and 8.33 Nm (SD 10.18) to 18.45 Nm (SD 14.41), respectively, median dorsiflexion AROM had improved from -10.45° (SD 12.01) to 11.87° (SD 20.69), and median dorsiflexion PROM increased from 20.0° (SD 9.04) to 25.0° (SD 8.03). Isometric torque generation with real-time feedback, stretching and active movement training helped promote neuroplasticity and improve motor performance in children with acute brain injury.

  1. Ankle passive and active movement training in children with acute brain injury using a wearable robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a wearable robotic device in guiding isometric torque generation and passive-active movement training for ankle motor recovery in children with acute brain injury. Participants/setting: Ten inpatient children with acute brain injury being treated in a rehabilitation hospital. Design: Daily robot-guided ankle passive-active movement therapy for 15 sessions, including isometric torque generation under real-time feedback, stretch-ing, and active movement training with motivating games using a wearable ankle rehabilitation robot. Main measures: Ankle biomechanical improvements induced by each training session including ankle range of motion (ROM, muscle strength, and clinical (Fugl-Meyer Lower-Extremity (FMLE, Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS and biomechanical (ankle ROM and muscle strength outcomes over 15 training sessions. Results: As training progressed, improvements in biomechanical performance measures followed logarithmic curves. Each training session increased median dorsiflexion active range of motion (AROM 2.73° (standard deviation (SD 1.14, dorsiflexion strength 0.87 Nm (SD 0.90, and plantarflexion strength 0.60 Nm (SD 1.19. After 15 training sessions the median FMLE score had increased from 14.0 (SD 10.11 to 23.0 (SD 11.4, PBS had increased from 33.0 (SD 19.99 to 50.0 (SD 23.13 (p < 0.05, median dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength had improved from 0.21 Nm (SD 4.45 to 4.0 Nm (SD 7.63 and 8.33 Nm (SD 10.18 to 18.45 Nm (SD 14.41, respectively, median dorsiflexion AROM had improved from –10.45° (SD 12.01 to 11.87° (SD 20.69, and median dorsiflexion PROM increased from 20.0° (SD 9.04 to 25.0° (SD 8.03. Conclusion: Isometric torque generation with real-time feedback, stretching and active movement training helped promote neuroplasticity and improve motor performance in children with acute brain injury.

  2. Treatment of Medial Malleolus or Pure Deltoid Ligament Injury in Patients with Supination-External Rotation Type IV Ankle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Jian-Wen; Wang, Chen; Huang, Jia-Zhang; Ma, Xin; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Xue

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of internal fixation on postoperative ankle function in patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures, including medial malleolus fractures and deltoid ligament injury. Between January 2012 and June 2014, patients with medial structure injuries were enrolled in this study and assigned to the medial malleolus fracture group or the deltoid ligament group. The surgical procedures for the two groups were documented. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate or screw was removed from the lateral ankle. The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was used to assess ankle function. A total of 84 patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures had complete medical records and were included in this study. The average age of the patients was 44.16 years (range, 15-75). The patient sample included 39 males and 45 females. Overall, 49 patients (19 males and 30 females) suffered a medial malleolus fracture. The average age of these patients was 40.20 years (range, 15-75). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 81.6% (40 patients) of these patients. Overall, 35 patients (20 males and 15 females) experienced a deltoid ligament injury. The average age of these patients was 44.21 years (range, 17-73). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 11.5% (four patients) of these patients. Open reduction was performed in patients with medial malleolus fractures, and two 4.0-mm cannulated screws were used to fixate the posterior malleolus and the medial malleolus. The suture-anchor technique was used to repair the ligaments in patients with deltoid ligament injuries. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate and screws were removed from the lateral ankle in patients. The average follow-up period was 13.4 months (range, 11-17). The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was

  3. Dynamic Evaluation of the Contact Characteristics and Three-Dimensional Motion for the Ankle Joint with Lateral Ligament Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kensaku; Omori, Go; Terashima, Shojiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Hara, Toshiaki

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the dynamic changes in contact pressure distribution and three-dimensional ankle joint motion before and after lateral ligament injuries. Five fresh and frozen intact cadaveric ankles were examined. Each ankle was mounted on a specially designed frame that preserved five degrees of freedom motion. The direct linear transformation technique was used to measure the three-dimensional ankle motion, and a pressure-sensitive conductive rubber sensor was inserted into the talocrural joint space to determine the contact pressure distribution. The contact area on the talus for intact ankle moved anteriorly and laterally with increasing dorsiflexion. An area of high pressure was observed in the medial aspect of the articular surface after the ligament was cut. Supination significantly increased after a combined anterior talofibular ligament (ATF) and calcaneofibular ligament (CF) were cut in comparison with after only an ATF was cut, and no significant differences were observed in motional properties under each experimental condition.

  4. Sprained Ankles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... away before the ligament is injured. Types of Sprains In young children, the ankle is the most commonly sprained joint, followed by ... A walking cast may be necessary if the ankle or foot injury has been severe. Most grade 1 sprains will heal within two weeks without subsequent complications. ...

  5. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study protocol. An additional group of non-injured individuals were also recruited to act as a control group. All participants completed the anterior, posterior-lateral and posterior-medial reach directions of the star excursion balance test. Sagittal plane kinematics of the lower extremity and associated fractal dimension of the centre of pressure path were also acquired. Participants with chronic ankle instability displayed poorer performance in the anterior, posterior-medial and posterior-lateral reach directions compared with controls bilaterally, and in the posterior-lateral direction compared with lateral ankle sprain copers on their 'involved' limb only. These performance deficits in the posterior-lateral and posterior-medial directions were associated with reduced flexion and dorsiflexion displacements at the hip, knee and ankle at the point of maximum reach, and coincided with reduced complexity of the centre of pressure path. In comparison with lateral ankle sprain copers and controls, participants with chronic ankle instability were characterised by dynamic balance deficits as measured using the SEBT. This was attested to reduced sagittal plane motions at the hip, knee and ankle joints, and reduced capacity of the stance limb to avail of its supporting base. III.

  6. Delayed presentation or delayed diagnosis? A retrospective study of prospectively collected data of 482 foot and ankle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajiv; Shah, Shivam

    2017-08-01

    Delayed presentation of injury cases is common in developing countries like India. It is prudent to study reasons for delayed presentations to focus preventive measures towards responsible factors. Since foot and ankle orthopaedics is in its infancy in India, it was deemed to be worthwhile to study reasons for delayed presentations of foot and ankle injuries. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 482 foot and ankle injuries treated at our three foot and ankle centres over past three years was undertaken. Delayed presentation was defined as cases presenting to us at or after 3 weeks of injury, but with complete records. Reasons for delayed presentations were analysed. There were ninety eight such cases who fulfilled the delayed presentation criteria and within this group there were twenty different varieties of foot and ankle injuries. Of these twenty six cases were never treated by qualified orthopaedic surgeons and were labelled as direct delayed presentations, and the remaining 72 cases who were treated by qualified orthopaedic surgeons, but could not be diagnosed and presented late, were labelled as indirect delayed presentations. Failure to suspect injury (5 cases) or failure to diagnose injury (67 cases) were reasons for indirect delayed presentations. Failure to diagnose injury on part of clinicians was either due to failure of clinical and radiological analysis (analytical failure - 15 cases) or due to failure to investigate case with further radiological investigations (investigative failure - 10 cases). Forty-two cases had combined failures. In developing countries like India, patients did neglect their foot and ankle injuries and presented late. In fact, by way of delayed diagnosis, clinicians were more responsible for indirect delayed presentations of foot and ankle injuries. This is contrary to the common belief that in developing countries like India, only patients would be solely responsible for delayed presentations after injury

  7. Ligamentous Injuries and the Risk of Associated Tissue Damage in Acute Ankle Sprains in Athletes: A Cross-sectional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Frank W; Jomaah, Nabil; Niu, Jingbo; Almusa, Emad; Roger, Bernard; D'Hooghe, Pieter; Geertsema, Celeste; Tol, Johannes L; Khan, Karim; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Ankle joint injuries are extremely common sports injuries, with the anterior talofibular ligament involved in the majority of ankle sprains. There have been only a few large magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on associated structural injuries after ankle sprains. To describe the injury pattern in athletes who were referred to MRI for the assessment of an acute ankle sprain and to assess the risk of associated traumatic tissue damage including lateral and syndesmotic ligament involvement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 261 ankle MRI scans of athletes with acute ankle sprains were evaluated for: lateral and syndesmotic ligament injury; concomitant injuries to the deltoid and spring ligaments and sinus tarsi; peroneal, flexor, and extensor retinacula and tendons; traumatic and nontraumatic osteochondral and osseous changes; and joint effusion. Patients were on average 22.5 years old, and the average time from injury to MRI was 5.7 days. Six exclusive injury patterns were defined based on lateral and syndesmotic ligament involvement. The risk for associated injuries was assessed by logistic regression using ankles with no or only low-grade lateral ligament injuries and no syndesmotic ligament damage as the reference. With regard to the injury pattern, there were 103 ankles (39.5%) with complete anterior talofibular ligament disruption and no syndesmotic injury, and 53 ankles (20.3%) had a syndesmotic injury with or without lateral ligament damage. Acute osteochondral lesions of the lateral talar dome were seen in 20 ankles (7.7%). The percentage of chronic lateral osteochondral lesions was 1.1%. The risk for talar bone contusions increased more than 3-fold for ankles with complete lateral ligament ruptures (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.43; 95% CI, 1.72-6.85) but not for ankles with syndesmotic involvement. The risk for associated deltoid ligament injuries increased for ankles with complete lateral ligament injuries (aOR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1

  8. The anatomy in relation to injury of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: a current concepts review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Oostra, Roelof Jan; Alvarez, Pau Golano; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2008-01-01

    Injuries to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle are common problems in acute care practice. We believe that a well-developed knowledge of the anatomy provides a foundation for understanding the basic mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment, especially surgical treatment, of lateral

  9. Foot-ankle complex injury risk curves using calcaneus bone mineral density data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Chirvi, Sajal; Voo, Liming; DeVogel, Nicholas; Pintar, Frank A; Banerjee, Anjishnu

    2017-08-01

    Biomechanical data from post mortem human subject (PMHS) experiments are used to derive human injury probability curves and develop injury criteria. This process has been used in previous and current automotive crashworthiness studies, Federal safety standards, and dummy design and development. Human bone strength decreases as the individuals reach their elderly age. Injury risk curves using the primary predictor variable (e.g., force) should therefore account for such strength reduction when the test data are collected from PMHS specimens of different ages (age at the time of death). This demographic variable is meant to be a surrogate for fracture, often representing bone strength as other parameters have not been routinely gathered in previous experiments. However, bone mineral densities (BMD) can be gathered from tested specimens (presented in this manuscript). The objective of this study is to investigate different approaches of accounting for BMD in the development of human injury risk curves. Using simulated underbody blast (UBB) loading experiments conducted with the PMHS lower leg-foot-ankle complexes, a comparison is made between the two methods: treating BMD as a covariate and pre-scaling test data based on BMD. Twelve PMHS lower leg-foot-ankle specimens were subjected to UBB loads. Calcaneus BMD was obtained from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) images. Fracture forces were recorded using a load cell. They were treated as uncensored data in the survival analysis model which used the Weibull distribution in both methods. The width of the normalized confidence interval (NCIS) was obtained using the mean and ± 95% confidence limit curves. The mean peak forces of 3.9kN and 8.6kN were associated with the 5% and 50% probability of injury for the covariate method of deriving the risk curve for the reference age of 45 years. The mean forces of 5.4 kN and 9.2kN were associated with the 5% and 50% probability of injury for the pre-scaled method. The NCIS

  10. Effect of Complete Syndesmotic Disruption and Deltoid Injuries and Different Reduction Methods on Ankle Joint Contact Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMothe, Jeremy; Baxter, Josh R; Gilbert, Susannah; Murphy, Conor I; Karnovsky, Sydney C; Drakos, Mark C

    2017-06-01

    Syndesmotic injuries can be associated with poor patient outcomes and posttraumatic ankle arthritis, particularly in the case of malreduction. However, ankle joint contact mechanics following a syndesmotic injury and reduction remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of a syndesmotic injury and reduction techniques on ankle joint contact mechanics in a biomechanical model. Ten cadaveric whole lower leg specimens with undisturbed proximal tibiofibular joints were prepared and tested in this study. Contact area, contact force, and peak contact pressure were measured in the ankle joint during simulated standing in the intact, injured, and 3 reduction conditions: screw fixation with a clamp, screw fixation without a clamp (thumb technique), and a suture-button construct. Differences in these ankle contact parameters were detected between conditions using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Syndesmotic disruption decreased tibial plafond contact area and force. Syndesmotic reduction did not restore ankle loading mechanics to values measured in the intact condition. Reduction with the thumb technique was able to restore significantly more joint contact area and force than the reduction clamp or suture-button construct. Syndesmotic disruption decreased joint contact area and force. Although the thumb technique performed significantly better than the reduction clamp and suture-button construct, syndesmotic reduction did not restore contact mechanics to intact levels. Decreased contact area and force with disruption imply that other structures are likely receiving more loads (eg, medial and lateral gutters), which may have clinical implications such as the development of posttraumatic arthritis.

  11. Biomechanical analysis of ankle ligamentous sprain injury cases from televised basketball games: Understanding when, how and why ligament failure occurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakis, Emmanouil; Mok, Kam-Ming; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Bull, Anthony M J

    2017-12-01

    Ankle sprains due to landing on an opponent's foot are common in basketball. There is no analysis to date that provides a quantification of this injury mechanism. The aim of this study was to quantify the kinematics of this specific injury mechanism and relate this to lateral ankle ligament biomechanics. Case series. The model-based image-matching technique was used to quantify calcaneo-fibular-talar kinematics during four ankle inversion sprain injury incidents in televised NBA basketball games. The four incidents follow the same injury pattern in which the players of interest step onto an opponent's foot with significant inversion and a diagnosed ankle injury. A geometric analysis was performed to calculate the in vivo ligament strains and strain rates for the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL). Despite the controlled selection of cases, the results show that there are two distinct injury mechanisms: sudden inversion and internal rotation with low levels of plantarflexion; and a similar mechanism without internal rotation. The first of these mechanisms results in high ATFL and CFL strains, whereas the second of these strains the CFL in isolation. The injury mechanism combined with measures of the ligament injury in terms of percentage of strain to failure correlate directly with the severity of the injury quantified by return-to-sport. The opportunity to control excessive internal rotation through proprioceptive training and/or prophylactic footwear or bracing could be utilised to reduce the severity of common ankle injuries in basketball. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability with ligamentum bifurcatum injury: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yaning; Wang, Huijuan; Tang, Yuchao; Qin, Shiji; Zhao, Mingming; Zhang, Fengqi

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to report our institution's experience in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI) with ligamentum bifurcatum (LB) injury.This retrospective study included 218 consecutive patients with CLAI who underwent surgery from January 2012 to December 2015. The 218 patients received tendon allograft reconstruction of the lateral ligament. CLAI was combined with LB injury in 51.4% (112/218) of patients. The 112 patients with concurrent LB injury had this treated simultaneously; 36 patients underwent excision of the anterior process of the calcaneus, 68 underwent LB repair, and 8 underwent LB reconstruction. Patients returned for a clinical and radiologic follow-up evaluation at an average of 31 (range, 24-35) months postoperatively. Outcomes were assessed by comparison of pre- and postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores, visual analog scale pain scores, Karlsson scores, and radiographic assessment.Of the patients with concurrent LB injury, 82.1% (92/112) returned for final evaluation. Postoperatively, most patients recovered very well. However, the outcome was not ideal in those who underwent excision of the anterior process of the calcaneus; there were significant postoperative decreases in talar tilt (P < .05) and anterior drawer (P < .05), but there was no significant postoperative improvement in visual analog scale pain score and AOFAS score. Patients who underwent LB repair or reconstruction had an excellent or good outcome regarding patient subjective self-assessment, pain scores, Karlsson scores, and AOFAS scores at final follow-up.Patients with CLAI often have concurrent LB injury. The diagnosis of LB injury can be missed or delayed. Clinicians should closely examine the LB in cases of CLAI, and should surgically repair or reconstruct the LB when necessary.

  13. Y-balance test performance and BMI are associated with ankle sprain injury in collegiate male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Emily M; Hoch, Matthew C; Boling, Michelle C

    2017-10-25

    To determine if static balance, dynamic balance, ankle range of motion, body mass index (BMI), or history of an ankle sprain were associated with ankle sprain injuries within male and female collegiate athletes. Prospective cohort. Three hundred and eighty-four male (age=19.79±1.80 years, height=178.02±10.39cm, mass=85.71±17.59kg) and one hundred and sixty seven female (age=19.80±1.52 years, height=165.61±7.08cm, mass=66.16±10.53kg) collegiate athletes involved in a variety of sports at a NCAA Division II or NAIA institution participated. Baseline measures of the Y-Balance (YBT), modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS), weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT), BMI, and history of ankle sprain were recorded. Participants were followed prospectively for two years and incidence of ankle sprain injury was documented. The average of the WBLT, mBESS, and YBT measures were used for analysis. Male and female participants were analyzed separately. Mann-Whitney U tests were utilized to identify variables which may be significantly associated with ankle sprain injury for logistic regression analysis. A total of 59 (38 males and 21 females) individuals sustained an ankle sprain during the follow up period. The binary logistic regression revealed BMI (Nagelkerke R 2 =0.069; X 2 =12.89; p<0.001; OR=3.85; 95% CI, 1.90-7.79; p<0.001) and anterior reach of the YBT (Nagelkerke R 2 =0.074; X 2 =13.70, p<0.001; OR=3.64; 95% CI=1.83-7.23; p=0.01) were significantly associated with ankle sprain injury in male athletes. No variables were associated with ankle sprain injury within female athletes. Male collegiate athletes with greater BMI and lesser YBT anterior reach were at a greater risk of sustaining an ankle sprain injury. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Searching for the "sweet spot": the foot rotation and parallel engagement of ankle ligaments in maximizing injury tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Bingbing; Forman, Jason L; Mait, Alexander R; Donlon, John-Paul; Panzer, Matthew B; Kent, Richard W

    2017-12-01

    Ligament sprains, defined as tearing of bands of fibrous tissues within ligaments, account for a majority of injuries to the foot and ankle complex in field-based sports. External rotation of the foot is considered the primary injury mechanism of syndesmotic ankle sprains with concomitant flexion and inversion/eversion associated with particular patterns of ligament trauma. However, the influence of the magnitude and direction of loading vectors to the ankle on the in situ stress state of the ligaments has not been quantified in the literature. The objective of the present study was to search for the maximum injury tolerance of a human foot with an acceptable subfailure distribution of individual ligaments. We used a previously developed and comprehensively validated foot and ankle model to reproduce a range of combined foot rotation experienced during high-risk sports activities. Biomechanical computational investigation was performed on initial foot rotation from [Formula: see text] of plantar flexion to [Formula: see text] of dorsiflexion, and from [Formula: see text] of inversion to [Formula: see text] of eversion prior to external rotation. Change in initial foot rotation shifted injury initiation among different ligaments and resulted in a wide range of injury tolerances at the structural level (e.g., 36-125 Nm of rotational moment). The observed trend was in agreement with a parallel experimental study that initial plantar flexion decreased the incidence of syndesmotic injury compared to a neutral foot. A mechanism of distributing even loads across ligaments subjected to combined foot rotations was identified. This mechanism is potential to obtain the maximum load-bearing capability of a foot and ankle while minimizing the injury severity of ligaments. Such improved understanding of ligament injuries in athletes is necessary to facilitate injury management by clinicians and countermeasure development by biomechanists.

  15. The influence of landing mat composition on ankle injury risk during a gymnastic landing: a biomechanical quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaofei; Hao, Weiya; Li, Xuhong; Wan, Bingjun; Shan, Gongbing

    2017-01-01

    About 70% injury of gymnasts happened during landing - an interaction between gymnast and landing mat. The most injured joint is the ankle. The current study examined the effect of mechanical properties of landing mat on ankle loading with aims to identify means of decreasing the risk of ankle injury. Gymnastic skill - salto backward stretched with 3/2 twist was captured by two high-speed camcorders and digitized by using SIMI-Motion software. A subject-specific, 14-segment rigid-body model and a mechanical landing-mat model were built using BRG.LifeMODTM. The landings were simulated with varied landing-mat mechanical properties (i.e., stiffness, dampness and friction coefficients). Real landing performance could be accurately reproduced by the model. The simulations revealed that the ankle angle was relatively sensitive to stiffness and dampness of the landing mat, the ankle loading rate increased 26% when the stiffness was increased by 30%, and the changing of dampness had notable effect on horizontal ground reaction force and foot velocity. Further, the peak joint-reaction force and joint torque were more sensitive to friction than to stiffness and dampness of landing mat. Finally, ankle muscles would dissipate about twice energy (189%) when the friction was increased by 30%. Loads to ankles during landing would increase as the stiffness and dampness of the landing mat increase. Yet, increasing friction would cause a substantial rise of the ankle internal loads. As such, the friction should be a key factor influencing the risk of injury. Unfortunately, this key factor has rarely attracted attention in practice.

  16. Methodical features of physical rehabilitation of sportsmen with intra articulate injuries of ankle joint at the out-patient stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Charbel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the analysis of modern approaches to application of means and forms of physical rehabilitation of sportsmen with intra articulate injuries of ankle joint at the out-patient stage. Material & Methods: the analysis of urgent special references on the problem of treatment and rehabilitation at intra articulate injuries of ankle joint. Results: it is defined that together with the broad application of traditional complex techniques of medical physical culture, classical massage and physical therapy, the percent of use of nonconventional methods of non-drug therapy grows objectively and significantly in the last decade in physical rehabilitation. Conclusions: the connected application of east bath and special techniques of east massage for rehabilitation of sportsmen with intra articulate injuries of ankle joint at the out-patient stage in special literature is described not enough that in turn demands the additional practical researches among methods of non-drug therapy.

  17. Correlation of AO and Lauge-Hansen classification systems for ankle fractures to the mechanism of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Edward K; Kwon, John Y; Herder, Lindsay M; Appleton, Paul T

    2013-11-01

    Our aim was to assess whether the Lauge-Hansen (LH) and the Muller AO classification systems for ankle fractures radiographically correlate with in vivo injuries based on observed mechanism of injury. Videos of potential study candidates were reviewed on YouTube.com. Individuals were recruited for participation if the video could be classified by injury mechanism with a high likelihood of sustaining an ankle fracture. Corresponding injury radiographs were obtained. Injury mechanism was classified using the LH system as supination/external rotation (SER), supination/adduction (SAD), pronation/external rotation (PER), or pronation/abduction (PAB). Corresponding radiographs were classified by the LH system and the AO system. Thirty injury videos with their corresponding radiographs were collected. Of the video clips reviewed, 16 had SAD mechanisms and 14 had PER mechanisms. There were 26 ankle fractures, 3 nonfractures, and 1 subtalar dislocation. Twelve fractures with SAD mechanisms had corresponding SAD fracture patterns. Five PER mechanisms had PER fracture patterns. Eight PER mechanisms had SER fracture patterns and 1 had SAD fracture pattern. When the AO classification was used, all 12 SAD type injuries had a 44A type fracture, whereas the 14 PER injuries resulted in nine 44B fractures, two 44C fractures, and three 43A fractures. When injury video clips of ankle fractures were matched to their corresponding radiographs, the LH system was 65% (17/26) consistent in predicting fracture patterns from the deforming injury mechanism. When the AO classification system was used, consistency was 81% (21/26). The AO classification, despite its development as a purely radiographic system, correlated with in vivo injuries, as based on observed mechanism of injury, more closely than did the LH system. Level IV, case series.

  18. The proximal fibula should be examined in all patients with ankle injury: a case series of missed maisonneuve fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweel, Nicholas R; Raikin, Steven M; Karanjia, Homyar N; Ahmad, Jamal

    2013-02-01

    The Maisonneuve fracture is a spiral fracture of the proximal third of the fibula. It occurs from violent twisting of the ankle that characteristically causes ligament damage and severe instability. Most patients complain of significant ankle pain but very little pain over the fracture. The clinical and radiographic examination is usually directed to the ankle region; and the proximal fibula is often ignored. The authors intend to show the ease of missing the proximal fibular fracture when the clinical examination is directed to the ankle region. They discuss the importance of palpating the proximal fibula and ordering appropriate radiographs. The authors report on 5 patients who presented to the Emergency Department, where the Maisonneuve fracture was missed despite having ankle radiographs taken. All patients required open reduction and internal fixation. The Maisonneuve fracture injury pattern causes untoward consequences if not promptly recognized and treated. To avoid misdiagnosis, the proximal fibula should be examined in all patients with ankle injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Repair of syndesmosis injury in ankle fractures: Current state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, May Fong; Stern, Richard; Assal, Mathieu

    2018-01-01

    Conventional treatment of syndesmosis injuries in rotationally unstable ankle fractures is associated with an unacceptably high rate of malreduction, and this has led to a paradigm shift in the approach to a newer concept of anatomical repair.In the anatomical approach, the principle is to 'directly fix what is broken and repair what is torn'. The approach is effective in reducing the rate of syndesmosis malreduction, increasing the biomechanical strength of syndesmosis fixation and avoiding the need for trans-syndesmotic fixation and its secondary removal.The objective of this review article is to compare the conventional treatment of these injuries (accepted usage, general consent, traditional, generally accepted) with a newer anatomical approach to be considered as a shift in thinking. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2018;3:24-29. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.3.170017.

  20. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ankle Sprain Treatment Page Content Article Body Acute ankle and foot injuries are common in athletes and other active young ... Phase I treatment involves resting and protecting the ankle to permit healing, to prevent further injury, and to control pain and swelling. Rest, protection ( ...

  1. The Influence of Circadian Variation on Aetiological Markers of Ankle Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Chris; Marrin, Kelly; Page, Richard; Greig, Matt

    2018-03-15

    Clinical and functional assessments are performed regularly in sporting environments to screen for performance deficits and injury risk. Circadian rhythms have been demonstrated to affect human performance, however the influence of time of day on a battery of multiple ankle injury risk factors has yet to be established within athletic populations. To investigate the influence of circadian variation on a battery of tests, used to screen for ankle aetiological risk factors. Randomised crossover design. University laboratory. Thirty-three semi-professional soccer players (age 24.9 ± 4.4 years; height 1.77 ± 0.17 m; body mass 75.47 ± 7.98 kg) completed three randomized experimental trials (07:00 h, 12:00 h, 19:00 h) Main Outcome Measures: Trials involved the completion of a standardized test battery comprising Biodex Stability System (BSS), Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), isokinetic inversion: eversion ratio, joint position sense, and a drop landing inversion cutting manoeuvre. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significantly (P < 0.05) lower values for all BSS indicia; Overall Stability Index (1.10 ± 0.31 a.u), Anterior-Posterior (0.76 ± 0.21 a.u) and Medio-Lateral (0.68 ± 0.23) at 12:00 h when compared to 07:00 h. (1.30 ± 0.45 a.u; 0.96 ± 0.26 a.u; 0.82 ± 0.40 a.u) respectively. However, no significant (P ≥ 0.05) main effects for time of day were reported for any other test. Circadian influence on ankle aetiological risk factors was task dependent, with measures of proprioception, strength and SEBT displaying no circadian variation, indicating no association between time of day and markers of injury risk. However, the BSS displayed improved performance at midday, indicating postural stability tasks requiring unanticipated movements to display a time of day effect and potential increased injury risk. Consequently, time of testing for this task should be standardized to ensure correct interpretations of assessments and/or interventions.

  2. Sagittal Plane Hip, Knee, and Ankle Biomechanics and the Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Mari; Pasanen, Kati; Krosshaug, Tron; Kannus, Pekka; Vasankari, Tommi; Kujala, Urho M; Bahr, Roald; Perttunen, Jarmo; Parkkari, Jari

    2017-12-01

    Stiff landings with less knee flexion and high vertical ground-reaction forces have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The literature on the association between other sagittal plane measures and the risk of ACL injuries with a prospective study design is lacking. To investigate the relationship between selected sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle biomechanics and the risk of ACL injury in young female team-sport athletes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 171 female basketball and floorball athletes (age range, 12-21 years) participated in a vertical drop jump test using 3-dimensional motion analysis. All new ACL injuries, as well as match and training exposure data, were recorded for 1 to 3 years. Biomechanical variables, including hip and ankle flexion at initial contact (IC), hip and ankle ranges of motion (ROMs), and peak external knee and hip flexion moments, were selected for analysis. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs. The combined sensitivity and specificity of significant test variables were assessed using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 15 noncontact ACL injuries were recorded during follow-up (0.2 injuries/1000 player-hours). Of the variables investigated, landing with less hip flexion ROM (HR for each 10° increase in hip ROM, 0.61 [95% CI, 0.38-0.99]; P < .05) and a greater knee flexion moment (HR for each 10-N·m increase in knee moment, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.04-1.40]; P = .01) was significantly associated with an increased risk of ACL injury. Hip flexion at IC, ankle flexion at IC, ankle flexion ROM, and peak external hip flexion moment were not significantly associated with the risk of ACL injury. ROC curve analysis for significant variables showed an area under the curve of 0.6, indicating a poor combined sensitivity and specificity of the test. Landing with less hip flexion ROM and a greater peak

  3. Military personnel with self-reported ankle injuries do not demonstrate deficits in dynamic postural stability or landing kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansbach, Heather M; Lovalekar, Mita T; Abt, John P; Rafferty, Deirdre; Yount, Darcie; Sell, Timothy C

    2017-08-01

    The odds of sustaining non-contact musculoskeletal injuries are higher in Special Operations Forces operators than in infantry soldiers. The ankle is one of the most commonly injured joints, and once injured can put individuals at risk for reinjury. The purpose of this study was to determine if any differences in postural stability and landing kinematics exist between operators with a self-reported ankle injury in the past one year and uninjured controls. A total of 55 Special Operations Forces operators were included in this analysis. Comparisons were made between operators with a self-reported ankle injury within one-year of their test date (n=11) and healthy matched controls (n=44). Comparisons were also made between injured and uninjured limbs within the injured group. Dynamic postural stability and landing kinematics at the ankle, knee, and hip were assessed during a single-leg jump-landing task. Comparisons were made between groups with independent t-tests and within the injured group between limbs using paired t-tests. There were no significant differences in dynamic postural stability index or landing kinematics between the injured and uninjured groups. Anterior-posterior stability index was significantly higher on the uninjured limb compared to the injured limb within the injured group (P=0.02). Single ankle injuries sustained by operators may not lead to deficits in dynamic postural stability. Dynamic postural stability index and landing kinematics within one year after injury were either not affected by the injuries reported, or injured operators were trained back to baseline measures through rehabilitation and daily activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Foot and Ankle Impact Injury: Risk Evaluation of Calcaneus and Talus Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wenxin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Foot and ankle impact injury is common in geriatric trauma and often leads to fracture of rearfoot, including calcaneus and talus. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of foot impact on the risk of calcaneus and talus fracture via finite element analysis. Methods A three-dimensional finite element model of foot and ankle was constructed based on magnetic resonance images of a female aged 28. The foot sustained a 7-kg passive impact through a foot plate. The simulated impact velocities were from 2.0 to 7.0 m/s with 1.0 m/s interval. Results At 5.0 m/s impact velocity, the maximum von Mises stress of the trabecular calcaneus and talus were 3.21MPa and 2.41MPa respectively, while that of the Tresca stress were 3.46MPa and 2.55MPa. About 94% and 84% of the trabecular calcaneus and talus exceeded the shear yielding stress, while 21.7% and 18.3% yielded the compressive stress. The peak stresses were distributed around the talocalcaneal articulation and the calcaneal tuberosity inferiorly, which corresponded to the common fracture sites. Conclusions The prediction in this study showed that axial compressive impact at 5.0 m/s could produce considerable yielding of trabecular bone in both calcaneus and talus, dominantly by shear and compounded with compression that predispose the rearfoot in the risk of fracture. This study suggested the injury pattern and fracture mode of high energy trauma that provides insights in injury prevention and fracture management. PMID:27119740

  5. Biopsychosocial Factors Associated with Foot and Ankle Pain and Injury in Irish Dance: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Roisin; Purtill, Helen; O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2017-06-01

    Foot and ankle pain/injury (FAPI) is the most common musculoskeletal problem suffered in Irish dancing. A prospective examination of risk factors for FAPI in this cohort has never been performed. Prospective study over 1-year. 85 elite adult Irish dancers were screened at baseline for biopsychosocial factors and followed up prospectively each month for 1 year to evaluate FAPI rates and potential risk factors. Subjects who suffered from multiple incidences of FAPI (with no pain/injury reported elsewhere in the body) or at least one moderate episode of FAPI were allocated to the foot/ankle-injured (FAI) group (n=28, 25 F/3 M). Subjects reporting no pain/injury or only one minor FAPI were allocated to the non-injured group (n=21, 14 F/7 M). Baseline differences in variables between groups were tested with the independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test for skewed data, and Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Baseline factors significantly associated with the FAI group included failing to always perform a warm-up (p=0.042), lower levels of energy (p=0.013), and more bothersome pain (p=0.021). Subjects also scored worse on two dimensions of the Athletic Coping Skills Inventory: i.e., coping with adversity (p=0.035) and goal setting and mental preparation (p=0.009). Several biopsychosocial factors appear to be associated with FAPI in Irish dancers. Biopsychosocial screening protocols and prevention strategies may best identify and support at-risk dancers.

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Foot and Ankle Impact Injury: Risk Evaluation of Calcaneus and Talus Fracture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Wai-Chi Wong

    Full Text Available Foot and ankle impact injury is common in geriatric trauma and often leads to fracture of rearfoot, including calcaneus and talus. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of foot impact on the risk of calcaneus and talus fracture via finite element analysis.A three-dimensional finite element model of foot and ankle was constructed based on magnetic resonance images of a female aged 28. The foot sustained a 7-kg passive impact through a foot plate. The simulated impact velocities were from 2.0 to 7.0 m/s with 1.0 m/s interval.At 5.0 m/s impact velocity, the maximum von Mises stress of the trabecular calcaneus and talus were 3.21MPa and 2.41MPa respectively, while that of the Tresca stress were 3.46MPa and 2.55MPa. About 94% and 84% of the trabecular calcaneus and talus exceeded the shear yielding stress, while 21.7% and 18.3% yielded the compressive stress. The peak stresses were distributed around the talocalcaneal articulation and the calcaneal tuberosity inferiorly, which corresponded to the common fracture sites.The prediction in this study showed that axial compressive impact at 5.0 m/s could produce considerable yielding of trabecular bone in both calcaneus and talus, dominantly by shear and compounded with compression that predispose the rearfoot in the risk of fracture. This study suggested the injury pattern and fracture mode of high energy trauma that provides insights in injury prevention and fracture management.

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Foot and Ankle Impact Injury: Risk Evaluation of Calcaneus and Talus Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wenxin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Foot and ankle impact injury is common in geriatric trauma and often leads to fracture of rearfoot, including calcaneus and talus. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of foot impact on the risk of calcaneus and talus fracture via finite element analysis. A three-dimensional finite element model of foot and ankle was constructed based on magnetic resonance images of a female aged 28. The foot sustained a 7-kg passive impact through a foot plate. The simulated impact velocities were from 2.0 to 7.0 m/s with 1.0 m/s interval. At 5.0 m/s impact velocity, the maximum von Mises stress of the trabecular calcaneus and talus were 3.21MPa and 2.41MPa respectively, while that of the Tresca stress were 3.46MPa and 2.55MPa. About 94% and 84% of the trabecular calcaneus and talus exceeded the shear yielding stress, while 21.7% and 18.3% yielded the compressive stress. The peak stresses were distributed around the talocalcaneal articulation and the calcaneal tuberosity inferiorly, which corresponded to the common fracture sites. The prediction in this study showed that axial compressive impact at 5.0 m/s could produce considerable yielding of trabecular bone in both calcaneus and talus, dominantly by shear and compounded with compression that predispose the rearfoot in the risk of fracture. This study suggested the injury pattern and fracture mode of high energy trauma that provides insights in injury prevention and fracture management.

  8. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... Ankle replacement surgery is most often done while you are under general anesthesia. This means you will ...

  9. Can we use biomarkers of coagulation to predict which patients with foot and ankle injury will develop deep vein thrombosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Ben A; Cleves, Andrew; Alikhan, Raza; Pugh, Neil; Nokes, Len; Perera, Anthony

    2017-08-16

    Our aim was to determine whether plasma levels of Tissue Factor (TF), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM-1), Interleukin 6 (IL-6) or D-dimer after foot and ankle injury could predict which patients would develop deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Patients aged 18-60 years with acute foot and ankle injury had venous blood sample to measure TF, VCAM-1, IL-6 and D-dimer within 3 days of injury. Patients had bilateral lower limb venous ultrasound to assess for DVT on discharge from clinic. 21 of 77 patients were found to have DVT (27%). There was no statistically significant association between levels of TF, VCAM-1, IL-6 or D-dimer and subsequent development of DVT. Tissue Factor (TF), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and D-dimer levels were not associated with development deep vein thrombosis in patients with acute foot and ankle injury. Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Proceedings of the SRBR-KBVR osteoarticular section meeting of October 18, 2003 in Antwerp--Part one. Imaging of chronic ankle pain, with a focus on soccer injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.; de Jonge, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Chronic ankle pain is a very common problem encountered in soccer injuries. It can be divided into three regional entities, including anterior ankle pain, deep ankle pain and posterior ankle pain. The purpose of this presentation is to present the value of each imaging technique (standard

  11. The influence of foot and ankle injury patterns and treatment delays on outcomes in a tertiary hospital; a one-year prospective observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav Kumar; Dhillon, M S; Dhatt, Sarvdeep Singh

    2016-03-01

    Ankle and foot fractures are amongst the most common injuries, and patterns may vary from primary care set up to tertiary hospitals. Severe foot injuries are projected to have significantly worse outcomes and surgical delays are thought to alter prognosis. All patients with foot and ankle trauma were prospectively evaluated at a Tertiary trauma centre over one year. The incidence, fracture patterns, risk factors, and outcomes were evaluated, and cases were divided into simple foot injuries (FASS ≤ 3) and severe foot injuries (FASS>3). Injury mechanisms, associated injuries, and delays in treatment were evaluated, and outcomes were analyzed using Visual-Analogue Scale Foot and Ankle (VASFA), Maryland Foot Score (MFS) and Foot and ankle disability index (FADI). 294 Foot and Ankle injuries (51 females, 243 males) were encountered in 2919 trauma cases (incidence of 10%). 80 patients (27.2%) had simple foot injuries and 214 (72.8%) had severe foot injuries. 29 patients (9.9%) were below 18 years; most (65.3%) patients were between 18 and 45 years age. Road traffic accident was most commonest mode of injury, with ankle fractures (30.6%) the most common. Metatarsal fractures (27.9%) and calcaneal fractures (21.4%) were 2nd and 3rd most common injuries in the foot. Surgical delay averaged 1 day in both severe and simple injuries. Injury led to 32 (10.9%) below knee amputations. Outcome evaluation in 127 (91 severe, 36 simple injuries) patients showed mean Maryland foot score of 89.30 in simple injury group and 84.87 in severe injury group. Mean VASFA score was 82.87 (simple) and 81.87 in severe injury, and mean FADI score was 93.13 (simple) and 91.05 (severe injury). More detailed analysis revealed that more good scores (64.4%) were documented in severe injuries group, and more excellent scores (52.8%) in simple injuries group. Foot injuries constitute 10% of all orthopaedic trauma at tertiary hospitals; Majority of them are severe foot injuries, with 68.7% being open

  12. Treatment and outcome prognosis of patients with high-energy transsyndesmotic ankle fracture dislocation-the "Logsplitter" injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Tang, Xin; Li, Shenglong; Wang, Xiuhui; Gong, Liangfeng; Zhong, Tao; Wang, Kunzheng

    2017-01-10

    This study aimed to retrospectively review the clinical efficacy of open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) for treatment of high-energy transsyndesmotic ankle fracture dislocation-the "Logsplitter" injury. Between December 2006 and December 2014, 41 patients (29 males and 12 females; mean age, 41.46 ± 13.42 years) with Logsplitter injury were treated by ORIF procedure. Patients were grouped as typical injury (mainly vertical axial stress) and untypical injury (mainly rotational stress) according to the injury mechanism and the degree of the talus wedged into the distal tibiofibular joint. After the follow-up of 32.48 ± 24.18 weeks, average American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score at final follow-up was 78.54 ± 10.66 and the excellent and good rate of 82.9%. Three patients in typical group developed nonunion, and other three cases had infection vs. none in untypical group (both P = 0.053). Burwell-Charnely scoring system revealed anatomic reduction of fracture was achieved in 22 cases, fair reduction in 16 cases, and poor in only 3 cases. Patients in untypical group had better fracture reduction (P = 0.015) and lower incidence rate of posttraumatic ankle arthritis (P = 0.042) than typical cases as well as the range of motion (P < 0.01). The ORIF may be an optimal approach to treat Logsplitter injuries. Patients with untypical injury had better fracture reduction, range of motion, and low incidence rate of posttraumatic ankle arthritis than those typical ones, and the postoperative outcome was affected by the injury and treatment characteristics.

  13. Plantar talar head contusions and osteochondral fractures: associated findings on ankle MRI and proposed mechanism of injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbachova, Tetyana; Wang, Peter S.; Hu, Bing [Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horrow, Jay C. [Drexel University, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the significance of plantar talar head injury (PTHI) in predicting osseous and soft tissue injuries on ankle MRI. The IRB approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. The study group consisted of 41 ankle MRIs with PTHI that occurred at our institution over a 5 1/2 year period. Eighty MRIs with bone injuries in other locations matched for age, time interval since injury, and gender formed a control group. Injuries to the following structures were recorded: medial malleolus, lateral malleolus/distal fibula, posterior malleolus, talus, calcaneus, navicular, cuboid, lateral, medial and syndesmotic ligaments, spring ligament complex, and extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) muscle. Twenty separate logistic regressions determined which injuries PTHI predicted, using the Holm procedure to control for family-wise alpha at 0.05. PTHI strongly predicted the occurrence of injuries involving the anterior process of the calcaneus [24 % of cases, odds ratio (OR) 12.66], plantar components of the spring ligament (27 %, OR 9.43), calcaneal origin of the EDB and attachment of the dorsolateral calcaneocuboid ligament (22 %, OR 7.22), cuboid (51 %, OR 6.58), EDB (27 %, OR 5.49), anteromedial talus (66 %, OR 4.78), and posteromedial talus (49 %, OR 4.48). PTHI strongly predicted lack of occurrence of syndesmotic ligament injury (OR 19.6). The PTHI group had a high incidence of lateral ligamentous injury (78 %), but not significantly different from the control group (53 %). PTHI is strongly associated with injury involving the transverse tarsal joint complex. We hypothesize it results from talo-cuboid and/or talo-calcaneal impaction from a supination injury of the foot and ankle. (orig.)

  14. Plantar talar head contusions and osteochondral fractures: associated findings on ankle MRI and proposed mechanism of injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbachova, Tetyana; Wang, Peter S.; Hu, Bing; Horrow, Jay C.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of plantar talar head injury (PTHI) in predicting osseous and soft tissue injuries on ankle MRI. The IRB approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. The study group consisted of 41 ankle MRIs with PTHI that occurred at our institution over a 5 1/2 year period. Eighty MRIs with bone injuries in other locations matched for age, time interval since injury, and gender formed a control group. Injuries to the following structures were recorded: medial malleolus, lateral malleolus/distal fibula, posterior malleolus, talus, calcaneus, navicular, cuboid, lateral, medial and syndesmotic ligaments, spring ligament complex, and extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) muscle. Twenty separate logistic regressions determined which injuries PTHI predicted, using the Holm procedure to control for family-wise alpha at 0.05. PTHI strongly predicted the occurrence of injuries involving the anterior process of the calcaneus [24 % of cases, odds ratio (OR) 12.66], plantar components of the spring ligament (27 %, OR 9.43), calcaneal origin of the EDB and attachment of the dorsolateral calcaneocuboid ligament (22 %, OR 7.22), cuboid (51 %, OR 6.58), EDB (27 %, OR 5.49), anteromedial talus (66 %, OR 4.78), and posteromedial talus (49 %, OR 4.48). PTHI strongly predicted lack of occurrence of syndesmotic ligament injury (OR 19.6). The PTHI group had a high incidence of lateral ligamentous injury (78 %), but not significantly different from the control group (53 %). PTHI is strongly associated with injury involving the transverse tarsal joint complex. We hypothesize it results from talo-cuboid and/or talo-calcaneal impaction from a supination injury of the foot and ankle. (orig.)

  15. Plantar talar head contusions and osteochondral fractures: associated findings on ankle MRI and proposed mechanism of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachova, Tetyana; Wang, Peter S; Hu, Bing; Horrow, Jay C

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the significance of plantar talar head injury (PTHI) in predicting osseous and soft tissue injuries on ankle MRI. The IRB approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. The study group consisted of 41 ankle MRIs with PTHI that occurred at our institution over a 5 ½ year period. Eighty MRIs with bone injuries in other locations matched for age, time interval since injury, and gender formed a control group. Injuries to the following structures were recorded: medial malleolus, lateral malleolus/distal fibula, posterior malleolus, talus, calcaneus, navicular, cuboid, lateral, medial and syndesmotic ligaments, spring ligament complex, and extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) muscle. Twenty separate logistic regressions determined which injuries PTHI predicted, using the Holm procedure to control for family-wise alpha at 0.05. PTHI strongly predicted the occurrence of injuries involving the anterior process of the calcaneus [24 % of cases, odds ratio (OR) 12.66], plantar components of the spring ligament (27 %, OR 9.43), calcaneal origin of the EDB and attachment of the dorsolateral calcaneocuboid ligament (22 %, OR 7.22), cuboid (51 %, OR 6.58), EDB (27 %, OR 5.49), anteromedial talus (66 %, OR 4.78), and posteromedial talus (49 %, OR 4.48). PTHI strongly predicted lack of occurrence of syndesmotic ligament injury (OR 19.6). The PTHI group had a high incidence of lateral ligamentous injury (78 %), but not significantly different from the control group (53 %). PTHI is strongly associated with injury involving the transverse tarsal joint complex. We hypothesize it results from talo-cuboid and/or talo-calcaneal impaction from a supination injury of the foot and ankle.

  16. Clinical Tests Have Limited Predictive Value for Chronic Ankle Instability When Conducted in the Acute Phase of a First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate whether a battery of clinical assessments for acute lateral ankle sprain (LAS) can be used to predict long-term recovery. Cohort study. University biomechanics laboratory. Individuals (N=82) were assessed using a clinical test battery within 2 weeks of incurring a first-time LAS. Not applicable. The clinical test battery included scores on the talar glide test (degrees), the anterior drawer, talar tilt, figure of 8 for swelling (millimeters) and knee to wall (millimeters) tests, and handheld goniometric range of motion (inversion, eversion, and plantarflexion [in degrees]). Scores on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool taken 12 months after the clinical test battery were used to classify participants as having chronic ankle instability (CAI) or as being LAS copers. Forty percent of participants were designated as having CAI, with 60% being designated as LAS copers. A logistic regression analysis revealed that a combined model using scores from the talar glide, talar tilt, and anterior drawer tests in addition to plantarflexion range of motion was statistically significant (P<.01) and correctly classified cases with moderate accuracy (68.8%). The final model had moderate sensitivity (64%) and good specificity (72%). The clinical tests used in this investigation have limited predictive value for CAI when conducted in the acute phase of a first-time LAS injury. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-leg drop landing motor control strategies following acute ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2015-08-01

    No research currently exists investigating the effect of acute injury on single-limb landing strategies. The aim of the current study was to analyze the coordination strategies of participants in the acute phase of lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury. Thirty-seven participants with acute, first-time LAS and 19 uninjured participants completed a single-leg drop landing task on both limbs. Three-dimensional kinematic (angular displacement) and sagittal plane kinetic (moment-of-force) data were acquired for the joints of the lower extremity from 200 ms pre-initial contact (IC) to 200 ms post-IC. The peak magnitude of the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRF) was also computed. Injured participants displayed a bilateral increase in hip flexion, with altered transverse plane kinematic profiles at the knee and ankle for both limbs (P < 0.05). This coincided with a reduction in the net-supporting flexor moment of the lower extremity (P < 0.05) and magnitude of the peak vertical GRF for the injured limb (21.82 ± 2.44 N/kg vs 24.09 ± 2.77 N/kg; P = 0.013) in injured participants compared to control participants. These results demonstrate that compensatory movement strategies are utilized by participants with acute LAS to successfully reduce the impact forces of landing. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Adherence to physiotherapy clinical guideline acute ankle injury and determinants of adherence: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wees, Philip J; Hendriks, Erik JM; Jansen, Mariette J; van Beers, Hans; de Bie, Rob A; Dekker, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines are considered important instruments to improve quality in health care. In physiotherapy, insight in adherence to guidelines is limited. Knowledge of adherence is important to identify barriers and to enhance implementation. Purpose of this study is to investigate the ability to adherence to recommendations of the guideline Acute ankle injury, and to identify patient characteristics that determine adherence to the guideline. Methods Twenty-two physiotherapists collected data of 174 patients in a prospective cohort study, in which the course of treatment was systematically registered. Indicators were used to investigate adherence to recommendations. Patient characteristics were used to identify prognostic factors that may determine adherence to the guideline. Correlation between patient characteristics and adherence to outcome-indicators (treatment sessions, functioning of patient, accomplished goals) was calculated using univariate logistic regression. To calculate explained variance of combined patient characteristics, multivariate analysis was performed. Results Adherence to individual recommendations varied from 71% to 100%. In 99 patients (57%) the physiotherapists showed adherence to all indicators. Adherence to preset maximum of six treatment sessions for patients with severe ankle injury was 81% (132 patients). The odds to receive more than six sessions were statistically significant for three patient characteristics: females (OR:3.89; 95%CI: 1.41–10.72), recurrent sprain (OR: 6.90; 95%CI: 2.34 – 20.37), co-morbidity (OR: 25.92; 95% CI: 6.79 – 98.93). All factors together explained 40% of the variance. Inclusion of physiotherapist characteristics in the regression model showed that work-experience reduced the odds to receive more than six sessions (OR: 0.2; 95%CI: 0.06 – 0.77), and increased explained variance to 45%. Conclusion Adherence to the clinical guideline Acute ankle sprain showed that the guideline is

  19. Adherence to physiotherapy clinical guideline acute ankle injury and determinants of adherence: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Beers Hans

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical guidelines are considered important instruments to improve quality in health care. In physiotherapy, insight in adherence to guidelines is limited. Knowledge of adherence is important to identify barriers and to enhance implementation. Purpose of this study is to investigate the ability to adherence to recommendations of the guideline Acute ankle injury, and to identify patient characteristics that determine adherence to the guideline. Methods Twenty-two physiotherapists collected data of 174 patients in a prospective cohort study, in which the course of treatment was systematically registered. Indicators were used to investigate adherence to recommendations. Patient characteristics were used to identify prognostic factors that may determine adherence to the guideline. Correlation between patient characteristics and adherence to outcome-indicators (treatment sessions, functioning of patient, accomplished goals was calculated using univariate logistic regression. To calculate explained variance of combined patient characteristics, multivariate analysis was performed. Results Adherence to individual recommendations varied from 71% to 100%. In 99 patients (57% the physiotherapists showed adherence to all indicators. Adherence to preset maximum of six treatment sessions for patients with severe ankle injury was 81% (132 patients. The odds to receive more than six sessions were statistically significant for three patient characteristics: females (OR:3.89; 95%CI: 1.41–10.72, recurrent sprain (OR: 6.90; 95%CI: 2.34 – 20.37, co-morbidity (OR: 25.92; 95% CI: 6.79 – 98.93. All factors together explained 40% of the variance. Inclusion of physiotherapist characteristics in the regression model showed that work-experience reduced the odds to receive more than six sessions (OR: 0.2; 95%CI: 0.06 – 0.77, and increased explained variance to 45%. Conclusion Adherence to the clinical guideline Acute ankle sprain showed that the

  20. A rare type of ankle fracture: Syndesmotic rupture combined with a high fibular fracture without medial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wessem, K J P; Leenen, L P H

    2016-03-01

    High fibular spiral fractures are usually caused by pronation-external rotation mechanism. The foot is in pronation and the talus externally rotates, causing a rupture of the medial ligaments or a fracture of the medial malleolus. With continued rotation the anterior and posterior tibiofibular ligament will rupture, and finally, the energy leaves the fibula by creating a spiral fracture from anterior superior to posterior inferior. In this article we demonstrate a type of ankle fracture with syndesmotic injury and high fibular spiral fractures without a medial component. This type of ankle fractures cannot be explained by the Lauge-Hansen classification, since it lacks injury on the medial side of the ankle, but it does have the fibular fracture pattern matching the pronation external rotation injury (anterior superior to posterior inferior fracture). We investigated the mechanism of this injury illustrated by 3 cases and postulate a theory explaining the biomechanics behind this type of injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship of Self-Reported Ability to Weight-Bear Immediately After Injury as Predictor of Stability for Ankle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Bonnie; Hofmann, Kurt; Ghorbanhoseini, Mohammad; Zurakowski, David; Rodriguez, Edward K; Appleton, Paul; Ellington, J Kent; Kwon, John Y

    2016-09-01

    Determining the stability of ankle fractures, particularly Weber B fibula fractures, can be challenging. Ability to weight-bear after injury may be predictive of stability. We sought to determine whether patients' ability to weight-bear immediately after injury was an effective indicator for ankle stability following fracture. A prospective review was conducted of patients sustaining ankle fractures. Patients' ability to weight-bear after injury was elicited and correlated with ankle radiographs, which were deemed stable or unstable based on commonly used indices to assess stability. For the entire cohort (n = 121), patients who were able to weight-bear immediately after injury were over 8 times more likely to have a stable fracture than those who could not (odds ratio [OR] = 8.6, P < .001). Positive predictive value (PPV) for being able to fully weight-bear as it related to stability was 73%. Inability to weight-bear was 85% specific among patients with an unstable fracture. When analyzing patients with radiographic isolated fibula fractures (n = 67), PPV = 82%, negative predictive value [NPV] = 53%, specificity = 79%, whereas the OR was 5.0 (P = .003) for those who could weight-bear having a stable fracture. When subanalyzing patients who presented with isolated fibula fractures and anatomic mortises (n = 43), PPV = 74%, NPV = 52%, specificity = 62%, whereas the OR was 3.6 (P = .07) for those who could weight-bear having a stable fracture. Patients' ability to weight-bear immediately after injury was a specific and prognostic indicator for stability across a range of ankle fracture subtypes. Patients with an isolated fibula fracture and anatomic mortise were 3.6 times more likely to have a stable fracture if they were able to fully weight-bear at the time of injury. Although a patient's history does not preclude the need for appropriate imaging studies and clinical judgment, it may aid in the assessment of ankle stability following fracture. Level II, clinical

  2. The Relationship of Static Anthropometric Measurements to Lower Leg, Ankle, and Foot Injuries in Air Force Academy Cadets: A Prospective Longitudinal Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMahon, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the relationship between static anthropometric measures or demographical information and overuse injuries in the lower leg, ankle and foot...

  3. Evaluation of Transsyndesmotic Fixation and Primary Deltoid Ligament Repair in Ankle Fractures With Suspected Combined Deltoid Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai; Lin, Jian; Huang, Jianhua; Wang, Qiugen

    2018-04-13

    The present prospective study examined the utility of the intraoperative tap test/technique for distal tibiofibular syndesmosis in the diagnosis of deltoid ligament rupture and compared the outcomes of transsyndesmotic fixation to deltoid ligament repair with suture anchor. This diagnostic technique was performed in 59 ankle fractures with suspected deltoid ligament injury. The width of the medial clear space of 59 cases was evaluated to assess the sensitivity and specificity. Those with deltoid ligament rupture were randomly assigned to 2 groups and treated with deltoid ligament repair with a suture anchor or with syndesmosis screw fixation. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale, short-form 36-item questionnaire (SF-36), and visual analog scale (VAS). The tap test was positive in 53 cases. However, surgical exploration demonstrated that 51 cases (86.4%) had a combined deltoid ligament injury and fracture. The sensitivity and specificity of the tap test was 100.0% and 75.0%, respectively. Finally, 26 cases (96.3%) in the syndesmosis screw group and 22 (91.7%) in the deltoid repair group were followed up. No statistically significant differences were found in the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale score, SF-36 score, or VAS score between the 2 groups. The malreduction rate in the syndesmosis screw group was 34.6% and that in the deltoid repair group was 9.09%. The tap test is an intraoperative diagnostic method to use to evaluate for deltoid ligament injury. Deltoid ligament repair with a suture anchor had good functional and radiologic outcomes comparable to those with syndesmotic screw fixation but has a lower malreduction rate. We did not encounter the issue of internal fixation failure or implant removal. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Single-leg drop landing movement strategies 6 months following first-time acute lateral ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2015-12-01

    No research exists predicating a link between acute ankle sprain injury-affiliated movement patterns and those of chronic ankle instability (CAI) populations. The aim of the current study was to perform a biomechanical analysis of participants, 6 months after they sustained a first-time acute lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury to establish this link. Fifty-seven participants with a 6-month history of first-time LAS and 20 noninjured participants completed a single-leg drop landing task on both limbs. Three-dimensional kinematic (angular displacement) and sagittal plane kinetic (moment of force) data were acquired for the joints of the lower extremity, from 200 ms pre-initial contact (IC) to 200 ms post-IC. Individual joint stiffnesses and the peak magnitude of the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRF) were also computed. LAS participants displayed increases in hip flexion and ankle inversion on their injured limb (P < 0.05); this coincided with a reduction in the net flexion-extension moment at the hip joint, with an increase in its stiffness (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the magnitude of the peak vertical GRF for either limb compared with controls. These results demonstrate that altered movement strategies persist in participants, 6 months following acute LAS, which may precipitate the onset of CAI. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comparison of screw fixation with elastic fixation methods in the treatment of syndesmosis injuries in ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Donmez, Ferdi; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Cakmak, Selami; Mutlu, Serhat; Guler, Olcay

    2015-07-01

    17 patients with ankle syndesmosic injury were treated with a 4.5mm single cortical screw fixation (passage of screw 4 cortices) and 15 patients were treated with single-level elastic fixation material. All patients were evaluated according to the AOFAS ankle and posterior foot scale at the third, sixth and twelfth months after the fixation. The ankle range of movement was recorded together with the healthy side. The Student's t test was used for statistical comparisons. No statistical significant difference was observed between the AOFAS scores (p>0.05). The range of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion motion of the elastic fixation group at the 6th and 12th months were significantly better compared to the screw fixation group (pfixation is as functional as screw fixation in the treatment of ankle syndesmosis injuries. The unnecessary need of a second surgical intervention for removal of the fixation material is another advantageous aspect of this method of fixation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Ankle sprains and instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Cory M; Tran, Elaine; Cai, Andrew N; DiPreta, John A

    2014-03-01

    Ankle injuries are among the most common injuries presenting to primary care providers and emergency departments and may cause considerable time lost to injury and long-term disability. Inversion injuries about the ankle involve about 25% of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and 50% of all sports-related injuries. Medial-sided ankle sprains occur less frequently than those on the lateral side. High ankle sprains occur less frequently in the general population, but do occur commonly in collision sports. Providers should apply the Ottawa ankle rules when radiography is indicated and refer fractures and more severe injuries to orthopedic surgery as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of postural control impairment using Balance Error Scoring System among athletes with ankle injury: an effective tool in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, M; Sundaraganesh, K; Justine, M; Kurup, M; Leonard, J H

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate postural control impairment in athletes with history of ankle injury by using Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) and to compare with the controls. This is a case-control study that compared postural control among subjects with history of ankle injury with the matched controls. A total of sixty subjects (n = 60) were recruited from the department of physical education and sports science from a higher learning institute. Thirty athletes who had history of ankle injury were recruited for case group and the control group had an another thirty participants who were healthy athletes with no history of ankle injury. BESS was used to measure postural control by estimating the errors committed in standing between the two group of athletes. Independent sample t test was used to compare the means between two groups and the level of significance is set at level of 0.05. The athletes with history of ankle injury scored more number of errors in BESS with high mean value of (15.10 +/- 6.52 errors) than the control group (5.63 / 3.81 errors which was significant at p=0.01 level. Postural control impairment was identified among athletes with history of ankle injury when compared with control group.

  8. Effectiveness of a single platelet-rich plasma injection to promote recovery in rugby players with ankle syndesmosis injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, David J; Sman, Amy D; Rae, Katherine; Linklater, James; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Hiller, Claire E

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether a single ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection into the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) reduces the time for rugby athletes to return to function and match play following MRI confirmed ankle syndesmosis injury. Cohort controlled pilot study. 10 Rugby Union players were recruited during the 2014 season, and consented to receive a single autologous PRP injection into the AITFL within 14 days of MRI confirmed ankle syndesmosis injury. A historical control group included 11 comparable Rugby Union players between 2011 and 2013 who were treated conservatively with the same inclusion criteria and rehabilitation protocol as the intervention group. Participants followed a standardised rehabilitation protocol involving simple milestones for progression. Early functional tests were performed 2 weeks after the removal of the CAM (controlled ankle motion) boot. Time to return to play was recorded. Repeat functional testing occurred within 1 week of return to play. Groups were comparable in anthropometrics, playing position and MRI injury severity. Time to return to play was significantly less in the intervention group (p=0.048). Following return to play, athletes in the intervention group showed higher agility (p=0.002) and vertical jump (p=0.001). There was a lower level of fear avoidance associated with rugby in the intervention group (p=0.014). This pilot study shows that, following ankle syndesmosis injury, a single autologous PRP injection may accelerate safe and successful return to Rugby Union, with improved functional capacity and reduced fear avoidance. It demonstrates the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to further assess this therapy. ANZCTRN12614000055606.

  9. Medial joint line bone bruising at MRI complicating acute ankle inversion injury: What is its clinical significance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.O.; Moran, D.E.; Shine, S.; Eustace, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the incidence and clinical significance of medial joint line bone bruising following acute ankle inversion injury. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients who underwent ankle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 2 weeks of acute ankle inversion injury were included in this prospective study. Integrity of the lateral collateral ligament complex, presence of medial joint line bone bruising, tibio-talar joint effusion, and soft-tissue swelling were documented. Clinical follow-up at 6 months was carried out to determine the impact of injury on length of time out of work, delay in return to normal walking, delay in return to sports activity, and persistence of medial joint line pain. Results: Thirty-seven patients had tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). Twenty-six patients had medial joint line bone bruising with altered marrow signal at the medial aspect of the talus and congruent surface of the medial malleolus. A complete ATFL tear was seen in 92% of the patients with medial joint line bone bruising (p = 0.05). Patients with an ATFL tear and medial joint line bone bruising had a longer delay in return to normal walking (p = 0.0002), longer delay in return to sports activity (p = 0.0001), and persistent medial joint line pain (p = 0.0003). There was no statistically significant difference in outcome for the eight patients without ATFL tears. Conclusion: Medial joint line bone bruising following an acute ankle inversion injury was significantly associated with a complete ATFL tear, longer delay in the return to normal walking and sports activity, as well as persistent medial joint line pain. Its presence should prompt detailed assessment of the lateral collateral ligament complex, particularly the ATFL

  10. Randomized comparison of tape versus semi-rigid and versus lace-up ankle support in the treatment of acute lateral ankle ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bekerom, M P J; van Kimmenade, Robert; Sierevelt, I N; Eggink, Karin; Kerkhoffs, G M M J; van Dijk, C N; Raven, E E J

    2016-04-01

    Functional treatment is the optimal non-surgical treatment for acute lateral ankle ligament injury (ALALI) in favour of immobilization treatment. There is no single most effective functional treatment (tape, semi-rigid brace or lace-up brace) based on currently available randomized trials. This study is designed as a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the difference in functional outcome after treatment with tape versus semi-rigid versus lace-up ankle support (brace) for grades II and III ALALIs. The Karlsson score and the FAOS were evaluated at 6-month follow-up. One hundred and ninety-three patients (52% males) were randomized, 66 patients were treated with tape, 58 patients with a semi-rigid brace and 62 patients with a lace-up brace. There were no significant differences in any baseline characteristics between the three groups. Mean age of the patients was 37.3 years (35.1-39.5; SD 15.3). Ninety-five males (49%) were included. One hundred and sixty-one (59 + 50 + 52) patients completed the study through final follow-up; 32% lost at follow-up. In two patients treated with tape support, the treatment was changed to a semi-rigid brace because of dermatomal blisters. Except for the difference in Foot and Ankle Outcome Score sport between the lace-up and the semi-rigid brace, there are no differences in any of the outcomes after 6-month follow-up. The most important finding of current study was that there is no difference in outcome 6 months after treatment with tape, semi-rigid brace and a lace-up brace. I.

  11. The Use of Intravenous Lidocaine for the Management of Acute Pain Secondary to Traumatic Ankle Injury: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Billy; Gritsenko, Diana; Tam, Grace; Koop, Kimberly; Mok, Eva

    2018-02-01

    Sports-related injuries are a frequent cause of visits to the emergency department (ED) across the United States. A majority of these injuries affect the lower extremities with the ankle as the most frequently reported site. Most sports-related injuries are not severe enough to require inpatient hospitalization; however, they often lead to acute distress and pain which require prompt treatment with analgesics. Approximately 22% of patients who presented to the ED required pharmacotherapy for acute pain management. Opioids have been traditionally used for the management of severe acute pain in the ED; however, there are growing concerns for opioid overuse and misuse. As a result, there is growing controversy regarding the appropriate selection of analgesic agents, optimal dosing, and need for outpatient therapy which has contributed to changes in prescribing patterns of opioids in the ED. Lidocaine, a class 1b antiarrhythmic, has been utilized as an analgesic agent. Its use has been documented for the management of intractable chronic pain caused by cancer, stroke, neuropathies, or nephrolithiasis. However, literature describing the use of intravenous lidocaine for the management of acute pain secondary to trauma is limited to a single case series. This case report describes the use of intravenous lidocaine in a 17-year-old male who presented to the ED in acute distress secondary to ankle dislocation and fracture. This report serves to describe additional clinical experience with intravenous lidocaine for the management of acute pain secondary to ankle fracture in the emergency department.

  12. Epidemiology and return to play following isolated syndesmotic injuries of the ankle: a prospective cohort study of 3677 male professional footballers in the UEFA Elite Club Injury Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubberts, Bart; D'Hooghe, Pieter; Bengtsson, Håkan; DiGiovanni, Christopher W; Calder, James; Ekstrand, Jan

    2017-12-21

    To determine the epidemiology of isolated syndesmotic injuries in professional football players. Data from 15 consecutive seasons of European professional football between 2001 and 2016 contributed to the dataset of this study. Match play and training data from a total of 3677 players from 61 teams across 17 countries have been included. Team medical staff recorded player exposure and time loss injuries. Injury incidence was defined as the number of injuries per 1000 player-hours. Injury burden was defined as number of days absence per 1000 player-hours. Seasonal trends for isolated syndesmotic injury incidence, isolated syndesmotic injury proportion of ankle ligament injuries and isolated syndesmotic injury burden were analysed via linear regression. The isolated syndesmotic injury incidence was 0.05 injuries per 1000 hours of exposure (95% CI 0.04 to 0.06) or one injury per team every three seasons. The injury incidence during match play was 13 times higher compared with during training, 0.21 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.26) and 0.02 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.02), respectively. Out of the 1320 ankle ligament injuries registered during the 15 seasons, 94 (7%) were diagnosed as isolated syndesmotic injuries. An annual increase in injury incidence was observed (R 2 =0.495, b=0.003, 95% CI 0.001 to 0.004, P=0.003). However, no significant annual change of injury burden was observed (R 2 =0.033, b=0.032, 95% CI -0.073 to 0.138, P=0.520). Seventy-four per cent of the injuries were contact related, and the mean (±SD) absence following an isolated syndesmotic injury was 39 (±28) days. The incidence of isolated syndesmotic injuries in elite professional European football annually increased between 2001 and 2016. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Fixation of ankle syndesmotic injuries: comparison of tightrope fixation and syndesmotic screw fixation for accuracy of syndesmotic reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Gohar A; Cunningham, Patricia; Lynch, Bernadette; Galvin, Rose; Awan, Nasir

    2012-12-01

    Ankle syndesmotic injuries are complex and require anatomic reduction and fixation to restore the normal biomechanics of the ankle joint and prevent long-term complications. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy and maintenance of syndesmotic reduction using TightRope versus syndesmotic screw fixation. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. This cohort study included consecutive patients treated for ankle syndesmotic diastases between July 2007 and June 2009. Single slice axial computed tomography (CT) scans of both the ankles together were performed at the level of syndesmosis, 1 cm above the tibial plafond. A greater than 2-mm widening of syndesmosis compared with the untreated contralateral ankle was considered significant malreduction. Clinical outcomes were measured using the American Orthopaedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) scores. Forty-six of 55 eligible patients participated in the study; 23 patients were in the TightRope group and 23 in the syndesmotic screw group. The average age was 42 years in the TightRope and 40 years in the syndesmotic screw group, and the mean follow-up time was 2.5 years (range, 1.5-3.5 years). The average width of normal syndesmosis was 4.03 ± 0.89 mm. In the TightRope group, the mean width of syndesmosis was 4.37 mm (SD, ±1.12 mm) (P = .30, t test) compared with 5.16 mm (SD, ±1.92 mm) in the syndesmotic screw group (P = .01, t test). Five of 23 ankles (21.7%) in the syndesmotic screw group had syndesmotic malreduction, whereas none of the TightRope group showed malreduction on CT scans (P = .04, Fisher exact test). Average time to full weightbearing was 8 weeks in the TightRope group and 9.1 weeks in the syndesmotic screw group. There was no significant difference between the TightRope and syndesmotic screw groups in mean postoperative AOFAS score (89.56 and 86.52, respectively) or FADI score (82.42 and 81.22, respectively). Regression analysis confirmed malreduction of

  14. A Biomechanical Comparison of Locking Versus Conventional Plate Fixation for Distal Fibula Fractures in Trimalleolar Ankle Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyentat, Annie; Camisa, William; Patel, Sandeep; Lagaay, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Previous biomechanical studies have advocated the use of locking plates for isolated distal fibula fractures in osteoporotic bone. Complex rotational ankle injuries involve an increased number of fractures, which can result in instability, potentially requiring the same fixed angle properties afforded by locking plates. However, the mechanical indication for locking plate technology has not been tested in this fracture model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of locking and conventional plate fixation for distal fibula fractures in trimalleolar ankle injuries. Fourteen (7 matched pairs) fresh-frozen cadaver leg specimens were used. The bone mineral density of each was obtained using dual x-ray absorptiometry scans. The fracture model simulated an OTA 44-B3.3 fracture. The syndesmosis was not disrupted. Each fracture was fixated in the same fashion, except for the distal fibula plate construct: locking (n = 7) and one-third tubular (n = 7). The specimens underwent axial and torsional cyclic loading, followed by torsional loading to failure. No statistically significant differences were found between the locking and conventional plate constructs during both fatigue and torque to failure testing (p > .05). Our specimen bone mineral density averages did not represent poor bone quality. The clinical implication of the present study is that distal fibular locking plates do not provide a mechanical advantage for trimalleolar ankle injuries in individuals with normal bone density and in the absence of fracture comminution. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Minimal Invasive Fixation Can Decrease Infection Rates in Diabetic and Obese Patients With Severe Ankle Fracture and Syndesmotic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebraheim, Nabil A; Dailey, Matthew; Huff, Scott; Qu, Yihuai; White, Erik; Liu, Jiayong

    2018-03-01

    Ankle fractures involving syndesmosis disruption cause severely unstable joint conditions. Traditional invasive operations put certain patient groups at an increased risk of infection. There is limited literature discussing the outcomes of minimally invasive fixation of severe ankle fractures including syndesmotic injury, as clinicians may be tempted to treat these difficult cases with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF). A retrospective case-control study was conducted on patients treated at a level one trauma center. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on presence of diabetes and/or obesity (body mass index ≥30.0 kg/m 2 ). Those with either comorbidity were defined as high infection risk patients and placed in a comorbidity group. Patients were further divided into subgroups based on the operation's invasiveness; either traditional ORIF or percutaneous cannulated screw fixation. Comorbid patients (N = 67) were more likely to sustain Weber C fractures compared to noncomorbid patients (N = 43) (59.70% to 37.21%, P = .019). Additionally, patients receiving minimally invasive fixation procedures experienced fewer infections than those receiving ORIF (0 vs 11 incidences, P = .01), without effect on union rates, fracture reduction, pain, need for revision surgery, or time to full weightbearing. Diabetic and obese patients are at an increased risk of experiencing severe ankle fractures. The use of minimally invasive fixation methods can reduce the risk of postoperative infection without sacrificing other surgical outcomes, even with fractures involving syndesmotic injury. Therapeutic, Level III: Retrospective comparative study.

  16. The sprained ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, J C

    2001-01-01

    The sprained ankle is the most common musculoskeletal injury seen by physicians caring for active youngsters and adults. It accounts for approximately one fourth of all sports-related injuries and is commonly seen in athletes participating in basketball, soccer, or football. It has been shown that one third of West Point cadets suffer an ankle sprain during their 4 years at the military academy. While diagnosis and management of the sprained ankle is usually straightforward, several serious injuries can masquerade as an ankle sprain, and it is important for the clinician to recognize these to prevent long-term morbidity. In this article the basic anatomy of the ankle, mechanisms by which the ankle is injured, and the differential diagnosis of the acutely injured ankle are reviewed. Appropriate evaluation of the injured ankle and the criteria that should be utilized for determining the necessity of radiographs are discussed as well as management of the acutely sprained ankle and the role of prevention in reducing the risk of ankle injury.

  17. Deltoid ligament and tibiofibular syndesmosis injury in chronic lateral ankle instability: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation at 3T and comparison with arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ka Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Dae Jung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential

  18. Deltoid ligament and tibiofibular syndesmosis injury in chronic lateral ankle instability: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation at 3T and comparison with arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Ka Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Dae Jung [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential.

  19. Deltoid Ligament and Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Injury in Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation at 3T and Comparison with Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Ka-Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min-Sun; Kim, Dae-Jung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential.

  20. Evaluating the Reliability and Reproducibility of the AO and Lauge-Hansen Classification Systems for Ankle Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Meng-Chen; Yuan, Xue-Fei; Ma, Jun-Ming; Xia, Ye; Wang, Tao; Xu, Xiao-Li; Yan, Yin-Jie; Xu, Jin-Hai; Ye, Jie; Tong, Zheng-Yi; Feng, Yan-Qi; Wang, Hong-Bo; Wu, Xue-Qun; Mo, Wen

    2015-07-01

    Ankle injuries are responsible for more than 5 million emergency department visits each year. The AO and Lauge-Hansen classification systems are widely used in the clinical diagnosis of ankle injuries. This study aimed to analyze the intraobserver reliability and interobserver reproducibility of the AO and Lauge-Hansen classification systems. In addition, the authors explored the differences among physicians' classification responses and evaluated the clinical value for diagnosis. Fifty-six patients with an ankle injury with complete clinical and radiologic data were enrolled. The definition of injury type, the index score typing methods, and the specific study criteria were explained in detail. Five observers, who were orthopedic surgeons, determined the classifications according to both the AO and Lauge-Hansen systems. The classification was repeated 1 month later. Cronbach's alpha and Cohen's kappa test were used to determine interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility. The physicians conducted 560 classifications (56 cases × 5 physicians × 2 times per patient). Average inter- and intraobserver kappa values for the AO system were 0.708 and 0.608, respectively. Average inter- and intraobserver kappa values for the Lauge-Hansen system were 0.402 and 0.398, respectively. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 96.7% for the AO system and 76.0% for the Lauge-Hansen system. The Lauge-Hansen classification system is a comprehensive yet cumbersome system. Comparatively, the AO classification system is easier to understand. This study shows that the AO classification system has more reliability and reproducibility, and thus has more value in clinical practice, than the Lauge-Hansen classification system. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Hip and Ankle Kinematics in Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Situations: Video Analysis Using Model-Based Image Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hideyuki; Nakamae, Atsuo; Shima, Yosuke; Bahr, Roald; Krosshaug, Tron

    2018-02-01

    Detailed kinematic descriptions of real anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury situations are limited to the knee only. To describe hip and ankle kinematics as well as foot position relative to the center of mass (COM) in ACL injury situations through use of a model-based image-matching (MBIM) technique. The distance between the projection of the COM on the ground and the base of support (BOS) (COM_BOS) normalized to the femur length was also evaluated. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten ACL injury video sequences from women's handball and basketball were analyzed. Hip and ankle joint kinematic values were obtained by use of MBIM. The mean hip flexion angle was 51° (95% CI, 41° to 63°) at initial contact and remained constant over the next 40 milliseconds. The hip was internally rotated 29° (95% CI, 18° to 39°) at initial contact and remained unchanged for the next 40 milliseconds. All of the injured patients landed with a heel strike with a mean dorsiflexion angle of 2° (95% CI, -9° to 14°), before reaching a flatfooted position 20 milliseconds later. The foot position was anterior and lateral to the COM in all cases. However, none of the results showed larger COM_BOS than 1.2, which has been suggested as a criterion for ACL injury risk. Hip kinematic values were consistent among the 10 ACL injury situations analyzed; the hip joint remained unchanged in a flexed and internally rotated position in the phase leading up to injury, suggesting that limited energy absorption took place at the hip. In all cases, the foot contacted the ground with the heel strike. However, relatively small COM_BOS distances were found, indicating that the anterior and lateral foot placement in ACL injury situations was not different from what can be expected in noninjury game situations.

  2. [Clinical outcomes Tight rope versus traditional screw fixation for the treatment of injury of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis in ankle fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong-Zhi; Zhang, Long-Ying; Chen, Yu

    2017-05-25

    To compare the clinical effectiveness for Tight rope fixation and traditional screw fixation in treating injury of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis in ankle fractures. A retrospective study was carried out in patients with injury of distal syndesmosis in ankle fractures who received 2 surgical operations(observation group: 33 cases with Tight rope fixation; control group: 35 cases with traditional screw fixation) from May 2014 to February 2016. There were 18 males and 15 females, aged from 20 to 55 years old with an average of(32.4±5.2) years old in observation group; of them, 19 cases were caused by traffic accidents, 10 by sprain, and 4 by falling; according to Lauge-Hansen typing of ankle fractures, all of the 33 cases were pronation-extorsion fracture, 12 cases were III degree and 21 cases were IV degree. There were 19 males and 16 females, aged from 21 to 54 years old with an average of (32.8±5.5) years old in control group; of them, 20 cases were caused by traffic accidents, 11 by sprain, 4 by falling; according to Lauge-Hansen typing of ankle fractures, 1 case was with pronation-outreach, 34 cases with pronation-extorsion, 13 cases were III degree and 21 cases were IV degree. Fixation time and complication were compared between two groups and AOFAS scores were observed in two groups 3 and 6 months after the operation as well as final follow-up. All the patients were followed up from 8 to 24 months with an average of (16.3±3.8) months. Fixation time of observation group and control group were (10.1±2.8) min and (9.5±2.3) min( P >0.05) respectively. There were significant difference in complication and AOFAS of 3, 6 months postoperatively between two groups( P 0.05). Tight rope for the treatment of injury of distal tibiofibular ligament union in ankle fractures has advantages such as easier techniques, earlier weight-bearing exercises without risk of screw breakage, thus is a new choice. However, it is still necessary to further study the angle, direction

  3. Indications for radiography in patients with acute ankle injuries: role of the physical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auletta, A G; Conway, W F; Hayes, C W; Guisto, D F; Gervin, A S

    1991-10-01

    A prospective study was performed to test the hypothesis that a thorough physical examination can eliminate the need for a large number of radiographs obtained in patients with acute ankle trauma. Two hundred one patients were seen in the emergency department for acute ankle trauma and referred to the department of radiology for ankle radiographs. Radiology residents performed a brief but thorough physical examination of the ankle in all 201 patients. Solely on the basis of a strict set of physical examination criteria (examination for gross deformity, instability, crepitation, focal bony tenderness, severe soft-tissue tenderness, moderate or severe soft-tissue swelling, and ecchymosis), the radiologists determined whether or not the radiographs were indicated. All patients, irrespective of the physical examination, underwent ankle radiography, and the results were correlated with those of the physical examination. On the basis of the results of the physical examinations, 101 (50%) of the radiologic studies were not indicated. In only one of these patients was a fracture seen on radiographs. The radiograph in this case showed a small avulsion fracture of the dorsal aspect of the talus that was clinically insignificant (no cast or surgery was required). Our results suggest that a brief but thorough physical examination can eliminate the need for a large percentage of radiographs ordered in patients with acute ankle trauma.

  4. Mechanical instability after acute ankle ligament injury: randomized prospective comparison of two forms of conservative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pires Prado

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This trial has the objective to investigate the incidence of mechanical ankle instability after the conservative treatment of first episode, severe ankle ligamentar lesions. This common lesion affects young, professional and physical active patients, causing important personal and economic consequences. There are difficulties related to adequate diagnosis and treatment for these lesions. METHOD: 186 patients with severe ankle ligament lesions were included in this trial. They were randomized in two treatment options. In group A patients were treated using ankle long orthoosis, weight bearing allowed as confortable, pain care, ice, elevation with restricted joint mobilization for three weeks. After that they were maintained in short, functional orthosis (air cast, starting the reabilitation program. In group B patients were immobilized using a functional orthosis (air cast, following the same other sequences that patients in group A. RESULTS: We did not find significant differences in relation to the residual mechanical ankle instability between both groups. We did not find differences in the intensity of pain, but the functional evaluation using AOFAS score system showed better results in the functional treatment group. CONCLUSION: The functional treatment (Group B had better AOFAS score and few days off their professional activities, comparing with patients treated with rigid orthosis (Group A, without increased chance in developing ankle mechanical instability.

  5. Spanish Translation, Cross-Cultural Adaptation, and Validation of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Foot and Ankle Outcomes Questionnaire in Mexican-Americans With Traumatic Foot and Ankle Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Francisco, Ben S; Bossmann, James P; Fajardo, Roberto J; Bhandari, Mohit

    2017-05-01

    Hispanics represent the largest minority group within the US population accounting for an estimated 55.4 million individuals. Enrolling Hispanics into clinical outcome studies is important in order for study populations to be externally valid and representative of the US population. Inclusion of Mexican-Americans in clinical studies is frequently limited by the lack of validated outcome measures. The goal of this study was to validate a Spanish version of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Foot and Ankle Outcomes Questionnaire (AAOS-FAOQ) in Mexican-Americans with traumatic foot and ankle injuries. The translation and cross-cultural adaptation procedure was performed by a committee of bilingual speakers using the following steps: (1) forward translation and adaptation, (2) synthesis, (3) back translation, (4) committee review, and (5) pilot testing. The validation was performed in 100 Mexican-Americans with traumatic foot and ankle injuries. A total of 41 females and 59 males were enrolled in this study. The mean age was 42.98 years (range 18-88). The Spanish version of the Global Foot and Ankle Scale of the AAOS-FAOQ showed statistically significant correlations with all 8 subscales of the Spanish SF-36 as well as the Physical Component Summary scale and the Mental Component Summary scale (P Foot and Ankle scale of the Spanish AAOS-FAOQ demonstrated a test-retest reliability of 0.68. We provide a Spanish translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the AAOS-FAOQ. The instrument demonstrates appropriate psychometric properties in Mexican-Americans with traumatic foot and ankle injuries.

  6. [Dutch-language patient-reported outcome measures for foot and ankle injuries; a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weel, Hanneke; Zwiers, Ruben; Sierevelt, Inger N; Haverkamp, Daniel; van Dijk, C Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2015-01-01

    To investigate which valid and reliable patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are available for foot and ankle disorders in the Dutch population, and which of these is the most suitable for uniform use. Systematic review. PubMed, Embase and Google Scholar were systematically searched for relevant articles; subsequently two researchers screened first the title and the abstract, and then the full article within a selection of these articles. Studies that described a validation process for foot- and ankle-PROMs in a Dutch population were included. Data on measurement characteristics and translation procedure were extracted, and methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the COSMIN checklist. ('COSMIN' stands for 'Consensus-based standards for the selection of health status measurement instruments'.) Two general foot- and ankle-PROMs in the Dutch language were validated: the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and the Foot and Ankle Ability Measurement (FAAM); two foot-PROMs: the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI) and the 5-point Foot Function Index (FFI-5pt) were also validated. There were also two disorder-specific PROMs available in Dutch: the Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) for Achilles tendinopathies and the Foot Impact Scale for Rheumatoid Arthritis (FIS-RA) for rheumatoid arthritis patients. The FAOS and the FFI-5pt showed the strongest evidence for having good measurement characteristics. Currently, we regard the FAOS as the most appropriate foot- and ankle-PROM for general foot and ankle problems. Further studies of higher methodological quality are, however, required to draw firmer conclusions.

  7. 3D Model Analysis of Ankle Flexion on Anatomic Reduction of a Syndesmotic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Jason M; Mikula, Jacob D; Backus, Jonathon D; Venderley, Melanie B; Dornan, Grant J; LaPrade, Robert F; Clanton, Thomas O

    2017-04-01

    The effect of ankle positioning during suture-button fixation for syndesmosis repair on range of motion (ROM) and anatomic reduction has yet to be investigated. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to compare the effects of 3 different ankle positions during suture-button repair on volumetric reduction of the syndesmosis, fibular displacement, and ROM of the ankle using 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) analysis. The null hypothesis was that ankle position during fixation would not affect syndesmotic volume restoration, fibular displacement, or ROM. Twelve matched pair (n = 24) human cadaveric specimens were used for this study. Prior to syndesmotic sectioning, ROM assessment and CT scans were performed. Following sectioning of the syndesmosis, specimens were repaired in plantarflexion, dorsiflexion, or neutral, and simulated postrepair ROM evaluations and CT scans were repeated. Least squares mean differences between repair groups and the preinjury state were compared by analysis of variance and Tukey's method. There were no significant differences between repair groups for volumetric reduction ( P = .917), fibular displacement (anterior-posterior, P = .805; medial-lateral, P = .949), or dorsiflexion capacity ( P = .249). Among all specimens, compared with the preinjury state, there was a significant mean ± SD volume reduction of 337 ± 400 mm 3 and medial displacement of 1.9 ± 1.5 mm. This study failed to reject the null hypothesis and demonstrated that ankle flexion at the time of syndesmotic fixation with a suture-button construct had no significant in vitro effect on volume changes, fibular displacement, or dorsiflexion capacity. However, in comparison to the preinjured state, suture-button repair resulted in significant overcompression with respect to syndesmosis volume and medial displacement of the fibula. Ankle position at the time of syndesmotic fixation did not affect overall ankle ROM when using a suture-button construct; however

  8. Fracture of the Lateral Process of the Talus in Children: A Kind of Ankle Injury With Frequently Missed Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongtao; Jiang, Hai; Wang, Bing; Miao, Wusheng

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the clinical characteristics, the treatment, and the outcome of lateral process fracture of the talus in children. From March 2011 to October 2013, 12 children with lateral process fracture of the talus were treated in our hospital. The study contained 3 female and 9 male patients, including 8 patients affected on the left side and 4 on the right side. The age at the time of injury ranged from 8 to 13 years. Concomitant injuries included undisplaced calcaneus fractures in 1 case and distal fibula epiphysis injury in 1 case. The patients presented to our hospital from 2 hours to 2 months after injury. All cases were classified by the Hawkins fracture system. Treatment included immobilization and not bearing weight for 4 weeks for nondisplaced fractures or open reduction and fixation for significantly displaced fractures. Therapeutic effects were evaluated on the basis of the AOFAS (The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society) Ankle Hindfoot Scale. Seven of the cases were initially diagnosed in our department, and the diagnosis was missed in 5 cases. The missed diagnosis rate was 42%. All patients were followed up for 18 months on an average. Follow-up radiographs did not show avascular necrosis of the talus, nonunion, and malunion in any patient. The mean AOFAS hindfoot score was 96 points. The clinical result was found to be excellent in 10 patients, good in 1 patient, and fair in 1 patient (the success rate was 92%). The lateral process of talus fracture is a frequently missed injury. The diagnosis must rely on thorough check-ups combined with standard radiographs and computed tomographic scan. Depending on the type and the displacement of the fracture, proper treatment options could be implemented for desirable clinical effects.

  9. The health economics of ankle and foot sprains and fractures: A systematic review of English-language published papers. Part 2: The direct and indirect costs of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielska, Iwona A; Wang, Xiang; Lee, Raymond; Johnson, Ana P

    2017-07-20

    Ankle and foot sprains and fractures are prevalent injuries, which may result in substantial physical and economic consequences for the patient and place a financial burden on the health care system. Therefore, the objectives of this paper are to examine the direct and indirect costs of treating ankle and foot injuries (sprains, dislocations, fractures), as well as to provide an overview of the outcomes of full economic analyses of different treatment strategies. A systematic review was carried out among seven databases to identify English language publications on the health economics of ankle and foot injury treatment published between 1980 and 2014. The direct and indirect costs were abstracted by two independent reviewers. All costs were adjusted for inflation and reported in 2016 US dollars (USD). Among 2047 identified studies, 32 were selected for analysis. The direct costs of ankle sprain management ranged from $292 to $2268 per patient (2016 USD), depending on the injury severity and treatment strategy. The direct costs of managing ankle fractures were higher ($1908-$19,555). Foot fracture treatment had similar direct costs ranging from $998 to $21,801. The economic evaluations were conducted from the societal or payer's perspectives. The costs of treating ankle and foot sprains and fractures varied among the studies, mostly due to differences in injury type and study characteristics, which impacted the ability of directly comparing the financial burden of treatment. Nonetheless, the review showed that the costs experienced by the patient and the health care system increased with injury complexity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Standing with electrical stimulation and splinting is no better than standing alone for management of ankle plantarflexion contractures in people with traumatic brain injury: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Leung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Question: Is a combination of standing, electrical stimulation and splinting more effective than standing alone for the management of ankle contractures after severe brain injury? Design: A multi-centre randomised trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Thirty-six adults with severe traumatic brain injury and ankle plantarflexion contractures. Intervention: All participants underwent a 6-week program. The experimental group received tilt table standing, electrical stimulation and ankle splinting. The control group received tilt table standing alone. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was passive ankle dorsiflexion with a 12 Nm torque. Secondary outcomes included: passive dorsiflexion with lower torques (3, 5, 7 and 9 Nm; spasticity; the walking item of the Functional Independence Measure; walking speed; global perceived effect of treatment; and perceived treatment credibility. Outcome measures were taken at baseline (Week 0, end of intervention (Week 6, and follow-up (Week 10. Results: The mean between-group differences (95% CI for passive ankle dorsiflexion at Week 6 and Week 10 were –3 degrees (–8 to 2 and –1 degrees (–6 to 4, respectively, in favour of the control group. There was a small mean reduction of 1 point in spasticity at Week 6 (95% CI 0.1 to 1.8 in favour of the experimental group, but this effect disappeared at Week 10. There were no differences for other secondary outcome measures except the physiotherapists’ perceived treatment credibility. Conclusion: Tilt table standing with electrical stimulation and splinting is not better than tilt table standing alone for the management of ankle contractures after severe brain injury. Trial registration: ACTRN12608000637347. [Leung J, Harvey LA, Moseley AM, Whiteside B, Simpson M, Stroud K (2014 Standing with electrical stimulation and splinting is no better than standing alone for management of ankle plantarflexion

  11. A Comparison of Screw Fixation and Suture-Button Fixation in a Syndesmosis Injury in an Ankle Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Han; Gwak, Heui-Chul; Lee, Chang-Rack; Choo, Hye-Jeung; Kim, Jeon-Gyo; Kim, Dae-Yoo

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the quality of reduction and the clinical assessment between screw fixation and suture-button fixation with an ankle fracture accompanied by syndesmosis injury. We studied the clinical and radiologic findings 1 year postoperatively through retrospective examination of 24 patients who had undergone screw fixation from January 2011 to December 2012 and prospective examination of 20 patients who had undergone suture button fixation from January 2013 to May 2014. Regarding the tibiofibular clear space, tibiofibular overlap, and medial clear space, the screw fixation group had improvement from a preoperative mean of 6.97 (range 2.79 to 15.81) mm, 4.43 (range 0 to 7.87) mm, 7.90 (range 4.24 to 19.50) mm to a postoperative mean of 4.95 (range 2.72 to 9.08) mm, 6.29 (range 0 to 10.37) mm, and 4.32 (range 1.98 to 6.57) mm, respectively. The corresponding improvement for the suture-button fixation group was from a preoperative mean of 6.65 (range 3.94 to 13.73) mm, 5.39 (range 0 to 9.44) mm, 7.27 (range 4.04 to 16.00) mm to a postoperative mean of 5.15 (range 2.93 to 7.30) mm, 7.21 (range 2.15 to 10.30) mm, and 4.25 (range 2.97 to 5.71) mm. No statistically significant difference was found between the 2 techniques. Both suture-button and metal screw fixation are effective treatment methods for an ankle fracture accompanied by syndesmosis injury. However, a long-term and prospective analysis is needed. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Temporal Indices of Ankle Clonus and Relationship to Electrophysiologic and Clinical Measures in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manella, Kathleen J; Roach, Kathryn E; Field-Fote, Edelle C

    2017-10-01

    Clonus arising from plantar flexor hyperreflexia is a phenomenon that is commonly observed in persons with spastic hypertonia. We assessed the temporal components of a biomechanical measure to quantify ankle clonus, and validated these in persons with spasticity due to spinal cord injury. In 40 individuals with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury, we elicited ankle clonus using a standardized mechanical perturbation (drop test). We examined reliability and construct validity of 2 components of the drop test: clonus duration (timed with a stopwatch) and number of oscillations in the first 10-second interval (measured via optical motion capture). We compared these measures to the Spinal Cord Assessment Tool for Spastic reflexes (SCATS) clonus score and H-reflex/M-wave (H/M) ratio, a clinical and electrophysiologic measure, respectively. Intra- and interrater reliability of clonus duration measurement was good [intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC (2, 1) = 1.00]; test-retest reliability was good both at 1 hour [ICC (2, 2) = 0.99] and at 1 week [ICC (2, 2) = 0.99]. Clonus duration was moderately correlated with SCATS clonus score (r = 0.58). Number of oscillations had good within-session test-retest reliability [ICC (2, 1) > 0.90] and strong correlations with SCATS clonus score (r = 0.86) and soleus H/M ratio (r = 0.77). Clonus duration and number of oscillations as measured with a standardized test are reliable and valid measures of plantar flexor hyperreflexia that are accessible for clinical use. Tools for objective measurement of ankle clonus are valuable for assessing effectiveness of interventions directed at normalizing reflex activity associated with spasticity.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A179).

  13. Acute inversion injury of the ankle without radiological abnormalities: assessment with high-field MR imaging and correlation of findings with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Inga; Frank, Matthias; Hinz, Peter; Ekkernkamp, Axel [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Emergency Department, Greifswald (Germany); Kuehn, Jens Peter; Hosten, Norbert; Langner, Soenke [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Acute inversion injuries of the ankle are the most common sports accidents, accounting for approximately 10% of emergency room admissions. In up to 85%, an injury of the lateral collateral ligaments is observed. Classically, the assessment of these injuries has relied on clinical examination and radiographs, including stress views. The aim of our study was to correlate prospectively the findings of high-field 3 T MRI in acute ankle distortion with clinical outcome. During a 6-month period, 38 patients were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 48 h of trauma and clinical examination using a protocol consisting of axial T2-weighted and coronal and sagittal T1-weighted images and a sagittal proton density (PDw) sequence. Each ligament injury was graded on a three-point scale. Functional outcome was evaluated using the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale. In 24/38 patients (63.12%), ligament injury was observed. In 22/24 cases, this was an injury of the lateral ligaments and in 2/24 cases of the medial ligaments. Injury of the syndesmosis occurred in three patients, a bone bruise in four, and an osteochondral lesion in three cases. Patients with an injury of two or more ligaments or a bone bruise had a lower AOFAS score and returned to sports activities and full weight-bearing later (P < 0.01). MR imaging at 3 Tesla is an independent predictor for clinical outcome. Therefore MRI may be beneficial in those cases where the findings influence further treatment. (orig.)

  14. Acute inversion injury of the ankle without radiological abnormalities: assessment with high-field MR imaging and correlation of findings with clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, Inga; Frank, Matthias; Hinz, Peter; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Kuehn, Jens Peter; Hosten, Norbert; Langner, Soenke

    2011-01-01

    Acute inversion injuries of the ankle are the most common sports accidents, accounting for approximately 10% of emergency room admissions. In up to 85%, an injury of the lateral collateral ligaments is observed. Classically, the assessment of these injuries has relied on clinical examination and radiographs, including stress views. The aim of our study was to correlate prospectively the findings of high-field 3 T MRI in acute ankle distortion with clinical outcome. During a 6-month period, 38 patients were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 48 h of trauma and clinical examination using a protocol consisting of axial T2-weighted and coronal and sagittal T1-weighted images and a sagittal proton density (PDw) sequence. Each ligament injury was graded on a three-point scale. Functional outcome was evaluated using the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale. In 24/38 patients (63.12%), ligament injury was observed. In 22/24 cases, this was an injury of the lateral ligaments and in 2/24 cases of the medial ligaments. Injury of the syndesmosis occurred in three patients, a bone bruise in four, and an osteochondral lesion in three cases. Patients with an injury of two or more ligaments or a bone bruise had a lower AOFAS score and returned to sports activities and full weight-bearing later (P < 0.01). MR imaging at 3 Tesla is an independent predictor for clinical outcome. Therefore MRI may be beneficial in those cases where the findings influence further treatment. (orig.)

  15. Functional Instability of the Ankle Joint: Etiopathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan ÖRSÇELİK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ankle sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. Chronic ankle instability is a common complication of ankle sprains. Two causes of chronic ankle instability are mechanical instability and functional instability. It is important to understand functional instability etiopathogenesis of the ankle joint in order to guide diagnosis and treatment. This article aims to understand the etiopathogenesis of functional ankle instability.

  16. Trunk and hip muscle recruitment patterns during the prone leg extension following a lateral ankle sprain: A prospective case study pre and post injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehman Gregory J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and case presentation The prone leg extension (PLE is commonly used to identify dysfunction of muscle recruitment patterns. The prone leg extension is theorized to identify proximal muscle disturbances which are a result of distal injury or dysfunction (i.e. an ankle sprain. This case study compares the trunk and hip muscle (bilateral lower erector spine, ipsilateral hamstring and ipsilateral gluteus maximus timing during a PLE of a 27 year old female runner during a healthy state (pre ankle sprain and 2 and 8 weeks post ankle sprain. Results and discussion The gluteus maximus muscle onsets at 8 weeks post injury appeared to occur earlier compared with 2 weeks post injury. The Right Erector Spinae at 8 weeks post injury was also active earlier compared with the participant's non-injured state. A large degree of variability can be noted within trials on the same day for all muscle groups. Conclusion An acute ankle injury did not result in a delay in gluteus maximus muscle activation. The utility of the prone leg extension as a clinical and functional test is questionable due to the normal variability seen during the test and our current inability to determine what is normal and what is dysfunctional.

  17. Trunk and hip muscle recruitment patterns during the prone leg extension following a lateral ankle sprain: A prospective case study pre and post injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Gregory J

    2006-01-01

    Background and case presentation The prone leg extension (PLE) is commonly used to identify dysfunction of muscle recruitment patterns. The prone leg extension is theorized to identify proximal muscle disturbances which are a result of distal injury or dysfunction (i.e. an ankle sprain). This case study compares the trunk and hip muscle (bilateral lower erector spine, ipsilateral hamstring and ipsilateral gluteus maximus) timing during a PLE of a 27 year old female runner during a healthy state (pre ankle sprain) and 2 and 8 weeks post ankle sprain. Results and discussion The gluteus maximus muscle onsets at 8 weeks post injury appeared to occur earlier compared with 2 weeks post injury. The Right Erector Spinae at 8 weeks post injury was also active earlier compared with the participant's non-injured state. A large degree of variability can be noted within trials on the same day for all muscle groups. Conclusion An acute ankle injury did not result in a delay in gluteus maximus muscle activation. The utility of the prone leg extension as a clinical and functional test is questionable due to the normal variability seen during the test and our current inability to determine what is normal and what is dysfunctional. PMID:16504168

  18. [Efficacy of Shangbai ointment in alleviating pain in patients with acute ankle joint lateral collateral ligament injury: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Sun, Kai; Chen, Yan; Chen, Guo-Liang; Deng, De-Jun; Jiao, Gen-Long; Li, Zhi-Zhong

    2017-03-20

    To investigate the effect of Shangbai ointment in relieving pain in patients with acute ankle joint lateral collateral ligament injury. Fifty patients with unilateral ankle injury were randomized into Shangbai ointment treatment group and control group (n=25). The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores, ankle joint circumference, Kofoed score and self-rated lower limb function were recorded before and at 3, 7, and 14 days after the treatment. The baseline data were comparable between the two groups. The VAS pain score and swelling elimination in the treatment group were better than those in the control group at 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment; the Kofoed ankle score was higher in the treatment group than in the control group at 7 and 14 days after treatment. The patients in the treatment also reported better self-rated lower limb function than those in the control group at 7 and 14 days after the treatment. Shangbai ointment treatment can rapidly relieve pain in patients with acute ankle joint lateral collateral ligament injury and improve the functional scores of the joint.

  19. The foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging of the foot and ankle can be difficult because of the complex anatomy. Familiarity with the bony and ligamentous anatomy is essential for proper evaluation of radiographic findings. Therefore, pertinent anatomy is discussed as it applies to specific injuries. Special views, tomography, arthrography, and other techniques may be indicated for complete evaluation of foot and ankle trauma

  20. Ankle sprains and instability in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Padhraig F; Hodgkins, Christopher W; Kennedy, John G

    2008-04-01

    Ankle inversion injuries are the most common traumatic injuries in dancers. Ankle stability is integral to normal mobilization and to minimizing the risk for ankle sprain. The ability of the dynamic and static stabilizers of the ankle joint to maintain their structural integrity is a major component of the normal gait cycle. In the world of dance, this quality assumes even greater importance given the range of movement and stresses imposed on the ankle during various dance routines.

  1. Different functional treatment strategies for acute lateral ankle ligament injuries in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Struijs, P. A. A.; Marti, R. K.; Assendelft, W. J. J.; Blankevoort, L.; van Dijk, C. N.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute lateral ankle ligament ruptures are common problems in present health care. Early mobilisation and functional treatment are advocated as a preferable treatment strategy. However, functional treatment comprises a broad spectrum of treatment strategies and as of yet no optimal

  2. Ultrasonography of the ankle joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Won; Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Kim, Sung Kwan; Gwak, Heui Chul [Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Dae Kyung Imaging Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Ankle disorders are a relatively common pathological condition, and ankle injuries account for approximately 14% of sports-related orthopedic emergency visits. Various imaging modalities can be used to make a diagnosis in cases of ankle pain; however, ultrasound (US) has several benefits for the evaluation of ankle pain, especially in the tendons, ligaments, and nerves of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to review the common causes of ankle pathology, with particular reference to US features. In addition, the importance of a dynamic evaluation and a stress test with US is emphasized.

  3. Ultrasonography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Won; Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Kim, Sung Kwan; Gwak, Heui Chul; Lee, Sung Moon

    2017-01-01

    Ankle disorders are a relatively common pathological condition, and ankle injuries account for approximately 14% of sports-related orthopedic emergency visits. Various imaging modalities can be used to make a diagnosis in cases of ankle pain; however, ultrasound (US) has several benefits for the evaluation of ankle pain, especially in the tendons, ligaments, and nerves of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to review the common causes of ankle pathology, with particular reference to US features. In addition, the importance of a dynamic evaluation and a stress test with US is emphasized

  4. Neuromuscular Alterations After Ankle Sprains: An Animal Model to Establish Causal Links After Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Lindsey K; McKeon, Patrick O; Fitzpatrick, Shane G; Beckemeyer, Catherine L; Uhl, Timothy L; Butterfield, Timothy A

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to the development of chronic ankle instability are not understood. Investigators have developed a hypothetical model in which neuromuscular alterations that stem from damaged ankle ligaments are thought to affect periarticular and proximal muscle activity. However, the retrospective nature of these studies does not allow a causal link to be established. To assess temporal alterations in the activity of 2 periarticular muscles of the rat ankle and 2 proximal muscles of the rat hind limb after an ankle sprain. Controlled laboratory study. Laboratory. Five healthy adult male Long Evans rats (age = 16 weeks, mass = 400.0 ± 13.5 g). Indwelling fine-wire electromyography (EMG) electrodes were implanted surgically into the biceps femoris, medial gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior muscles of the rats. We recorded baseline EMG measurements while the rats walked on a motor-driven treadmill and then induced a closed lateral ankle sprain by overextending the lateral ankle ligaments. After ankle sprain, the rats were placed on the treadmill every 24 hours for 7 days, and we recorded postsprain EMG data. Onset time of muscle activity, phase duration, sample entropy, and minimal detectable change (MDC) were assessed and compared with baseline using 2-tailed dependent t tests. Compared with baseline, delayed onset time of muscle activity was exhibited in the biceps femoris (baseline = -16.7 ± 54.0 milliseconds [ms]) on day 0 (5.2 ± 64.1 ms; t 4 = -4.655, P = .043) and tibialis anterior (baseline = 307.0 ± 64.2 ms) muscles on day 3 (362.5 ± 55.9 ms; t 4 = -5.427, P = .03) and day 6 (357.3 ± 39.6 ms; t 4 = -3.802, P = .02). Longer phase durations were observed for the vastus lateralis (baseline = 321.9 ± 92.6 ms) on day 3 (401.3 ± 101.2 ms; t 3 = -4.001, P = .03), day 4 (404.1 ± 93.0 ms; t 3 = -3.320, P = .048), and day 5 (364.6 ± 105.2 ms; t 3 = -3.963, P = .03) and for the tibialis anterior (baseline = 103.9 ± 16.4 ms

  5. Ankle syndesmotic fixation using two screws: risk of injury to the perforating branch of the peroneal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penera, Keith; Manji, Karim; Wedel, Mathew; Shofler, David; Labovitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Trans-syndesmotic screws are commonly used to repair syndesmosis ruptures and stabilize the ankle joint. Just as with any surgery, the neurovascular structures can be compromised, causing complications. We evaluated the position of the perforating branch of the peroneal artery to define the risk of arterial compromise during placement of 2 trans-syndesmotic screws. In 37 cadaveric specimens, 2 trans-syndesmotic screws were inserted 2 and 4 cm proximal to the ankle joint. The distances between the perforating branch of the peroneal artery and the screws and the other anatomic landmarks were measured. Significant differences were calculated between the male and female limbs, and regression analysis was used to determine the significant associations between the tibial length and screw location. The perforating branch of the peroneal artery passed through the interosseous membrane 3.42 ± 0.6 cm proximal to the tibial plafond. The artery was located up to 4 mm from the superior and inferior screws 51.4% and 10.8% of the time, respectively. A greater percentage of male specimens displayed close proximity between the artery and the superior screw, and the distance of the artery from the distal fibula was statistically significant compared with the distance in the female specimens. Regression analysis revealed that the greater the tibial length, the closer the superior screw was to the artery, with a negative correlation discovered for the inferior screw. We concluded that superior screw placement increased the risk of injuring the perforating branch of the peroneal artery injury, and the likelihood of injuring the artery with the inferior screw increased as the length of the tibia decreased. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative study on isokinetic capacity of knee and ankle joints by functional injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Seo, Byoung-Do; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To collect basic data for exercise programs designed to enhance functional knee and ankle joint stability based on isokinetic measurement and muscle strength evaluations in normal and impaired functional states. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the athlete group and the control group (n = 12 each). Data were collected of isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and ankle plantar and dorsiflexor strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Results] Significant intergroup differences were observed in peak torque of the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and the right flexors at 240°/sec. Significant differences were observed in peak torque/body weight in the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and in the right flexors at 180°/sec and 240°/sec. Significant peak torque differences were noted in the left ankle joint dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, right plantar flexor at 120°/sec, left plantar flexor at 30°/sec, left dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, and right dorsiflexor at 120°/sec. [Conclusion] Isokinetic evaluation stimulates muscle contraction at motion-dependent speeds and may contribute to the development of intervention programs to improve knee and ankle joint function and correct lower-extremity instability.

  7. Influence of ankle joint plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on lateral ankle sprain: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Kim, Kyungsoo; Batbaatar, Myagmarbayar; Lee, SuKyoung; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of injury involved in lateral ankle sprain is essential to prevent injury, to establish surgical repair and reconstruction, and to plan reliable rehabilitation protocols. Most studies for lateral ankle sprain posit that ankle inversion, internal rotation, and plantarflexion are involved in the mechanism of injury. However, recent studies indicated that ankle dorsiflexion also plays an important role in the lateral ankle sprain mechanism. In this study, the contributions of ankle plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on the ankle joint were evaluated under complex combinations of internal and inversion moments. A multibody ankle joint model including 24 ligaments was developed and validated against two experimental cadaveric studies. The effects of ankle plantarflexion (up to 60°) and dorsiflexion (up to 30°) on the lateral ankle sprain mechanism under ankle inversion moment coupled with internal rotational moment were investigated using the validated model. Lateral ankle sprain injuries can occur during ankle dorsiflexion, in which the calcaneofibular ligament and anterior talofibular ligament tears may occur associated with excessive inversion and internal rotational moment, respectively. Various combinations of inversion and internal moment may lead to anterior talofibular ligament injuries at early ankle plantarflexion, while the inversion moment acts as a primary factor to tear the anterior talofibular ligament in early plantarflexion. It is better to consider inversion and internal rotation as primary factors of the lateral ankle sprain mechanism, while plantarflexion or dorsiflexion can be secondary factor. This information will help to clarify the lateral ankle sprain mechanism of injury.

  8. Do orthopaedic shoes improve local dynamic stability of gait? An observational study in patients with chronic foot and ankle injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex foot and ankle fractures, such as calcaneum fractures or Lisfranc dislocations, are often associated with a poor outcome, especially in terms of gait capacity. Indeed, degenerative changes often lead to chronic pain and chronic functional limitations. Prescription footwear represents an important therapeutic tool during the rehabilitation process. Local Dynamic Stability (LDS) is the ability of locomotor system to maintain continuous walking by accommodating small perturbations that occur naturally during walking. Because it reflects the degree of control over the gait, LDS has been advocated as a relevant indicator for evaluating different conditions and pathologies. The aim of this study was to analyze changes in LDS induced by orthopaedic shoes in patients with persistent foot and ankle injuries. We hypothesised that footwear adaptation might help patients to improve gait control, which could lead to higher LDS: Methods Twenty-five middle-aged inpatients (5 females, 20 males) participated in the study. They were treated for chronic post-traumatic disabilities following ankle and/or foot fractures in a Swiss rehabilitation clinic. During their stay, included inpatients received orthopaedic shoes with custom-made orthoses (insoles). They performed two 30s walking trials with standard shoes and two 30s trials with orthopaedic shoes. A triaxial motion sensor recorded 3D accelerations at the lower back level. LDS was assessed by computing divergence exponents in the acceleration signals (maximal Lyapunov exponents). Pain was evaluated with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). LDS and pain differences between the trials with standard shoes and the trials with orthopaedic shoes were assessed. Results Orthopaedic shoes significantly improved LDS in the three axes (medio-lateral: 10% relative change, paired t-test p < 0.001; vertical: 9%, p = 0.03; antero-posterior: 7%, p = 0.04). A significant decrease in pain level (VAS score -29%) was observed

  9. The effects of powered ankle-foot orthoses on joint kinematics and muscle activation during walking in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Antoinette

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Powered lower limb orthoses could reduce therapist labor during gait rehabilitation after neurological injury. However, it is not clear how patients respond to powered assistance during stepping. Patients might allow the orthoses to drive the movement pattern and reduce their muscle activation. The goal of this study was to test the effects of robotic assistance in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury using pneumatically powered ankle-foot orthoses. Methods Five individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (ASIA C-D participated in the study. Each subject was fitted with bilateral ankle-foot orthoses equipped with artificial pneumatic muscles to power ankle plantar flexion. Subjects walked on a treadmill with partial bodyweight support at four speeds (0.36, 0.54, 0.72 and 0.89 m/s under three conditions: without wearing orthoses, wearing orthoses unpowered (passively, and wearing orthoses activated under pushbutton control by a physical therapist. Subjects also attempted a fourth condition wearing orthoses activated under pushbutton control by them. We measured joint angles, electromyography, and orthoses torque assistance. Results A therapist quickly learned to activate the artificial pneumatic muscles using the pushbuttons with the appropriate amplitude and timing. The powered orthoses provided ~50% of peak ankle torque. Ankle angle at stance push-off increased when subjects walked with powered orthoses versus when they walked with passive-orthoses (ANOVA, p Two of the five subjects were able to control the orthoses themselves using the pushbuttons. The other three subjects found it too difficult to coordinate pushbutton timing. Orthoses assistance and maximum ankle angle at push-off were smaller when the subject controlled the orthoses compared to when the therapist-controlled the orthoses (p Conclusion Mechanical assistance from powered ankle-foot orthoses improved ankle push-off kinematics without

  10. The proportion of distal fibula Salter-Harris type I epiphyseal fracture in the paediatric population with acute ankle injury: a prospective MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsli, Mikael; Torfing, Trine; Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2016-03-01

    Ankle injuries are common among the paediatric population. There are few prospective studies utilizing MRI to diagnose a clinically suspected Salter-Harris type I of the distal fibula (SH1FDF). The aim of this study was to examine the proportion of clinically suspected SH1FDF in children. All paediatric patients with ankle injury, seen at the emergency room from September 2012 to May 2013 at a single institution, underwent a standardized clinical examination, and their radiographs were obtained if found necessary. All images and data were recorded prospectively and patients suspected of having SH1FDF were referred for MRI of the ankle joint. Out of 391 paediatric patients seen at the emergency room with ankle injury, 38 patients had a clinical suspicion of SH1FDF. A total of 31 patients, 18 male and 13 female, with a mean age of 10 ± 2.86 years, were included in the study. Only seven patients were excluded from the study. MRI was obtained on an average of 6.9 ± 2.87 days. None of the included patients had evidence of SH1FDF on MRI. Our study and review of the literature verifies the high false-positive rate of clinically suspected SH1FDF. Most children had ligamentous lesions, bone contusion or joint effusion, rather than SH1FDF.

  11. THE EFFECT OF TALO-CRURAL JOINT MANIPULATION ON RANGE OF MOTION AT THE ANKLE JOINT IN SUBJECTS WITH A HISTORY OF ANKLE INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Skye; Fryer, Gary A.; McLaughlin, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: There is little research available on the effects of peripheral joint manipulation. Only a few studies have examined the effect of manipulation on ankle range of motion, with conflicting results. This study aimed to determine whether a single high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation to the talo-crural joint altered ankle range of motion in subjects with a history of lateral ligament sprain. Methods: Male and female volunteers (N=52) with a history of lateral ligament sprain were randomly assigned into either an experimental group (n=26) or a control group (n=26). Those in the experimental group received a single HVLA thrust to the talo-crural joint, whilst those in the control group received no treatment intervention. Pre-test and post-test measurements of passive dorsiflexion range of motion were taken. Results: No significant changes in dorsiflexion range of motion were detected between manipulated ankles and those of control subjects using dependent and independent t-tests. Ankles that cavitated displayed a greater mean DFR and large effect size (d=0.8) compared to those that did not gap and cavitate, but analysis with ANOVA revealed these differences to be not significant. Conclusion: HVLA manipulation of the ankle did not increase dorsiflexion range of motion in subjects with a history of lateral ligament sprain. PMID:17987212

  12. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  13. Acute Ankle Sprains in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. van Rijn (Rogier)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOf all injuries of the musculoskeletal system, 25% are acute lateral ankle sprains.1 In the USA and the UK there are about 23,000 and 5000 ankle sprains, respectively, each day. In the Netherlands approximately 600,000 people sustain an ankle injury each year, of those 120,000 occur

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Decision Rules to Exclude Fractures in Acute Ankle Injuries : Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Ingrid; Krijnen, Wim P.; van de Leur, Johannes P.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Goddard, Robert J.

    Background: Ankle decision rules are developed to expedite patient care and reduce the number of radiographs of the ankle and foot. Currently, only three systematic reviews have been conducted on the accuracy of the Ottawa Ankle and Foot Rules (OAFR) in adults and children. However, no systematic

  15. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  16. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  17. Acute ankle sprain in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers. Because of the relative frequency of this injury and its wide acceptance as a likely part of an active lifestyle, in many individuals it may not receive the careful attention it deserves. An extreme ankle range of motion and excellent ankle stability are fundamental to success in dance. Hence, following a proper treatment protocol is crucial for allowing a dancer who suffers an ankle sprain to return to dance as soon as possible without impaired function. This article reviews the basic principles of the etiology and management of ankle sprain in dancers. Key concepts are on-site examination and treatment, early restoration, dance-specific rehabilitation, and a carefully administered safe return to dance. Additionally, injuries that may occur in conjunction with ankle sprain are highlighted, and practical, clinically relevant summary concepts for dance healthcare professionals, dance scientists, dance teachers, and dancers are provided.

  18. Evaluation of the effectiveness of toe board energy-absorbing material for foot, ankle, and lower leg injury reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalak, John P; Stitzel, Joel D

    2018-02-17

    Since 2000, numerous improvements have been made to the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, Incorporated (NASCAR®) driver restraint system, resulting in improved crash protection for motorsports drivers. Advancements have included seats, head and neck restraints (HNRs), seat belt restraint systems, driver helmets, and others. These enhancements have increased protection for drivers from severe crash loading. Extending protection to the driver's extremities remains challenging. Though the drivers' legs are well contained for lateral and vertical crashes, they remain largely unrestrained in frontal and frontal oblique crashes. Sled testing was conducted for the evaluation of an energy-absorbing (EA) toe board material to be used as a countermeasure for leg and foot injuries. Testing included baseline rigid toe boards, tests with EA material-covered toe boards, and pretest positioning of the 50th percentile male frontal Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) lower extremities. ATD leg and foot instrumentation included foot acceleration and tibia forces and moments. The sled test data were evaluated using established injury criteria for tibial plateau fractures, leg shaft fractures, and calcaneus, talus, ankle, and midfoot fractures. A polyurethane EA foam was found to be effective in limiting axial tibia force and foot accelerations when subjected to frontal impacts using the NASCAR motorsport restraint system.

  19. Malreduction of syndesmosis injury associated with malleolar ankle fracture can be avoided using Weber's three indexes in the mortise view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futamura, Kentaro; Baba, Tomonori; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Morohashi, Itaru; Kanda, Akio; Obayashi, Osamu; Sato, Kazuo; Ueda, Yasuhisa; Kurata, Yoshiaki; Tsuji, Hideki; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    Malalignment of syndesmosis is generally associated with a poor outcome, yet occurs at a high rate in malleolar ankle fractures. In this study, we examine whether malreduction of syndesmosis injury associated with malleolar ankle fracture can be avoided using Weber's three indexes in the mortise view. Of 156 patients with malleolar ankle fracture who underwent surgery from December 2012 to March 2016 at two medical facilities, 24 patients who received syndesmotic screw fixation were included in the study. Fractures were Danis-Weber types B and C in 8 (8/134, 6.0%) and 16 (16/22, 72.7%) patients, respectively. Using axial computed tomography (CT), we calculated the difference between injured and non-injured sides for each of three parameters: tibiofibular clear space (TFCS), anterior tibiofibular interval (ATF), and fibular rotation (θ fib ). Malreduction was diagnosed if one or more of the three parameters had an abnormal value. Weber's three indexes in the mortise view on the injured side were used to determine whether reduction of syndesmosis was performed successfully. Consistency between the evaluation of reduction of syndesmosis in axial CT images and reevaluation of mortise views was examined by calculation of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). The rate of malreduction of syndesmosis in axial CT images was 29.2% (7/24). Re-evaluation in the mortise view confirmed malreduction of syndesmosis in six of the seven subjects, all of whom also had malreduction based on axial CT images. The one subject in whom malreduction could not be detected in a mortise view showed an abnormal value only for ATF. Use of the mortise view for perioperative diagnosis had a sensitivity of 0.857, specificity of 1.000, PPV of 1.000, and NPV of 0.944. The results of our study show that malreduction of syndesmosis can be avoided by careful interpretation of intraoperative perspective mortise views based on Weber's three

  20. Whole-body vibration improves ankle spasticity, balance, and walking ability in individuals with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Taesung; Jung, Kyoungsim; Lee, Mingoo; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2018-04-07

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on ankle spasticity, balance, and walking ability in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) at cervical level. Twenty-eight patients with cervical iSCI were randomly assigned to WBV (n = 14) or control group (n = 14). WBV group received WBV training, while control group was treated with placebo-treatment. All interventions were given for 20-min, twice a day, 5-days a week for 8-weeks. The spasticity of ankle plantar-flexors was assessed by estimating passive resistive force using a hand-held dynamometer. Balance was analyzed based on postural sway length (PSL) using a force plate. Timed-Up and Go test (TUG) and 10 m-Walk Test (10MWT) were used to assess walking ability. Both groups showed significant improvements in spasticity, balance and walking ability. Also, the significant differences between two groups were demonstrated in the outcomes of spasticity (3.0±1.7 vs 0.9±1.2), PSL (6.4±1.2 vs 3.2±0.9 with eyes-open, and 15.1±10.9 vs 7.4±4.3 with eyes-closed), TUG (2.3±1.3 vs 1.0±1.0), and 10MWT (3.5±2.3 vs 1.3±1.4). WBV may be a safe and effective intervention to improve spasticity, balance and walking ability in individuals with cervical iSCI. Thus, WBV may be used to improve these symptoms in clinics.

  1. Ankle instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krips, Rover; de Vries, Jasper; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The ankle joint is the most congruent joint of the human body. Stability is provided by the bony configuration of the ankle mortise and the talar dome and by the ankle ligaments. During ankle motions, rotation and translation around and along the movement axes occur. Soft tissue stability is

  2. Cost-effectiveness of the SEN-concept: Specialized Emergency Nurses (SEN treating ankle/foot injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Tulder Maurits W

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency Departments (EDs are confronted with progressive overcrowding. As a consequence, the workload for ED physicians increases and waiting times go up with the risk of unnecessary complications and patient dissatisfaction. To cope with these problems, Specialized Emergency Nurses (SENs, regular ED-nurses receiving a short, injury-specific course, were trained to assess and treat minor injuries according to a specific protocol. Methods An economic evaluation was conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial comparing House Officers (HOs and SENs in their assessment of ankle and foot injuries. Cost prices were established for all parts of healthcare utilization involved. Total costs of health care utilization were computed per patient in both groups. Cost-effectiveness was investigated by comparing the difference in total cost between groups with the difference in sensitivity and specificity between groups in diagnosing fractures and severe sprains. Finally, cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated and presented on a cost-effectiveness plane. Results No significant differences were seen between treatment groups for any of the health care resources assessed. However, the waiting times for both first assessment by a treatment officer and time spent waiting between hearing the diagnosis and final treatment were significantly longer in the HO group. There was no statistically significant difference in costs between groups. The total costs were € 186 (SD € 623 for patients in the SEN group and € 153 (SD € 529 for patients in the HO group. The difference in total costs was € 33 (95% CI: – € 84 to € 155. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was € 27 for a reduction of one missed diagnosis and € 18 for a reduction of one false negative. Conclusion Considering the benefits of the SEN-concept in terms of decreased workload for the ED physicians, increased patient satisfaction and decreased waiting times

  3. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholmer, E.; Andersen, A.; Andersen, S.B.; Funder, V.; Joergensen, J.P.; Niedermann, B.; Vuust, M.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a clinical prospective investigation 102 patients with fresh ankle injuries underwent ankle arthrography and surgery for rupture of the lateral ligaments of the ankle. Three hypotheses concerning the improvement of the arthrographic diagnosis of rupture of the calcaneofibular ligament were tested. Two were rejected. Improvement in the diagnostic specificity was possible by combining arthrography with a stress inversion test, but the sensitivity of this combination was low. It was demonstrated that absence of peroneus sheath filling was a better diagnostic sign with good rather than with poor recess filling. (Auth.)

  4. Clinical benefit of the FIFA 11 programme for the prevention of hamstring and lateral ankle ligament injuries among amateur soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouni-Garcia, Rauf; Carratala-Munuera, Concepcion; Orozco-Beltran, Domingo; Lopez-Pineda, Adriana; Asensio-Garcia, María Rosario; Gil-Guillen, Vicente F

    2017-06-22

    To analyse the relationship between the implementation of 'the 11' protocol during the regular season in a men's amateur soccer team and the rate of hamstring and lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries, and to estimate the clinical benefit of the programme according to the type of injury and the position field. This cohort study was conducted in two different men's amateur soccer teams. During two seasons, the exposed group (43 players) performed 'the 11' protocol twice a week, and the unexposed group (43 players) performed the regular training programme. All players trained three times per week for 1.5 hours per day. Data collection was performed for every 1000 hours of play. 18 hamstring injuries (injury rate (IR) of 2.26 injuries/1000 training+competition hours) and 15 LAL injuries (IR of 1.88 injuries/1000) were registered in the exposed group. In the unexposed group, there were 25 LAL injuries (IR of 3.14 injuries/1000) and 35 hamstring injuries (IR of 4.39 injuries/1000). The number needed to treat to prevent one new case was 3.9 in LAL injuries, 3.31 in biceps femoris injuries and 10.7 in recurrent hamstring injuries. 'The 11' programme reduced the incidence of hamstring and LAL injuries in amateur players. According to the field position, the programme was effective for defenders and midfielders. In accordance with the type of injury, the exposed group had a lower risk of LAL, biceps femoris and hamstring injuries compared with those in the unexposed group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Risk Factors for Parachute Injuries and Airborne Student Observations on the Parachute Ankle Brace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-03

    Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise . 30: 975...factors among armor battalion soldiers at Ft Riley, Kansas. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise . 35: S278. 20. Davis WR (1964). Parachute...police (Army). Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise . 35: S279. 34. Heir T, and Eide G (1997). Injury proneness in infantry conscripts

  6. MDCT classification of osseous ankle and foot injuries; MDCT-Klassifikation knoecherner Verletzungen des oberen Sprunggelenks und des Fusses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opherk, J.P.; Rosenthal, H.; Galanski, M. [Medizinische Hochschule, Abteilung Diagnostische Radiologie, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Conventional radiography plays an essential role in the primary evaluation of acute ankle and foot trauma. In the case of complex injuries, however, subsequent computed tomography (CT) is nowadays recommended. In this connection, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) allows better temporal, spatial, and contrast resolution compared with the conventional single-slice spiral CT. Multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional reconstruction of the acquired data sets are also helpful tools for critical assessment of therapeutic intervention. This report reviews the potential of the MDCT technique for accurate fracture classification, precise illustration of displaced components, and postoperative control of arrangement of typical lesions. (orig.) [German] Die konventionelle Radiographie spielt bei der initialen Diagnostik akuter Verletzungen des oberen Sprunggelenks und des Fusses eine essenzielle Rolle. Im Falle komplexer Frakturen ist jedoch eine weiterfuehrende computertomographische Diagnostik empfehlenswert. Dabei ist die Multidetektorcomputertomographie (MDCT) der konventionellen Einzeilencomputertomographie hinsichtlich Zeit-, Orts- und Kontrastaufloesung deutlich ueberlegen. Die multiplanare Reformation und dreidimensionale Rekonstruktion des akquirierten Datensatzes sind zudem bei der Beurteilung therapeutischer Interventionen aussagekraeftige Werkzeuge. Der vorliegende Beitrag gibt einen Ueberblick ueber die exakte Frakturklassifikation, die praezise Abbildung dislozierter Komponenten und die postoperative Stellungskontrolle typischer Verletzungen mit dieser Technik. (orig.)

  7. Knee and ankle injuries from playing football; Knie- und Sprunggelenkverletzungen beim Fussballspiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, J.; Scheurecker, G. [Roentgeninstitut am Schillerpark, Linz (Austria)

    2010-05-15

    Soccer is the most common sport activity worldwide. Over the last two decades the increase in soccer players has mainly been due to increased interest by females. In general, soccer is a relatively safe sport activity, especially if minor injuries resulting in short periods of absence from playing or training are neglected. However, due to the high number of soccer players severe injuries are also frequent. These are a problem not only for the injured player and the team but may also become problematic for the socio-economic system. In up to 80-90% structures of the lower extremities are injured. For sufficient radiological diagnosis knowledge of the biomechanics of the soccer game and some details about the history of the injury may be of help. To prevent soccer injuries or keep the degree of injury low, special programs had been developed. (orig.) [German] Fussball ist die weltweit am meisten verbreitete Sportart. Der Zuwachs an Fussballspieler(innen) in den letzten beiden Jahrzehnten wird jedoch hauptsaechlich auf das verstaerkte Interesse an weiblichen Spielern zurueckgefuehrt. Das Fussballspiel gilt grundsaetzlich, insbesondere wenn man geringfuegige Verletzungen, die keine therapeutischen Massnahmen notwendig machen, sondern lediglich eine kurzfristige Trainings- oder Spielpause bedingen, als eine relativ sichere Sportart. Auf Grund der Vielzahl an SpielerInnen kommt es allerdings doch zu einer betraechtlichen Anzahl durchaus sehr schwerer Verletzungen. Diese Tatsache stellt ein Problem fuer Spieler und Team dar und mag moeglicherweise auch fuer das soziooekonomische System problematisch werden. Von Verletzungen sind v. a. auf Grund der Natur des Spieles die unteren Extremitaeten betroffen. Zur Durchfuehrung einer suffizienten radiologischen Diagnostik sind Kenntnisse der moeglichen Verletzungsmechanismen und eine Anamneseerhebung von nicht zu unterschaetzendem Wert. Um jedoch derartige Laesionen zu vermeiden bzw. gering zu halten, wurde ueber die Jahre

  8. Dynamic ultrasound evaluation of the syndesmosis ligamentous complex and clear space in acute ankle injury, compared to magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle van Niekerk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Syndesmosis injuries are often more serious than an injury to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle, with double the recovery time, chronic discomfort and joint instability. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is considered as the best imaging modality to assess the integrity of the syndesmotic ligamentous complex and clear space, a dynamic ultrasound evaluation may provide an alternative imaging option worthy of exploring. Aim: The aim of this article is to compare the sensitivity and specificity of musculoskeletal ultrasound and MRI, in the diagnosis of syndesmosis pathology, with surgical findings as the reference point. Method: MRI was performed on 114 participants presenting with pain over the lateral aspect of the ankle after injury. This was followed by a dynamic ultrasound examination during which the anterior tibiofibular ligament (ATiFL was assessed for continuity, contour and haematoma. The tibiofibular clear space was measured with the ankle in a neutral position, followed by internal and external rotation. Results: The Fisher’s exact test was used to determine non-random associations between variables and compute statistical significance (p < 0.05. Ultrasound achieved a sensitivity of 86.3%, specificity of 97% with a false-positive rate of 3%. The sensitivity of MRI is similar to that of ultrasound (86% with a specificity of 100%. Conclusion: Although both imaging tests performed very well, MRI was slightly better at excluding pathology while both tests performed equally in demonstrating pathology. As a simple, inexpensive and reproducible test, dynamic ultrasound can thus be considered as an alternative to MRI in acute ankle pathology.

  9. A Systematic Review on the Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain Brace versus Other Functional Treatment Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, Ingrid; Backx, Frank; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2011-01-01

    Ankle injuries, especially ankle sprains, are a common problem in sports and medical care. Ankle sprains result in pain and absenteeism from work and/or sports participation, and can lead to physical restrictions such as ankle instability. Nowadays, treatment of ankle injury basically consists of

  10. A surgical ankle sprain pain model in the rat: Effects of morphine and indomethacin

    OpenAIRE

    Young Kim, Hee; Wang, Jigong; Chung, Kyungsoon; Mo Chung, Jin

    2008-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a frequent injury in humans that results in pain, swelling and difficulty in walking on the affected ankle. Currently a suitable animal model resembling human ankle sprain is lacking. Here, we describe an animal ankle sprain model induced by ankle ligament injury (ALI) in rats. Cutting combinations of the lateral ankle ligament complex produced pain, edema and difficulty of weight bearing, thereby mimicking severe (grade III) ankle sprain in humans. Analgesic compounds, morphi...

  11. Balance failure in single limb stance due to ankle sprain injury: an analysis of center of pressure using the fractal dimension method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2014-01-01

    Instrumented postural control analysis plays an important role in evaluating the effects of injury on dynamic stability during balance tasks, and is often conveyed with measures based on the displacement of the center-of-pressure (COP) assessed with a force platform. However, the desired outcome of the task is frequently characterized by a loss of dynamic stability, secondary to injury. Typically, these failed trials are discarded during research investigations, with the potential loss of informative data pertaining to task success. The novelty of the present study is that COP characteristics of failed trials in injured participants are compared to successful trial data in another injured group, and a control group of participants, using the fractal dimension (FD) method. Three groups of participants attempted a task of eyes closed single limb stance (SLS): twenty-nine participants with acute ankle sprain successfully completed the task on their non-injured limb (successful injury group); twenty eight participants with acute ankle sprain failed their attempt on their injured limb (failed injury group); sixteen participants with no current injury successfully completed the task on their non-dominant limb (successful non-injured group). Between trial analyses of these groups revealed significant differences in COP trajectory FD (successful injury group: 1.58±0.06; failed injury group: 1.54±0.07; successful non-injured group: 1.64±0.06) with a large effect size (0.27). These findings demonstrate that successful eyes-closed SLS is characterized by a larger FD of the COP path when compared to failed trials, and that injury causes a decrease in COP path FD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The tuning fork test—a useful tool for improving specificity in “Ottawa positive” patients after ankle inversion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissmann, P D; Han, K H

    2006-01-01

    The Ottawa ankle rules are a clinical instrument calibrated towards a high sensitivity in order not to miss any fractures of the ankle or mid‐foot. This is at the cost of a mean specificity of around only 32%. The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of tuning fork testing in combination with existing Ottawa guidance for increasing the specificity in detecting fractures of the lateral malleolus. A prospective pilot study was carried out, in which a single trained investigator examined all patients with already “Ottawa positive” findings for possible lateral malleolus injury by applying a tuning fork (C° 128 Hz). The tuning fork test findings were compared with formal reports of plain ankle radiographs using simple cross‐table analysis. The observed prevalence of ankle fractures was 5 of 49 (10%). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated as 100% and 61%, respectively, for tuning fork testing on the tip of the lateral malleolus (TLM), and as 100% and 95%, respectively, for testing on the distal fibula shaft (DFS). The associated positive and negative likelihood ratios were 2.59 and 0 (TLM), and 22 and 0 (DFS), respectively. The data were significant, with p = 0.014 (TLM) and p<0.001 (DFS). This study suggests that additional tuning fork testing of “Ottawa positive” patients may lead to a marked reduction in ankle radiographs, with consequently reduced radiation exposure and journey time. This may be particularly relevant in situations where radiological facilities are not readily available (expedition medicine) or where access to these has to be prioritised (major incidents, natural catastrophes). PMID:16988308

  13. Ankle Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Ankle ProblemsFollow this chart for more information about problems that can cause ankle pain. Our trusted Symptom Checker is written and ...

  14. [Ankle fracture in adolescents: triplanar injury associated to fracture of leg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzmar-Grimalt, D; Escudero-Heldt, M; Aldunate-González, J T; Plaza-Guzmán, N

    2016-01-01

    the vast mayority of epiphyseal children fractures could be classified according to Salter Harris. There are other types of patterns such as triplanar and Tillaux fractures. The former is a complex type with fracture lines in sagital, axial and frontal planes. These fractures have main complications such as early epiphyseal closure, mechanical axis malalignment and gait disturbances. A clinical case is pictured which had a tibial shaft and ipsilateral triplanar fracture, this complex scenario of rare ocurrence was treated with reduction and osteosynthesis of both fractures. This clinical case is shown to help in the management of these injuries that with the early sport practice initiation, could appear more frequently.

  15. Comprehensive Assessment of Ankle Syndesmosis Injury Using 3D Isotropic Turbo Spin-Echo Sequences: Diagnostic Performance Compared With That of Conventional and Oblique 3-T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minchul; Choi, Yun Sun; Jeong, Min Sun; Park, Mira; Chun, Tong Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 3D sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) sequences in the evaluation of ankle syndesmosis injuries, compared with that of conventional orthogonal MRI and oblique proton density-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences performed with 3-T MRI. This retrospective study included 98 patients with suspected ankle syndesmosis injuries who underwent both MRI and surgery. Fifty patients (mean [± SD] age, 34.5 ± 15.3 years) had acute injuries, and 48 patients (mean age, 28.5 ± 9.6 years) had chronic injuries. For both groups, the diagnostic performance of each MRI sequence with regard to syndesmosis injuries was evaluated. Arthroscopy findings were used as a reference standard to confirm diagnosis. No statistically significant differences in the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and AUC values were noted between images of the syndesmosis obtained using proton density-weighted TSE sequences and images of the syndesmosis obtained using 3D SPACE sequences (p > 0.05). Interobserver agreement regarding the diagnosis of both acute and chronic syndesmosis injuries was almost perfect for proton density-weighted TSE images (κ > 0.80) and was substantial for 3D SPACE images (κ > 0.75). Both methods of obtaining images of the syndesmosis had a diagnostic performance superior to that of conventional orthogonal MRI. The performance of 3D SPACE sequences is comparable to that of 2D proton density-weighted MR images for the diagnosis of acute and chronic syndesmosis injuries.

  16. Ankle arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boc, Steven F; Norem, Nathan D

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of current ankle arthrodesis techniques. Surgical indications, pathophysiology of the ankle joint, preoperative assessment of the patient, surgical techniques for ankle fusion, and complications/sequelae are discussed. The surgical techniques section focuses on crossed screws arthrodesis and intramedullary nailing for tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. Other techniques, including arthroscopic fusion, are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Characteristics of myogenic response and ankle torque recovery after lengthening contraction-induced rat gastrocnemius injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Hongsun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although muscle dysfunction caused by unfamiliar lengthening contraction is one of most important issues in sports medicine, there is little known about the molecular events on regeneration process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal and spatial expression patterns of myogenin, myoD, pax7, and myostatin after acute lengthening contraction (LC-induced injury in the rat hindlimb. Methods We employed our originally developed device with LC in rat gastrocnemius muscle (n = 24. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane (aspiration rate, 450 ml/min, concentration, 2.0%. The triceps surae muscle of the right hindlimb was then electrically stimulated with forced isokinetic dorsi-flexion (180°/sec and from 0 to 45°. Tissue contents of myoD, myogenin, pax7, myostatin were measured by western blotting and localizations of myoD and pax7 was measured by immunohistochemistry. After measuring isometric tetanic torque, a single bout of LC was performed in vivo. Results The torque was significantly decreased on days 2 and 5 as compared to the pre-treatment value, and recovered by day 7. The content of myoD and pax7 showed significant increases on day 2. Myogenin showed an increase from day 2 to 5. Myostatin on days 5 and 7 were significantly increased. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that myoD-positive/pax7-positive cells increased on day 2, suggesting that activated satellite cells play a role in the destruction and the early recovery phases. Conclusion We, thus, conclude that myogenic events associate with torque recovery after LC-induced injury.

  18. The effectiveness of exercise on recovery and clinical outcomes of soft tissue injuries of the leg, ankle, and foot: A systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitzik, Erin; Jacobs, Craig; Wong, Jessica J; Côté, Pierre; Shearer, Heather M; Randhawa, Kristi; Sutton, Deborah; Southerst, Danielle; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Brison, Robert J; Yu, Hainan; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Stern, Paula J; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne; Stupar, Maja; Mior, Silvano; Carroll, Linda J

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue injuries of the leg, ankle, or foot are common and often treated by exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of exercise for the management of soft tissue injuries of the leg, ankle, or foot. A systematic review of the literature was conducted. We searched five databases from 1990 to 2015. Relevant articles were critically appraised using Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. The evidence from studies with low risk of bias was synthesized using the best-evidence synthesis methodology. We screened 7946 articles. We critically appraised ten randomized trials and six had a low risk of bias. The evidence suggests that for recent lateral ankle sprain: 1) rehabilitation exercises initiated immediately post-injury are as effective as a similar program initiated one week post-injury; and 2) supervised progressive exercise plus education/advice and home exercise lead to similar outcomes as education/advice and home exercise. Eccentric exercises may be more effective than an AirHeel brace but less effective than acupuncture for Achilles tendinopathy of more than two months duration. Finally, for plantar heel pain, static stretching of the calf muscles and sham ultrasound lead to similar outcomes, while static plantar fascia stretching provides short-term benefits compared to shockwave therapy. We found little evidence to support the use of early or supervised exercise interventions for lateral ankle sprains. Eccentric exercises may provide short-term benefits over a brace for persistent Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fascia stretching provides short-term benefits for plantar heel pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complications and patient-injury after ankle fracture surgery. -A closed claim analysis with data from the Patient Compensation Association in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars Bo; Mersø, Camilla

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Patient Compensation Association (PCA) receives claims for financial compensation from patients who believe they have sustained damage from their treatment in the Danish health care system. In this study, we have analysed closed claims in which patients suffered injuries due...... review. All patients were adults with an iatrogenic injury, and received compensation. A root cause analysis was performed to identify whether the patient suffered the damage preoperatively, during surgery or postoperatively, and to determine the level of education of the injurious doctor. Economic...... of damages. General recommendations regarding ORIF were not followed in 21/49 of the perioperative damages. The pronation fracture was the most common. The patients received a total average compensation of 17.561 USD each. CONCLUSION: Managing the complex ankle fracture, requires considerable experience...

  20. A twofold reduction in the incidence of acute ankle sprains in volleyball after the introduction of an injury prevention program: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, R; Lian, O; Bahr, I A

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an injury prevention program, consisting mainly of an injury awareness session, technical training (with emphasis on proper take-off and landing technique for blocking and attacking) and a balance board training program, for players with recurrent sprains. Baseline data were collected during the 1992-93 season and the program was introduced during the 1993-94 season. The 1994-95 season was used to evaluate the effects of the prevention program. The coaches and players in the top two division of the Norwegian Volleyball Federation kept monthly records of exposure time and acute injuries (causing a player to miss at least one playing day). The total exposure time was 149968 h, 132757 h of training and 17211 h of match play during the three seasons. The incidence of ankle injuries was reduced from 0.9 +/- 0.1 per 1000 player hours during the 1992-93 season (48 injuries) to 0.7 +/- 0.1 during the 1993-94 season (38 injuries; NS vs. 1992-93) and to 0.5 +/- 0.1 during the 1994-95 season (24 injuries, P < 0.01 vs. 1992-93).

  1. Footwear and ankle stability in the basketball player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, O; Blocher, K; Bradbury, R L; Saxena, A; Toy, M L

    1988-04-01

    Ankle stability in basketball players is affected by footwear. Athletic shoe manufacturers have introduced specialized lacing systems and high-top performance shoes to improve ankle stability. These performance shoes not only aid in preventing ankle injuries, but also protect injured ankles.

  2. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragonez, S.D.B.; Avila, G.A. de; Calieron, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of artrography in the diagnosis of acute ligaments injuries of the ankle is discussed. The technique of examination is described. An anatomic review, diagnostic elements and the proceeding are presented emphasizing the lateral ligaments. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Altered left ventricular performance in aging physically active mice with an ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michael J; Guderian, Sophie; Wikstrom, Erik A; Huot, Joshua R; Peck, Bailey D; Arthur, Susan T; Marino, Joseph S; Hubbard-Turner, Tricia

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the impact of differing physical activity levels throughout the lifespan, using a musculoskeletal injury model, on the age-related changes in left ventricular (LV) parameters in active mice. Forty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three running wheel groups (transected CFL group, transected ATFL/CFL group, SHAM group) or a SHAM Sedentary group (SHAMSED). Before surgery and every 6 weeks after surgery, LV parameters were measured under 2.5 % isoflurane inhalation. Group effects for daily distance run was significantly greater for the SHAM and lesser for the ATLF/CFL mice (p = 0.013) with distance run decreasing with age for all mice (p age, interaction (group × age) was noted with LV posterior wall thickness-to-radius ratios (h/r) where h/r increased with age in the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice while the SHAM and CFL mice exhibited decreased h/r with age (p = 0.0002). Passive filling velocity (E wave) was significantly greater in the SHAM mice and lowest for the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice (p age. Active filling velocity (A wave) was not different between groups (p = 0.10). Passive-to-active filling velocity ratio (E/A ratio) was different between groups (p activity beginning at 9 months of age. Passive-to-active filling velocity ratio decreased with age (p activity throughout the lifespan improved LV structure, passive filling velocity, and E/A ratio by 6 to 9 months of age and attenuated any negative alterations throughout the second half of life. The diastolic filling differences were found to be significantly related to the amount of activity performed by 9 months and at the end of the lifespan.

  4. Effects of Prefabricated Ankle Orthoses on Postural Stability in Basketball Players with Chronic Ankle Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Faraji, Elahe; Daneshmandi, Hassan; Atri, Ahmad Ebrahimi; Onvani, Vahid; Namjoo, Faride Rezaee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries among athletes and instability and injury to this joint is responsible for long time loss of physical and recreational activity. Also, it can impose high costs to sport teams. Prevention of this injury is an important concern of practice and rehabilitation. One way of reducing the possibility of ankle joint injury is using an ankle orthosis. The present study aimed at inspecting the effects of two ankle orthoses on dynamic and semi-dynam...

  5. Examination of Interventions to Prevent Common Lower-Limb Injuries in the New Zealand Defense Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    ankle braces have been reported to reduce ankle injury rates in sports such as soccer" and basketball ...inci- dence of ankle sprains and other lower-limb injuries . Ankle injury incidence among basketball players, however, has been found to be unaffected...mechanisms of these injuries suggested that lateral ankle instability was a common causal factor in many of the injuries . Injury prevention

  6. [The potential of the modern methods for clinical diagnostics applied in the forensic medical assessment of functional disturbances of the ankle joint in the case of its injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabova, Z S; Fetisov, V A

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is focused on the problems of clinical diagnostics of the functional disturbances in the locomotor apparatus as exemplified by the injuries to the ankle joint. The results of analysis of the entire range of up-to-date diagnostic tools for the purpose suggest the necessity of revision of obsolete methodological principles still adopted in forensic medicine as regards the problem being condidered. It is proposed based on the recent progress achieved by the specialists in traumatology, orthopedics, medicosocial expertise, and the related areas that a forensic medical expert should not confine oneself to the consideration of the sole criterion, such as "the range of articular movements", for the estimation of the severity of harm to health in the patients presenting with a joint injury.

  7. [Motor skills and safety of patients with bi- or trimalleolar ankle injury : Comparison with healthy, active, age-matched control subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudovici-Krug, Dana; Benkenstein, Monique; Derlien, Steffen; Best, Norman

    2017-01-26

    Do patients with bi- or trimalleolar ankle injury show differences in motor skills and safety in comparison with healthy, active, age-matched control subjects? Prospective controlled cross-sectional study. Inclusion of 17 patients with bi- or trimalleolar ankle injury (mean 1.5 years postsurgery) and 23 healthy, active subjects of comparable age (fitness studio). Measurement instruments: motor test procedures and questionnaires. Comparison of patients and control subjects by routine daily motor function: patients  0.05), fear of falling: patients > controls (p = 0.003) and physical activity: patients < controls (p = 0.032). There were no significant motor deficits in activities of daily life between the patients and controls, only tendencies; however, the patients showed definite limitations with an increased fear of falling and a reduced physical activity compared with the healthy control group. The resulting differences should be positively influenced by appropriate enhancement of training or participation in sports courses. The aim is to achieve a similar quality of life by a perception of safety and trust in one's own motor skills.

  8. Ankle replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total - discharge; Total ankle arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement - discharge; Osteoarthritis - ankle ... You had an ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped ... an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were ...

  9. Distinguishing active from passive components of ankle plantar flexor stiffness in stroke, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Grey, Michael James; Crone, Clarissa

    2010-01-01

    to distinguish the contribution of active reflex mechanisms from passive muscle properties to ankle joint stiffness in 31 healthy, 10 stroke, 30 multiple sclerosis and 16 spinal cord injured participants. The results were compared to routine clinical evaluation of spasticity. METHODS: A computer......-controlled robotic device applied stretches to the ankle plantar flexor muscles at different velocities (8-200deg/s; amplitude 6 degrees ). The reflex threshold was determined by soleus EMG. Torque and EMG data were normalized to the maximal torque and EMG evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve...

  10. High resolution ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of tendino-ligamentous injuries around ankle joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevien El-Liethy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: US is an excellent tool for imaging soft tissue abnormalities, as it allows rapid, in-expensive detailed examination of the structures of the ankle joint. US and MRI are two complementary tools of investigation with the former being used as primary effective tool of investigation and the latter is done to confirm the diagnosis.

  11. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool in assessing deltoid ligament injury in supination external rotation fractures of the ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henari, Shwan

    2011-10-01

    The medial deltoid ligament is the primary stabilizing structure in the ankle joint following lateral malleolar fracture. However, medial deltoid ligament ruptures are difficult to diagnose using current imaging modalities. We hypothesized that ultrasonography can be used to accurately allow early clinical assessment of ankle fracture stability, thereby negating the need to perform plain film stress views of the acutely injured ankle. This prospective study included 12 patients (age range, 18-72) with supination external rotation fractures requiring operative fixation. Following induction of anesthesia, ultrasonography examination was performed, followed by an arthrogram under fluoroscopic screening. Radiographs, ultrasonography, and arthrographic findings were compared. There was 100% correlation between ultrasonography and arthrogram findings. Ultrasonography accurately diagnosed medial deltoid rupture with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100%. Plain film radiographs of the ankle had a sensitivity of 57.1% and a specificity of 60%. The difference between these was significant (χ(2)=.0091). This study demonstrates diagnostic ultrasonography to be an accurate diagnostic modality in assessing medial deltoid ligament integrity in patients with supination external rotation fractures. It offers the same sensitivity and specificity as arthrography without the need for additional invasive procedures. Its relative ease of use and lack of ionizing radiation make it a potentially useful tool, particularly in a busy trauma service.

  12. Arthrography of the ankle sprains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Moon Hee

    1985-01-01

    Ankle arthrography, by direct puncture of joint cavity, is considered to be a simple and accurate diagnostic method for a precise evaluation of ligamentous injury. Forty-seven cases of ankle arthrography were successively performed in the patients of acute ankle sprains. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how ankle arthrography can delineate the pathologic anatomy in such cases. The results are as follows: 1. Thirty cases among forty seven revealed the findings of ligament tears. 2. For better diagnostic accuracy, the arthrography should be performed within 72 hrs. after injury. 3. The anterior talofibular ligament tears were the most common (twenty-nine cases) of all and seventeen of them revealed tears without association of any other ligament tears. 4. There were ten cases of calcaneofibular ligament tears and nine of them were associated with anterior talofibular ligament tears. 5. Three cases of anterior tibiofibular and one deltoid ligament tears were demonstrated

  13. MRI of ankle sprain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Gen [Dokkyo Univ., Mibu, Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    We reviewed MR (magnetic resonance) studies in 54 patients with a sprained ankle. MR examination was able to depict the following injuries: lateral collateral ligamentous injuries, fluid collection in the peroneal tendon sheath, injury to the peroneal tendon, deltoid ligamentous injuries, the extent of subcutaneous soft tissue swelling, and various kinds of osseous injuries. A total of 21 patients underwent repair or reconstructive surgery to the lateral collateral ligaments, the findings of which were correlated with those on MR examination. MR diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 16/21; the discrepancy could be attributed to remodeling and/or reorganization which progressed during the time lapse between the MR examination and surgery in three, while the misdiagnosis resulted from the difficulty in distinguishing the acute tear from the injured scar in two. The calcaneofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 10/12; two false negatives were responsible for the difficulty in delineating its entire length on a single image and/or in differentiating between the attenuated star and the normal calcaneofibular ligament. MR imaging is a useful tool to use in deciding the surgical indication and predicting the prognosis of the patients with ankle sprain. (author)

  14. MRI of ankle sprain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Gen

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MR (magnetic resonance) studies in 54 patients with a sprained ankle. MR examination was able to depict the following injuries: lateral collateral ligamentous injuries, fluid collection in the peroneal tendon sheath, injury to the peroneal tendon, deltoid ligamentous injuries, the extent of subcutaneous soft tissue swelling, and various kinds of osseous injuries. A total of 21 patients underwent repair or reconstructive surgery to the lateral collateral ligaments, the findings of which were correlated with those on MR examination. MR diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 16/21; the discrepancy could be attributed to remodeling and/or reorganization which progressed during the time lapse between the MR examination and surgery in three, while the misdiagnosis resulted from the difficulty in distinguishing the acute tear from the injured scar in two. The calcaneofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 10/12; two false negatives were responsible for the difficulty in delineating its entire length on a single image and/or in differentiating between the attenuated star and the normal calcaneofibular ligament. MR imaging is a useful tool to use in deciding the surgical indication and predicting the prognosis of the patients with ankle sprain. (author)

  15. Complications and patient-injury after ankle fracture surgery. -A closed claim analysis with data from the Patient Compensation Association in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars Bo; Mersø, Camilla; Wong, Christian

    2018-02-01

    The Patient Compensation Association (PCA) receives claims for financial compensation from patients who believe they have sustained damage from their treatment in the Danish health care system. In this study, we have analysed closed claims in which patients suffered injuries due to the surgical treatment of their ankle fracture. We identified causalities contributing to these injuries and malpractices, as well as the economic consequences of these damages. Fifty-one approved closed claims from the PCA database from the years 2004-2009 were analysed in a retrospective systematic review. All patients were adults with an iatrogenic injury, and received compensation. A root cause analysis was performed to identify whether the patient suffered the damage preoperatively, during surgery or postoperatively, and to determine the level of education of the injurious doctor. Economic compensation, co-morbidities and end-result complications were registered. In 9 of the cases the injuries happened preoperatively, but the majority of the injuries, namely 34 occurred during surgery. In 21 of the cases the damage happened postoperatively. Thirty percentages of the patients were mistreated in more than one phase. Level of competence was medical specialists in 2/3 and junior doctors in 1/3 of the cases. In the preoperative phase both groups were equally responsible for the inflicted damage. In the perioperative- and postoperative group, medical specialists inflicted the majority of damages. General recommendations regarding ORIF were not followed in 21/49 of the perioperative damages. The pronation fracture was the most common. The patients received a total average compensation of 17.561 USD each. Managing the complex ankle fracture, requires considerable experience. This study indicates that extra attention should be paid to the most technically demanding fractures as the pronation-external-rotation-, diabetic- and fragility fractures. Surgeons should follow the recommendations for

  16. Prospectively identified deficits in sagittal plane hip-ankle coordination in female athletes who sustain a second anterior cruciate ligament injury after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and return to sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Mark V; Kiefer, Adam W; Bonnette, Scott; Riley, Michael A; Schmitt, Laura C; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Shockley, Kevin; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-12-01

    Athletes who return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are at increased risk of future ACL injury. Altered coordination of lower extremity motion may increase this risk. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine if altered lower extremity coordination patterns exist in athletes who go on to sustain a 2nd anterior cruciate ligament injury. Sixty-one female athletes who were cleared to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were included. Hip-ankle coordination was assessed prior to return to sport with a dynamic postural coordination task. Within 12 months, 14 patients sustained a 2nd ACL injury. Fourteen matched subjects were selected for comparative analysis. Cross-recurrence quantification analysis characterized hip-ankle coordination patterns. A group × target speed (slow vs. fast) × leg (involved vs. uninvolved) analysis of variance was used to identify differences. A main effect of group (P = 0.02) indicated that the single injury group exhibited more stable hip-ankle coordination [166.2 (18.9)] compared to the 2nd injury group [108.4 (10.1)]. A leg × group interaction was also observed (P = .04). The affected leg of the single injury group exhibited more stable coordination [M = 187.1 (23.3)] compared to the affected leg of the 2nd injury group [M = 110.13 (9.8)], P = 0.03. Hip-ankle coordination was altered in female athletes who sustained a 2nd anterior cruciate ligament injury after return to sport. Failure to coordinate lower extremity movement in the absence of normal knee proprioception may place the knee at risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ankle Fractures: The Operative Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hafiz Z

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ankle fractures are commonly seen in orthopaedic practice. This retrospective study of patients with ankle fractures who underwent surgical treatment in our institution from January 2000 to December 2003 was undertaken to analyze the common causes and patterns of ankle fractures; and the functional outcome of operative treatment for these fractures. Eighty patients were identified and reviewed. There were 65 male (81.3% and 15 female patients (18.7% with age ranging from 13 to 71 years old (mean, 32.3y. Common causes of ankle fractures were trauma (especially motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries and the osteoporotic bones in the elderly. Weber C (64.0% was the most common pattern of fracture at presentation. The most common operative treatment for ankle fractures was open reduction and internal fixation (73 patients, 91.2%. Excellent and good outcomes were achieved in 93.8% of cases when measured using the Olerud and Molander scoring system for foot and ankle. In conclusion, operative treatment for ankle fractures restores sufficient stability and allowed mobility of the ankle joint.

  18. Expecting ankle tilts and wearing an ankle brace influence joint control in an imitated ankle sprain mechanism during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Dominic; Wissler, Sabrina; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the functional aspects of ankle joint control is essential to developing effective injury prevention. It is of special interest to understand how neuromuscular control mechanisms and mechanical constraints stabilize the ankle joint. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine how expecting ankle tilts and the application of an ankle brace influence ankle joint control when imitating the ankle sprain mechanism during walking. Ankle kinematics and muscle activity were assessed in 17 healthy men. During gait rapid perturbations were applied using a trapdoor (tilting with 24° inversion and 15° plantarflexion). The subjects either knew that a perturbation would definitely occur (expected tilts) or there was only the possibility that a perturbation would occur (potential tilts). Both conditions were conducted with and without a semi-rigid ankle brace. Expecting perturbations led to an increased ankle eversion at foot contact, which was mediated by an altered muscle preactivation pattern. Moreover, the maximal inversion angle (-7%) and velocity (-4%), as well as the reactive muscle response were significantly reduced when the perturbation was expected. While wearing an ankle brace did not influence muscle preactivation nor the ankle kinematics before ground contact, it significantly reduced the maximal ankle inversion angle (-14%) and velocity (-11%) as well as reactive neuromuscular responses. The present findings reveal that expecting ankle inversion modifies neuromuscular joint control prior to landing. Although such motor control strategies are weaker in their magnitude compared with braces, they seem to assist ankle joint stabilization in a close-to-injury situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains fall into two main categories: acute ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability, which are among the most common recurrent injuries during occupational activities, athletic events, training and army service. Acute ankle sprain is usually managed conservatively and functional rehabilitation failure by conservative treatment leads to development of chronic ankle instability, which most often requires surgical intervention. Enhancing the in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics and pathology helps greatly in deciding the management options. Cite this article: Al-Mohrej OA, Al-Kenani NS. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach? EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:34-44. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000010. PMID:28461926

  20. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale; Translation and validation of the Dutch language version for ankle fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. de Boer (Annette ); Tjioe, R.J.C. (Roderik J.C.); Van Der Sijde, F. (Fleur); D.E. Meuffels (Duncan); P.Th. den Hoed (Pieter); C.H. van der Vlies (Cornelis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale is among the most commonly used instruments for measuring outcome of treatment in patients who sustained a complex ankle or hindfoot injury. It consists of a patient-reported and a physician-reported

  1. A New Snowboard Injury Caused by "FLOW" Bindings A Complete Deltoid Ligament and Anterior Talofibular Ankle Ligament Rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, Daniel; Hoornenborg, Daniel; Maas, Mario; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a snowboard injury that caused a combination of a complete deltoid and anterior talofibular ligament rupture, without bony or syndesmotic injury. Initial surgical repair for both ligaments was performed. We describe the etiology of this injury to demonstrate the cause and

  2. The relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Stephanie; Moore, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    The lateral ligament complex of the ankle is the most frequently injured structure in the body. Although most simple ankle sprains do not result in long-term disability, a significant number do not completely resolve, leading to residual symptoms that may persist for years. The most commonly reported symptoms, particularly among athletes, include instability, re-injury, and tendinitis. Ballet dancers are a combination of artist and high-performance athlete; consequently, they are subjected to the same types of injuries as other athletes, including lateral ankle sprains and their sequelae. Furthermore, ballet dancers perform in unusual positions such as en pointe, which places the ankle in extreme plantar flexion, requiring stabilization by surrounding muscles. Dancers' extraordinary performance demands place them at risk for other ankle injuries as well, including inflammation ofseveral tendons, especially the peroneals. This report reviews the relevant literature to characterize the scope of lateral ankle sprains and sequelae, discuss the importance of the peroneal muscles in ankle stability, and explore a relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers. Informal interviews were conducted with physical therapists who specialize in treating ballet dancers, providing a clinical context for this report. An extensive review of the literature was conducted, including electronic databases, reference lists from papers, and relevant reference texts. Numerous studies have investigated ankle sprains and residual complaints; nearly all report that lateral ankle sprains commonly lead to chronic ankle instability. Studies exploring ankle stability have demonstrated that the peroneal muscles play a crucial role in ankle stabilization; EMG studies confirm they are the first to contract during ankle inversion stress. The dancer's need for exceptional ankle stabilization may lead to peroneal overuse and tendinitis. Studies have linked peroneal

  3. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  4. Review of common and unusual causes of lateral ankle pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Surabhi [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); McNally, Eugene [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre and University of Oxford, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Lateral ankle pain is a common clinical presentation having several important causes, including lateral ligament injury, peroneal tendon injury, sinus tarsi syndrome, and nerve entrapments. However, other causes should be kept in mind in patients with unusual patterns of pain or intractable symptoms. We present a review of common and some unusual causes of lateral ankle pain including a review of post-operative imaging findings following surgery for lateral ankle ligament and peroneal tendon injuries. (orig.)

  5. Review of common and unusual causes of lateral ankle pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Surabhi; McNally, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Lateral ankle pain is a common clinical presentation having several important causes, including lateral ligament injury, peroneal tendon injury, sinus tarsi syndrome, and nerve entrapments. However, other causes should be kept in mind in patients with unusual patterns of pain or intractable symptoms. We present a review of common and some unusual causes of lateral ankle pain including a review of post-operative imaging findings following surgery for lateral ankle ligament and peroneal tendon injuries. (orig.)

  6. Unrecognised Acute Rupture of the Achilles Tendon in Severe Ankle Sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inversion ankle sprain is a common sport injury. It commonly refers to the injury of lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle. Failure to detect the concomitant injuries would lead to inappropriate treatment and suboptimal result. A case of unrecognised rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with severe inversion ankle sprain is reported.

  7. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains : an evidence-based clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M.; van den Bekerom, Michel; Elders, Leon A. M.; van Beek, Peter A.; Hullegie, Wim A. M.; Bloemers, Guus M. F. M.; de Heus, Elly M.; Loogman, Masja C. M.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J. G. M.; Kuipers, Ton; Hoogstraten, J. W. A. P.; Dekker, Rienk; ten Duis, Henk-Jan; van Dijk, C. Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van der Wees, Philip J.; de Bie, Rob A.

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical

  8. Gait Biomechanics in Participants, Six Months after First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris J.; Herte, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    No research currently exists predicating a link between the injury-affiliated sensorimotor deficits of acute ankle sprain and those of chronic ankle instability during gait. This analysis evaluates participants with a 6-month history of ankle sprain injury to affirm this link. 69 participants with a 6-month history of acute first-time lateral ankle sprain were divided into subgroups (‘chronic ankle instability’ and 'coper') based on their self-reported disability and compared to 20 non-injure...

  9. Prospective study of ankle and foot fractures in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadagiri Surender Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of ankle fractures in old people is changing as time passes on. The incidence of ankle fractures increases with advancing age. The study conducted was among a rural popula-tion which comprised of 68 women (32 women with ankle fractures & 36 women with foot fractures. Patients studied were in the age group more than 50 years. The study highlights the etiological & risk factors for fractures of ankle & foot. The commonest ankle fracture was the lateral malleolar fracture & the commonest foot fracture was the 5th Metatarsal fracture. Diabetes is a risk factor which increases the occurrence of ankle and foot injuries.

  10. Weight bearing cone beam CT scan versus gravity stress radiography for analysis of supination external rotation injuries of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, John M; Kluczynski, Melissa A; Clyde, Corey; Anders, Mark J; Mutty, Christopher E; Ritter, Christopher A

    2017-12-01

    For AO 44-B2 ankle fractures of uncertain stability, the current diagnostic standard is to obtain a gravity stress radiograph, but some have advocated for the use of weight-bearing radiographs. The primary aim was to compare measures of medial clear space (MCS) on weight-bearing cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans versus gravity stress radiographs for determining the state of stability of ankle fractures classified as AO SER 44-B2 or Weber B. The secondary aim was to evaluate the details offered by CBCT scans with respect to other findings that may be relevant to patient care. Nine patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study between April 2016 and February 2017 if they had an AO SER 44-B2 fracture of uncertain stability, had a gravity stress radiograph, and were able to undergo CT scan within seven days. The width of the MCS was measured at the level of the talar dome on all radiographs and at the mid coronal slice on CT. Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests were used to compare MCS between initial radiographs, gravity stress radiographs and weight-bearing CBCT scans. MCS on weight-bearing CBCT scan (1.41±0.41 mm) was significantly less than standard radiographs (3.28±1.63 mm, P=0.004) and gravity stress radiographs (5.82±1.93 mm, P=0.02). There was no statistically significant difference in MCS measured on standard radiographs versus gravity stress radiographs (P=0.11). Detailed review of the multiplanar CT images revealed less than perfect anatomical reduction of the fractures, with residual fibular shortening, posterior displacement, and fracture fragments in the incisura as typical findings. Similar to weight-bearing radiographs, weight-bearing CBCT scan can predict stability of AO 44-B2 ankle fractures by showing restoration of the MCS, and might be used to indicate patients for non-operative treatment. None of the fractures imaged in this study were perfectly reduced however, and further clinical research is necessary to determine if any of the

  11. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapik, Joseph J; Spiess, Anita; Darakjy, Salima; Grier, Tyson; Manning, Fred; Livingston, Elaine; Swedler, David; Amoroso, Paul; Jones, Bruce H

    2008-01-01

    ...) of the Defense Safety Oversight Council (DSOC) to evaluate the parachute ankle brace (PAB). Information provided by the questionnaire identified potential injury risk factors and comments on the PAB...

  12. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  13. Open medial ankle dislocation without associated fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlimi, F; Mahfoud, M; Berrada, M S; El Bardouni, A; El Yaacoubi, M

    2011-12-01

    Tibiotalar dislocation without associated fracture is a rare injury. We report a case of an unusual open medial ankle dislocation without any associated bony injury. After reduction and debridement under general anaesthesia, capsule suture and ligaments repair were performed. An external fixator was applied for ankle immobilization. After 3 years follow-up, functional results were excellent without signs of instability or degenerative arthritis. Copyright © 2011 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Review of ankle inversion sprain simulators in the biomechanics laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Sophia Chui-Wai; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ankle inversion ligamentous sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. The most direct way is to investigate real injury incidents, but it is unethical and impossible to replicate on test participants. Simulators including tilt platforms, trapdoors, and fulcrum devices were designed to mimic ankle inversion movements in laboratories. Inversion angle was the only element considered in early designs; however, an ankle sprain is composed of inversion and plantarflexion in clinical observa...

  15. Quantitative evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of the ankle joint complex in patients suffering from ankle sprain by the anterior drawer test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Shau, Yio-Wha; Wang, Chung-Li; Chai, Huei-Ming; Kang, Jiunn-Horng

    2013-06-01

    Biological tissues such as ligaments exhibit viscoelastic behaviours. Injury to the ligament may induce changes of these viscoelastic properties, and these changes could serve as biomarkers to detect the injury. In the present study, a novel instrument was developed to non-invasive quantify the viscoelastic properties of the ankle in vivo by the anterior drawer test. The purpose of the study was to investigate the reliability of the instrument and to compare the viscoelastic properties of the ankle between patients suffering from ankle sprain and controls. Eight patients and eight controls participated in the present study. The reliability test was performed on three randomly chosen subjects. In patient and control test, both ankles of each subject were tested to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of the ankle. The viscosity index was defined for quantitatively evaluating the viscosity of the ankle. Greater viscosity index was associated with lower viscosity. Injured and uninjured ankles of patient and both ankles of controls were compared. The instrument exhibited excellent test-retest reliability (r > 0.9). Injured ankles exhibited significantly less viscosity than uninjured ankles, since injured ankles of patients had significantly higher viscosity index (8,148 ± 5,266) compared with uninjured ankles of patients (948 ± 617; p = 0.008) and controls (1,326 ± 613; p ankle can serve as sensitive and useful clinical biomarkers to differentiate between injured and uninjured ankles. The method may provide a clinical examination for objectively evaluating lateral ankle ligament injuries.

  16. The effect of ankle joint mobility when using an isocentric reciprocating gait orthosis (IRGO) on energy consumption in people with spinal cord injury: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazpour, M; Hojjati, M J; Samadian, M; Bahramizadeh, M; Bani, M Ahmadi; Hutchins, S W

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of walking with isocentric reciprocating gait orthoses (IRGOs) utilizing two designs of ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) on specific outcome measures in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Four volunteer SCI subjects participated in this study, and were fitted with an IRGO equipped with either solid or dorsiflexion-assisted AFOs in a randomized order. Subjects walked at their self-selected speed along a flat walkway to enable a comparison of walking speed, endurance and the resulting physiological cost index (PCI) to be performed. Increased walking speed, increased distance walked and less PCI were demonstrated in walking with the IRGO incorporating dorsiflexion-assisted AFOs as compared to walking with an IRGO plus solid AFO as a control condition. This study demonstrated that people with SCI could walk at relatively higher speeds and with greater endurance and a reduced PCI when utilizing an IRGO with dorsiflexion-assisted AFO components compared to solid ones. It is therefore concluded that the IRGO incorporating dorsiflexion-assisted AFOs may be an effective alternative in helping to reduce the energy consumption experienced by people with SCI.

  17. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon-Sun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  18. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  19. The effect of ankle joint adjustment on the path of the centre of pressure and rotation during gait

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Tech. (Chiropractic) Problem Statement: Ankle sprains are one of the most common acute injuries treated by physicians (Pellow & Brantingham, 2001). Most ankle sprains involve the lateral ankle ligaments, with the anterior tibiotalar ligament being the most commonly affected in injuries involving plantarflexion and inversion. These injuries often result in restriction of movements that will limit gait (Crosbie, Green, Refshauge, 1999). Even in the event of injury to one ankle, the sensori...

  20. Clinician Recommendations and Perceptions of Factors Associated With Ankle Brace Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Jason M.; Waldhelm, Andrew; Hacke, Jonathon D.; Gross, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little information is available regarding the ankle braces orthopaedic sports medicine clinicians recommend or clinicians’ concerns that may influence their decisions to recommend use of an ankle brace. Hypotheses: (1) Clinicians most frequently recommend lace-up braces with straps. (2) Clinicians who are concerned about potential adverse side effects from ankle brace use are less likely to recommend an ankle brace to prevent ankle sprain injuries. Study Design: Descriptive survey study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Surveys were sent via e-mail to 1000 randomly selected members of the Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and 1000 randomly selected members of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA). A total of 377 individuals responded to the survey. Results: Lace-up braces, specifically lace-up braces with straps, were the most frequently recommended type of ankle brace. Regression analyses indicated that the only perceived adverse side effect significantly related to frequency of ankle brace recommendation was a potential negative influence on ankle strength. Conclusion: Based on our sample, clinicians recommend lace-up ankle braces with straps most frequently to prevent ankle sprain injuries. Clinicians who are concerned about weakness of ankle musculature may be less likely to recommend use of an ankle brace. Clinical Relevance: Clinicians may effectively reduce the number of ankle sprain injuries by recommending an ankle brace use after an initial ankle sprain injury. PMID:26131306

  1. Responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to foot movements in rats with a sprained ankle

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are common problems and often lead to persistent pain. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ankle sprain pain, the response properties of spinal dorsal horn neurons were examined after ankle sprain. Acute ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending the ankle of a rat hindlimb in a direction of plantarflexion and inversion. The weight-bearing ratio (WBR) of the affected foot was used as an indicator of pain. Single unit activities of dorsal horn neurons in res...

  2. The Ankle Injury Management (AIM) trial: a pragmatic, multicentre, equivalence randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation comparing close contact casting with open surgical reduction and internal fixation in the treatment of unstable ankle fractures in patients aged over 60 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, David J; Mistry, Dipesh; Nam, Julian; Tutton, Elizabeth; Handley, Robert; Morgan, Lesley; Roberts, Emma; Gray, Bridget; Briggs, Andrew; Lall, Ranjit; Chesser, Tim Js; Pallister, Ian; Lamb, Sarah E; Willett, Keith

    2016-10-01

    Close contact casting (CCC) may offer an alternative to open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) surgery for unstable ankle fractures in older adults. We aimed to (1) determine if CCC for unstable ankle fractures in adults aged over 60 years resulted in equivalent clinical outcome compared with ORIF, (2) estimate cost-effectiveness to the NHS and society and (3) explore participant experiences. A pragmatic, multicentre, equivalence randomised controlled trial incorporating health economic evaluation and qualitative study. Trauma and orthopaedic departments of 24 NHS hospitals. Adults aged over 60 years with unstable ankle fracture. Those with serious limb or concomitant disease or substantial cognitive impairment were excluded. CCC was conducted under anaesthetic in theatre by surgeons who attended training. ORIF was as per local practice. Participants were randomised in 1 : 1 allocation via remote telephone randomisation. Sequence generation was by random block size, with stratification by centre and fracture pattern. Follow-up was conducted at 6 weeks and, by blinded outcome assessors, at 6 months after randomisation. The primary outcome was the Olerud-Molander Ankle Score (OMAS), a patient-reported assessment of ankle function, at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were quality of life (as measured by the European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions, Short Form questionnaire-12 items), pain, ankle range of motion and mobility (as measured by the timed up and go test), patient satisfaction and radiological measures. In accordance with equivalence trial US Food and Drug Administration guidance, primary analysis was per protocol. We recruited 620 participants, 95 from the pilot and 525 from the multicentre phase, between June 2010 and November 2013. The majority of participants, 579 out of 620 (93%), received the allocated treatment; 52 out of 275 (19%) who received CCC later converted to ORIF because of loss of fracture reduction. CCC resulted in equivalent ankle

  3. Kinematic analysis of a televised medial ankle sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca E. Wade

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ankle sprains are one of the most prevalent athletic injuries. Prior work has investigated lateral ankle sprains, but research on generally more severe medial sprains is lacking. This case report performs a kinematic analysis using novel motion analysis methods on a non-contact medial ankle sprain. Peak eversion (50° occurred 0.2 seconds following ground contact, maximum velocity of 426°/s, while peak dorsiflexion (64° occurred with a greater maximum velocity (573°/s. The combination of dorsiflexion at ground contact and rapid eversion is associated with a non-contact eversion sprain. This study provides a quantitative analysis of the eversion ankle sprain injury mechanism. Keywords: Athletic injury, Biomechanics, Ankle injury, Kinematics

  4. An epidemiological survey on ankle sprain.

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, M S; Chan, K M; So, C H; Yuan, W Y

    1994-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury and is often regarded as trivial by athletes and coaches. This epidemiological study was conducted among three categories of Hong Kong Chinese athletes: national teams, competitive athletes and recreational athletes. This study shows that as much as 73% of all athletes had recurrent ankle sprain and 59% of these athletes had significant disability and residual symptoms which led to impairment of their athletic performance. This study indicates that a pro...

  5. Neuromuscular transmission failure and muscle fatigue in ankle muscles of the adult rat after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Tessler, Alan; Burns, Anthony S.

    2009-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that significant morphological changes occur in nerve-muscle connections caudal to spinal cord injury (SCI). To determine whether neuromuscular junction (NMJ) function is compromised after SCI, we investigated the contribution of NMJ failure to hindlimb muscle fatigue in control and spinalized adult rats. Repetitive supramaximal nerve stimulation was applied to two muscle-nerve preparations: medial gastrocnemius (MG)-tibial and tibialis anterior (TA)-peroneal. NMJ transmission failure was evident in control and SCI animals after repetitive stimulation. At 2 wk post-SCI, NMJ transmission failure was greater in SCI animals compared with controls, but the difference was not significant (P = 0.205 for the MG and P = 0.053 for the TA). At 6 wk post-SCI, there was a significant but small difference in NMJ transmission failure for the TA between control and spinal animals. These results demonstrate that, although there may be a mild decrement in NMJ function, NMJ transmission remains largely intact for supramaximal nerve stimulation. PMID:19644032

  6. Potential savings of a program to prevent ankle sprain recurrence: Economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hupperets, M.D.W.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Heymans, M.W.; Bosmans, J.E.; Tulder, M.W. van; Mechelen, W. van

    2010-01-01

    Background: The most common ankle injury is the lateral ankle sprain. Dutch annual sports-related ankle sprain costs can roughly be estimated at 187,200,000. Research has shown that proprioceptive training accounts for an approximated overall 50% reduction in ankle sprain recurrence rate.

  7. Potential savings of a program to prevent ankle sprain recurrence: economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hupperets, M.D.W.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Heijmans, M.W.; Bosmans, J.E.; van Tulder, M.W.; van Mechelen, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The most common ankle injury is the lateral ankle sprain. Dutch annual sports-related ankle sprain costs can roughly be estimated at 187,200,000. Research has shown that proprioceptive training accounts for an approximated overall 50% reduction in ankle sprain recurrence rate.

  8. Comparison of different outcome instruments following foot and ankle trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Christina L; Schemitsch, Emil; Bhandari, Mohit; Mathew, George; Petrisor, Brad A

    2010-12-01

    Identifying optimal treatment strategies in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries has been hampered by the use of multiple available outcome measures with unproven reliability and validity. This prospective observational study aimed to measure the correlation between six functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries. Patients 18 years of age or older with a traumatic foot or ankle injury completed the Short Form-12 (SF-12), Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA), Foot Function Index (FFI), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), Foot and Ankle Questionnaire and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale at a single followup visit. Raw scores for each of the outcome measures were calculated. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in our study. Pearson correlation coefficients provided measures of correlation. Moderate to strong correlations were found for most pairwise comparisons of raw scores and functional categorical rankings (ρ=|0.5243 to 0.92|, p Foot and Ankle Questionnaire. High correlations between scores on six commonly used functional outcome instruments suggest it is likely unnecessary to use more than one instrument when examining functional outcome in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries. However, inconsistencies between measures in the same patient population suggest a need for further validation and scrutiny.

  9. Effects of prefabricated ankle orthoses on postural stability in basketball players with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Elahe; Daneshmandi, Hassan; Atri, Ahmad Ebrahimi; Onvani, Vahid; Namjoo, Faride Rezaee

    2012-12-01

    Ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries among athletes and instability and injury to this joint is responsible for long time loss of physical and recreational activity. Also, it can impose high costs to sport teams. Prevention of this injury is an important concern of practice and rehabilitation. One way of reducing the possibility of ankle joint injury is using an ankle orthosis. The present study aimed at inspecting the effects of two ankle orthoses on dynamic and semi-dynamic postural stability in athletes with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Twenty basketball players with CAI and fifteen non-injured athletes volunteered to participate in this study. Biodex Balance System was used to assess the participants' postural stability in bilateral position at level 8 and level 2. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed in order to examine the effects of ankle orthoses. Statistical significance level was determined at Pankle supports on dynamic and semi-dynamic postural stability in the two groups and results indicated there wasn't significant difference between groups. According to our results the orthoses improved both dynamic and semi-dynamic postural stability. Therefore, orthoses can prevent injury and its reoccurrence.

  10. Differentiation of ankle sprain motion and common sporting motion by ankle inversion velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Vikki Wing-Shan; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Fung, Kwai-Yau; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2010-07-20

    This study investigated the ankle inversion and inversion velocity between various common motions in sports and simulated sprain motion, in order to provide a threshold for ankle sprain risk identification. The experiment was composed of two parts: firstly, ten male subjects wore a pair of sport shoes and performed ten trials of running, cutting, jump-landing and stepping-down motions. Secondly, five subjects performed five trials of simulated sprain motion by a supination sprain simulator. The motions were analyzed by an eight-camera motion capture system at 120 Hz. A force plate was employed to record the vertical ground reaction force and locate the foot strike time for common sporting motions. Ankle inversion and inversion velocity were calculated by a standard lower extremity biomechanics calculation procedure. Profiles of vertical ground reaction force, ankle inversion angle and ankle inversion velocity were obtained. Results suggested that the ankle was kept in an everted position during the stance. The maximum ankle inversion velocity ranged from 22.5 to 85.1 degrees/s and 114.0 to 202.5 degrees/s for the four tested motions and simulated sprain motion respectively. Together with the ankle inversion velocity reported in the injury case (623 degrees/s), a threshold of ankle inversion velocity of 300 degrees/s was suggested for the identification of ankle sprain. The information obtained in this study can serve as a basis for the development of an active protection apparatus for reducing ankle sprain injury. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Score: A study protocol for the translation and validation of the Dutch language version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); A.S. de Boer (Annette); D.E. Meuffels (Duncan); P.Th. den Hoed (Pieter); C.H. van der Vlies (Cornelis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Score is among the most commonly used instruments for measuring the outcome of treatment in patients who sustained a complex ankle or hindfoot injury. It combines a clinician-reported and a

  12. Predicting functional recovery after acute ankle sprain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R O'Connor

    Full Text Available Ankle sprains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal conditions presenting to primary care. Their clinical course is variable but there are limited recommendations on prognostic factors. Our primary aim was to identify clinical predictors of short and medium term functional recovery after ankle sprain.A secondary analysis of data from adult participants (N = 85 with an acute ankle sprain, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The predictive value of variables (age, BMI, gender, injury mechanism, previous injury, weight-bearing status, medial joint line pain, pain during weight-bearing dorsiflexion and lateral hop test recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks post injury were investigated for their prognostic ability. Recovery was determined from measures of subjective ankle function at short (4 weeks and medium term (4 months follow ups. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association between the aforementioned variables and functional recovery.Greater age, greater injury grade and weight-bearing status at baseline were associated with lower function at 4 weeks post injury (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.34. Greater age, weight-bearing status at baseline and non-inversion injury mechanisms were associated with lower function at 4 months (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.20. Pain on medial palpation and pain on dorsiflexion at 4 weeks were the most valuable prognostic indicators of function at 4 months (p< 0.01; adjusted R square=0.49.The results of the present study provide further evidence that ankle sprains have a variable clinical course. Age, injury grade, mechanism and weight-bearing status at baseline provide some prognostic information for short and medium term recovery. Clinical assessment variables at 4 weeks were the strongest predictors of recovery, explaining 50% of the variance in ankle function at 4 months. Further prospective research is required to highlight the factors

  13. Exploração operatória e redução de sindesmose em lesão de tornozelo de Weber tipo C Operative exploration and reduction of syndesmosis in Weber type C ankle injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Yang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar os métodos cirúrgicos no tratamento de fratura de tornozelo de Weber tipo C e estimar a necessidade de exploração cirúrgica da sindesmose. MÉTODOS: Quarenta e três pacientes que apresentavam fratura de tornozelo de Weber tipo C foram tratados com redução aberta e fixação interna de outubro de 2004 a dezembro de 2009. Vinte e nove pacientes foram tratados com o procedimento de rotina, que envolve redução aberta e fixação interna, exploração de sindesmose. Nos outros pacientes, foram realizados reparos adicionais. Trinta e quatro pacientes foram acompanhados durante um período médio de 31,2 meses (faixa, 18 a 50 meses, 22 pacientes desse total foram tratados com procedimentos de rotina e 12 foram tratados com exploração cirúrgica adicional da sindesmose. RESULTADOS: Todas as fraturas estavam unidas no período médio de 13,1 semanas (faixa, 10 a 18 semanas, tendo início o apoio de peso total. A escala média de tornozelo e retropé do escore da american orthopaedics foot and ankle society foi 79,86 (faixa, 65 a 98 no grupo procedimentos de rotina e 86,67 (faixa, 78 a 100 no grupo exploração da sindesmose. Os valores do escore de Olerud-Molander foram 77,27 (faixa, 55 a 100 e 86,67 (faixa, 75 a 100, respectivamente. Constatou-se diferença estatisticamente significante entre os dois grupos (P OBJECTIVE: to investigate the surgical methods in treating weber type C ankle injury and estimate the necessity of syndesmosis operative exploration. METHODS: forty three patients presenting weber type C ankle injury were treated with open reduction and internal fixation from october 2004 to december 2009. twenty nine patients were treated with routine procedure involving open reduction and internal fixation, syndesmosis exploration. additional repair was performed in the others. thirty four patients were followed during an average time of 31.2 months (range, 18 to 50 months, 22 patients of those were treated with

  14. The Epidemiology of High Ankle Sprains in National Collegiate Athletic Association Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauntel, Timothy C; Wikstrom, Erik A; Roos, Karen G; Djoko, Aristarque; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-07-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common injuries experienced by collegiate athletes. The type of ankle sprain is rarely differentiated in epidemiological studies. This differentiation is necessary, as each ankle sprain type has a unique injury mechanism and recovery period. High ankle sprains commonly result in long recovery periods. Thus, a further examination of the epidemiology of high ankle sprains is warranted. To describe the epidemiology of high ankle sprains in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports during the 2009/2010-2014/2015 academic years. Descriptive epidemiology study. NCAA Injury Surveillance Program high ankle sprain data and athlete-exposures (AEs) from 25 sports were evaluated. Certified athletic trainers recorded sport-related injury, event, and AE data during team-sanctioned events. High ankle sprain injury rates per 10,000 AEs were calculated. Percentage distributions were calculated for the amount of time lost from sport and percentage of recurrent injuries. Injury rate ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs compared injury rates by event type, participation restriction time, and sex. 95% CIs not containing 1.00 were considered statistically significant. The overall high ankle sprain injury rate was 1.00 per 10,000 AEs. Overall, 56.7% of high ankle sprain injuries occurred during competitions, and 9.8% of high ankle sprain injuries were recurrent. Men's football (2.42/10,000 AEs), wrestling (2.11/10,000 AEs), and ice hockey (1.19/10,000 AEs) had the highest high ankle sprain injury rates. In sex-comparable sports, men had higher injury rates (RR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.28-2.44). Player contact was the most common injury mechanism (60.4%), and 69.0% of injuries resulted in ≥1 day of participation restriction, with 47.1% resulting in ≥7 days of participation restriction and 15.8% resulting in >21 days of participation restriction. High ankle sprains resulted in significant participation restriction time from sport participation. The majority of

  15. Effect of Ankle Taping and Fatigue on Dynamic Stability in Athletes With and Without Chronic Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Pourkhani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion In the athletes with chronic ankle instability, taping without fatigue improved dynamic balance in the vertical direction. Taping after fatigue could not improve dynamic stability in the athletes with and without chronic ankle instability. Future researchers should examine injured and uninjured participants tested under these conditions to determine if these results are useful in selecting appropriate prophylactic method that can treat or prevent injury to the ankle during functional activities.

  16. The prevalence of clinical signs of ankle instability in club rugby ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Ankle injuries are one of the most common injuries in sport and have a high recurrence rate. Aim. To determine the prevalence of clinical signs of ankle injuries in club rugby players in South Gauteng. Methods. Institutional ethical clearance was obtained for the study. Of the 180 players from 9 clubs who were ...

  17. The effect of isokinetic and proprioception training on strength, movement and gait parameters after acute supination injury of the ankle ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mucha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a three-week isokinetic training compared to typical proprio -ceptive training on parameters of strength, movement and gait function after acute ankle ligament sprain were investigated. Thirty-nine patients were randomly allocated to two comparison groups. In group 1 (n=20a proprioceptive training and in group 2 (n=19 an isokinetic strength training (Cybex 6000® were administered. Thepatients of both groups underwent training five times a week for three weeks. Before and at the end of the treatmentcourse, in both groups isokinetic strength was tested, the range of motion in the ankle joint was recorded and gait wasanalyzed (multicomponent strength measurement platform, Henschel-System®. The maximum isokinetic torque(60°/s [Nm] and the contact time (monopedal support time of the injured leg during gait cycle were the basis for evaluation.The data obtained show that in group 2 a significantly greater increase of the maximum isokinetic torque wasattained in almost all range of motion of the ankle joint in the course of treatment. A t the same time, in group 2 theshortening of the contact time in the stance phase of the injured leg could be compensated. The active range of motionin the ankle joint was less at the end of treatment in group 2 than in group 1. The isokinetic training obviously did notonly lead to better strength regeneration, but also to a functionally more stable ankle joint with a rhythmically moreevenly balanced stance phase of the gait cycle.  These results suggest that the used isokinetic training had positive effects on functional stability after acute ankle sprain.

  18. Heel-Rise Height Deficit 1 Year After Achilles Tendon Rupture Relates to Changes in Ankle Biomechanics 6 Years After Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsson, Annelie; Willy, Richard W; Tranberg, Roy; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

    2017-11-01

    It is unknown whether the height of a heel-rise performed in the single-leg standing heel-rise test 1 year after an Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) correlates with ankle biomechanics during walking, jogging, and jumping in the long-term. To explore the differences in ankle biomechanics, tendon length, calf muscle recovery, and patient-reported outcomes at a mean of 6 years after ATR between 2 groups that, at 1-year follow-up, had less than 15% versus greater than 30% differences in heel-rise height. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventeen patients with less than 15% (30% group) side-to-side difference in heel-rise height at 1 year after ATR were evaluated at a mean (SD) 6.1 (2.0) years after their ATR. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were sampled via standard motion capture procedures during walking, jogging, and jumping. Patient-reported outcome was evaluated with Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), Physical Activity Scale (PAS), and Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). Tendon length was evaluated by ultrasonography. The Limb Symmetry Index (LSI = [Injured Side ÷ Healthy Side] × 100) was calculated for side differences. The >30% group had significantly more deficits in ankle kinetics during all activities compared with patients in the 30% group, compared with the <15% group, also had significantly lower values in heel-rise height (LSI, 72% and 95%, respectively; P < .001) and heel-rise work (LSI, 58% and 91%, respectively; P < .001) and significantly larger side-to-side difference in tendon length (114% and 106%, respectively; P = .012). Achilles tendon length correlated with ankle kinematic variables ( r = 0.38-0.44; P = .015-.027) whereas heel-rise work correlated with kinetic variables ( r = -0.57 to 0.56; P = .001-.047). LSI tendon length correlated negatively with LSI heel-rise height ( r = -0.41; P = .018). No differences were found between groups in patient-reported outcome ( P = .143-.852). Height obtained during the single-leg standing heel

  19. Mechanical instability destabilises the ankle joint directly in the ankle-sprain mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Dominic; Faschian, Katrin; Lauber, Benedikt; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    Despite massive research efforts, it remains unclear how mechanical ankle instability (MAI) and functional ankle instability (FAI) affect joint control in the situation of ankle sprain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether individuals with MAI have deficits in stabilising their ankle joint in a close-to-injury situation compared with those with FAI and healthy controls. Ankle-joint control was assessed by means of three-dimensional motion analysis and electromyography in participants with FAI and MAI (n=19), in participants with pure FAI (n=9) and in healthy controls (n=18). Close-to-injury situations were simulated during standing, walking and jumping by means of a custom-made tilt platform. Individuals with FAI and MAI displayed significantly greater maximum ankle inversion angles (+5°) and inversion velocities (+50°/s) in the walking and jumping conditions compared to those with pure FAI and controls. Furthermore, individuals in the FAI and MAI group showed a significantly decreased pre-activation of the peroneus longus muscle during jumping compared to those with FAI. No differences between groups were found for plantar flexion and internal rotation, or for muscle activities following tilting of the platform. The present study demonstrates that MAI is characterised by impairments of ankle-joint control in close-to-injury situations. This could make these individuals more prone to recurrent ankle sprains, and suggests the need for additional mechanical support such as braces or even surgery. In addition, the study highlights the fact that dynamic experimental test conditions in the acting participant are needed to further unravel the mystery of chronic ankle instability.

  20. Rehabilitation of the Ankle after Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines rehabilitation concepts applicable to acute and chronic ankle injury, providing evidence for current techniques used in ankle rehabilitation and describing a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into account empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. The article notes that…

  1. Ottawa Ankle Rules and Subjective Surgeon Perception to Evaluate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Foot and ankle injuries are frequent in emergency departments. Although only a few patients with foot and ankle sprain present fractures and the fracture patterns are almost always simple, lack of fracture diagnosis can lead to poor functional outcomes. Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the ...

  2. Comparative ultrasound study of acute lateral ankle ligament ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to establish the difference in rehabilitation outcomes between the Jump Stretch Flex Band (JSFB) programme and conventional ankle rehabilitation programmes of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. This study compares the process of healing under the guidance of ultrasound in both groups.

  3. Ottawa ankle rules and subjective surgeon perception to evaluate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Foot and ankle injuries are frequent in emergency departments. Although only a few patients with foot and ankle sprain present fractures and the fracture patterns are almost always simple, lack of fracture diagnosis can lead to poor functional outcomes. Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the reliability of ...

  4. Acute lateral ankle sprains: from functional treatment to prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemler, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Ankle sprains are common in daily life and often considered to be minor injuries. The objective in this thesis was to provide more evidence on the burden and optimal management of ankle sprains in terms of the magnitude of the problem, the prognostic consequences and ways to improve treatment and

  5. Ankle Arthrodesis Following Trauma, a Useful Salvage Procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three patients with severe open ankle injuries between January 2007 and December 2009 were seen and had wound debridement done and compressive ankle arthrodesis with a Charnley's arthrodesis clamp. Tibiotalar and tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis was the procedure carried out. Patients were followed up for 3–12 ...

  6. Modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuangli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To investigate the clinical outcome of modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis. Methods:Between November 2009 and June 2012, 28 patients with ankle arthritis were treated, among whom 11 had obvious foot varus deformity, and 17 were almost normal in appearance. There were 13 males and 15 females with an average age of 49.4 years (range, 23-67 years. The main symptoms included swelling, pain, and a limited range of motion of the ankles. The ankle joints functions were assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score and visual analog scale (VAS preoperatively and at 1 year follow-up. Results:Twenty-eight patients were followed up for 19.8 months on average (range, 1-2 years. Superficial wound infection occurred in 3 cases, and was cured after debridement; the other incisions healed by first intention without complications. All ankles were fused at 1 year follow-up after operation. The symptom was relieved completely in all patients at last follow-up without complication of implant failure, or nonunion. The postoperative AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score was 83.13±3.76, showing significant difference when compared with the preoperative score (45.38±3.21, P<0.01. VAS was significantly decreased from 8.01±0.63 to 2.31±1.05 at 1 year follow-up (P<0.05. Conclusion:Modified Blair ankle fusion has the advantages of high feasiblity, less cost and rigid fixation. It shows high reliability in pain relief and may obtain a good clinical effectiveness. Key words: Ankle; Arthritis; Arthrodesis; Fracture fixation, intramedullary

  7. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000548.htm Ankle fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An ankle fracture is a break in 1 or more ...

  8. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The ankle joint connects the foot with the leg. The ...

  9. Clinical examination results in individuals with functional ankle instability and ankle-sprain copers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Cynthia J; Arnold, Brent L; Ross, Scott E; Ketchum, Jessica; Ericksen, Jeffrey; Pidcoe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Why some individuals with ankle sprains develop functional ankle instability and others do not (ie, copers) is unknown. Current understanding of the clinical profile of copers is limited. To contrast individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI), copers, and uninjured individuals on both self-reported variables and clinical examination findings. Cross-sectional study. Sports medicine research laboratory. Participants consisted of 23 individuals with a history of 1 or more ankle sprains and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI: Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool [CAIT] score = 20.52 ± 2.94, episodes of giving way = 5.8 ± 8.4 per month), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers: CAIT score = 27.74 ± 1.69), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain and no instability (uninjured: CAIT score = 28.78 ± 1.78). Self-reported disability was recorded using the CAIT and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports. On clinical examination, ligamentous laxity and tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and pain at end ROM were recorded. Questionnaire scores for the CAIT, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports, ankle inversion and anterior drawer laxity scores, pain with palpation of the lateral ligaments, ankle ROM, and pain at end ROM. Individuals with FAI had greater self-reported disability for all measures (P < .05). On clinical examination, individuals with FAI were more likely to have greater talar tilt laxity, pain with inversion, and limited sagittal-plane ROM than copers (P < .05). Differences in both self-reported disability and clinical examination variables distinguished individuals with FAI from copers at least 1 year after injury. Whether the deficits could be detected immediately postinjury to prospectively identify potential copers is unknown.

  10. Temporomandibular disorders after whiplash injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasch, Helge; Hjorth, Tine; Svensson, Peter

    2002-01-01

    to a motor vehicle accident involving a rear collision participated in a study of TMD. The control group consisted of 20 age- and gender-matched ankle-injury patients. Participants were seen within 4 weeks and again at 6 months post-injury. The masticatory system was examined in accordance with the research...... obtained at each visit. Results: One whiplash patient and I ankle-injury patient bad jaw pain at the first visit. Palpation scores of the TMJ and the summated palpation scores only tended to be higher in patients sustaining a whiplash injury than in ankle-injury controls at the first visit. However, MPQ......, TMD symptoms and signs, MVOF and PDT, I were not significantly different in whiplash-injury and ankle-injury patients after 4 weeks and 6 months. Conclusion: TMD pain after whiplash injury and ankle injury is rare, suggesting that whiplash injury is not a major risk factor for the development of TMD...

  11. Advancements in ankle arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. Niek; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Important progress has been made during the past 30 years in arthroscopic ankle surgery. Ankle arthroscopy has gradually changed from a diagnostic to a therapeutic tool. Most arthroscopic procedures can be performed by using the anterior working area with the ankle in dorsiflexion or plantar

  12. Relation between peak knee flexion angle and knee ankle kinetics in single-leg jump landing from running: a pilot study on male handball players to prevent ACL injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameer, Mariam A; Muaidi, Qassim I

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between knee kinematics and knee-ankle kinetics during the landing phase of single leg jumping has been widely studied to identify proper strategies for preventing non-contact ACL injury. However, there is a lack of study on knee-ankle kinetics at peak knee flexion angle during jumping from running. Hence, the purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between peak knee flexion angle, knee extension moment, ankle plantar flexion moment and ground reaction force in handball players in order to protect ACL from excessive stress during single leg jumping. In addition, the study also clarifies the role of calf muscles in relieving part of ACL stresses with different knee flexion angles during landing. Fifteen active male elite handball players of Saudi Arabia have participated in this study (Age = 22.6 ± 3.5years, Height = 182 ± 3.7 cm, Weight = 87.5 ± 10.2 kg). The players performed three successful landings of single-leg jump following running a fixed distance of about 450cm. The data were collected using a 3D motion capture and analysis system (VICON). Pearson product moment correlation coefficients showed that greater peak knee flexion angle is related significantly to both lesser knee extension moment (r = -.623, P = .013) and vertical component of ground reaction force (VGRF) (r = -.688, P = .005) in landing phase. Moreover, increasing the peak knee flexion angle in landing phase tends to increase the ankle plantar flexion moment significantly (r = .832, P = .000). With an increase of the peak knee flexion angle during single leg jump landing from running, there would be less knee extension moment, low impact force and more plantar flexion moment. As such, the clinical implication of this study is that there may be a possible protective mechanism by increasing the knee flexion angle during landing phase, which tends to protect the ACL from vigorous strain and injuries.

  13. Minor or occult ankle instability as a cause of anterolateral pain after ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jordi; Peña, Fernando; Golanó, Pau

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which intra-articular injuries are associated with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. From 2008 to 2010, records of all patients who underwent ankle joint arthroscopy with anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain were reviewed. A systematic arthroscopic examination of the intra-articular structures of the ankle joint was performed. Location and characteristics of the injuries were identified and recorded. A total of 36 ankle arthroscopic procedures were reviewed. A soft-tissue occupying mass over the lateral recess was present in 18 patients (50%). A partial injury of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was observed in 24 patients (66.6%). Cartilage abrasion due to the distal fascicle of the anteroinferior tibiofibular ligament coming into contact with the talus was seen in 21 patients (58.3%), but no thickening of the ligament was observed. Injury to the intra-articular posterior structures, including the transverse ligament in 19 patients (52.7%) and the posterior surface of the distal tibia in 21 patients (58.3%), was observed. Intra-articular pathological findings have been observed in patients affected by anterolateral pain after an ankle sprain. Despite no demonstrable abnormal lateral laxity, morphologic ATFL abnormality has been observed on arthroscopic evaluation. An injury of the ATFL is present in patients with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. A degree of microinstability due to a deficiency of the ATFL could explain the intra-articular pathological findings and the patients' complaints. IV.

  14. The effects of tibiofibularis anterior ligaments on ankle joint biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaşlı, Ahmet; Erduran, Mehmet; Baktıroğlu, Lütfü; Büdeyri, Aydın; Yıldız, Didem Venüs; Havıtçıoğlu, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of anterior inferior tibiofibularis ligament (AITFL) deficient human ankle under axial loading of ankle at stance phase of gait. In order to investigate the contribution of AITFL to ankle stability, an in vitro sequential experimental setup was simulated. The measurement of posterior displacement of distal tibia and anterior displacement of the foot, in neutral position, secondary to axial compression, was performed by two non-contact video extensometers. Eight freshly frozen, anatomically intact, cadaveric human ankle specimens were included and tested. An axial compression test machine was utilized from 0 to 800 Newtonswith a loading speed of 5 mm/min in order to simulate the axial weight-bearing sequence of the ankle at stance phase of human gait. There was a statistically significant difference between anteroposterior displacement values for AITFL-Intact and AITFL-Dissected specimens (p≤0.05). Mean AITFL-Intact and mean AITFL-Dissected ankle anteroposterior displacement was 1.28±0.47 mm and 2.06±0.7 mm, respectively. This study determined some numerical and quantitative data about the biomechanical properties of AITFL in neutral foot position. In the emergency department, diagnosis and treatment of AITFL injury, due to ankle distortion, is important. In AITFL injuries, ankle biomechanics is affected, and ankle instability occurs.

  15. Incidence and Cost of Ankle Sprains in United States Emergency Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shweta; Thomas, Abbey C.; Noone, Joshua M.; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Wikstrom, Erik A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ankle sprains represent a common injury in emergency departments, but little is known about common complications, procedures, and charges associated with ankle sprains in emergency departments. Hypothesis: There will be a higher incidence of ankle sprains among younger populations (≤25 years old) and in female patients. Complications and procedures will differ between ankle sprain types. Lateral ankle sprains will have lower health care charges relative to medial and high ankle sprains. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: A cross-sectional study of the 2010 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample was conducted. Outcomes such as charges, complications, and procedures were compared using propensity score matching between lateral and medial as well as lateral and high ankle sprains. Results: The sample contained 225,114 ankle sprains. Female patients sustained more lateral ankle sprains (57%). After propensity score adjustment, lateral sprains incurred greater charges than medial ankle sprains (median [interquartile range], $1008 [$702-$1408] vs $914 [$741-$1108]; P sprain of the foot (2.96% vs 0.70%, P ankle sprain events. Among procedures, medial ankle sprains were more likely to include diagnostic radiology (97.91% vs 83.62%, P ankle sprains (0.87% vs 2.79%, P ankle sprains than lateral ankle sprains (24 [6.06%] vs 1 [0.25%], P Ankle sprain emergency department visits account for significant health care charges in the United States. Age- and sex-related differences persist among the types of ankle sprains. Clinical Relevance: The health care charges associated with ankle sprains indicate the need for additional preventive measures. There are age- and sex-related differences in the prevalence of ankle sprains that suggest these demographics may be risk factors for ankle sprains. PMID:27474161

  16. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint.

  17. Intrinsic risk factors of noncontact ankle sprains in soccer: a prospective study on 100 professional players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fousekis, Konstantinos; Tsepis, Elias; Vagenas, George

    2012-08-01

    Ankle sprain is an extremely common injury in soccer players. Despite extensive research, the intrinsic cause of this injury under noncontact conditions remains unclear. To identify intrinsic risk factors for noncontact ankle sprains in professional soccer players. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2 One hundred professional soccer players were assessed in the preseason for potential risk factors of noncontact ankle sprains. The assessment included (A) ankle joint asymmetries (right-left) in isokinetic muscle strength, flexibility, proprioception, and stability; (B) somatometric asymmetries; (C) previous injuries; and (D) lateral dominance traits. Noncontact ankle sprains were prospectively recorded and diagnosed for a full competition period (10 months). Seventeen of the players sustained at least 1 noncontact ankle sprain. Logistic regression revealed that players with (A) eccentric isokinetic ankle flexion strength asymmetries (odds ratio [OR] = 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.95-40.36, P = .005), (B) increased body mass index (OR = 8.16; 95% CI, 1.42-46.63, P = .018), and (C) increased body weight (OR = 5.72; 95% CI, 1.37-23.95, P = .017 ) each had a significantly higher risk of a noncontact ankle sprain. A trend for younger players (OR = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.061-1.24, P = .092) and for players with ankle laxity asymmetries (OR = 3.38; 95% CI, 0.82-14.00, P = .093) to be at greater risk for ankle sprain was also apparent to the limit of statistical significance (.05 ankle flexors and increased body mass index and body weight raise the propensity for ankle sprains in professional soccer players. Age and asymmetries in ankle laxity are potential factors worth revisiting, as there was an indication for younger players and players with ankle instability to be at higher risk for ankle injury. Proper preseason evaluation may improve prevention strategies for this type of injury in soccer.

  18. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. [Functionality and stability of the treatment of Weber B ankle fractures with syndesmotic injury depending on the placement level of the screw (2.0 versus 3.5 cm)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Martínez, O; Saucedo-Valencia, J; Saldívar-Moreno, A

    2017-01-01

    Ankle fractures are one of the most frequent lesions of the musculoskeletal system; there are studies that report an increase in the incidence of these fractures starting in the 1970s, associated with the increased media outreach of sporting activities. Supra- and transyndesmal fractures often lead to injury of the syndesmosis, which, if not treated properly, will leave joint instability. The most common treatment is the placement of a transyndesmal screw; there is controversy on the height in which it should be located with regard to the distal tibial joint line. A descriptive, observational, retrospective and transversal study with clinical and radiographic records of patients operated on bimalleolar fractures; they were divided into two groups: those with the transyndesmal screw at 2 or 2.5 cm and those with the screw at 3.5 cm or more proximal. There was a total of 34 cases (group A: 16 patients; group B: 18), 22 male and 12 female, aged between 19 and 45 years. We applied the Olerud-Molander ankle score for the clinical evaluation and measured the radiographic medial space of the ankle to consider the degree of reduction. The results in both groups were compared. The location of the screw at 2.0 cm presented a percentage of 75% of joint stability and 25% of joint instability, the joint functionality was relatively smaller in comparison to the placement of the screw at 3.5 cm, with which we achieved a joint stability of 83.3% and 16.3% of joint instability.

  20. Talofibular interval changes after acute ankle sprain: a stress ultrasonography study of ankle laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Theodore; Saliba, Susan; Saliba, Ethan; Anderson, Mark W; Hertel, Jay

    2013-11-01

    Quantifying talocrural joint laxity after ankle sprain is problematic. Stress ultrasonography (US) can image the lateral talocrural joint and allow the measurement of the talofibular interval, which may suggest injury to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). The acute talofibular interval changes after lateral ankle sprain are unknown. Twenty-five participants (9 male, 16 female; age 21.8 ± 3.2 y, height 167.8 ± 34.1 cm, mass 72.7 ± 13.8 kg) with 27 acute, lateral ankle injuries underwent bilateral stress US imaging at baseline (ankle at 3 wk and 6 wk from injury in 3 ankle conditions: neutral, anterior drawer, and inversion. Talofibular interval (mm) was measured using imaging software and self-reported function (activities of daily living [ADL] and sports) by the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM). The talofibular interval increased with anterior-drawer stress in the involved ankle (22.65 ± 3.75 mm; P = .017) over the uninvolved ankle (19.45 ± 2.35 mm; limb × position F1,26 = 4.9, P = .035) at baseline. Inversion stress also resulted in greater interval changes (23.41 ± 2.81 mm) than in the uninvolved ankles (21.13 ± 2.08 mm). A main effect for time was observed for inversion (F2,52 = 4.3, P = .019, 21.93 ± 2.24 mm) but not for anterior drawer (F2,52 = 3.1, P = .055, 21.18 ± 2.34 mm). A significant reduction in the talofibular interval took place between baseline and week 3 inversion measurements only (F1,26 = 5.6, P = .026). FAAM-ADL and sports results increased significantly from baseline to wk 3 (21.9 ± 16.2, P ankle sprain. Stress US provides a safe, repeatable, and quantifiable method of measuring the talofibular interval and may augment manual stress examinations in acute ankle injuries.

  1. Single-leg drop landing movement strategies in participants with chronic ankle instability compared with lateral ankle sprain 'copers'

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris J.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with CAI display alterations in hip joint kinematics and energetics during a unipodal landing task compared to LAS 'copers'. These alterations may be responsible for the increased risk of injury experienced by individuals with CAI during landing manoeuvres. Thus, clinicians must recognise the potential for joints proximal to the affected ankle to contribute to impaired function following an acute lateral ankle sprain injury and to develop rehabilitation protocols accordingly.

  2. Ultrasound therapy for acute ankle sprains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Windt, D. A.; Van Der Heijden, G. J.; Van Den Berg, S. G.; Ter Riet, G.; De Winter, A. F.; Bouter, L. M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasound is used in the treatment of a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of ultrasound therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group specialised register (November

  3. Vibration training improves balance in unstable ankles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloak, R; Nevill, A M; Clarke, F; Day, S; Wyon, M A

    2010-12-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) is a common condition following ankle injury characterised by increased risk of injury. Ankle sprains are a common acute form of injury suffered in dancing and loss of balance can affect not only risk of injury risk but also performance aesthetics. Whole body vibration training (WBVT) is a new rehabilitation method that has been linked with improving balance and muscle function. 38 female dancers with self reported unilateral FAI were randomly assigned in 2 groups: WBVT and control. Absolute centre of mass (COM) distribution during single leg stance, SEBT normalised research distances and Peroneus longus mean power frequency (f(med)) where measured pre and post 6-week intervention. There was a significant improvement in COM distribution over the 6 weeks from 1.05 ± 0.57 to 0.33 ± 0.42 cm² (Ptraining intervention. There was no evidence of improvement in peroneus longus (f(med)) over time (P=0.915) in either group. WBVT improved static balance and SEBT scores amongst dancers exhibiting ankle instability but did not affect peroneus longus muscle fatigue. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Medial ankle pain after lateral ligament rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Marti, R. K.

    1996-01-01

    After a severe ankle sprain the incidence of residual complaints, particularly on the medial side of the joint, is high. We studied a consecutive series of 30 patients who had operative repair of acute ruptures of lateral ligaments. During operation, arthroscopy revealed a fresh injury to the

  5. Review of ankle inversion sprain simulators in the biomechanics laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Chui-Wai Ha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ankle inversion ligamentous sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. The most direct way is to investigate real injury incidents, but it is unethical and impossible to replicate on test participants. Simulators including tilt platforms, trapdoors, and fulcrum devices were designed to mimic ankle inversion movements in laboratories. Inversion angle was the only element considered in early designs; however, an ankle sprain is composed of inversion and plantarflexion in clinical observations. Inversion velocity is another parameter that increased the reality of simulation. This review summarised the simulators, and aimed to compare and contrast their features and settings.

  6. A systematic review on the treatment of acute ankle sprain: brace versus other functional treatment types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, Ingrid; Backx, Frank; van Dijk, C Niek

    2011-03-01

    Ankle injuries, especially ankle sprains, are a common problem in sports and medical care. Ankle sprains result in pain and absenteeism from work and/or sports participation, and can lead to physical restrictions such as ankle instability. Nowadays, treatment of ankle injury basically consists of taping the ankle. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of ankle braces as a treatment for acute ankle sprains compared with other types of functional treatments such as ankle tape and elastic bandages. A computerized literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Clinical Trial Register. This review includes randomized controlled trials in English, German and Dutch, published between 1990 and April 2009 that compared ankle braces as a treatment for lateral ankle sprains with other functional treatments. The inclusion criteria for this systematic review were (i) individuals (sports participants as well as non-sports participants) with an acute injury of the ankle (acute ankle sprains); (ii) use of an ankle brace as primary treatment for acute ankle sprains; (iii) control interventions including any other type of functional treatment (e.g. Tubigrip™, elastic wrap or ankle tape); and (iv) one of the following reported outcome measures: re-injuries, symptoms (pain, swelling, instability), functional outcomes and/or time to resumption of sports, daily activities and/or work. Eight studies met all inclusion criteria. Differences in outcome measures, intervention types and patient characteristics precluded pooling of the results, so best evidence syntheses were conducted. A few individual studies reported positive outcomes after treatment with an ankle brace compared with other functional methods, but our best evidence syntheses only demonstrated a better treatment result in terms of functional outcome. Other studies have suggested that ankle brace treatment is a more cost-effective method, so the use of braces after acute

  7. Three-dimensional isotropic T2-weighted fast spin-echo (VISTA) ankle MRI versus two-dimensional fast spin-echo T2-weighted sequences for the evaluation of anterior talofibular ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H J; Lee, S Y; Park, N H; Rho, M H; Chung, E C; Park, J H; Park, S J

    2016-04-01

    To compare the performance of axial images of the ankle joint on three-dimensional (3D) volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) with that of two-dimensional (2D) fast spin echo (FSE) T2-weighted images for the diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury. This retrospective study included 101 patients who underwent both 2D FSE T2-weighted and 3D VISTA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the ankle. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of both sequences were measured. The anatomical identification score and diagnostic performances of both sequences were evaluated by two radiologists. The diagnostic performances of 3D VISTA and 2D FSE images were analysed in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosing ATFL injury. Surgically or clinically confirmed diagnoses were used as reference standards. The margin sharpness scores on 3D VISTA were significantly inferior to those of 2D FSE (p<0.001). Other scores (entire length, entire width) were not significantly different between the two imaging methods. The SNRs and CNRs of 3D VISTA were significantly higher than those of 2D FSE (p<0.001). When diagnoses were classified as normal and abnormal, the specificity of the 3D VISTA images for the diagnosis of ATFL injury was 95.7%, significantly superior to 2D FSE (84.3-85.7%). There were no significant differences between 3D VISTA and 2D FSE images in sensitivity or accuracy for diagnosis (p=0.227-1.000), with the exception of accuracy by reader 1 (p=0.039). 3D VISTA imaging has a diagnostic performance comparable to that of 2D FSE for the diagnosis of ATFL injury, although 3D VISTA is inferior to 2D FSE for the evaluation of margin sharpness. Replacing axial and coronal images with 3D VISTA can save imaging time without negatively impacting the diagnostic ability for ATFL injury. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Musculoskeletal Health and Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    involving the lateral ankle . • Ankle sprains represent 21 to 53% and 17 to 29% of all basketball and soccer injuries respectively. • Ankle sprains...Musculoskeletal Health and Injury Prevention Francis G. O’Connor, MD, MPH Patricia A. Deuster, PhD, MPH Department of Military and Emergency...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Musculoskeletal Health and Injury Prevention 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  9. Does Accessory Ossicle Affect Management Plan in an Athlete After Ankle Sprain? A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerife Şeyma TORĞUTALP

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Os subfibulare is an accessory ossicle that lies at the distal part of lateral malleolus. It is typically asymptomatic and detected incidentally by the presence of ankle injuries. A case report of sixteen years old male athlete with ankle injury was presented.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in anterolateral impingement of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, L.K. III.; Cooperman, A.E.; Helms, C.A.; Speer, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the MR imaging findings of anterolateral impingement (ALI) of the ankle.Design and patients. Nine patients with a history of ankle inversion injury and chronic lateral ankle pain were imaged with MR imaging, and the findings correlated with the results of arthroscopy. Three additional patients with clinically suspected ALI of the ankle were also included. Ankle MR imaging studies from 20 control patients in whom ALI was not suspected clinically were examined for similar findings to the patient group.Results. MR imaging findings in the patients with ALI included a soft tissue signal mass in the anterolateral gutter of the ankle in 12 of 12 (100%) cases, corresponding to the synovial hypertrophy and soft tissue mass found at arthroscopy in the nine patients who underwent arthroscopy. Disruption, attenuation, or marked thickening of the anterior talofibular ligament was seen in all cases. Additional findings included signs of synovial hypertrophy elsewhere in the tibiotalar joint in seven of 12 patients (58%) and bony and cartilaginous injuries to the tibiotalar joint in five of 12 (42%). None of the control patients demonstrated MR imaging evidence of a soft tissue mass in the anterolateral gutter.Conclusions. ALI of the ankle is a common cause for chronic lateral ankle pain. It has been well described in the orthopedic literature but its imaging findings have not been clearly elucidated. The MR imaging findings, along with the appropriate clinical history, can be used to direct arthroscopic examination and subsequent debridement. (orig.)

  11. Dynamic ankle control in athletes with ankle instability during sports maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Chin-Yang; Lin, Chia-Wei

    2011-09-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury. While the effects of static constraints in stabilizing the ankle joint are relatively well understood, those of dynamic constraints are less clear and require further investigation. This study was undertaken to evaluate the dynamic stability of the ankle joint during the landing phase of running and stop-jump maneuvers in athletes with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Controlled laboratory study. Fifteen athletes with CAI and 15 age-matched athletes without CAI performed running and stop-jump landing tasks. The dynamic ankle joint stiffness, tibialis anterior (TA)/peroneus longus (PL) and TA/gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) co-contraction indices, ankle joint angle, and root-mean-square (RMS) of the TA, PL, and GL electromyographic signals were measured during each task. During running, the CAI group exhibited a greater ankle inversion angle than the control group in the pre-landing phase (P = .012-.042) and a lower dynamic ankle joint stiffness in the post-landing phase (CAI: 0.109 ± 0.039 N·m/deg; control: 0.150 ± 0.068 N·m/deg; P = .048). In the stop-jump landing task, athletes with CAI had a significantly lower TA/PL co-contraction index during the pre-landing phase (CAI: 49.1 ± 19; control: 64.8 ± 16; P = .009). In addition, the CAI group exhibited a greater ankle inversion (P = .049), a lower peak eversion (P = .04), and a smaller RMS of the PL electromyographic signal in the post-landing phase (CAI: 0.73 ± 0.32; control: 0.51 ± 0.22; P = .04). Athletes with CAI had a relatively inverted ankle, reduced muscle co-contraction, and a lower dynamic stiffness in the ankle joint during the landing phase of sports maneuvers and this may jeopardize the stability of the ankle. Sports training or rehabilitation programs should differentiate between the pre-landing and post-landing phases of sports maneuvers, and should educate athletes to land with an appropriate ankle position and muscle recruitment.

  12. Ankle Sprains. A Round Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Types of ankle sprains, surgical versus nonsurgical treatment, tape versus brace for support, rehabilitation, exercise, and prevention of ankle sprains are discussed by a panel of experts. An acute ankle taping technique is illustrated. (MT)

  13. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  14. Return to sports after ankle fractures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Buono, Angelo; Smith, Rebecca; Coco, Manuela; Woolley, Laurence; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to provide information on the time athletes will take to resume sports activity following ankle fractures. We systematically searched Medline (PubMED), EMBASE, CINHAL, Cochrane, Sports Discus and Google scholar databases using the combined keywords 'ankle fractures', 'ankle injuries', 'athletes', 'sports', 'return to sport', 'recovery', 'operative fixation', 'pinning', 'return to activity' to identify articles published in English, Spanish, French, Portuguese and Italian. Seven retrospective studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Of the 793 patients, 469 (59%) were males and 324 (41%) were females, and of the 356 ankle fractures we obtained information on, 338 were acute and 18 stress fractures. The general principles were to undertake open reduction and internal fixation of acute fractures, and manage stress fractures conservatively unless a thin fracture line was visible on radiographs. The best timing to return to sports after an acute ankle fracture is still undefined, given the heterogeneity of the outcome measures and results. The time to return to sports after an acute stress injury ranged from 3 to 51 weeks. When facing athletes with ankle fractures, associated injuries have to be assessed and addressed to improve current treatment lines and satisfy future expectancies. The best timing to return to sports after an ankle fracture has not been established yet. The ideas of the return to activity parameter and surgeon databases including sports-related information could induce research to progress.

  15. Developing a Framework for Ankle Function: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kelli R.; Evans, Todd A.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Addressing clinical outcomes is paramount to providing effective health care, yet there is no consensus regarding the appropriate outcomes to address after ankle injuries. Compounding the problem is the repetitive nature of lateral ankle sprains, referred to as functional (FAI) or chronic (CAI) ankle instability. Although they are commonly used terms in practice and research, FAI and CAI are inconsistently defined and assessed. Objective: To establish definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, FAI, and CAI, as well as their characteristics and assessment techniques. Design: Delphi study. Setting: Telephone interviews and electronic surveys. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen experts representing the fields of ankle function and treatment, ankle research, and outcomes assessment and research were selected as panelists. Data Collection and Analysis: A telephone interview produced feedback regarding the definition of, functional characteristics of, and assessment techniques for a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and FAI/CAI. Those data were compiled, reduced, and returned through electronic surveys and were either included by reaching consensus (80% agreement) or excluded. Results: The definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI reached consensus. Experts did not agree on a definition of CAI. Eleven functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, 32 functional characteristics of an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and 13 characteristics of FAI were agreed upon. Conclusions: Although a consensus was reached regarding the definitions and functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI, the experts could only agree on 1 characteristic to include in the FAI definition. Several experts did, however, provide additional comments that reinforced the differences in the interpretation of those concepts. Although the experts could not agree on the definition of CAI, its

  16. Biomechanical Study about Lateral Ankle Laxity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Voicu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to study the contribution of the anterior talofibular ligament to ankle laxity at 18 cadaver ankles. For this, there was made an original, bipolar transoseus system, in a monitorized test stand Mx-500N Schmidt with a digital force gauge Imada. It was measured the motion response for applied antero-posterior force, inversion-eversion moment and internal-external rotary torque, in three positions of flexion of the ankle, with an intact anterior talofibular ligament and after it’s sectioning. The results showed a significant increases in laxity in plantar flexion for the inversion and internal rotary torque, this mechanism coresponding with common modes of injury.

  17. Responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to foot movements in rats with a sprained ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are common problems and often lead to persistent pain. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ankle sprain pain, the response properties of spinal dorsal horn neurons were examined after ankle sprain. Acute ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending the ankle of a rat hindlimb in a direction of plantarflexion and inversion. The weight-bearing ratio (WBR) of the affected foot was used as an indicator of pain. Single unit activities of dorsal horn neurons in response to plantarflexion and inversion of the foot or ankle compression were recorded from the medial part of the deep dorsal horn, laminae IV-VI, in normal and ankle-sprained rats. One day after ankle sprain, rats showed significantly reduced WBRs on the affected foot, and this reduction was partially restored by systemic morphine. The majority of deep dorsal horn neurons responded to a single ankle stimulus modality. After ankle sprain, the mean evoked response rates were significantly increased, and afterdischarges were developed in recorded dorsal horn neurons. The ankle sprain-induced enhanced evoked responses were significantly reduced by morphine, which was reversed by naltrexone. The data indicate that movement-specific dorsal horn neuron responses were enhanced after ankle sprain in a morphine-dependent manner, thus suggesting that hyperactivity of dorsal horn neurons is an underlying mechanism of pain after ankle sprain. PMID:21389306

  18. Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis of the Ankle: A Distinct Clinical Entity Requiring New Research Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delco, Michelle L.; Kennedy, John G.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is increasing as a result of advancements in non-invasive imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, improved arthroscopic surgical technology and heightened awareness among clinicians. Unlike OA of the knee, primary or age-related ankle OA is rare, with the majority of ankle OA classified as post-traumatic (PTOA). Ankle trauma, more specifically ankle sprain, is the single most common athletic injury, and no effective therapies are available to prevent or slow progression of PTOA. Despite the high incidence of ankle trauma and OA, ankle-related OA research is sparse, with the majority of clinical and basic studies pertaining to the knee joint. Fundamental differences exist between joints including their structure and molecular composition, response to trauma, susceptibility to OA, clinical manifestations of disease, and response to treatment. Considerable evidence suggests that research findings from knee should not be extrapolated to the ankle, however few ankle-specific preclinical models of PTOA are currently available. The objective of this article is to review the current state of ankle OA investigation, highlighting important differences between the ankle and knee that may limit the extent to which research findings from knee models are applicable to the ankle joint. Considerations for the development of new ankle-specific, clinically relevant animal models are discussed. PMID:27764893

  19. Chronic Ankle Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments and exercises to strengthen the ankle, improve balance and range of motion and retrain your muscles. As you progress through rehabilitation, you may also receive training that relates specifically to your activities or sport. Bracing. Some patients wear an ankle brace to ...

  20. Ankle-Brachial Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... measured at your arm. A low ankle-brachial index number can indicate narrowing or blockage of the arteries in ... tell your doctor so that he or she can continue to monitor your risk. Blockage (0.9 or less). An ankle-brachial index number less than 1.0 indicates narrowing of ...

  1. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  2. Kinematics of a Novel Ankle Rehabilitation Device with Two Degrees of Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Doroftei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The human ankle joint is the most common injured in sports and daily life in general. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy. However, the experiences suggest that without sufficient rehabilitation many people will have future problems. Furthermore, during a rehabilitation treatment, cooperative and intensive efforts of therapists and patients are required over prolonged sessions. Thus, robotic devices have been developed for human ankle rehabilitation. This paper discusses kinematic aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device, which can facilitate the recovery of the ankle joint

  3. Estudo epidemiológico das lesões do pé e tornozelo na prática desportiva recreacional Epidemiological study of foot and ankle injuries in recreational sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre de Paiva Luciano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Trata-se de estudo retrospectivo apresentando a incidência, tipo e extensão das lesões ocorridas no pé e / ou tornozelo como resultado da prática esportiva recreacional. MÉTODOS: Foram atendidos 131 pacientes, destes 123 do sexo masculino e oito do feminino, com história de trauma e dor no pé e/ou tornozelo após a prática de esportes recreacionais. A média de idade dos pacientes masculinos foi de 24,53 anos. A avaliação foi realizada através de um protocolo de pesquisa, que continha as variáveis de idade, sexo, diagnóstico e o tipo de esporte recreativo. RESULTADOS: Os esportes foram classificados, segundo a American Medical Association, que os divide em: de contato e de não contato. 82,4% da amostra praticavam esportes de contacto, contra 17,6% dos de não contacto classificados. CONCLUSÕES: A entorse do tornozelo foi significativamente o tipo de lesão mais encontrada, principalmente as do grau I e II. O futebol foi o esporte responsável pela maior incidência das lesões e dentre as suas várias modalidades prevaleceu o futsal (35%. Nos esportes de não contacto o principal esporte em ocorrências foi a corrida. Nível de Evidência IV, Série de Casos.OBJECTIVE: This is a retrospective study showing the incidence, type and extent of injuries occurring in the foot and/or ankle as a result of recreational sports practice. METHODS: We treated 131 patients, of which 123 were male and 8 female, with a history of trauma and pain in the foot and/or ankle after the practicing recreational sports. The average age of the male patients was 24.53 years. The evaluation was done through a research protocol, which contained the variables age, sex, diagnosis, and type of recreational sport. RESULTS: The sports were classified according to the American Medical Association, which divides them into contact and non-contact sports. 82.4% of the sample practiced contact sports, while 17.6% practicedsports classified as non

  4. Accuracy of Physical Examination, Ankle-Brachial Index, and Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Arterial Injury in Patients With Penetrating Extremity Trauma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSouza, Ian S; Benabbas, Roshanak; McKee, Sean; Zangbar, Bardiya; Jain, Ashika; Paladino, Lorenzo; Boudourakis, Leon; Sinert, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Penetrating Extremity Trauma (PET) may result in arterial injury, a rare but limb- and life-threatening surgical emergency. Timely, accurate diagnosis is essential for potential intervention in order to prevent significant morbidity. Using a systematic review/meta-analytic approach, we determined the utility of physical examination, Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI), and Ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of arterial injury in emergency department (ED) patients who have sustained PET. We applied a test-treatment threshold model to determine which evaluations may obviate CT Angiography (CTA). We searched PubMed, Embase, and Scopus from inception to November 2016 for studies of ED patients with PET. We included studies on adult and pediatric subjects. We defined the reference standard to include CTA, catheter angiography, or surgical exploration. When low-risk patients did not undergo the reference standard, trials must have specified that patients were observed for at least 24 hours. We used the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) to evaluate bias and applicability of the included studies. We calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) of physical examination ("hard signs" of vascular injury), US, and ABI. Using established CTA test characteristics (sensitivity = 96.2%, specificity = 99.2%) and applying the Pauker-Kassirer method, we developed a test-treatment threshold model (testing threshold = 0.14%, treatment threshold = 72.9%). We included eight studies (n = 2,161, arterial injury prevalence = 15.5%). Studies had variable quality with most at high risk for partial and double verification bias. Some studies investigated multiple index tests: physical examination (hard signs) in three studies (n = 1,170), ABI in five studies (n = 1,040), and US in four studies (n = 173). Due to high heterogeneity (I 2  > 75%) of the results, we could not calculate LR+ or LR- for hard signs or LR+ for ABI. The weighted

  5. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, pankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity (pankle instability (pankles. Injured ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (pankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  7. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Gait Biomechanics in Participants, Six Months after First-time Lateral Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2016-06-01

    No research currently exists predicating a link between the injury-affiliated sensorimotor deficits of acute ankle sprain and those of chronic ankle instability during gait. This analysis evaluates participants with a 6-month history of ankle sprain injury to affirm this link. 69 participants with a 6-month history of acute first-time lateral ankle sprain were divided into subgroups ('chronic ankle instability' and 'coper') based on their self-reported disability and compared to 20 non-injured participants during a gait task. Lower extremity kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-heel strike (period 1) and from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-toe off (period 2). The 'chronic ankle instability' subgroup (who reported greater disability) displayed increased knee flexion during period 1. During period 2, this subgroup exhibited greater total displacement at their ankle joint and greater extensor dominance at their knee. That many of these features are present, both in individuals with acute ankle sprain and those with chronic ankle instability may advocate a link between acute deficits and long-term outcome. Clinicians must be aware that the sensorimotor deficits of ankle sprain may persevere beyond the acute stage of injury and be cognizant of the capacity for impairments to pervade proximally. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF KINESIO TAPING ON PROPRIOCEPTION AT THE ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark DeBeliso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was designed to determine if KinesioTM taping the anterior and lateral portion of the ankle would enhance ankle proprioception compared to the untaped ankle. 30 subjects, 15 men, 15 women, ages 18-30 participated in this study. Exclusion criteria: Ankle injury < 6 months prior to testing, significant ligament laxity as determined through clinical evaluation by an ATC, or any severe foot abnormality. Experiment utilized a single group, pretest and posttest. Plantar flexion and inversion with 20° of plantar flexion reproduction of joint position sense (RJPS was determined using an ankle RJPS apparatus. Subjects were barefooted, blindfolded, and equipped with headphones playing white noise to eliminate auditory cues. Subjects had five trials in both plantar flexion and inversion with 20° plantar flexion before and after application of the KinesioTM tape to the anterior/lateral portion of the ankle. Constant error and absolute error were determined from the difference between the target angle and the trial angle produced by the subject. The treatment group (KinesioTM taped subjects showed no change in constant and absolute error for ankle RJPS in plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion when compared to the untaped results using the same motions. The application of KinesioTM tape does not appear to enhance proprioception (in terms of RJPS in healthy individuals as determined by our measures of RJPS at the ankle in the motions of plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion.

  10. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed.

  11. The Effect of Ankle Kinesio Tape on Ankle Muscle Activity During a Drop Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2015-11-01

    The use of Kinesio Tape among health care professional has grown recently in efforts to efficiently prevent and treat joint injuries. However, limited evidence exists regarding the efficacy of this technique in enhancing joint stability and neuromuscular control. To determine how Kinesio Tape application to the ankle joint alters forces and muscle activity during a drop-jump maneuver. Single-group pretest- posttest. University laboratory. 22 healthy adults with no previous history of ankle injury. Participants were instrumented with electromyography on the lower-leg muscles as they jumped from a 35-cm platform onto force plates. Test trials were performed without tape (BL), immediately after application of Kinesio Tape to the ankle (KT-I), and after 24 h of continued use (KT-24). Peak ground-reaction forces (GRFs) and time to peak GRF were compared across taping conditions, and the timing and amplitude of muscle activity from the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and lateral gastrocnemius were compared across taping conditions. No significant differences in amplitude or timing of GRFs were observed (P > .05). However, muscle activity was observed to decrease from BL to KT-I in the tibialis anterior (P = .027) and from BL to KT-24 in the PL (P = .022). The data suggest that Kinesio Tape decreases muscle activity in the ankle during a drop-jump maneuver, although no changes in GRFs were observed. This is contrary to the proposed mechanisms of Kinesio Tape. Further research might investigate how this affects participants with a history of injury.

  12. Sprained ankle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sprain is caused by the twisting or bending of a joint into a position it was not designed to move. The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint. Some common symptoms of a sprain are pain around the joint, ...

  13. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Driscoll Jeremiah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  14. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Driscoll, Jeremiah

    2011-06-09

    Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed\\/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  15. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability.

  16. [Current concepts in surgical treatment of chronic ankle joint instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojecki, Łukasz; Płomiński, Janusz; Pepłoński, Artur; Pawlik, JarosŁaw; Jeśkiewicz, Mateusz

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprain is one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries. Initial treatment of choice in acute injury is conservative and is obtained by immobilization. The goal of such treatment is to heal ruptured capsular-ligamentous complex. However, despite the conservative treatment some patients develop chronic ankle instability as a result of injury. In those cases, surgical anatomical and non-anatomical ligamentous reconstruction is advised. Aim of the study was evaluation of the results obtained with various surgical techniques in view of published data. According to most authors, in patients who experienced chronic ankle instability, surgical technique of anatomical repair is preferred. In cases when anatomical repair might not be undertaken due to technical capabilities, anatomical reconstruction using autoor allografts is advised. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  17. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability. (orig.)

  18. Injured lateral ankle ligaments: technique and assessment of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Trattnig, S.; Kukla, C.; Gaebler, C.; Kaider, A.; Haller, J.; Heinz-Peer, G.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    56 patients with the clinical diagnosis of sprained ankles were investigated. Evaluation of the anterior (AFTL) and posterior fibulotalar ligament (PFTL) was performed with the foot in dorsiflexion (20 ) and of the fibulo calcanear ligament (FCL) in plantarflexion (45 ). Axial T 1 w-SE and T 2 w-TSE images were obtained. Full-length visualisation of ligmaments in one slice and the extent of injury were evaluated. 12 ankle injuries were confirmed by operation. With MRI full-length visualisation of lateral ankle ligaments was possible in 86%. A partial/complete rupture of the AFTL was noticed in 33/64% and of the FCI in 29/39%, and of the PFTL in 27/5%. Sensitivity/specificity of MRI when compared to surgery was 100/100% for injuries of the AFTL, 64/100% for the FCL, and 33/78% for the PFTL. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  20. MRI of the ankle. Comparison of 0.2-T and 1.0-T units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merhemic, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of ankle joint injuries with different MR systems and at different field strengths. Method: Ten patients with acute ankle injuries were examined using mid-field (1.0 T) and dedicated low-field (0.2 T) MR units. Findings of ligamentous injury, sinus tarsi involvement, bone injury, and tendon injury were correlated. Results: There was no significant difference between mid- and low-field MR imaging for ligamentous injuries (χ 2 =0.0395), sinus taris changes bone injuries (χ 2 =0.0507; critical value=5,991). Conclusion: This study showed good agreement in pathological findings in ankle injury on mid-field and low-field MR imaging. (orig.) [de

  1. Glossary of Foot and Ankle Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary of Foot & Ankle Terms Glossary of Foot & Ankle Terms Page Content Achilles tendon - The Achilles tendon ... research grants, humanitarian outreach and public education initiatives. Ankle instability - Chronic, repetitive sprains of the ankle. This ...

  2. Ankle manual therapy for individuals with post-acute ankle sprains: description of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher Beth E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle sprains are common within the general population and can result in prolonged disablement. Limited talocrural dorsiflexion range of motion (DF ROM is a common consequence of ankle sprain. Limited talocrural DF ROM may contribute to persistent symptoms, disability, and an elevated risk for re-injury. As a result, many health care practitioners use hands-on passive procedures with the intention of improving talocrural joint DF ROM in individuals following ankle sprains. Dosage of passive hands-on procedures involves a continuum of treatment speeds. Recent evidence suggests both slow- and fast-speed treatments may be effective to address disablement following ankle sprains. However, these interventions have yet to be longitudinally compared against a placebo study condition. Methods/Design We developed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to test the hypotheses that hands-on treatment procedures administered to individuals following ankle sprains during the post-acute injury period can improve short-, intermediate-, and long-term disablement, as well as reduce the risk for re-injury. Discussion This study is designed to measure the clinical effects of hands-on passive stretching treatment procedures directed to the talocrural joint that vary in treatment speed during the post-acute injury period, compared to hands-on placebo control intervention. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00888498.

  3. A study of semi-rigid support on ankle supination sprain kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y M; Wu, Z H; Liao, W H; Chan, K M

    2010-12-01

    Ankle sprain injury is very common in sports and the use of ankle support is crucial. This research investigated the effect of an ankle brace in reducing the ankle angular displacement and angular velocity during sudden supination. In the experiment, 11 healthy males were tested. The bracing condition, semi-rigid ankle braces were investigated. The angular displacement and angular velocity of the ankle were computed. The motion-capture system was adopted to capture the three-dimensional coordinates of the reflective markers. The coordinates of the reflective markers were used to compute the ankle kinematics during simulated ankle supination. A mechanical supination platform was used to simulate the sprain motions. Experimental results showed that the semi-rigid brace tested significantly reduced the ankle angular displacement and angular velocity compared with control conditions during sudden supination. In conclusion, the semi-rigid-type brace can provide significant restriction to reduce the magnitudes of the angular displacement and angular velocity of the ankle during sudden supination sprain. The semi-rigid-type brace is suggested as the prophylactic bracing for the ankle. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Prophylactic ankle bracing vs. taping: effects on functional performance in female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKean, L C; Bell, G; Burnham, R S

    1995-08-01

    Ankle support devices are commonly used for prevention and treatment of ankle injury, but the effect of these on sport performance has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different ankle support devices on four basketball-related performance tests. Eleven female basketball players underwent four performance tests (vertical jump, jump shot, sprint drill, and submaximal treadmill run) while wearing five different types of ankle support on both ankles (no support, tape, Swede-O-Universal, Active Ankle, and Aircast). Ankle support effect on overall performance was assessed using Friedman's analysis of variance (ANOVA) by ranks and on specific performance parameters using one-way ANOVA for repeated measures. Overall performance was impaired by ankle support. The Active Ankle brace impaired performance the least out of the support devices. Vertical jump was less with ankle tape as compared with no tape (p jump shot accuracy was better with tape as compared with the Swede-O-Universal (p < .05). Oxygen consumption (VO2) and energy expenditure were higher with the Aircast as compared with tape (p < .05). It was concluded that the use of ankle support by female basketball players does adversely affect basketball-related performance tests, and the prophylactic benefit of bracing needs to be weighed against performance impairment.

  5. Percutaneous cannulated screw fixation for pediatric epiphyseal ankle fractures

    OpenAIRE

    ?i?ekli, ?zg?r; ?zdemir, G?zelali; Uysal, Mustafa; Bi?ici, Vedat; Bing?l, ?zzet

    2016-01-01

    Background Ankle injuries are among the most common injuries in children. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of two percutaneous fixation methods after closed reduction in physeal ankle fractures. Methods We reviewed the cases of 24 patients with a mean age of 12.29?years; 16 were male, and 8 were female. Only patients with fractures of Salter-Harris types 2, 3, and 4 with displacements greater than 2?mm were included in the study. Patients were treated with closed reduction ...

  6. Relationship between ankle frontal plane kinematics during different functional tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Luke; Feger, Mark A

    2017-05-01

    Increased inversion following lateral ankle sprain and in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) is thought to contribute to recurrent injury and feelings of instability, however, there are no biomechanic assessment tools readily available to evaluate for excessive inversion prior to or following lateral ankle sprains. Before establishing a clinically useful biomechanic assessment tool, it is important to understand whether there is a relationship in the extent of ankle frontal plane motion across various tasks to help determine if one task or a combination of tasks would be most appropriate when evaluating patients. The purpose of this preliminary study was to analyze the relationship between ankle frontal plane kinematics during walking, step-down, and jump-landing tasks. Fifty-six recreationally active adults (gender=M:26;F:30, age=21.2±3.2, height=171.3±8.0cm, mass=75.6±15.4) volunteered. Main outcome measures were ankle frontal plane motion at initial contact and peak inversion during aerial phases across 3 tasks (walking, step-down, and jump-landing). Relationships between ankle frontal plane kinematics were analyzed by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r). There were strong correlations in peak inversion during the aerial phase between the step-down and walking (r=0.68; pbiomechanics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ankle work and dynamic joint stiffness in high- compared to low-arched athletes during a barefoot running task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Douglas W; Williams, D S Blaise; Windsor, Brett; Butler, Robert J; Zhang, Songning

    2014-04-01

    High- (HA) and low-arched (LA) athletes have an exaggerated risk of injury. Ankle joint stiffness is a potential underlying mechanism for the greater rate of injury within these two functionally different groups. An alternative candidate mechanism of injury in HA and LA athletes pertains to the efficacy of the foot as a rigid lever during propulsion. The purpose of this study was to quantify the differences in ankle dynamic joint stiffness, and ankle braking work and ankle propulsive work during stance phase of running. Ten HA and ten LA athletes performed five barefoot running trials while ground reaction forces and three-dimensional kinematics were recorded. Ankle dynamic joint stiffness was calculated as the slope of the ankle joint moment-ankle joint angle plot during load attenuation. Ankle braking and propulsive work values were calculated for the stance phase. HA athletes had significantly greater ankle dynamic joint stiffness and significantly smaller ankle net and propulsive work than LA athletes. These data demonstrate that HA and LA athletes exhibit unique biomechanical patterns during running. These patterns may be related to lower extremity injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anterior ankle arthrodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gordon L; Sayres, Stephanie C; O’Malley, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common procedure that resolves many conditions of the foot and ankle; however, complications following this procedure are often reported and vary depending on the fixation technique. Various techniques have been described in the attempt to achieve ankle arthrodesis and there is much debate as to the efficiency of each one. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of anterior plating in ankle arthrodesis using customised and Synthes TomoFix plates. We present the outcomes of 28 ankle arthrodeses between 2005 and 2012, specifically examining rate of union, patient-reported outcomes scores, and complications. All 28 patients achieved radiographic union at an average of 36 wk; the majority of patients (92.86%) at or before 16 wk, the exceptions being two patients with Charcot joints who were noted to have bony union at a three year review. Patient-reported outcomes scores significantly increased (P plate offers added compression and provides a rigid fixation for arthrodesis stabilization. PMID:24649408

  9. Arthrography of the foot and ankle. Ankle and subtalar joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, H J; Ivanic, G; Trattnig, S

    2000-03-01

    Arthrography is the intra-articular injection of contrast media. This article reviews the normal and pathologic findings of standard arthrography and MR imaging arthrography of the ankle and subtalar joint. Standard arthrography is used primarily after acute ankle sprains, whereas MR imaging arthrography is used for staging and detecting osteochondritis dissecans of the talus, anterolateral soft tissue impingement, and chronic lateral ankle instability.

  10. Acute paediatric ankle trauma: MRI versus plain radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohman, M. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Radiological Dept., Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Kallio, P.; Puntila, J. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Vehmas, T. [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland)

    2001-09-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnosis of acute physeal ankle fractures on plain radiographs using MRI as the gold standard. Methods: Sixty consecutive children, 29 with a clinical diagnosis of lateral ligament injury and 31 with physeal ankle fractures, were examined using both radiographs and MRI in the acute period. The imaging data were reviewed by three ''masked'' radiologists. The fracture diagnosis and Slater-Harris classification of radiographs were compared with findings on MRI. Results: Plain radiography produced five of 28 (18%) false negative and 12 of 92 (13%) false positive fracture diagnoses compared with MRI. Six of the 12 false positive fractures were due to a misclassification of lateral ligament disruption as SH1 fractures. Altogether a difference was found in 21% of cases in either the diagnosis or the classification of the fractures according to Salter- Harris. All bone bruises in the distal tibia and fibula and 64% of bone bruises in the talus were seen in association with lateral ligament injuries. Talar bone bruises in association with fractures occurred on the same side as the malleolar fracture; talar bone bruises in association with lateral ligament disruption were seen in different locations. The errors identified on radiographs by MRI did not affect the management of the injury. Conclusions: The incidence of false negative ankle fractures in plain radiographs was small and no complex ankle fractures were missed on radiographs. The total extent of complex fractures was, however, not always obvious on radiographs. In an unselected series of relatively mild ankle injuries, we were unable to show a single case where the treatment or prognosis based on plain radiography should have been significantly altered after having done a routine MRI examination. Plain radiography is still the diagnostic cornerstone of paediatric ankle injuries. (orig.)

  11. Acute paediatric ankle trauma: MRI versus plain radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohman, M.; Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L.; Vehmas, T.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnosis of acute physeal ankle fractures on plain radiographs using MRI as the gold standard. Methods: Sixty consecutive children, 29 with a clinical diagnosis of lateral ligament injury and 31 with physeal ankle fractures, were examined using both radiographs and MRI in the acute period. The imaging data were reviewed by three ''masked'' radiologists. The fracture diagnosis and Slater-Harris classification of radiographs were compared with findings on MRI. Results: Plain radiography produced five of 28 (18%) false negative and 12 of 92 (13%) false positive fracture diagnoses compared with MRI. Six of the 12 false positive fractures were due to a misclassification of lateral ligament disruption as SH1 fractures. Altogether a difference was found in 21% of cases in either the diagnosis or the classification of the fractures according to Salter- Harris. All bone bruises in the distal tibia and fibula and 64% of bone bruises in the talus were seen in association with lateral ligament injuries. Talar bone bruises in association with fractures occurred on the same side as the malleolar fracture; talar bone bruises in association with lateral ligament disruption were seen in different locations. The errors identified on radiographs by MRI did not affect the management of the injury. Conclusions: The incidence of false negative ankle fractures in plain radiographs was small and no complex ankle fractures were missed on radiographs. The total extent of complex fractures was, however, not always obvious on radiographs. In an unselected series of relatively mild ankle injuries, we were unable to show a single case where the treatment or prognosis based on plain radiography should have been significantly altered after having done a routine MRI examination. Plain radiography is still the diagnostic cornerstone of paediatric ankle injuries. (orig.)

  12. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGovern RP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ryan P McGovern,1 RobRoy L Martin,1,2 1Department of Physical Therapy, Rangos School of Health Sciences, Duquesne University, 2Centers for Sports Medicine – University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI, interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. Keywords: reinjury, chronic ankle instability, rehabilitation techniques, diagnosis, intervention, athlete

  13. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  14. Basketball injuries: caring for a basketball team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojian, Thomas H; Cracco, Andreya; Hall, Matthew; Mascaro, Melissa; Aerni, Giselle; Ragle, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Basketball is a popular sport in North America and worldwide. Most injuries are lower extremity injuries to the ankle and knee. In this article, injuries common to basketball and, from our experience, injuries that escape injury surveillance systems are discussed from the physician and athletic trainer's perspective. Both treatment and prevention of injuries are discussed.

  15. Epidemiological Patterns of Ankle Sprains in Youth, High School, and College Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Daniel R; Koldenhoven, Rachel M; Hertel, Jay; Onate, James A; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-02-01

    Variations in ankle injury rates and distributions among competition levels are unclear, but such data may help inform strategies to prevent ankle sprains during American football. To describe the epidemiological patterns of ankle sprains in youth, high school (HS), and collegiate American football. Descriptive epidemiological study. Data regarding youth, HS, and college football athletes were collected from 3 injury surveillance programs: (1) the Youth Football Safety Study (YFSS), (2) the National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network (NATION), and (3) the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP). During the 2012-2014 seasons, the YFSS, NATION, and NCAA ISP included 310, 184, and 71 football team-seasons, respectively. Athletic trainers (ATs) attended each practice and game and reported injuries and athlete-exposures (AEs) via their preferred injury documentation application. Ankle sprain rates for each type of ankle sprain were calculated overall, by event type (ie, practices and games), and specifically for severe injuries (ie, participation restriction time >21 days) and recurrent injuries (as defined by ATs). Rate ratios (RRs) were used to compare ankle sprain rates by competition level and event type. Injury proportion ratios (IPRs) were used to compare differences in severity, surgical needs, recurrence, injury mechanism, and injury activity by competition level. RRs and IPRs with 95% confidence intervals excluding 1.00 were considered statistically significant. A total of 124, 897, and 643 ankle sprains were reported in youth, HS, and college football, respectively. This led to respective rates of 0.59, 0.73, and 1.19 sprains per 1000 AEs. The ankle sprain rate in college football was higher than the rates in HS (RR = 1.64; 95% CI, 1.48-1.82) and youth (RR = 2.01; 95% CI, 1.65-2.43) football. The proportion of ankle sprains that were recurrent in youth football was higher than the proportions in HS (IPR

  16. Septic arthritis of the adult ankle joint secondary to Salmonella enteritidis: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan

    2011-09-01

    Salmonella septic arthritis in healthy individuals is a rare phenomenon. However, septic arthritis of the native adult ankle joint in healthy patients has not been previously described in the published data. This is a case report of a 70-year-old farmer who presented with a 2-week history of a painful, swollen right ankle and an inability to bear weight. He had no history of ankle injury or any predisposing conditions. Joint aspirations were positive for Salmonella enteritidis that was successfully treated with right ankle arthrotomy and washout, along with a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotic therapy.

  17. MR arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Rand, T.; Breitenseher, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Schick, S.; Imhof, H.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its superior soft tissue contrast conventional MRI is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of ankle joint disorders. Conventional MR imaging can accurately demonstrate normal or acutely injured ligaments; however, in subacute and chronic injury joint fluid necessary for delineation of injured ligaments is absent and MR arthrography should be performed. MR arthrography uses the intraarticular injection of contrast material to distend the joint, yielding improved discrimination of intraarticular structures. This joint distension with MR arthrography is also helpful in the staging of osteochondritis dissecans, since in cases of unstable lesions tracking of contrast material into the interface can be more easily demonstrated. Finally, high contrast and joint distension by MR arthrography improves the detection of intraarticular loose bodies, which often require surgery. MR artrography, although invasive, may provide additional information in various ankle joint disorders. (orig.) [de

  18. Single-leg drop landing movement strategies in participants with chronic ankle instability compared with lateral ankle sprain 'copers'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    To compare the movement patterns and underlying energetics of individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) to ankle sprain 'copers' during a landing task. Twenty-eight (age 23.2 ± 4.9 years; body mass 75.5 ± 13.9 kg; height 1.7 ± 0.1 m) participants with CAI and 42 (age 22.7 ± 1.7 years; body mass 73.4 ± 11.3 kg; height 1.7 ± 0.1 m) ankle sprain 'copers' were evaluated 1 year after incurring a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury. Kinematics and kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle joints from 200 ms pre-initial contact (IC) to 200 ms post-IC, in addition to the vertical component of the landing ground reaction force, were acquired during performance of a drop land task. The CAI group adopted a position of increased hip flexion during the landing descent on their involved limb. This coincided with a reduced post-IC flexor pattern at the hip and increased overall hip joint stiffness compared to copers (-0.01 ± 0.05 vs. 0.02 ± 0.05°/Nm kg(-1), p = 0.03). Individuals with CAI display alterations in hip joint kinematics and energetics during a unipodal landing task compared to LAS 'copers'. These alterations may be responsible for the increased risk of injury experienced by individuals with CAI during landing manoeuvres. Thus, clinicians must recognise the potential for joints proximal to the affected ankle to contribute to impaired function following an acute lateral ankle sprain injury and to develop rehabilitation protocols accordingly. Level III.

  19. A mechanical jig for measuring ankle supination and pronation torque in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chung, Mandy Man-Ling; Chan, Yue-Yan; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2012-07-01

    This study presents the design of a mechanical jig for evaluating the ankle joint torque on both cadaver and human ankles. Previous study showed that ankle sprain motion was a combination of plantarflexion and inversion. The device allows measurement of ankle supination and pronation torque with one simple axis in a single step motion. More importantly, the ankle orientation allows rotation starting from an anatomical position. Six cadaveric specimens and six human subjects were tested with simulated and voluntary rotation respectively. The presented mechanical jig makes possible the determination of supination torque for studying ankle sprain injury and the estimation of pronation torque for examining peroneal muscle response. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A pilot investigation into the relationship between static diagnosis of ankle equinus and dynamic ankle and foot dorsiflexion during stance phase of gait: Time to revisit theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Alfred; De Giorgio, Stephanie; Chockalingam, Nachiappan; Formosa, Cynthia

    2017-03-01

    Although the clinical assessment of ankle dorsiflexion has traditionally been measured utilising various goniometric means, the validity of this static examination has never been investigated. Since any impairment in ankle flexibility is likely to result in injuries, it is imperative that the correct examination technique is conducted. To determine whether a clinical diagnosis of ankle equinus, or limited ankle dorsiflexion, correlates with a decreased dorsiflexion range of movement of the foot and ankle during gait. Twenty participants with a clinical diagnosis of ankle equinus underwent optoelectronic motion capture utilising the Rizzoli foot model. Participants were divided into two groups, Group A with dynamic ankle dorsiflexion angle of 13.9°, while those in Group A had a mean dorsiflexion angle of 4.4°, resulting in a significant difference (p=0.004) between the two groups. Likewise, foot mean dynamic dorsiflexion angle of Group B was 17.13° and Group A 8.6° (p=0.006). There is no relationship between a static diagnosis of ankle dorsiflexion at 0° with dorsiflexion during gait. On the other hand, those subjects with less than -5° of dorsiflexion during static examination did exhibit reduced ankle range of motion during gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of ankle braces on lower extremity joint energetics in single-leg landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jacob K; McCaw, Steven T; Laudner, Kevin G; Smith, Peter J; Stafford, Lindsay N

    2012-06-01

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in competitive and recreational athletics. Studies have shown that the use of prophylactic ankle braces effectively reduces the frequency of ankle sprains in athletes. However, although it is generally accepted that the ankle braces are effective at reducing frontal plane motion, some researchers report that the design of the brace may also reduce ankle sagittal plane motion. The purpose of this study was to quantify lower extremity joint contributions to energy absorption during single-legged drop landings in three ankle brace conditions (no brace, boot brace, and hinged brace). Eleven physically active females experienced in landing and free of lower extremity injury (age = 22.3 ± 1.7 yr, height = 1.66 ± 0.04 m, mass = 58.43 ± 5.83 kg) performed 10 single-leg drop landings in three conditions (one unbraced, two braced) from a 0.33-m height. Measurements taken were hip, knee, and ankle joint impulse; hip, knee, ankle, and total work; and hip, knee, and ankle joint relative work. Total energy absorption remained consistent across the braced conditions (P = 0.057). Wearing the boot brace reduced relative ankle work (P = 0.04, Cohen d = 0.43) but did not change relative knee (P = 0.08, Cohen d = 0.32) or hip (P = 0.14, Cohen d = 0.20) work compared with the no-brace condition. In an ankle-braced condition, ankle, knee, and hip energetics may be altered depending on the design of the brace.

  2. Ankle Arthrodesis Following Trauma, a Useful Salvage Procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    injuries between January 2007 and December 2009 were seen and had wound debridement done and compressive ankle arthrodesis with a Charnley's arthrodesis clamp. Tibiotalar and tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis was the procedure carried out. Patients were followed up for 3–12 months. Wound breakdown was seen in two ...

  3. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Cusimano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs. A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM. The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action that may affect an athlete’s decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36, as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37. Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players’ willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs.

  4. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusimano, Michael D; Faress, Ahmed; Luong, Wilson P; Amin, Khizer; Eid, Joanne; Abdelshaheed, Tamer; Russell, Kelly

    2013-05-10

    This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs). A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers) and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action) that may affect an athlete's decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36), as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37). Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players' willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs.

  5. Syndesmotic Stabilization in Pronation External Rotation Ankle Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Haverkamp, Daniel; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Boden et al. suggested syndesmosis fixation was not necessary in distal pronation external rotation (PER) ankle fractures if rigid bimalleolar fracture fixation is achieved and was not necessary with deltoid ligament injury if the fibular fracture is no higher than 4.5 cm of the tibiotalar joint. We

  6. Prevalence of chronic ankle instability and associated symptoms in university dance majors: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Janet; Hall, Emily; Docherty, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations have established that dancers suffer a large number of injuries to the lower leg, foot, and ankle, with a portion of these being significant time loss injuries or in some cases career ending. Lateral ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers and can often lead to recurrent instability and repetitive injuries. Research in other active populations has linked ankle sprains to the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of CAI and related symptoms of ankle sprain in a student dance population. Individuals were included if they were currently a modern or ballet dance major at the investigators' university (exclusion criterion: a history of fracture or surgery in the lower extremities). A self-reported demographic questionnaire and the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability survey were used to identify the presence and characteristics of CAI. A total of 83 questionnaires were collected, and after exclusions, 77 participants remained: 43 modern dancers and 34 ballet dancers (10 males and 67 females, mean age 19.61 ± 2.53 years, mean dance experience 13.61 ± 3.16 years). Of all dancers surveyed, 41 (53.2%) had CAI, and of those 24 (58.5%) were modern dancers, and 17 (41.5%) were ballet dancers. When looking only at those dancers who had a previous lateral ankle sprain, 75.9% were identified as having CAI. Chronic Ankle Instability can create long-term problems for anyone but especially female dancers, who place extreme stress on their feet and ankles from being en pointe or demi-pointe. It is important to educate dancers, instructors, and medical staff of the importance of recognizing CAI and seeking medical care for ankle sprains and their residual symptoms.

  7. Sway as predictor of injuries in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Lisbeth; Kristensen, Peter Lund; Junge, Tina

    ). Outcome measures Primary outcome was overuse and traumatic injuries, with special emphasis on ankle and knee sprains. Complaints were registered by SMS-track on a weekly basis, and after a telephone interview, clinicians examined and diagnosed the children with complaints. Injuries were diagnosed using...... ICD-10. Results Injuries: 2276, traumatic injuries: 714, ankle sprains: 164, knee sprains: 42 Preliminary multivariate analysis taking into account competing risk showed significant odds ratios (OR) at test 1; A) 1.003 per cm increase of sway; B) overall traumatic injury OR=3.0, ankle sprain OR=5...

  8. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES - IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used...... compared to Airex® and floor. This study can serve as guidance for clinicians who wish to implement a gradual progression of ankle rehabilitation and prevention exercises by taking the related ankle kinematics and muscle activity into account. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3.......BACKGROUND: A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important...

  9. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries.

  10. Foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kickboxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Intharasompan, Piyapong; Wattanarojanapom, Thongaek; Theeraamphon, Nipon; Auephanviriyakul, Sansanee; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-01-01

    Muay Thai kickboxing is a common sport that uses the foot and ankle in fighting. Muay Thai kickboxing trainees usually receive training in Thailand Foot and ankle problems in this group ofpeople who usually train barefoot remain unexplored To evaluate the prevalence of common foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kick boxers. The present study is a cross-sectional survey of Muay Thai kick boxers practicing in northern Thailand. Interviews were conducted and foot and ankle examinations were evaluated Foot morphology was examined using a Harris mat footprint. One hundred and twenty-three Muay Thai kickbox ersinnine training gyms were included in this study. Common foot and ankle problems found in the Muay Thai kick boxers were callosity (59%), gastrocnemius contracture (57%), toe deformities (49.3%), wounds (10%) and heel pain (9%). Callosity was most commonly found on the forefoot (77.5%), on the plantar first metatarsal (55.3%) and on the big toe (33.3%). An association was found between a tight heel cord and a history of foot injury with prolonged periods of weekly training. Toe deformities such as hallux rigidus (37.6%) were also associated with prolonged periods of training (p = 0.001). No correlation was found between type of foot arch and foot and ankle problems. Plantar forefoot callosities and wounds as well as toe deformities including tight heel cords are some of the foot and ankle problems commonly found in Muay Thai kick boxers. They are associated with prolonged periods of barefoot training. The unique pattern of training and of the kicks in Muay Thai might be a path mechanism, leading to the development of foot and ankle problems.

  11. Posterior ankle labral changes at MRI: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasir; Sahota, Navdeep; Shepel, Michael L; Obaid, Haron

    2017-10-01

    The transverse ligament in the ankle joint has been described as a labrum-like structure in a previous cadaveric study. The purpose of this study is to assess the spectrum of abnormal changes related to this structure on imaging/MRI, and correlate these findings with other ankle joint findings and patient symptoms. A retrospective observational review of 172 ankle MRI scans was carried out independently by two fellowship trained musculoskeletal Radiologists. Correlation between abnormal labral changes, other ankle joint findings and patient symptomatology was performed. Abnormal labral changes were seen in 26% of the MRI scans (n = 44/172) and included signal change, contour abnormality with heterogeneous signal change, linear fluid filled clefts, multidirectional fluid filled clefts, and a macerated labrum. There was a statistically significant association between abnormal labral changes and the presence of Stieda process/os trigonum (P = 0.001), talocrural joint osteoarthritis (P = 0.0003), paralabral cysts (P = 0.0001), imaging features of posterior impingement (P = 0.01), and both medial (P = 0.005) and lateral (P = 0.01) ankle ligament injuries. However, there was no statistically significant association between abnormal labral changes and patient symptoms. The posterior ankle labrum can develop a spectrum of abnormal MRI appearances in patients with other ankle joint abnormalities. Although this study showed no correlation between patients' symptoms and posterior ankle labral changes, larger studies are needed to examine the biomechanical alterations that may arise from these labral changes. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains – A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brendan; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Study Selection Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings. Data Syntheses Most studies (n=7) had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants. Conclusions It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control) and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely. PMID

  13. Epidemiology of injuries in female high school soccer players ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The knee (22.2%) and ankle (15.9%) were the most frequently injured body parts. Muscle injury was the most commonly reported followed by bruising. Conclusion: Prevalence of injuries was high with the lower limb, specifically the knee and ankle being commonly injured. Keywords: Epidemiology, soccer injuries, youth ...

  14. Functional bandage for ankle sprains. Recommendations for nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Isabel Arcos Cirauqui

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Three quarters of ankle injuries are diagnosed as sprains. For the most part sprains are caused by a forced inversion movement with involvement of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL. One of the recommended guidelines is immobilization by taping. The aim of this article is to unify the recommendations for nursing, on taping in the treatment of ankle sprains. The methodology used was a literature review, analyzing the information found in books and journals in hospital libraries and nursing databases on the Internet. The main results are a set of guidelines for the most accurate and therapeutic taping.

  15. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle surgeons are the surgical ... every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? After completing undergraduate education, the foot ...

  16. Anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint for lateral sprain or lateral malleolar fracture evaluated by radiographic measurements.