WorldWideScience

Sample records for anisotropy physics

  1. Physics of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Bucher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), especially of its frequency spectrum and its anisotropies, both in temperature and in polarization, have played a key role in the development of modern cosmology and our understanding of the very early universe. We review the underlying physics of the CMB and how the primordial temperature and polarization anisotropies were imprinted. Possibilities for distinguishing competing cosmological models are emphasized. The current status of CMB experiments and experimental techniques with an emphasis toward future observations, particularly in polarization, is reviewed. The physics of foreground emissions, especially of polarized dust, is discussed in detail, since this area is likely to become crucial for measurements of the B modes of the CMB polarization at ever greater sensitivity.

  2. Physical modelling of elastic anisotropy in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furre, Anne-Kari

    1997-12-31

    During the last decades, anisotropy has become increasingly interesting in hydrocarbon prospecting. Knowledge of anisotropy in the subsurface can improve reservoir production and data interpretation. This thesis presents experimental studies of three different artificial anisotropic media: layered materials, isotropic matrix with stress-induced fractures, and layered media with controlled crack patterns at an oblique angle relative to layering. Layered media were constructed by varying grain size distributions for different layers, which resulted in acoustic and permeability anisotropy. The thin layer materials could be described by Backus modelling provided the wavelength was much larger than the layer periods. Frequency dependent scattering was observed for waves travelling normal to the layers. Saturated wave velocities were consistent with transverse isotropic Biot theory, but because the permeability anisotropy was small, no flow dependent attenuation anisotropy was observed. When sandstones were cemented under stress and then released, to simulate a vertical core or uplift process, predominantly horizontal cracks developed in the samples. On reloading to the cementing stress level, the velocities were below the initial values, which supports the theories of crack growth. In further triaxial tests on the same material a stress-dependent anisotropy occurred similar to what is often seen in natural samples taken from large depths. 70 refs., 200 figs., 56 tabs.

  3. Estimation of anisotropy parameters in organic-rich shale: Rock physics forward modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropy analysis becomes an important step in processing and interpretation of seismic data. One of the most important things in anisotropy analysis is anisotropy parameter estimation which can be estimated using well data, core data or seismic data. In seismic data, anisotropy parameter calculation is generally based on velocity moveout analysis. However, the accuracy depends on data quality, available offset, and velocity moveout picking. Anisotropy estimation using seismic data is needed to obtain wide coverage of particular layer anisotropy. In anisotropic reservoir, analysis of anisotropy parameters also helps us to better understand the reservoir characteristics. Anisotropy parameters, especially ε, are related to rock property and lithology determination. Current research aims to estimate anisotropy parameter from seismic data and integrate well data with case study in potential shale gas reservoir. Due to complexity in organic-rich shale reservoir, extensive study from different disciplines is needed to understand the reservoir. Shale itself has intrinsic anisotropy caused by lamination of their formed minerals. In order to link rock physic with seismic response, it is necessary to build forward modeling in organic-rich shale. This paper focuses on studying relationship between reservoir properties such as clay content, porosity and total organic content with anisotropy. Organic content which defines prospectivity of shale gas can be considered as solid background or solid inclusion or both. From the forward modeling result, it is shown that organic matter presence increases anisotropy in shale. The relationships between total organic content and other seismic properties such as acoustic impedance and Vp/Vs are also presented

  4. Estimation of anisotropy parameters in organic-rich shale: Rock physics forward modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herawati, Ida, E-mail: ida.herawati@students.itb.ac.id; Winardhi, Sonny; Priyono, Awali [Mining and Petroleum Engineering Faculty, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Anisotropy analysis becomes an important step in processing and interpretation of seismic data. One of the most important things in anisotropy analysis is anisotropy parameter estimation which can be estimated using well data, core data or seismic data. In seismic data, anisotropy parameter calculation is generally based on velocity moveout analysis. However, the accuracy depends on data quality, available offset, and velocity moveout picking. Anisotropy estimation using seismic data is needed to obtain wide coverage of particular layer anisotropy. In anisotropic reservoir, analysis of anisotropy parameters also helps us to better understand the reservoir characteristics. Anisotropy parameters, especially ε, are related to rock property and lithology determination. Current research aims to estimate anisotropy parameter from seismic data and integrate well data with case study in potential shale gas reservoir. Due to complexity in organic-rich shale reservoir, extensive study from different disciplines is needed to understand the reservoir. Shale itself has intrinsic anisotropy caused by lamination of their formed minerals. In order to link rock physic with seismic response, it is necessary to build forward modeling in organic-rich shale. This paper focuses on studying relationship between reservoir properties such as clay content, porosity and total organic content with anisotropy. Organic content which defines prospectivity of shale gas can be considered as solid background or solid inclusion or both. From the forward modeling result, it is shown that organic matter presence increases anisotropy in shale. The relationships between total organic content and other seismic properties such as acoustic impedance and Vp/Vs are also presented.

  5. Research on anisotropy of shale oil reservoir based on rock physics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Qi; Liu, Cai; Liu, Xi-Wu; Dong, Ning; Liu, Yu-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Rock physics modeling is implemented for shales in the Luojia area of the Zhanhua topographic depression. In the rock physics model, the clay lamination parameter is introduced into the Backus averaging theory for the description of anisotropy related to the preferred alignment of clay particles, and the Chapman multi-scale fracture theory is used to calculate anisotropy relating to the fracture system. In accordance with geological features of shales in the study area, horizontal fractures are regarded as the dominant factor in the prediction of fracture density and anisotropy parameters for the inversion scheme. Results indicate that the horizontal fracture density obtained has good agreement with horizontal permeability measured from cores, and thus confirms the applicability of the proposed rock physics model and inversion method. Fracture density can thus be regarded as an indicator of reservoir permeability. In addition, the anisotropy parameter of the P-wave is higher than that of the S-wave due to the presence of horizontal fractures. Fracture density has an obvious positive correlation with P-wave anisotropy, and the clay content shows a positive correlation with S-wave anisotropy, which fully shows that fracture density has a negative correlation with clay and quartz contents and a positive relation with carbonate contents.

  6. Particle physics implications of Wilkinson microwave anisotropy project measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U A Yajnik

    2004-12-01

    We present an overview of the implications of the WMAP data for particle physics. The standard parameter set and characterising the inflaton potential can be related to the power-law indices characterising deviation of the CMB spectrum from the scale invariant form. Different classes of inflation potentials are in turn naturally associated with different unified schemes. At present WMAP does not exclude any but a few simple unified models. In particular, hybrid models favoured by supersymmetric unification continue to be viable. However future improvement in data leading to better determination of the `running' of power-law indices should help to narrow the possibilities for unified models. The main conclusion is that WMAP is consistent with the paradigm of GUT scale (1016 GeV) inflation.

  7. Physical modeling and analysis of P-wave attenuation anisotropy in transversely isotropic media

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zhu, Y.; Tsvankin, I.; Dewangan, P.; Van Wijk, K.

    phase attenuation coefficient A governed by the Thomsen- style attenuation-anisotropy parameters H9280Q and H9254Q. Whereas the symmetry axis of the angle-dependent coefficient Aprac- tically coincides with that of the velocity function, the magni- tude... and Tsvankin H208492004, 2006H20850 introduced Thomsen-style attenuation parameters H9280Q, H9254Q, and H9253Q de- rived from the Q-matrix for transversely isotropic H20849TIH20850 media and used the new notation to obtain simple approximations for the angle...

  8. The effect of physical assumptions on the calculation of microwave background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W; Sugiyama, N; White, M; Hu, Wayne; Scott, Douglas; Sugiyama, Naoshi; White, Martin

    1995-01-01

    As the data on CMB anisotropies improve and potential cosmological applications are realized, it will be increasingly important for theoretical calculations to be as accurate as possible. All modern calculations for inflationary-inspired fluctuations involve the numerical solution of coupled Boltzmann equations. There are many assumptions and choices to be made when carrying out such calculations. We go through each in turn, pointing out the best selections to make, and the level of inaccuracy expected through incorrect choice: (1) neglecting the effects of neutrinos or polarization has a 10% effect; (2) varying radiation temperature and He fraction can have smaller, but noticeable effects; (3) numerical issues, such as k-range and smoothing are discussed; (4) short-cut methods, e.g. free-streaming and tilt approximations, are generally inadequate at the few % level; (5) at the 1% level somewhat baroque effects are important, such as He recombination and even minimal reionization; (6) at smaller angular scale...

  9. Constraints on Cosmology and the Physics of the Intracluster Medium from Secondary Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James Colin

    This thesis presents a number of new statistical approaches to constrain cosmology and the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) using measurements of secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the remnant thermal radiation left over from the Big Bang that still permeates the universe today. In particular, I consider the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect, in which the hot, ionized gas in massive galaxy clusters casts a "shadow" against the CMB, and gravitational lensing of the CMB, in which the gravity of intervening structures bends the path of CMB photons as they travel to us from the early universe. I use data from the Planck satellite to obtain the first detection of the tSZ - CMB lensing cross-power spectrum, a signal which is sensitive to a previously unstudied population of high-redshift, low-mass groups and clusters. I combine this measurement with Planck measurements of the tSZ power spectrum to obtain cosmological and astrophysical constraints, and also investigate the ability of future tSZ power spectrum measurements to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity and the sum of the neutrino masses. In addition to these power spectrum measurements, I also present new techniques to obtain cosmological and astrophysical constraints from non-Gaussian statistics of the tSZ signal, starting with the tSZ skewness and proceeding to consider the entire one-point PDF of the tSZ field. I apply these methods to data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, yielding some of the tightest constraints yet achieved on the amplitude of cosmic matter density fluctuations. Moreover, these methods allow the long-standing degeneracy between cosmology and ICM physics to be directly broken with tSZ data alone for the first time.

  10. The jumps of physical quantities at fast shocks under pressure anisotropy: theory versus observations at the bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of the solar wind with magnetized planets leads to the formation of the so-called magnetosphere, a cavity generated by the geomagnetic field. The supersonic, superalfvenic, and magnetized solar wind flow interacting with blunt bodies produces a detached bow shock, separating the solar wind from the magnetosheath, the region between the shock wave and the magnetopause. On approach to a planetary obstacle, the solar wind becomes subsonic at the bow shock and then flows past the planet in the magnetosheath. At the bow shock, the plasma parameters and the magnetic field strength change from upstream to downstream, i.e., an increase of plasma density, temperature, pressure, and magnetic field strength, and a decrease of the velocity across the shock. In this PhD thesis we mainly concentrate on the variations of all physical quantities across the bow shock taking into account pressure anisotropy, which is an important feature in space plasma physics and observed by various spacecraft missions in the solar wind as well as in the magnetosheath. Dealing with anisotropic plasma conditions, one has to introduce the so-called pressure tensor, characterized by two scalar pressures, the pressure perpendicular (Pperp) and the pressure parallel (Pparallel) with respect to the magnetic field and in general one speaks of anisotropic conditions for Pperp is not Pparallel. Many spacecraft observations of the solar wind show Pparallel > Pperp, whereas observations of the magnetosheath show the opposite case, Pparallel perp. Therefore, dissipation of kinetic energy into thermal energy plays an important role in studying the variations of the relevant physical quantities across the shock. It has to be mentioned that planetary bow shocks are good examples for fast MHD shock waves. Therefore, the basic equations for describing the changes across the shock can be obtained by integrating the MHD equations in conservative form. We note that these equations, the so

  11. Physical model construction for electrical anisotropy of single crystal zinc oxide micro/nanobelt using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on conductivity characterization of single crystal zinc oxide (ZnO) micro/nanobelt (MB/NB), we further investigate the physical mechanism of nonlinear intrinsic resistance-length characteristic using finite element method. By taking the same parameters used in experiment, a model of nonlinear anisotropic resistance change with single crystal MB/NB has been deduced, which matched the experiment characterization well. The nonlinear resistance-length comes from the different electron moving speed in various crystal planes. As the direct outcome, crystallography of the anisotropic semiconducting MB/NB has been identified, which could serve as a simple but effective method to identify crystal growth direction of single crystal semiconducting or conductive nanomaterial

  12. Physical model construction for electrical anisotropy of single crystal zinc oxide micro/nanobelt using finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Guangbin [The Higher Educational Key Laboratory for Measuring and Control Technology and Instrumentations of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Tang, Chaolong [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Song, Jinhui, E-mail: jhsong@eng.ua.edu, E-mail: wqlu@cigit.ac.cn [The Higher Educational Key Laboratory for Measuring and Control Technology and Instrumentations of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 400714 (China); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT), University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Lu, Wenqiang, E-mail: jhsong@eng.ua.edu, E-mail: wqlu@cigit.ac.cn [Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 400714 (China)

    2014-04-14

    Based on conductivity characterization of single crystal zinc oxide (ZnO) micro/nanobelt (MB/NB), we further investigate the physical mechanism of nonlinear intrinsic resistance-length characteristic using finite element method. By taking the same parameters used in experiment, a model of nonlinear anisotropic resistance change with single crystal MB/NB has been deduced, which matched the experiment characterization well. The nonlinear resistance-length comes from the different electron moving speed in various crystal planes. As the direct outcome, crystallography of the anisotropic semiconducting MB/NB has been identified, which could serve as a simple but effective method to identify crystal growth direction of single crystal semiconducting or conductive nanomaterial.

  13. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  14. Anisotropy of rare-earth magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Skomski; D.J.Sellmyer

    2009-01-01

    Rare-earth intermetallics such as Nd2FeI4B and Sm-Co are widely used as high-performance permanent magnets,because they combine high magnetocrystalline anisotropy with reasonable magnetization and Curie temperature.The anisotropy is a combined effect of spin-orbit coupling and electrostatic crystal-field interactions.The main contribution comes from the rare-earth 4f electrons,which are well-screened from the crystalline environment but exhibit a strong spin-orbit coupling.In this limit,the magnetocrystalline anisotropy has a very transparent physical interpretation,the anisotropy energy essentially being equal to the energy of Hund's-rules 4f ion in the crystal field.The corresponding expression for the lowest-order uniaxial anisotropy constant K1 is used to discuss rare-earth substitutions,which have recently attracted renewed interest due to shifts in the rare-earth production and demand.Specific phenomena reviewed in this article are the enhancement of the anisotropy of Sm2Fe17 due to interstitial nitrogen,the use of Sm-Co magnets for high-temperature applications,and the comparison of rare-earth single-ion anisotropy with other single-ion and two-ion mechanisms.

  15. Magnetic surface anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rado, George T.

    1992-02-01

    Selected aspects of magnetic surface anisotropy are reviewed. The emphasis is on methods for deducing reliable surface anisotropy values from experiments such as ferromagnetic resonance at microwave frequencies and Brillouin scattering at optical frequencies. The methods used are the "general exchange boundary condition method" and the "effective volume anisotropy method". The essence of the former is the supplementing of the equation of motion of the magnetization with the general exchange boundary condition whereas the latter consists of using the "stratagem" of effective volume anisotropy. We find that use of the general exchange boundary condition method is not only preferable in principle but often actually necessary to prevent the prediction of wrong surface anisotropy values and to permit the prediction of some observable Brillouin shifts.

  16. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Habibi, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming survey of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipole anisotropy or anisotropy in higher multipole moments that would be detectable by the LSST.

  17. Relativistic Density Functional Treatment of Magnetic Anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hongbin

    2009-01-01

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) reduces the spatial symmetry of ferromagnetic solids. That is, the physical properties of ferromagnetic materials are anisotropic, depending on the magnetization direction. In this thesis, by means of numerical calculations with full-relativistic density functional theory, we studied two kinds of physical properties: surface magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) and anisotropic thermoelectric power due to Lifshitz transitions. After a short introduction to ...

  18. A Theoretical Diagnosis on Light Speed Anisotropy from GRAAL Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lingli, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The light speed anisotropy, i.e., the variation of the light speed with respect to direction in an "absolute" reference frame, is a profound issue in physics. The one-way experiment, performed at the GRAAL facility of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, reported results on the light speed anisotropy by Compton scattering of laser photons on high-energy electrons. We show in this paper that the azimuthal distribution of the GRAAL experiment data can be elegantly reproduced by a new theory of Lorentz invariance violation or space-time anisotropy, based on a general principle of physical independence of the mathematical background manifold.

  19. Polarization and dilepton anisotropy in pion-nucleon collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Speranza, Enrico; Friman, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Hadronic polarization and the related anisotropy of the dilepton angular distribution are studied for the reaction $\\pi N \\rightarrow Ne^+ e^-$. We employ consistent effective interactions for baryon resonances up to spin-5/2, where non-physical degrees of freedom are eliminated, to compute the anisotropy coefficients for isolated intermediate baryon resonances. It is shown that the spin and parity of the intermediate baryon resonance is reflected in the angular dependence of the anisotropy coefficient. We then compute the anisotropy coefficient including the $N(1520)$ and $N(1440)$ resonances, which are essential at the collision energy of the recent data obtained by the HADES collaboration on this reaction. We conclude that the anisotropy coefficient provides useful constraints for unravelling the resonance contributions to this process.

  20. CMB anisotropy science: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Challinor, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides us with our most direct observational window to the early universe. Observations of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB have played a critical role in defining the now-standard cosmological model. In this contribution we review some of the basics of CMB science, highlighting the role of observations made with ground-based and balloon-borne Antarctic telescopes. Most of the ingredients of the standard cosmological model are poorly understood in terms of fundamental physics. We discuss how current and future CMB observations can address some of these issues, focusing on two directly relevant for Antarctic programmes: searching for gravitational waves from inflation via B-mode polarization, and mapping dark matter through CMB lensing.

  1. Review of the anisotropy working group at UHECR-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs has recently experienced a jump in statistics as well as improved instrumentation. This has allowed a better sensitivity in searching for anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic rays. In this written version of the presentation given by the inter-collaborative “Anisotropy Working Group” at the International Symposium on Future Directions in UHECR physics at CERN in February 2012, we report on the current status for anisotropy searches in the arrival directions of UHECRs.

  2. Effective anisotropy through traveltime and amplitude matching

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hui

    2014-08-05

    Introducing anisotropy to seismic wave propagation reveals more realistic physics of our Earth\\'s subsurface as compared to the isotropic assumption. However wavefield modeling, the engine of seismic inverse problems, in anisotropic media still suffers from computational burdens, in particular with complex anisotropy such as transversely isotropic (TI) and Orthorhombic anisotropy. We develop effective isotropic velocity and density models to package the effects of anisotropy such that the wave propagation behavior using these effective models approximate those of the original anisotropic model. We build these effective models through the high frequency asymptotic approximation based on the eikonal and transport equations. We match the geometrical behavior of the wave-fields, given by traveltimes, from the anisotropic and isotropic eikonal equations. This matching yields the effective isotropic velocity that approximates the kinematics of the anisotropic wavefield. Equivalently, we calculate the effective densities by equating the anisotropic and isotropic transport equations. The effective velocities and densities are then fed into the isotropic acoustic variable density wave equation to obtain cheaper anisotropic wavefields. We justify our approach by testing it on an elliptical anisotropic model. The numerical results demonstrate a good matching of both traveltime and amplitude between anisotropic and effective isotropic wavefields.

  3. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  4. Colossal anisotropy of the magnetic properties of doped lithium nitrodometalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antropov, Vladimir P [Ames Laboratory; Antonov, Victor N [Ames Laboratory

    2014-09-01

    We present a first-principles investigation of the electronic structure and physical properties of doped lithium nitridometalates Li2(Li1-xMx)N (LiMN) with M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. The diverse properties include the equilibrium magnetic moments, magneto-crystalline anisotropy, magneto-optical Kerr spectra, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. We explain the colossal magnetic anisotropy in LiFeN by its unique electronic structure which ultimately leads to a series of unusual physical properties. The most unique property is a complete suppression of relativistic effects and freezing of orbital moments for in-plane orientation of the magnetization. This leads to the colossal spatial anisotropy of many magnetic properties including energy, Kerr, and dichroism effects. LiFeN is identified as an ultimate single-ion anisotropy system where a nearly insulating state can be produced by a spin orbital coupling alone. A very nontrivial strongly fluctuating and sign changing character of the magnetic anisotropy with electronic 3d-atomic doping is predicted theoretically. A large and highly anisotropic Kerr effect due to the interband transitions between atomic-like Fe 3d bands is found for LiFeN. A giant anisotropy of the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism for the Fe K spectrum and a very weak one for the Fe L2,3 spectra in LiFeN are also predicted.

  5. Low-temperature magnetic anisotropy in micas and chlorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Bender Koch, Christian; Lorenz, Wolfram E A;

    2014-01-01

    of magnetic susceptibility. Because diamagnetic and paramagnetic susceptibility are both linearly dependent on field, separation of the anisotropic contributions requires understanding how the degree of anisotropy of the paramagnetic susceptibility changes as a function of temperature. Note that diamagnetic...... of approximately 6.3-8.7 for individual samples of muscovite, phlogopite and chlorite on cooling from RT to 77 K and between 11.2 and 12.4 for biotite. A decrease in temperature enhances the paramagnetic anisotropy in a mineral. Biotite exhibits a relatively stronger enhancement due to the onset of magnetic......Phyllosilicates, such as micas and chlorite, are common rock-forming minerals and often show preferred orientation in deformed rocks. In combination with single-crystal anisotropy, this leads to anisotropy of physical properties in the rock, such as magnetic susceptibility. In order to effectively...

  6. Anisotropy of weakly vibrated granular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortel, Geert H; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally probe the anisotropy of weakly vibrated flowing granular media. Depending on the driving parameters-flow rate and vibration strength-this anisotropy varies significantly. We show how the anisotropy collapses when plotted as a function of the driving stresses, uncovering a direct link between stresses and anisotropy. Moreover, our data suggest that for small anisotropies, the shear stresses vanish. Anisotropy of the fabric of granular media thus plays a crucial role in determining the rheology of granular flows. PMID:26565148

  7. Anisotropy of Weakly Vibrated Granular Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Wortel, Geert; Van Hecke, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally probe the anisotropy of the fabric of weakly vibrated, flowing granular media. Depending on the driving parameters --- flow rate and vibration strength --- this anisotropy varies significantly. We show how the anisotropy collapses when plotted as function of the driving stresses, uncovering a direct link between stresses and anisotropy. Moreover, our data suggests that for small anisotropies, the shear stresses vanish. Anisotropy of the fabric of granular media thus plays a ...

  8. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  9. Anisotropy in solid inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the model of solid / elastic inflation, inflation is driven by a source that has the field theoretical description of a solid. To allow for prolonged slow roll inflation, the solid needs to be extremely insensitive to the spatial expansion. We point out that, because of this property, the solid is also rather inefficient in erasing anisotropic deformations of the geometry. This allows for a prolonged inflationary anisotropic solution, providing the first example with standard gravity and scalar fields only which evades the conditions of the so called cosmic no-hair conjecture. We compute the curvature perturbations on the anisotropic solution, and the corresponding phenomenological bound on the anisotropy. Finally, we discuss the analogy between this model and the f(φ)F2 model, which also allows for anisotropic inflation thanks to a suitable coupling between the inflaton φ and a vector field. We remark that the bispectrum of the curvature perturbations in solid inflation is enhanced in the squeezed limit and presents a nontrivial angular dependence, as had previously been found for the f(φ)F2 model

  10. Neutrino Anisotropies after Planck

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbino, Martina; Said, Najla

    2013-01-01

    We present new constraints on the rest-frame sound speed, c_eff^2, and the viscosity parameter, c_vis^2, of the Cosmic Neutrino Background from the recent measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies provided by the Planck satellite. While broadly consistent with the ex- pectations of c_eff^2 = c_vis^2 = 1/3 in the standard scenario, the Planck dataset hints for a higher value of the viscosity parameter, with c_vis^2 = 0.60 +/- 0.18 at 68% c.l., and a lower value of the sound speed, with c_eff^2 = 0.304 +/- 0.013 at 68% c.l.. We find a correlation between the neutrino parameters and the lensing amplitude of the temperature power spectrum A_L. When the latter parameter is allowed to vary, we find a better consistency with the standard model with c_vis^2 = 0.51 +/- 0.22, c_eff^2 = 0.311 +/- 0.019 and A_L = 1.08 +/- 0.18 at 68% c.l.. This result indicates that the anomalous large value of A_L measured by Planck could be connected to non-standard neutrino properties. Including additional datasets ...

  11. Ferromagnetic resonance of nanocrystal chains with competitive and cooperative anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulialias, D.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of cellular magnetic dipoles by chain assemblies of nearly equidimensional, stable single domain magnetite nanocrystals aligned along their [111] easy axes is a common property encountered in many magnetotactic bacteria (MTB). The development of such dipoles permits the navigation of MTB along the geomagnetic field towards favourable habitats, a process also referred to as magnetotaxis. An important characteristic is the anisotropy within the chains, which mainly consists of the magnetocrystalline and the shape anisotropy. The two anisotropy contributions can be cooperative or competitive depending on the orientation with respect to the chain axis. The change in the relative orientation between the two anisotropy contributions caused by the Verwey transition TV, can be used to unambigously detect MTB and their fossil remains. Ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FMR) is a well-established method to probe magnetic anisotropy in absolute units. Here, we use X- and Q-band FMR spectroscopy and numerical simulation to analyze the MTB species of Desulfovibrio magneticus RS-1 with elongated magnetosomes aligned along the [100] hard axis. In this special case, the magnetotaxis above TV is strongly affected by the shape anisotropy of the nanocrystals and it is competitive to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Below TV, the change of the easy axis [111] to [100] generates a cooperative system, which can be considered as the optimal case for magnetotaxis, i.e., shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropies are nearly parallel to the MTB chain axis. In summary, the nanocrystal assembly in RS-1 provides another step towards a better understanding of the physics behind magnetotaxis.

  12. Work function anisotropy and surface stability of half-metallic CrO(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, J. J.; Uijttewaal, M. A.; de Wijs, G. A.; de Groot, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Insight in the interplay between work function and stability is important for many areas of physics. In this paper, we calculate the anisotropy in the work function and the surface stability of CrO(2), a prototype half-metal, and find an anisotropy of 3.8 eV. An earlier model for the relation betwee

  13. Single-ion anisotropy in the gadolinium pyrochlores studied by electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazkov, V. N.; Zhitomirsky, M. E.; Smirnov, A. I.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Loidl, A.; Marin, C.; Sanchez, J.-P.

    2005-07-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance is used to measure the single-ion anisotropy of Gd3+ ions in the pyrochlore structure of (Y1-xGdx)2Ti2O7 . A rather strong easy-plane-type anisotropy is found. The anisotropy constant D is comparable to the exchange integral J in the prototype Gd2Ti2O7 , D≃0.75J , and exceeds the dipolar energy scale. Physical implications of an easy-plane anisotropy for a pyrochlore antiferromagnet are considered. We calculate the magnetization curves at T=0 and discuss phase transitions in a magnetic field.

  14. Extracting the jet azimuthal anisotropy from higher order cumulants

    CERN Document Server

    Lokhtin, Igor P; Snigirev, A M

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the method for calculation of a coefficient of jet azimuthal anisotropy without reconstruction of the nuclear reaction plane considering the higher order correlators between the azimuthal position of jet axis and the angles of particles not incorporated in the jet. The reliability of this technique in the real physical situation under LHC conditions is illustrated.

  15. Spin confinement by anisotropy modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, J.A.C. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jacb1@phy.cam.ac.uk; Lew, W.S.; Li, S.P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Vaz, C.A.F. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Natali, M.; Chen, Y. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS-LPN, Marcoussis (France)

    2002-10-07

    The spin configuration in a magnet is in general a 'natural' consequence of both the intrinsic properties of the material and the sample dimensions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome in a homogeneous ferromagnetic film by engineering an anisotropy contrast. Substrates with laterally modulated single-crystal and polycrystalline surface regions were used to induce selective epitaxial growth of a ferromagnetic Ni film. The resulting spatially varying magnetic anisotropy leads to regular perpendicular and in-plane magnetic domains, separated by a new type of magnetic domain wall-the 'anisotropy constrained' magnetic wall. Micromagnetic simulations indicate that the wall is asymmetric, has a small out-of-plane component and has no mobility under external perturbation. (author)

  16. Spin confinement by anisotropy modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, J. A. C.; Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Natali, M.; Chen, Y.

    2002-10-01

    The spin configuration in a magnet is in general a `natural' consequence of both the intrinsic properties of the material and the sample dimensions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome in a homogeneous ferromagnetic film by engineering an anisotropy contrast. Substrates with laterally modulated single-crystal and polycrystalline surface regions were used to induce selective epitaxial growth of a ferromagnetic Ni film. The resulting spatially varying magnetic anisotropy leads to regular perpendicular and in-plane magnetic domains, separated by a new type of magnetic domain wall-the `anisotropy constrained' magnetic wall. Micromagnetic simulations indicate that the wall is asymmetric, has a small out-of-plane component and has no mobility under external perturbation.

  17. Ion temperature anisotropy limitation in high beta plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Keiter, Paul A. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Balkey, Matthew M. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Boivin, Robert F. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kline, John L. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Blackburn, Melanie [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Measurements of parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies (LEIA) space simulation chamber display an inverse correlation between the upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy and the parallel ion beta ({beta}=8{pi}nkT/B{sup 2}). Fluctuation measurements indicate the presence of low frequency, transverse, electromagnetic waves with wave numbers and frequencies that are consistent with predictions for Alfven Ion Cyclotron instabilities. These observations are also consistent with in situ spacecraft measurements in the Earth's magnetosheath and with a theoretical/computational model that predicts that such an upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy is imposed by scattering from enhanced fluctuations due to growth of the Alfven ion cyclotron instability. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. A CMB Gibbs sampler for localized secondary anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Philip; Eriksen, Hans Kristian; Ferreira, Pedro G; Fuskeland, Unni; Gorski, Krzysztof M; Jewell, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-01

    As well as primary fluctuations, CMB temperature maps contain a wealth of additional information in the form of secondary anisotropies. Secondary effects that can be identified with individual objects, such as the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects due to galaxy clusters, are difficult to unambiguously disentangle from foreground contamination and the primary CMB, which currently inhibits their use as precision cosmological probes. We develop a Bayesian formalism for rigorously characterising anisotropies that are localised on the sky, taking the TSZ and KSZ effects as an example. Using a Gibbs sampling scheme, we are able to efficiently sample from the joint posterior distribution for a multi-component model of the sky with many thousands of correlated physical parameters. The posterior can then be exactly marginalised to estimate properties of the secondary anisotropies, fully taking into account degeneracies with the other signals in the CMB map. We show that this method is computationally...

  19. Amiba Observation of CMB Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kin-Wang

    2003-03-01

    The Array for Microwave Background Anisotropies (AMiBA), a 13-element dual-channel 85-105 GHz interferometer array with full polarization capabilities, is being built to search for high redshift clusters of galaxies via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect as well as to probe the polarization properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We discuss several important issues in the observation of the CMB anisotropies such as observing strategy, l space resolution and mosaicing, optimal estimation of the power spectra, and ground pickup removal.

  20. Laser-induced nuclear orientation and gamma anisotropy in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser optical pumping to induce nuclear orientation in several isotopes and one isomer of atomic sodium vapor is described. Essentially complete nuclear polarization, P > 90%, has been achieved in stable 23Na when pumping with modest laser intensities (I approx. = 10 mW/cm2). The volume of the sample cell was approximately 10 cc, and was filled with a sodium density of about 10'' atoms/cc. Complete coverage of the Doppler distribution was accomplished with the use of trace amounts (less than or equal to 1 torr) of argon buffer gas to induce velocity changing collisions. A theoretical model which accurately predicts the amount of polarization is developed. The orientation of nuclei which are unstable to gamma decay can manifest itself in anisotropic gamma ray emission. This anisotropy can be used to measure isotope and isomer shifts, from which nuclear properties can be derived. Gamma anisotropy was observed in two systems, 22Na and /sup 24m/Na. From the observed anisotropy in /sup 24m/Na, a negative sign for the g factor is determined. Values are derived for the magnetic moment, μ = 2.56 +- 0.64 nm, and the isomer shift, deltaν/sub 24m/ = 288 +- 191 MHz (D1 line). A model is described which relates various laser and fubber gas parameters to the observed gamma anisotropy lineshape. This model facilitates the extraction of physical parameters from knowledge of the laser frequency at which the anisotropy is a maximum

  1. Performance of ERNE in particle flux anisotropy measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Riihonen

    Full Text Available The HED particle detector of the ERNE experiment to be flown on the SOHO spacecraft is unique compared to the earlier space-born detectors in its high directional resolution (better than 2°, depending on the track inclination. Despite the fixed view cone due to the three-axis stabilization of the spacecraft, the good angular and temporal resolution of the detector provides a new kind of opportunity for monitoring in detail the development of the anisotropies pertaining, for example, to the onset of SEP events, or passage of shock fronts related to gradual events. In order to optimize the measurement parameters, we have made a preflight simulation study of the HED anisotropy measurement capabilities. The purpose was to prove the feasibility of the selected measurement method and find the physical limits for the HED anisotropy detection. The results show HED to be capable of detecting both strong anisotropies related to impulsive events, and smoother anisotropies associated with gradual events.

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  3. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, E.; Bennett, Charles L.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat ? cold dark matter (Lambda Cold Dark Matter) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of > 68, 000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino background, flatness of spatial geometry of the universe, a deviation from a scale-invariant spectrum of initial scalar fluctuations, and that the current universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The WMAP observations provide the strongest ever support for inflation; namely, the structures we see in the universe originate from quantum fluctuations generated during inflation.

  4. Exotic skyrmion crystals in chiral magnets with compass anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. P.; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Liu, J. -M.

    2016-01-01

    The compass-type anisotropy appears naturally in diverse physical contexts with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) such as transition metal oxides and cold atomic gases etc, and it has been receiving substantial attention. Motivated by recent studies and particularly recent experimental observations on helimagnet MnGe, we investigate the critical roles of this compass-type anisotropy in modulating various spin textures of chiral magnets with strong SOC, by Monte Carlo simulations based on a classical Heisenberg spin model with Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and compass anisotropy. A phase diagram with emergent spin orders in the space of compass anisotropy and out-of-plane magnetic field is presented. In this phase diagram, we propose that a hybrid super-crystal structure consisting of alternating half-skyrmion and half-anti-skyrmion is the possible zero-field ground state of MnGe. The simulated evolution of the spin structure driven by magnetic field is in good accordance with experimental observations on MnGe. Therefore, this Heisenberg spin model successfully captures the main physics responsible for the magnetic structures in MnGe, and the present work may also be instructive to research on the magnetic states in other systems with strong SOC. PMID:27377149

  5. Exotic skyrmion crystals in chiral magnets with compass anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. P.; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Liu, J.-M.

    2016-07-01

    The compass-type anisotropy appears naturally in diverse physical contexts with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) such as transition metal oxides and cold atomic gases etc, and it has been receiving substantial attention. Motivated by recent studies and particularly recent experimental observations on helimagnet MnGe, we investigate the critical roles of this compass-type anisotropy in modulating various spin textures of chiral magnets with strong SOC, by Monte Carlo simulations based on a classical Heisenberg spin model with Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and compass anisotropy. A phase diagram with emergent spin orders in the space of compass anisotropy and out-of-plane magnetic field is presented. In this phase diagram, we propose that a hybrid super-crystal structure consisting of alternating half-skyrmion and half-anti-skyrmion is the possible zero-field ground state of MnGe. The simulated evolution of the spin structure driven by magnetic field is in good accordance with experimental observations on MnGe. Therefore, this Heisenberg spin model successfully captures the main physics responsible for the magnetic structures in MnGe, and the present work may also be instructive to research on the magnetic states in other systems with strong SOC.

  6. Detection of zero anisotropy at 5.2 AU during the November 1998 solar particle event: Ulysses Anisotropy Telescopes observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dalla

    Full Text Available For the first time during the mission, the Anisotropy Telescopes instrument on board the Ulysses spacecraft measured constant zero anisotropy of protons in the 1.3-2.2 MeV energy range, for a period lasting more than three days. This measurement was made during the energetic particle event taking place at Ulysses between 25 November and 15 December 1998, an event characterised by constant high proton fluxes within a region delimited by two interplanetary forward shocks, at a distance of 5.2 AU from the Sun and heliographic latitude of 17°S. We present the ATs results for this event and discuss their possible interpretation and their relevance to the issue of intercalibration of the two telescopes.

    Key words: Interplanetary physics (energetic particles - Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles - Space plasma physics (instruments and techniques

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  10. Influence of deformation and annealing on texture and anisotropy of the properties in VT23 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharchenko, I.G.; Ivasishin, O.M.; Ivanij, V.S.; Kshnyakin, V.S. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Metallofiziki; Sumskij Gosudarstvennyj Pedagogicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR))

    The effect of cold rolling and following heat treatment on development of texture and anisotropy of physical properties in sheets of VT23 titanium alloy is investigated. It is shown that decrease of elastic anisotropy of hot-rolled sheets of VT23 alloy can be assured by cold rolling. Annealings at temperatures up to 500 deg C do not bring about essential changes in anisotropy. But orientated ..cap alpha.. reversible ..beta.. - transformations at annealing up to 750-800 deg C promoting development of prismatic and pyramidal components of texture result in increase of anisotropy of elastic properties. Essential decrease of anisotropy value of Young modulus takes place after heating in the ..beta..-region.

  11. CMB Anisotropies from a Gradient Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    A pure gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect at linear level. We confirm this by showing that its contribution to the dipolar power asymmetry of CMB anisotropies vanishes, if Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To this end, the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit is extended to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. At second order, a gradient mode generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce a quadrupole moment. For instance in a matter-dominated model it is equal to 5/18 times the square of the linear gradient part. This quadrupole can be cancelled by superposing a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a non-linear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  13. Seismic Anisotropy in the Deep Mantle, Boundary Layers and the Geometry of Mantle Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karato, S.

    An attempt is made to explore the geodynamical significance of seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle on the basis of mineral physics. The mineral physics observations used include the effects of deformation mechanisms on lattice and shape preferred orientation, the effects of pressure on elastic anisotropy and the nature of lattice preferred orientation in deep mantle minerals in dislocation creep regime. Many of these issues are still poorly constrained, but a review of recent results shows that it is possible to interpret deep mantle seismic anisotropy in a unified fashion, based on the solid state processes without invoking partial melting. The key notions are (i) the likely regional variation in the magnitude of anisotropy as deformation mechanisms change from dislocation to diffusion creep (or superplasticity), associated with a change in the stress level and/or grain-size in the convecting mantle with a high Rayleigh number, and (ii) the change in elastic anisotropy with pressure in major mantle minerals, particularly in (Mg, Fe)O. The results provide the following constraints on the style of mantle convection (i) the SH > SV anisotropy in the bottom transition zone and the SV > SH anisotropy in the top lower mantle can be attributed to anisotropy structures (lattice preferred orientation and/or laminated structures) caused by the horizontal flow in this depth range, suggesting the presence of a mid-mantle boundary layer due to (partially) layered convection, (ii) the observed no significant seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle near subduction zones implies that deformation associated with subducting slabs is due mostly to diffusion creep (or superplasticity) and therefore slabs are weak in the deep mantle and hence easily deformed when encountered with resistance forces, and (iii) the SH > SV anisotropy in the cold thick portions of the D" layer is likely to be due to horizontally aligned shape preferred orientation in perovskite plus magnesiow

  14. Magnetoresistance Anisotropy in WTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoutam, Laxman Raju; Wang, Yonglei; Xiao, Zhili; Das, Saptarshi; Luican Mayer, Adina; Divan, Ralu; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai Kwong

    We report the angle dependence of the magnetoresistance in WTe2. Being a layered material, WTe2 is considered to be electronically two-dimensional (2D). Our results demonstrate that it is in fact 3D with an anisotropy of effective mass as small as 2. We measured the magnetic field dependence of the sample resistance R(H) at various angles between the applied magnetic field with respect to the c-axis of the crystal and found that they can be scaled based on the mass anisotropy, which changes from ~2 to ~5 with decreasing temperature in the Fermi liquid state. We will also discuss the origin of the turn-on temperature behavior in this material.

  15. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  18. Linking preferred orientations to elastic anisotropy in muderong shale, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    W. Kanitpanyacharoen; Vasin, R; Wenk, HR; Dewhurst, DN

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. The significance of shales for unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs, nuclear waste repositories, and geologic carbon stor- age has opened new research frontiers in geophysics. Among many of its unique physical properties, elastic anisotropy had long been investigated by experimental and computational ap- proaches. Here, we calculated elastic properties of Cretaceous Muderong Shale from Australia with a self-consistent averaging method based on mic...

  19. Large-Angular Scales CMB Anisotropy from Excited Initial Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Sojasi, A; Yusofi, E

    2015-01-01

    According to the inflationary cosmology, the CMB anisotropy gives an opportunity to test predictions of the new physics hypothesis. Initial state of quantum fluctuations is one of the important options at high energy scale, which can affect on the observables such as CMB power spectrum. In this study a quasi-de Sitter inflationary background with approximate de Sitter mode function built over the Bunch-Davies mode is applied to investigate the scale-dependency of the CMB anisotropy. Indeed, considering the recent Planck constraint on spectral index, motivated us to examine the effect of new excited mode function (instead of pure de Sitter mode) on the CMB anisotropy in large-angular scales. In so doing, it was revealed that the angular scale-invariance in the CMB temperature fluctuations is broken and in the limit $ \\ell<200 $ the tiny deviation is appeared. Also, it was shown that the power spectrum of CMB anisotropy is dependent on the slow-roll parameter $\\epsilon $.

  20. A CMB GIBBS SAMPLER FOR LOCALIZED SECONDARY ANISOTROPIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, Philip; Eriksen, Hans Kristian; Fuskeland, Unni [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, Ingunn K.; Ferreira, Pedro G. [Astrophysics, University of Oxford, DWB, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Górski, Krzysztof M.; Jewell, Jeffrey B., E-mail: p.j.bull@astro.uio.no [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    In addition to primary fluctuations, cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps contain a wealth of additional information in the form of secondary anisotropies. However, secondary effects that can be identified with individual objects, such as the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (TSZ–KSZ) effects due to galaxy clusters, are difficult to unambiguously disentangle from foreground contamination and the primary CMB. We develop a Bayesian formalism to rigorously characterize anisotropies that are localized on the sky, taking the TSZ and KSZ effects as an example. Using a Gibbs sampling scheme, we are able to efficiently sample from the joint posterior distribution for a multi-component model of the sky with many thousands of correlated physical parameters. The posterior can then be exactly marginalized to estimate the properties of the secondary anisotropies, fully taking into account degeneracies with the other signals in the CMB map. We show that this method is computationally tractable using a simple implementation based on the existing Commander component separation code and discuss how other types of secondary anisotropy can be accommodated within our framework.

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  3. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  4. Hierarchical multi-scale modeling of texture induced plastic anisotropy in sheet forming

    OpenAIRE

    Gawad, J.; van Bael, Albert; Eyckens, P.; Samaey, G.; Van Houtte, P.; Roose, D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a Hierarchical Multi-Scale (HMS) model of coupled evolutions of crystallographic texture and plastic anisotropy in plastic forming of polycrystalline metallic alloys. The model exploits the Finite Element formulation to describe the macroscopic deformation of the material. Anisotropy of the plastic properties is derived from a physics-based polycrystalline plasticity micro-scale model by means of virtual experiments. The homogenized micro-scale stress response given b...

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Hill

    2012-01-01

    The months that have passed since the last CMS Bulletin have been a very busy and exciting time for CMS physics. We have gone from observing the very first 8TeV collisions produced by the LHC to collecting a dataset of the collisions that already exceeds that recorded in all of 2011. All in just a few months! Meanwhile, the analysis of the 2011 dataset and publication of the subsequent results has continued. These results come from all the PAGs in CMS, including searches for the Higgs boson and other new phenomena, that have set the most stringent limits on an ever increasing number of models of physics beyond the Standard Model including dark matter, Supersymmetry, and TeV-scale gravity scenarios, top-quark physics where CMS has overtaken the Tevatron in the precision of some measurements, and bottom-quark physics where CMS made its first discovery of a new particle, the Ξ*0b baryon (candidate event pictured below). Image 2:  A Ξ*0b candidate event At the same time POGs and PAGs...

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  8. Lichtinduzierte Generierung und Charakterisierung optischer Anisotropie

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Carl Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Eine Nutzung der optischen Anisotropie dünner Schichten ist vor allem für die Displaytechnologie, die optische Datenspeicherung und für optische Sicherheitselemente von hoher Bedeutung. Diese Doktorarbeit befasst sich mit theoretischen und experimentellen Untersuchung von dreidimensionaler Anisotropie und dabei insbesondere mit der Untersuchung von lichtinduzierter dreidimensionaler Anisotropie in organischen dünnen Polymer-Schichten. Die gewonnenen Erkentnisse und entwickelten Methoden könne...

  9. Flow stress anisotropy in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.; Hansen, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy of cold-rolled high purity aluminum (99.996%) and commercially pure aluminum (99.6%) has been investigated. Sample parameters were the initial grain size and the degree of plastic strain (ϵ ... tension as a function of the angle between the tensile axis and the rolling direction. Textures were determined by neutron diffraction, and Taylor M-factors were calculated. The microstructures were studied by TEM. It was found that the flow stress varies significantly with orientation both at low...

  10. Anomalous Nernst Effect with Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy (110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesman, Carlos; Costa Neto, Jose; Department of Physics-UFRN Team

    2014-03-01

    When a ferromagnetic material is submitted to a temperature gradient and the magnetic field generates voltage on the edges of the samples, this is called the Anomalous Nernst Effect (ANE). The Heusler alloys that currently exhibit this effect are the most promising for spintronics and spin caloritronics. In this study we perform a theoretical investigation of voltage curves associated to the ANE, when the material displays magnetocrystalline anisotropy for experimental results in two configurations, ANE versus applied magnetic field and planar angle variations of ANE. We analyzed three types of magnetocrystalline anisotropy: cubic anisotropy (100) with C4 symmetry, uniaxial anisotropy with C2 symmetry and cubic anisotropy (110). The aim was to prove that cubic anisotropy (110) is equivalent to anisotropy (100) combined with uniaxial anisotropy. Theoretical fitting of experimental ANE data demonstrates this total equivalence and that a new interpretation with the use of cubic anisotropy (110) may be due to the atomic arrangement of the so-called full-Heusler. Comparative analyses of Co2FeAl and Co2MnGe alloys will be presented. CNPq, CAPES, FAPERN.

  11. CMB anisotropies from a gradient mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-03-01

    A linear gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect on short distance physics. We confirm this by showing that if there was such a gradient mode extending across the whole observable Universe, it would not cause any hemispherical asymmetry in the power of CMB anisotropies, as long as Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To study the effect of the long wavelength mode on short wavelength modes, we generalize the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. Next, we consider effects that are of second order in the long mode. A gradient mode Φ = qṡx generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce an observable quadrupole moment. For instance, in a matter-dominated model it is equal to Q = 5(qṡx)2/18. This quadrupole can be canceled by superposition of a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a nonlinear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      The period since the last CMS Bulletin has been historic for CMS Physics. The pinnacle of our physics programme was an observation of a new particle – a strong candidate for a Higgs boson – which has captured worldwide interest and made a profound impact on the very field of particle physics. At the time of the discovery announcement on 4 July, 2012, prominent signals were observed in the high-resolution H→γγ and H→ZZ(4l) modes. Corroborating excess was observed in the H→W+W– mode as well. The fermionic channel analyses (H→bb, H→ττ), however, yielded less than the Standard Model (SM) expectation. Collectively, the five channels established the signal with a significance of five standard deviations. With the exception of the diphoton channel, these analyses have all been updated in the last months and several new channels have been added. With improved analyses and more than twice the i...

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The Physics Groups are actively engaged on analyses of the first data from the LHC at 7 TeV, targeting many results for the ICHEP conference taking place in Paris this summer. The first large batch of physics approvals is scheduled for this CMS Week, to be followed by four more weeks of approvals and analysis updates leading to the start of the conference in July. Several high priority analysis areas were organized into task forces to ensure sufficient coverage from the relevant detector, object, and analysis groups in the preparation of these analyses. Already some results on charged particle correlations and multiplicities in 7 TeV minimum bias collisions have been approved. Only one small detail remains before ICHEP: further integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC! Beyond the Standard Model measurements that can be done with these data, the focus changes to the search for new physics at the TeV scale and for the Higgs boson in the period after ICHEP. Particle Flow The PFT group is focusing on the ...

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The collisions last year at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV provided the long anticipated collider data to the CMS physics groups. Quite a lot has been accomplished in a very short time. Although the delivered luminosity was small, CMS was able to publish its first physics paper (with several more in preparation), and commence the commissioning of physics objects for future analyses. Many new performance results have been approved in advance of this CMS Week. One remarkable outcome has been the amazing agreement between out-of-the-box data with simulation at these low energies so early in the commissioning of the experiment. All of this is testament to the hard work and preparation conducted beforehand by many people in CMS. These analyses could not have happened without the dedicated work of the full collaboration on building and commissioning the detector, computing, and software systems combined with the tireless work of many to collect, calibrate and understand the data and our detector. To facilitate the efficien...

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      2012 has started off as a very busy year for the CMS Physics Groups. Planning for the upcoming higher luminosity/higher energy (8 TeV) operation of the LHC and relatively early Rencontres de Moriond are the high-priority activities for the group at the moment. To be ready for the coming 8-TeV data, CMS has made a concerted effort to perform and publish analyses on the 5 fb−1 dataset recorded in 2011. This has resulted in the submission of 16 papers already, including nine on the search for the Higgs boson. In addition, a number of preliminary results on the 2011 dataset have been released to the public. The Exotica and SUSY groups approved several searches for new physics in January, such as searches for W′ and exotic highly ionising particles. These were highlighted at a CERN seminar given on 24th  January. Many more analyses, from all the PAGs, including the newly formed SMP (Standard Model Physics) and FSQ (Forward and Small-x QCD), were approved in February. The ...

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Demortier

    Physics-wise, the CMS week in December was dominated by discussions of the analyses that will be carried out in the “next six months”, i.e. while waiting for the first LHC collisions.  As presented in December, analysis approvals based on Monte Carlo simulation were re-opened, with the caveat that for this work to be helpful to the goals of CMS, it should be carried out using the new software (CMSSW_2_X) and associated samples.  By the end of the week, the goal for the physics groups was set to be the porting of our physics commissioning methods and plans, as well as the early analyses (based an integrated luminosity in the range 10-100pb-1) into this new software. Since December, the large data samples from CMSSW_2_1 were completed. A big effort by the production group gave a significant number of events over the end-of-year break – but also gave out the first samples with the fast simulation. Meanwhile, as mentioned in December, the arrival of 2_2 meant that ...

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    the PAG conveners

    2011-01-01

    The delivered LHC integrated luminosity of more than 1 inverse femtobarn by summer and more than 5 by the end of 2011 has been a gold mine for the physics groups. With 2011 data, we have submitted or published 14 papers, 7 others are in collaboration-wide review, and 75 Physics Analysis Summaries have been approved already. They add to the 73 papers already published based on the 2010 and 2009 datasets. Highlights from each physics analysis group are described below. Heavy ions Many important results have been obtained from the first lead-ion collision run in 2010. The published measurements include the first ever indications of Υ excited state suppression (PRL synopsis), long-range correlation in PbPb, and track multiplicity over a wide η range. Preliminary results include the first ever measurement of isolated photons (showing no modification), J/ψ suppression including the separation of the non-prompt component, further study of jet fragmentation, nuclear modification factor...

  18. Anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background an analytic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W; Wayne Hu; Naoshi Sugiyama

    1994-01-01

    We introduce a simple yet powerful {\\it analytic} method which obtains the structure of cosmic microwave background anisotropies to better than 5-10\\% in temperature fluctuations on {\\it all} scales. It is applicable to {\\it any} model in which the potential fluctuations at recombination are both linear and known. Moreover, it recovers and explains the presence of the ``Doppler peaks'' at degree scales as {\\it driven} acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid. We treat in detail such subtleties as the time dependence of the gravitational driving force, anisotropic stress from the neutrino quadrupole, and damping during the recombination process, again all from an analytic standpoint. We apply this formalism to the standard cold dark matter model to gain physical insight into the anisotropies, including the dependence of the peak locations and heights on cosmological parameters such as \\Omega_b and h, as well as model parameters such as the ionization history. Damping due to the finite thickness of the ...

  19. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. D'Hondt

    The Electroweak and Top Quark Workshop (16-17th of July) A Workshop on Electroweak and Top Quark Physics, dedicated on early measurements, took place on 16th-17th July. We had more than 40 presentations at the Workshop, which was an important milestone for 2007 physics analyses in the EWK and TOP areas. The Standard Model has been tested empirically by many previous experiments. Observables which are nowadays known with high precision will play a major role for data-based CMS calibrations. A typical example is the use of the Z to monitor electron and muon reconstruction in di-lepton inclusive samples. Another example is the use of the W mass as a constraint for di-jets in the kinematic fitting of top-quark events, providing information on the jet energy scale. The predictions of the Standard Model, for what concerns proton collisions at the LHC, are accurate to a level that the production of W/Z and top-quark events can be used as a powerful tool to commission our experiment. On the other hand the measure...

  20. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Christopher Hill

    2013-01-01

    Since the last CMS Bulletin, the CMS Physics Analysis Groups have completed more than 70 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete Run 1 dataset. In parallel the Snowmass whitepaper on projected discovery potential of CMS for HL-LHC has been completed, while the ECFA HL-LHC future physics studies has been summarised in a report and nine published benchmark analyses. Run 1 summary studies on b-tag and jet identification, quark-gluon discrimination and boosted topologies have been documented in BTV-13-001 and JME-13-002/005/006, respectively. The new tracking alignment and performance papers are being prepared for submission as well. The Higgs analysis group produced several new results including the search for ttH with H decaying to ZZ, WW, ττ+bb (HIG-13-019/020) where an excess of ~2.5σ is observed in the like-sign di-muon channel, and new searches for high-mass Higgs bosons (HIG-13-022). Search for invisible Higgs decays have also been performed both using the associ...

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    The period since the last CMS bulletin has seen the end of proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy 8 TeV, a successful proton-lead collision run at 5 TeV/nucleon, as well as a “reference” proton run at 2.76 TeV. With these final LHC Run 1 datasets in hand, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have been busy analysing these data in preparation for the winter conferences. Moreover, despite the fact that the pp run only concluded in mid-December (and there was consequently less time to complete data analyses), CMS again made a strong showing at the Rencontres de Moriond in La Thuile (EW and QCD) where nearly 40 new results were presented. The highlight of these preliminary results was the eagerly anticipated updated studies of the properties of the Higgs boson discovered in July of last year. Meanwhile, preparations for Run 2 and physics performance studies for Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrade scenarios are ongoing. The Higgs analysis group produced updated analyses on the full Run 1 dataset (~25 f...

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    In the period since the last CMS Bulletin, the LHC – and CMS – have entered LS1. During this time, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have performed more than 40 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete 8 TeV dataset delivered by the LHC in 2012 (and in some cases on the full Run 1 dataset). These results were shown at, and well received by, several high-profile conferences in the spring of 2013, including the inaugural meeting of the Large Hadron Collider    Physics Conference (LHCP) in Barcelona, and the 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies (LP) in San Francisco. In parallel, there have been significant developments in preparations for Run 2 of the LHC and on “future physics” studies for both Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades of the CMS detector. The Higgs analysis group produced five new results for LHCP including a new H-to-bb search in VBF production (HIG-13-011), ttH with H to γ&ga...

  3. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters.

  4. Seepage Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ore dumps are heterogeneous bodies with anisotropic seepage characteristics because of the ore segregation.In an indoor experiment, a dump was constructed with three strata, where the horizontal and vertical seepage experiments were carried out.Horizontals flow are regarded as phreatic plan flows without penetration.Its seepage law satifies the Dupuit equation.With parallel lay seepage model, the equivalent seepage coefficient in the horizontal flow was obtained and was equivalent to the weighted mean of the seepage coefficient of each stratum.An unsaturated flow appeared in the vertical experiment, with a hydraulic gradient of 1.The vertical flow was equivalent to the seepage model that moved in vertical bedding; its equivalent seepage coefficient depended on the stratum with the minimum seepage coefficient.That the experiment showed clear anisotropy in a heterogeneous body was obvious with an anisotropic coefficient between 63 and 155, which is 25 to 100 times larger than that of a homogeneous body.

  5. Shrinkage anisotropy characteristics from soil structure and initial sample/layer size

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is a physical prediction of such soil shrinkage anisotropy characteristics as variation with drying of (i) different sample/layer sizes and (ii) the shrinkage geometry factor. With that, a new presentation of the shrinkage anisotropy concept is suggested through the sample/layer size ratios. The work objective is reached in two steps. First, the relations are derived between the indicated soil shrinkage anisotropy characteristics and three different shrinkage curves of a soil relating to: small samples (without cracking at shrinkage), sufficiently large samples (with internal cracking), and layers of similar thickness. Then, the results of a recent work with respect to the physical prediction of the three shrinkage curves are used. These results connect the shrinkage curves with the initial sample size/layer thickness as well as characteristics of soil texture and structure (both inter- and intra-aggregate) as physical parameters. The parameters determining the reference shrinkage c...

  6. First principles study on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Fe-Ga magnetostrictive alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Lei; Jiang Cheng-Bao; Shang Jia-Xiang; XU Hui-Bin

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the electronic structure and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Fe-Ga magnetostrictive material by means of the full potential-linearized augmented plane-wave method within the generalized gradient approximation.The 3d-orbit splitting of Fe atoms in D03,B2-like and L12 crystalline structures of Fe-Ga is calculated with consideration of the crystal field as well as the spin-orbit coupling effect.Because of the frozen orbital angular momenta of the 3d-orbit for Fe atoms in Fe-Ga magnetostrictive alloys and the spin-orbit coupling,the distribution of the electron cloud is not isotropic,which leads to the anisotropy of exchange interaction between the different atoms.A method on estimating the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Fe-Ga alloys by means of calculating orbit-projected density of states for Fe atoms is performed.The anisotropic distribution of the electron cloud of Fe atoms in these three crystalline structures of Fe-Ga is studied based on the above method showing the highest magnetic anisotropy for B2-like structure.This qualitative method comes closer to physical reality with a vivid physical view,which can evaluate the anisotropy of electron cloud for 3d transition atoms directly.The calculated results are in good agreement with both the previous theoretical computation and the tested value on the magnetic anisotropy constant,which con firms that the electron cloud anisotropy of Fe atoms could well characterize the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Fe-Ga magnetostrictive material.

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    V.Ciulli

    2011-01-01

    The main programme of the Physics Week held between 16th and 20th May was a series of topology-oriented workshops on di-leptons, di-photons, inclusive W, and all-hadronic final states. The goal of these workshops was to reach a common understanding for the set of objects (ID, cleaning...), the handling of pile-up, calibration, efficiency and purity determination, as well as to revisit critical common issues such as the trigger. Di-lepton workshop Most analysis groups use a di-lepton trigger or a combination of single and di-lepton triggers in 2011. Some groups need to collect leptons with as low PT as possible with strong isolation and identification requirements as for Higgs into WW at low mass, others with intermediate PT values as in Drell-Yan studies, or high PT as in the Exotica group. Electron and muon reconstruction, identification and isolation, was extensively described in the workshop. For electrons, VBTF selection cuts for low PT and HEEP cuts for high PT were discussed, as well as more complex d...

  8. Primordial anisotropies in gauged hybrid inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study primordial anisotropies generated in the model of gauged hybrid inflation in which the complex waterfall field is charged under a U(1)gauge field. Primordial anisotropies are generated either actively during inflation or from inhomogeneities modulating the surface of end of inflation during waterfall transition. We present a consistent δN mechanism to calculate the anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum. We show that the primordial anisotropies generated at the surface of end of inflation do not depend on the number of e-folds and therefore do not produce dangerously large anisotropies associated with the IR modes. Furthermore, one can find the parameter space that the anisotropies generated from the surface of end of inflation cancel the anisotropies generated during inflation, therefore relaxing the constrains on model parameters imposed from IR anisotropies. We also show that the gauge field fluctuations induce a red-tilted power spectrum so the averaged power spectrum from the gauge field can change the total power spectrum from blue to red. Therefore, hybrid inflation, once gauged under a U(1) field, can be consistent with the cosmological observations

  9. Kurtosis fractional anisotropy, its contrast and estimation by proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Brian; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion kurtosis observed with diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) may vary with direction. This directional variation is summarized in the scalar kurtosis fractional anisotropy (KFA). Recent studies suggest that kurtosis anisotropy offers microstructural contrast not contained in other commonly used dMRI markers. We compare KFA to other dMRI contrasts in fixed rat brain and in human brain. We then investigate the observed contrast differences using data obtained in a physical phantom and simulations based on data from the phantom, rat spinal cord, and human brain. Lastly, we assess a strategy for rapid estimation of a computationally modest KFA proxy by evaluating its correlation to true KFA for varying number of sampling directions and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels. We also map this proxy's b-value dependency. We find that KFA supplements the contrast of other dMRI metrics - particularly fractional anisotropy (FA) which vanishes in near orthogonal fiber arrangements where KFA does not. Simulations and phantom data support this interpretation. KFA therefore supplements FA and could be useful for evaluation of complex tissue arrangements. The KFA proxy is strongly correlated to true KFA when sampling is performed along at least nine directions and SNR is high. PMID:27041679

  10. Magnetic Domain Confinement by Anisotropy Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. P.; Lew, W. S.; Bland, J. A.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Vaz, C. A.; Natali, M.; Chen, Y.

    2002-02-01

    The spin configuration in a magnet is in general a ``natural'' consequence of both the intrinsic properties of the material and the sample dimensions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome in a homogeneous ferromagnetic film by engineering an anisotropy contrast. Substrates with laterally modulated single-crystal and polycrystalline surface regions were used to induce selective epitaxial growth of a ferromagnetic Ni film. The resulting spatially varying magnetic anisotropy leads to regular perpendicular and in-plane magnetic domains, separated by a new type of magnetic wall-the ``anisotropy constrained'' magnetic wall.

  11. Apparent resistivity of azimuthal anisotropy layered media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮爱国; 毛桐恩; 李清河; 葛双成

    2002-01-01

    The electric field, equations of boundary conditions and calculation formula of apparent resistivity are derived for azimuthal anisotropy layered media with DC method based on anisotropic Ohm(s law. Taking Schlumberger symmetric system as an example and using recurrence formula of nuclear function, the paper theoretically simulates a model of four layers with the same anisotropy coefficient for each layer. The deep sounding curves of resistivity and the pattern of contours are obtained for the model. The results shows the theoretical formula of this paper is correct, the deep sounding curves not only exhibit the difference of resistivity among layers but also indicate the anisotropy characteristics of layers.

  12. Effect of anisotropy on small magnetic clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, Alfred; Sil, Shreekantha; Entel, Peter; 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.104438

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dipolar interaction and local uniaxial anisotropy on the magnetic response of small spin clusters where spins are located on the vertices of icosahedron, cuboctahedron, tetrahedron and square geometry have been investigated. We consider the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 and spin-1 Heisenberg model with uniaxial anisotropy and dipolar interaction and apply numerical exact diagonalization technique in order to study the influence of frustration and anisotropy on the ground state properties of the spin-clusters. The ground state magnetization, spin-spin correlation and several thermodynamic quantities such as entropy and specific heat are calculated as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  13. A Coupled Multiscale Model of Texture Evolution and Plastic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawad, J.; Van Bael, A.; Yerra, S. K.; Samaey, G.; Van Houtte, P.; Roose, D.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we present a multiscale model of a plastic deformation process in which the anisotropy of plastic properties is related to the evolution of the crystallographic texture. The model spans several length scales from the macroscopic deformation of the workpiece to the microscale interactions between individual grains in a polycrystalline material. The macroscopic behaviour of the material is described by means of a Finite Element (FE) model. Plastic anisotropy is taken into account in a constitutive law, based on the concept of a plastic potential in strain rate space. The coefficients of a sixth-order Facet equation are determined using the Taylor theory, provided that the current crystallographic texture at a given FE integration point is known. Texture evolution in the FE integration points is predicted by an ALAMEL micromechanical model. Mutual interactions between coarse and fine scale are inherent in the physics of the deformation process. These dependencies are taken into account by full bidirectional coupling in the model. Therefore, the plastic deformation influences the crystallographic texture and the evolution of the texture induces anisotropy of the macroscopic deformation. The presented approach enables an adaptive texture and yield surface update scheme with respect to the local plastic deformation in the FE integration points. Additionally, the computational cost related to the updates of the constitutive law is reduced by application of parallel computing techniques. Suitability of on-demand computing for this computational problem is discussed. The parallelisation strategy addresses both distributed memory and shared memory architectures. The cup drawing process has been simulated using the multiscale model outlined above. The discussion of results includes the analysis of the planar anisotropy in the cup and the influence of complex deformation path on texture development. Evolution of texture at selected material points is assessed as

  14. Measures of three-dimensional anisotropy and intermittency in strong Alfvénic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, A.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Chandran, B. D. G.; Chen, C. H. K.; Horbury, T. S.; Wicks, R. T.; Greenan, C. C.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the local anisotropy of numerically simulated strong Alfvénic turbulence with respect to two local, physically relevant directions: along the local mean magnetic field and along the local direction of one of the fluctuating Elsasser fields. We find significant scaling anisotropy with respect to both these directions: the fluctuations are `ribbon-like' - statistically, they are elongated along both the mean magnetic field and the fluctuating field. The latter form of anisotropy is due to scale-dependent alignment of the fluctuating fields. The intermittent scalings of the nth-order conditional structure functions in the direction perpendicular to both the local mean field and the fluctuations agree well with the theory of Chandran, Schekochihin & Mallet, while the parallel scalings are consistent with those implied by the critical-balance conjecture. We quantify the relationship between the perpendicular scalings and those in the fluctuation and parallel directions, and find that the scaling exponent of the perpendicular anisotropy (i.e. of the aspect ratio of the Alfvénic structures in the plane perpendicular to the mean magnetic field) depends on the amplitude of the fluctuations. This is shown to be equivalent to the anticorrelation of fluctuation amplitude and alignment at each scale. The dependence of the anisotropy on amplitude is shown to be more significant for the anisotropy between the perpendicular and fluctuation-direction scales than it is between the perpendicular and parallel scales.

  15. Density dependent B parameter of relativistic stars with anisotropy in pseudo-spheroidal space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Paul, B. C.

    2016-04-01

    We present a class of relativistic solutions for compact cold stars with strange matter in a pseudo-spheroidal space-time. Considering strange matter equation of state namely, p = 1/3(ρ -4B), where ρ , p and B are energy density, pressure and MIT Bag parameter respectively, stellar models are obtained. In the presence of anisotropy with a pseudo-spheroidal geometry described by Vaidya-Tikekar, metric stellar models are explored where the Bag parameter varies with the energy density (ρ ) inside the compact object. We determine the density dependence of B at different anisotropy. It is noted that although B varies with anisotropy inside the star, finally at the surface it attains a value which is independent of the anisotropy. The Bag parameter B is found to increase with an increase in anisotropy for a given compactness factor (M/b) and spheroidicity λ . It is also noted that for a star with given mass and radius, the parameter B increases with the increase in λ and finally at large λ , it attains a constant. The equation of state (EoS) obtained here from geometrical consideration with allowed `B' value is found same to that one obtains from micro-physics. The stability of the stellar models for compact stars with anisotropy in hydrostatic equilibrium obtained here is also studied.

  16. Cosmic microwave background anisotropies with mixed isocurvature perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, R; Riazuelo, A; Durrer, R

    2001-12-01

    In the light of the recent high quality data of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies, several estimations of cosmological parameters have been published. We study to what extent these estimations depend on assumptions about the initial conditions of the cosmological perturbations, which are usually supposed to be adiabatic. We show that, for more generic initial conditions, not only the best fit values are very different but the allowed parameter range enlarges dramatically. This raises the question which cosmological information (matter content of the Universe vs physics of inflation) can be reliably extracted from these data.

  17. Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias I. Baskin

    2004-04-01

    The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

  18. Conductivity-type anisotropy in molecular solids

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrick, J. R.; Dodabalapur, A.; Torsi, L.; Lovinger, A, J.; Kwock, E. W.; Miller, T. M.; Galvin, M; Berggren, Magnus; Katz, H. E.

    1997-01-01

    Thin polycrystalline films of perylenetetracarboxylic dianyhydride (PTCDA), an organic molecular solid, exhibits substantial anisotropies in its electronic transport properties. Only electrons transport in the directions along molecular planes, while mainly holes transport in the direction normal to molecular planes. A series of measurements on both field effect transistors with PTCDA active layers and light emitting diodes with PTCDA transport layers documents the anisotropy seen in the elec...

  19. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  20. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  1. Does deformation saturate seismic anisotropy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, D. J.; Lloyd, G. E.; Butler, R. W.; Casey, M.

    2006-12-01

    The progressive simple shear deformation that characterizes ductile fault zones in the crust involves both rotation and intensification of the strain ellipsoid. These mathematic predictions have been confirmed repeatedly by finite strain determinations in outcrop studies of natural shear zones and used to test geodynamic models of mountain belts. Seismic anisotropy (SA) methods offer the opportunity to pursue these approaches in situ. First however, we must calibrate the magnitude and orientation of the SA ellipsoid against naturally deformed tectonites of known strain state and microstructure. Here we present data from a field analogue of mafic ductile crust in an amphibolite-facies shear zone developed in a deformed mafic dyke embedded within the Lewisian Gneiss (Badcall, NW Scotland). Deflection of pre-existing linear and planar elements and attenuation of the dyke into the shear zone are used to determine the strain gradient. Specimens collected along this gradient were used to establish the geometric fabric intensity defined by different minerals (hornblende grain alignment and ellipticity of plagioclase clots). Finally, petrophysical properties were calculated for the specimens using the SEM-EBSD measured populations of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) for all mineral phases. It is the hornblende-plagioclase LPO, combined in their modal proportions and modulated by the individual mineral single crystal elastic properties, which define the SA profile across the shear zone. Hornblende develops a strong preferred dimensional orientation and hence LPO at shear strains of about 2, whereas the plagioclase LPO remains close to random regardless of bulk strain. The modelled SA of the samples is dominated therefore by the amphibole LPO. Although the values of bulk shear strain vary across the shear zone (0 at the margins to greater than 12 in the centre), the calculated intensity of SA saturates at a shear strain of about 2. These results, if typical of large

  2. Effects of soil moisture content on reflectance anisotropy - Laboratory goniometer measurements and RPV model inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosjen, P.P.J.; Bartholomeus, H.M.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Optical methods to study soil moisture content (SMC) are often based on empirically or physically based models that relate changes in reflectance intensity to SMC. The effects of SMC on the reflectance anisotropy, however, have not received much attention. In this paper the effects of SMC on the ani

  3. Stress-Induced Seismic Anisotropy Revisited Nouveau regard sur l'anisotropie sismique induite par les contraintes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasolofosaon P.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This summary contains formulas (*** which can not be displayed on the screenA general principle outlined by P. Curie (1894 regarding the influence of symmetry in physical phenomena states, in modern language, that the symmetry group of the causes is a sub-group of the symmetry group of the effects. For instance, regarding stress-induced seismic anisotropy, the most complex symmetry exhibited by an initially isotropic medium when tri-axially stressed is orthorhombic, or orthotropic, symmetry characterized by three symmetry planes mutually perpendicular (Nur, 1971. In other respects, Schwartz et al. (1994 demonstrated that two very different rock models, namely a cracked model and a weakly consolidated granular model, always lead to elliptical anisotropy when uniaxially stressed. The addressed questions are : Is this result true for any rock model? and more generally : Do initially isotropic rock form a well-defined sub-set of orthorhombic media when triaxially stressed?Under the hypothesis of 3rd order nonlinear isotropic hyperelasticity (i. e. , no hysteresis and existence of an elastic energy function developed to the 3rd order in the strain components it is demonstrated that the qP-wave stress-induced anisotropy is always ellipsoidal, for any strength of anisotropy. For instance point sources generate ellipsoidal qP-wave fronts. This result is general and absolutely independent of the rock model, that is to say independent of the causes of nonlinearity, as far as the initial assumptions are verified. This constitutes the main result of this paper. Thurston (1965 pointed out that an initially isotropic elastic medium, when non-isotropically pre-stressed, is never strictly equivalent to an unstressed anisotropic crystal. For instance the components of the stressed elastic tensor lack the familiar symmetry with respect to indices permutation. This would prohibit Voigt's notation of contracted indices. However if the magnitude of the components of

  4. Anisotropy-graded media: Magnetic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhihong; Visscher, P. B.; Harrell, J. W.

    2008-04-01

    The concept of exchange-coupled media (each grain having a soft end whose exchange field helps to switch a hard end) has recently been generalized to allow a continuous gradation of anisotropy from soft to hard. We have recently shown that the "figure of merit" for such media ξ =2Eb/μ0MsHsw, proportional to the ratio of the energy barrier Eb to the switching field Hsw, cannot exceed 4 for any anisotropy profile K(r ). In the thin-wall limit (exchange constant A ≪KL2), it can be made to approach 4 by choosing a graded anisotropy K(z )∝z2. In developing such a medium, it is important to be able to experimentally probe the anisotropy distribution. In this paper, we study one method for doing this, the hard axis loop. In the absence of exchange, the second derivative of this loop gives the distribution directly; we show that even in the presence of realistic exchange, this remains approximately true and the anisotropy distribution can be extracted from the hard axis loop.

  5. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: unal@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis 55455 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F{sup 2} gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  6. Surface anisotropy characterisation with meteosat observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzio, A.; Govaerts, Y. M.; Pinty, B.

    Surface albedo, or more precisely Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR), is the integral the Bi-directional Reflectance Factor (BRF) of the surface over all angles of the upward hemisphere. The retrieval of the DHR trough space observations requires accounting for the scattering and absorption processes in the atmosphere as well as for the angular anisotropy of the surface, the two systems being radiatively coupled. The accuracy achieved in the albedo estimation depends thus on the density of the angular sampling and the reliability of the atmospheric correction. Pinty et al. demonstrated the possibility to derive reliable surface albedo from observations acquired by Meteosat, the European meteorological geostationary satellite. The purpose of this presentation is to analyse the accuracy of this new Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) product, including the effects due to instrument changes and associated calibration uncertainties. In particular, the consistency of the surface anisotropy characterisation is examined in detail. To this end, observations acquired by two adjacent geostationary spacecrafts, i.e., Meteosat-7 and Meteosat-5 have been processed with the MSA algorithm. These satellites are located respectively at 0 and 63 degrees East. Data acquired by these two instruments overlap over a large area encompassing most of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The consistency of the surface anisotropy retrieval is evaluated through a reconstruction of the Meteosat-5 (-7) observations with the Meteosat-7 (-5) surface anisotropy characterisation. No differences larger than the calibration uncertainties have been found, which indicates that the MSA algorithm accounts correctly for the surface anisotropy and instrument differences.

  7. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F2 gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales

  8. Measurement of magnetic anisotropy of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in nematic host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtoaje, Cristina; Petrescu, Emil

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic anisotropy of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-s) is measured using their dispersion in nematic liquid crystal (NLC). Due to their ability to align themselves with inserted nano-particles, NLC are very useful for the study of the physical properties of MWCNT as well as for other micro or nano-particles. Thus an organized system is obtained from the beginning and the influence of initial random orientation is considerably reduced. The average magnetic anisotropy of MWCNT dispersed in NLC was calculated from the system relaxation time and the obtained value (6.61 ×10-5) was in good agreement with other reported results.

  9. Measurements of magnetic anisotropy in sickle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room temperature magnetic measurements in deoxigenated sickle cells showed the existence of magnetic anisotropy, Δchi=1,29 x 10-3. This effect was supposed paramagnetic and considered to be due to the iron atoms of the hemoglobin molecules which are one over the other, forming ordered chains inside the erythrocytes. Low temperature (liquid He - 4,2K) measurements of the magnetic anisotropy of sickle cells and normal red blood cells diluted in a cryoprotector was made to confirm the paramagnetic origin of the fenomena. For that purpose it was used a superconductor magnetometer coupled to a SQUID, developed in the 'Laboratorio do Estado Solido do Departamento de Fisica da PUC-RJ'. The results obtained seem to confirm the expected paramagnetic anisotropy and, furthermore, suggest the presence of magnetic interactions among the iron atoms in the sickle cells samples. (Author)

  10. Large Friction Anisotropy of a Polydiacetylene Monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friction force microscopy measurements of a polydiacetylene monolayer film reveal a 300% friction anisotropy that is correlated with the film structure. The film consists of a monolayer of the red form of N-(2-ethanol)- 10,12 pentacosadiynamide, prepared on a Langmuir trough and deposited on a mica substrate. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, the monolayer consists of domains of linearly oriented conjugated backbones with pendant hydrocarbon side chains above and below the backbones. Maximum friction occurs when the sliding direction is perpendicular to the backbone. We propose that the backbones impose anisotropic packing of the hydrocarbon side chains which leads to the observed friction anisotropy. Friction anisotropy is therefore a sensitive, optically-independent indicator of polymer backbone direction and monolayer structural properties

  11. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhu, Jianting

    2010-05-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or capillary pressure) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have not been fully understood. This study developed an approach based on a conceptualization of combining the neural network based pedo-transfer function (PTF) results with the thin layer concept to explore the capillary pressure-dependent anisotropy in relation to soil texture and soil bulk density. The main objective is to examine how anisotropy characteristics are related to the relationships between hydraulic parameters and the basic soil attributes such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic parameters are correlated with the texture and bulk density based on the pedo-transfer function (PTF) results. It is demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior of the unsaturated soil anisotropy in relation to the capillary pressure is only observed when the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the shape parameter are both related to the mean particle diameter. When only one hydraulic parameter is related to the grain diameter or when both are not related to the same attribute simultaneously, the unsaturated soil anisotropy increases monotonically with the increasing capillary pressure head. Therefore, it is suggested that this behavior is mainly due to the coupled dependence of the layer saturated hydraulic conductivities and the shape factors on the texture and bulk density. The correlation between the soil grain diameter and bulk density decreases the anisotropy effects of the unsaturated layered soils. The study illustrates that the inter-relationships of soil texture, bulk density, and hydraulic properties may cause vastly different characteristics of anisotropic unsaturated soils.

  12. Beta-dependent upper bound on ion temperature anisotropy in a laboratory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Paul A. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Balkey, Matthew M. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Boivin, Robert [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kline, John L. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion temperatures, parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field, in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies space simulation chamber (a steady-state, high beta, argon plasma) display an inverse correlation between the upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy and the parallel ion beta ({beta}=8{pi}nkT/B{sup 2}). These observations are consistent with in situ spacecraft measurements in the Earth's magnetosheath and with a theoretical/computational model that predicts that such an upper bound is imposed by scattering from enhanced fluctuations due to growth of the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability (the Alfven ion cyclotron instability). (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Macroscopic quasi-linear theory and particle-in-cell simulation of helium ion anisotropy instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Seough, Jungjoon; Hwang, Junga; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The protons and helium ions in the solar wind are observed to possess anisotropic temperature profiles. The anisotropy appears to be limited by various marginal instability conditions. One of the efficient methods to investigate the global dynamics and distribution of various temperature anisotropies in the large-scale solar wind models may be that based upon the macroscopic quasi-linear approach. The present paper investigates the proton and helium ion anisotropy instabilities on the basis of the quasi-linear theory versus particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that the overall dynamical development of the particle temperatures is quite accurately reproduced by the macroscopic quasi-linear scheme. The wave energy development in time, however, shows somewhat less restrictive comparisons, indicating that while the quasi-linear method is acceptable for the particle dynamics, the wave analysis probably requires higher-order physics, such as wave-wave coupling or nonlinear wave-particle interaction.

  14. Measures of Three-Dimensional Anisotropy and Intermittency in Strong Alfv\\'enic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mallet, A; Chandran, B D G; Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Wicks, R T; Greenan, C C

    2015-01-01

    We measure the local anisotropy of numerically simulated strong Alfv\\'enic turbulence with respect to two local, physically relevant directions: along the local mean magnetic field and along the local direction of one of the fluctuating Elsasser fields. We find significant scaling anisotropy with respect to both these directions: the fluctuations are "ribbon-like" --- statistically, they are elongated along both the mean magnetic field and the fluctuating field. The latter form of anisotropy is due to scale-dependent alignment of the fluctuating fields. The intermittent scalings of the $n$th-order conditional structure functions in the direction perpendicular to both the local mean field and the fluctuations agree well with the theory of Chandran et al. 2015, while the parallel scalings are consistent with those implied by the critical-balance conjecture. We quantify the relationship between the perpendicular scalings and those in the fluctuation and parallel directions, and find that the scaling exponent of ...

  15. Resolving and Tuning Mechanical Anisotropy in Black Phosphorus via Nanomechanical Multimode Resonance Spectromicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xu-Qian; Yang, Rui; Ye, G J; Chen, X H; Feng, Philip X-L

    2016-09-14

    Black phosphorus (P) has emerged as a layered semiconductor with a unique crystal structure featuring corrugated atomic layers and strong in-plane anisotropy in its physical properties. Here, we demonstrate that the crystal orientation and mechanical anisotropy in free-standing black P thin layers can be precisely determined by spatially resolved multimode nanomechanical resonances. This offers a new means for resolving important crystal orientation and anisotropy in black P device platforms in situ beyond conventional optical and electrical calibration techniques. Furthermore, we show that electrostatic-gating-induced straining can continuously tune the mechanical anisotropic effects on multimode resonances in black P electromechanical devices. Combined with finite element modeling (FEM), we also determine the Young's moduli of multilayer black P to be 116.1 and 46.5 GPa in the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. PMID:27505636

  16. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Haifeng; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonon scattering was theoretically studied with the deformation potential theory. Based on Boltzmann equation with relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was deduced, which shows that the influence of effective mass to the mobility anisotropy is larger than that of deformation potential constant and elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic 2D materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC$_2$N, MXene, TiS$_3$, GeCH$_3$) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio was overestimated in the past.

  17. A two-fluid approximation for calculating the cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljak, Uros

    1994-01-01

    We present a simplified treatment for calculating the cosmic microwave background anisotropy power spectrum in adiabatic models. It consists of solving for the evolution of a two-fluid model until the epoch of recombination and then integrating over the sources to obtain the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. The approximation is useful both for a physical understanding of CMB anisotropies as well as for a quantitative analysis of cosmological models. Comparison with exact calculations shows that the accuracy is typically 10%-20% over a large range of angles and cosmological models, including those with curvature and cosmological constant. Using this approximation we investigate the dependence of the CMB anisotropy on the cosmological parameters. We identify six dimensionless parameters that uniquely determine the anisotropy power spectrum within our approximation. CMB experiments on different angular scales could in principle provide information on all these parameters. In particular, mapping of the Doppler peaks would allow an independent determination of baryon mass density, matter mass density, and the Hubble constant.

  18. Effects of anisotropy on gravitational infall in galaxy clusters using an exact general relativistic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troxel, M.A.; Peel, Austin; Ishak, Mustapha, E-mail: troxel@utdallas.edu, E-mail: austin.peel@utdallas.edu, E-mail: mishak@utdallas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75083 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We study the effects and implications of anisotropies at the scale of galaxy clusters by building an exact general relativistic model of a cluster using the inhomogeneous and anisotropic Szekeres metric. The model is built from a modified Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile. We compare this to a corresponding spherically symmetric structure in the Lemaȋtre-Tolman (LT) model and quantify the impact of introducing varying levels of anisotropy. We examine two physical measures of gravitational infall — the growth rate of density and the velocity of the source dust in the model. We introduce a generalization of the LT dust velocity profile for the Szekeres metric and demonstrate its consistency with the growth rate of density. We find that the growth rate of density in one substructure increases by 0.5%, 1.5%, and 3.75% for 5%, 10%, and 15% levels of introduced anisotropy, which is measured as the fractional displaced mass relative to the spherically symmetric case. The infall velocity of the dust is found to increase by 2.5, 10, and 20 km s{sup −1} (0.5%, 2%, and 4.5%), respectively, for the same three levels of anisotropy. This response to the anisotropy in a structure is found to be strongly nonlinear with respect to the strength of anisotropy. These relative velocities correspond to an equivalent increase in the total mass of the spherically symmetric structure of 1%, 3.8%, and 8.4%, indicating that not accounting for the presence of anisotropic mass distributions in cluster models can strongly bias the determination of physical properties like the total mass.

  19. Correlated oscillations of the magnetic anisotropy energy and orbital moment anisotropy in thin films: The role of quantum well states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandratskii, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    We report the first-principles study of the correlated behavior of the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) and orbital moment anisotropy (OMA) as the functions of the thickness N of the Fe film. The work is motivated by recent experimental studies combining photoemission, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and magnetic anisotropy measurements. In agreement with experiment, the correlated oscillations of MAE (N ) and OMA (N ) are obtained that have their origin in the formation of the 3d quantum well states (QWS) confined in the films. The main contribution to the oscillation amplitude comes from the surface layer. This is an interesting feature of the phenomenon consisting in the peculiar dependence of the physical quantities on the thickness of the film. We demonstrate that the band structure of the bulk Fe does not reflect adequately the properties of the 3d QWS in thin films and, therefore, does not provide the basis for understanding the oscillations of MAE (N ) and OMA (N ) . A detailed point-by-point analysis in the two-dimensional (2D) Brillouin zone (BZ) of the film shows that the contribution of the Γ point, contrary to a rather common expectation, does not play an important role in the formation of the oscillations. Instead, the most important contributions come from a broad region of the 2D BZ distant from the center of the BZ. Combining symmetry arguments and direct calculations we show that orbital moments of the electronic states possess nonzero transverse components orthogonal to the direction of the spin magnetization. The account for this feature is crucial in the point-by-point analysis of the OMA. On the basis of the calculations for noncollinear spin configurations we suggest interpretations of two interesting experimental findings: fast temperature decay of the oscillation amplitude in MAE (N ) and unexpectedly strong spin mixing of the initial states of the photoemission process.

  20. Angular anisotropy representation by probability tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we improve point-wise or group-wise angular anisotropy representation by using probability tables. The starting point of this study was to give more flexibility (sensitivity analysis) and more accuracy (ray effect) to group-wise anisotropy representation by Dirac functions, independently introduced at CEA (Mao, 1998) and at IRSN (Le Cocq, 1998) ten years ago. Basing ourselves on our experience of cross-section description, acquired in CALENDF (Sublet et al., 2006), we introduce two kinds of moment based probability tables, Dirac (DPT) and Step-wise (SPT) Probability Tables where the angular probability distribution is respectively represented by Dirac functions or by a step-wise function. First, we show how we can improve equi-probable cosine representation of point-wise anisotropy by using step-wise probability tables. Then we show, by Monte Carlo techniques, how we can obtain a more accurate description of group-wise anisotropy than the one usually given by a finite expansion on a Legendre polynomial basis (that can induce negative values) and finally, we describe it by Dirac probability tables. This study is carried out in the framework of GALILEE project R and D activities (Coste-Delclaux, 2008). (authors)

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching at LHC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I P Lokhtin; S V Petrushanko; L I Sarycheva; A M Snigirev

    2003-05-01

    We analyze the azimuthal anisotropy of jet spectra due to energy loss of hard partons in quark–gluon plasma, created initially in nuclear overlap zone in collisions with non-zero impact parameter. The calculations are performed for semi-central Pb–Pb collisions at LHC energy.

  2. Impact of rock anisotropy on fracture development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianbo Zeng; Jiyong Zhao; Shengju Zhu; Weiliang Xiong; Yonghong He; Jianwen Chen

    2008-01-01

    Experiments on uniaxial and triaxial rock mechanics and rock acoustic emissions have been conducted for research on the impact of rock anisotropy on the development of the fractures of different directions by taking as an example the ultra-low-permeability sandstone reservoir in the Upper Triassic Yanchang Formation within the Ordos Basin. The experimental results prove the existence of anisotropy of the rock mechanical property in the different directions on the plane, which is the chief reason for the production of impacts on the development of different assemblages of fractures in the geological periods. The rock anisotropy usually restricts the development of one assemblage of conjugate shear fractures. The fractures in the Yanchang Formation within the Ordos Basin are mainly shear fractures that formed under two tectonic actions. Theoretically, here, four assemblages of shear fractures should have developed, but due to the effect of a strong rock anisotropy, in each period one assemblage of fractures chiefly developed. Thus, two assemblages of fractures are usually developed in every part at present.

  3. Magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Lindgård, Per-Anker;

    1970-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the energy of long- wavelength magnons in Tb-10%Ho has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The results agree with the `frozen-lattice' model, provided that the second-order magnetoelastic effect is taken into account. The planar anisotropy is almost...

  4. Plastic Anisotropy Prediction by Ultrasonic Texture Data

    OpenAIRE

    Serebryany, V. N.

    1996-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy parameters (R coefficient and height of ears of the drawn cup) have been calculated from ultrasonic orientation distribution function (ODF) coefficients on the basis of Taylor theory for low carbon steel and aluminium alloy sheets. The ODF coefficients were defined by Sayers method and using the iterative procedure on the basis of measurement of bulk longitudinal and shear wave time delays.

  5. Anisotropy of Wood in the Microwave Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziherl, Sasa; Bajc, Jurij; Urankar, Bernarda; Cepic, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    Wood is transparent for microwaves and due to its anisotropic structure has anisotropic dielectric properties. A laboratory experiment that allows for the qualitative demonstration and quantitative measurements of linear dichroism and birefringence in the microwave region is presented. As the proposed experiments are based on the anisotropy (of…

  6. Gold Spiky Nanodumbbells: Anisotropy in Gold Nanostars

    OpenAIRE

    Novikov, Sergey M.; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Schmidt, Mikołaj K.; Chuvilin, Andrey; Aizpurua, Javier; Grzelczak, Marek; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of gold nanoparticle—called “spiky nanodumbbells”—is introduced. These particles combine the anisotropy of nanorods with sharp nanoscale features of nanostars, which are important for SERS applications. Both the morphology and the optical response of the particles are characterized in detail, and the experimental results are compared with FDTD simulations, showing good agreement.

  7. Surface stress anisotropy of Ge(001)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, M.T.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2002-01-01

    By analyzing the equilibrium shape of vacancy islands on the Ge(001) surface we have determined the surface stress anisotropy, i.e., the difference between the compressive stress component along the substrate dimer rows and the tensile stress component perpendicular to the substrate dimer rows. In o

  8. Gaussian Anisotropy In Strange Quark Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Panahi, H; Eghdami, I

    2015-01-01

    In this paper for studying the anisotropic strange quark stars, we assume that the radial pressure inside the anisotropic star is a superposition of pressure in an isotropic case plus a Gaussian perturbation term. Considering a proportionality between electric charge density and the density of matter, we solve the TOV equation for different cases numerically. Our results indicate that anisotropy increases the maximum mass $M_{max}$ and also its corresponding radius $R$ for a typical strange quark star. According to our calculations, an anisotropy amplitude of $A=3\\times10^{33}Nm^{-2}$ with a standard deviation of $\\sigma=3\\times10^{3}m$ leads to a neutron star of 1.97$M_{\\odot}$. Furthermore, electric charge not only increases the maximum mass and its corresponding radius, but also raises up the anisotropy factor. We can see that the tangential pressure $p_{t}$ and anisotropy factor $\\Delta$ unlike the radial pressure $p_{r}$ have a maximum on the surface and this maximum increases by adding electric charge e...

  9. Seismic Anisotropy and Velocity-Porosity Relationships in the Seafloor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Patricia A.

    In this dissertation, I investigate the structure and composition of marine sediments and the upper oceanic crust using seismic data and rock physics theories. Common marine sediments such as silty clays exhibit anisotropy because they are made up of thin sub-parallel lamellae of contrasting mineralogical composition and differing elastic properties. In 1986, Rondout Associates, Inc. and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution recorded direct shear waves in shallow marine sediments in 21-m-deep water by using a newly developed ocean-bottom shear source and a multicomponent on-bottom receiver. A nearby drill hole showed that the sediments are interbedded silty clays, clays, and sands. I used an anisotropic reflectivity program written by Geo-Pacific Corporation to produce synthetic seismograms to estimate the five independent elastic stiffnesses necessary for describing transverse isotropy, the form of anisotropy found in these sediments. The synthetics fit the vertical and two horizontal components for two intersecting profiles, 150 and 200 m long. The data require low shear velocities (theories to modeling the oceanic crust. Seismic velocities are controlled by the porosity, typically 20-30% for the top of layer 2. Most rock physics theories that relate seismic velocities to porosities are invalid for such high porosities. I combined elements of the self-consistent and noninteraction approaches to extend some rock physics theories for porosities up to at least 30-35%. Since the oceanic crust contains pores and cracks of many shapes, an appropriate theory must model round pores as well as flat cracks. I present examples of how layer 2A of the oceanic crust might be represented using an extended version of the Kuster-Toksoz theory. Alteration processes modify the pore structure of the oceanic crust. Currently, alteration is measured primarily from ocean drilling results. By developing a realistic relationship between seismic velocities and the age-dependent pore

  10. A Laboratory Goniometer System for Measuring Reflectance and Emittance Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan de Jong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a laboratory goniometer system for performing multi-angular measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A commercially available robotic arm enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements over the full hemisphere within a short time span making it much faster than other goniometers. In addition, the presented set-up enables assessment of anisotropic reflectance and emittance behaviour of soils, leaves and small canopies. Mounting a spectrometer enables acquisition of either hemispherical measurements or measurements in the horizontal plane. Mounting a thermal camera allows directional observations of the thermal emittance. This paper also presents three showcases of these different measurement set-ups in order to illustrate its possibilities. Finally, suggestions for applying this instrument and for future research directions are given, including linking the measured reflectance anisotropy with physically-based anisotropy models on the one hand and combining them with field goniometry measurements for joint analysis with remote sensing data on the other hand. The speed and flexibility of the system offer a large added value to the existing pool of laboratory goniometers.

  11. Tuning the Magnetic Anisotropy at a Molecule-Metal Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bairagi, K.; Bellec, A.; Repain, V.;

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a C60 overlayer enhances the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a Co thin film, inducing an inverse spin reorientation transition from in plane to out of plane. The driving force is the C60/Co interfacial magnetic anisotropy that we have measured quantitatively in situ as a ......) surface decreases the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. These results open the way to tailor the interfacial magnetic anisotropy in organic-material-ferromagnet systems....

  12. The Glasma, Photons and the Implications of Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    McLerran, Larry

    2014-01-01

    We introduce distribution functions for quarks and gluons in the Glasma and discuss how they satisfy various relationships of statistical physics. We use these distributions to compute photon production in the early stages of heavy ion collisions. Photon rates satisfy geometric scaling, that is, the emission rate per unit area scales as a function of the saturation momenta divided by the transverse momentum of the photon. Photon distributions from the Glasma are steeper than those computed in the Thermalized Quark Gluon Plasma (TQGP). Both the delayed equilibration of the Glasma and a possible anisotropy in the pressure lead to slower expansion and mean times of photon emission of fixed energy are increased. This delayed emission might allow for larger photon elliptic flow.

  13. A unified solution to the anisotropy and gradient problems

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The Fermi-LAT collaboration recently confirmed a discrepancy between the observed longitudinal profile of gamma-ray diffuse emission from the Galaxy and that computed with numerical codes assuming that Cosmic Rays (CRs) are produced by Galactic supernova remnants; the accurate Fermi-LAT measurements make this anomaly hardly explainable in terms of conventional diffusion schemes. Moreover, experimental data from both Muon detector and Extensive Air Shower experiments about the large scale dipole anisotropy of CRs can hardly be compatible with model predictions within the framework of conventional isotropic and homogeneous propagation. We argue that, accounting for a well physically motivated correlation between the CR escape time and the spatially dependent magnetic turbulence power, it is possible to solve both problems at the same time in a very natural way. Indeed, by exploiting this correlation, we find propagation models that fit a wide set of CR primary and secondary spectra, and consistently reproduce t...

  14. Shale Deformation Experiments Toward an Understanding of Elastic and Fracture Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, J.; Miyagi, L. M.; Jugle, M.; Wang, Y.; Yu, T.

    2014-12-01

    The significance of shales as unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has opened new research frontiers in geosciences. Among many of its unique physical properties, elastic anisotropy in shales has long been investigated by both experimental and computational approaches. Shales is highly anisotropic due to texture (crystallographic preferred orientation) of their constituent clay minerals. Moreover, texturing is known to cause fracture anisotropy, which can affect both fracture toughness and fracture orientations in metals, ceramics, and polyphase materials. However, the relationship between texture and fracture anisotropy in shale has not been explored. In this study we use the multi-anvil deformation tool (D-DIA) to deform shales with a range of clay and silt contents to failure while collecting x-ray diffraction and radiography images. Diffraction images are used to extract to texture and lattice strain evolution while radiography are used to measure macrostrain and determine failure. Since clay mineral have shear moduli in the range of 6-17 GPa, our stress resolution is in the range of 30 -100 MPa respectively, within the range of unconfined compressive strengths of shales. Our results show that the orientation of clay minerals become more prominent in all samples upon deforming the sample at 100 MPa. Recovered samples are investigated with SEM to document microstructural changes. A second deformation experiment will be coupled with ultrasonic and acoustic emissions measurements to make direct comparisons of elastic anisotropy and understand the role of fracture on anisotropy. Acoustic emissions allows us to locate damage initiation and determine fracture orientations in-situ. This information will be compared with texture data to determine fracture anisotropy in our samples.

  15. A New Light-Speed Anisotropy Experiment: Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves Detected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Data from a new experiment measuring the anisotropy of the one-way speed of EM waves in a coaxial cable, gives the speed of light as 300,000 +/- 400 (+/- 20 km/s in a measured direction RA=5.5 +/- 2 hrs, Dec=70 +/- 10 Deg S, is shown to be in excellent agreement with the results from seven previous anisotropy experiments, particularly those of Miller (1925/26, and even those of Michelson and Morley (1887. The Miller gas-mode interferometer results, and those from the RF coaxial cable experiments of Torr and Kolen (1983, De Witte (1991 and the new experiment all reveal the presence of gravitational waves, as indicated by the last +/- variations above, but of a kind different from those supposedly predicted by General Relativity. Miller repeated the Michelson-Morley 1887 gas-mode interferometer experiment and againdetected the anisotropy of the speed of light, primarily in the years 1925/1926 atop Mt.Wilson, California. The understanding of the operation of the Michelson interferometer in gas-mode was only achieved in 2002 and involved a calibration for the interferometer that necessarily involved Special Relativity effects and the refractive index of the gas in the light paths. The results demonstrate the reality of the Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction as an observer independent relativistic effect. A common misunderstanding is that the anisotropy of the speed of light is necessarily in conflict with Special Relativity and Lorentz symmetry - this is explained. All eight experiments and theory show that we have both anisotropy of the speed of light and relativistic effects, and that a dynamical 3-space exists - that absolute motion through that space has been repeatedly observed since 1887. These developments completely change fundamental physics and our understanding of reality. Modern vacuum-mode Michelson interferometers, particularly the long baseline terrestrial versions, are, by design flaw, incapable of detecting the anisotropy effect and the

  16. Evolution of Tidally Truncated Globular Clusters with Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, K; Inagaki, S

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of tidally truncated globular clusters is investigated by integrating two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation that allows the development of velocity anisotropy. We start from the isotropic Plummer model with tidal cut off and followed the evolution through the corecollapse. The heating by three-binary is included to obtain the evolution past the corecollapse. The anisotropy in velocity dispersion develops during the precollapse evolution. However, the anisotropy becomes highly depressed during the post-collapse evolution because of rapid loss of radial orbits. Maximum radial anisotropy appears just after the beginning of the expansion, and degree of anisotropy decreases slowly as the total mass of the cluster decreases. Thus it may be possible to determine the evolutionary status of a cluster if the velocity anisotropy can be measured in the sense that the postcollapse clusters always have very little degree of anisotropy. The structure of the post-collapse cluster can be well fitted to King mod...

  17. Anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background: Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, S.

    1998-02-01

    Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) contain a wealth of information about the past history of the universe and the present values of cosmological parameters. I online some of the theoretical advances of the last few years. In particular, I emphasize that for a wide class of cosmological models, theorists can accurately calculate the spectrum to better than a percent. The spectrum of anisotropies today is directly related to the pattern of inhomogeneities present at the time of recombination. This recognition leads to a powerful argument that will enable us to distinguish inflationary models from other models of structure formation. If the inflationary models turn out to be correct, the free parameters in these models will be determined to unprecedented accuracy by the upcoming satellite missions.

  18. Two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; Shao, Hanrong; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2006-09-01

    We have developed a novel method for imaging the fluorescence intensity and anisotropy by two-photon fluorescence microscopy and tested its capability in biological application. This method is applied to model sample including FITC and FITC-CD44 antibody solution and also FITC-CD44 stained cells. The fluorescence anisotropy (FA) of FITC-CD44ab solution is higher than the FITC solution with the same concentration. The fluorescence in cell sample has even higher FA than in solution because the rotation diffusion is restrained in membrane. The method is employed to study the effect of berberine a kind of Chinese medicine, on tumor metastasis. The results indicated that tumor cell membrane fluidity is decreasing with increasing the concentration of berberine in culture medium.

  19. Microwave background anisotropies in quasiopen inflation

    CERN Document Server

    García-Bellido, J; Montes, X; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Garriga, Jaume; Montes, Xavier

    1999-01-01

    Quasiopenness seems to be generic to multi-field models of single-bubble open inflation. Instead of producing infinite open universes, these models actually produce an ensemble of very large but finite inflating islands. In this paper we study the possible constraints from CMB anisotropies on existing models of open inflation. The effect of supercurvature anisotropies combined with the quasiopenness of the inflating regions make some models incompatible with observations, and severely reduces the parameter space of others. Supernatural open inflation and the uncoupled two-field model seem to be ruled out due to these constraints for values of $\\Omega_0\\lesssim0.98$. Others, such as the open hybrid inflation model with suitable parameters for the slow roll potential can be made compatible with observations.

  20. Texture-induced microwave background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Borrill, J; Liddle, A R; Stebbins, A J; Veeraraghavan, S; Julian Borrill; Edmund J Copeland; Andrew R Liddle; Albert Stebbins; Shoba Veeraraghavan

    1994-01-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analysed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. The influence of these results on analytic estimates of texture induced microwave anisotropies is examined, and compari...

  1. CMB anisotropies in the weak coupling limit

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W; Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1995-01-01

    We present a new, more powerful and accurate, analytic treatment of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in the weakly coupled regime. Three applications are presented: gravitational redshifts in a time dependent potential, the Doppler effect in reionized scenarios, and the Vishniac effect. The Vishniac effect can dominate primary anisotropies at small angles even in late and minimally reionized models in flat dark-matter dominated universes with Harrison-Zel'dovich initial conditions. The techniques developed here refine previous calculations yielding a larger coherence angle for the Vishniac effect and moreover can be applied to non-trivial ionization histories. These analytic expressions may be used to modify results for the standard cold dark matter model to its cosmological constant and reionized extensions without detailed and time consuming recalculation.

  2. Reionization Revisited: Secondary CMB Anisotropies and Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Secondary CMB anisotropies and polarization provide a laboratory to study structure formation in the reionized epoch. We consider the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from mildly nonlinear large-scale structure and show that it is a natural extension of the perturbative Vishniac effect. If the gas traces the dark matter to overdensities of order 10, as expected from simulations, this effect is at least comparable to the Vishniac effect at arcminute scales. On smaller scales, it may be used t...

  3. Interferometric Observation of Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    White, M; Dragovan, M; White, Martin; Carlstrom, John E.; Dragovan, Mark

    1999-01-01

    We present a formalism for analyzing interferometric observations of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy and polarization data. The formalism is based upon the ell-space expansion of the angular power spectrum favoured in recent years. Explicit discussions of maximum likelihood analysis, power spectrum reconstruction, parameter estimation, imaging and polarization are given. As an example, several calculations for the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI) and Cosmic Background Interferometer (CBI) experiments are presented.

  4. Mid mantle seismic anisotropy around subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenda, M.

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence for mid mantle seismic anisotropy around subduction zones whose interpretation remains elusive. In this study I estimate the strain-induced mid mantle fabric and associated seismic anisotropy developing in 3D petrological-thermo-mechanical subduction models where the slab is either stagnating over the 660 km discontinuity or penetrating into the lower mantle. The modelling of synthetic lattice-preferred-orientation (LPO) development of wadsleyite and perovskite has been calibrated with results from deformational experiments and ab-initio atomic scale models, and the single crystal elastic tensor of the different mineral phases is scaled by local P-T conditions. The lower transition zone (ringwoodite + garnet) is assumed to be isotropic. Mid mantle fabric develops in proximity of the subducting slab where deformation and stresses are high, except at depths where upwelling or downwelling material undergoes phase transformations, yielding to LPO reset. The upper transition zone (wadsleyite + garnet) is characterized by weak transverse isotropy (2-3%) with symmetry axes oriented and fast S wave polarized dip-normal. A slightly stronger transverse isotropy develops in the lower mantle (perovskite + periclase), where the symmetry axes, the polarization of the fast S wave and the maximum Vp and dVs are parallel to the slab dip and subduction direction. For stagnating slab models this translates into negative and positive radial anisotropy in the upper transition zone and lower mantle back-arc, respectively, minimum delay times for vertically travelling shear waves and large shear wave splitting for waves propagating horizontally in the lower mantle. These results may help in reconciling the seismic anisotropy patterns observed in some subduction zones with subduction-induced deformation, such as those measured in the mid mantle between the Australian plate and the New Hebrides-Tonga-Kermadec trenches that I interpret as related to stagnating

  5. Cosmic microwave background radiation: anisotropies and polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Sergio Vitorino de Borba; Guaitolini Junior, J.T. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The development of cosmological models which describe correctly the universe we live in is becoming more reliable, as the improvement of the measure tools provides us with more accurate information. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB) was discovered accidentally by Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson in early 60s, becoming a strong evidence in favor of the Big Bang model. This radiation, typical of a blackbody with maximum intensity in the microwave band, was already predicted by Gamov, Alpher and Herman and it's originated from the uncoupling between radiation and matter in recombination, at z = 1088. Nowadays, since no other observable in Cosmology provides us with information of such a distant past, studying CMB is of great importance for the process of the comprehension of the universe. The detection of small anisotropies at the temperatures distribution, which remain even after considering the universe recent phenomena and effects of referential movements, evidenced that the primordial universe was closer to the thermodynamic equilibrium and that the appearance of small inhomogeneities were the beginning of the formation of the structures we see today. These small anisotropies are important because from them it is possible to observe polarization at CMB. In a universe so perfectly homogeneous and isotropic, polarization would never exist. In this work, we calculate the behavior of light propagation in a disturbed universe, obtaining anisotropies from the potential variation at the radiation way and from the peculiar velocity of matter which spread radiation in our direction. At this point, the next purpose is to theoretically calculate these anisotropies in an alternative cosmological example, such as in Brans-Dicke theory or a model of an universe filled with a viscous fluid. Besides, with the Stokes Parameters describing the radiation field, we study the CMB polarization, in particular analyzing the polarization tensor in a 2-sphere as

  6. Gaussian Anisotropy In Strange Quark Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Panahi, H.; Monadi, R.; Eghdami, I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper for studying the anisotropic strange quark stars, we assume that the radial pressure inside the anisotropic star is a superposition of pressure in an isotropic case plus a Gaussian perturbation term. Considering a proportionality between electric charge density and the density of matter, we solve the TOV equation for different cases numerically. Our results indicate that anisotropy increases the maximum mass $M_{max}$ and also its corresponding radius $R$ for a typical strange q...

  7. Getting Anisotropy in the Seismic Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenia de la Caridad Camejo Cordero

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In a conventional processing of seismic data (processing of only one type of wave, P or S, to getimages for hydrocarbons exploration, an isotropic model of the earth is assumed. Studies havedemonstrated that in areas with evidences of anisotropy, the conventional process of time migrationproduces images with poor resolution or erroneous lateral localization of structural events with highinclinations, due to variations in the elastic properties according to the direction of propagation of theseismic waves. At present this topic is of great importance in seismic acquisitions because of thevast employ of the far offset (large distances source–receptor. To, compensate this negative effectsis a priority objective to improve the seismic information. To obtain the anisotropy first started from asequence of high density processing that takes into consideration the characteristics of the earth;and data can be analyzed in all volume. As a final result; getting the comparison between the timemigration stack, with the application of standard normal Moveout correction (NMO and the others,that takes into consideration the obtained anisotropy values, allowing an improvement in the continuityof the reflectors in the seismic images, and at the same time a more reliable interpretation, with theconsequent decrease of the uncertainty and the risks in the oil exploration.

  8. Anisotropy of ice Ih: Developement of fabric and effects of anisotropy on deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    The anisotropy arising from preferred crystal orientation of ice I h is examined. To understand plastic anisotropy of polycrystalline materials it is necessary to examine the behavior at the single crystal level. Ice crystals have extremely strong plastic anisotropy that strongly influences the bulk behavior. There are several ways to relate single crystal deformation to the bulk behavior. Two approaches are used here. The first one is to assume a homogeneous stress throughout the bulk, which allows us to derive analytical relations between stress and strain rate. The anisotropy affects the strain rate-stress relationship significantly. For example strongly anisotropic ice, with a vertically symmetric fabric, can deform transversely to the applied stress in pure shear, be nearly undeformable in vertical compression, and shear easily in simple shear. The second approach takes the interaction between neighboring crystals into account, and recrystallization processes are also considered. Comparison of fabric evolution using the model and fabric from the GRIP ice core indicates that nearest neighbor interaction is necessary to explain observations. Quantification of the interaction is complicated by recrystallization processes. A consistent method of characterizing measured fabric is needed to verify models of fabric development. Here the elastic anisotropy of ice plays a central role, and relations between fabric and elastic wave velocities are used to characterize fabric. As always, several other methods are possible, but comparison indicates that sonic measurements give an accurate estimate for deformation effects from vertically symmetric fabric especially in simple shear. The deformation of the borehole at Dye 3, Greenland, has been measured with borehole inclinometry. Sonic velocity measurements done in the borehole allow us to model the deformation using an anisotropic flow law. Anisotropy alone cannot explain all the deformation. The additional processes

  9. Experimental study of void space, permeability and elastic anisotropy in crustal rocks under ambient and hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Philip Michael

    Anisotropy in the physical and transport properties of crustal rocks is a key influence on crustal evolution and energy resource management. Data from deep seismic soundings, borehole logging and laboratory measurement all show that the physical properties of the earth are anisotropic. Such anisotropy generally results from the superposition of fabric development during diagenesis and/or petrogenesis, and the application of anisotropic tectonic stresses. This leads to an aligned crack and pore fabric in crustal rocks that, in turn, leads to seismic velocity anisotropy and permeability anisotropy. This thesis describes an experimental study which aims to investigate the relationships between pressure, pore fabric geometry and seismic and permeability anisotropy under hydrostatic pressures from room pressure to ~4km depth equivalence within the Earth's crust. Firstly, pore fabric analyses of three representative crustal rock types is presented. These rock types represent a range of crack and pore fabrics. The average void space shape and orientation is determined 3-D using the methods of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and velocity anisotropy. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent-dye crack imaging techniques further aid in the void space characterisation. Secondly, the development and application of an apparatus capable of contemporaneously measuring elastic wave velocity, porosity and permeability at effective pressures of up to 100 MPa is described. Results are analysed in terms of applied effective pressure and the rock pore fabric type and orientation. Finally, the laboratory data are used to test models that attempt to predict geophysical parameters such as permeability and elastic wave velocity from microstructural attributes. This multi-facetted analysis allows a number of conclusions to be drawn, expanding the state-of-the-art in how the pore fabric microstructure of crustal rock is represented by the methods of elastic wave velocity and

  10. Modelling of friction anisotropy of deepdrawing sheet in ABAQUS/EXPLICIT

    OpenAIRE

    F. Stachowicz; Trzepieciński, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental and numerical results of rectangular cup drawing of steel sheets. The aim of the experimental study was to analyze material behavior under deformation. The received results were further used to verify the results from numerical simulation by taking friction and material anisotropy into consideration. A 3D parametric finite element (FE) model was built using the FE-package ABAQUS/Standard. ABAQUS allows analyzing physical models of real processes putting s...

  11. The role of pressure anisotropy on the maximum mass of cold compact stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Karmakar; S Mukherjee; S Sharma; S D Maharaj

    2007-06-01

    We study the physical features of a class of exact solutions for cold compact anisotropic stars. The effect of pressure anisotropy on the maximum mass and surface red-shift is analysed in the Vaidya–Tikekar model. It is shown that maximum compactness, red-shift and mass increase in the presence of anisotropic pressures; numerical values are generated which are in agreement with observation.

  12. Cosmological Rotation of Quantum-Mechanical Origin and Anisotropy of the Microwave Background

    OpenAIRE

    Grishchuk, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that rotational cosmological perturbations can be generated in the early Universe, similarly to gravitational waves. The generating mechanism is quantum-mechanical in its nature, and the created perturbations should now be placed in squeezed vacuum quantum states. The physical conditions under which the phenomenon can occur are formulated. The generated perturbations can contribute to the large-angular-scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. An exact formula...

  13. Optical anisotropy in packed isotropic spherical particles: indication of nanometer scale anisotropy in packing structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kohei; Inasawa, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Yukio

    2013-02-28

    We investigated the origin of birefringence in colloidal films of spherical silica particles. Although each particle is optically isotropic in shape, colloidal films formed by drop drying demonstrated birefringence. While periodic particle structures were observed in silica colloidal films, no regular pattern was found in blended films of silica and latex particles. However, since both films showed birefringence, regular film structure patterns were not required to exhibit birefringence. Instead, we propose that nanometer-scale film structure anisotropy causes birefringence. Due to capillary flow from the center to the edge of a cast suspension, particles are more tightly packed in the radial direction. Directional packing results in nanometer-scale anisotropy. The difference in the interparticle distance between radial and circumferential axes was estimated to be 10 nm at most. Nanometer-scale anisotropy in colloidal films and the subsequent optical properties are discussed.

  14. Field orientation dependence of magnetization reversal in thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallarino, Lorenzo; Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The magnetization reversal process of hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) (0001) oriented Co and C o90R u10 thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) has been studied as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field angle. Room temperature pure cobalt exhibits two characteristic reversal mechanisms. For angles near in-plane field orientation, the magnetization reversal proceeds via instability of the uniform magnetic state, whereas in the vicinity of the out-of-plane (OP) orientation, magnetization inversion takes place by means of domain nucleation. Temperature dependent measurements enable the modification of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and reveal a gradual disappearance of the domain nucleation process during magnetization reversal for elevated temperatures. Ultimately, this suppression of the domain nucleation process leads to the exclusive occurrence of uniform state instability reversal for all field orientations at sufficiently high temperature. Comparative magnetic measurements of C o90R u10 alloy samples allow the identification and confirmation of the high temperature remanent magnetization state of cobalt as an OP stripe domain state despite the reduction of magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Detailed micromagnetic simulations supplement the experimental results and corroborate the physical understanding of the temperature dependent behavior. Moreover, they enable a comprehensive identification of the complex energy balance in magnetic films with PMA, for which three different magnetic phases occur for sufficiently high anisotropy values, whose coexistence point is tricritical in nature.

  15. Anisotropy of the electron component in a cylindrical magnetron discharge. II. Application to real magnetron discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porokhova, I A; Golubovskii, Yu B; Behnke, J F

    2005-06-01

    The physical processes occurring in electrode regions and the positive column of a cylindrical magnetron discharge in crossed electric and magnetic fields are investigated based on the solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation by a multiterm decomposition of the electron phase space distribution function in terms of spherical tensors. The influence of the distribution function anisotropy on the absolute values and radial profiles of the electron density and rates of various transport and collision processes is analyzed. The spiral lines for the directed particle and energy transport are obtained to illustrate the anisotropy effects in dependence on the magnetic field. The electron equipressure surfaces are constructed in the form of ellipsoids of pressure and their transformation in the cathode and anode regions is studied. A strong anisotropy of the energy flux tensor in contrast to a weak anisotropy of the momentum flux density tensor is found. Particular results are obtained for the cylindrical magnetron discharge in argon at pressure 3 Pa, current 200 mA, and magnetic fields ranging within 100 and 400 G. PMID:16089880

  16. Fabrication of electrodeposited Co nanowire arrays with perpendicular anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Co nanowire arrays have been electrodeposited into polycarbonate membranes with nanosized pores at different voltages. By means of X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, their microstructures and magnetic properties were investigated at full length. The sample prepared at -1.2 V, 250 mA/cm2 shows perpendicular anisotropy, but the one deposited at -1.0V, 125 mA/cm2 has no perpendicular anisotropy. This different magnetic behavior can be explained from their different microstructures. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction evidence that the former sample is amorphous, and the latter is polycrystalline. In the polycrystalline sample, due to the competition of shape anisotropy and magnetocrystal anisotropy, the sample does not display perpendicular anisotropy. But magnetocrystal anisotropy is very small in amorphous sample, therefore, shape anisotropy plays a dominant role which leads to strong perpendicular anisotropy because of shape anisotropy. Furthermore, applying a magnetic field during deposition, Co grains will preferentially grow with c-axis along the wire axis, which also leads to strong perpendicular anisotropy

  17. Extending Velocity Channel Analysis for Studying Turbulence Anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Kandel, Dinesh; Pogosyan, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    We extend the analysis of the fluctuations in the velocity slices of Position-Position- Velocity (PPV) spectroscopic data from Doppler broadened lines, i.e. Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) introduced by Lazarian & Pogosyan (2000), to study anisotropy of the underlying velocity and density turbulence statistics that arises from the presence of magnetic field. In particular, we study analytically how the measurable anisotropy of the statistics of the channel map fluctuations changes with the thickness of velocity channels. In agreement with the earlier VCA studies we find that the anisotropy of the thick channels reflects the anisotropy of the density field, while the relative contribution of density and velocity fluctuations to the thin velocity channels depends on the density spectral slope. We show that the anisotropies arising from Alfven, slow and fast modes are different, in particular, the anisotropy in PPV created by fast modes is opposite to that created by Alfven and slow modes and this can be use...

  18. Lichtinduzierte Generierung und Charakterisierung optischer Anisotropie. - [überarb. Diss.

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Carl Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Eine Nutzung der optischen Anisotropie dünner Schichten ist vor allem für die Displaytechnologie, die optische Datenspeicherung und für optische Sicherheitselemente von hoher Bedeutung. Diese Doktorarbeit befasst sich mit theoretischen und experimentellen Untersuchung von dreidimensionaler Anisotropie und dabei insbesondere mit der Untersuchung von lichtinduzierter dreidimensionaler Anisotropie in organischen dünnen Polymer-Schichten. Die gewonnenen Erkentnisse und entwickelten Methoden könne...

  19. Anisotropy in cohesive, frictional granular media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modelling of cohesive, frictional granular materials with a discrete particle molecular dynamics is reviewed. From the structure of the quasi-static granular solid, the fabric, stress, and stiffness tensors are determined, including both normal and tangential forces. The influence of the material properties on the flow behaviour is also reported, including relations between the microscopic attractive force and the macroscopic cohesion as well as the dependence of the macroscopic friction on the microscopic contact friction coefficient. Related to the dynamics, the anisotropy of both structure and stress are exponentially approaching the maximum

  20. Three-layer model for exchange anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.; de Aguiar, F. M.; Fermin, J. R.; Egelhoff, W. F.; Parkin, S. S.

    2002-08-01

    Recent x-ray absorption measurements have indicated that the interface between the antiferromagnetic (AF) and the ferromagnetic (FM) layers in AF/FM bilayers instead of being abrupt, consists of a thin layer with uncompensated spins. Here the effect of an interfacial layer between the AF and FM layers on the ferromagnetic resonance response is investigated using a three-layer model for the exchange anisotropy. The calculated dependence of the resonance field with the azimuthal angle of the in-plane external field agrees quite well with experimental data in several samples, lending support to the existence of the uncompensated interfacial layer.

  1. Cosmology with cosmic microwave background anisotropy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarun Sourdeep

    2006-10-01

    Measurements of CMB anisotropy and, more recently, polarization have played a very important role in allowing precise determination of various parameters of the `standard' cosmological model. The expectation of the paradigm of inflation and the generic prediction of the simplest realization of inflationary scenario in the early Universe have also been established - `acausally' correlated initial perturbations in a flat, statistically isotropic Universe, adiabatic nature of primordial density perturbations. Direct evidence for gravitational instability mechanism for structure formation from primordial perturbations has been established. In the next decade, future experiments promise to strengthen these deductions and uncover the remaining crucial signature of inflation - the primordial gravitational wave background.

  2. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Kevin H.

    2014-07-14

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  3. Computing magnetic anisotropy constants of single molecule magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramasesha; Shaon Sahoo; Rajamani Raghunathan; Diptiman Sen

    2009-09-01

    We present here a theoretical approach to compute the molecular magnetic anisotropy parameters, and for single molecule magnets in any given spin eigenstate of exchange spin Hamiltonian. We first describe a hybrid constant -valence bond (VB) technique of solving spin Hamiltonians employing full spatial and spin symmetry adaptation and we illustrate this technique by solving the exchange Hamiltonian of the Cu6Fe8 system. Treating the anisotropy Hamiltonian as perturbation, we compute the and values for various eigenstates of the exchange Hamiltonian. Since, the dipolar contribution to the magnetic anisotropy is negligibly small, we calculate the molecular anisotropy from the single-ion anisotropies of the metal centers. We have studied the variation of and by rotating the single-ion anisotropies in the case of Mn12Ac and Fe8 SMMs in ground and few low-lying excited states of the exchange Hamiltonian. In both the systems, we find that the molecular anisotropy changes drastically when the single-ion anisotropies are rotated. While in Mn12Ac SMM values depend strongly on the spin of the eigenstate, it is almost independent of the spin of the eigenstate in Fe8 SMM. We also find that the value is almost insensitive to the orientation of the anisotropy of the core Mn(IV) ions. The dependence of on the energy gap between the ground and the excited states in both the systems has also been studied by using different sets of exchange constants.

  4. The study of the shape anisotropy in patterned permalloy films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Dong; Zhai Ya; Zhai Hong-Ru

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a systematic ferromagnetic resonance study shows that an in-plane magnetic anisotropy in the patterned micron octagon permalloy (Ni80Fe20) elements is mainly determined by the element geometry. The easy-axis is along the edge of the elements, and the hard-axis is along the diagonal. The shape anisotropy of the octagon elements is determined by square and equilateral octagon, and the theoretical calculation was studied on the shape anisotropy. The shape anisotropy of rectangular was calculated by using the same theory.

  5. Texture and anisotropy analysis of Qusaiba shales

    KAUST Repository

    Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

    2011-02-17

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, microtomography and ultrasonic velocity measurements were used to characterize microstructures and anisotropy of three deeply buried Qusaiba shales from the Rub\\'al-Khali basin, Saudi Arabia. Kaolinite, illite-smectite, illite-mica and chlorite show strong preferred orientation with (001) pole figure maxima perpendicular to the bedding plane ranging from 2.4-6.8 multiples of a random distribution (m.r.d.). Quartz, feldspars and pyrite crystals have a random orientation distribution. Elastic properties of the polyphase aggregate are calculated by averaging the single crystal elastic properties over the orientation distribution, assuming a nonporous material. The average calculated bulk P-wave velocities are 6.2 km/s (maximum) and 5.5 km/s (minimum), resulting in a P-wave anisotropy of 12%. The calculated velocities are compared with those determined from ultrasonic velocity measurements on a similar sample. In the ultrasonic experiment, which measures the effects of the shale matrix as well as the effects of porosity, velocities are smaller (P-wave maximum 5.3 km/s and minimum 4.1 km/s). The difference between calculated and measured velocities is attributed to the effects of anisotropic pore structure and to microfractures present in the sample, which have not been taken into account in the matrix averaging. © 2011 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  6. The Anisotropy of Replicated Aluminum Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeny L. Furman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The replication casting process gives the open-cell aluminum foams that can be used in many industrial applications as well as in filtering technology. The essential requirement for filters is the uniformity of filtering degree which is defined by the minimal pore size. However the structure of replication castings is often inhomogeneous and the minimal pore radius is decreasing in the direction of melt infiltration. The objective of this investigation is to study the dynamics of melt impregnation of the porous medium by vacuum suction to identify the possibility of reducing the anisotropy. Theoretical data illustrate the processes at the boundary between melt and gas medium. The experiments were carried out using the replication aluminum samples produced according to commercial technology. It was found that the permeability coefficient varies throughout the height of castings. A method for estimation of pressure on the line of melt movement was proposed. The resistance of NaCl layer and circular vents of the mold causes the inhomogeneity of castings. Finally the ways of minimizing the anisotropy were offered.

  7. Electromagnetic Instabilities Excited by Electron Temperature Anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆全明; 王连启; 周艳; 王水

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of electromagnetic instabilities excited by the electron temperature anisotropy in homogeneous plasmas with different parameters. The results show that the electron temperature anisotropy can excite the two right-hand electromagnetic instabilities, one has the frequency higher than Ωe, the other is the whistler instability with larger amplitude,and its frequency is below Ωe. Their dispersion relations are consistent with the prediction from the cold plasma theory. In the initial growth stage (prediction from linear theory), the frequency of the dominant mode (the mode whose amplitude is large enough) of the whistler wave almost does not change, but in the saturation stage the situation is different. In the case that the ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency is larger than 1, the frequency of the dominant mode of the whistler wave drifts from high to low continuously. However, for the case of the ratio smaller than 1, besides the original dominant mode of the whistler wave whose frequency is about 2.6ωe, another dominant mode whose frequency is about 1.55ωe also begins to be excited at definite time,and its amplitude increases with time until it exceeds the original dominant mode.

  8. Anisotropy in thin Canning sheet metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, D. W. A.

    2003-03-01

    The in-plane anisotropy of ductile sheet metal may be characterised by r-values within a uniform tensile strain range. In iow ductiiity material, tensile failure occurs by the formation of an inciined groove within which the plasticity is localised. Under these conditions, where lateral and axial displacements cannot determine an r-value reliably, the inclination of the local groove is used. Anisotropy is characterised from an orthotropic yield criterion within three r-values, found from tension tests at 0^{circ}, 45^{circ} and 90^{circ} to the roll. Application to bi-axial stress states are made from elliptical bulge forming. The theory may reprcduce the pressure-height curves and pole strain paths provided an equivalence exists between flow curves from tension and bulge tests. Otherwise, the circular bulge test is better for providing the hardening parameters and fracture strain for use in in biaxial stress applications. There appears to be no advantage in using other non-quadratic yield criteria except by the addition of linear and cubic terms.

  9. Scanning anisotropy parameters in complex media

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2011-03-21

    Parameter estimation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium offers many challenges; chief among them is the trade-off between inhomogeneity and anisotropy. It is especially hard to estimate the anisotropy anellipticity parameter η in complex media. Using perturbation theory and Taylor’s series, I have expanded the solutions of the anisotropic eikonal equation for transversely isotropic (TI) media with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) in terms of the independent parameter η from a generally inhomogeneous elliptically anisotropic medium background. This new VTI traveltime solution is based on a set of precomputed perturbations extracted from solving linear partial differential equations. The traveltimes obtained from these equations serve as the coefficients of a Taylor-type expansion of the total traveltime in terms of η. Shanks transform is used to predict the transient behavior of the expansion and improve its accuracy using fewer terms. A homogeneous medium simplification of the expansion provides classical nonhyperbolic moveout descriptions of the traveltime that are more accurate than other recently derived approximations. In addition, this formulation provides a tool to scan for anisotropic parameters in a generally inhomogeneous medium background. A Marmousi test demonstrates the accuracy of this approximation. For a tilted axis of symmetry, the equations are still applicable with a slightly more complicated framework because the vertical velocity and δ are not readily available from the data.

  10. Anisotropy and Heterogeneity Interaction in Shear Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, M.; Schmid, D. W.

    2009-04-01

    Rocks are heterogeneous on many different scales and deformation may introduce a coexistence of heterogeneity and anisotropy in shear zones. A competent inclusion embedded in a laminated matrix is a typical example. Indisputably, the presence of a mechanical heterogeneity leads to a flow perturbation and consequently to a deflection of the lamination in its vicinity. Assuming a passive response of the matrix phase, the pattern formation around rigid objects has been modeled in two and three dimensions using analytical solutions. Yet, the laminas may be mechanically distinct, leading to an effectively anisotropic rheology of the matrix. The feedback of an evolving matrix structure on the inclusion motion cannot be precluded in this case. In our study elliptical inclusions of varying aspect ratios are embedded in a laminated linear viscous host and subject to a large simple shear deformation in finite element numerical simulations. Increasing the viscosity ratio of the weak and strong lamina significantly changes the pattern characteristics in the matrix. The structural evolution around an inclusion proves to have a major impact on the inclusion motion, leading to the stabilization of elongated inclusions at antithetic orientations. We provide a comparison of two different modeling approaches. In the first approach discrete layers are introduced in the matrix and the large strain evolution of individual minute layers is resolved. Next, the matrix is modeled as an anisotropic medium using an evolving director field that locally describes the anisotropy direction. The length scale of layering can be restored in this model using the micropolar medium formulation.

  11. Experimental study of anisotropy for Berea Sandstone with image-based evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Y.; Yun, T.

    2013-12-01

    The rock anisotropy in internal structure of sedimentary rock governs physical behavior of whole body. Spatial composition of mineral and geometry of fabric contributes the anisotropy of rock, influencing on thermal property and wave propagation in internal structure of rock. Thermal conductivity and Wave velocity are important parameters to rock physical properties correlating other key parameters such as strength and elastic modulus. However, the invisibility of anisotropy of rock makes it hard to characterize the internal structure. In this study, 3D X-ray Computed Tomography is used to reveal the orientation of layer in Berea Sandstone based on statistical approach, SPM (Slicing Plane Method) with respect to the uniformly rotated orientation. This study also represents experimental study of thermal conductivity and elastic wave velocity Berea Sandstone. Divided bar method is conducted to get thermal conductivity of rock and elastic wave velocity is evaluated. Result from the statistical study based on image shows that anisotropic ratio for every orientation has unique value and they are coincides with tendency of layer direction. The uniqueness of thermal conductivity and wave velocity based on experimental study is also discussed. 3D Image of Berea Sandstone Result from SPM

  12. Measurements of cosmic ray anisotropies from Pioneers 10 and 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic ray anisotropy measurements are performed by the University of California, San Diego experiments on Pioneers 10 and 11. A directional Cerenkov counter sensitive to protons and α particles with kinetic energies >= 480 MeV/nucleon is used to determine east-west and north-south anisotropies. (orig./WBU)

  13. Effects of the local field and inherent deformation in reflectance anisotropy spectra of A{sup III}B{sup V} semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovits, V.L.; Gordeeva, A.B.; Kosobukin, V.A. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Politekhnicheskaya ul. 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15

    Reflectance anisotropy (RA) spectra of naturally oxidized GaAs(001) and InAs(001) surfaces reveal features that differ qualitatively from those caused by reconstruction of clean surfaces or surface electric fields of the crystals. We show that the observed RA spectra of the semiconductor/oxide systems are simultaneously influenced by interface and near-surface anisotropies whose physical origins are different. The interface anisotropy is associated with anisotropic polarizability of the valence bonds belonging to a monatomic layer of excess As atoms occurring between the crystal and oxide. The near-surface anisotropy is due to uniaxial strain of a near-surface region of the crystals. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Zhou, Tie-ge; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu; Feng, Min

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, we study the magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene and its dependence on carrier accumulation. We show that carrier accumulation not only impacts the magnitude of magnetic anisotropy but also switches its sign. Hole accumulation enhances the perpendicular anisotropy up to ˜16 meV per Gd atom, while electron accumulation switches the anisotropy from perpendicular to in-plane direction. Moreover, we find that the first order perturbation of spin-orbit coupling interaction induces a pseudo-gap at Γ for the perpendicular magnetization, which leads to the the anomalous magnetic anisotropy for the neutral composite. Our findings pave the way for magneto-electric materials based on rare-earth-decorated graphene for voltage-controlled spintronics.

  15. Intrinsic anisotropy-defined magnetization reversal in submicron ring magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. P.; Lew, W. S.; Bland, J. A. C.; Natali, M.; Lebib, A.; Chen, Y.

    2002-12-01

    We report a study of the effect of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the magnetization reversal of submicron Co rings fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. For weak magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the complete reversal takes place via a transition from saturation at large negative fields, into a vortex configuration at small fields, and back to reverse saturation at large positive fields. When the anisotropy strength is increased to a critical value, the intermediate vortex configuration no longer exists in the magnetization reversal along the easy axis; instead, the reversal occurs through a rapid jump. However, when the applied field direction is far from the easy axis, the presence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy favors local vortex nucleation, and this leads to a similar switching process as found for low anisotropy. Micromagnetic simulations indicate that the magnetization reversal process of the rings, starts from a buckling-like reverse domain nucleation, followed by local vortex formation and an avalanche process of local vortex nucleation.

  16. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Co85Cr15/Pt multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pol Hwang; Baohe Li; Tao Yang; Zhonghai Zhai; Fengwu Zhu

    2004-01-01

    The CoCr/Pt bilayers and (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers with Pt underlayer were prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. The effects of prepared condition on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were investigated. The results show that the thickness of Pt underlayer has a great effect on the microstructure and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoCr/Pt bilayers and (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers.When the thickness of Pt underlayer increases, Pt(111) and CoCr(002) peaks of both CoCr/Pt bilayers and (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers increase and the bilayer periodicity of the multilayers is improved. The effective magnetic anisotropy of (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers with Pt underlayer was much larger than that of CoCr/Pt bilayers. The (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers has a stronger perpendicular magnetic anisotropy than that of CoCr/Pt bilayers. This is ascribed to the interface magnetic anisotropy of the multilayers.

  17. Carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, we study the magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene and its dependence on carrier accumulation. We show that carrier accumulation not only impacts the magnitude of magnetic anisotropy but also switches its sign. Hole accumulation enhances the perpendicular anisotropy up to ∼16 meV per Gd atom, while electron accumulation switches the anisotropy from perpendicular to in-plane direction. Moreover, we find that the first order perturbation of spin-orbit coupling interaction induces a pseudo-gap at Γ for the perpendicular magnetization, which leads to the the anomalous magnetic anisotropy for the neutral composite. Our findings pave the way for magneto-electric materials based on rare-earth-decorated graphene for voltage-controlled spintronics.

  18. Fine structure constant variation or spacetime anisotropy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations on the quasar absorption spectra supply evidence for the variation of the fine structure constant α. In this paper, we propose another interpretation of the observational data on the quasar absorption spectra: a scenario with spacetime inhomogeneity and anisotropy. Maybe the spacetime is characterized by the Finsler geometry instead of the Riemann one. The Finsler geometry admits fewer symmetries than the Riemann geometry does. We investigate the Finslerian geodesic equations in the Randers spacetime (a special Finsler spacetime). It is found that the cosmological redshift in this spacetime deviates from the one in general relativity. The modification term to the redshift could be generally revealed as a monopole plus dipole function of spacetime locations and directions. We suggest that this modification corresponds to the spatial monopole and dipole of α variation in the quasar absorption spectra. (orig.)

  19. Anisotropy of light propagation in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Stephan; Hermann, Marcus; Essenpreis, Matthias; Farrell, Thomas J.; Krämer, Uwe; Patterson, Michael S.

    2000-10-01

    Using spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectometry, a directional dependence was found in the propagation of visible and near infrared light through human skin in vivo. The skin's reduced scattering coefficient µ's varies by up to a factor of two between different directions of propagation at the same position. This anisotropy is believed to be caused by the preferential orientation of collagen fibres in the dermis, as described by Langer's skin tension lines. Monte Carlo simulations that examine the effect of partial collagen fibre orientation support this hypothesis. The observation has consequences for non-invasive diagnostic methods relying on skin optical properties, and it could be used non-invasively to determine the direction of lines of cleavage in order to minimize scars due to surgical incisions.

  20. Daytime Thermal Anisotropy of Urban Neighbourhoods: Morphological Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scott Krayenhoff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface temperature is a key variable in boundary-layer meteorology and is typically acquired by remote observation of emitted thermal radiation. However, the three-dimensional structure of cities complicates matters: uneven solar heating of urban facets produces an “effective anisotropy” of surface thermal emission at the neighbourhood scale. Remotely-sensed urban surface temperature varies with sensor view angle as a consequence. The authors combine a microscale urban surface temperature model with a thermal remote sensing model to predict the effective anisotropy of simplified neighbourhood configurations. The former model provides detailed surface temperature distributions for a range of “urban” forms, and the remote sensing model computes aggregate temperatures for multiple view angles. The combined model’s ability to reproduce observed anisotropy is evaluated against measurements from a neighbourhood in Vancouver, Canada. As in previous modeling studies, anisotropy is underestimated. Addition of moderate coverages of small (sub-facet scale structure can account for much of the missing anisotropy. Subsequently, over 1900 sensitivity simulations are performed with the model combination, and the dependence of daytime effective thermal anisotropy on diurnal solar path (i.e., latitude and time of day and blunt neighbourhood form is assessed. The range of effective anisotropy, as well as the maximum difference from nadir-observed brightness temperature, peak for moderate building-height-to-spacing ratios (H/W, and scale with canyon (between-building area; dispersed high-rise urban forms generate maximum anisotropy. Maximum anisotropy increases with solar elevation and scales with shortwave irradiance. Moreover, it depends linearly on H/W for H/W < 1.25, with a slope that depends on maximum off-nadir sensor angle. Decreasing minimum brightness temperature is primarily responsible for this linear growth of maximum anisotropy. These

  1. Creation of artificial skyrmions and antiskyrmions by anisotropy engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Phatak, C.

    2016-08-01

    Topologically non-trivial spin textures form a fundamental paradigm in solid-state physics and present unique opportunities to explore exciting phenomena such as the topological Hall effect. One such texture is a skyrmion, in which the spins can be mapped to point in all directions wrapping around a sphere. Understanding the formation of these spin textures, and their energetic stability, is crucial in order to control their behavior. In this work, we report on controlling the perpendicular anisotropy of continuous Co/Pt multilayer films with ion irradiation to form unique spin configurations of artificial skyrmions and antiskyrmions that are stabilized by their demagnetization energy. We elucidate their behavior using aberration-corrected Lorentz transmission electron microscopy. We also discuss the energetic stability of these structures studied through in-situ magnetizing experiments performed at room temperature, combined with micromagnetic simulations that successfully reproduce the spin textures and behavior. This research offers new opportunities towards creation of artificial skyrmion or antiskyrmion lattices that can be used to investigate not only fundamental properties of their interaction with electron currents but also technological applications such as artificial magnonic crystals.

  2. Fluid-dependent anisotropy and experimental measurements in synthetic porous rocks with controlled fracture parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we analyse the influence of fluid on P- and S-wave anisotropy in a fractured medium. Equivalent medium theories are used to describe the relationship between the fluid properties and the rock physics characteristics in fractured rocks, and P-wave and S-wave velocities and anisotropy are considered to be influenced by fluid saturation. However, these theoretical predictions require experimental measurement results for calibration. A new construction method was used to create synthetic rock samples with controlled fracture parameters. The new construction process provides synthetic rocks that have a more realistic mineral composition, porous structure, cementation and pressure sensitivity than samples used in previous research on fractured media. The synthetic rock samples contain fractures which have a controlled distribution, diameter, thickness and fracture density. In this study, the fracture diameter was about 4 mm, the thickness of fractures was about 0.06 mm, and the fracture density in the two fractured rock samples was about 3.45%. SEM images show well-defined penny-shaped fractures of 4 mm in length and 0.06 mm in width. The rock samples were saturated with air, water and oil, and P- and S-wave velocities were measured in an ultrasonic measurement system. The laboratory measurement results show that the P-wave anisotropy is strongly influenced by saturated fluid, and the P-wave anisotropy parameter, ε, has a much larger value in air saturation than in water and oil saturations. The S-wave anisotropy decreases when the samples are saturated with oil, which can be caused by high fluid viscosity. In the direction perpendicular to the fractures (the 0° direction), shear-wave splitting is negligible, and is similar to the blank sample without fractures, as expected. In the direction parallel to the fractures (the 90° direction) shear-wave splitting is significant. The fractured rock samples show significant P- and S-wave anisotropy caused

  3. A New Light-Speed Anisotropy Experiment: Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves Detected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Data from a new experiment measuring the anisotropy of the one-way speed of EM waves in a coaxial cable, gives the speed of light as 300,000 ± 400 ± 20km/s in a measured direction RA = 5.5 ± 2 hrs, Dec = 70 ± 10 ◦ S, is shown to be in excellent agreement with the results from seven previous anisotropy experiments, particularly those of Miller (1925/26, and even those of Michelson and Morley (1887. The Miller gas-mode interferometer results, and those from the RF coaxial cable experiments of Torr and Kolen (1983, De Witte (1991 and the new experiment all reveal the presence of gravitational waves, as indicated by the last ± variations above, but of a kind different from those supposedly predicted by General Relativity. Miller repeated the Michelson-Morley 1887 gas-mode interferometer experiment and again detected the anisotropy of the speed of light, primarily in the years 1925/1926 atop Mt.Wilson, California. The understanding of the operation of the Michelson interferometer in gas-mode was only achieved in 2002 and involved a calibration for the interferometer that necessarily involved Special Relativity effects and the refractive index of the gas in the light paths. The results demonstrate the reality of the Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction as an observer independent relativistic effect. A common misunderstanding is that the anisotropy of the speed of light is necessarily in conflict with Special Relativity and Lorentz symmetry — this is explained. All eight experiments and theory show that we have both anisotropy of the speed of light and relativistic effects, and that a dynamical 3-space exists — that absolute motion through that space has been repeatedly observed since 1887. These developments completely change fundamental physics and our understanding of reality. “Modern” vacuum-mode Michelson interferometers, particularly the long baseline terrestrial versions, are, by design flaw, incapable of detecting the anisotropy effect

  4. Composite microstructural anisotropies in reservoir rocks: consequences on elastic properties and relation with deformation; Anisotropies microstructurales composites dans les roches reservoir: consequences sur les proprietes elastiques et relation a la deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, L.

    2003-10-15

    From diagenesis to tectonic stress induced deformation, rock microstructures always present some anisotropy associated with a preferential orientation, shape or spatial arrangement of its constituents. Considering the consequences anisotropy has on directional transport properties and compliance, as the geological history it carries, this approach has received a particular attention in numerous works. In this work, the microstructural features of various sedimentary rocks were investigated through direct observations and laboratory measurements in naturally deformed and undeformed blocks, samples being considered as effective media. All investigated samples were found to be anisotropic with respect to the physical properties we measured (i.e. ultrasonic P-wave velocity, magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity). Considering that P-wave velocities can be described by a second order tensor, we applied to the velocity data the same inversion procedure as the one routinely used in magnetic studies, which provided an efficient tool to estimate and compare these 3D anisotropies with respect to the original sample geographical position. In each case, we tried to identify as thoroughly as possible the microstructural source of the observed anisotropies, first by the mean of existing models, then through direct observations (optic and electronic microscopy). Depending on the rock investigated, anisotropy was found to be controlled by pore shape, intergranular contact distribution, preferentially oriented microcracks interacting with compaction pattern or pressure solution cleavages interacting with each other. The net result of this work is that P-wave velocity anisotropy can express the interaction between different microstructural features as well as their evolution during deformation. (author)

  5. Anisotropy Graded Media: Extending the Superparamagnetic Limit (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, K. Renee; Kang, S.; Harrell, J. W.

    2009-04-01

    The maximum storage density in magnetic media is limited by the superparamagnetic size of the grains that make up the bits. The superparamagnetic size can be reduced by increasing the anisotropy of the grains; however, in conventional media, in which the anisotropy of the grains is uniform, this leads to a proportionate increase in the switching field. The switching field, however, is limited by the maximum magnetization of the core material in the write head. Recent calculations have shown that the switching field can be significantly reduced relative to the thermal stability of the grains if the anisotropy is made to vary appropriately from the bottom to the top of the grain. In this project we propose to test this concept by fabricating and characterizing anisotropy graded films. We will use the hcp CoPtX system, with X = Cr or Ru, where the anisotropy gradient is obtained by grading the composition. Both sheet films and granular films will be fabricated. The anisotropy gradients will be determined by analyzing magnetization curves. Dynamic coercivity measurements will be used to determine the short-time coercivity and the zero-field energy barrier in the granular films. These results will be compared with similar measurements on films with uniform anisotropy films in order to test the predictions for graded media.

  6. Working group report: Astroparticle and neutrino physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Gandhi; Subhendra Mohanty; Tarun Souradeep; S Agarwalla; K Bhattacharya; B Brahmachari; R Crittenden; S Goswami; P Ghoshal; M Lindner; H S Mani; S Mitra; S Pascoli; S Panda; R Rangarajan; S Ray; T Roy Choudhury; R Saha; S Sarkar; A Srivastava; R Sheth; S Uma Sankar; U Yajnik

    2006-10-01

    The working group on astroparticle and neutrino physics at WHEPP-9 covered a wide range of topics. The main topics were neutrino physics at INO, neutrino astronomy and recent constraints on dark energy coming from cosmological observations of large scale structure and CMB anisotropy.

  7. Robust constraints on average radial lower mantle anisotropy and consequences for composition and texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, R. W. L.; Trampert, J.

    2015-11-01

    Seismic anisotropy has been observed in the upper mantle (toroidal normal modes together with a neural-network-based technique to infer probability density functions for the average radial anisotropy in the lower mantle. We show, for the first time, a robust observation that the average lower mantle is anisotropic (mainly in the parameter η) below 1900 km depth, challenging the consensus that this part of the mantle is isotropic. The mass density also shows a well-constrained positive deviation from existing models at the same depths. Using existing mineral physics data, our results are compatible with an average lower mantle that is about 100-200 K colder than commonly-assumed adiabats and that consists of a mixture of about 60-65% perovskite and 35-40% ferropericlase containing 10-15% iron. If further a crystal alignment mechanism is assumed, the observed anisotropy can constrain the orientation of the two minerals and suggests a new window to study the nature of flow in the lower mantle.

  8. Effects of anisotropy on gravitational infall in galaxy clusters using an exact general relativistic model

    CERN Document Server

    Troxel, M A; Ishak, Mustapha

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects and implications of anisotropies at the scale of galaxy clusters by building an exact general relativistic model of a cluster using the inhomogeneous and anisotropic Szekeres metric. The model is built from a modified Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile. We compare this to a corresponding spherically symmetric structure in the Lemaitre-Tolman (LT) model and quantify the impact of introducing varying levels of anisotropy. We examine two physical measures of gravitational infall -- the growth rate of density and the velocity of the source dust in the model. We introduce a generalization of the LT dust velocity profile for the Szekeres metric and demonstrate its consistency with the growth rate of density. We find that the growth rate of density in one substructure increases by 0.5%, 1.5%, and 3.75% for 5%, 10%, and 15% levels of introduced anisotropy, which is measured as the fractional displaced mass relative to the spherically symmetric case. The infall velocity of the dust is found...

  9. Growth of Co Nanomagnet Arrays with Enhanced Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Laura; Ilyn, Maxim; Magaña, Ana; Vitali, Lucia; Ortega, José Enrique

    2016-01-01

    A trigon structure formed by submonolayer gadolinium deposition onto Au(111) is revealed as a robust growth template for Co nanodot arrays. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and X‐Ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism measurements evidence that the Co nanoislands behave as independent magnetic entities with an out‐of‐plane easy axis of anisotropy and enhanced magnetic anisotropy values, as compared to other self‐organized Co nanodot superlattices. The large strain induced by the lattice mismatch at the interface between Co and trigons is discussed as the main reason for the increased magnetic anisotropy of the nanoislands. PMID:27711268

  10. Effects of surface anisotropy on magnetic vortex core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V., E-mail: engraver@univ.net.ua [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Sheka, Denis D. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri [Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03143 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    The vortex core shape in the three dimensional Heisenberg magnet is essentially influenced by a surface anisotropy. We predict that depending of the surface anisotropy type there appears barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex core along the magnet thickness. Our theoretical study is well confirmed by spin–lattice simulations. - Highlights: • The shape of magnetic vortex core is essentially influenced by SA (surface anisotropy). • We predict barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex depending on SA. • The variational approach fully describes the vortex core deformation. • We performed spin–lattice simulations to detect SA influence on the vortex core.

  11. Anisotropies of Gravitational Wave Backgrounds: A Line Of Sight Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Contaldi, Carlo R

    2016-01-01

    In the weak field regime, gravitational waves can be considered as being made up of collisionless, relativistic tensor modes that travel along null geodesics of the perturbed background metric. We work in this geometric optics picture to calculate the anisotropies in gravitational wave backgrounds resulting from astrophysical and cosmological sources. Our formalism yields expressions for the angular power spectrum of the anisotropies. We show how the anisotropies are sourced by intrinsic, Doppler, Sachs-Wolfe, and Integrated Sachs-Wolfe terms in analogy with Cosmic Microwave Background photons.

  12. Irreversible magnetic processes under biaxial and uniaxial magnetic anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, S.; Akioya, O.; Alqhtany, N. H.; Dickens, C.; Morgan, W.; Wuttig, M.; Lisfi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Irreversible magnetic processes have been investigated in magnetic systems with two different anisotropy symmetries (uniaxial and biaxial) through angular measurement of the switching field, the irreversible susceptibility and the magnetic viscosity. These two systems consist of two-dimensional cobalt ferrite hetero-structures epitaxially grown on (100) and (110) MgO substrate. It is found that for uniaxial anisotropy the irreversible characteristics of the magnetization are large and display a strong angular dependence, which exhibits its maximum at the easy axis and drops quickly to vanish at the hard axis. However, for biaxial anisotropy the magnetization irreversible characteristics are considerably reduced and are less sensitive to the field angle.

  13. Modelling of friction anisotropy of deepdrawing sheet in ABAQUS/EXPLICIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stachowicz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental and numerical results of rectangular cup drawing of steel sheets. The aim of the experimental study was to analyze material behavior under deformation. The received results were further used to verify the results from numerical simulation by taking friction and material anisotropy into consideration. A 3D parametric finite element (FE model was built using the FE-package ABAQUS/Standard. ABAQUS allows analyzing physical models of real processes putting special emphasis on geometrical non-linearities caused by large deformations, material non-linearities and complex friction conditions. Frictional properties of the deep drawing quality steel sheet were determined by using the pin-on-disc tribometer. It shows that the friction coefficient value depends on the measured angle from the rolling direction and corresponds to the surface topography. A quadratic Hill anisotropic yield criterion was compared with Huber-Mises yield criterion having isotropic hardening. Plastic anisotropy is the result of the distortion of the yield surface shape due to the material microstructural state. The sensitivity of constitutive laws to the initial data characterizing material behavior isalso presented. It is found that plastic anisotropy of the matrix in ductile sheet metal has influence on deformation behavior of the material. If the material and friction anisotropy are taken into account in the finite element analysis, this approach undoubtedly gives the most approximate numerical results to real processes. This paper is the first part of the study of numerical investigation using ABAQUS and mainly deals with the most influencing parameters in a forming process to simulate the sheet metal forming of rectangular cup.

  14. Exchange bias for ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers with the uniaxial anisotropy being misaligned with the exchange anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI YuHao; YUN GuoHong

    2009-01-01

    Using the principle of minimal energy and S-W model, the exchange bias for ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers has been investigated when the uniaxial anisotropy is misaligned with the exchange anisotropy. According to the relation between the energy of the bilayer and the orientation of ferromagnetic magnetization, it is found that the bilayer will be in the monostable state or bistable state when the external field is absent in the initial magnetization state. The monostable state or bistable state of the bilayer, which determines the angular dependence of exchange bias directly, is controlled by the competition between the exchange anisotropy and uniaxial anisotropy. When the applied field is parallel to the intrinsic easy axes and intrinsic hard axes, one of the switching fields of the hysteresis loop shows an abrupt change, while the other keep continuous by analyzing the magnetization reversal processes. Consequently, the exchange bias field and the coercivity will show a jump phenomenon.The numerical calculations indicate that both the magnitude and direction of the exchange anisotropy will significantly affect the angular dependence of exchange bias. The jump phenomenon of exchange bias is an intrinsic property of the bilayer, which is dependent on the interracial exchange-coupling constant, the orientation of the exchange anisotropy, the thickness and uniaxial anisotropy constant of the ferromagnetic layer.

  15. Exchange bias for ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers with the uniaxial anisotropy being misaligned with the exchange anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using the principle of minimal energy and S-W model,the exchange bias for ferromagnetic/antiferro-magnetic bilayers has been investigated when the uniaxial anisotropy is misaligned with the exchange anisotropy. According to the relation between the energy of the bilayer and the orientation of ferro-magnetic magnetization,it is found that the bilayer will be in the monostable state or bistable state when the external field is absent in the initial magnetization state. The monostable state or bistable state of the bilayer,which determines the angular dependence of exchange bias directly,is controlled by the competition between the exchange anisotropy and uniaxial anisotropy. When the applied field is parallel to the intrinsic easy axes and intrinsic hard axes,one of the switching fields of the hysteresis loop shows an abrupt change,while the other keep continuous by analyzing the magnetization reversal processes. Consequently,the exchange bias field and the coercivity will show a jump phenomenon. The numerical calculations indicate that both the magnitude and direction of the exchange anisotropy will significantly affect the angular dependence of exchange bias. The jump phenomenon of exchange bias is an intrinsic property of the bilayer,which is dependent on the interfacial exchange-coupling constant,the orientation of the exchange anisotropy,the thickness and uniaxial anisotropy constant of the ferromagnetic layer.

  16. Twinning anisotropy of tantalum during nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, Saurav, E-mail: S.GOEL@qub.ac.uk [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Beake, Ben [Micro Materials Limited, Willow House, Yale Business Village, Ellice Way, Wrexham LL13 7YL (United Kingdom); Dalton Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, M15GD (United Kingdom); Chan, Chi-Wai [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Haque Faisal, Nadimul [School of Engineering, Robert Gordon University, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen AB10 7GJ (United Kingdom); Dunne, Nicholas [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-11

    Unlike other BCC metals, the plastic deformation of nanocrystalline Tantalum (Ta) during compression is regulated by deformation twinning. Whether or not this twinning exhibits anisotropy was investigated through simulation of displacement-controlled nanoindentation test using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. MD data was found to correlate well with the experimental data in terms of surface topography and hardness measurements. The mechanism of the transport of material was identified due to the formation and motion of prismatic dislocations loops (edge dislocations) belonging to the 1/2〈111〉 type and 〈100〉 type Burgers vector family. Further analysis of crystal defects using a fully automated dislocation extraction algorithm (DXA) illuminated formation and migration of twin boundaries on the (110) and (111) orientation but not on the (010) orientation and most importantly after retraction all the dislocations disappeared on the (110) orientation suggesting twinning to dominate dislocation nucleation in driving plasticity in tantalum. A significant finding was that the maximum shear stress (critical Tresca stress) in the deformation zone exceeded the theoretical shear strength of Ta (Shear modulus/2π~10.03 GPa) on the (010) orientation but was lower than it on the (110) and the (111) orientations. In light of this, the conventional lore of assuming the maximum shear stress being 0.465 times the mean contact pressure was found to break down at atomic scale.

  17. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jason A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, Δλ(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, Hc2(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature Δλ(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was fitted with a power-law function Δλ(T) = ATn. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s ± scenario for the whole doping range.

  18. Surface-Charge Anisotropy of Scheelite Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiyong; Hu, Yuehua; Sun, Wei; Drelich, Jaroslaw W

    2016-06-28

    Atomic force microscopy was employed to measure the colloidal interactions between silicon nitride cantilever tips and scheelite crystal surfaces in 1 mM KCl solutions of varying pH. By fitting the Derjguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theoretical model to the recorded force-distance curves, the surface-charge density and surface-potential values were calculated for three crystallographic surfaces including {112}, {101}, and {001}. The calculated surface-potential values were negative in both acidic and basic solutions and varied among crystallographic surfaces. The determined surface-potential values were within zeta-potential values reported in the literature for powdered scheelite minerals. The surface {101} was the most negatively charged surface, followed by {112} and {001}. The surface potential for {001} was only slightly affected by pH, whereas the surface potential for both {112} and {101} increased with increasing pH. Anisotropy in surface-charge density was analyzed in relation to the surface density of active oxygen atoms, that is, the density of oxygen atoms with one or two broken bond(s) within tungstate ions located in the topmost surface layer. On a surface with a higher surface density of active oxygen atoms, a larger number of OH(-) are expected to adsorb through hydrogen bonding, leading to a more negatively charged surface. PMID:27269369

  19. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Narges; Germaschewski, Kai; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron-free energy so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  20. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Narges; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here, we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron free energy, so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  1. Tuning Exchange Anisotropy of Exchange-Biased System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan; HU Jing-Guo; R.L.Stamps

    2008-01-01

    Exchange anisotropy in FM/AFM bilayers has given a lot of static magnetization properties such as enhanced coercivity and magnetization loop shifts.These phenomena are primarily from the effective anisotropies intro-duced into a ferromagnet by exchange coupling with a strongly anisotropic antiferromagnet.These effective anisotropies can also be used to explain the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.In this article,the dynamic con-sequences such as exchange-induced susceptibility,exchange-induced permeability,and the corresponding domain wall characteristics in the exchange-biased structures of ferromagnet/antiferromagnetl/antiferromagnet2 are studied.The results show that the second antiferromagnetic layer can largely affect the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.Especially in the ease of critical temperature,the effects become more obvious.Practically,the exchange anisotropy of biased bilayer system can be tuned by exchange coupling with the second antiferromagnetic layer.

  2. Axisymmetric equilibria with pressure anisotropy and plasma flow

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelias, Achilleas

    2016-01-01

    In this Master thesis we investigate the influence of pressure anisotropy and incompressible flow of arbitrary direction on the equilibrium properties of magnetically confined, axisymmetric toroidal plasmas. The main novel contribution is the derivation of a pertinent generalised Grad-Shafranov equation. This equation includes six free surface functions and recovers known Grad-Shafranov-like equations in the literature as well as the usual static, isotropic one. The form of the generalised equation indicates that pressure anisotropy and flow act additively on equilibrium. In addition, two sets of analytical solutions, an extended Solovev one with a plasma reaching the separatrix and an extended Hernegger-Maschke one for a plasma surrounded by a fixed boundary possessing an X-point, are constructed, particularly in relevance to the ITER and NSTX tokamaks. Furthermore, the impacts both of pressure anisotropy, through an anisotropy function assumed to be uniform on the magnetic surfaces, and plasma flow, via the...

  3. Issues on generating primordial anisotropies at the end of inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit the idea of generating primordial anisotropies at the end of inflation in models of inflation with gauge fields. To be specific we consider the charged hybrid inflation model where the waterfall field is charged under a U(1) gauge field so the surface of end of inflation is controlled both by inflaton and the gauge fields. Using δN formalism properly we find that the anisotropies generated at the end of inflation from the gauge field fluctuations are exponentially suppressed on cosmological scales. This is because the gauge field evolves exponentially during inflation while in order to generate appreciable anisotropies at the end of inflation the spectator gauge field has to be frozen. We argue that this is a generic feature, that is, one can not generate observable anisotropies at the end of inflation within an FRW background

  4. Microstructure, Slip Systems and Yield Stress Anisotropy in Plastic Deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Grethe; You, Ze Sheng; Lu, Lei

    The highly anisotropic microstructures in nanotwinned copper produced by electrodeposition provide an excellent opportunity to evaluate models for microstructurally induced mechanical anisotropy. A crystal plasticity model originally developed for the integration of deformation induced dislocation...

  5. Polarimetric investigation of materials with both linear and circular anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naydenova, I.; Nikolova, L.; Todorov, T.;

    1997-01-01

    We investigate light propagation through materials with both linear and circular anisotropy and find the relation of the amplitude and polarization transfer functions to the four anisotropic characteristics: linear circular birefringence, and linear and circular dichroism. We determine these four...

  6. A solution to the cosmic ray anisotropy problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, P.; Funk, S.

    2015-10-01

    Observations of the cosmic ray (CR) anisotropy are widely advertised as a means of finding nearby sources. This idea has recently gained currency after the discovery of a rise in the positron fraction and is the goal of current experimental efforts, e.g., with AMS-02 on the International Space Station. Yet, even the anisotropy observed for hadronic CRs is not understood, in the sense that isotropic diffusion models overpredict the dipole anisotropy in the TeV-PeV range by almost two orders of magnitude. Here, we consider two additional effects normally not considered in isotropic diffusion models: anisotropic diffusion due to the presence of a background magnetic field and intermittency effects of the turbulent magnetic fields. We numerically explore these effect by tracking test-particles through individual realisations of the turbulent field. We conclude that a large misalignment between the CR gradient and the background field can explain the observed low level of anisotropy.

  7. Axisymmetric equilibria with pressure anisotropy and plasma flow

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelias, A

    2016-01-01

    A generalised Grad-Shafranov equation that governs the equilibrium of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma with anisotropic pressure and incompressible flow of arbitrary direction is derived. This equation includes six free surface functions and recovers known Grad-Shafranov-like equations in the literature as well as the usual static, isotropic one. The form of the generalised equation indicates that pressure anisotropy and flow act additively on equilibrium. In addition, two sets of analytical solutions, an extended Solovev one with a plasma reaching the separatrix and an extended Hernegger-Maschke one for a plasma surrounded by a fixed boundary possessing an X-point, are constructed, particularly in relevance to the ITER and NSTX tokamaks. Furthermore, the impacts both of pressure anisotropy and plasma flow on these equilibria are examined. It turns out that depending on the maximum value and the shape of an anisotropy function, the anisotropy can act either paramagnetically or diamagnetically. Also, in most of...

  8. Electric Field Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in a Ferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, S. J.

    2010-02-24

    We report the first observation of a transient all electric field induced magnetic anisotropy in a thin film metallic ferromagnet. We generate the anisotropy with a strong (-10{sup 9} V/m) and short (70 fs) {rvec E}-field pulse. This field is large enough to distort the valence charge distribution in the metal, yet its duration is too brief to change the atomic positions. This pure electronic structure alteration of the sample generates a new type of transient anisotropy axis and strongly influences the magnetization dynamics. The successful creation of such an anisotropy opens the possibility for all {rvec E}-field induced magnetization reversal in thin metallic films - a greatly desired yet unachieved process.

  9. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Santo-Lima, R; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Lazarian, A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic MHD turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the isotropic (standard) one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are able to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropy can also drive kinetic instabilities which grow faster near the ions kinetic scales. Observations from the solar wind suggest that these micro- instabilities scatter the ions, thus relaxing the anisotropy. This work aims to compare this relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the scattering rate provided by...

  10. Dark matter electron anisotropy. A universal upper limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borriello, Enrico [Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche; INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Cuoco, Alessandro [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    Indirect searches of particle Dark Matter (DM) with high energy Cosmic Rays (CR) are affected by large uncertainties, coming both from the DM side, and from poor understanding of the astrophysical backgrounds. We show that, on the contrary, the DM intrinsic degree of anisotropy in the arrival directions of high energy CR electrons and positrons does not suffer from these unknowns. Furthermore, if contributions from possible local sources are neglected, the intrinsic DM anisotropy sets the maximum degree of total anisotropy. As a consequence, if some anisotropy larger than the DM upper bound is detected, its origin could not be ascribed to DM, and would constitute an unambiguous evidence for the presence of astrophysical local discrete sources of high energy electrons and positrons. The Fermi-LAT will be able to probe such scenarios in the next years. (orig.)

  11. Primordial Statistical Anisotropies: The Effective Field Theory Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the effective field theory of primordial statistical anisotropies generated during anisotropic inflation involving a background $U(1)$ gauge field. Besides the usual Goldstone boson associated with the breaking of time diffeomorphism we have two additional Goldstone bosons associated with the breaking of spatial diffeomorphisms. We further identify these two new Goldstone bosons with the expected two transverse degrees of the $U(1)$ gauge field fluctuations. Upon defining the appropriate unitary gauge, we present the most general quadratic action which respects the remnant symmetry in the unitary gauge. The interactions between various Goldstone bosons leads to statistical anisotropy in curvature perturbation power spectrum. Calculating the general results for power spectrum anisotropy, we recover the previously known results in specific models of anisotropic inflation. In addition, we present novel results for statistical anisotropy in models with non-trivial sound speed for inflaton ...

  12. ORIGIN OF COBALT ANISOTROPY IN RARE EARTH-COBALT INTERMETALLICS

    OpenAIRE

    Ballou, Rafik; Lemaire, R.

    1988-01-01

    The strong cobalt anisotropies in rare earth-cobalt intermetallics are shown to arise from orbitally selective 3d band energy dispersion due to either chain like or layered like cobalt staking rather than from usual crystal field effect.

  13. Anisotropy signature in extended images from reverse-time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sava, Paul

    2012-11-04

    Reverse-time migration can accurately image complex geologic structures in anisotropic media. Extended images at selected locations in the earth, i.e. at common-image-point gathers (CIPs), carry enough information to characterize the angle-dependent illumination and to provide measurements for migration velocity analysis. Furthermore, inaccurate anisotropy leaves a distinctive signature in CIPs, which can be used to evaluate anisotropy through techniques similar to the ones used in conventional wavefield tomography.

  14. Effective anisotropy gradient in pressure graded [Co/Pd] multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, B. J., E-mail: bkirby@nist.gov; Maranville, B. B. [Center for Neutron Research, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Greene, P. K.; Liu, Kai [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Davies, J. E. [Advanced Technology Group, NVE Corporation, Eden Prarie, Minneapolis 55344 (United States)

    2015-02-14

    We have used polarized neutron reflectometry to show that controlled variation of growth pressure during deposition of Co/Pd multilayers can be used to achieve a significant vertical gradient in the effective anisotropy. This gradient is strongly dependent on deposition order (low to high pressure or vice versa), and is accompanied by a corresponding gradient in saturation magnetization. These results demonstrate pressure-grading as an attractively simple technique for tailoring the anisotropy profile of magnetic media.

  15. Anisotropies in the HI gas distribution toward 3C 196

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The local Galactic Hi gas was found to contain cold neutral medium (CNM) filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission. These filaments appear to be dominated by the magnetic field and in this case turbulence is expected to show distinct anisotropies. Aims: We use the Galactic Effelsberg-Bonn Hi Survey (EBHIS) to derive 2D turbulence spectra for the Hi distribution in direction to 3C 196 and two more comparison fields. Methods: Prior to Fourier transform we apply a rotational symmetric 50% Tukey window to apodize the data. We derive average as well as position angle dependent power spectra. Anisotropies in the power distribution are defined as the ratio of the spectral power in orthogonal directions. Results: We find strong anisotropies. For a narrow range in position angle, in direction perpendicular to the filaments and the magnetic field, the spectral power is on average more than an order of magnitude larger than parallel. In the most extreme case the anisotropy reaches locally a factor of 130. Anisotropies increase on average with spatial frequency as predicted by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995, ApJ, 438, 763), at the same time the Kolmogorov spectral index remains almost unchanged. The strongest anisotropies are observable for a narrow range in velocity and decay with a power law index close to -8/3, almost identical to the average isotropic spectral index of -2.9 Hi filaments, associated with linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations in direction to 3C 196, show turbulence spectra with marked anisotropies. Decaying anisotropies appear to indicate that we witness an ongoing shock passing the Hi and affecting the observed Faraday depth.

  16. Magnetic anisotropies of late transition metal atomic clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Seivane, Lucas; Ferrer, Jaime

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the impact of the magnetic anisotropy on the geometric structure and magnetic ordering of small atomic clusters of palladium, iridium, platinum and gold, using Density Functional Theory. Our results highlight the absolute need to include self-consistently the spin orbit interaction in any simulation of the magnetic properties of small atomic clusters, and a complete lack of universality in the magnetic anisotropy of small-sized atomic clusters.

  17. In-plane anisotropy of 1545 aluminum alloy sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yong-yi; YIN Zhi-min; YANG Jin; DU Yu-xuan

    2005-01-01

    The microstructures and the tensile mechanical properties in the rolling plane of 1545 aluminum alloy sheet at different orientations with respect to the rolling direction were studied by means of tensile test,X-ray diffractometer(XRD),optical microscope and transmission electron microscope.The in-plane anisotropy of tensile mechanical properties was calculated and the inverse pole figures of the rolling plane,transversal section and longitudinal section were obtained by Harris method.The results show that the 1545 Al alloy sheet has remarkable in-plane anisotropy of mechanical properties and the main texture component is{110}texture.On the basis of the model that regards the sheet containing only{110}texture as a monocrystal,the relationship of in-plane anisotropy and the anisotropy of crystallography was analyzed.The study shows that it is the combined effects of the anisotropy of crystallography and microstructures that cause the in-plane anisotropy of mechanical properties,but the main cause is the crystallographic texture.

  18. Anisotropy of eddy variability in the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, K. D.; Spence, P.; Waterman, S.; Sommer, J. Le; Molines, J.-M.; Lilly, J. M.; England, M. H.

    2015-11-01

    The anisotropy of eddy variability in the global ocean is examined in geostrophic surface velocities derived from satellite observations and in the horizontal velocities of a 1/12° global ocean model. Eddy anisotropy is of oceanographic interest as it is through anisotropic velocity fluctuations that the eddy and mean-flow fields interact dynamically. This study is timely because improved observational estimates of eddy anisotropy will soon be available with Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) altimetry data. We find there to be good agreement between the characteristics and distributions of eddy anisotropy from the present satellite observations and model ocean surface. In the model, eddy anisotropy is found to have significant vertical structure and is largest close to the ocean bottom, where the anisotropy aligns with the underlying isobaths. The highly anisotropic bottom signal is almost entirely contained in the barotropic variability. Upper-ocean variability is predominantly baroclinic and the alignment is less sensitive to the underlying bathymetry. These findings offer guidance for introducing a parameterization of eddy feedbacks, based on the eddy kinetic energy and underlying bathymetry, to operate on the barotropic flow and better account for the effects of barotropic Reynolds stresses unresolved in coarse-resolution ocean models.

  19. Slow shock formation and temperature anisotropy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimori, K.; Hoshino, M.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a two-dimensional simulation by using an electromagnetic hybrid code to study the formation of slow-mode shocks in collisionless magnetic reconnection in low beta plasmas, and we argue that one of important agents of the formation of slow shocks is the ion temperature anisotropy enhanced at the shock downstream region. As magnetic reconnection develops, it is known that the parallel temperature along the magnetic field becomes large in association with the anisotropic PSBL ion beams, and this temperature anisotropy has a tendency to suppress the formation of slow shock. Although preceding studies on magnetic reconnection with kinetic codes have shown such ion temperature anisotropy along the reconnection layer, the direct relation between formation of slow shocks and the ion temperature anisotropy has not been investigated. Based on our simulation result, we found that the slow shock formation is suppressed due to the large temperature anisotropy near the X-type region, but the downstream ion temperature anisotropy relaxes with increasing the distance from the magnetic neutral point. As a result, two pairs of current structures, which are the strong evidence of dissipation of magnetic field in slow shocks, are formed at the distance |x| > 115 λ i from the neutral point.

  20. Magnetic anisotropies of (Ga,Mn)As films and nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Frank

    2011-02-02

    In this work the magnetic anisotropies of the diluted magnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As were investigated experimentally. (Ga,Mn)As films show a superposition of various magnetic anisotropies which depend sensitively on various parameters such as temperature, carrier concentration or lattice strain. However, the anisotropies of lithographically prepared (Ga,Mn)As elements differ significantly from an unpatterned (Ga,Mn)As film. In stripe-shaped structures this behaviour is caused by anisotropic relaxation of the compressive lattice strain. In order to determine the magnetic anisotropies of individual (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures a combination of ferromagnetic resonance and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy was employed in this thesis. In addition, local changes of the magnetic anisotropy in circular and rectangular structures were visualized by making use of spatially resolved measurements. Finally, also the influence of the laterally inhomogeneous magnetic anisotropies on the static magnetic properties, such as coercive fields, was investigated employing spatially resolved static MOKE measurements on individual (Ga,Mn)As elements. (orig.)

  1. In-Plane Optical Anisotropy of Layered Gallium Telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengxi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Ling, Xi; Guo, Huaihong; Wang, Ziqiang; Watson, Garrett; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Kong, Jing; Li, Ju; Yang, Teng; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2016-09-27

    Layered gallium telluride (GaTe) has attracted much attention recently, due to its extremely high photoresponsivity, short response time, and promising thermoelectric performance. Different from most commonly studied two-dimensional (2D) materials, GaTe has in-plane anisotropy and a low symmetry with the C2h(3) space group. Investigating the in-plane optical anisotropy, including the electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions of GaTe is essential in realizing its applications in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. In this work, the anisotropic light-matter interactions in the low-symmetry material GaTe are studied using anisotropic optical extinction and Raman spectroscopies as probes. Our polarized optical extinction spectroscopy reveals the weak anisotropy in optical extinction spectra for visible light of multilayer GaTe. Polarized Raman spectroscopy proves to be sensitive to the crystalline orientation of GaTe, and shows the intricate dependences of Raman anisotropy on flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. Such intricate dependences can be explained by theoretical analyses employing first-principles calculations and group theory. These studies are a crucial step toward the applications of GaTe especially in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, and provide a general methodology for the study of the anisotropy of light-matter interactions in 2D layered materials with in-plane anisotropy.

  2. Characterization of optical anisotropy in quantum wells under compressive anisotropic in-plane strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, Mark L.; Walters, Matthew; Diaz-Barriga, James; Rabinovich, W. S.

    2003-10-01

    Anisotropic in-plane strain in quantum wells leads to an optical polarization anisotropy that can be exploited for device applications. We have determined that for many anisotropic compressive strain cases, the dependence of the optical anisotropy is linear in the strain anisotropy. This result holds for a variety of well and barrier materials and widths and for various overall strain conditions. Further, the polarization anisotropy per strain anisotropy varies as the reciprocal of the energy separation of the relevant hole sub-bands. Hence, a general result for the polarization anisotropy per strain anisotropy is avialable for cases of compressive anisotropic in-plane strain.

  3. Characterization of optical anisotropy in quantum wells under compressive anisotropic in-plane strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermann, Mark L [Physics Department, 566 Brownson Rd., U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Walters, Matthew [Physics Department, 566 Brownson Rd., U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Diaz-Barriga, James [Physics Department, 566 Brownson Rd., U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Rabinovich, W S [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 5652, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375-5320 (United States)

    2003-10-21

    Anisotropic in-plane strain in quantum wells leads to an optical polarization anisotropy that can be exploited for device applications. We have determined that for many anisotropic compressive strain cases, the dependence of the optical anisotropy is linear in the strain anisotropy. This result holds for a variety of well and barrier materials and widths and for various overall strain conditions. Further, the polarization anisotropy per strain anisotropy varies as the reciprocal of the energy separation of the relevant hole sub-bands. Hence, a general result for the polarization anisotropy per strain anisotropy is available for cases of compressive anisotropic in-plane strain.

  4. Tensors for physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the science of tensors in a didactic way. The various types and ranks of tensors and the physical basis is presented. Cartesian Tensors are needed for the description of directional phenomena in many branches of physics and for the characterization the anisotropy of material properties. The first sections of the book provide an introduction to the vector and tensor algebra and analysis, with applications to physics,  at undergraduate level. Second rank tensors, in particular their symmetries, are discussed in detail. Differentiation and integration of fields, including generalizations of the Stokes law and the Gauss theorem, are treated. The physics relevant for the applications in mechanics, quantum mechanics, electrodynamics and hydrodynamics is presented. The second part of the book is devoted to  tensors of any rank, at graduate level.  Special topics are irreducible, i.e. symmetric traceless tensors, isotropic tensors, multipole potential tensors, spin tensors, integration and spin-...

  5. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  6. Equatorial anisotropy of the Earth's inner-inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X.; Wang, T.; Xia, H.

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropy of Earth's inner core is a key to understand its evolution and the generation of the Earth's magnetic field. All the previous inner core anisotropy models have assumed a cylindrical anisotropy with the symmetry axis parallel (or nearly parallel) to the Earth's spin axis. However, we have recently found that the fast axis in the inner part of the inner core is close to the equator from inner-core waves extracted from earthquake coda. We obtained inner core phases, PKIIKP2 and PKIKP2 (round-trip phases between the station and its antipode that passes straight through the center of the Earth and that is reflected from the inner core boundary, respectively), from stackings of autocorrelations of the coda of large earthquakes (10,000~40,000 s after Mw>=7.0 earthquakes) at seismic station clusters around the world. We observed large variation of up to 10 s along equatorial paths in the differential travel times PKIIKP2 - PKIKP2, which are sensitive to inner-core structure. The observations can be explained by a cylindrical anisotropy in the inner inner core (IIC) (with a radius of slightly less than half the inner core radius) that has a fast axis aligned near the equator and a cylindrical anisotropy in the outer inner core (OIC) that has a fast axis along the north-south direction. We have obtained more observations using the combination of autocorrelations and cross-correlations at low-latitude station arrays. The results further confirm that the IIC has an equatorial anisotropy and a pattern different from the OIC. The equatorial fast axis of the IIC is near the Central America and the Southeast Asia. The drastic change in the fast axis and the form of anisotropy from the IIC to the OIC may suggest a phase change of the iron or a major shift in the crystallization and deformation during the formation and growth of the inner core.

  7. Tunable ambipolar polarization-sensitive photodetectors based on high anisotropy ReSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Enze; Wang, Peng; Li, Zhe; Huang, Ce; Zhang, Kaitai; Lu, Shiheng; Wang, Weiyi; Liu, Shanshan; Fang, Hehai; Zhou, Xiaohao; Hu, Weida; Zhou, Peng; Xiu, Faxian

    Atomically-thin 2D layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been extensively studied recently because of their intriguing physical properties and promising applications in nanoelectronic devices. Among them, ReSe2is a material that exhibits a stable distorted 1T phase and strong in-plane anisotropy. Here, the anisotropic nature of ReSe2 is revealed by Raman scattering under linearly polarized excitations. Utilizing high-quality ReSe2 nanosheets, we are able to build top-gate ReSe2 field-effect transistors which show an excellent on/off current ratio exceeding 107 and a well-developed current saturation at room temperature. Importantly, the successful synthesis of ReSe2 directly onto hexagonal boron nitride substrates has effectively improved the electron motility over 100 times and the hole mobility over 50 times at low temperatures. Remarkably, the ReSe2based photodetectors show a polarization-sensitive photo-responsivity due to the intrinsic linear dichroism originated from high in-plane optical anisotropy. With a back gate the linear dichroism photodetection can be unambiguously tuned both in the electron and hole regime. The appealing physical properties of ReSe2 demonstrated in this study identify it as an emerging candidate for electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  8. Scaling of coercivity in a 3d random anisotropy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The random-anisotropy Heisenberg model is numerically studied on lattices containing over ten million spins. The study is focused on hysteresis and metastability due to topological defects, and is relevant to magnetic properties of amorphous and sintered magnets. We are interested in the limit when ferromagnetic correlations extend beyond the size of the grain inside which the magnetic anisotropy axes are correlated. In that limit the coercive field computed numerically roughly scales as the fourth power of the random anisotropy strength and as the sixth power of the grain size. Theoretical arguments are presented that provide an explanation of numerical results. Our findings should be helpful for designing amorphous and nanosintered materials with desired magnetic properties. - Highlights: • We study the random-anisotropy model on lattices containing up to ten million spins. • Irreversible behavior due to topological defects (hedgehogs) is elucidated. • Hysteresis loop area scales as the fourth power of the random anisotropy strength. • In nanosintered magnets the coercivity scales as the six power of the grain size

  9. Axisymmetric equilibria with pressure anisotropy and plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelias, A.; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.

    2016-04-01

    A generalised Grad-Shafranov equation that governs the equilibrium of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma with anisotropic pressure and incompressible flow of arbitrary direction is derived. This equation includes six free surface functions and recovers known Grad-Shafranov-like equations in the literature as well as the usual static, isotropic one. The form of the generalised equation indicates that pressure anisotropy and flow act additively on equilibrium. In addition, two sets of analytical solutions, an extended Solovev one with a plasma reaching the separatrix and an extended Hernegger-Maschke one for a plasma surrounded by a fixed boundary possessing an X-point, are constructed, particularly in relevance to the ITER and NSTX tokamaks. Furthermore, the impacts both of pressure anisotropy and plasma flow on these equilibria are examined. It turns out that depending on the maximum value and the shape of an anisotropy function, the anisotropy can act either paramagnetically or diamagnetically. Also, in most of the cases considered both the anisotropy and the flow have stronger effects on NSTX equilibria than on ITER ones.

  10. Phenomenological description of anisotropy effects in some ferromagnetic superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shopova, Diana V., E-mail: sho@issp.bas.bg [TCCM Research Group, Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorov, Michail D. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-07-03

    We study phenomenologically the role of anisotropy in ferromagnetic superconductors UGe{sub 2}, URhGe, and UCoGe for the description of their phase diagrams. We use the Ginzburg–Landau free energy in its uniform form as we will consider only spatially independent solutions. This is an expansion of previously derived results where the effect of Cooper-pair and crystal anisotropies is not taken into account. The three compounds are separately discussed with the special stress on UGe{sub 2}. The main effect comes from the strong uniaxial anisotropy of magnetization while the anisotropy of Cooper pairs and crystal anisotropy only slightly change the phase diagram in the vicinity of Curie temperature. The limitations of this approach are also discussed. - Highlights: • Anisotropic Landau energy for description of ferromagnetic superconductors is proposed. • Meissner phases are described with their existence and stability conditions. • The application of the model to UGe{sub 2} is discussed. • The limitations to apply the model for description of experimental data are explained.

  11. Anisotropies in the HI gas distribution toward 3C196

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, P M W

    2016-01-01

    The local Galactic HI gas was found to contain cold neutral medium (CNM) filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission. These filaments appear to be dominated by the magnetic field and in this case turbulence is expected to show distinct anisotropies. We use the Galactic Effelsberg--Bonn HI Survey (EBHIS) to derive 2D turbulence spectra for the HI distribution in direction to 3C196 and two more comparison fields. Prior to Fourier transform we apply a rotational symmetric 50% Tukey window to apodize the data. We derive average as well as position angle dependent power spectra. Anisotropies in the power distribution are defined as the ratio of the spectral power in orthogonal directions. We find strong anisotropies. For a narrow range in position angle, in direction perpendicular to the filaments and the magnetic field, the spectral power is on average more than an order of magnitude larger than parallel. In the most extreme case the anisotropy reaches locally a factor of 130. Anisotropies increase on...

  12. Anisotropy vs chemical composition at ultra-high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes and discusses a test of the chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays that relies on the anisotropy patterns measured as a function of energy. In particular, we show that if one records an anisotropy signal produced by heavy nuclei of charge Z above an energy E_{thr}, one should record an even stronger (possibly much stronger) anisotropy at energies >E_{thr}/Z due to the proton component that is expected to be associated with the sources of the heavy nuclei. This conclusion remains robust with respect to the parameters characterizing the sources and it does not depend at all on the modelling of astrophysical magnetic fields. As a concrete example, we apply this test to the most recent data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. Assuming that the anisotropy reported above 55EeV is not a statistical accident, and that no significant anisotropy has been observed at energies 10^{45}Z^{-2}erg/s. Using this bound in conjunction with the above conclusions, we argue that the current PAO data...

  13. Anisotropy of magnetoviscous effect in structure-forming ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumari, Aparna; Ilg, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    The magnetoviscous effect, change in viscosity with change in magnetic field strength, and the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect, change in viscosity with orientation of magnetic field, have been a focus of interest for four decades. A satisfactory understanding of the microscopic origin of anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect in magnetic fluids is still a matter of debate and a field of intense research. Here, we present an extensive simulation study to understand the relation between the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect and the underlying change in microstructures of ferrofluids. Our results indicate that field-induced chainlike structures respond very differently depending on their orientation relative to the direction of an externally applied shear flow, which leads to a pronounced anisotropy of viscosity. In this work, we focus on three exemplary values of dipolar interaction strengths which correspond to weak, intermediate, and strong interactions between dipolar colloidal particles. We compare our simulation results with an experimental study on cobalt-based ferrofluids as well as with an existing theoretical model called the chain model. A nonmonotonic behavior in the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect is observed with increasing dipolar interaction strength and is explained in terms of microstructure formation.

  14. Optical activity of chitosan films with induced anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegel, Natalia O.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.

    2016-04-01

    The optical anisotropy and optical activity of salt and basic chitosan films, both initial and modified in formic acid vapor were studied. The modification of such films was found to be accompanied by induced time-stable optical anisotropy, by varying the values of specific optical rotation [α] and an inversion of the sign of [α]. The angular dependences (indicatrices) of the specific optical rotation of films on the orientation angle of the sample relative to the direction of the polarization vector of the incident light beam in a plane perpendicular to the beam were obtained. The indicatrices of the initial chitosan films have an almost symmetrical character while those of the films modified in formic acid vapor are irregular. It is concluded of the formation of a vitrified cholesteric mesophase in the chitosan films with induced optical anisotropy.

  15. Violating the General Density-Slope Anisotropy Inequality

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Jeremy A

    2014-01-01

    We examine the robustness of the well-known empirical relationship between the density slope and the velocity anisotropy of collisionless systems. This relation, known as the Global Density-Slope Anisotropy Inequality (GDSAI) (Ciotti & Morganti, 2010), posits that no collisionless system with a globally positive distribution function exists where the anisotropy exceeds half of the power-law of the density slope. We significantly extend previous indications that the GDSAI is not a universal rule by identifying a class of models where violation occurs. These models possess a globally positive DF, have an isotropic central core, but are not guaranteed to be stable. Our analysis suggests that stability criteria provide a stronger basis for determining if a DF represents an equilibrium solution for a collisionless system.

  16. The investigations of anisotropy in orientations of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Pajowska, Paulina; Flin, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    In 1994 Parnovsky, Karachentsev and Karachentseva suggested a modified method for investigation of the orientations of galaxies. Using this method they analyzed galaxies from the UGC and ESO catalogues, as well as from their's own catalogue inclusive of flat, edge-on galaxies. They found statistically significant anisotropy in the galaxies orientations'. In 1995 Flin suggested that this anisotropy has to be specific to LOcal Supercluster (LSC) In the present paper, using the method proposed by Parnovsky, Karachentsev and Karachentseva in 1994, we analyzed orientation of galaxies in the sample of galaxies belonging to LSC founding only a weak anisotropy. The relation of this method to Hawley and Peebles (1975) method of the investigation of the orientation of galaxies was discussed as well.

  17. Dynamics of low anisotropy morphologies in directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, B; Bodenschatz, E

    2002-11-01

    We report experimental results on quasi-two-dimensional diffusion limited growth in directionally solidified succinonitrile with small amounts of poly(ethylene oxide), acetone, or camphor as a solute. Seaweed growth, or dense branching morphology, is selected by growing grains close to the [111] plane, where the in-plane surface tension is nearly isotropic. The observed growth morphologies are very sensitive to small anisotropies in surface tension caused by misorientations from the [111] plane. Different seaweed morphologies are found, including the degenerate, the stabilized, and the strongly tilted seaweeds. The degenerate seaweeds show a limited fractal scaling range and, with increased undercooling, suggests a transition from "fractal" to "compact" seaweed. Strongly tilted seaweeds demonstrate a significant twofold anisotropy. In addition, seaweed-dendrite transitions are observed in low anisotropy growth.

  18. Finite-size anisotropy in statistically uniform porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Koza, Zbigniew; Khalili, Arzhang

    2009-01-01

    Anisotropy of the permeability tensor in statistically uniform porous media of sizes used in typical computer simulations is studied. Although such systems are assumed to be isotropic by default, we show that de facto their anisotropic permeability can give rise to significant changes of transport parameters such as permeability and tortuosity. The main parameter controlling the anisotropy is $a/L$, being the ratio of the obstacle to system size. Distribution of the angle $\\alpha$ between the external force and the volumetric fluid stream is found to be approximately normal, and the standard deviation of $\\alpha$ is found to decay with the system size as $(a/L)^{d/2}$, where $d$ is the space dimensionality. These properties can be used to estimate both anisotropy-related statistical errors in large-scale simulations and the size of the representative elementary volume.

  19. Angular anisotropy of the fusion-fission and quasifission fragments

    CERN Document Server

    Nasirov, A K; Utamuratov, R K; Fazio, G; Giardina, G; Hanappe, F; Mandaglio, G; Manganaro, M; Scheid, W

    2007-01-01

    The anisotropy in the angular distribution of the fusion-fission and quasifission fragments for the $^{16}$O+$^{238}$U, $^{19}$F+$^{208}$Pb and $^{32}$S+$^{208}$Pb reactions is studied by analyzing the angular momentum distributions of the dinuclear system and compound nucleus which are formed after capture and complete fusion, respectively. The orientation angles of axial symmetry axes of colliding nuclei to the beam direction are taken into account for the calculation of the variance of the projection of the total spin onto the fission axis. It is shown that the deviation of the experimental angular anisotropy from the statistical model picture is connected with the contribution of the quasifission fragments which is dominant in the $^{32}$S+$^{208}$Pb reaction. Enhancement of anisotropy at low energies in the $^{16}$O+$^{238}$U reaction is connected with quasifission of the dinuclear system having low temperature and effective moment of inertia.

  20. Interplay between anisotropy and spatial dispersion in metamaterial waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Koshelev, Kirill L

    2016-01-01

    We analyze spectrum of waveguide modes of an arbitrary uniaxial anisotropic metamaterial slab with non-local electromagnetic response whose permittivity tensor could be described within Drude approximation. Spatial dispersion was introduced within the hydrodynamical model. Both anisotropy and spatial dispersion were considered as perturbations. This helps to distinguish their effect on the spectrum of the slab and to analyze lifting of the degeneracy of eigenmodes at plasma frequency in detail. Spatial dispersion is shown to result in break of the singularity in the den- sity of optical states in the hyperbolic regime and in suppression of negative dispersion induced by anisotropy. Mutual effect of spatial dispersion and anisotropy can bring light to a complete stop at certain frequencies.

  1. Polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission due to electron pressure anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Komarov, S; Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical plasmas are typically magnetized, with the Larmor radii of the charged particles many orders of magnitude smaller than their collisional mean free paths. The fundamental properties of such plasmas, e.g., conduction and viscosity, may depend on the instabilities driven by the anisotropy of the particle distribution functions and operating at scales comparable to the Larmor scales. We discuss a possibility that the pressure anisotropy of thermal electrons could produce polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission. In particular, we consider coherent large-scale motions in galaxy clusters to estimate the level of anisotropy driven by stretching of the magnetic-field lines by plasma flow and by heat fluxes associated with thermal gradients. Our estimate of the degree of polarization is $\\sim 0.1 \\%$ at energies $\\gtrsim kT$. While this value is too low for the forthcoming generation of X-ray polarimeters, it is potentially an important proxy for the processes taking place at extremely small scale...

  2. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, Δλ (T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, Hc2(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature Δλ (T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was fitted with a power-law function Δλ (T) = ATn. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s± scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s± gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at λ (T), in optimally - doped, SrFe2(As1-xPx)2, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (Tc ~ 25 K) and annealed (Tc ~ 35 K) single crystals of SrFe2(As1-xPx)2 were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from λ(0) = 300 ± 10 nm in as-grown samples to λ (0) = 275±10 nm. At low temperatures, λ (T) ~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe2(As1-xPx)2, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently different from

  3. Thermal conductivity anisotropy of metasedimentary and igneous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael G.; Chapman, David S.; van Wagoner, Thomas M.; Armstrong, Phillip A.

    2007-05-01

    Thermal conductivity anisotropy was determined for three sets of metasedimentary and igneous rocks from central Utah, USA. Most conductivity measurements were made in transient mode with a half-space, line source instrument oriented in two orthogonal directions on a flat face cut perpendicular to bedding. One orientation of the probe yields thermal conductivity parallel to bedding (kpar) directly, the other orientation of the probe measures a product of conductivities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from which the perpendicular conductivity (kperp) is calculated. Some direct measurements of kpar and kperp were made on oriented cylindrical discs using a conventional divided bar device in steady state mode. Anisotropy is defined as kpar/kperp. Precambrian argillites from Big Cottonwood Canyon have anisotropy values from 0.8 to 2.1 with corresponding conductivity perpendicular to bedding of 2.0 to 6.2 W m-1 K-1. Anisotropy values for Price Canyon sedimentary samples are less than 1.2 with a mean of 1.04 although thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding for the samples varied from 1.3 to 5.0 W m-1 K-1. The granitic rocks were found to be essentially isotropic with thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding having a range of 2.2 to 3.2 W m-1 K-1 and a mean of 2.68 W m-1 K-1. The results confirm the observation by Deming [1994] that anisotropy is negligible for rocks having kperp greater than 4.0 W m-1 K-1 and generally increases for low conductivity metamorphic and clay-rich rocks. There is little evidence, however, for his suggestion that thermal conductivity anisotropy of all rocks increases systematically to about 2.5 for low thermal conductivity rocks.

  4. Seismic anisotropy in granite at the Underground Research Laboratory, Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Shear-Wave Experiment at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory was probably the first controlled-source shear-wave survey in a mine environment. Taking place in conjunction with the excavation of the Mine-by test tunnel at 420 m depth, the shear-wave experiment was designed to measure the in situ anisotropy of the rockmass and to use shear waves to observe excavation effects using the greatest variety of raypath directions of any in situ shear-wave survey to date. Inversion of the shear-wave polarizations shows that the anisotropy of the in situ rockmass is consistent with hexagonal symmetry with an approximate fabric orientation of strike 023degree and dip 35degree. The in situ anisotropy is probably due to microcracks with orientations governed by the in situ stress field and to mineral alignment within the weak gneissic layering. However, there is no unique interpretation as to the cause of the in situ anisotropy as the fabric orientation agrees approximately with both the orientation expected from extensive-dilatancy anisotropy and that of the gneissic layering. Eight raypaths with shear waves propagating wholly or almost wholly through granodiorite, rather than granite, do not show the expected shear-wave splitting and indicate a lower in situ anisotropy, which may be due to the finer grain size and/or the absence of gneissic layering within the granodiorite. These results suggest that shear waves may be used to determine crack and mineral orientations and for remote monitoring of a rockmass. This has potential applications in mining and waste monitoring

  5. FIRE HOSE INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, L.; Schwartz, S. J. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hellinger, P. [Astronomical Institute, CAS, Prague (Czech Republic); Landi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)

    2015-10-10

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma, including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, can also be triggered when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies, both of them can drive the instability, and we observe the generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in the direction of the drift associated with the unstable species. The generated waves scatter particles and reduce their temperature anisotropy to a marginally stable state, and, moreover, they significantly reduce the relative drift between the two ion populations. The coexistence of modes excited by both species leads to saturation of the plasma in distinct regions of the beta/anisotropy parameter space for protons and alpha particles, in good agreement with in situ solar wind observations. Our results confirm that fire hose instabilities are likely at work in the solar wind and limit the anisotropy of different ion species in the plasma.

  6. Three dimensional solar anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays near the recent solar minimum 23/24

    CERN Document Server

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) anisotropy has been studied for 2006- 2012. The GCR anisotropy, both in the ecliptic plane and in polar direction, were obtained based on the neutron monitors (NMs) and Nagoya muon telescopes (MT) data. We analyze two dimensional (2D) GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and north-south anisotropy normal to the ecliptic plane. We reveal quasi-periodicities - the annual and 27-days waves in the GCR anisotropy in 2006-2012. We investigate the relationship of the 27-day variation of the GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and in the polar direction with the parameters of solar activity and solar wind.

  7. Anisotropy without tensors: a novel approach using geometric algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Sérgio A; Ribeiro, Marco A; Paiva, Carlos R

    2007-11-12

    The most widespread approach to anisotropic media is dyadic analysis. However, to get a geometrical picture of a dielectric tensor, one has to resort to a coordinate system for a matrix form in order to obtain, for example, the index-ellipsoid, thereby obnubilating the deeper coordinate-free meaning of anisotropy itself. To overcome these shortcomings we present a novel approach to anisotropy: using geometric algebra we introduce a direct geometrical interpretation without the intervention of any coordinate system. By applying this new approach to biaxial crystals we show the effectiveness and insight that geometric algebra can bring to the optics of anisotropic media.

  8. Electronic nematic phase transition in the presence of anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Yamase, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We study the phase diagram of electronic nematic instability in the presence of xy anisotropy. While a second order transition cannot occur in this case, mean-field theory predicts that a first order transition occurs near van Hove filling and its phase boundary forms a wing structure, which we term a Griffiths wing, referring to his original work of He3-He4 mixtures. When crossing the wing, the anisotropy of the electronic system exhibits a discontinuous change, leading to a meta-nematic tra...

  9. Nanopatterned CoPt alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, D.; Bermúdez-Ureña, E.; Schmidt, O. G.; Liscio, F.; Maret, M.; Brombacher, C.; Schulze, S.; Hietschold, M.; Albrecht, M.

    2008-10-01

    CoPt alloy films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were grown on SiO2 nanoparticle arrays with particle sizes as small as 10 nm. In order to induce perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the CoPt film, a MgO seed layer was sputter deposited. Despite the fact that neighboring CoPt film caps are interconnected, individual caps appear as single domain and for most of them their magnetization orientation can be reversed individually. This behavior might be caused by domain wall nucleation and pinning preferentially at the rim of each cap. Thus, arrays of magnetic caps with defined pinning sites can be considered as a percolated perpendicular medium.

  10. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy in CoFeB/Pd Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    COEY, JOHN; FOWLEY, CIARAN; OGUZ, KAAN; Rode, Karsten; Kurt, Huseyin

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is observed in ultrathin (0.6 nm) amorphous Co40Fe40B20 when sputtered on an MgO (001) buffer layer and capped with Pd. The layers are superparamagnetic with a blocking temperature of similar to 230 K, below which they show an exponential temperature dependence of coercivity. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is observed in the as-deposited state and the mechanism is different from that of CoFeB/Pt, which requires postannealing. These ultrathin l...

  11. Anisotropy of mechanical properties of zirconium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In studies of technological applications of zirconium to fuel elements of nuclear reactor, it was found that the use of plasticity equations for isotropic materials is not in agreement with experimental results, because of the strong anisotropy of zirconium. The present review describes recent progress on the knowledge of the influence of anisotropy on mechanical properties, after Douglass' review in 1971. The review was written to be selfconsistent, changing drastically the presentation of some of the referenced papers. It is also suggested some particular experiments to improve developments in this area

  12. Topographical Anisotropy and Wetting of Ground Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Bellmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and physico-chemical methods were used for a comprehensive surface characterization of different mechanically modified stainless steel surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed using high-resolution confocal microscopy, resulting in detailed information about the topographic properties. In addition, static water contact angle measurements were carried out to characterize the surface heterogeneity of the samples. The effect of morphological anisotropy on water contact angle anisotropy was investigated. The correlation between topography and wetting was studied by means of a model of wetting proposed in the present work, that allows quantifying the air volume of the interface water drop-stainless steel surface.

  13. Dielectric and magnetic anisotropy of a nematic ytterbium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sign and the magnitude of the dielectric anisotropy of an ytterbium-based paramagnetic nematic liquid crystal complex, namely, tris[1-(4-(4-propylcyclohexyl)phenyl)octane-1,3-dione]-[5,5'-di (heptadecile)-2,2'-bipyridine]ytterbium, are determined. The temperature dependence of the permittivity components of the complex is obtained in the temperature range of a nematic phase. The sign of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of this compound is experimentally determined

  14. Dielectric and magnetic anisotropy of a nematic ytterbium complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrun, L. A., E-mail: l.dobrun@spbu.ru; Sakhatskii, A. S.; Kovshik, A. P.; Ryumtsev, E. I.; Kolomiets, I. P. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Knyazev, A. A.; Galyametdinov, Yu. G. [Kazan National Research Technological University (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    The sign and the magnitude of the dielectric anisotropy of an ytterbium-based paramagnetic nematic liquid crystal complex, namely, tris[1-(4-(4-propylcyclohexyl)phenyl)octane-1,3-dione]-[5,5'-di (heptadecile)-2,2'-bipyridine]ytterbium, are determined. The temperature dependence of the permittivity components of the complex is obtained in the temperature range of a nematic phase. The sign of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of this compound is experimentally determined.

  15. Fabrication of epitaxial Fe nanodot arrays and anisotropy engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, H. M.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Arrays of Fe nanodots were fabricated from an epitaxial Fe (20 nm) film on Cu (001)/Si(001) by using laser interference lithography and chemical wet etching. The nanodots were aligned parallel to the two magnetic hard directions of the film and were arranged on rectangular lattices of different periods in order to engineer the magnetic anisotropy of the system by using the shape of array. As the separation between dots along one direction decrease from 550 nm to 150 nm, the dipole interaction effect became strong, and finally a uniaxial magnetic anisotropy were realized.

  16. Search for Large Scale Anisotropies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, R.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    The Pierre Auger Observatory studies the nature and the origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (>3\\cdot1018 eV). Completed at the end of 2008, it has been continuously operating for more than six years. Using data collected from 1 January 2004 until 31 March 2009, we search for large scale anisotropies with two complementary analyses in different energy windows. No significant anisotropies are observed, resulting in bounds on the first harmonic amplitude at the 1% level at EeV energies.

  17. Anisotropy in layered half-metallic Heusler alloy superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadani, Javad G.; Munira, Kamaram; Sivakumar, Chockalingam; Butler, William H. [Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Romero, Jonathon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Ma, Jianhua; Ghosh, Avik W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    We show that when two Heusler alloys are layered in the [001], [110], or [111] directions for various thicknesses to form a superlattice, the Slater-Pauling rule may still be satisfied and the resulting superlattice is often half-metallic with gaps comparable to or larger than those of its constituents. In addition, uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy is induced because of the differences in the electronic structure of the two Heuslers in the superlattice. Various full-full, full-half, and half-half Heusler superlattices are studied, and potential half-metallic superlattices with perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy are identified.

  18. Small-angle anisotropies in the CMBR from active sources

    CERN Document Server

    Battye, R A

    1997-01-01

    We consider the effects of photon diffusion on the small-angle microwave background anisotropies due to active source models. We find that fluctuations created just before the time of last scattering allow anisotropy to be created on scales much smaller than allowed by standard Silk damping. Using simple models for string and texture structure functions as examples, we illustrate the differences in the angular power spectrum at scales of order a few arcminutes. In particular, we find that the Doppler peak heights are modified by 10-50% and the small-angle fall-off is power law rather than exponential.

  19. Random-anisotropy Blume-Emery-Griffiths model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritan, Amos; Cieplak, Marek; Swift, Michael R.; Toigo, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    The results are described of studies of a random-anisotropy Blume-Emery-Griffiths spin-1 Ising model using mean-field theory, transfer-matrix calculations, and position-space renormalization-group calculations. The interplay between the quenched randomness of the anisotropy and the annealed disorder introduced by the spin-1 model leads to a rich phase diagram with a variety of phase transitions and reentrant behavior. The results may be relevant to the study of the phase separation of He-3 - He-4 mixtures in porous media in the vicinity of the superfluid transition.

  20. Galactic foreground contribution to the BEAST CMB Anisotropy Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Mejía, Jorge; Bersanelli, Marco; Burigana, Carlo; Childers, Jeff; Figueiredo, Newton; Kangas, Miikka; Lubin, Philip; Maino, Davide; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Josh; Meinhold, Peter; O'Dwyer, Ian; O'Neill, Hugh,; Platania, Paola; Seiffert, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We report limits on the Galactic foreground emission contribution to the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) Ka- and Q-band CMB anisotropy maps. We estimate the contribution from the cross-correlations between these maps and the foreground emission templates of an H${\\alpha}$ map, a de-striped version of the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, and a combined 100 $\\mu$m IRAS/DIRBE map. Our analysis samples the BEAST $\\sim10^\\circ$ declination band into 24 one-hour (RA) wide sector...

  1. Experimental constraints on the electrical anisotropy of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Anne; Leinenweber, Kurt; Kohlstedt, David L; Qi, Chao; Garnero, Edward J; Mackwell, Stephen J; Tyburczy, James A

    2015-06-11

    The relative motion of lithospheric plates and underlying mantle produces localized deformation near the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. The transition from rheologically stronger lithosphere to weaker asthenosphere may result from a small amount of melt or water in the asthenosphere, reducing viscosity. Either possibility may explain the seismic and electrical anomalies that extend to a depth of about 200 kilometres. However, the effect of melt on the physical properties of deformed materials at upper-mantle conditions remains poorly constrained. Here we present electrical anisotropy measurements at high temperatures and quasi-hydrostatic pressures of about three gigapascals on previously deformed olivine aggregates and sheared partially molten rocks. For all samples, electrical conductivity is highest when parallel to the direction of prior deformation. The conductivity of highly sheared olivine samples is ten times greater in the shear direction than for undeformed samples. At temperatures above 900 degrees Celsius, a deformed solid matrix with nearly isotropic melt distribution has an electrical anisotropy factor less than five. To obtain higher electrical anisotropy (up to a factor of 100), we propose an experimentally based model in which layers of sheared olivine are alternated with layers of sheared olivine plus MORB or of pure melt. Conductivities are up to 100 times greater in the shear direction than when perpendicular to the shear direction and reproduce stress-driven alignment of the melt. Our experimental results and the model reproduce mantle conductivity-depth profiles for melt-bearing geological contexts. The field data are best fitted by an electrically anisotropic asthenosphere overlain by an isotropic, high-conductivity lowermost lithosphere. The high conductivity could arise from partial melting associated with localized deformation resulting from differential plate velocities relative to the mantle, with subsequent upward melt percolation

  2. Analysis of image versus position, scale and direction reveals pattern texture anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland eLehoucq

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern heterogeneities and anisotropies often carry significant physical information. We provide a toolbox which: (i cumulates analysis in terms of position, direction and scale; (ii is as general as possible; (iii is simple and fast to understand, implement, execute and exploit.It consists in dividing the image into analysis boxes at a chosen scale; in each box an ellipse (the inertia tensor is fitted to the signal and thus determines the direction in which the signal is more present. This tensor can be averaged in position and/or be used to study the dependence with scale. This choice is formally linked with Leray transforms and anisotropic wavelet analysis. Such protocol is intutively interpreted and consistent with what the eye detects: relevant scales, local variations in space, priviledged directions. It is fast and parallelizable.Its several variants are adaptable to the user's data and needs. It is useful to statistically characterize anisotropies of 2D or 3D patterns in which individual objects are not easily distinguished, with only minimal pre-processing of the raw image, and more generally applies to data in higher dimensions.It is less sensitive to edge effects, and thus better adapted for a multiscale analysis down to small scale boxes, than pair correlation function or Fourier transform.Easy to understand and implement,it complements more sophisticated methods such as Hough transform or diffusion tensor imaging.We use it on various fracture patterns (sea ice cover, thin sections of granite, granular materials, to pinpoint the maximal anisotropy scales. The results are robust to noise and to user choices. This toolbox could turn also useful for granular materials, hard condensed matter, geophysics, thin films, statistical mechanics, characterisation of networks, fluctuating amorphous systems, inhomogeneous and disordered systems, or medical imaging, among others.

  3. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Liao, X. L.; Jing, H. L.; Deng, Z. G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems.

  4. In-Plane Electronic Anisotropy of Underdoped ___122___ Fe-Arsenide Superconductors Revealed by Measurements of Detwinned Single Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Ian Randal

    2012-05-08

    The parent phases of the Fe-arsenide superconductors harbor an antiferromagnetic ground state. Significantly, the Neel transition is either preceded or accompanied by a structural transition that breaks the four fold symmetry of the high-temperature lattice. Borrowing language from the field of soft condensed matter physics, this broken discrete rotational symmetry is widely referred to as an Ising nematic phase transition. Understanding the origin of this effect is a key component of a complete theoretical description of the occurrence of superconductivity in this family of compounds, motivating both theoretical and experimental investigation of the nematic transition and the associated in-plane anisotropy. Here we review recent experimental progress in determining the intrinsic in-plane electronic anisotropy as revealed by resistivity, reflectivity and ARPES measurements of detwinned single crystals of underdoped Fe arsenide superconductors in the '122' family of compounds.

  5. Magnetic anisotropy in GaMnAs; Magnetische Anisotropie in GaMnAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daeubler, Joachim

    2009-07-02

    The goal of the present work was the detailed investigation of the impact of parameters like vertical strain, hole concentration, substrate orientation and patterning on the MA in GaMnAs. At first a method is introduced enabling us to determine the MA from angle-dependent magnetotransport measurements. This method was used to analyze the impact of vertical strain {epsilon}{sub zz} on the MA in a series of GaMnAs layers with a Mn content of 5% grown on relaxed InGaAs-templates. While hole concentration and Curie temperature were found to be unaffected by vertical strain, a significant dependence of the MA on {epsilon}{sub zz} was found. The most pronounced dependence was observed for the anisotropy parameter B{sub 2} {sub perpendicular} {sub to}, representing the intrinsic contribution to the MA perpendicular to the layer plane. For this parameter a linear dependence on {epsilon}{sub zz} was found, resulting in a strain-induced transition of the magnetic easy axis with increasing strain from in-plane to out-of-plane at {epsilon}{sub zz} {approx} -0.13%. Post-growth annealing of the samples leads to an outdiffusion and/or regrouping of the highly mobile Mn interstitial donor defects, resulting in an increase in both p and T{sub C}. For the annealed samples, the transition from in-plane to out-of-plane easy axis takes place at {epsilon}{sub zz} {approx} -0.07%. From a comparison of as-grown and annealed samples, B{sub 2} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} was found to be proportional to both p and {epsilon}{sub zz}, B{sub 2} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} {proportional_to} p .{epsilon}{sub zz}. To study the influence of substrate orientation on the magnetic properties of GaMnAs, a series of GaMnAs layers with Mn contents up to 5% was grown on (001)- and (113)A-oriented GaAs substrates. The hole densities and Curie temperatures, determined from magnetotransport measurements, are drastically reduced in the (113)A layers. The differences in the magnetic properties of (113)A- and

  6. Anisotropy of sublimation from equivalent crystal faces of carbon-containing tungsten monocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekhtyar, I.Ya.; Kolesnik, V.N.; Ovsienko, D.E.; Patoka, V.I.; Silant' ev, V.I.; Sosnina, E.I. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Metallofiziki)

    1981-08-01

    Anisotropy of sublimation parameters was found in equivalent faces (100) or (1O0) of W single crystals oriented perpendicular or parallel to the growth direction. The anisotropy value depends on C concentration in W single crystals.

  7. Anisotropy of sublimation from equivalent crystal faces of carbon-containing tungsten monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropy of sublimation parameters was found in equivalent faces (100) or (1O0) of W single crystals oriented perpendicular or parallel to the growth direction. The anisotropy value depends on C concentration in W single crystals

  8. Experimental Study of Rock Drill-ability Anisotropy by Acoustic Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Rock drill-ability anisotropy has significant effects on directional drilling and deviation control. Its evaluation is an important but difficult research subject. Definitions of drill-ability anisotropy and acoustic anisotropy of rock are given in this paper. The acoustic velocities and the drill-ability parameters of several rock samples from the Engineering Center for Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) are respectively measured with the device for testing the rock drill-ability and the ultrasonic testing system in laboratory, so that their drill-ability anisotropy and acoustic anisotropy are respectively calculated and discussed in detail by using the experimental data. On the basis of these experimental results and calculations, correlations between drill-ability anisotropy and acoustic anisotropy of the rock samples are illustrated through regression analyses. Thus, a mathematical model developed may be used to evaluate the rock drill-ability anisotropy with the acoustic logging or seismic data to a certain extent.

  9. The large scale microwave background anisotropy in decaying particle cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the large-scale anisotropy of the microwave background radiation in cosmological models with decaying particles. The observed value of the quadrupole moment combined with other constraints gives an upper limit on the redshift of the decay z/sub d/ < 3-5. 12 refs., 2 figs

  10. Diamagnetic Anisotropy: Two Iron Complexes as Laboratory Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ignacio; Sanchez, Jorge Fernando Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    There are relatively few experiments describing the NMR properties of bis(amine) iron(II) phthalocyanine complexes. Several features make this experiment attractive: First, it nicely illustrates the diamagnetic anisotropy phenomena, providing both students and teachers an opportunity to gain insight into aspects such as phase correction and…

  11. Resolution of reservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, V.; Hoversten, G.M.; Key, K.; Chen, J.

    2011-10-01

    A combination of 1D and 3D forward and inverse solutions is used to quantify the sensitivity and resolution of conventional controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data collected using a horizontal electric dipole source to transverse electrical anisotropy located in a deep-water exploration reservoir target. Since strongly anisotropic shale layers have a vertical resistivity that can be comparable to many reservoirs, we examine how CSEM can discriminate confounding shale layers through their characteristically lower horizontal resistivity. Forward modeling demonstrates that the sensitivity to reservoir level anisotropy is very low compared to the sensitivity to isotropic reservoirs, especially when the reservoir is deeper than about 2 km below the seabed. However, for 1D models where the number of inversion parameters can be fixed to be only a few layers, both vertical and horizontal resistivity of the reservoir can be well resolved using a stochastic inversion. We find that the resolution of horizontal resistivity increases as the horizontal resistivity decreases. We show that this effect is explained by the presence of strong horizontal current density in anisotropic layers with low horizontal resistivity. Conversely, when the reservoir has a vertical to horizontal resistivity ratio of about 10 or less, the current density is vertically polarized and hence has little sensitivity to the horizontal resistivity. Resistivity anisotropy estimates from 3D inversion for 3D targets suggest that resolution of reservoir level anisotropy for 3D targets will require good a priori knowledge of the background sediment conductivity and structural boundaries.

  12. K Variations and Anisotropy: Microstructure Effect and Numerical Predictions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旭东; 李华清

    2003-01-01

    Computer experiments were performed on simulated polycrystalline material samples that possess locally anisotropic microstructures to investigate stress intensity factor ( K ) variations and anisotropy along fronts of microcracks of different sizes. The anisotropic K , arising from inhomogeneous stresses in broken grains, was determined for planar microcracks by using a weight function-based numerical technique. It has been found that the grain-orientation-geometry-induced local anisotropy produces large variations in K along front of microcracks, when the crack size is of the order of few grain diameters. Synergetic effect of grain orientation and geometry of broken grains control K variations and evolution along the microcrack front. The K variations may diminish at large crack sizes, signifying a shift of K calculation to bulk stress dependence from local stress dependence. Local grain geometry and texture may lead to K anisotropy, producing unusually higher/lower K at a segment of the crack front. Either K variation or anisotropy cannot be ignored when assessing a microcrack.

  13. Effect of earthquake locations on Rayleigh wave azimuthal anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z.; Masters, G.

    2013-12-01

    We have compiled a large dataset for Rayleigh wave phase arrival times from 5mHz to 35mHz by using cluster analysis method. Estimation of source phase is improved by using a second order approximation of the associated Legendre functions. Currently, we have about 300,000 measurements for 5mHz, 600,000 for 10mHz, 400,000 for 20mHz and 280,000 for 35mHz. We use our new dataset to invert for the 2-phi terms of Rayleigh wave azimuthal anisotropy. We have found differences in the inverted fast directions when using PDE versus CMT source locations, especially near subduction zones where most earthquakes happen. Allowing small changes in earthquake locations (latitude and longitude) in our inversion greatly reduces such discrepancies. Residue patterns and checkerboard tests both indicate that the azimuthal anisotropy patterns in ocean basins are likely coherent over large distances, especially in the Pacific. To model the change of anisotropy amplitudes in the Pacific for different frequencies, we follow the approach proposed by Montagner and Nataf (1986). Values of elastic constants are compiled from Anderson and Isaak (1995) and Abramson et al (1997). The depth extent of anisotropy will be discussed.

  14. Anisotropy signature in reverse-time migration extended images

    KAUST Repository

    Sava, Paul C.

    2014-11-04

    Reverse-time migration can accurately image complex geologic structures in anisotropic media. Extended images at selected locations in the Earth, i.e., at common-image-point gathers, carry rich information to characterize the angle-dependent illumination and to provide measurements for migration velocity analysis. However, characterizing the anisotropy influence on such extended images is a challenge. Extended common-image-point gathers are cheap to evaluate since they sample the image at sparse locations indicated by the presence of strong reflectors. Such gathers are also sensitive to velocity error that manifests itself through moveout as a function of space and time lags. Furthermore, inaccurate anisotropy leaves a distinctive signature in common-image-point gathers, which can be used to evaluate anisotropy through techniques similar to the ones used in conventional wavefield tomography. It specifically admits a V-shaped residual moveout with the slope of the "V" flanks depending on the anisotropic parameter η regardless of the complexity of the velocity model. It reflects the fourth-order nature of the anisotropy influence on moveout as it manifests itself in this distinct signature in extended images after handling the velocity properly in the imaging process. Synthetic and real data observations support this assertion.

  15. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1�}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  16. The importance of anisotropy for relativistic fluids with spherical symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, B. V.

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that an effective anisotropic spherically symmetric fluid model with heat flow can absorb the addition to a perfect fluid of pressure anisotropy, heat flow, bulk and shear viscosity, electric field and null fluid. In most cases the induction of effective heat flow can be avoided.

  17. Flow stress anisotropy caused by geometrically necessary boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Juul Jensen, D.

    1992-01-01

    The microstructural anisotropy of deformed metal is related to the formation of geometrically necessary boundaries such as dense dislocation walls and microbands. These boundaries have a macroscopic orientation with respect to the sample axes and they can resist slip due to a high concentration of...

  18. Photoinduced Circular Anisotropy in Side-Chain Azobenzene Polyesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Todorov, T.; Ivanov, M.;

    1997-01-01

    We report for the first time the inducing of large circular anisotropy in previously unoriented films of side-chain azobenzene polyesters on illumination with circularly polarized light at a wavelength of 488 nm. The circular dichroism and optical activity are measured simultaneously in real time...

  19. Window Function for Non-Circular Beam CMB Anisotropy Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Souradeep, Tarun; Ratra, Bharat

    2001-01-01

    We develop computationally rapid methods to compute the window function for a cosmic microwave background anisotropy experiment with a non-circular beam which scans over large angles on the sky. To concretely illustrate these methods we compute the window function for the Python V experiment which scans over large angles on the sky with an elliptical Gaussian beam.

  20. Measurement of anisotropy constant in US with polarized neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, G.H.; Brooks, M.S.S.; Lebech, B.;

    1991-01-01

    Uranium compounds can have an anisotropy that is considerably greater than that found in rare‐earth compounds. Early estimates of K1 in ferromagnetic US (Tc = 178 K), for example, were that K1 ≳ 108 erg/cm3. We have re‐examined this cubic material and determined K1 in the range of reduced moment (μ...

  1. AMiBA-array for microwave background anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesteven, M.

    2002-03-01

    AMiBA is a 90 GHz interferometric array of the ASIAA (Academia Sinica, Institue of Astronomy and Astrophysics). It will make a detailed study of the polarization of the CMB anisotropy; it will also undertake a survey of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters. It is under construction at present, with an expected completion date of late 2003. .

  2. Influence of magnetic anisotropy on the superferromagnetic ordering in nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Christiansen, Gunnar Dan

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic interaction between ultrafine particles may result in superferromagnetism, i.e., ordering of the magnetic moments of particles which would be superparamagnetic if they were noninteracting. In this article we discuss the influence of the magnetic anisotropy on the temperature dependence o...

  3. On the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of greigite (Fe3S4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklhofer, Michael; Chang, Liao; Eder, Stephan H. K.

    2014-04-01

    ferrimagnetic mineral greigite (cubic Fe3S4) is well known as an intracellular biomineralization product in magnetic bacteria and as a widely occurring authigenic mineral in anoxic sediments. Due to the lack of suitable single-crystal specimens, the magnetic anisotropy parameters of greigite have remained poorly constrained, to the point where not even the easy axis of magnetization is known. Here we report on an effort to determine the anisotropy parameters on the basis of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) powder spectroscopy on hydrothermally synthesized, chemically pure greigite microcrystals dispersed in a nonmagnetic matrix. In terms of easy axis orientations, the FMR data are consistent with or , or less likely, a more general type. With a g factor of 2.09, the anisotropy field is about 90 mT and in some samples may reach 125 mT, compared to 30 mT for cubic magnetite. This confirms the dominating role of cubic anisotropy on the magnetic properties of greigite, which we show to be responsible for large SIRM/k values. K1 is in the range -15 … -23 J/m3 () or +10 … +15 kJ/m3 (), yielding upper limits of 44 or 34 nm for the superparamagnetic grain size, respectively.

  4. On the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of greigite (Fe3S 4)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winklhofer, M.; Chang, L.; Eder, S.H.K.

    2014-01-01

    The ferrimagnetic mineral greigite (cubic Fe3S4) is well known as an intracellular biomineralization product in magnetic bacteria and as a widely occurring authigenic mineral in anoxic sediments. Due to the lack of suitable single-crystal specimens, the magnetic anisotropy parameters of greigite hav

  5. Giant and Tunable Anisotropy of Nanoscale Friction in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Clara M.; Prioli, Rodrigo; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Cançado, Luiz Gustavo; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; de Cicco, Marcelo; Menezes, Marcos G.; Achete, Carlos A.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.

    2016-08-01

    The nanoscale friction between an atomic force microscopy tip and graphene is investigated using friction force microscopy (FFM). During the tip movement, friction forces are observed to increase and then saturate in a highly anisotropic manner. As a result, the friction forces in graphene are highly dependent on the scanning direction: under some conditions, the energy dissipated along the armchair direction can be 80% higher than along the zigzag direction. In comparison, for highly-oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG), the friction anisotropy between armchair and zigzag directions is only 15%. This giant friction anisotropy in graphene results from anisotropies in the amplitudes of flexural deformations of the graphene sheet driven by the tip movement, not present in HOPG. The effect can be seen as a novel manifestation of the classical phenomenon of Euler buckling at the nanoscale, which provides the non-linear ingredients that amplify friction anisotropy. Simulations based on a novel version of the 2D Tomlinson model (modified to include the effects of flexural deformations), as well as fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, are able to reproduce and explain the experimental observations.

  6. Galactic foreground contribution to the BEAST CMB Anisotropy Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Mejia, J; Burigana, C; Childers, J; Figueiredo, N; Kangas, M; Lubin, P; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Marvil, J; Meinhold, P; O'Dwyer, I; O'Neill, H; Platania, P; Seiffert, M; Stebor, N; Tello, C A S; Villela, T; Wandelt, B; Wünsche, C A; Mej\\'{\\i}a, Jorge; Bersanelli, Marco; Burigana, Carlo; Childers, Jeff; Figueiredo, Newton; Kangas, Miikka; Lubin, Philip; Maino, Davide; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Josh; Meinhold, Peter; Dwyer, Ian O'; Neill, Hugh O'; Platania, Paola; Seiffert, Michael; Stebor, Nathan; Tello, Camilo; Villela, Thyrso; Wandelt, Benjamin; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    We report limits on the Galactic foreground emission contribution to the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) Ka- and Q-band CMB anisotropy maps. We estimate the contribution from the cross-correlations between these maps and the foreground emission templates of an H${\\alpha}$ map, a de-striped version of the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, and a combined 100 $\\mu$m IRAS/DIRBE map. Our analysis samples the BEAST $\\sim10^\\circ$ declination band into 24 one-hour (RA) wide sectors with $\\sim7900$ pixels each, where we calculate: (a) the linear correlation coefficient between the anisotropy maps and the templates; (b) the coupling constants between the specific intensity units of the templates and the antenna temperature at the BEAST frequencies and (c) the individual foreground contributions to the BEAST anisotropy maps. The peak sector contributions of the contaminants in the Ka-band are of 56.5% free-free with a coupling constant of $8.3\\pm0.4$ $\\mu$K/R, and 67.4% dust with $45.0\\pm2.0$ $\\mu$K/...

  7. On the Origin of Grid Anisotropy in the Simulation of Dendrite Growth by a VFT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaraoui, Afaf; Nebti, Samia

    2016-10-01

    A virtual front tracking model, based on solute and heat diffusion in two dimensions, is chosen to capture the full microstructural behavior of dendritic solidification in a binary alloy. We use a simple method of calculation, easy to perform, with relatively high stable time step, to simulate the dendrite growth in an Al-8 wt pct Mg alloy for which no numerical simulation has been carried out in the past. Local equilibrium at the liquid solid interface and the buildup of solute ahead of the interface are solved, and the dendrite growth process is simulated in isothermal solidification conditions. We show that the artificial grid anisotropy originates from the four cell neighborhood method adopted for capturing the moving front. By a correct neighborhood configuration, a grid independent set of results and expected phenomena are reproduced for a free dendrite growing either aligned or inclined with the grid. The dendrite morphology and orientation, and the growth velocity are explored via physical simulation parameters such as undercooling and surface tension anisotropy.

  8. Microstructural characterization of creep anisotropy at 673 K in the M5® alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium alloy tubing is used in pressurized water nuclear reactors in order to prevent fissile material from leaking into the coolant. It can be the first safety wall of nuclear fuel, and is submitted to complex thermomechanical loadings. In consequence, new Nb-modified alloys, such as the M5® alloy, and fine numerical models are being developed to guarantee a better and longer mechanical integrity of these tubes. To identify the physical mechanisms that could be considered in such models, an experimental approach, combining creep tests with electron backscattered diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy investigations, was carried out. Tubular specimens were submitted to multiaxial creep tests at a temperature of 673 K. Seven ratios between the axial and hoop applied stresses were investigated. It enabled a macroscopic evidence of the creep anisotropy. Besides, EBSD analyses on a mesoscopic-sized non deformed area led to the characterization of the variation of the average Schmid factor with the direction of loading. Finally, TEM observations were done on seven crept samples, corresponding to the seven directions of loading tested mechanically. The variations of the different parameters investigated (activated slip systems, dislocation densities, curvatures of the dislocations) can be seen as the effects of the creep anisotropy at a microscopic scale. The correlation between results is then discussed in a multiscale frame.

  9. Impact of momentum space anisotropy on heavy quark dynamics in a QGP medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Vinod; Das, Santosh K.

    2016-05-01

    Momentum space anisotropy present in the quark and gluon distribution functions in relativistic heavy ion collisions induces Chromo-Weibel instability in the hot QCD medium created therein. The impact of the Chromo-Weibel instability on the dynamics of a heavy quark (HQ) traversing in the QGP medium is investigated within the framework of kinetic theory by studying the momentum and temperature behavior of HQ drag and diffusion coefficients. The physics of anisotropy is captured in an effective Vlasov term in the transport equation. The effects of the instability are handled by making a relation with the phenomenologically known jet-quenching parameter in RHIC and LHC. Interestingly, the presence of instability significantly affects the temperature and momentum dependences of the HQ drag and diffusion coefficients. These results may have appreciable impact on the experimental observables such as the nuclear suppression factor, RA A(pT) , and the elliptic flow, v2(pT), of heavy mesons in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies which is a matter of future investigation.

  10. Magnetic field-induced gluonic (inverse) catalysis and pressure (an)isotropy in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, G S; Endrodi, G; Gruber, F; Schaefer, A

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of strong external magnetic fields on gluonic and fermionic observables in the QCD vacuum at zero and nonzero temperatures, via lattice simulations with N_f=1+1+1 staggered quarks of physical masses. The gluonic action density is found to undergo magnetic catalysis at low temperatures and inverse magnetic catalysis near and above the transition temperature, similar to the quark condensate. Moreover, the gluonic action develops an anisotropy: the chromo-magnetic field parallel to the external field is enhanced, while the chromo-electric field in this direction is suppressed. We demonstrate that the same hierarchy is obtained using the Euler-Heisenberg effective action. Conversely, the topological charge density correlator does not reveal a significant anisotropy up to magnetic fields eB~1 GeV^2. Furthermore, we show that the pressure remains isotropic even for nonzero magnetic fields, if it is defined through a compression of the system at fixed external field. In contrast, if the flux o...

  11. Anisotropy mapping in rat brains using Intermolecular Multiple Quantum Coherence Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This document reports an unconventional and rapidly developing approach to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using intermolecular multiple-quantum coherences (iMQCs). Rat brain images are acquired using iMQCs. We detect iMQCs between spins that are 10 {\\mu}m to 500 {\\mu}m apart. The interaction between spins is dependent on different directions. We can choose the directions on physical Z, Y and X axis by choosing correlation gradients along those directions. As an important application, iMQCs can be used for anisotropy mapping. In the rat brains, we investigate tissue microstructure. We simulated images expected from rat brains without microstructure. We compare those with experimental results to prove that the dipolar field from the overall shape only has small contributions to the experimental iMQC signal. Because of the underlying low signal to noise ratio (SNR) in iMQCs, this anisotropy mapping method still has comparatively large potentials to grow. The ultimate goal of my project is to develop creative a...

  12. Cosmic ray electron anisotropies as a tool to discriminate between exotic and astrophysical sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cernuda, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    Recent results from the PAMELA, ATIC, PPB BETS and Fermi collaborations extend the energy range in the electron flux measurement up to unexplored energies in the hundred GeVs range confirming the bump starting at about 10GeV already suggested by HEAT and AMS01 data . This bump can be explained by annihilating dark matter in the context of exotic physics, or by nearby astrophysical sources e.g. pulsars. In order to discriminate between competing models for primary positron production, the study of anisotropies ,complementary to the spectrum determination, shows up as new tool to look for the origin of the lepton excess. In this letter we calculate the contribution to the electron flux given by the collection of all known gamma ray pulsars (as listed in the ATNF catalogue) and by annihilating dark matter both in case of a clumpy halo or in case the excess can be atributed to a nearby sizeable dark matter clump. We address the problem of the electron anisotropy in both scenarios and estimate the prospect that a ...

  13. Magnetism of One-Dimensional Dipolar-Interaction Spin Chains with Perpendicular Anisotropy*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Kai-Cheng; ZHU Yan

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetism of one-dimensional dipolar-interaction spin chains with perpendicular anisotropy by simulation.The behaviors of the magnetizations and the orientation correlations change dramatically as the anisotropy increases to the critical value.The domain length can be controlled by adjusting the temperature and the external field as well as the anisotropy.These properties are interesting and arise from the competition between the anisotropy and the interaction along the chain.

  14. Unconventional superconductors anisotropy and multiband effects

    CERN Document Server

    Askerzade, Iman

    2012-01-01

    This book deals with the new class of materials unconventional superconductors, cuprate compounds, borocarbides, magnesium-diboride and oxypnictides. It gives a systematical review of physical properties of novel  superconductors. There is an increasing number of fundamental properties of these compounds which are relevant to future applications, opening new possibilities. The theoretical explanation is presented as generalization of Ginzburg-Landau phenomenology and microscopical Eliashberg theory for multiband and anisotropic superconductors. Various applications of this approachs and time dependent version of two-band Ginzburg-Landau theory are considered. An important topic are fluctuations in two-band and anisotropic superconductors. Significant  new results on current problems are presented to stimulate further research. Numerous illustrations, diagrams and tables make this book useful as a reference for students and researchers.

  15. Anisotropy in broad component of H$\\alpha$ line in the magnetospheric device RT-1

    CERN Document Server

    Kawazura, Yohei; Yoshida, Zensho; Nishiura, Masaki; Nogami, Tomoaki; Kashyap, Ankur; Yano, Yoshihisa; Saitoh, Haruhiko; Yamasaki, Miyuri; Mushiake, Toshiki; Nakatsuka, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Temperature anisotropy in broad component of H$\\alpha$ line was found in the ring trap 1 (RT-1) device by Doppler spectroscopy. Since hot hydrogen neutrals emitting a broad component are mainly produced by charge exchange between neutrals and protons, the anisotropy in the broad component is the evidence of proton temperature anisotropy generated by betatron acceleration.

  16. Testing distance duality with CMB anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Rasanen, Syksy; Kosonen, Ville

    2015-01-01

    We constrain deviations of the form $T\\propto (1+z)^{1+\\epsilon}$ from the standard redshift-temperature relation, corresponding to modifying distance duality as $D_L=(1+z)^{2(1+\\epsilon)} D_A$. We consider a consistent model, in which both the background and perturbation equations are changed. For this purpose, we introduce a species of dark radiation particles to which photon energy density is transferred, and assume $\\epsilon\\ge0$. The Planck 2015 release high multipole temperature plus low multipole data give the limit $\\epsilon<4.5\\times 10^{-3}$ at 95% C.L. The main obstacle to improving this CMB-only result is strong degeneracy between $\\epsilon$ and the physical matter densities $\\omega_{\\rm b}$ and $\\omega_{\\rm c}$. A constraint on deuterium abundance improves the limit to $\\epsilon<1.8\\times 10^{-3}$. Adding the Planck high-multipole CMB polarisation and BAO data leads to a small improvement; with this maximal dataset we obtain $\\epsilon<1.3\\times 10^{-3}$. This dataset constrains the prese...

  17. Anisotropy above and below the subducting Nazca lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, J. G.; Fischer, K. M.; Anderson, M. L.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study is to constrain mantle flow above and below the subducting Nazca plate at latitudes of 30°-41° S. In this segment of the South American subduction zone, slab dip varies from flat slab subduction in the north to a dip of ~40° in the south, where the segment ends at a slab gap associated with Chile Ridge. We measured shear-wave splitting in over 280 S arrivals from local earthquakes recorded by the 2010 Chile RAMP IRIS/PASSCAL array (aftershock locations from Lange et al., 2010), the 2000-2002 CHARGE IRIS/PASSCAL array, and permanent stations PLCA (USGS/GTSN) and PEL (Geoscope). We also resolved splitting in 17 SK(K)S phases at PLCA and permanent station TRQA (IRIS/GSN). Splitting parameters for a subset of phases were determined using a range of filters; most were stable as a function of frequency. The results reported below correspond to a 0.05-2 Hz bandpass filter. Local S lag times range from 0.1-0.9 seconds. For back-arc stations above the area of steep subduction, lag times correlate with path length in the mantle wedge, indicating that wedge anisotropy dominates. Lag times from the Chile RAMP stations, which are located in the forearc between 33°S and 39°S and in general correspond to shorter paths, span a narrower range (0.1-0.4 seconds). Splitting fast polarizations at back-arc stations show a coherent variation with latitude. Fast polarizations vary from NE at 40°-41°S, to N (roughly slab-strike parallel) at 35°-36°S, to NE-ESE at 30°-33°S, curving as the slab flattens. Modeling of these local S splitting results reveals that the fast symmetry axis of anisotropy is sub-parallel to the overall trend of fast polarization directions at each station, and that the strength of anisotropy is equivalent to 10-30% of single crystal olivine anisotropy. At forearc stations, we observe roughly trench-parallel fast polarization directions (largely N-NE) with the exception of two areas of localized, yet robust trench-normal trends (E

  18. Diverse anisotropy of phonon transport in two-dimensional group IV-VI compounds: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Qin, Zhenzhen; Fang, Wu-Zhang; Zhang, Li-Chuan; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Yan, Qing-Bo; Hu, Ming; Su, Gang

    2016-05-01

    New classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, including layered and non-layered, and their heterostructures, are currently attracting increasing interest due to their promising applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and clean energy, where thermal transport is a fundamental physical parameter. In this paper, we systematically investigated the phonon transport properties of the 2D orthorhombic group IV-VI compounds of GeS, GeSe, SnS and SnSe by solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. Despite their similar puckered (hinge-like) structure along the armchair direction as phosphorene, the four monolayer compounds possess diverse anisotropic properties in many aspects, such as phonon group velocity, Young's modulus and lattice thermal conductivity (κ), etc. Especially, the κ along the zigzag and armchair directions of monolayer GeS shows the strongest anisotropy while monolayer SnS and SnSe show almost isotropy in phonon transport. The origin of the diverse anisotropy is fully studied and the underlying mechanism is discussed in details. With limited size, the κ could be effectively lowered, and the anisotropy could be effectively modulated by nanostructuring, which would extend the applications to nanoscale thermoelectrics and thermal management. Our study offers fundamental understanding of the anisotropic phonon transport properties of 2D materials, and would be of significance for further study, modulation and applications in emerging technologies.

  19. The role of length scales in bridging the gap between rock CPO and seismic signals of crustal anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaya, D.; Johnson, S. E.; Vel, S. S.; Song, W. J.; Christensen, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies based on laboratory petrophysics and in particular EBSD-based calculations indicate material rock anisotropy for crustal rocks can possess significant low orders of symmetry. These symmetries based on elastic tensor calculations can range from hexagonal and orthorhombic down to monoclinic and triclinic. On the other hand, interpretation of field seismic data yield crustal anisotropy of fast- or slow-axis transverse isotropy (hexagonal) symmetry at best; identification of orthorhombic symmetry is barely possible. Seismic results are often limited to simple orientations of the symmetry axes, such as vertical (radial anisotropy) or horizontal (azimuthal anisotropy). The physical scales of earth anisotropic fabrics and of seismic waves affect the types of information that may be extracted from seismic signals. A seismic wave has inherent limits to resolving capabilities, usually measured as some percentage of its wavelength, λ. This wave will accumulate anisotropic signal in two ways based on its path through anisotropic media of physical size, L: (1) When the wave is much smaller than the anisotropic material (λ material (λ >> L), the wave will not see details of the material but will respond to just the bulk average of the material. In the first case, the wave will be sensitive to large scale earth changes such as limbs of an antiformal mountain range. The accumulating anisotropic seismic signal can get complicated (e.g., shear wave splits of splits). In the second case, the wave is too large to see any fine detail, and the material can be represented by an equivalent "effective media" that produces the same seismic response. Geometrical structure is a factor that helps bridge the scales of rock CPO to lower resolution seismic signals. Local rock CPO can fill or be mapped into a structure that is large enough for a seismic wave to respond to. We use tensor representation of anisotropic elasticity to formulate a way to separate structural effects

  20. Temporal and Spatial Turbulent Spectra of MHD Plasma and an Observation of Variance Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffner, D A; Lukin, V S

    2014-01-01

    The nature of MHD turbulence is analyzed through both temporal and spatial magnetic fluctuation spectra. A magnetically turbulent plasma is produced in the MHD wind-tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). The power of magnetic fluctuations is projected into directions perpendicular and parallel to a local mean field; the ratio of these quantities shows the presence of variance anisotropy which varies as a function of frequency. Comparison amongst magnetic, velocity, and density spectra are also made, demonstrating that the energy of the turbulence observed is primarily seeded by magnetic fields created during plasma production. Direct spatial spectra are constructed using multi-channel diagnostics and are used to compare to frequency spectra converted to spatial scales using the Taylor Hypothesis. Evidence for the observation of dissipation due to ion inertial length scale physics is also discussed as well as the role laboratory experiment can play in understanding turbulence typica...

  1. The first moment of azimuthal anisotropy in nuclear collisions from AGS to LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Singha, Subhash; Keane, Declan

    2016-01-01

    We review topics related to the first moment of azimuthal anisotropy ($v_1$), commonly known as directed flow, focusing on both charged particles and identified particles from heavy-ion collisions. Beam energies from the highest available, at the CERN LHC, down to projectile kinetic energies per nucleon of a few GeV per nucleon, as studied in experiments at the Brookhaven AGS, fall within our scope. We focus on experimental measurements and on theoretical work where direct comparisons with experiment have been emphasized. The physics addressed or potentially addressed by this review topic includes the study of Quark Gluon Plasma, and more generally, investigation of the Quantum Chromodynamics phase diagram and the equation of state describing the accessible phases.

  2. Cosmological observables, IR growth of fluctuations, and scale-dependent anisotropies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    B. Giddings, Steven; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2011-01-01

    We extend semiclassical methods in inflationary cosmology that capture leading IR corrections to correlators. Such large IR effects can be absorbed into a coordinate change when examining sufficiently local observables, but not when comparing observations at large separation in scales, such as seen...... by a late-time observer. The analysis is facilitated by definition of a scale-dependent metric and physical momentum. These assist definition of "IR-safe" observables seen by a post-inflationary observer, which are contrasted to those based on the local geometry of the reheating surface....... For such observables, the observer's horizon provides an effective IR cutoff. IR growth contributes to enhanced statistical inhomogeneities/anisotropies at short scales, observation of which by a present day observer might be sought in 21 cm measurements. Such IR corrections are argued to grow large for a very late...

  3. Stress, strain rate and anisotropy in Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. K.; Aoki, Y.; Unglert, K.; Ohkura, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Shimizu, H.; Iguchi, M.; Tameguri, T.; Ohminato, T.; Mori, J.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy, the directional dependence of wave speeds, may be caused by stress-oriented cracks or by strain-oriented minerals, yet few studies have quantitatively compared anisotropy to stress and strain over large regions. Here we compare crustal stress and strain rates on the Island of Kyushu, Japan, as measured from inversions of focal mechanisms, GPS and shear wave splitting. Over 85,000 shear wave splitting measurements from local and regional earthquakes are obtained from the NIED network between 2004 and 2012, and on Aso, Sakurajima, Kirishima and Unzen volcano networks. Strain rate measurements are made from the Japanese Geonet stations. JMA-determined S arrival times processed with the MFAST shear wave splitting code measure fast polarisations (Φ), related to the orientation of the anisotropic medium and time delays (dt), related to the path length and the percent anisotropy. We apply the TESSA 2-D delay time tomography and spatial averaging code to the highest quality events, which have nearly vertical incidence angles, separating the 3455 shallow (depth = 40 km) earthquakes. Using square grids with 30 km sides for all the inversions, the best correlations are observed between splitting from shallow earthquakes and stress. Axes of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) and Φ correlate with a coefficient c of 0.56, significant at the 99% confidence level. Their mean difference is 31.9°. Axes of maximum compressional strain rate and SHmax are also well aligned, with an average difference of 28°, but they do not correlate with each other, meaning that where they differ, the difference is not systematic. Anisotropy strength is negatively correlated with the stress ratio parameter determined from focal mechanism inversion (c = - 0.64; significant at the 99% confidence level). The anisotropy and stress results are consistent with stress-aligned microcracks in the crust in a dominantly strike-slip regime. Eigenvalues of maximum horizontal strain rate

  4. Downscaling Smooth Tomographic Models: Separating Intrinsic and Apparent Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Thomas; Capdeville, Yann; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, a number of tomographic models based on full waveform inversion have been published. Due to computational constraints, the fitted waveforms are low pass filtered, which results in an inability to map features smaller than half the shortest wavelength. However, these tomographic images are not a simple spatial average of the true model, but rather an effective, apparent, or equivalent model that provides a similar 'long-wave' data fit. For example, it can be shown that a series of horizontal isotropic layers will be seen by a 'long wave' as a smooth anisotropic medium. In this way, the observed anisotropy in tomographic models is a combination of intrinsic anisotropy produced by lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of minerals, and apparent anisotropy resulting from the incapacity of mapping discontinuities. Interpretations of observed anisotropy (e.g. in terms of mantle flow) requires therefore the separation of its intrinsic and apparent components. The "up-scaling" relations that link elastic properties of a rapidly varying medium to elastic properties of the effective medium as seen by long waves are strongly non-linear and their inverse highly non-unique. That is, a smooth homogenized effective model is equivalent to a large number of models with discontinuities. In the 1D case, Capdeville et al (GJI, 2013) recently showed that a tomographic model which results from the inversion of low pass filtered waveforms is an homogenized model, i.e. the same as the model computed by upscaling the true model. Here we propose a stochastic method to sample the ensemble of layered models equivalent to a given tomographic profile. We use a transdimensional formulation where the number of layers is variable. Furthermore, each layer may be either isotropic (1 parameter) or intrinsically anisotropic (2 parameters). The parsimonious character of the Bayesian inversion gives preference to models with the least number of parameters (i.e. least number of layers, and

  5. The influence of anisotropy on preferential flow in landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, Elena; Barontini, Stefano; Bogaard, Thom A.; Shao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Infiltration is one of the most important landslides triggering mechanisms and it is controlled by the hydraulic characteristics of the soil, which depends on the degree of saturation, the existence of preferential flow paths and by anisotropy. Many soils, indeed, exhibit a certain degree of anisotropy due to the stratification associated with soil forming process. Recently, various authors investigated the effect of rainfall in layered soils and its effect on rainfall triggered landslides by means of experimental, conceptual, numerical and theoretical approaches. However, the combined effect of anisotropy and preferential flow on infiltration process and related to rainfall induced landslides has, according to the authors best knowledge, not been studied yet. Aiming at better understanding the soil hydrological processes which take place during an infiltration process, the stability of a synthetic hill slope is numerically investigated. The geometry we considered for the model is a slope with two different layers: the upper soil layer consists of sandy loam, while the lower soil layer is made out of clay. The geometry was studied using both a single permeability and a dual permeability model. In the first case the hydraulic conductivity at saturation was considered isotropic, equal in all directions. Then the vertical component of the hydraulic conductivity tensor at saturation was reduced, while in the third scenario the horizontal component was reduced. In this way the anisotropy effects on both the principal directions were studied. In the dual permeability model, the influence of the anisotropy was considered only in the preferential flow domain, and the hydraulic conductivity at saturation of the soil matrix domain was defined as being isotropic. In order to evaluate also the effects of rainfall intensity on the slope, two different rainfall events were studied: a low intensity rainfall with a long time duration (2 mmh-1,150 h) and an high intensity rainfall

  6. Spectroscopic ellipsometry investigations of optical anisotropy in obliquely deposited hafnia thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokas, R. B.; Jena, Shuvendu; Haque, S. Maidul; Rao, K. Divakar; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    In present work, HfO2 thin films have been deposited at various oblique incidences on Si substrates by electron beam evaporation. These refractory oxide films exhibited anisotropy in refractive index predictably due to special columnar microstructure. Spectroscopic ellipsometry being a powerful tool for optical characterization has been employed to investigate optical anisotropy. It was observed that the film deposited at glancing angle (80°) exhibits the highest optical anisotropy. Further, anisotropy was noticed to decrease with lower values of deposition angles while effective refractive index depicts opposite trend. Variation in refractive index and anisotropy has been explained in light of atomic shadowing during growth of thin films at oblique angles.

  7. Anisotropy magnetic susceptibility measurements of vulcanic rock from merapi mountain in central Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropy Magnetic susceptibility indicated a differences of Magnetic susceptibility value of a sample due to the direction or orientation of magnetic field on it. The 22 sample's were taken from lour area around Merapi mountain in central Java and their Anisotropy Magnetic susceptibility were measured by using MS2 Bartington. The 22 sample's shown a high susceptibility value about 8037.5 x 105. Eleven sample's have high anisotropy ( it's anisotropy degree about 16% ). The rest of the sample have an anisotropy degree less than 6% (sample's from pasar bubar, Kali Kuning, Kali Gendong, Kali Gendol Utara). This result give an indication that a part of the sample's can be used for paleomagnetic

  8. Tunable Ambipolar Polarization-Sensitive Photodetectors Based on High-Anisotropy ReSe2 Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Enze; Wang, Peng; Li, Zhe; Wang, Haifeng; Song, Chaoyu; Huang, Ce; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Kaitai; Lu, Shiheng; Wang, Weiyi; Liu, Shanshan; Fang, Hehai; Zhou, Xiaohao; Yan, Hugen; Zou, Jin; Wan, Xiangang; Zhou, Peng; Hu, Weida; Xiu, Faxian

    2016-08-23

    Atomically thin 2D-layered transition-metal dichalcogenides have been studied extensively in recent years because of their intriguing physical properties and promising applications in nanoelectronic devices. Among them, ReSe2 is an emerging material that exhibits a stable distorted 1T phase and strong in-plane anisotropy due to its reduced crystal symmetry. Here, the anisotropic nature of ReSe2 is revealed by Raman spectroscopy under linearly polarized excitations in which different vibration modes exhibit pronounced periodic variations in intensity. Utilizing high-quality ReSe2 nanosheets, top-gate ReSe2 field-effect transistors were built that show an excellent on/off current ratio exceeding 10(7) and a well-developed current saturation in the current-voltage characteristics at room temperature. Importantly, the successful synthesis of ReSe2 directly onto hexagonal boron nitride substrates has effectively improved the electron motility over 500 times and the hole mobility over 100 times at low temperatures. Strikingly, corroborating with our density-functional calculations, the ReSe2-based photodetectors exhibit a polarization-sensitive photoresponsivity due to the intrinsic linear dichroism originated from high in-plane optical anisotropy. With a back-gate voltage, the linear dichroism photodetection can be unambiguously tuned both in the electron and hole regime. The appealing physical properties demonstrated in this study clearly identify ReSe2 as a highly anisotropic 2D material for exotic electronic and optoelectronic applications. PMID:27472807

  9. Anisotropy in the electronic states of self-assembled quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Self-assembled quantum dots (QD) are semiconductor nanostructures that have been widely reported for use in technological devices such as optical memories and detectors. Besides this commercial potential, their zero-dimensional characteristics unveil a vast realm of fundamental physics to be explored in condensed matter physics. An example is the tailorable InAsP QD system, which allows one to control emission energy and QD sizes, among other properties. In this work we use polarized optical techniques in order to determine the origin of some structures previously identified via photoluminescence (PL) and photomodulated transmission (PT). We show that by varying the linear polarization of either excitation beam (PL) or probe beam (PT) it was possible to identify both QD and wetting layer (WL) contributions for the optical spectra of InAsP QDs. PT shows clearly that lower energy spectral structures present an anisotropy as a function of the polarization direction, which can be associated to QD recombination, since some degree of spatial anisotropy is expected for these nanostructures. WL contributions, however, appears at higher energies and shows isotropic behavior as a function of linear polarization, a characteristics of a two-dimensional layer. Polarized PL measurements seem to confirm the above identification, however a slightly dependence on WL intensity as a function of excitation polarization was found; it might be related to the diffraction grating polarization response of our spectrometer, and this is under investigation at the moment. Higher states for both WL and QD, although faint in the spectra, are present for samples with deeper confining potentials. (author)

  10. Crustal anisotropy of Taihang Mountain Range using azimuthal variation of receiver functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Bao-feng; LI Juan; YAO Zhen-xing

    2008-01-01

    We discussed the possibility of studying crust anisotropy by analyzing azimuthal variation of the receiver functions and presented a technique for computing the transmission response of a flat-layered medium with arbitrarily ori- ented hexagonally symmetric anisotropy using the reflectivity algorithm. Using this method we investigated the crust anisotropy of Taihang Mountain Range (TMR). Our result shows that there is significant anisotropy with a slow symmetry axis in the upper crust and a fast symmetry axis in the lower crust. The anisotropy magnitude of about 8%~15% is found in the upper crust and a smaller magnitude of about 3%~5% in the lower crust. Orienta- tion of the symmetry axes and the depth of anisotropy appearance as deduced from the seismic records of four individual seismic stations are different from each other. The crust anisotropy beneath the four stations may be associated with the local crustal fabrics in a small area.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of medium-scale CMB anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A J

    1996-01-01

    Recent detections of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy at half-degree angular scales show considerable scatter in the reported amplitude even at similar angular resolution. We use Monte Carlo techniques to simulate the current set of medium-scale CMB observations, including all relevant aspects of sky coverage and measurement technique. The scatter in the reported amplitudes is well within the range expected for the standard cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model, and results primarily from the restricted sky coverage of each experiment. Within the context of standard CDM current observations of CMB anisotropy support the detection of a ``Doppler peak'' in the CMB power spectrum consistent with baryon density 0.01 < Omega_b < 0.13 (95% confidence) for Hubble constant H_0 = 50 km/s/Mpc. The uncertainties are approximately evenly divided between instrument noise and cosmic variance arising from the limited sky coverage.

  12. Effects of plastic anisotropy on crack-tip behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Tvergaard, Viggo; Kuroda, Mitsutoshi

    2002-01-01

    For a crack in a homogeneous material the effect of plastic anisotropy on crack-tip blunting and on the near-tip stress and strain fields is analyzed numerically. The full finite strain analyses are carried out for plane strain under small scale yielding conditions, with purely symmetric mode I...... loading remote from the crack-tip. In cases where the principal axes of the anisotropy are inclined to the plane of the crack it is found that the plastic zones as well as the stress and strain fields just around the blunted tip of the crack become non-symmetric. In these cases the peak strain...... on the blunted tip occurs off the center line of the crack, thus indicating that the crack may want to grow in a different direction. When the anisotropic axes are parallel to the crack symmetry is retained, but the plastic zones and the near-tip fields still differ from those predicted by standard isotropic...

  13. 3D analyses of cavitation instabilities accounting for plastic anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    , and the main focus is on the effect of different degrees of plastic anisotropy. Loading cases are considered, where all the macroscopic principal stresses differ. The numerical quasi‐static solutions are obtained by a full transient analysis of the equations of motion, in which the loading is applied so slowly......Full three dimensional cell model analyses are carried out for a solid containing a single small void, in order to determine the critical stress levels for the occurrence of cavitation instabilities. The material models applied are elastic‐viscoplastic, with a small rate‐hardening exponent...... that the quasi‐static solution is well approximated. A special procedure is used to strongly reduce the loading rate a little before the instability occurs. It is found that plastic anisotropy has a significant effect on the level of the critical stress for cavitation instabilities....

  14. CMB anisotropy induced by tachyonic perturbations of dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Libanov, M V; Sazhina, O S; Sazhin, M V

    2008-01-01

    We study effects of possible tachyonic perturbations of dark energy on the CMB temperature anisotropy. Motivated by some models of phantom energy, we consider both Lorentz-invariant and Lorentz-violating dispersion relations for tachyonic perturbations. We show that in the Lorentz-violating case, the shape of the CMB anisotropy spectrum generated by the tachyonic perturbations is very different from that due to adiabatic scalar perturbations and, if sizeable, it would be straightforwardly distinguished from the latter. The tachyonic contribution improves slightly the agreement between the theory and data; however, this improvement is not statistically significant, so our analysis results in limits on the time scale of the tachyonic instability. In the Lorentz-invariant case, tachyonic contribution is a rapidly decaying function of the multipole number $l$, so that the entire observed dipole can be generated without conflicting the data at higher multipoles. On the conservative side, our comparison with the da...

  15. Plastic anisotropy of straight and cross rolled molybdenum sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertel, C.-G. [Institut fuer Strukturphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: oertel@physik.tu-dresden.de; Huensche, I.; Skrotzki, W. [Institut fuer Strukturphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Knabl, W.; Lorich, A.; Resch, J. [PLANSEE Metall GmbH, A-6600 Reutte, Tyrol (Austria)

    2008-06-15

    The microstructure, texture and mechanical properties of molybdenum sheets produced by different rolling processes were investigated by orientation imaging in the scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and tensile tests, respectively. For comparable recrystallization degree of the sheets investigated, straight rolling with low reduction ratio produces {alpha}-fiber textures with a maximum at {l_brace}100{r_brace} <110>. At higher rolling degrees the maximum shifts to {l_brace}112{r_brace} <110>. Cross rolling increases the rotated cube component {l_brace}100{r_brace} <110>. The strong differences in the texture measured are reflected in the plastic anisotropy characterized by differences in the yield stress and Lankford parameter which were measured along directions in the rolling plane at angles of 0 deg., 45 deg. and 90 deg. with the rolling direction. The Taylor-Bishop-Hill theory is used successfully to qualitatively explain the plastic anisotropy.

  16. Large scale cosmic-ray anisotropy with KASCADE

    CERN Document Server

    Antoni, T; Badea, A F; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Blümer, H; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Büttner, C; Daumiller, K; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fessler, F; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Kampert, K H; Klages, H O; Maier, G; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Milke, J; Müller, M; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Petcu, M; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Risse, M; Roth, M; Schatz, G; Schieler, H; Scholz, J; Thouw, T; Ulrich, H; Van, J; Buren; Vardanyan, A S; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2004-01-01

    The results of an analysis of the large scale anisotropy of cosmic rays in the PeV range are presented. The Rayleigh formalism is applied to the right ascension distribution of extensive air showers measured by the KASCADE experiment.The data set contains about 10^8 extensive air showers in the energy range from 0.7 to 6 PeV. No hints for anisotropy are visible in the right ascension distributions in this energy range. This accounts for all showers as well as for subsets containing showers induced by predominantly light respectively heavy primary particles. Upper flux limits for Rayleigh amplitudes are determined to be between 10^-3 at 0.7 PeV and 10^-2 at 6 PeV primary energy.

  17. Backscatter, anisotropy, and polarization of solar hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of anisotropy, polarization, center-to-limb variation of the X-ray spectrum, and Compton backscatter are investigated in a study of solar hard X-rays. Effect of backscatter are found particularly important for anisotropic sources which emit hard X-rays predominantly toward the photosphere; for such anisotropic primary X-ray sources, the observed X-ray flux near 30 keV does not depend significantly on the position of the flare. In addition, the degree of polarization of the sum of the primary and reflected X-rays with energies in the 15 to 30 keV range may be as high as 30%. Determination of the height and anisotropy of the primary X-ray sources from study of the albedo patch is also discussed.

  18. Exhaustive Study of Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies in Quintessential Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, P; Riazuelo, A; Brax, Philippe; Martin, Jerome; Riazuelo, Alain

    2000-01-01

    Recent high precision measurements of the CMB anisotropies performed by the BOOMERanG and MAXIMA-1 experiments provide an unmatched set of data allowing to probe different cosmological models. Among these scenarios, motivated by the recent measurements of the luminosity distance versus redshift relation for type Ia supernovae, is the quintessence hypothesis. It consists in assuming that the acceleration of the Universe is due to a scalar field whose final evolution is insensitive to the initial conditions. Within this framework we investigate the cosmological perturbations for two well-motivated potentials: the Ratra-Peebles and the SUGRA tracking potentials. We show that the solutions of the perturbed equations possess an attractor and that, as a consequence, the insensitivity to the initial conditions is preserved at the perturbed level. Then, we study the predictions of these two models for structure formation and CMB anisotropies and investigate the general features of the multipole moments in the presenc...

  19. Three-dimensional mapping of single-atom magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shichao; Choi, Deung-Jang; Burgess, Jacob A J; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Loth, Sebastian

    2015-03-11

    Magnetic anisotropy plays a key role in the magnetic stability and spin-related quantum phenomena of surface adatoms. It manifests as angular variations of the atom's magnetic properties. We measure the spin excitations of individual Fe atoms on a copper nitride surface with inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy. Using a three-axis vector magnet we rotate the magnetic field and map out the resulting variations of the spin excitations. We quantitatively determine the three-dimensional distribution of the magnetic anisotropy of single Fe atoms by fitting the spin excitation spectra with a spin Hamiltonian. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of fully mapping the vector magnetic properties of individual spins and characterizing complex three-dimensional magnetic systems.

  20. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jaeckel, J. [Univ. of Durham, Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini- charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster. (orig.)

  1. Structural Anisotropy in Polar Fluids Subjected to Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A heuristic model based on dielectric continuum theory for the long-range solvation free energy of a dipolar system possessing periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) is presented. The predictions of the model are compared to simulation results for Stockmayer fluids simulated using three different cell geometries. The boundary effects induced by the PBCs are shown to lead to anisotropies in the apparent dielectric constant and the long-range solvation free energy of as much as 50%. However, the sum of all of the anisotropic energy contributions yields a value that is very close to the isotropic one derived from dielectric continuum theory, leading to a total system energy close to the dielectric value. It is finally shown that the leading-order contribution to the energetic and structural anisotropy is significantly smaller in the noncubic simulation cell geometries compared to when using a cubic simulation cell. PMID:22303290

  2. Non-elliptic wavevector anisotropy for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y.

    2015-11-01

    A model of non-elliptic wavevector anisotropy is developed for the inertial-range spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and is presented in the two-dimensional wavevector domain spanning the directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. The non-elliptic model is a variation of the elliptic model with different scalings along the parallel and the perpendicular components of the wavevectors to the mean magnetic field. The non-elliptic anisotropy model reproduces the smooth transition of the power-law spectra from an index of -2 in the parallel projection with respect to the mean magnetic field to an index of -5/3 in the perpendicular projection observed in solar wind turbulence, and is as competitive as the critical balance model to explain the measured frequency spectra in the solar wind. The parameters in the non-elliptic spectrum model are compared with the solar wind observations.

  3. Effect of anisotropy on HBT radii using leptonpair interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, Payal; Roy, Pradip K

    2014-01-01

    The effect of initial state momentum-space anisotropy on invariant mass dependence of HBT radii extracted from the leptonpair interferometry is presented here. We have studied the Bose-Einstein Correlation Function (BECF) for two identical virtual photons decaying to leptonpairs at most central collision of LHC energy having fixed transverse momentum of one of the virtual photons ($k_{1T}$= 2 GeV). The {\\em free streaming interpolating} model with fixed initial condition has been used for the evolution in anisotropic Quark Gluon Plasma (aQGP) and the relativistic (1+2)d hydrodynamics model with cylindrical symmetry and longitudinal boost invariance has been used for both isotropic Quark Gluon Plasma (iQGP) and hadronic phases. We found a significant change in the spatial and temporal dimension of the evolving system in presence of initial state momentum-space anisotropy.

  4. Large scale anisotropy studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, R., E-mail: rbonino@to.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica - IFSI, c.so Fiume 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); INFN sezione di Torino, v. P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2012-11-11

    Completed at the end of 2008, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been continuously operating for more than seven years. We present here the analysis techniques and the results about the search for large scale anisotropies in the sky distribution of cosmic rays, reporting both the phase and the amplitude measurements of the first harmonic modulation in right ascension in different energy ranges above 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} eV. Thanks to the collected statistics, a sensitivity of 1% at EeV energies can be reached. No significant anisotropies have been observed, upper limits on the amplitudes have been derived and are here compared with the results of previous experiments and with some theoretical expectations.

  5. Large scale anisotropy studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, R.

    2012-11-01

    Completed at the end of 2008, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been continuously operating for more than seven years. We present here the analysis techniques and the results about the search for large scale anisotropies in the sky distribution of cosmic rays, reporting both the phase and the amplitude measurements of the first harmonic modulation in right ascension in different energy ranges above 2.5×1017 eV. Thanks to the collected statistics, a sensitivity of 1% at EeV energies can be reached. No significant anisotropies have been observed, upper limits on the amplitudes have been derived and are here compared with the results of previous experiments and with some theoretical expectations.

  6. Anisotropy minimization via least squares method for transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Mateus A F C; Gabrielli, Lucas H; Spadoti, Danilo H

    2014-07-28

    In this work the least squares method is used to reduce anisotropy in transformation optics technique. To apply the least squares method a power series is added on the coordinate transformation functions. The series coefficients were calculated to reduce the deviations in Cauchy-Riemann equations, which, when satisfied, result in both conformal transformations and isotropic media. We also present a mathematical treatment for the special case of transformation optics to design waveguides. To demonstrate the proposed technique a waveguide with a 30° of bend and with a 50% of increase in its output width was designed. The results show that our technique is simultaneously straightforward to be implement and effective in reducing the anisotropy of the transformation for an extremely low value close to zero.

  7. Deciphering the Dipole Anisotropy of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the dipole anisotropy in the arrival directions of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) indicate a strong energy dependence of the dipole amplitude and phase in the TeV-PeV range. We argue here that these observations can be well understood within standard diffusion theory as a combined effect of (i) one or more local sources at Galactic longitude 120deg < l < 300deg dominating the CR gradient below 0.1-0.3 PeV, (ii) the presence of a strong ordered magnetic field in our local environment, (iii) the relative motion of the solar system, and (iv) the limited reconstruction capabilities of ground-based observatories. We show that an excellent candidate of the local CR source responsible for the dipole anisotropy at 1-100 TeV is the Vela supernova remnant.

  8. Controlling magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial FePt(001) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epitaxial equiatomic Fe50Pt50 thin films with a variable order parameter ranging from 0 to 0.9 and Fe100-xPtx thin films with x ranging from 33 to 50 were deposited on MgO (001) substrates by dc sputtering. A seed layer consisting of nonmagnetic Cr (4 nm)/Pt (12 nm) was used to promote the crystallinity of the magnetic films. The crystal structure and magnetic properties were gauged using x-ray diffraction and magnetometry. The magnetic anisotropy can be controlled by changing the order parameter. For Fe100-xPtx films, the increase in Fe composition leads to an increase in coercivity in the hard axis loop and causes a loss of perpendicular anisotropy.

  9. Lateral-drag Casimir forces induced by anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Nefedov, Igor S

    2016-01-01

    We predict the existence of lateral drag forces near the flat surface of an absorbing slab of an anisotropic material. The forces originate from the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, when the anisotropy axis of the material forms a certain angle with the surface. In this situation, the spatial spectra of the fluctuating electromagnetic fields becomes asymmetric, different for positive and negative transverse wave vectors components. Differently from the case of van der Waals interactions in which the forward-backward symmetry is broken due to the particle movement or in quantum noncontact friction where it is caused by the mutual motion of the bodies, in our case the lateral motion results merely from the anisotropy of the slab. This new effect, of particular significance in hyperbolic materials, could be used for the manipulation of nanoparticles.

  10. Dynamical Condensation in a Holographic Superconductor Model with Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Xiaojian; Park, Miok; Sunly, Khimphun

    2014-01-01

    We study dynamical condensation process in a holographic superconductor model with anisotropy. The time-dependent numerical solution is constructed for the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with complex scalar in asymptotic AdS spacetime. The introduction of dilaton field generates the anisotropy in boundary spatial directions. In analogy of isotropic case, we have two black hole solutions below certain critical temperature $T_c$, the anisotropic charged black hole with and without scalar hair, corresponding respectively to the supercooled normal phase and superconducting phase in the boundary theory. The instability of the supercooled anisotropic black hole will drive a small perturbation of the scalar field to rise exponentially, until the final stable hairy black hole configuration is reached. Via AdS/CFT correspondence, we extract time evolution of the condensate operator and anisotropic pressure of the boundary system. Both of them experience exponential growth and subsequent saturation, but with different...

  11. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic ODS steels - Temperature dependancy and anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, B.; Steckmeyer, A.; Rouffie, A.-L.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Ratti, M.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Tournie, I.; Rabeau, V.; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Kruml, T.; Kubena, I.

    2012-11-01

    Ferritic 14%Cr and 18%Cr ODS steels produced at CEA in round bars or plates were tested mechanically. The present paper reports results obtained in tension, impact, fatigue, creep and toughness tests. These tests were carried out at various temperatures and in different directions. These materials show a pronounced anisotropy at all tested temperatures. No matter the loading, the transversal direction is always found to be far less resistant than the longitudinal one. This anisotropy is mainly observed in terms of damage mechanisms, with intergranular fracture preferentially occurring along the extrusion direction. This intergranular fracture mode leads to very low and anisotropic toughness values and to the absence of tertiairy creep stage, pointing out the unstable nature of fracture, even at high temperature. The unrealistically high values of the Norton exponent measured in creep suggests the existence of a threshold stress, which is consistent with the mainly kinematic nature of the stress as revealed by fatigue tests.

  12. Optimization of artificial flockings by means of anisotropy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Makiguchi, Motohiro

    2010-01-01

    An effective procedure to determine the optimal parameters appearing in artificial flockings is proposed in terms of optimization problems. We numerically examine genetic algorithms (GAs) to determine the optimal set of such parameters such as the weights for three essential interactions in BOIDS by Reynolds (1987) under `zero-collision' and `no-breaking-up' constraints. As a fitness function (the energy function) to be maximized by the GA, we choose the so-called the $\\textyen gamma$-value of anisotropy which can be observed empirically in typical flocks of starling. We confirm that the GA successfully finds the solution having a large $\\textyen gamma$-value leading-up to a strong anisotropy. The numerical experience shows that the procedure might enable us to make more realistic and efficient artificial flocking of starling even in our personal computers.

  13. Differential expansion of space and the Hubble flow anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Wiltshire, David L

    2015-01-01

    The Universe on scales $10-100~h^{-1}$ Mpc is dominated by a cosmic web of voids, filaments, sheets and knots of galaxy clusters. These structures participate differently in the global expansion of the Universe: from non-expanding clusters to the above average expansion rate of voids. In this paper we characterize Hubble expansion anisotropies in the COMPOSITE sample of 4534 galaxies and clusters. We concentrate on the dipole and quadrupole in the rest frame of the Local Group. These both have statistically significant amplitudes. These anisotropies, and their redshift dependence, cannot be explained solely by a boost of the Local Group in the Friedmann-Lema\\^{i}tre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model which expands isotropically in the rest frame of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. We simulate the local expansion of the Universe with inhomogeneous Szekeres models, which match the standard FLRW model on $> 100~ h^{-1}$ Mpc scales but exhibit nonkinematic differential expansion on small scales. We res...

  14. Artificially engineered Heusler ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Q. L. Ma; Zhang, X. M.; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S.

    2015-01-01

    To extend density limits in magnetic recording industry, two separate strategies were developed to build the storage bit in last decade, introduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and adoption of ferrimagnetism/antiferromagnetism. Meanwhile, these properties significantly improve device performance, such as reducing spin-transfer torque energy consumption and decreasing signal-amplitude-loss. However, materials combining PMA and antiferromagnetism rather than transition-metal/rar...

  15. Flow anisotropies due to momentum deposition from hard partons

    CERN Document Server

    Tomasik, Boris

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear collisions at the LHC large number of hard partons are created in initial partonic interactions, so that it is reasonable to suppose that they do not thermalise immediately but deposit their energy and momentum later into the evolving hot quark-gluon fluid. We show that this mechanism leads to contribution to flow anisotropies at all orders which are non-negligible and should be taken into account in realistic simulations.

  16. Soliton collisions in soft magnetic nanotube with uniaxial anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Usov, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of stable magnetic solitons of various orders in soft magnetic nanotube with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy has been studied using numerical simulation. Solitons of even order are immobile in axially applied magnetic field. Odd solitons show decreased mobility with respect to that of head-to head domain wall. Solitons of various orders can participate in nanotube magnetization reversal process. Various coalescence and decomposition processes in soliton assembly are considered. It ...

  17. Seismic anisotropy of serpentinite from Val Malenco, Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Kern, H; Lokajicek, T; Svitek, T; Wenk, HR

    2015-01-01

    © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Serpentinites, deformed in mantle subduction zones, are thought to contribute significantly to seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle and have therefore been of great interest with studies on deformation, preferred orientation, and elastic properties. Here we present a combined study of a classical sample from Val Malenco, Italy, investigating the microstructure and texture with state-of-the art synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction...

  18. Crustal anisotropy from tectonic tremor in Guerrero, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesca-Pérez, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Raúl W.; Ortega, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    We present new shear wave anisotropy measurements in the continental crust in northern Guerrero obtained from tectonic tremor. Measurements of crustal anisotropy had not been performed in this area due to the lack of seismicity. However, tectonic tremor activity is abundant and offers an opportunity to determine anisotropy parameters. Polarization and splitting analyses were performed using broadband three-component seismograms. Results show that splitting times range between 0.07 and 0.36 s. These values are similar to the splitting magnitudes typically observed in the continental crust. The state of stress in the continental crust was investigated by inverting focal mechanisms determined in this study, and also from previous structural geology studies. Unfortunately, no stress measurements were possible in the area where tectonic tremor occurs. It was determined that, to the south of the study area, near the Pacific coast, and to the north, in the volcanic arc, the maximum compressive stress shows a general E-W trend. The fast polarization directions are oriented NE-SW and are oblique to the observed maximum compressive stress surrounding the study area. Thus, the relationship between the maximum compressive stress and the observed anisotropic pattern cannot be conclusively established. Several factors such as nonlinear strain in the continental crust as a result of Slow Slip Events, variations of pore fluid pressure, deep crustal mineralogy, and/or upper crust foliations and schistosity could be inducing the observed anisotropy pattern. In general, the fast axes tend to parallel the regional Laramide and Tertiary folds-and-thrusts which strike NNE-SSW. This system of folds-and-thrusts is highly foliated in low-grade schist and seems likely to control the anisotropic structure observed within the tectonic tremor region in Guerrero.

  19. Conductivity anisotropy of layered BiTe-SbTe-heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport properties of ordered bismuth and antimony tellurides are studied theoretically based on first-principle electronic structure calculations using a screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Greens function method. The anisotropy of the electron mobility both in the bulk materials and in layered BiTe-SbTe-heterostructures is analyzed within the relaxation time approximation of the Boltzmann theory. The influence of doping on the electrical conductivity is discussed applying the rigid band approximation.

  20. Conductivity anisotropy of layered BiTe-SbTe-heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavorsky, Bogdan; Hinsche, Nicki; Zahn, Peter [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Institut fuer Physik, Halle (Germany); Gradhand, Martin; Mertig, Ingrid [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Institut fuer Physik, Halle (Germany); MPI fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Transport properties of ordered bismuth and antimony tellurides are studied theoretically based on first-principle electronic structure calculations using a screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Greens function method. The anisotropy of the electron mobility both in the bulk materials and in layered BiTe-SbTe-heterostructures is analyzed within the relaxation time approximation of the Boltzmann theory. The influence of doping on the electrical conductivity is discussed applying the rigid band approximation.

  1. High Vp/Vs ratio: Saturated cracks or anisotropy effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.-Q.; Schubnel, A.; Fortin, J.; David, E. C.; Guéguen, Y.; Ge, H.-K.

    2012-06-01

    We measured Vp/Vs ratios of thermally cracked Westerly granite, thermally cracked Carrara marble and 4% porosity Fontainebleau sandstone, for an effective mean pressure ranging from 2 to 95 MPa. Samples were fluid-saturated alternatively with argon gas and water (5 MPa constant pore pressure). The experimental results show that at ultrasonic frequencies, Vp/Vs ratio of water saturated specimen never exceeded 2.15, even at effective mean pressure as low as 2 MPa, or for a lithology for which the Poisson's ratio of minerals is as high as 0.3 (calcite). In order to check these results against theoretical models: we examine first a randomly oriented cracked medium (with dispersion but without anisotropy); and second a medium with horizontally aligned cracks (with anisotropy but without dispersion). The numerical results show that experimental data agree well with the first model: at high frequency, Vp/Vs ratios range from 1.6 to 1.8 in the dry case and from 1.6 to 2.2 in the saturated case. The second model predicts both Vp/Sv and Vp/Sh to vary from 1.2 to 3.5, depending on the raypath angle relative to the crack fabric. In addition, perpendicular to the crack fabric, a high Vp/Vs ratio is predicted in the absence of shear wave splitting. From these results, we argue the possibility that high Vp/Vs ratio (>2.2) as recently imaged by seismic tomography in subduction zones, may come from zones presenting important crack anisotropy. The cumulative effects of crack anisotropy and high pore fluid pressure are required to get Vp/Vs ratios above 2.2.

  2. A method to detect positron anisotropies with Pamela data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panico, B. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Adriani, O. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G.C. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); University of Naples Federico II”, Department of Physics, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R. [University of Bari, Department of Physics, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E.A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bongi, M. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bottai, S. [University of Naples Federico II”, Department of Physics, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bruno, A. [University of Bari, Department of Physics, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Cafagna, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carbone, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH, Department of Physics, and the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Casolino, M. [INFN, Sezione di Rome Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome (Italy); RIKEN, Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama (Japan); Castellini, G. [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); De Donato, C. [INFN, Sezione di Rome Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome (Italy); and others

    2014-11-15

    The PAMELA experiment is collecting data since 2006; its results indicate the presence of a large flux of positron with respect to electrons in the CR spectrum above 10 GeV. This excess might also be originated in objects such as pulsars and microquasars or through dark matter annihilation. Here the electrons and positrons events collected by PAMELA have been analized searching for anisotropies. The analysis is performed at different angular scales and results will be presented at the conference.

  3. Structural Anisotropy in Polar Fluids Subjected to Periodic Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Karlström, Gunnar; Linse, Per

    2011-01-01

    A heuristic model based on dielectric continuum theory for the long-range solvation free energy of a dipolar system possessing periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) is presented. The predictions of the model are compared to simulation results for Stockmayer fluids simulated using three different cell geometries. The boundary effects induced by the PBCs are shown to lead to anisotropies in the apparent dielectric constant and the long-range solvation free energy of as much as 50%. However, the s...

  4. Electric Field Controlled Magnetic Anisotropy in a Single Molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Zyazin, Alexander S.; Berg, Johan W. G. van den; Osorio, Edgar A; Van Der Zant, Herre S J; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos P.; Leijnse, Martin; Wegewijs, Maarten R; May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter; Danieli, Chiara; Cornia, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We have measured quantum transport through an individual Fe$_4$ single-molecule magnet embedded in a three-terminal device geometry. The characteristic zero-field splittings of adjacent charge states and their magnetic field evolution are observed in inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the molecule retains its magnetic properties, and moreover, that the magnetic anisotropy is significantly enhanced by reversible electron addition / subtraction controlled with the gate voltag...

  5. The Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Paul T. P.; Altamirano, Pablo; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Chung-Cheng; Chen, Ke-Jung; Chen, Ming-Tang; Han, Chih-Chiang; Ho, West M.; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Ibanez-Romano, Fabiola; Jiang, Homin; Koch, Patrick M.

    2008-01-01

    The Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is the first interferometer dedicated to studying the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at 3mm wavelength. The choice of 3mm was made to minimize the contributions from foreground synchrotron radiation and Galactic dust emission. The initial configuration of seven 0.6m telescopes mounted on a 6-m hexapod platform was dedicated in October 2006 on Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Scientific operations began with the detection of a ...

  6. Seismic anisotropy below Mexico and its implications for mantle dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Stubailo, Igor

    2015-01-01

    We use data from seismic networks with unprecedented dense coverage to study the Earth's structure under Mexico. First, we develop a three-dimensional (3-D) model of shear-wave velocity and anisotropy for the Mexico subduction zone using fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion measurements. The 3-D nature of our surface-wave-based results allows for better understanding of the interaction between the subducting slab, mantle lithosphere, and asthenosphere in the top 200 km. ...

  7. Relativistic Plasma Polarizer: Impact of Temperature Anisotropy on Relativistic Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Stark, David J.; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Toncian, Toma; Mahajan, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    3D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the enhanced transparency of a relativistically hot plasma is sensitive to how the energy is partitioned between different degrees of freedom. We consider here the simplest problem: the propagation of a low amplitude pulse through a preformed relativistically hot anisotropic electron plasma to explore its intrinsic dielectric properties. We find that: 1) the critical density for propagation depends strongly on the pulse polarization, 2) two plasmas with the same density and average energy per electron can exhibit profoundly different responses to electromagnetic pulses, 3) the anisotropy-driven Weibel instability develops as expected; the timescales of the growth and back reaction (on anisotropy), however, are long enough that sufficient anisotropy persists for the entire duration of the simulation. This plasma can then function as a polarizer or a wave plate to dramatically alter the pulse polarization. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Contract Nos. DE-FG02-04ER54742 and DE-AC05-06OR23100 (D. J. S.) and NNSA Contract No. DE-FC52-08NA28512.

  8. Radial orbital anisotropy and the Fundamental Plane of elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Nipoti, Carlo; Londrillo, Pasquale; Ciotti, Luca

    2002-01-01

    The existence of the Fundamental Plane (FP) imposes strong constraints on the structure and dynamics of elliptical galaxies, and thus contains important information on the processes of their formation and evolution. Here we focus on the relations between the FP thinness and tilt and the amount of radial orbital anisotropy. By using N-body simulations of galaxy models characterized by observationally motivated density profiles, and also allowing for the presence of live, massive dark matter halos, we explore the impact of radial orbital anisotropy and instability on the FP properties. The numerical results confirm a previous semi--analytical finding: the requirement of stability matches almost exactly the thinness of the FP. In other words, galaxy models that are radially anisotropic enough to be found outside the observed FP (with their isotropic parent models lying on the FP) are unstable, and their end--products fall back on the FP itself. We also find that a systematic increase of radial orbit anisotropy w...

  9. Effects of spacetime anisotropy on the galaxy rotation curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Zhe; Li, Xin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Beijing (China); Li, Ming-Hua; Lin, Hai-Nan; Wang, Sai [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2013-05-15

    The observations on galaxy rotation curves show significant discrepancies from the Newtonian theory. This issue could be explained by the effect of the anisotropy of the spacetime. Conversely, the spacetime anisotropy could also be constrained by the galaxy rotation curves. Finsler geometry is a kind of intrinsically anisotropic geometry. In this paper, we study the effect of the spacetime anisotropy at galactic scales in the Finsler spacetime. It is found that the Finslerian model has close relations with the Milgrom's MOND. By performing the best-fit procedure to the galaxy rotation curves, we find that the anisotropic effects of the spacetime become significant when the Newtonian acceleration GM/r{sup 2} is smaller than the critical acceleration a{sub 0}. Interestingly, the critical acceleration a{sub 0}, although varies between different galaxies, is in the order of magnitude cH{sub 0}/2{pi} {proportional_to} 10{sup -10}ms{sup -2}. (orig.)

  10. Polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission due to electron pressure anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, S. V.; Khabibullin, I. I.; Churazov, E. M.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Astrophysical plasmas are typically magnetized, with the Larmor radii of the charged particles many orders of magnitude smaller than their collisional mean free paths. The fundamental properties of such plasmas, e.g. conduction and viscosity, may depend on the instabilities driven by the anisotropy of the particle distribution functions and operating at scales comparable to the Larmor scales. We discuss a possibility that the pressure anisotropy of thermal electrons could produce polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission. In particular, we consider coherent large-scale motions in galaxy clusters to estimate the level of anisotropy driven by stretching of the magnetic-field lines by plasma flow and by heat fluxes associated with thermal gradients. Our estimate of the degree of polarization is ˜0.1 per cent at energies ≳kT. While this value is too low for the forthcoming generation of X-ray polarimeters, it is potentially an important proxy for the processes taking place at extremely small scales, which are impossible to resolve spatially. The absence of the effect at the predicted level may set a lower limit on the electron collisionality in the ICM. At the same time, the small value of the effect implies that it does not preclude the use of clusters as (unpolarized) calibration sources for X-ray polarimeters at this level of accuracy.

  11. Pseudospin anisotropy of trilayer semiconductor quantum Hall ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravet, D.; Proetto, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    When two Landau levels are brought to a close coincidence between them and with the chemical potential in the integer quantum Hall regime, the two Landau levels can just cross or collapse while the external or pseudospin field that induces the alignment changes. In this work, all possible crossings are analyzed theoretically for the particular case of semiconductor trilayer systems, using a variational Hartree-Fock approximation. The model includes tunneling between neighboring layers, bias, intralayer, and interlayer Coulomb interaction among the electrons. We have found that the general pseudospin anisotropy classification scheme used in bilayers applies also to the trilayer situation, with the simple crossing corresponding to an easy-axis ferromagnetic anisotropy analogy, and the collapse case corresponding to an easy-plane ferromagnetic analogy. An isotropic case is also possible, with the levels just crossing or collapsing depending on the filling factor and the quantum numbers of the two nearby levels. While our results are valid for any integer filling factor ν (=1 ,2 ,3 ,... ), we have analyzed in detail the crossings at ν =3 and 4, and we have given clear predictions that will help in their experimental search. In particular, the present calculations suggest that by increasing the bias, the trilayer system at these two filling factors can be driven from an easy-plane anisotropy regime to an easy-axis regime, and then can be driven back to the easy-plane regime. This kind of reentrant behavior is a unique feature of the trilayers, compared with the bilayers.

  12. Anisotropy is Everywhere, to See, to Measure, and to Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Nick; Quadros, Eda

    2015-07-01

    Anisotropy is everywhere. Isotropy is rare. Round stones are collectors' items, and any almost cubic blocks are photographed, as they are the exception. The reasons for rock masses to frequently exhibit impressive degrees of anisotropy, with properties varying with direction of observation and measurement, are clearly their varied geological origins. Origins may provide distinctive bedding cycles in sedimentary rocks, distinctive flows and flow-tops in basalts, foliation in gneisses, schistosity in schists and cleavage in slates, and faults through all the above. We can add igneous dykes, sills, weathered horizons, and dominant joint sets. Each of the above are rich potential or inevitable sources of velocity, modulus, strength and permeability anisotropy—and inhomogeneity. The historic and present-day stress anisotropy provides a wealth of effects concerning the preferentially oriented jointing, with its reduced roughness and greater continuity. High stress may also have induced oriented micro-cracks. All the above reinforce disbelief in the elastic-isotropic-continuum or intact-medium-based assumptions promoted by commercial software companies and used by so many for modelling rock masses. RQD and Q are frequently anisotropic as well, and Q is anisotropic not just because of RQD. The authors, therefore, question whether the a priori assumption of homogeneous-isotropic-elastic behaviour has any significant place in the scientific practice of realistic rock mechanics.

  13. Anisotropies of Solar Energetic Electron Events Observed By Multiple Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresing, N.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Klassen, A.; Heber, B.; Malandraki, O.; Droege, W.; Kartavykh, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We combine energetic electron observations by the two STEREO spacecraft with ACE measurements at the Earth's longitude to investigate events with wide longitudinal spreads. We scanned the whole STEREO dataset up to mid-2013 and collected 21 of such events. To be counted as a wide-spread event, a minimum longitudinal separation angle of 80 degrees is requested between the source active region at the Sun and the magnetic footpoint of one spacecraft observing the event. Special attention is paid to anisotropies to distinguish different source and transport mechanisms leading to the unexpectedly wide particle spreads. One favorable mechanism is efficient perpendicular transport in the interplanetary medium leading to vanishing anisotropies for larger separation angles. Another scenario is a large particle spread which is performed close to the Sun either due to a coronal shock or due to coronal transport. In this case, the observations at 1 AU during the early phase of the events are expected to show significant anisotropies due to the wide injection range at the Sun and particle focusing during the outwards propagation. For both of the above scenarios we find events in our sample, which suit the expected observations and even further events, which suggest a more complex scenario.

  14. Biased Brownian motion in narrow channels with asymmetry and anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zheng; To, Kiwing

    2016-08-01

    We study Brownian motion of a single millimeter size bead confined in a quasi-two-dimensional horizontal channel with built-in anisotropy and asymmetry. Channel asymmetry is implemented by ratchet walls while anisotropy is introduced using a channel base that is grooved along the channel axis so that a bead can acquire a horizontal impulse perpendicular to the longitudinal direction when it collides with the base. When energy is injected to the channel by vertical vibration, the combination of asymmetric walls and anisotropic base induces an effective force which drives the bead into biased diffusive motion along the channel axis with diffusivity and drift velocity increase with vibration strength. The magnitude of this driving force, which can be measured in experiments on a tilted channel, is found to be consistent with those obtained from dynamic mobility and position probability distribution measurements. These results are explained by a simple collision model that suggests the random kinetic energy transfer between different translational degrees of freedom may be turned into useful work in the presence of asymmetry and anisotropy.

  15. Induced anisotropy in nanocrystalline FeCuNbSiB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of induced anisotropy Kind was studied in nanocrystalline Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9, as well as in the amorphous precursor and in amorphous Fe78B13Si9. The nanocrystalline alloy was produced from the precursor by annealing at 813 K for 1 h and possessed an average FeSi grain size of 13 nm, as determined from x-ray diffraction. Annealing in a 0.2 T field at 723--773 K, above Tc of the amorphous phase, resulted in low values of Kind. The data were compared to the micromagnetic theory of Kronmueller to determine activation energy spectra. Kind for the nanocrystalline alloy is well described by this theory, however, with an activation energy spectrum that is much narrower than for the amorphous alloys. The limiting value of the anisotropy is K∞ ∼ 13 J/m3 consistent with that expected for the anisotropy in Fe-20at%.Si with the DO3 structure

  16. Communication: Solute Anisotropy Effects in Hydrated Anion and Neutral Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Hui; Hou, Gao-Lei; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Valiev, Marat; Wang, Xue B.

    2013-01-21

    Specific ion effects in solvation processes are often rationalized in terms of spherically symmetric models involving an ion’s size, charge, and polarizability. The effects of permanent charge anisotropy, related to the polyatomic nature of complex solutes, are expected to play a role in solvation but the extent of their importance remains unexplored. In this work we provide compelling experimental and theoretical evidence that the anisotropic nature of complex polyoxyanion solutes can have a critical influence on the solvation process. Combined photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical modeling results show that the electron binding energy (EBE) of IO3-(H2O)n (n = 0 - 12) clusters is characterized by an anomalous drop at n = 10. Such behavior is unprecedented for rigid solute molecules, and is related to the anisotropy of the neutral iodate radical that displays a strong selectivity to solvent configurations generated by the charged anion complex. These results highlight the significance of solute anisotropy and its potential impact on ion specificity and selectivity in aqueous environments.

  17. The upper mantle anisotropy in Yunnan area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮爱国; 王椿镛

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave phase SKS of 11 earthquakes, collected from 23 stations of Yunnan Digital Seismic Network, is analyzed by fitting the theoretical transverse component with the observed one for determining the orientation and extent of polarization seismic anisotropy of upper mantle. Shear wave splitting is obviously observed in all stations except Heqing station (HQ). The results show that the polarization of fast split S-wave of upper mantle in Yunnan area is north-northeast in general and the time delay between fast and slow split shear waves is 0.5~2.0 s. It suggests that the influence of faults upon anisotropy analysis could not be neglected in such a geologically complex area. As the transitional zone between Qinghai-Tibetan plateau and the block of southern China, in Yunnan area the orientation of fast shear wave polarization indicating the subduction of Indian plate into Eurasian plate is the fundamental background of earth dynamics. While the southeast or south-southeast movement of Sichuan-Yunnan rhomb block, formed by the uplift of Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, plays an important role in the composition of complicated structural and stress environment of Yunnan area. The divergence between the fast direction and the movement of upper mantle indicates in Yunnan area there exists complex coupling effect between lower velocity layer or asthenosphere and crustal block. The distribution of structure driving force looks like a palm extending to northeast. According to the time delay between fast and slow split shear waves, it is deduced that the thickness of anisotropy layer is 60~225 km with variation range roughly equal to that of 104~260 km of the buried depth of lower velocity layer of the earth in Yunnan area. So it suggests the top of anisotropy zone starts from the bottom of crust or from the lower velocity layer varying with specific locations related to the tremendous variation of the Moho discontinuity in Yunnan area. Furthermore, it is deduced that the

  18. Ultra Low Energy Switching of Ferromagnet with Perpendicular Anisotropy on Topological Insulator by Voltage Controlled Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Bahniman; Pramanik, Tanmoy; Dey, Rik; Roy, Urmimala; Register, Leonard; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate, through simulation, an ultra low energy memory device on a topological insulator thin film. The device consists of a thin layer of Fe deposited on the surface of a topological insulator, Bi2Se3. The top surface of Fe is covered with MgO so that the ferromagnetic layer has perpendicular anisotropy. Current is passed on the surface of the topological insulator which switches the magnetization of the Fe ferromagnet through strong exchange interaction, between electrons contributing to the surface current on the Bi2Se3 and the d electrons in the ferromagnet, and spin transfer torque due to shunting of current through the ferromagnet. Voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy enables ultra low energy switching. Our micromagnetic simulations, predict switching time of the order of 2.4 ns and switching energy of the order of 0.16 fJ for a ferromagnetic bit with thermal stability of 90 kBT. The proposed structure combines the advantages of both large spin torque from topological insulators and those of perpendicular anisotropy materials. This work is supported by NRI SWAN and NSF NASCENT Center.

  19. Magnetization reversal of giant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at the magnetic-phase transition in FeRh films on MgO

    OpenAIRE

    Odkhuu, Dorj; Park, Noejung

    2015-01-01

    Phenomena originated from spin-orbit interaction, such as magnetic anisotropy (MA), Rashba-type interactions, or topological insulators, have drawn huge attention for its intriguing physics. In particular, the search for a novel antiferromagnetic material, with potentially large perpendicular MA (PMA), has been becoming very intensive for next-generation high density memory applications. Here, we propose that substitutions of transition metals Ru and Ir, neighboring and same group elements in...

  20. Anisotropy in Cosmic-Ray Arrival Directions in the Southern Hemisphere Based on Six Years of Data from the IceCube Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O’Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory accumulated a total of 318 billion cosmic-ray-induced muon events between 2009 May and 2015 May. This data set was used for a detailed analysis of the sidereal anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays in the TeV to PeV energy range. The observed global sidereal anisotropy features large regions of relative excess and deficit, with amplitudes of the order of 10‑3 up to about 100 TeV. A decomposition of the arrival direction distribution into spherical harmonics shows that most of the power is contained in the low-multipole (ℓ ≤ 4) moments. However, higher multipole components are found to be statistically significant down to an angular scale of less than 10°, approaching the angular resolution of the detector. Above 100 TeV, a change in the morphology of the arrival direction distribution is observed, and the anisotropy is characterized by a wide relative deficit whose amplitude increases with primary energy up to at least 5 PeV, the highest energies currently accessible to IceCube. No time dependence of the large- and small-scale structures is observed in the period of six years covered by this analysis. The high-statistics data set reveals more details of the properties of the anisotropy and is potentially able to shed light on the various physical processes that are responsible for the complex angular structure and energy evolution.

  1. Effects of the single-ion anisotropy on magnetic and thermodynamic properties of a ferrimagnetic mixed-spin (1, 3/2) cylindrical Ising nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Bi, Jiang-lin; Liu, Rui-jia; Chen, Xu; Liu, Jin-ping

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation has been performed in detail to study magnetic and thermodynamic properties of a ferrimagnetic mixed-spin (1, 3/2) cylindrical Ising nanowire with core-shell structure. The ground phase diagrams are obtained for different single-ion anisotropies. The system can display rich phase transitions such as the second- and first-order phase transitions, the tricritical points and the compensation points. Especially, emphasis has been given to the effects of the single-ion anisotropy and the temperate on the magnetization, the internal energy, the specific heat, the compensation points and hysteresis loops of the system as well as two sublattices. A number of characteristic phenomena such as such as various types of magnetization curves and triple, duadruple as well as quintuple hysteresis loops behaviors have been observed for certain physical parameters, originating from the competitions among the anisotropies, temperature and the longitudinal magnetic field. It is found that the single-ion anisotropy and the temperature strongly affect the coercivity and the remanence of the system. A satisfactory agreement can be achieved from comparisons between our results and previous theoretical and experimental works.

  2. Effect of heterogeneity and anisotropy related to the construction method on transfer processes in waste rock piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmira, Belkacem; Lefebvre, René; Aubertin, Michel; Bussière, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Waste rock piles producing acid mine drainage (AMD) are partially saturated systems involving multiphase (gas and liquid) flow and coupled transfer processes. Their internal structure and heterogeneous properties are inherited from their wide-ranging material grain sizes, their modes of deposition, and the underlying topography. This paper aims at assessing the effect of physical heterogeneity and anisotropy of waste rock piles on the physical processes involved in the generation of AMD. Generic waste rock pile conditions were represented with the numerical simulator TOUGH AMD based on those found at the Doyon mine waste rock pile (Canada). Models included four randomly distributed material types (coarse, intermediate, fine and very fine-grained). The term "randomly" as used in this study means that the vertical profile and spatial distribution of materials in waste rock piles (internal structure) defy stratigraphy principles applicable to natural sediments (superposition and continuity). The materials have different permeability and capillary properties, covering the typical range of materials found in waste rock piles. Anisotropy with a larger horizontal than vertical permeability was used to represent the effect of pile construction by benches, while the construction by end-dumping was presumed to induce a higher vertical than horizontal permeability. Results show that infiltrated precipitation preferentially flows in fine-grained materials, which remain almost saturated, whereas gas flows preferentially through the most permeable coarse materials, which have higher volumetric gas saturation. Anisotropy, which depends on pile construction methods, often controls global gas flow paths. Construction by benches favours lateral air entry close to the pile slope, whereas end-dumping leads to air entry from the surface to the interior of the pile by secondary gas convection cells. These results can be useful to construct and rehabilitate waste rock piles to minimize

  3. A new TiW seed layer for SmCo{sub 5} films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Weiming; Liu, Wenwu [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang, Xiao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Dai, Yifan; Cheng, Xiaomin [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Miao, Xiangshui, E-mail: miaoxs@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-11-15

    A new seed layer TiW is proposed for SmCo{sub 5} films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The influence of a TiW seed layer on the microstructure and the surface morphology of Cu underlayer are studied. The grain size and surface roughness dependence of Cu underlayer on the thickness and the annealing of the TiW seed layer are also investigated. The improvement in the perpendicular magnetic properties of SmCo{sub 5} film from the TiW seed layer is approved. The results show that a 5 nm Ti{sub 3}W{sub 7} seed layer improves the microstructure and surface morphology of Cu underlayer, and significantly improves the perpendicular magnetic properties of SmCo{sub 5} film. The diffusion barrier and a high melting point of the TiW seed layer are regarded as the physical mechanism of the improvement for SmCo{sub 5} film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiW seed layer improves the texture of Cu under layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiW seed layer decreases the surface roughness of Cu underlayer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A 5 nm TiW seed layer significantly improves the perpendicular coercivity of SmCo{sub 5} film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diffusion barrier and a high melting point of TiW seed layer are the physical mechanism of the improvement for SmCo{sub 5} film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  4. Effect of heterogeneity and anisotropy related to the construction method on transfer processes in waste rock piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmira, Belkacem; Lefebvre, René; Aubertin, Michel; Bussière, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Waste rock piles producing acid mine drainage (AMD) are partially saturated systems involving multiphase (gas and liquid) flow and coupled transfer processes. Their internal structure and heterogeneous properties are inherited from their wide-ranging material grain sizes, their modes of deposition, and the underlying topography. This paper aims at assessing the effect of physical heterogeneity and anisotropy of waste rock piles on the physical processes involved in the generation of AMD. Generic waste rock pile conditions were represented with the numerical simulator TOUGH AMD based on those found at the Doyon mine waste rock pile (Canada). Models included four randomly distributed material types (coarse, intermediate, fine and very fine-grained). The term "randomly" as used in this study means that the vertical profile and spatial distribution of materials in waste rock piles (internal structure) defy stratigraphy principles applicable to natural sediments (superposition and continuity). The materials have different permeability and capillary properties, covering the typical range of materials found in waste rock piles. Anisotropy with a larger horizontal than vertical permeability was used to represent the effect of pile construction by benches, while the construction by end-dumping was presumed to induce a higher vertical than horizontal permeability. Results show that infiltrated precipitation preferentially flows in fine-grained materials, which remain almost saturated, whereas gas flows preferentially through the most permeable coarse materials, which have higher volumetric gas saturation. Anisotropy, which depends on pile construction methods, often controls global gas flow paths. Construction by benches favours lateral air entry close to the pile slope, whereas end-dumping leads to air entry from the surface to the interior of the pile by secondary gas convection cells. These results can be useful to construct and rehabilitate waste rock piles to minimize

  5. Analytical solutions to the mass-anisotropy degeneracy with higher order Jeans analysis: a general method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Thomas; Fairbairn, Malcolm

    2013-07-01

    The Jeans analysis is often used to infer the total density of a system by relating the velocity moments of an observable tracer population to the underlying gravitational potential. This technique has recently been applied in the search for dark matter (DM) in objects such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies where the presence of DM is inferred via stellar velocities. A precise account of the density is needed to constrain the expected gamma-ray flux from DM self-annihilation and to distinguish between cold and warm DM models. Unfortunately, the traditional method of fitting the second-order Jeans equation to the tracer dispersion suffers from an unbreakable degeneracy of solutions due to the unknown velocity anisotropy of the projected system. To tackle this degeneracy, one can appeal to higher moments of the Jeans equation. By introducing an analogue to the Binney anisotropy parameter at fourth order, β' we create a framework that encompasses all solutions to the fourth-order Jeans equations rather than the restricted range imposed by the separable augmented density. The condition β' = f(β) ensures that the degeneracy is lifted and we interpret the separable augmented density system as the order-independent case β' = β. For a generic choice of β', we present the line-of-sight projection of the fourth moment and how it could be incorporated into a joint likelihood analysis of the dispersion and kurtosis. The framework is then extended to all orders such that constraints may be placed to ensure a physically positive distribution function. Having presented the mathematical framework, we then use it to make preliminary analyses of simulated dwarf spheroidal data leading to interesting results which strongly motivate further study.

  6. A New Maximum-Likelihood Technique for Reconstructing Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy at All Angular Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Markus; Desiati, Paolo; Díaz-Vélez, Juan Carlos; Fiorino, Daniel W; Westerhoff, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The arrival directions of TeV-PeV cosmic rays show weak but significant anisotropies with relative intensities at the level of one per mille. Due to the smallness of the anisotropies, quantitative studies require careful disentanglement of detector effects from the observation. We discuss an iterative maximum-likelihood reconstruction that simultaneously fits cosmic ray anisotropies and detector acceptance. The method does not rely on detector simulations and provides an optimal anisotropy reconstruction for ground-based cosmic ray observatories located in the middle latitudes. It is particularly well suited to the recovery of the dipole anisotropy, which is a crucial observable for the study of cosmic ray diffusion in our Galaxy. We also provide general analysis methods for recovering large- and small-scale anisotropies that take into account systematic effects of the observation by ground-based detectors.

  7. Proton temperature-anisotropy-driven instabilities in weakly collisional plasmas: Hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hellinger, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic instabilities in weakly collisional, high beta plasmas are investigated using two-dimensional hybrid expanding box simulations with Coulomb collisions modeled through the Langevin equation (corresponding to the Fokker-Planck one). The expansion drives a parallel or perpendicular temperature anisotropy (depending on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field). For the chosen parameters the Coulomb collisions are important with respect to the driver but are not strong enough to keep the system stable with respect to instabilities driven by the proton temperature anisotropy. In the case of the parallel temperature anisotropy the dominant oblique fire hose instability efficiently reduces the anisotropy in a quasilinear manner. In the case of the perpendicular temperature anisotropy the dominant mirror instability generates coherent compressive structures which scatter protons and reduce the temperature anisotropy. For both the cases the instabilities generate temporarily enough wave energy so that the ...

  8. Analysis of complex anisotropy decays from single-frequency polarized-phasor ellipse plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozer, Noga; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2016-06-01

    The anisotropy decay of a fluorescently-labelled macromolecule provides information on the internal and global dynamics of the macromolecule. Weber was a pioneer of fluorescent probes, polarization and polarized phase-modulation methods and revealed the power of combining or comparing these methods to disentangle complex modes of emission depolarization. In this paper we take a similar course and show that when measurements of dynamic depolarization are combined with steady-state anisotropy, complex anisotropy decays can be deduced from measurements at a single modulation frequency. Specifically, a double exponential anisotropy decay can be resolved by combining one of the polarized emission phasors with the steady-state anisotropy. The key is the polarized phasor ellipse plot which provides a convenient visualisation aid and reduces the dimensionality of the minimisation problem from three variables to one variable. We illustrate these concepts with an experimental measurement of the anisotropy decay of a small cytoplasmic fluorescent probe in live cells.

  9. A New Maximum-likelihood Technique for Reconstructing Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy at All Angular Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, M.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Desiati, P.; Díaz–Vélez, J. C.; Fiorino, D. W.; Westerhoff, S.

    2016-05-01

    The arrival directions of TeV–PeV cosmic rays show weak but significant anisotropies with relative intensities at the level of one per mille. Due to the smallness of the anisotropies, quantitative studies require careful disentanglement of detector effects from the observation. We discuss an iterative maximum-likelihood reconstruction that simultaneously fits cosmic-ray anisotropies and detector acceptance. The method does not rely on detector simulations and provides an optimal anisotropy reconstruction for ground-based cosmic-ray observatories located in the middle latitudes. It is particularly well suited to the recovery of the dipole anisotropy, which is a crucial observable for the study of cosmic-ray diffusion in our Galaxy. We also provide general analysis methods for recovering large- and small-scale anisotropies that take into account systematic effects of the observation by ground-based detectors.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking and its anisotropy of a PZT ferroelectric ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a PZT ferroelectric ceramics in various media, such as moist atmosphere, silicon oil, methanol, water and formamide, and its anisotropy have been investigated at constant load test using a single-edge notched tensile specimen. The results showed that SCC could occur in all media, and the threshold stress intensity factor of SCC in water and formamide, KISCC, revealed anisotropy. The KISCC for poling direction parallel to the crack plane, was greater than that perpendicular to the crack plane, similar to the anisotropy of fracture toughness KIC; however, the anisotropy factor of KISCC, which was =1.8 (in formamide) and 2.1 (in water), was larger than that of KIC, which is =1.4. The stress-induced 90° domain switching causes the anisotropy of KIC and KISCC, besides, the resistance of SCC also has anisotropy.

  11. Magnetic anisotropy investigations of (Ga,Mn)As with a large epitaxial strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juszyński, P.; Gryglas-Borysiewicz, M.; Szczytko, J.; Tokarczyk, M.; Kowalski, G. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoża 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Sadowski, J. [Max-IV Laboratory, Lund University, Lund SE-221 00 (Sweden); Institute of Physics, PAS, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Wasik, D. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoża 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic properties of 20 nm thick (Ga,Mn)As layer deposited on (Ga,In)As buffer with very large epitaxial tensile strain are investigated. Ga{sub 1−x}In{sub x}As buffer with x=30% provides a 2% lattice mismatch, which is an important extension of the mismatch range studied so far (up to 0.5%). Evolution of magnetic anisotropy as a function of temperature is determined by magnetotransport measurements. Additionally, results of direct measurements of magnetization are shown. - Highlights: • Magnetic anisotropy parameter in (Ga,Mn)As with a large epitaxial strain is determined. • Extension of a linear magnetic anisotropy dependence on lattice mismatch up to 2% is presented. • A linear dependence of magnetic anisotropy on magnetization is established. • Magnetic anisotropy dependence on temperature is shown. • Electrical transport measurements are successfully applied to study magnetic anisotropy.

  12. Time evolution of the anisotropies of the hydrodynamically expanding sQGP

    CERN Document Server

    Bagoly, Attila

    2015-01-01

    In high energy heavy ion collisions of RHIC and LHC, a strongly interacting quark gluon plasma (sQGP) is created. This medium undergoes a hydrodynamic evolution, before it freezes out to form a hadronic matter. The initial state of the sQGP is determined by the initial distribution of the participating nucleons and their interactions. Due to the finite number of nucleons, the initial distribution fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane anisotropy of the initial state can be translated into a series of anisotropy coefficients or eccentricities: second, third, fourth-order anisotropy etc. These anisotropies then evolve in time, and result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we investigate the time evolution of the anisotropies. With a numerical hydrodynamic code, we analyze how the speed of sound and viscosity influence this evolution.

  13. Inverse problem of polarimetry for homogeneous anisotropy media on basis of Mueller matrix calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenkov, S. N.; Oberemok, Y. A.

    2007-07-01

    The generalized matrix model of homogeneous anisotropy medium has been derived in Mar'enko et al. (Optics and Spectroscopy, 76(1), 94-96, 1994). Generalized Mueller matrix of homogeneous anisotropy medium, according to Mar'enko et al., is a product of the four matrices of basic types of anisotropy (in terms of Jones - simple properties): linear amplitude and phase and circular amplitude and phase anisotropy. As a result of non-commutativity of basic matrices and taking into account the first Jones equivalence theorem (JOSA 31, 493-499, 1941), it was note in Mar'enko et al. that there exist six orders (polarization bases) of multiplications of the basic matrices. In this paper we study the bases, in which matrices of phase anisotropy (linear and circular) are located between matrices of amplitude anisotropy. We show that these bases are not general

  14. Anisotropy of strength and deformability of fractured rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Noorian Bidgoli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anisotropy of the strength and deformation behaviors of fractured rock masses is a crucial issue for design and stability assessments of rock engineering structures, due mainly to the non-uniform and non-regular geometries of the fracture systems. However, no adequate efforts have been made to study this issue due to the current practical impossibility of laboratory tests with samples of large volumes containing many fractures, and the difficulty for controlling reliable initial and boundary conditions for large-scale in situ tests. Therefore, a reliable numerical predicting approach for evaluating anisotropy of fractured rock masses is needed. The objective of this study is to systematically investigate anisotropy of strength and deformability of fractured rocks, which has not been conducted in the past, using a numerical modeling method. A series of realistic two-dimensional (2D discrete fracture network (DFN models were established based on site investigation data, which were then loaded in different directions, using the code UDEC of discrete element method (DEM, with changing confining pressures. Numerical results show that strength envelopes and elastic deformability parameters of tested numerical models are significantly anisotropic, and vary with changing axial loading and confining pressures. The results indicate that for design and safety assessments of rock engineering projects, the directional variations of strength and deformability of the fractured rock mass concerned must be treated properly with respect to the directions of in situ stresses. Traditional practice for simply positioning axial orientation of tunnels in association with principal stress directions only may not be adequate for safety requirements. Outstanding issues of the present study and suggestions for future study are also presented.

  15. Anisotropy of strength and deformability of fractured rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Majid Noorian Bidgoli; Lanru Jing

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy of the strength and deformation behaviors of fractured rock masses is a crucial issue for design and stability assessments of rock engineering structures, due mainly to the non-uniform and non-regular geometries of the fracture systems. However, no adequate efforts have been made to study this issue due to the current practical impossibility of laboratory tests with samples of large volumes con-taining many fractures, and the difficulty for controlling reliable initial and boundary conditions for large-scale in situ tests. Therefore, a reliable numerical predicting approach for evaluating anisotropy of fractured rock masses is needed. The objective of this study is to systematically investigate anisotropy of strength and deformability of fractured rocks, which has not been conducted in the past, using a nu-merical modeling method. A series of realistic two-dimensional (2D) discrete fracture network (DFN) models were established based on site investigation data, which were then loaded in different directions, using the code UDEC of discrete element method (DEM), with changing confining pressures. Numerical results show that strength envelopes and elastic deformability parameters of tested numerical models are significantly anisotropic, and vary with changing axial loading and confining pressures. The results indicate that for design and safety assessments of rock engineering projects, the directional variations of strength and deformability of the fractured rock mass concerned must be treated properly with respect to the directions of in situ stresses. Traditional practice for simply positioning axial orientation of tunnels in association with principal stress directions only may not be adequate for safety requirements. Outstanding issues of the present study and suggestions for future study are also presented.

  16. Measurements of scattering anisotropy in dental tissue and zirconia ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María M.

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of biological structures is useful for clinical applications, especially when dealing with incoming biomaterials engineered to improve the benefits for the patient. One ceramic material currently used in restorative dentistry is yttrium cation-doped tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP) because of its good mechanical properties. However, its optical properties have not been thoroughly studied. Many methods for the determination of optical parameters from biological media make the assumption that scattered light is isotropically distributed over all angles. Nevertheless, real biological materials may have an angular dependence on light scattering, which may affect the optical behaviour of the materials. Therefore, the recovery of the degree of anisotropy in the scattering angular distribution is important. The phase function that represents the scattering angular distribution is usually characterized by the anisotropy coefficient g, which equals the average cosine of the scattering angle. In this work, we measured angularscattering distributions for two zirconia ceramic samples, pre-sintered and sintered, with similar thicknesses (0.48 mm and 0.50 mm, respectively) and also for a human dentine sample (0.41 mm in thickness). The samples were irradiated with a He-Ne laser beam (λ = 632.8 nm) and the angular-scattering distributions were measured using a rotating goniometer. The g values yielded were: -0.7970 +/- 0.0016 for pre-sintered zirconia, -0.2074 +/- 0.0024 for sintered zirconia and 0.0620 +/- 0.0010 for dentine. The results show that zirconia sintering results in optical behaviour more similar to those of dentine tissue, in terms of scattering anisotropy.

  17. Effective wavefield extrapolation in anisotropic media: Accounting for resolvable anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-04-30

    Spectral methods provide artefact-free and generally dispersion-free wavefield extrapolation in anisotropic media. Their apparent weakness is in accessing the medium-inhomogeneity information in an efficient manner. This is usually handled through a velocity-weighted summation (interpolation) of representative constant-velocity extrapolated wavefields, with the number of these extrapolations controlled by the effective rank of the original mixed-domain operator or, more specifically, by the complexity of the velocity model. Conversely, with pseudo-spectral methods, because only the space derivatives are handled in the wavenumber domain, we obtain relatively efficient access to the inhomogeneity in isotropic media, but we often resort to weak approximations to handle the anisotropy efficiently. Utilizing perturbation theory, I isolate the contribution of anisotropy to the wavefield extrapolation process. This allows us to factorize as much of the inhomogeneity in the anisotropic parameters as possible out of the spectral implementation, yielding effectively a pseudo-spectral formulation. This is particularly true if the inhomogeneity of the dimensionless anisotropic parameters are mild compared with the velocity (i.e., factorized anisotropic media). I improve on the accuracy by using the Shanks transformation to incorporate a denominator in the expansion that predicts the higher-order omitted terms; thus, we deal with fewer terms for a high level of accuracy. In fact, when we use this new separation-based implementation, the anisotropy correction to the extrapolation can be applied separately as a residual operation, which provides a tool for anisotropic parameter sensitivity analysis. The accuracy of the approximation is high, as demonstrated in a complex tilted transversely isotropic model. © 2014 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  18. Differential cosmic expansion and the Hubble flow anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Nazer, M. Ahsan; Wiltshire, David L.

    2016-06-01

    The Universe on scales 01–100 h‑1Mpc is dominated by a cosmic web of voids, filaments, sheets and knots of galaxy clusters. These structures participate differently in the global expansion of the Universe: from non-expanding clusters to the above average expansion rate of voids. In this paper we characterize Hubble expansion anisotropies in the COMPOSITE sample of 4534 galaxies and clusters. We concentrate on the dipole and quadrupole in the rest frame of the Local Group. These both have statistically significant amplitudes. These anisotropies, and their redshift dependence, cannot be explained solely by a boost of the Local Group in the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model which expands isotropically in the rest frame of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. We simulate the local expansion of the Universe with inhomogeneous Szekeres solutions, which match the standard FLRW model on gtrsim 100 h‑1Mpc scales but exhibit nonkinematic relativistic differential expansion on small scales. We restrict models to be consistent with observed CMB temperature anisotropies, while simultaneously fitting the redshift variation of the Hubble expansion dipole. We include features to account for both the Local Void and the "Great Attractor". While this naturally accounts for the Hubble expansion and CMB dipoles, the simulated quadrupoles are smaller than observed. Further refinement to incorporate additional structures may improve this. This would enable a test of the hypothesis that some large angle CMB anomalies result from failing to treat the relativistic differential expansion of the background geometry; a natural feature of solutions to Einstein's equations not included in the current standard model of cosmology.

  19. CMB Anisotropy due to Cosmic Strings in an Accelerated Expanding Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Rokni, S Y; Bordbar, M R

    2013-01-01

    We want to find the cosmological constant influence on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy due to cosmic strings. Considering the space-time metric of a cosmic string under the effect of a positive cosmological constant, the CMB anisotropy is studied. The result shows that a positive cosmological constant (i.e. the presence of cosmic strings in an accelerated expanding universe) weakens the anisotropy so that more strong resolution is needed to detect the corresponding influences on the CMB power spectrum.

  20. A simple model for the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in mixed ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.br [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. Gen. Tiburcio 80 SE/4, Urca, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cardoso, L.H.G., E-mail: lh.cardoso@yahoo.com.br [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. Gen. Tiburcio 80 SE/4, Urca, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    A simple model, based on the relative occupancy of tetrahedral and octahedral sites by different cations, is proposed for the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of mixed ferrite nanoparticles. According to this model, the total magnetocrystalline anisotropy is the weighted average of the contributions of the anisotropies of Fe{sup 3+} and M{sup 2+} ions in A and B sites. The model predictions are confirmed in the case of cobalt-zinc ferrite.

  1. Optical diode based on the one-way light-speed anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2011-01-01

    We report that a triangular Fabry-Perot resonator filled with a parity-odd linear anisotropic medium exhibiting the one-way light speed anisotropy acts as a perfect diode. A Linear crystal such as the nematic liquid crystals whose molecular structures break parity can exhibit the one-way light speed anisotropy. The one-way light speed anisotropy also can be induced in a non-linear medium in the presence of constant electric and magnetic field strengths.

  2. Vortex Turbulence due to the Interplay of Filament Tension and Rotational Anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Mi; MA Ping

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of scroll wave turbulence is investigated in excitable media with rotational anisotropy. We adopt the Barkley model with heterogeneity in the diffusion constants. Through comparative numerical studies, we demonstrate the vortex turbulence results from the rotational anisotropy's cooperation with negative filament tension or competition with positive filament tension. The presence of rotational anisotropy can enlarge the parameter region leading to negative-tension induced wave turbulence in isotropic media.

  3. Influence of shape anisotropy on microwave complex permeability in carbonyl iron flakes/epoxy resin composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Fu-Sheng; Qiao Liang; Zhou Dong; Zuo Wen-Liang; Yi Hai-Bo; Li Fa-Shen

    2008-01-01

    To explore the mechanism of carbonyl iron flake composites for microwave complex permeability, this paper investigates the feature of the flakes. The shape anisotropy was certified by the results of the magnetization hysteresis loops and the Mossbauer spectra. Furthermore, the shape anisotropy was used to explain the origin of composite microwave performance, and the calculated results agree with the experiment. It is believed that the shape anisotropy dominates microwave complex permeability, and the natural resonance plays main role in flake.

  4. Magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial (Ga,Mn)As on (113)A GaAs

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanowicz, W.; C. Sliwa; Aleshkevych, P.; Dietl, T.; M. Doppe; Wurstbauer, U.; Wegscheider, W.; Weiss, D.; Sawicki, M.

    2010-01-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy in (113)A (Ga,Mn)As layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy is studied by means of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry as well as by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and magnetooptical effects. Experimental results are described considering cubic and two kinds of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. The magnitude of cubic and uniaxial anisotropy constants is found to be proportional to the fourth and second power of saturatio...

  5. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of rhombohedral CoCO3 crystals at T = 0 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V. V.; Rudenko, V. V.; Tugarinov, V. I.; Vorotynov, A. M.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2014-03-01

    A method for calculating the contribution of exchange interaction to uniaxial anisotropy with the use of g' factors has been worked out using CoCO3 crystals as an example. The calculated contribution of dipole-dipole interactions to the anisotropy of CoCO3 is 0.93 cm-1. The sum of the contributions to the anisotropy constant of CoCO3 with the inclusion of the dipole-dipole interactions is 36.1 cm-1.

  6. The method for analysing jet azimuthal anisotropy in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lokhtin, Igor P; Snigirev, A M

    2002-01-01

    The azimuthal anisotropy of jet spectra due to energy loss of jet partons in azimuthally non-symmetric volume of dense quark-gluon matter is considered for semi-central nuclear interactions at collider energies. We develop the techniques for event-by-event analysing jet azimuthal anisotropy using particle and energy elliptic flow, and suggest the method for calculating coefficient of jet azimuthal anisotropy without reconstruction of nuclear reaction plane.

  7. Ellipsoidal anisotropy in elasticity for rocks and rock masses

    CERN Document Server

    Pouya, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    One of the interesting features with the ellipsoidal models of anisotropy presented in this paper is their acceptance of analytical solutions for some of the basic elasticity problems. It was shown by Pouya (2000) and Pouya and Zaoui (2006) that many closed-form solutions for basic problems involving linear isotropic materials could be extended by linear transformation to cover a variety of "ellipsoidal" materials. This paper will describe two main varieties of ellipsoidal elastic models and show how well they fit the in situ data for sedimentary rocks; numerical homogenization results for several varieties of fractured rock masses will also be provided.

  8. Shape anisotropy in zero-magnetostrictive rapidly solidified amorphous nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotărescu, C.; Atitoaie, A.; Stoleriu, L.; Óvári, T.-A.; Lupu, N.; Chiriac, H.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic behavior of zero-magnetostrictive rapidly solidified amorphous nanowires has been investigated in order to understand their magnetic bistability. The study has been performed both experimentally - based on inductive hysteresis loop measurements - and theoretically, by means of micromagnetic simulations. Experimental hysteresis loops have shown that the amorphous nanowires display an axial magnetic bistability, characterized by a single-step magnetization reversal when the applied field reaches a critical value called switching field. The simulated loops allowed us to understand the effect of shape anisotropy on coercivity. The results are key for understanding and controlling the magnetization processes in these novel nanowires, with important application possibilities in new miniaturized sensing devices.

  9. Unidirectional superscattering by multilayered cavities of effective radial anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Shi, Jianhua; Hu, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    We achieve unidirectional forward superscattering by multilayered spherical cavities which are effectively radially anisotropic. It is demonstrated that, relying on the large effective anisotropy, the electric and magnetic dipoles can be tuned to spectrally overlap in such cavities, which satisfies the Kerker's condition of simultaneous backward scattering suppression and forward scattering enhancement. We show such scattering pattern shaping can be obtained in both all-dielectric and plasmonic multilayered cavities, and believe that the mechanism we have revealed provides extra freedom for scattering shaping, which may play a significant role in many scattering related applications and also in optoelectronic devices made up of intrinsically anisotropic two dimensional materials.

  10. Texture and Anisotropy by Formation and Decomposition of Nickel Hydride

    OpenAIRE

    Tomov, I.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of microstructure and crystal direction on the extent of phase transformation (EPT) of Ni into β-NiH by cathodic charging with H has been investigated by X-ray diffraction, EPT is controlled by the crystal direction in the case of heat-treated specimens. In the case of electrodeposited specimens, the imperfections of which are commensurate with those of cold-worked metals, EPT is controlled by both the crystal direction and the “dislocation-induced” anisotropy at the same time. The...

  11. Frictional Anisotropy of Metal Nanoparticles Adsorbed on Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Khomenko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Friction force acting on silver and nickel nanoparticles sheared on a graphene sheet in different lateral directions is investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal the existence of frictional anisotropy for both metals. In most cases, the maximum value of the friction force is about two times larger than the minimum one. The form of dependencies of instantaneous values of the friction force components on the corresponding lateral components of the position of the centre of mass of the nanoislands strongly depends on sliding direction, varying between the sawtooth and the irregular one. A qualitative explanation of the results based on the “patch” model is proposed.

  12. Thermoelectric effects and anisotropy in magnetic films

    OpenAIRE

    Soldatov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    It was the purpose of this thesis to contribute to a better understanding of spin caloritronic phenomena and thermoelectric effects as well as the anisotropy of magnetic thin films. Mostly this work was motivated by the recent discovery of the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in Japan: a generation of a pure spin current across the interface between magnetic|nonmagnetic materials upon application of the temperature gradient along (transversal SSE) or across (longitudinal SSE) the interface. As the ...

  13. The behaviour of turbulence anisotropy through shock waves and expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, H. H.; Kollmann, W.; Vandromme, D.

    1985-01-01

    A second order closure has been implemented in an implicit Navier-Stokes solver to study the behavior of the Reynolds stresses under the influence of severe pressure gradients. In the boundary layer zone, the strongly sheared character of the mean flow dominates the turbulence generation mechanisms. However, the pressure gradients play also a very important role for these processes, but at different locations within the boundary layer. This aspect may be emphasized by the analysis of turbulence anisotropy through shock waves and expansions.

  14. Seismic determination of elastic anisotropy and mantle flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Yu, Y

    1993-08-27

    When deformed, many rocks develop anisotropic elastic properties. On many seismic records, a long-period (100 to 250 seconds), "quasi-Love" wave with elliptical polarization arrives slightly after the Love wave but before the Rayleigh wave. Mantle anisotropy is sufficient to explain these observations qualitatively as long as the "fast" axis of symmetry is approximately horizontal. Quasi-Love observations for several propagation paths near Pacific Ocean subduction zones are consistent with either flow variations in the mantle within or beneath subducting plates or variations in the direction of fossil spreading in older parts of the Pacific plate.

  15. Multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics with anisotropy and flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an extension of the multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) equilibrium model that includes pressure anisotropy and general plasma flows. This anisotropic extension to our previous isotropic model is motivated by Sun and Finn's model of relaxed anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic equilibria. We prove that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite, our anisotropic extension of MRxMHD reduces to anisotropic ideal MHD with flow. The continuously nested flux surface limit of our MRxMHD model is the first variational principle for anisotropic plasma equilibria with general flow fields

  16. Soliton collisions in soft magnetic nanotube with uniaxial anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Usov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure of stable magnetic solitons of various orders in soft magnetic nanotube with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy has been studied using numerical simulation. Solitons of even order are immobile in axially applied magnetic field. Odd solitons show decreased mobility with respect to that of head-to head domain wall. Solitons of various orders can participate in nanotube magnetization reversal process. Various coalescence and decomposition processes in soliton assembly are considered. It is shown that the general magnetization state of magnetic nanotube consists of chains of magnetic solitons of various orders.

  17. Elastic anisotropy in multifilament Nb$_3$Sn superconducting wires

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Alknes, P; Arnau, G; Bjoerstad, R; Bordini, B

    2015-01-01

    The elastic anisotropy caused by the texture in the Nb3Sn filaments of PIT and RRP wires has been calculated by averaging the estimates of Voigt and Reuss, using published Nb3Sn single crystal elastic constants and the Nb3Sn grain orientation distribution determined in both wire types by Electron Backscatter Diffraction. At ambient temperature the calculated Nb3Sn E-moduli in axial direction in the PIT and the RRP wire are 130 GPa and 140 GPa, respectively. The calculated E-moduli are compared with tensile test results obtained for the corresponding wires and extracted filament bundles.

  18. On the origin of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    OpenAIRE

    Follop, Ria; Rassat, Anais; Cooray, Asantha; Abdalla, Filipe B.

    2007-01-01

    Suggestions have been made that the microwave background observed by COBE and WMAP and dubbed Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may have an origin within our own Galaxy or Earth. To consider the signal that may be correlated with Earth, a correlate-by-eye exercise was attempted by overlaying the CMB map from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe on a topographical map of Earth. Remarkably, several hot spots in the CMB map are found to be well aligned with either large cities on Earth or region...

  19. Near-surface Seismic Anisotropy of Taiwan Revealed by Coda Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Wei; Chen, Ying-Nien; Gung, Yuancheng; Lee, Jian-Cheng; Liang, Wen-Tzong

    2016-04-01

    We report the near-surface (dependence of the empirical Green's functions of shear waves extracted from the coda waves of 398 local earthquakes with ML>4.0 during the time period from 2011 to 2014. We find the clear characteristic azimuthal dependence of Vs in all the measurements. Strengths of the obtained anisotropy are much stronger than those reported in seismic tomography and SWS measurements. Specifically, about half of the measured amplitudes of anisotropy are larger than 10%, and the strongest anisotropy is 34%. Patterns of the resulting anisotropy fall into two categories, and both are well correlated with the surface geology and ambient stress at the borehole sites. In general, the fast Vs polarization directions are parallel to sub-parallel to the mountain strikes in mountains belts, and to the directions of maximum compression stress in coastal plains and lowlands, suggesting that the anisotropy of shallow crust are dominated by orogeny-induced fabrics in mountain area and by stress-aligned cracks in places with sediments, respectively. From these new findings, together with results from our recent studies, we infer that the stress-aligned anisotropy are likely confined to the uppermost portion (dependence of Vs and strong anisotropy suggest that anisotropy properties are fairly coherent in the near-surface structure. The strong near-surface anisotropy also implies that delay times contributed by the shallow crust might have been underestimated in studies of shear-wave splitting measurements using the direct arrivals of earthquake waves.

  20. Onset of initial planar instability with surface-tension anisotropy during directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Jincheng; Yang, Gencang

    2009-11-01

    A simple model is presented to describe the variation of the onset of the initial planar instability with surface tension anisotropy during directional solidification. The effect of surface-tension anisotropy on the incubation time and the initial average wavelength of planar instability are predicted by the simple model quantitatively, which are also verified by phase field simulation. Investigation results reveal that surface-tension anisotropy is one of important factors in the dynamic process of planar instability. The contribution of surface-tension anisotropy to the tilting modulation is also analyzed by comparing the results from the present simple model with those from phase field simulation.

  1. Anisotropy of heat conduction in the heavy fermion superconductor UPt3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussier, Benoit; Ellman, Brett; Taillefer, Louis

    1994-12-01

    We report on the first measurement of the anisotropy of heat conduction in a heavy fermion superconductor, performed on a single crystal of UPt3 with a current parallel and perpendicular to the hexagonal axis. Beyond the temperature-independent anisotropy of the normal state, a clear additional anisotropy develops in the superconducting state. This direct measure of gap anisotropy places precise constraints on the possible states for the two zero-field phases. An axial gap is excluded for both, and a comparison with existing calculations favors a d-wave gap for the low-temperature phase.

  2. High T physics at STAR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhasis Chattopadhyay

    2003-05-01

    We discuss the capabilities of STAR in exploring the physics at high T in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion colisions from RHIC at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}=130$ GeV. Preliminary results show that the spectra of negatively charged particles get suppressed at larger T in comparison to $p\\overline{p}$ data. A strong azimuthal anisotropy observed at large transverse momentum region. A preliminary ratio $\\overline{p}=p$ has been measured by STAR-RICH detector. Some ongoing studies and future plans are discussed.

  3. Artificially engineered Heusler ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, X. M.; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S.

    2015-01-01

    To extend density limits in magnetic recording industry, two separate strategies were developed to build the storage bit in last decade, introduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and adoption of ferrimagnetism/antiferromagnetism. Meanwhile, these properties significantly improve device performance, such as reducing spin-transfer torque energy consumption and decreasing signal-amplitude-loss. However, materials combining PMA and antiferromagnetism rather than transition-metal/rare-earth system were rarely developed. Here, we develop a new type of ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting PMA based on abundant Heusler alloy families. The superlattice is formed by [MnGa/Co2FeAl] unit with their magnetizations antiparallel aligned. The effective anisotropy (Kueff) over 6 Merg/cm3 is obtained, and the SL can be easily built on various substrates with flexible lattice constants. The coercive force, saturation magnetization and Kueff of SLs are highly controllable by varying the thickness of MnGa and Co2FeAl layers. The SLs will supply a new choice for magnetic recording and spintronics memory application such as magnetic random access memory.

  4. Optical anisotropy of schwarzschild metric within equivalent medium framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, Sina; Rashidian, Bizhan

    2010-04-01

    It is has been long known that the curved space in the presence of gravitation can be described as a non-homogeneous anisotropic medium in flat geometry with different constitutive equations. In this article, we show that the eigenpolarizations of such medium can be exactly solved, leading to a pseudo-isotropic description of curved vacuum with two refractive index eigenvalues having opposite signs, which correspond to forward and backward travel in time. We conclude that for a rotating universe, time-reversal symmetry is broken. We also demonstrate the applicability of this method to Schwarzschild metric and derive exact forms of refractive index. We derive the subtle optical anisotropy of space around a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and uncharged blackhole in the form of an elegant closed-form expression, and show that the refractive index in such a pseudo-isotropic system would be a function of coordinates as well as the direction of propagation. Corrections arising from such anisotropy in the bending of light are shown and a simplified system of equations for ray-tracing in the equivalent medium of Schwarzschild metric is found.

  5. Fluorescence anisotropy (polarization): from drug screening to precision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hairong; Wu, Qian; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluorescence anisotropy (FA) is one of the major established methods accepted by industry and regulatory agencies for understanding the mechanisms of drug action and selecting drug candidates utilizing a high-throughput format. Areas covered This review covers the basics of FA and complementary methods, such as fluorescence lifetime anisotropy and their roles in the drug discovery process. The authors highlight the factors affecting FA readouts, fluorophore selection, and instrumentation. Furthermore, the authors describe the recent development of a successful, commercially valuable FA assay for Long QT syndrome drug toxicity to illustrate the role that FA can play in the early stages of drug discovery. Expert opinion Despite the success in drug discovery, the FA-based technique experiences competitive pressure from other homogeneous assays. That being said, FA is an established yet rapidly developing technique, recognized by academic institutions, the pharmaceutical industry, and regulatory agencies across the globe. The technical problems encountered in working with small molecules in homogeneous assays are largely solved, and new challenges come from more complex biological molecules and nanoparticles. With that, FA will remain one of the major work-horse techniques leading to precision (personalized) medicine. PMID:26289575

  6. A Pair Correlation Function Characterizing the Anisotropy of Force Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qi-Cheng; JI Shun-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Force networks may underlie the constitutive relations among granular solids and granular flows and inter-state transitions. However, it is difficult to effectively describe the anisotropy of force networks. We propose a new pair correlation Function g(r, 0) to describe the characteristic lengths and orientations of force chains that are composed of particles with contact forces greater than the threshold values. A formulation g(r,0) ? A(r)+b(r) cos 2(0 -n/2) is used to fit the g(r, 0) data. The characteristic lengths and orientations of force networks are then elucidated.%@@ Force networks may underlie the constitutive relations among granular solids and granular flows and inter-state transitions.However, it is difficult to effectively describe the anisotropy of force networks.We propose a new pair correlation function g(r,θ) to describe the characteristic lengths and orientations of force chains that are composed of particles with contact forces greater than the threshold values.A formulation g(r,θ)≈a(r) + b( r ) cos 2(θ-π/2) is used to fit the g(r,θ) data.The characteristic lengths and orientations of force networks are then elucidated.

  7. Tunnel Junction with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy: Status and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxing Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ, which arises from emerging spintronics, has the potential to become the basic component of novel memory, logic circuits, and other applications. Particularly since the first demonstration of current induced magnetization switching in MTJ, spin transfer torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM has sparked a huge interest thanks to its non-volatility, fast access speed, and infinite endurance. However, along with the advanced nodes scaling, MTJ with in-plane magnetic anisotropy suffers from modest thermal stability, high power consumption, and manufactural challenges. To address these concerns, focus of research has converted to the preferable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA based MTJ, whereas a number of conditions still have to be met before its practical application. This paper overviews the principles of PMA and STT, where relevant issues are preliminarily discussed. Centering on the interfacial PMA in CoFeB/MgO system, we present the fundamentals and latest progress in the engineering, material, and structural points of view. The last part illustrates potential investigations and applications with regard to MTJ with interfacial PMA.

  8. Gamma-ray background anisotropy from galactic dark matter substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Dark matter annihilation in galactic substructure would imprint characteristic angular signatures on the all-sky map of the diffuse gamma-ray background. We study the gamma-ray background anisotropy due to the subhalos and discuss detectability at Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We derive analytic formulae that enable to directly compute the angular power spectrum, given parameters of subhalos. As our fiducial subhalo model, we adopt M^{-1.9} mass spectrum with the lower cutoff of Earth-mass scale, subhalos radial distribution suppressed towards the galactic center, and luminosity profile of each subhalo dominated by its smooth component. We find that, for interesting multipole regime corresponding to \\theta <~ 1 deg, the angular power spectrum is dominated by a noise-like term, with suppression due to internal structure of relevant subhalos. For this fiducial model, if the subhalo contribution to the gamma-ray background is more than ~5%, Fermi will be able to detect subhalos through anisotropy, with a m...

  9. Scattering Anisotropy Measurements in Dental Tissues and Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Perez, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the behaviour of light propagation in biological materials is essential for biomedical engineering and applications, and even more so when dealing with incoming biomaterials. Many methods for determining optical parameters from biological media assume that scattered light is isotropically distributed over all angles. However, an angular dependence of light scattering may exist and affect the optical behaviour of biological media. The present work seeks to experimentally analyze the scattering anisotropy in different dental tissues (enamel and dentine) and their potential substitute biomaterials (hybrid dental-resin, nano-filled composite, and zirconia ceramic) and comparatively study them. Goniometric measurements were made for four wavelengths in the visible range, allowing a spectral characterization of the materials studied. Previously, for each material, measurements were made with two different sample thicknesses at the same wavelength, checking the behaviour of the angular scattering profile. The asymmetry of experimental phase functions was considered in the recovery of the scattering anisotropy factor. The results demonstrate that the thicker sample yielded a less forward-directed scattering profile than did the thinner sample. The biomaterials analysed show angular scattering comparable to those of the tissues that they may replace. Comparisons can be made by virtue of the low uncertainties found.

  10. Write operation in MRAM with voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munira, Kamaram; Pandey, Sumeet; Sandhu, Gurtej

    In non-volatile Magnetic RAM, information is saved in the bistable configuration of the free layer in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). New information can be written to the free layer through magnetic induction (Toggle MRAM) or manipulation of magnetization using electric currents (Spin Transfer Torque MRAM or STT-MRAM). Both of the writing methods suffer from a shortcoming in terms of energy efficiency. This limitation on energy performance is brought about by the need for driving relatively large electrical charge currents through the devices for switching. In STT-MRAM, the nonzero voltage drop across the resistive MTJ leads to significant power dissipation. An energy efficient way to write may be with the assistance of voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA), where voltage applied across the MTJ creates an electric field that modulates the interfacial anisotropy between the insulator and free layer. However, VCMA cannot switch the free layer completely by 180 degree rotation of magnetization. It can lower the barrier between the two stable configurations or at best, cancel the barrier, allowing 90 degree rotation. A second mechanism, spin torque or magnetic field, is needed to direct the final switching destination.

  11. Exhaustive study of cosmic microwave background anisotropies in quintessential scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brax, Philippe; Martin, Jérôme; Riazuelo, Alain

    2000-11-01

    Recent high-precision measurements of the CMB anisotropies performed by the BOOMERanG and MAXIMA-1 experiments provide an unmatched set of data allowing us to probe different cosmological models. Among these scenarios, motivated by the recent measurements of the luminosity distance versus redshift relation for type Ia supernovas, is the quintessence hypothesis. It consists of assuming that the acceleration of the Universe is due to a scalar field whose final evolution is insensitive to the initial conditions. Within this framework we investigate the cosmological perturbations for two well-motivated potentials: the Ratra-Peebles and the SUGRA tracking potentials. We show that the solutions of the perturbed equations possess an attractor and that, as a consequence, the insensitivity to the initial conditions is preserved at the perturbed level. Then, we study the predictions of these two models for structure formation and CMB anisotropies and investigate the general features of the multipole moments in the presence of quintessence. We also compare the CMB multipoles calculated with the help of a full Boltzmann code with the BOOMERanG and MAXIMA-1 data. We pay special attention to the location of the second peak and demonstrate that it significantly differs from the location obtained in the cosmological constant case. Finally, we argue that the SUGRA potential is compatible with all the recent data with standard values of the cosmological parameters. In particular, it fits the MAXIMA-1 data better than a cosmological constant or the Ratra-Peebles potential.

  12. Competing anisotropies in exchange-biased nanostructured thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, F. J. T.; Paterson, G. W.; Stamps, R. L.; O'Reilly, S.; Bowman, R.; Gubbiotti, G.; Schmool, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic anisotropies of a patterned, exchange biased Fe50Mn50/Ni80Fe20 system are studied using ferromagnetic resonance, supplemented by Brillouin light scattering experiments and Kerr magnetometry. The exchange biased bilayer is partially etched into an antidot geometry so that the system approximates a Ni80Fe20 layer in contact with antidot structured Fe50Mn50 . Brillouin light scattering measurements of the spin wave frequency dependence on the wave vector reveal a magnonic band gap as expected for a periodic modulation of the magnetic properties. Analysis of the ferromagnetic resonance spectra reveals eightfold and fourfold contributions to the magnetic anisotropy. Additionally, the antidot patterning decreases the magnitude of the exchange bias and modifies strongly its angular dependence. Softening of all resonance modes is most pronounced for the applied magnetic field aligned within 10∘ of the antidot axis, in the direction of the bias. Given the degree to which one can tailor the ground state, the resulting asymmetry at low frequencies could make this an interesting candidate for applications such as selective/directional microwave filtering and multistate magnetic logic.

  13. Increased anisotropy in neonatal meningitis: an indicator of meningeal inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Nath, Kavindra [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Lucknow, UP (India); Malik, Gyanendra K.; Gupta, Amit [King George' s Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Lucknow (India); Prasad, Kashi N. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Lucknow (India); Purwar, Ankur; Rathore, Divya; Rathore, Ram K.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Kanpur (India); Narayana, Ponnada A. [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Increased anisotropy in brain abscesses has been shown to be due to adhesion of inflammatory cells and is suggestive of an active inflammatory process. The objective of this study was to determine if similar changes occur in the pia-arachnoid on the surface of the cerebral cortex in patients with pyogenic meningitis, and if these changes regress following antibiotic therapy. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed on 14 term neonates (mean age 13 days) with bacterial meningitis and 10 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on areas including the leptomeninges, the cerebral cortex and adjoining subcortical white matter for quantitation of mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity (MD) values. Follow-up MRI was performed in five of the neonates in the patient group after 2 weeks of antibiotic treatment. FA and MD values were compared in patients before and after antibiotic treatment as well as with those in the healthy controls. Significantly higher FA values but no difference in MD values were observed in the patient group as compared to the healthy controls at both time points (before and after antibiotic treatment). Significantly decreased FA values in the frontal, occipital and temporal cortical regions were observed in patients following antibiotic treatment. DTI-derived FA may be of value in the noninvasive assessment of meningeal inflammatory activity and treatment response in neonates. (orig.)

  14. Flow anisotropy in rotating buoyancy-driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Hadi; Joshi, Pranav; Kunnen, Rudie P. J.; Clercx, Herman J. H.

    2016-08-01

    We report a combined experimental-numerical study of the effects of background rotation on large- and small-scale isotropy in rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) from both Eulerian and Lagrangian points of view. Three-dimensional particle-tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) are employed at three different heights within the cylindrical cell. The Lagrangian velocity fluctuation and second-order Eulerian structure function are utilized to evaluate the large-scale isotropy for different rotation rates. Furthermore, we examine the experimental measurements of the Lagrangian acceleration of neutrally buoyant particles and the second-order Eulerian structure function to evaluate the small-scale isotropy as a function of rotation rate. It is found that background rotation enhances large-scale anisotropy at the cell center and close to the top plate, while decreases it at intermediate height. The large-scale anisotropy, induced by rotation, has negligible effect on the small scales at the cell center, whereas the small scales remain anisotropic close to the top plate.

  15. Analysis of breast thermograms using Gabor wavelet anisotropy index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganthi, S S; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-09-01

    In this study, an attempt is made to distinguish the normal and abnormal tissues in breast thermal images using Gabor wavelet transform. Thermograms having normal, benign and malignant tissues are considered in this study and are obtained from public online database. Segmentation of breast tissues is performed by multiplying raw image and ground truth mask. Left and right breast regions are separated after removing the non-breast regions from the segmented image. Based on the pathological conditions, the separated breast regions are grouped as normal and abnormal tissues. Gabor features such as energy and amplitude in different scales and orientations are extracted. Anisotropy and orientation measures are calculated from the extracted features and analyzed. A distinctive variation is observed among different orientations of the extracted features. It is found that the anisotropy measure is capable of differentiating the structural changes due to varied metabolic conditions. Further, the Gabor features also showed relative variations among different pathological conditions. It appears that these features can be used efficiently to identify normal and abnormal tissues and hence, improve the relevance of breast thermography in early detection of breast cancer and content based image retrieval. PMID:25064085

  16. Shear wave anisotropy in D" region beneath the western Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Zhi-yang; LIU Bin; WANG Xiao-xiang; ZHA Xian-jie; ZHANG Hu; YANG Feng-qin

    2007-01-01

    Using seismic shear phases from 47 Tonga-Fiji and its adjacent region events recorded by the CENC and IRIS, and from 26 northeast Asia and north Pacific events recorded by IRIS, we studied the shear wave anisotropy in D" region beneath the western Pacific utilizing the ScS-S differential travel time method and obtained the splitting time values between the radial and transverse components of each ScS wave corresponding to each core-mantle boundary (CMB) reflection point. We found that most shear waves involved horizontally polarized shear wave components traveling faster than vertically polarized shear wave components through the D" region. The splitting time values of ScS wave range from (0.91 s to 3.21 s with an average value of 1.1 s. The strength of anisotropy varies from (0.45% to 1.56% with an average value of 0.52%. The observations and analyses show that in the D" region beneath the western Pacific the lateral flow is expected to be dominant and the vertical transverse isotropy may be the main anisotropic structure. This structure feature may be explained by the shape preferred orientation of the CMB chemical reaction products or partial melt and the lattice preferred orientation of the lower mantle materials caused by the lateral flow at lowermost mantle.

  17. Tensor anisotropy as a tracer of cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to find voids in cosmological simulations based on the tidal and the velocity shear tensors definitions of the cosmic web. We use the fractional anisotropy (FA) computed from the eigenvalues of each web scheme as a void tracer. We identify voids using a watershed transform based on the local minima of the FA field without making any assumption on the shape or structure of the voids. We test the method on the Bolshoi simulation and report on the abundance and radial averaged profiles for the density, velocity and fractional anisotropy. We find that voids in the velocity shear web are smaller than voids in the tidal web, with a particular overabundance of very small voids in the inner region of filaments/sheets. We classify voids as subcompensated/overcompansated depending on the absence/presence of an overdense matter ridge in their density profile, finding that close to $65\\%$ and $35\\%$ of the total population are classified into each category, respectively. Finally, we find evidence ...

  18. Tuning the magnetic anisotropy in single-layer crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, E.; Sahin, H.; Bacaksiz, C.; Senger, R. T.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of an applied electric field and the effect of charging are investigated on the magnetic anisotropy (MA) of various stable two-dimensional (2D) crystals such as graphene, FeCl2, graphone, fluorographene, and MoTe2 using first-principles calculations. We found that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of Co-on-graphene and Os-doped-MoTe2 systems change linearly with electric field, opening the possibility of electric field tuning MA of these compounds. In addition, charging can rotate the easy-axis direction of Co-on-graphene and Os-doped-MoTe2 systems from the out-of-plane (in-plane) to in-plane (out-of-plane) direction. The tunable MA of the studied materials is crucial for nanoscale electronic technologies such as data storage and spintronics devices. Our results show that controlling the MA of the mentioned 2D crystal structures can be realized in various ways, and this can lead to the emergence of a wide range of potential applications where the tuning and switching of magnetic functionalities are important.

  19. The influence of open fracture anisotropy on CO2 movement within geological storage complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, C. E.; Wightman, R.; Ringrose, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon mitigation through the geological storage of carbon dioxide is dependent on the ability of geological formations to store CO2 trapping it within a geological storage complex. Secure long-term containment needs to be demonstrated, due to both political and social drivers, meaning that this containment must be verifiable over periods of 100-105 years. The effectiveness of sub-surface geological storage systems is dependent on trapping CO2 within a volume of rock and is reliant on the integrity of the surrounding rocks, including their chemical and physical properties, to inhibit migration to the surface. Oil and gas reservoir production data, and field evidence show that fracture networks have the potential to act as focused pathways for fluid movement. Fracture networks can allow large volumes of fluid to migrate to the surface within the time scales of interest. In this paper we demonstrate the importance of predicting the effects of fracture networks in storage, using a case study from the In Salah CO2 storage site, and show how the fracture permeability is closely controlled by the stress regime that determines the open fracture network. Our workflow combines well data of imaged fractures, with a discrete fracture network (DFN) model of tectonically induced fractures, within the horizon of interest. The modelled and observed fractures have been compared and combined with present day stress data to predict the open fracture network and its implications for anisotropic movement of CO2 in the sub-surface. The created fracture network model has been used to calculate the 2D permeability tensor for the reservoir for two scenarios: 1) a model in which all fractures are permeable, based on the whole DFN model and 2) those fractures determined to be in dilatational failure under the present day stress regime, a sub-set of the DFN. The resulting permeability anisotropy tensors show distinct anisotropies for the predicted CO2 movement within the reservoir. These

  20. Working group report: Cosmology and astroparticle physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raghavan Rangarajan; Ajit Srivastava; A Bandyopadhyay; A Basak; M Bastero-Gil; A Berera; J Bhatt; K Bhattacharya; S Chakraborty; M Das; S Das; K Dutta; D Ghosh; S Goswami; U Gupta; P Jain; Y-Y Keum; E Masso; D Majumdar; A P Mishra; S Mohanty; R Mohapatra; A Nautiyal; T Prokopec; S Rao; D P Roy; N Sahu; A Sarkar; P Saumia; A Sen; A Shivaji

    2011-05-01

    This is the report of the cosmology and astroparticle physics working group at WHEPPXI. We present the discussions carried out during the workshop on selected topics in the above fields. The problems discussed concerned axions, infrared divergences in inflationary theories, supersonic bubbles in a first-order electroweak phase transition, dark matter, MOND, interacting dark energy, composite Higgs models and statistical anisotropy of the Universe.

  1. Uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy in silicon-iron films prepared using vacuum coating plant (VCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockar, H.; Meydan, T.

    2005-06-01

    The novel VCP system is a mobile physical deposition method to deposit metallic/magnetic films using various source materials including powder, lump, pre-alloyed ingots and wires. The VCP system consists of a large deposition area of 960 cm2 and has been used for the first time to prepare magnetic thin films of Si{3}Fe{97}. The source material evaporated by a resistively heated furnace, which was position right under the substrate within the VCP system, contains small pieces of conventional 3% silicon-iron steel as source materials. The magnetic analysis of the films was achieved by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Observations indicate that the magnetic anisotropy and coercivity are dependent on the type of substrate and the deposition conditions. Results of all films deposited on flexible kapton^TM are anisotropic in the film plane whereas the films deposited on glass substrate indicate the less-well defined anisotropy in the film plane while the substrate holder of the VCP system was run at the speed of 100 rpm. In the case of stationary magnetic materials production, the films deposited on kapton and glass substrates show isotropic magnetic behaviour. All films showed planar magnetic anisotropy irrespective of type of substrate and the production conditions used. The findings are discussed in terms of scaling up the technique for the possible production of various shapes of circular, square or strip components with the compositions equivalent to that of conventional electrical steels in order to investigate a possible future to produce large scale of silicon-iron as the core materials for rotating machines and power transformers.

  2. The hot hELicon eXperiment (HELIX) and the large experiment on instabilities and anisotropy (LEIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scime, E. E.; Keiter, P. A.; Balkey, M. M.; Kline, J. L.; Sun, X.; Keesee, A. M.; Hardin, R. A.; Biloiu, I. A.; Houshmandyar, S.; Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Carr, J.; Galante, M.; McCarren, D.; Sears, S.

    2015-01-01

    The West Virginia University Hot hELIcon eXperiment (HELIX) provides variable density and ion temperature plasmas, with controllable levels of thermal anisotropy, for space relevant laboratory experiments in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropy (LEIA) as well as fundamental studies of helicon source physics in HELIX. Through auxiliary ion heating, the ion temperature anisotropy (T ⊥/T ∥) is variable from 1 to 20 for parallel plasma beta (β = 8πnkT i∥/B 2) values that span the range of 0.0001 to 0.01 in LEIA. The ion velocity distribution function is measured throughout the discharge volume in steady-state and pulsed plasmas with laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The wavelengths of very short wavelength electrostatic fluctuations are measured with a coherent microwave scattering system. Operating at low neutral pressures triggers spontaneous formation of a current-free electric double layer. Ion acceleration through the double layer is detected through LIF. LIF-based velocity space tomography of the accelerated beam provides a two-dimensional mapping of the bulk and beam ion distribution functions. The driving frequency for the m = 1 helical antenna is continuously variable from 8.5 to 16 MHz and frequency dependent variations of the RF coupling to the plasma allow the spontaneously appearing double layers to be turned on and off without modifying the plasma collisionality or magnetic field geometry. Single and multi-species plasmas are created with argon, helium, nitrogen, krypton, and xenon. The noble gas plasmas have steep neutral density gradients, with ionization levels reaching 100% in the core of the plasma source. The large plasma density in the source enables the study of Aflvén waves in the HELIX device.

  3. Turbulence in collisionless plasmas: statistical analysis from numerical simulations with pressure anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowal, G [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Falceta-Goncalves, D A; Lazarian, A, E-mail: kowal@astro.iag.usp.br [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    In recent years, we have experienced increasing interest in the understanding of the physical properties of collisionless plasmas, mostly because of the large number of astrophysical environments (e.g. the intracluster medium (ICM)) containing magnetic fields that are strong enough to be coupled with the ionized gas and characterized by densities sufficiently low to prevent the pressure isotropization with respect to the magnetic line direction. Under these conditions, a new class of kinetic instabilities arises, such as firehose and mirror instabilities, which have been studied extensively in the literature. Their role in the turbulence evolution and cascade process in the presence of pressure anisotropy, however, is still unclear. In this work, we present the first statistical analysis of turbulence in collisionless plasmas using three-dimensional numerical simulations and solving double-isothermal magnetohydrodynamic equations with the Chew-Goldberger-Low laws closure (CGL-MHD). We study models with different initial conditions to account for the firehose and mirror instabilities and to obtain different turbulent regimes. We found that the CGL-MHD subsonic and supersonic turbulences show small differences compared to the MHD models in most cases. However, in the regimes of strong kinetic instabilities, the statistics, i.e. the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of density and velocity, are very different. In subsonic models, the instabilities cause an increase in the dispersion of density, while the dispersion of velocity is increased by a large factor in some cases. Moreover, the spectra of density and velocity show increased power at small scales explained by the high growth rate of the instabilities. Finally, we calculated the structure functions of velocity and density fluctuations in the local reference frame defined by the direction of magnetic lines. The results indicate that in some cases the instabilities significantly increase the anisotropy of

  4. Physical Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Resources Return to: What is Elder Abuse? Physical Abuse Physical abuse is physical force or violence that results in ... may be acquaintances, sons, daughters, grandchildren, or others. Physical abuse that is perpetrated by spouses or intimate partners ...

  5. Magnetic Anisotropy in Single Crystals of Ho2CO17 and Ho2Fe17

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Kurt Nørgaard; Nielsen, Oliver Vindex

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy constants K1, K2 and K4 have been measured for the uniaxial easy basal plane ferrimagnetic compounds Ho2Fe17 and Ho2Co17 at a temperature of 4.2 K, using vibrating sample magnetometers. The observed anisotropy constants K1 and K4 for both compounds are about an order...

  6. The adsorption of bipyridine molecules on Au(110) as measured by reflection anisotropy spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reflection anisotropy spectra of 2, 2'-bipyridine and 4, 4'-bipyridine adsorbed onto an Au(110) surface in an electrochemical cell demonstrate that both systems form ordered structures. It is shown that reflection anisotropy spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between structural isomers adsorbed on the Au(110) surface

  7. Seismic anisotropy above and below the subducting Nazca lithosphere in southern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Julia G.; Fischer, Karen M.; Anderson, Megan L.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study is to better constrain anisotropy and mantle flow above and below the Nazca slab from 28°S to 42°S through modeling of shear wave splitting in local S, SKS and SKKS (SK(K)S) phases. Comparisons of local S splitting times and path lengths in the slab, mantle wedge, and upper plate indicate that splitting times for arc and back-arc stations are consistent with anisotropy in the mantle wedge, but long slab paths to fore-arc stations imply that slab anisotropy is also significant. SK(K)S shear wave splitting observations and models for sub-slab anisotropy show that significant anisotropy is present below the slab, and that the orientation of sub-slab anisotropy sometimes differs from anisotropy above the slab. Anisotropy both above the slab and below the slab in the South American subduction zone is consistent with mantle flow that is driven by a combination of entrainment with downgoing slab motion and flow complexity related to variations in slab shape and slab rollback.

  8. Hysteresis in Fe particles with surface and magnetoelastic anisotropies: Experiment and micromagnetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sanchez, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: fgarcias@icmm.csic.es; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: oksana@icmm.csic.es; Martinez, A. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado. P.O. Box 155, 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: alvamartinez@adif.es; Gonzalez, J.M. [Unidad Asociada ICMM-IMA. c/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid, Spain and P.O. Box 155, 28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jesus.m.gonzalez@icmm.csic.es

    2008-02-01

    We report on the correlation between the experimentally obtained saturation coercive force of highly elongated Fe nanoribbons and the results of micromagnetic simulations. To describe various realistic situations in our micromagnetic model of the ribbons we incorporated, in addition to a biaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, surface magnetocrysalline and magnetoelastic anisotropies and crystalline orientation distributions.

  9. On the Origin of the Large Magnetic Anisotropy of Rare Earth-Cobalt Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in Co, YCo5, GdCo5, SmCo5 and Y2Co17 is analysed using a single-ion crystal field and isotropic exchange interaction. The large magnetic anisotropy at high temperatures in the alloys is due to significant deviations in the alloy lattices of t...

  10. Ginzburg-Landau theory of the superheating field anisotropy of layered superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Transtrum, Mark K.; Sethna, James P.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effects of material anisotropy on the superheating field of layered superconductors. We provide an intuitive argument both for the existence of a superheating field, and its dependence on anisotropy, for κ =λ /ξ (the ratio of magnetic to superconducting healing lengths) both large and small. On the one hand, the combination of our estimates with published results using a two-gap model for MgB2 suggests high anisotropy of the superheating field near zero temperature. On the other hand, within Ginzburg-Landau theory for a single gap, we see that the superheating field shows significant anisotropy only when the crystal anisotropy is large and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ is small. We then conclude that only small anisotropies in the superheating field are expected for typical unconventional superconductors near the critical temperature. Using a generalized form of Ginzburg Landau theory, we do a quantitative calculation for the anisotropic superheating field by mapping the problem to the isotropic case, and present a phase diagram in terms of anisotropy and κ , showing type I, type II, or mixed behavior (within Ginzburg-Landau theory), and regions where each asymptotic solution is expected. We estimate anisotropies for a number of different materials, and discuss the importance of these results for radio-frequency cavities for particle accelerators.

  11. Photoinduced anisotropy measurements in liquid-crystalline azobenzene side-chain polyesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, NCR; Ramanujam, P.S.; Hvilsted, Søren

    1996-01-01

    Reversible photoinduced anisotropy in a series of Liquid-crystalline azobenzene side-chain polyesters is investigated as a function of intensity of the write beam and the sample temperature. Measurements reveal that the erasing takes place at a temperature much higher than the glass transition...... temperature. induced anisotropy can be erased by heating the polyesters to approximately 80 degrees C....

  12. Magnetic and structural anisotropies of Co2FeAl Heusler alloy epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, M. S.; Petrisor, T., Jr.; Tiusan, C.; Hehn, M.; Petrisor, T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper shows the correlation between chemical order, lattice strains, and magnetic properties of Heusler Co2FeAl films epitaxially grown on MgO(001). A detailed magnetic characterization is performed using vector-field magnetometery combined with a numerical Stoner-Wohlfarth analysis. We demonstrate the presence of three types of in-plane anisotropies: one biaxial, as expected for the cubic symmetry, and two uniaxial. The three anisotropies show different behavior with the annealing temperature. The biaxial anisotropy shows a monotonic increase. The uniaxial anisotropy that is parallel to the hard biaxial axes (related to chemical homogeneity) decreases, while the anisotropy that is supposed to have a magnetostatic origin remains constant.

  13. Searches for Cosmic-Ray Electron Anisotropies with the \\textit{Fermi} Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M

    2010-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope on board the \\textit{Fermi} satellite (\\textit{Fermi}-LAT) detected more than 1.6 million cosmic-ray electrons/positrons with energies above 60 GeV during its first year of operation. The arrival directions of these events were searched for anisotropies of angular scale extending from $\\sim$ 10 $^\\circ$ up to 90$^\\circ$, and of minimum energy extending from 60 GeV up to 480 GeV. Two independent techniques were used to search for anisotropies, both resulting in null results. Upper limits on the degree of the anisotropy were set that depended on the analyzed energy range and on the anisotropy's angular scale. The upper limits for a dipole anisotropy ranged from $\\sim0.5%$ to $\\sim5%$.

  14. Is inner core seismic anisotropy a marker of plastic flow of cubic iron?

    CERN Document Server

    Lincot, A; Cardin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates whether observations of seismic anisotropy are compatible with a cubic structure of the inner core Fe alloy. We assume that anisotropy is the result of plastic deformation within a large scale flow induced by preferred growth at the inner core equator. Based on elastic moduli from the literature, bcc- or fcc-Fe produce seismic anisotropy well below seismic observations ($\\textless{}0.4\\%$). A Monte-Carlo approach allows us to generalize this result to any form of elastic anisotropy in a cubic system. Within our model, inner core global anisotropy is not compatible with a cubic structure of Fe alloy. Hence, if the inner core material is indeed cubic, large scale coherent anisotropic structures, incompatible with plastic deformation induced by large scale flow, must be present.

  15. Kinematic deprojection and mass inversion of spherical systems of known velocity anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, Gary A

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, the mass-anisotropy degeneracy inherent in the spherical stationary non-streaming Jeans equation has been handled by assuming a mass profile and fitting models to the observed kinematical data. Here, the opposite approach is considered: The equation of anisotropic kinematic projection is inverted for known arbitrary anisotropy to yield the space radial velocity dispersion profile in terms of an integral involving the radial profiles of anisotropy and of the observational data. Then, through the Jeans equation, the mass profile of a spherical system is derived in terms of double integrals of observable quantities. Single integral formulas are provided for several simple anisotropy models (isotropic, radial, circular, general constant, Osipkov-Merritt, Mamon-Lokas and Diemand-Moore-Stadel). Tests of the mass inversion on NFW models with the first four of these anisotropy models yield accurate results in the case of perfect observational data, and typically better than 70% accurate mass profiles f...

  16. Electric anisotropy in high density polyethylene + carbon black composites induced by mechanical deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigueras-Santiago, E; Hernandez-Lopez, S; Camacho-Lopez, M A; Lara-Sanjuan, O, E-mail: eviguerass@uaemex.m [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA), Facultad de Quimica, UAEM. Paseo Colon esq. con Paseo Tollocan, s/n. C.P. 50000, Toluca (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    High density polyethylene + carbon black composites with electrical anisotropy was studied. Electrical anisotropy was induced by uniaxial mechanical deformation and injection moulding. We show that anisotropy depends on the carbon black concentration and percentage deformation. Resistivity had the highest anisotropy resistivity around the percolation threshold. Perpendicular resistivity showed two magnitude orders higher than parallel resistivity for injected samples, whereas resistivity showed an inverse behaviour for 100% tensile samples. Both directions were set respect to the deformation axe. Anisotropy could be explained in terms of the molecular deformation (alignment) of the polymer chains as a response of the deformation process originating a redistribution of the carbon black particles in both directions. Alignment of the polymer chains was evidenced by polarized Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Performance of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe AST-201 Star Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, David K.; vanBezooijen, Roelof; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) was launched to create a full-sky map of the cosmic microwave background. MAP incorporates two modified Lockheed Martin AST-201 (Autonomous Star Tracker) star trackers. The AST-201 employs an eight element radiation hardened lens assembly which is used to focus an image on a charge coupled device (CCD). The CCD image is then processed by a star identification algorithm which outputs a three-axis attitude. A CCD-shift algorithm called Time Delayed Integration (TDI) was also included in each star tracker. In order to provide some radiation effect filtering during MAP's three to five phasing loop passes through the Van Allen radiation belts, a simple pixel filtering scheme was implemented, rather than using a more complex, but more robust windowing algorithm. The trackers also include a fiber optic data interface. This paper details the ground testing that was accomplished on the MAP trackers.

  18. Turbulent heat transport and its anisotropy in an impinging jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petera Karel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent heat transport is anisotropic in many cases as reported by several researchers. RANS-based turbulence models use the turbulent viscosity when expressing the turbulent heat flux in the energy balance (analogy of the Reynolds stresses in the momentum balance. The turbulent (eddy viscosity calculation comes from the Boussinesq analogy mainly and it represents just a scalar value, hence a possible anisotropy in the turbulent flow field cannot be simply transferred to the temperature field. The computational cost of a LES-based approach can be too prohibitive in complex cases, therefore simpler explicit algebraic heat flux models describing the turbulent heat flux in the time-averaged energy equation could be used to get more accurate CFD results. This paper compares several turbulence models for the case of a turbulent impinging jet and deals with a methodology of implementing a user-defined function describing the anisotropic turbulent heat flux in a CFD code.

  19. The Optical Design and Characterization of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Page, L; Barnes, C; Bennett, C; Halpern, M; Hinshaw, G; Jarosik, N C; Kogut, A J; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wilkinson, D T; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2003-01-01

    The primary goal of the MAP satellite, now in orbit, is to make high fidelity polarization sensitive maps of the full sky in five frequency bands between 20 and 100 GHz. From these maps we will characterize the properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and Galactic and extragalactic emission on angular scales ranging from the effective beam size, <0.23 degree, to the full sky. MAP is a differential microwave radiometer. Two back-to-back shaped offset Gregorian telescopes feed two mirror symmetric arrays of ten corrugated feeds. We describe the prelaunch design and characterization of the optical system, compare the optical models to the measurements, and consider multiple possible sources of systematic error.

  20. The anisotropy of Hf diffusion in {alpha}-Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, G.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Zou, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Roy, J.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Schultz, R.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Matsuura, N. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Jackman, J.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.]|[Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-02-01

    Hf diffusion coefficients (D) have been measured ({proportional_to}870-1100 K) in directions parallel (D{sub pa}) and perpendicular (D{sub pe}) to the c-axis of double-faced, single-crystal specimens of both high purity (HP) and nominally pure (NP) {alpha}-Zr. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Hf diffusion in HP {alpha}-Zr is characterised by an activation energy of about 3.0 eV and a pre-exponential factor of about 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/s. The anisotropy ratio, D{sub pa}/D{sub pe}, is {proportional_to}<1.0 for the HP specimens and mostly >1.0 for the NP specimens. A dependence of D on diffusion time/depth is indicated for some experiments on NP Zr. (orig.).

  1. Reflectance anisotropy spectra of CdTe(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Nava, R.A.; Arzate, N.; Mendoza, B.S. [Photonics Division, Centro de Investigaciones en Optica A. C., Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2010-08-15

    We present first-principles calculations of reflectance anisotropy spectra (RAS) of the more common CdTe(001) surface reconstructions: Te-terminated (2 x 1) and Cd-terminated (2 x 1) and c(2 x 2). The last two reconstructions with a Cd coverage of half atomic layers. Calculations have been performed by using the density-functional formalism within the local-density approximation + scissors corrections. The electron-ion interaction has been modeled by ab initio, relativistic norm-conserving pseudopotentials. We have also calculated RAS spectra using a semi-empirical tight binding method (SETB) within a sp{sup 3} s{sup *} basis. We show RAS of each surface reconstruction and compare our theoretical results with experimental results reported in the literature and we found a good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectra for the (2 x 1) reconstructions. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Polarization Patterns Control Based on Photoinduced Anisotropy of Photochromic Fulgide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王英利; 姚保利; 门克内木乐; 陈懿; 黎甜楷; 郑媛; 雷铭; 董卫斌; 樊美公; 陈国夫

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the photoinduced anisotropy of a photochromic material of pyrrylfulgide/PMMA films. It is proven that when the film is illuminated with a linear polarization light, an optical axis that has the same polarization as the excitation light could be induced in the film. A matrix of light spots with different polarizations is recorded on the pyrrylfulgide/PMMA film. When reading out with non-polarization light, the matrix of light spots shows no information of patterns. However, when reading out with different linear polarization lights, different patterns could be observed. The experiment confirms that the pyrrylfulgide/PMMA film could be used to record two different polarization patterns in a matrix of spots. This property may be applied in camouflage technology.

  3. Anisotropy and micromagnetics in complex oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Thomas Andrew

    Complex oxide perovskites are a class of material with a remarkably wide range of functional properties including magnetism, superconductivity, metal-to-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance, and in some cases high magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Reduction in length scales through thin film deposition and nanopatterning results in altered properties from their bulk constituents. In this work, thin films of La0.7Sr0.3CoO3 (LSCO) and LSCO/La 0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) bilayers of varying thicknesses were deposited onto (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2TaAlO 6)0.7 (LSAT) substrates, and their anisotropic magnetic properties were measured along the in- plane [100] and [110] directions using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry and soft x-ray magnetic spectroscopy. The LSCO showed thickness dependent magnetism, and films were non-magnetic below a critical thickness of 4 nm. Magnetic LSCO films showed unique anisotropic effects on the saturation magnetization (Ms), with a lower M s in the [110] direction than the [100] direction. This potentially indicates the existence of a hard component in the [110] direction that is not being switched at fields in the SQUID magnetometer (7 T). Normalized hysteresis loops indicate the LSCO films display little magnetocrystalline anisotropy within the plane of the film. LSCO/LSMO bilayers with a fixed LSMO layer of 6 nm in thickness showed cobalt magnetism at thicknesses where single layers were non-magnetic, suggesting that the substrate/film interface is not the cause of the non-magnetic layer in the LSCO thin films. Magnetic coupling occurs in bilayers with LSCO layer thicknesses of below 4 nm, and both LSCO and LSMO layers showed a [110] easy axis. When the layer thickness of LSCO was increased above 8 nm, the LSCO layer developed a soft component at the LSCO/LSMO interface. This soft LSCO component remained coupled with the LSMO, though the easy axis changed to the [100] direction, and the harder, non-interface LSCO

  4. INTERPRETING MAGNETIC VARIANCE ANISOTROPY MEASUREMENTS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Podesta, J. J., E-mail: jason-tenbarge@uiowa.edu [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-07-10

    The magnetic variance anisotropy (A{sub m}) of the solar wind has been used widely as a method to identify the nature of solar wind turbulent fluctuations; however, a thorough discussion of the meaning and interpretation of the A{sub m} has not appeared in the literature. This paper explores the implications and limitations of using the A{sub m} as a method for constraining the solar wind fluctuation mode composition and presents a more informative method for interpreting spacecraft data. The paper also compares predictions of the A{sub m} from linear theory to nonlinear turbulence simulations and solar wind measurements. In both cases, linear theory compares well and suggests that the solar wind for the interval studied is dominantly Alfvenic in the inertial and dissipation ranges to scales of k{rho}{sub i} {approx_equal} 5.

  5. First Intrinsic Anisotropy Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Padin, S; Mason, B S; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Shepherd, M C; Sievers, J L; Udomprasert, P S; Holzapfel, W L; Myers, S T; Carlstrom, J E; Leitch, E M; Joy, M; Bronfman, L; May, J

    2001-01-01

    We present the first results of observations of the intrinsic anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with the Cosmic Background Imager from a site at 5080 m altitude in northern Chile. Our observations show a sharp decrease in C_l in the range l = 400 - 1500. Such a decrease in power at high l is one of the fundamental predictions of the standard cosmological model, and these are the first observations which cover a broad enough l-range to show this decrease in a single experiment. The power, C_l, at l ~ 600 is higher than measured by Boomerang and Maxima, with the differences being significant at the 2.7sigma and 1.9sigma levels, respectively. The C_l we have measured enable us to place limits on the density parameter, Omega(tot) = 0.7 (90% confidence).

  6. Azimuthal Anisotropies as Stringent Test for Nuclear Transport Models

    CERN Document Server

    Crochet, Philippe; Donà, R

    1997-01-01

    Azimuthal distributions of charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in Au+Au collisions at 600AMeV have been measured using the FOPI facility at GSI-Darmstadt. Data show a strong increase of the in-plane azimuthal anisotropy ratio with the charge of the detected fragment. Intermediate mass fragments are found to exhibit a strong momentum-space alignment with respect of the reaction plane. The experimental results are presented as a function of the polar center-of-mass angle and over a broad range of impact parameters. They are compared to the predictions of the Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics model using three different parametrisations of the equation of state. We show that such highly accurate data provide stringent test for microscopic transport models and can potentially constrain separately the stiffness of the nuclear equation of state and the momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction.

  7. Electromagnetic waves and electron anisotropies downstream of supercritical interplanetary shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, L B; Szabo, A; Breneman, A; Cattell, C A; Goetz, K; Kellogg, P J; Kersten, K; Kasper, J C; Maruca, B A; Pulupa, M

    2012-01-01

    We present waveform observations of electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler waves with f_ci 1.01. Thus, the whistler mode waves appear to be driven by a heat flux instability and cause perpendicular heating of the halo electrons. The lower hybrid waves show a much weaker correlation between \\partialB and normalized heat flux magnitude and are often observed near magnetic field gradients. A third type of event shows fluctuations consistent with a mixture of both lower hybrid and whistler mode waves. These results suggest that whistler waves may indeed be regulating the electron heat flux and the halo temperature anisotropy, which is important for theories and simulations of electron distribution evolution from the sun to the earth.

  8. Magnetic anisotropy study of triangular-shaped Co nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imperia, P. [Hahn Meitner Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: paolo.imperia@ansto.gov.au; Kandulski, W.; Kosiorek, A. [CESAR Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn (Germany); Glaczynska, H. [CESAR Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn (Germany); Department of Macromolecular Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, Poznan (Poland); Maletta, H. [Hahn Meitner Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Giersig, M. [CESAR Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) have been used to measure the magnetic and geometrical characteristics of triangular-shaped Co structures of lateral size 730 nm and thickness 32 nm, prepared by nanosphere lithography (NSL). Evidence of in-plane six-fold magnetic anisotropy induced by the symmetry of the structure has been found. By means of XMCD measurements, performed at remanence after applying a pulsed field, a structure rotation angle-dependent oscillation of about 15% with a periodicity of 60 deg. has been observed for both the orbital and spin moments. Furthermore, the system exhibits the angular hysteresis effect. The magnetic measurements performed by MFM show a reduction of the magnetic configurations to only two states, one quasi-single domain Y state and second, a combination of vortex and Y state.

  9. Study on the Anisotropy of Meniscus in the Growing Sapphire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Tai; ZUO Hong-bo; HAN Jie-cai; MENG Song-he; ZHANG Ming-fu; LI Chang-qing; Grigoryan Benik

    2006-01-01

    This study is aimed at predicting the relationship between the meniscus and the quality of the sapphire crystals produced by the micro-pulling and shoulder at cooled center (SAPMIC) technique. As with different orientations, the shapes of the meniscus vary, so an investigation into the anisotropy of the meniscus shapes is very important for the final quality of the sapphire crystal. An effective model to describe meniscus shapes and their formation process has been presented. The model has been applied to a sapphire crystal of 200 mm diameter in order to check its reliability. The results show that the model proves to be useful for forecasting the final shapes of the sapphire crystal made by the SAPMIC technique.

  10. Characterization of the scintillation anisotropy in crystalline stilbene scintillator detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline melt-grown and solution-grown stilbene to incident DT and DD neutrons. These measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature for melt-grown stilbene and providing the first measurements for solution-grown stilbene. In similar measurements of liquid and plastic detectors, no directional dependence was observed, confirming the hypothesis that the anisotropy in stilbene and other organic crystal scintillators is a result of internal effects due to the molecular or crystal structure and not an external effect on the measurement system.

  11. Alpha Anisotropy Studies of Near-Spherical and Deformed Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Duppen, P

    2002-01-01

    % IS329 \\\\ \\\\ Although it was the first decay mode to be discovered, the process of $\\alpha$-particle emission is still poorly understood. A few years ago the first systematic study of anisotropic $\\alpha$-decay triggered renewed theoretical interest. Nevertheless, today the theories are still not adequate enough and more experimental data are urgently needed. We therefore measure the $\\alpha$-anisotropies of the favoured transitions of a number of near-spherical Rn and At isotopes, and of deformed nuclei near A=220. As the different models yield contradictory predictions for the transitions that are investigated, the measurements will allow to discern on their validity. They will at the same time provide the necessary basis for further theoretical developments.

  12. Mechanochromism, Shear Force Anisotropy, and Molecular Mechanics in Polydiacetylene Monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURNS,ALAN R.; CARPICK,R.W.; SASAKI,DARRYL Y.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.; HADDAD,R.

    2000-08-14

    The authors use scanning probe microscopy to actuate and characterize the nanoscale mechanochromism of polydiacetylene monolayer on atomically-flat silicon oxide substrates. They find explicit evidence that the irreversible blue-to-red transformation is caused by shear forces exerted normal to the polydiacetylene polymer backbone. The anisotropic probe-induced transformation is characterized by a significant change in the tilt orientation of the side chains with respect to the surface normal. They also describe a new technique, based on shear force microscopy, that allows them to image friction anisotropy of polydiacetylene monolayer independent of scan direction. Finally, they discuss preliminary molecular mechanics modeling and electronic structure calculations that allow them to understand the correlation of mechanochromism with bond-angle changes in the conjugated polymer backbone.

  13. Initial state azimuthal anisotropies in small collision systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lappi, T

    2015-01-01

    Strong multiparticle azimuthal correlations have recently been observed in high energy proton-nucleus collisions. While final state collective effects can be responsible for many of the observations, the domain structure in the classical color field of a high energy nucleus also naturally leads to such correlations. We describe recent calculations of the momentum space 2-particle cumulant azimuthal anisotropy coefficients v_n{2}, n=2,3,4 from fundamental representation Wilson line distributions describing the high energy nucleus. We find significant differences between Wilson lines from the MV model and from JIMWLK evolution. We also discuss the relation of this calculation to earlier work on the ridge correlation obtained in the "glasma graph" approximation, and to the "color electric field domain model."

  14. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Attitude Estimation Filter Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Richard R.

    2005-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) spacecraft was launched in June of 2001. The sensor complement of WMAP consists of two Autonomous Star Trackers (ASTs), two Fine Sun Sensors (FSSs), and a gyro package which contains redundancy about one of the WMAP body axes. The onboard attitude estimation filter consists of an extended Kalman filter (EKF) solving for attitude and gyro bias errors which are then resolved into a spacecraft attitude quaternion and gyro bias. A pseudo-linear Kalman filter has been developed which directly estimates the spacecraft attitude quaternion, rate, and gyro bias. In this paper, the performance of the two filters is compared for the two major control modes of WMAP: inertial mode and observation mode.

  15. Rotational Doppler Effect: A Probe for Molecular Orbitals Anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Quan; Travnikova, Oksana; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Kimberg, Victor; Sun, Yu-Ping; Thomas, T Darrah; Nicolas, Christophe; Patanen, Minna; Miron, Catalin

    2015-05-01

    The vibrationally resolved X-ray photoelectron spectra of X2Σg+(3σg−1) and B2Σu+(2σu−1) states of N2+ were recorded for different photon energies and orientations of the polarization vector. Clear dependencies of the spectral line widths on the X-ray polarization as well as on the symmetry of the final electronic states are observed. Contrary to the translational Doppler, the rotational Doppler broadening is sensitive to the photoelectron emission anisotropy. On the basis of theoretical modeling, we suggest that the different rotational Doppler broadenings observed for gerade and ungerade final states result from a Young's double-slit interference phenomenon.

  16. The Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Paul T P; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Chung-Cheng; Chen, Ke-Jung; Chen, Ming-Tang; Han, Chih-Chiang; Ho, West M; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Ibanez-Romano, Fabiola; Jiang, Homin; Koch, Patrick M; Kubo, Derek Y; Li, Chao-Te; Lim, Jeremy; Lin, Kai-Yang; Liu, Guo-Chin; Lo, Kwok-Yung; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Martin, Robert N; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Molnar, Sandor M; Ng, Kin-Wang; Nishioka, Hiroaki; O'Connell, Kevin E; Oshiro, Peter; Patt, Ferdinand; Raffin, Philippe; Umetsu, Keiichi; Wei, Tashun; Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty; Chiueh, Tzi-Dar; Chiueh, Tzihong; Chu, Tah-Hsiung; Huang, Chih-Wei Locutus; Hwang, W Y Pauchy; Liao, Yu-Wei; Lien, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Wang, Huei; Wei, Ray-Ming; Yang, Chia-Hsiang; Kesteven, Michael; Kingsley, Jeff; Sinclair, Malcolm M; Wilson, Warwick; Birkinshaw, Mark; Liang, Haida; Lancaster, Katy; Park, Chan-Gyung; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B

    2008-01-01

    The Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is the first interferometer dedicated to studying the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at 3mm wavelength. The choice of 3mm is to minimize the contributions from foreground synchrotron radiation and Galactic dust emission. The initial configuration of seven 0.6m telescopes mounted on a 6-m hexapod platform, was dedicated in October 2006 on Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Scientific operations began with the detection of a number of clusters of galaxies via the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. We compare our data with Subaru weak lensing data in order to study the structure of dark matter. We also compare our data with X-ray data in order to derive the Hubble constant.

  17. Optical anisotropy of magnetosome-doped polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzarova, A., E-mail: dzarova@saske.s [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Royer, F.; Jamon, D. [Universite de Lyon, F-42023 Saint Etienne (France); DIOM EA 3523, Universite de Saint Etienne, Jean Monnet, F-42000 Saint Etienne (France); Kopcansky, P. [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Choueikani, F. [Universite de Lyon, F-42023 Saint Etienne (France); DIOM EA 3523, Universite de Saint Etienne, Jean Monnet, F-42000 Saint Etienne (France); Gojzewski, H. [Institute of Physics Poznan University of Technology ul. Nieszawska 13A, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Rousseau, J.J. [Universite de Lyon, F-42023 Saint Etienne (France); DIOM EA 3523, Universite de Saint Etienne, Jean Monnet, F-42000 Saint Etienne (France); Timko, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2011-05-15

    The anisotropy of several PVA/magnetosome magnetically textured films has been investigated. The thin film synthesized under the influence of a magnetic field (99 mT) shows the typical behavior of an anisotropic material. The results show that the magnetic field applied during the synthesis promotes an orientation of the chains of magnetosomes and permanent textured film is obtained after solidification. - Research Highlights: A new type of polymer film with bacterial magnetic particles - magnetosomes - was prepared. Magnetosomes tend to minimize their energy forming closed loops after isolation. The most preferable number of magnetosomes in one chain is around 7-8. A magnetic field applied during the synthesis promotes orientation of the chains of magnetosomes. Permanent textured magnetosome films were obtained.

  18. Optical anisotropy of magnetosome-doped polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anisotropy of several PVA/magnetosome magnetically textured films has been investigated. The thin film synthesized under the influence of a magnetic field (99 mT) shows the typical behavior of an anisotropic material. The results show that the magnetic field applied during the synthesis promotes an orientation of the chains of magnetosomes and permanent textured film is obtained after solidification. - Research Highlights: → A new type of polymer film with bacterial magnetic particles - magnetosomes - was prepared. → Magnetosomes tend to minimize their energy forming closed loops after isolation. → The most preferable number of magnetosomes in one chain is around 7-8. → A magnetic field applied during the synthesis promotes orientation of the chains of magnetosomes. → Permanent textured magnetosome films were obtained.

  19. Low coercivity giant magnetoresistance with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Seop; Yoon, Jungbum; Kang, Mool-Bit; You, Chun-Yeol, E-mail: cyyou@inha.ac.kr

    2014-05-01

    We find the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy giant magnetoresistance structure, whose coercivity is less than 10 Oe. We reveal that the coercivity of free layer can be smaller than 5 Oe in Co/Pd/Cu/[Co/Pd]{sub 4} multilayer structure with a TiO{sub 2} seed layer. The TiO{sub 2} seed layer plays a critical role in the small coercivity of free layer. The GMR ratio is around 1–1.8% for the out-of-plane magnetic fields, and the maximum MR sensitivity of 0.12%/Oe is achieved. - Highlights: • We find an extremely small coercivity giant magnetoresistance (GMR) structure for the out-of-plane magnetic field. • The key ingredient of small coercivity is a TiO{sub 2} seed layer. • Such a small coercivity GMR structure will be useful for automotive applications such as wheel speed, rotation, and position sensors.

  20. Inkjet printing of magnetic materials with aligned anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Han; Spencer, Jeremy; Jander, Albrecht; Nielsen, Jeffrey; Stasiak, James; Kasperchik, Vladek; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2014-05-01

    3-D printing processes, which use drop-on-demand inkjet printheads, have great potential in designing and prototyping magnetic materials. Unlike conventional deposition and lithography, magnetic particles in the printing ink can be aligned by an external magnetic field to achieve both high permeability and low hysteresis losses, enabling prototyping and development of novel magnetic composite materials and components, e.g., for inductor and antennae applications. In this work, we report an inkjet printing technique with magnetic alignment capability. Magnetic films with and without particle alignment are printed, and their magnetic properties are compared. In the alignment-induced hard axis direction, an increase in high frequency permeability and a decrease in hysteresis losses are observed. Our results suggest that unique magnetic structures with arbitrary controllable anisotropy, not feasible otherwise, may be fabricated via inkjet printing.

  1. Anisotropy engineering using exchange bias on antidot templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. T. Goncalves

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We explore an emerging device concept based on exchange bias used in conjunction with an antidot geometry to fine tune ferromagnetic resonances. Planar cavity ferromagnetic resonance is used to study the microwave response of NiO/NiFe bilayers with antidot structuring. A large frequency asymmetry with respect to an applied magnetic field is found across a broad field range whose underlying cause is linked to the distribution of magnetic poles at the antidot surfaces. This distribution is found to be particularly sensitive to the effects of exchange bias, and robust in regards to the quality of the antidot geometry. The template based antidot geometry we study offers advantages for practical device construction, and we show that it is suitable for broadband absorption and filtering applications, allowing tunable anisotropies via interface engineering.

  2. Anisotropy of BN and Be x-ray-emission bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, A.; Schnatterly, S.E.

    1987-12-15

    We present measurements of the K emission spectra of hexagonal Be and BN (h-Be and h-BN). The anisotropy of the emission allows us to separate the bands into their sigma and ..pi.. components, enabling us to demonstrate the unambiguous ..pi.. character of the B core exciton. We find that the exciton presents a double-peaked structure which we attribute to phonon ringing. For the first time we are able to separate into ..pi.. and sigma components the doubly ionized K emission bands of B and N in h-BN and of Be in h-Be, revealing the effect of the spectator core hole on the shape of the density of states. Such an effect is in qualitative agreement with the final-state rule, although the local p density of states is distorted more than has previously been reported.

  3. Rotational Doppler Effect: A Probe for Molecular Orbitals Anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Quan; Travnikova, Oksana; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Kimberg, Victor; Sun, Yu-Ping; Thomas, T Darrah; Nicolas, Christophe; Patanen, Minna; Miron, Catalin

    2015-05-01

    The vibrationally resolved X-ray photoelectron spectra of X2Σg+(3σg−1) and B2Σu+(2σu−1) states of N2+ were recorded for different photon energies and orientations of the polarization vector. Clear dependencies of the spectral line widths on the X-ray polarization as well as on the symmetry of the final electronic states are observed. Contrary to the translational Doppler, the rotational Doppler broadening is sensitive to the photoelectron emission anisotropy. On the basis of theoretical modeling, we suggest that the different rotational Doppler broadenings observed for gerade and ungerade final states result from a Young's double-slit interference phenomenon. PMID:26263315

  4. Two-dimensional chiral asymmetry in unidirectional magnetic anisotropy structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, P.; Ajejas, F.; Maccariello, D.; Cuñado, J. L.; Guerrero, R.; Niño, M. A.; Muñoz, M.; Prieto, J. L.; Miranda, R.; Camarero, J.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the symmetry-breaking effects of magnetic nanostructures that present unidirectional (one-fold) magnetic anisotropy. Angular and field dependent transport and magnetic properties have been studied in two different exchange-biased systems, i.e. ferromagnetic (FM)/ antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayer and spin-valve structures. We experimentally show the direct relationships between the magnetoresistance (MR) response and the magnetization reversal pathways for any field value and direction. We demonstrate that even though the MR signals are related to different transport phenomena, namely anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR), chiral asymmetries are found around the magnetization hard-axis direction, in both cases originated from the one-fold symmetry of the interfacial exchange coupling. Our results indicate that the chiral asymmetry of transport and magnetic behaviors are intrinsic of systems with an unidirectional contribution.

  5. Two-dimensional chiral asymmetry in unidirectional magnetic anisotropy structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Perna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the symmetry-breaking effects of magnetic nanostructures that present unidirectional (one-fold magnetic anisotropy. Angular and field dependent transport and magnetic properties have been studied in two different exchange-biased systems, i.e. ferromagnetic (FM/ antiferromagnetic (AFM bilayer and spin-valve structures. We experimentally show the direct relationships between the magnetoresistance (MR response and the magnetization reversal pathways for any field value and direction. We demonstrate that even though the MR signals are related to different transport phenomena, namely anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR and giant magnetoresistance (GMR, chiral asymmetries are found around the magnetization hard-axis direction, in both cases originated from the one-fold symmetry of the interfacial exchange coupling. Our results indicate that the chiral asymmetry of transport and magnetic behaviors are intrinsic of systems with an unidirectional contribution.

  6. AMiBA: Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, K. Y.; Chiueh, T. H.; Martin, R. N.; Ng, Kin-Wang; Liang, H.; Pen, Ue-Li; Ma, Chung-Pei

    An Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is being built to measure the polarization of the CMB and to survey for high z clusters via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE). AMiBA is a platform mounted 19-element interferometer operating between 85 - 105 GHz, with full polarization capabilities. The aperture size of the elements can be changed between 0.3m and 1.2m, in order to provide a range of fields of view and l-resolution. The platform size is about 10-m so that the resolution can be as high as 1 arc-minute. The sensitivity can be as low as 2 mJy and 7 μK in an hour. The array is to be placed on Mauna Kea in Hawaii or in the Atacama desert in Chile, and is scheduled to be completed in 2003. The current status of AMiBA will be described.

  7. The Intrinsic Quasar Luminosity Function: Accounting for Accretion Disk Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    DiPompeo, M A; Brotherton, M S; Runnoe, J C; Green, R F

    2014-01-01

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic --- in part due to its disk-like structure --- but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic l...

  8. Anisotropy in cosmic rays from internal transitions in neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ángeles Pérez-García, M., E-mail: mperezga@usal.es [Department of Fundamental Physics and IUFFyM, University of Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Kotera, Kumiko; Silk, Joseph [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095—CNRS, Université Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the possibility that some recently measured anisotropic cosmic ray components in the TeV–PeV energy range may be an indication of the ejection of a peculiar type of matter. We present a model where a neutron star internal transition with nuclear deconfinement of the quark content takes place. This catastrophic event may cause a mass ejection process seeding the insterstelar medium with droplets of quark matter, so called nuclearites. Neutralization of these droplets in molecular clouds may drive the anisotropy since quasi-rectilinear trajectories are allowed. Complementary information from current experimental settings on earth or magnetic spectrometers on the ISS may shed light on this exotic form of matter.

  9. Statistical analysis in search for anisotropies for the observed UHECRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumavo

    2012-07-01

    Cosmic accelerators produce particles with energies in a wide range (PeV to EeV, 1 PeV ˜ 10-15 eV, 1 EeV ˜ 10-18 eV) . The energy spectrum follows three power laws like a ` leg' structure of which the `knee' part ( ˜ 3 PeV) is of Galactic origin, the `ankle' part is unassociated with Glaxy and the highest energy source above the ankle shows evidence for extragalactic origin. In the present work various cross correlation functions are studied between the samples of observed UHECRs and and the catalogue of nearby galaxies to search for anisotropies , if any, in the arrival directions of UHECRs for identifying their possible sources. The robustness of the functions are studies through many random realizations of the original samples under considerations. Similar procedure is followed for catalogues also for comparison.

  10. Modeling Plasmas with Strong Anisotropy, Neutral Fluid Effects, and Open Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric T.

    Three computational plasma science topics are addressed in this research: the challenge of modeling strongly anisotropic thermal conduction, capturing neutral fluid effects in collisional plasmas, and modeling open boundaries in dissipative plasmas. The research efforts on these three topics contribute to a common objective: the improvement and extension of existing magnetohydrodynamic modeling capability. Modeling magnetically confined fusion-related plasmas is the focus of the research, but broader relevance is recognized and discussed. Code development is central to this work, and has been carried out within the flexible physics framework of the highly parallel HiFi implicit spectral element code. In magnetic plasma confinement, heat conduction perpendicular to the magnetic field is extremely slow compared to conduction parallel to the field. The anisotropy in heat conduction can be many orders of magnitude, and the inaccuracy of low-order representations can allow parallel heat transport to "leak" into the perpendicular direction, resulting in numerical perpendicular transport. If the computational grid is aligned to the magnetic field, this numerical error can be eliminated, even for low-order representations. However, grid alignment is possible only in idealized problems. In realistic applications, magnetic topology is chaotic. A general approach for accurately modeling the extreme anisotropy of fusion plasmas is to use high-order representations which do not require grid alignment for sufficient resolution. This research provides a comprehensive assessment of spectral element representation of anisotropy, in terms of dependence of accuracy on grid alignment, polynomial degree, and grid cell size, and gives results for two- and three-dimensional cases. Truncating large physical domains to concentrate computational resources is often necessary or desirable in simulating natural and man-made plasmas. A novel open boundary condition (BC) treatment for such

  11. Shape-controlled anisotropy of superparamagnetic micro-/nanohelices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshansky, Alexander M.; Morozov, Konstantin I.; Rubinstein, Boris Y.

    2016-07-01

    Micro-/nanopropellers can be actuated remotely by a rotating magnetic field and steered at high precision through various fluidic environments. Recent progress comprises microfabrication of superparamagnetic microhelices not possessing remanent magnetization, but rather magnetized by an applied magnetic field. In this article we present a numerical approach for computing, from first principles, the effective susceptibility of polarizable helical micro-/nanopropellers. We show that nanopropeller geometry, in particular, filament cross-section elongation and orientation, play a central role in determining its magnetic anisotropy and polarizability. The numerical predictions are in qualitative agreement with the previously reported experiments, showing that tight polarizable helices are propulsive. The numerical results are also supported by the approximate slender-body theory. Finally, we propose a semi-quantitative energy criterion to rank polarizable helices with different geometries of the filament by their propulsive capacity and also estimate their maximal propulsion speed.Micro-/nanopropellers can be actuated remotely by a rotating magnetic field and steered at high precision through various fluidic environments. Recent progress comprises microfabrication of superparamagnetic microhelices not possessing remanent magnetization, but rather magnetized by an applied magnetic field. In this article we present a numerical approach for computing, from first principles, the effective susceptibility of polarizable helical micro-/nanopropellers. We show that nanopropeller geometry, in particular, filament cross-section elongation and orientation, play a central role in determining its magnetic anisotropy and polarizability. The numerical predictions are in qualitative agreement with the previously reported experiments, showing that tight polarizable helices are propulsive. The numerical results are also supported by the approximate slender-body theory. Finally, we

  12. Correlations between Thermal and Sonic Anisotropy for Low-Permeable Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Yury; Chekhonin, Evgeny; Popov, Evgeny; Spasennykh, Mikhail; Ovcharenko, Yury; Zhukov, Vladislav; Martemyanov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Rock anisotropy plays an important role in geophysics. Knowledge of thermal anisotropy is necessary for reconstruction of thermal history of a basin and analysis of temperature logging data, while an acoustic anisotropy in sedimentary rocks has a significant impact on seismic processing and reservoir characterization. However, determination of anisotropy for real problems is a complex procedure usually. Common measurements on cores require sampling several plugs in different directions that led to the problem of rock heterogeneity influence. Moreover, full size cores will be destroyed in this case, that makes the approach time-consuming and not reliable often. Determination of anisotropy from sonic logging depends on the quality of the acoustic signal, borehole and mud conditions as well as the direction of the borehole with respect to the anisotropic axes of symmetry. To improve quality of rock anisotropy study we combined the sonic logging data with fast, non-contact non-destructive measurements of principal thermal conductivity tensor components on more than 2000 full-size cores. It provided a comprehensive analysis of variations in thermal and acoustic anisotropy along two wells drilled in low-permeable formations in West Siberia (Russia). Strong correlation between thermal and acoustic anisotropy was established within Bazhen formation (B.fm.). It can be used for prediction of acoustic anisotropy via results of thermal profiling on cores in the intervals, where quantitative analysis of sonic log is impossible (If core is absent, thermal anisotropy can be estimated on cavings and large cuttings using optical scanning method). The work was supported by the Russian Ministry of Education and Science, project No. RFMEFI58114X0008.

  13. Non-Gaussianity of the Cosmic Infrared Background anisotropies I : Diagrammatic formalism and application to the angular bispectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Lacasa, Fabien; Aghanim, Nabila

    2013-01-01

    We present the first halo model based description of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) non-Gaussianity (NG) that is fully parametric. To this end, we introduce, for the first time, a diagrammatic method to compute high order polyspectra of the 3D galaxy density field. It allows an easy derivation and visualisation of the different terms of the polyspectrum. We apply this framework to the power spectrum and bispectrum, and we show how to project them on the celestial sphere in the purpose of the application to the CIB angular anisotropies. Furthermore, we show how to take into account the particular case of the shot noise terms in that framework. Eventually, we compute the CIB angular bispectrum at 857 GHz and study its scale and configuration dependencies, as well as its variations with the halo occupation distribution parameters. Compared to a previously proposed empirical prescription, such physically motivated model is required to describe fully the CIB anisotropies bispectrum. Finally, we compare the C...

  14. A dipole anisotropy of galaxy distribution: Does the CMB rest-frame exist in the local universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, Yousuke; Takada, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    The peculiar motion of the Earth causes a dipole anisotropy modulation in the distant galaxy distribution due to the aberration effect. However, the amplitude and angular direction of the effect is not necessarily the same as those of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole anisotropy due to the growth of cosmic structures. In other words exploring the aberration effect may give us a clue to the horizon-scale physics perhaps related to the cosmic acceleration. In this paper we develop a method to explore the dipole angular modulation from the pixelized galaxy data on the sky properly taking into account the covariances due to the shot noise and the intrinsic galaxy clustering contamination as well as the partial sky coverage. We applied the method to the galaxy catalogs constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 6 data. After constructing the four galaxy catalogs that are different in the ranges of magnitudes and photometric redshifts, we found that the two samples of fainter magni...

  15. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, J., E-mail: jzheng@swjtu.edu.cn; Liao, X.L.; Jing, H.L.; Deng, Z.G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S.Y.; Wang, J.S.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The single-layer bulk HTSC with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP. • The double-layer bulk with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP too. • The double-layer bulk finding is contrast to MGSBP if pursuing high trapped field. • The optimization is highlighted by simple and easy operation, thus economical in the practice. -- Abstract: Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems.

  16. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The single-layer bulk HTSC with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP. • The double-layer bulk with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP too. • The double-layer bulk finding is contrast to MGSBP if pursuing high trapped field. • The optimization is highlighted by simple and easy operation, thus economical in the practice. -- Abstract: Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems

  17. Probing the epoch of pre-reionization by cross-correlating cosmic microwave and infrared background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Atrio-Barandela, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from {\\it Euclid}, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky {\\it Euclid} CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales $\\sim 5'-60'$ w...

  18. The In-Plane Anisotropy of WTe2 Investigated by Angle-Dependent and Polarized Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingjun; Pan, Xingchen; Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Kun; Tan, Qinghai; Li, Pan; Wan, Yi; Wang, Yilun; Xu, Xiaolong; Lin, Miaoling; Wan, Xiangang; Song, Fengqi; Dai, Lun

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) is a semi-metallic layered transition metal dichalcogenide with a stable distorted 1T phase. The reduced symmetry of this system leads to in-plane anisotropy in various materials properties. We have systemically studied the in-plane anisotropy of Raman modes in few-layer and bulk WTe2 by angle-dependent and polarized Raman spectroscopy (ADPRS). Ten Raman modes are clearly resolved. Their intensities show periodic variation with sample rotating. We identify the symmetries of the detected modes by quantitatively analyzing the ADPRS results based on the symmetry selection rules. Material absorption effect on the phonon modes with high vibration frequencies is investigated by considering complex Raman tensor elements. We also provide a rapid and nondestructive method to identify the crystallographic orientation of WTe2. The crystallographic orientation is further confirmed by the quantitative atomic-resolution force image. Finally, we find that the atomic vibrational tendency and complexity of detected modes are also reflected in the shrinkage degree defined based on ADPRS, which is confirmed by corresponding density functional calculation. Our work provides a deep understanding of the interaction between WTe2 and light, which will benefit in future studies about the anisotropic physical properties of WTe2 and other in-plane anisotropic materials. PMID:27404226

  19. Measuring remanence anisotropy of hematite in red beds: anisotropy of high-field isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2009-09-01

    The potential of using high-field anisotropy of isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR) measurements for determining the origin of natural remanent magnetization in red beds and for identifying and correcting possible red-bed inclination shallowing was investigated for specimens of the Carboniferous Shepody Formation of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada. The technique makes it possible for a typical paleomagnetic laboratory to measure the remanence anisotropy of high-coercivity hematite. High-field (hf) AIR was used in conjunction with 100 mT alternating field (af) and 120°C thermal demagnetization to separate the contribution of hematite to the remanence anisotropy from that of magnetite/maghemite and goethite, respectively. A 5-T impulse DC magnetic field was used for the hf-AIR to reset the magnetic moment of high-coercivity hematite so that demagnetization between AIR orientations was not necessary. The ability of a 5-T field to reset the magnetization was tested by generating an isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curve for hematite by using impulse DC magnetic fields up to 5 T in one orientation and followed by applying a field in the opposite direction at each step. Each field application was treated by 120°C heating and 100 mT af demagnetization before measurement. At 5 T, the difference between the magnetizations applied in opposite directions disappeared indicating that no magnetic memory persisted at this field strength. We performed a validity and reproducibility test of our hf-AIR measurement technique by measuring three specimens multiple times along two orthogonal coordinate systems. The method yielded highly reproducible results and, on rotating the specimen's coordinates, the fabric rotated by 90° as expected, showing that it is not an artifact of the technique. We also measured hf-AIR on samples that had previously been chemically demagnetized in 3N HCl to remove the secondary, chemically grown pigmentary hematite. The hf

  20. Physical properties of shungite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiecinska, Barbara [Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environment Protection, University of Science and Technology-AGH, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pusz, Slawomira; Krzesinska, Marta; Pilawa, Barbara [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Polish Academy of Science, ul. Sowinskiego 5, 44-121 Gliwice (Poland)

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents the results of physical parameters such as bulk porosity, true density, optical reflectance, dynamic elastic moduli, X-ray diffractograms and EPR spectra, determined for shungite. All shungite samples studied are considerably denser materials than anthracite - high rank coal with similar carbon content. Bright shungites were porous with the very dense matrix, while the dull shungite is compact, almost non-porous material. Elastic moduli of the dull shungite are generally higher than those of bright shungites and anthracite. All shungites studied (including anthracite) exhibit the directional dependence of elasticity. The maximum reflectance values of bright shungites are higher than those for dull shungite and anthracite. That corresponds with the denser matrix of these samples and suggests the greatest ordering of graphene layers in the case of bright shungites and also suggests some similarity to meta-anthracite from Paleozoic basins. Reflectance anisotropy of shungites studied are generally lower than that of anthracite. Ordering of graphene layers in bright shungite, as a high rank coal variety, is obvious, but lower anisotropy than that of anthracite is a surprise. X-ray studies confirm a high density of bright shungite. Interplanar distances d{sub hkl} of the shungite (d{sub 002} = 3.48 Aa) are closer to those of anthracite (d{sub 002} = 3.52 Aa) than to those of graphite (d{sub 002} = 3.35 Aa). All results described here show the differences in molecular structure and degree of graphitisation of carbonaceous matter in bright, semi-bright and dull varieties of shungite. Our data could play a key role in production of materials composed of carbon nanoparticles. (author)

  1. Order parameter anisotropy of MgB2 using specific heat jump of layered superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I N Askerzade

    2003-12-01

    The recently obtained analytical result [1] for renormalization of the jump of the heat capacity (S-N)/N by anisotropy of the order parameter is applied to the layered superconductors. The graph of (S-N)/N vs. the anisotropy of the order parameter allows a direct determination of the gap anisotropy in MgB2 using available experimental data.

  2. MAXIMA: an experiment to measure temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.T.; Balbi, A.; Borrill, J.; Jaffe, A.H.; Oh, S.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Winant, C.D. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, 301 LeConte Hall, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lee, A.T.; Jaffe, A.H.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Winant, C.D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ade, P.; Hristov, V.; Lange, A.E.; Pascale, E. [Queen Mary and Westfield College, London (United Kingdom); Balbi, A.; Borrill, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bock, J.; Crill, B.P.; Smoot, G.F. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bock, J.; Del Castillo, H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Boscaleri, A. [IROE-CNR, Firenze (Italy); De Bernardis, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Ferreira, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Ganga, K. [IPAC, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Hanany, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Mauskopf, P. [University of Massachusetts, Amhurst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Netterfield, C.B. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Ruhl, J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    We describe the MAXIMA experiment, a balloon-borne measurement designed to map temperature anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from l=80 to l=800. The experiment consists of a 1.3 m diameter off-axis Gregorian telescope and a receiver with a 16 element array of bolometers cooled to 100 mK. The frequency bands are centered at 150, 240, and 410 GHz. The 10{sup {prime}} FWHM beam sizes are well matched to the scale of acoustic peaks expected in the angular power spectrum of the CMB. The first flight of the experiment in its full configuration was launched in August 1998. A 122 deg{sup 2} map of the sky was made near the Draco constellation during the 7 hour flight in a region of extremely low galactic dust contamination. This map covers 0.3{percent} of the sky and has 3200 independent beamsize pixels. We describe the MAXIMA instrument and its performance during the recent flight. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Large-scale sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV galactic cosmic rays and the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Gou, Q B; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H C; Li, J Y; Liu, C; Lou, Y -Q; Lü, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ozawa, S; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X; Kota, J

    2009-01-01

    We develop a model anisotropy best-fitting to the two-dimensional sky-map of multi-TeV galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed with the Tibet III air shower (AS) array. By incorporating a pair of intensity excesses in the hydrogen deflection plane (HDP) suggested by Gurnett et al., together with the uni-directional and bi-directional flows for reproducing the observed global feature, this model successfully reproduces the observed sky-map including the "skewed" feature of the excess intensity from the heliotail direction, whose physical origin has long remained unknown. These additional excesses are modeled by a pair of the northern and southern Gaussian distributions, each placed ~50 degree away from the heliotail direction. The amplitude of the southern excess is as large as ~0.2 %, more than twice the amplitude of the northern excess. This implies that the Tibet AS experiment discovered for the first time a clear evidence of the significant modulation of GCR intensity in the heliotail and the asymmetr...

  4. Interpreting the cosmic far-infrared background anisotropies using a gas regulator model

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic far-infrared background (CFIRB) is a powerful probe of the history of star formation rate and the connection between baryons and dark matter. In this work, we explore to which extent the CFIRB anisotropies can be reproduced by a simple physical framework for galaxy evolution, the gas regulator (bathtub) model. The model is based on continuity equations for gas, stars, and metals, taking into account cosmic gas accretion, star formation, and gas ejection. Our model not only provides a good fit to the CFIRB power spectra measured by Planck, but also agrees well with the correlation between CFIRB and gravitational lensing, far-infrared galaxy number counts, and bolometric infrared luminosity functions. The strong clustering of CFIRB indicates a large galaxy bias, which corresponds to haloes of mass 10^12.5 Msun at z=2; thus, CFIRB favors strong infrared emission in massive haloes, which is higher than the expectation from the star formation rate. We provide constraints and fitting functions for the cosmic...

  5. Magnetic anisotropy and one-dimensionality finite-size scaling law in polycrystalline Ni nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fagen; Wang, Weigao; Li, Le; Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jun, E-mail: wjnaf@ustc.edu

    2015-06-25

    Highlights: • The Ni nanowires with different diameters have been fabricated in the AAO templates. • The high-temperature magnetic properties of 1D nanowire arrays are reported. • The templates can suppress growth of nanowires during high-temperature measurements. • The Curie temperature follows a finite-size scaling theory with λ = 0.926 and ξ{sub 0} = 17.35 Å. - Abstract: Ordered Ni nanowire arrays were successfully fabricated by electrochemical deposition method based on the anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. It was found that the diameter of nanowire can be well controlled by the pore size of AAO template. The nanowire arrays with 50 nm in diameter were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and physical properties measurement system. The results indicate that the polycrystalline Ni nanowire arrays exhibit obvious magnetic anisotropy, and the easy magnetization direction is oriented along the nanowire axial direction. By measuring the temperature dependence of magnetization, the Curie temperatures of nanowires with different sizes were obtained. The Curie temperature of one-dimensionality (1D) nanowire arrays is found to decrease with decreasing diameter and follow a finite-size scaling theory with λ = 0.926 and ξ{sub 0} = 17.35 Å. The fitting exponent of 1D nanowire arrays is close to the nanoparticles (zero-dimensionality, 0D) result and two-dimensionality (2D) nano-films result.

  6. Temporal and spatial turbulent spectra of MHD plasma and an observation of variance anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is analyzed through both temporal and spatial magnetic fluctuation spectra. A magnetically turbulent plasma is produced in the MHD wind tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment. The power of magnetic fluctuations is projected into directions perpendicular and parallel to a local mean field; the ratio of these quantities shows the presence of variance anisotropy which varies as a function of frequency. Comparisons among magnetic, velocity, and density spectra are also made, demonstrating that the energy of the turbulence observed is primarily seeded by magnetic fields created during plasma production. Direct spatial spectra are constructed using multi-channel diagnostics and are used to compare to frequency spectra converted to spatial scales using the Taylor hypothesis. Evidence for the observation of dissipation due to ion inertial length scale physics is also discussed, as well as the role laboratory experiments can play in understanding turbulence typically studied in space settings such as the solar wind. Finally, all turbulence results are shown to compare fairly well to a Hall-MHD simulation of the experiment.

  7. Temporal and spatial turbulent spectra of MHD plasma and an observation of variance anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffner, D. A.; Brown, M. R. [Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA (United States); Lukin, V. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is analyzed through both temporal and spatial magnetic fluctuation spectra. A magnetically turbulent plasma is produced in the MHD wind tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment. The power of magnetic fluctuations is projected into directions perpendicular and parallel to a local mean field; the ratio of these quantities shows the presence of variance anisotropy which varies as a function of frequency. Comparisons among magnetic, velocity, and density spectra are also made, demonstrating that the energy of the turbulence observed is primarily seeded by magnetic fields created during plasma production. Direct spatial spectra are constructed using multi-channel diagnostics and are used to compare to frequency spectra converted to spatial scales using the Taylor hypothesis. Evidence for the observation of dissipation due to ion inertial length scale physics is also discussed, as well as the role laboratory experiments can play in understanding turbulence typically studied in space settings such as the solar wind. Finally, all turbulence results are shown to compare fairly well to a Hall-MHD simulation of the experiment.

  8. The physical principles of rock magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 5: The Physical Principles of Rock Magnetism explores the physical principles of rock magnetism, with emphasis on the properties of finely divided magnetic materials. It discusses the origin and stability of rock magnetizations, the role of remanent magnetism in interpreting magnetic surveys, magnetic anisotropy as an indicator of rock fabric, and the relationship between piezomagnetic changes and seismic activity. Organized into 13 chapters, this volume discusses the properties of solids, magnetite and hematite grains, and rocks with magnetite grains

  9. Fourier-transform infrared anisotropy in cross and parallel sections of tendon and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidthanapally Aruna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI is used to investigate the amide anisotropies at different surfaces of a three-dimensional cartilage or tendon block. With the change in the polarization state of the incident infrared light, the resulting anisotropic behavior of the tissue structure is described here. Methods Thin sections (6 μm thick were obtained from three different surfaces of the canine tissue blocks and imaged at 6.25 μm pixel resolution. For each section, infrared imaging experiments were repeated thirteen times with the identical parameters except a 15° increment of the analyzer's angle in the 0° – 180° angular space. The anisotropies of amide I and amide II components were studied in order to probe the orientation of the collagen fibrils at different tissue surfaces. Results For tendon, the anisotropy of amide I and amide II components in parallel sections is comparable to that of regular sections; and tendon's cross sections show distinct, but weak anisotropic behavior for both the amide components. For articular cartilage, parallel sections in the superficial zone have the expected infrared anisotropy that is consistent with that of regular sections. The parallel sections in the radial zone, however, have a nearly isotropic amide II absorption and a distinct amide I anisotropy. Conclusion From the inconsistency in amide anisotropy between superficial to radial zone in parallel section results, a schematic model is used to explain the origins of these amide anisotropies in cartilage and tendon.

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SOURCE OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS USING ANISOTROPY VERSUS CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Taylor, Andrew M. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lemoine, Martin [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Waxman, Eli, E-mail: lemoine@iap.fr [Physics Faculty, Weizmann Institute, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 7600 (Israel)

    2013-10-20

    The joint analysis of anisotropy signals and chemical composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays offers strong potential for shedding light on the sources of these particles. Following up on an earlier idea, this paper studies the anisotropies produced by protons of energy >E/Z, assuming that anisotropies at energy >E have been produced by nuclei of charge Z, which share the same magnetic rigidity. We calculate the number of secondary protons produced through photodisintegration of the primary heavy nuclei. Making the extreme assumption that the source does not inject any proton, we find that the source(s) responsible for anisotropies such as reported by the Pierre Auger Observatory should lie closer than ∼20-30, 80-100, and 180-200 Mpc if the anisotropy signal is mainly composed of oxygen, silicon, and iron nuclei, respectively. A violation of this constraint would otherwise result in the secondary protons forming a more significant anisotropy signal at lower energies. Even if the source were located closer than this distance, it would require an extraordinary metallicity ∼> 120, 1600, and 1100 times solar metallicity in the acceleration zone of the source, for oxygen, silicon, and iron, respectively, to ensure that the concomitantly injected protons do not produce a more significant low-energy anisotropy. This offers interesting prospects for constraining the nature and the source of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays with the increase in statistics expected from next-generation detectors.

  11. P wave azimuthal and radial anisotropy of the Hokkaido subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiongwei; Zhao, Dapeng; Li, Jiabiao; Ruan, Aiguo

    2016-04-01

    We present the first three-dimensional P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the Hokkaido subduction zone, as well as P wave azimuthal anisotropy and S wave tomography, which are determined by inverting 298,430 P wave and 233,934 S wave arrival times from 14,245 local earthquakes recorded by 344 seismic stations. Our results reveal significant velocity heterogeneity, seismic anisotropy, and upwelling flows beneath the study region. In the mantle wedge, prominent low-velocity (low-V) anomalies exhibit trench-normal fast-velocity directions (FVDs) and a negative radial anisotropy (i.e., vertical velocity > horizontal velocity), which may reflect upwelling mantle flows. Fan-shaped FVDs are found at depths of 65-90 km, and a detailed 3-D mantle flow pattern is revealed, which may be caused by a combination of oblique subduction of the Pacific plate and collision of the Kuril arc with the Honshu arc beneath southern Hokkaido. The radial anisotropy changes at ~100 km depth, which may reflect variations in temperature and fluid conditions there. The subducting Pacific slab exhibits a positive radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal velocity > vertical velocity), which may reflect the original fossil anisotropy when the Pacific plate formed at the mid-ocean ridge.

  12. Modification of magnetic anisotropy in metallic glasses using high-energy ion beam irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Amrute; U R Mhatre; S K Sinha; D C Kothari; R Nagarajan; D Kanjilal

    2002-05-01

    Heavy ion irradiation in the electronic stopping power region induces macroscopic dimensional change in metallic glasses and introduces magnetic anisotropy in some magnetic materials. The present work is on the irradiation study of ferromagnetic metallic glasses, where both dimensional change and modification of magnetic anisotropy are expected. Magnetic anisotropy was measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy of virgin and irradiated Fe40Ni40B20 and Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 metallic glass ribbons. 90 MeV 127I beam was used for the irradiations. Irradiation doses were 5 × 1013 and 7.5 × 1013 ions/cm2. The relative intensity ratios 23 of the second and third lines of the Mössbauer spectra were measured to determine the magnetic anisotropy. The virgin samples of both the materials display in-plane magnetic anisotropy, i.e., the spins are oriented parallel to the ribbon plane. Irradiation is found to cause reduction in magnetic anisotropy. Near-complete randomization of magnetic moments is observed at high irradiation doses. Correlation is found between the residual stresses introduced by ion irradiation and the change in magnetic anisotropy.

  13. Azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves beneath the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The crustal and upper mantle azimuthal anisotropy of the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas was studied by Rayleigh wave tomography. We collected sufficient broadband digital seismograms trav-ersing the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas from available stations, including especially some data from the temporary stations newly deployed in Yunnan, eastern Tibet, and western Sichuan. They made an adequate path coverage in most regions to achieve a reasonable resolution for the inversion. The model resolution tests show that the anisotropic features of scope greater than 400 km and strength greater than 2% are reliable. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern inside the Tibetan Plateau was similar to the characteristic of tectonic partition. The crustal anisotropy strength is greater than 2% in most re-gions of East Tibet, and the anisotropy shows clockwise rotation surrounding the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Vertically, the anisotropy direction indicates a coherent pattern within the upper crust, lower crust, and lithosphere mantle of the Tibetan Plateau, which also is consistent with GPS velocity field and SKS fast polarization directions. The result supports that the crust-mantle deformation beneath the Tibetan Plateau is vertically coherent. The anisotropy strength of crust and lithospheric upper mantle in Yunnan outside the Tibetan Plateau is lower than 2%, so SKS splitting from core-mantle boundary to station should largely be attributed to the anisotropy of asthenosphere.

  14. Anisotropy of seasonal snow measured by polarimetric phase differences in radar time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinss, Silvan; Löwe, Henning; Proksch, Martin; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Wiesmann, Andreas; Hajnsek, Irena

    2016-08-01

    The snow microstructure, i.e., the spatial distribution of ice and pores, generally shows an anisotropy which is driven by gravity and temperature gradients and commonly determined from stereology or computer tomography. This structural anisotropy induces anisotropic mechanical, thermal, and dielectric properties. We present a method based on radio-wave birefringence to determine the depth-averaged, dielectric anisotropy of seasonal snow with radar instruments from space, air, or ground. For known snow depth and density, the birefringence allows determination of the dielectric anisotropy by measuring the copolar phase difference (CPD) between linearly polarized microwaves propagating obliquely through the snowpack. The dielectric and structural anisotropy are linked by Maxwell-Garnett-type mixing formulas. The anisotropy evolution of a natural snowpack in Northern Finland was observed over four winters (2009-2013) with the ground-based radar instrument "SnowScat". The radar measurements indicate horizontal structures for fresh snow and vertical structures in old snow which is confirmed by computer tomographic in situ measurements. The temporal evolution of the CPD agreed in ground-based data compared to space-borne measurements from the satellite TerraSAR-X. The presented dataset provides a valuable basis for the development of new snow metamorphism models which include the anisotropy of the snow microstructure.

  15. Giant anisotropy of the magnetoresistance and the 'spin valve' effect in antiferromagnetic Nd(2-x)Ce(x)CuO(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T; Wang, C H; Wu, G; Fang, D F; Luo, J L; Liu, G T; Chen, X H

    2008-07-01

    We have studied anisotropic magnetoresistance (MR) and magnetization with a rotating magnetic field (B) within the CuO(2) plane in lightly doped AF Nd(2-x)Ce(x)CuO(4). A giant anisotropy in the MR is observed at low temperature, below 5 K. The c-axis resistivity can be tuned over about one order of magnitude just by changing the B direction within the CuO(2) plane, and a scaling behavior for the out-of-plane and in-plane MR is found. A 'spin valve' effect is proposed for explaining the giant anisotropy of the out-of-plane MR and the evolution of the scaling parameters with the external field. It is found that the field-induced spin-flop transition of the Nd(3+) layer under high magnetic field is the key to understanding the giant anisotropy. These results suggest that a novel entanglement of charge and spin dominates the underlying physics. PMID:21694387

  16. Shear wave splitting analyses in Tian Shan: Geodynamic implications of complex seismic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherie, Solomon G.; Gao, Stephen S.; Liu, Kelly H.; Elsheikh, Ahmed A.; Kong, Fansheng; Reed, Cory A.; Yang, Bin B.

    2016-06-01

    The Tian Shan is a tectonically complex intracontinental orogenic belt situated between the Tarim Basin and the Kazakh Shield. The vast majority of the previous shear wave splitting (SWS) measurements were presented as station averages, which are only valid when the anisotropy structure can be approximated by a single layer of anisotropy with a horizontal axis of symmetry, i.e., a model of simple anisotropy. A variety of anisotropy-forming hypotheses have been proposed based on the station-averaged measurements. In this study, we measure the splitting parameters at 25 stations that recorded high-quality data from a wide back azimuthal range for the purpose of identifying and characterizing complex anisotropy. Among the 25 stations, 15 of them show systematic azimuthal variations in the observed splitting parameters with a 90° periodicity that is consistent with a model of two-layered anisotropy. The fast orientations of the upper layer range from 50° to 90° measured clockwise from the north, which are subparallel to the strike of the orogenic belt, and the splitting times are between 0.9 and 1.9 s. The corresponding values for the lower layer are -45° to -85° and 1.2-2.2 s, respectively. The remaining 10 stations demonstrate azimuthally invariant splitting parameters with strike-parallel fast orientations, and can be represented by a single layer of anisotropy with a horizontal axis of symmetry. We propose that the strike-parallel anisotropy is caused by lithospheric shortening, and anisotropy in the lower layer is associated with WNW-ward flow of asthenospheric material sandwiched between the subducting Tarim lithosphere and the thick Kazakh lithospheric root.

  17. Magnetic anisotropy and magnetostriction in nanocrystalline Fe–Al alloys obtained by melt spinning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, J.A.; Carrizo, J. [Depto. de Física de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Elbaile, L., E-mail: elbaile@uniovi.es [Depto. de Física de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Lago-Cachón, D.; Rivas, M. [Depto. de Física de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Castrillo, D. [Depto. de Ciencias de los Materiales de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Independencia, 33004 Oviedo (Spain); Pierna, A.R. [Depto. de Ingeniería Química y Medio Ambiente, EUPSS, UPV/EHU, San Sebastián (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    A study about the magnetic anisotropy and magnetostriction in ribbons of composition Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} and Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} obtained by the melt spinning technique is presented. The hysteresis loops indicate that the easy magnetization direction lies in both cases on the plane of the ribbon. Torque magnetometry measurements show that the in-plane magnetic anisotropy constant results 10100 J m{sup −3} and 490 J m{sup −3} for the Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} and Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} respectively. After a thermal treatment of 2 h at 473 K to remove the residual stresses, the in-plane magnetic anisotropy constants falls down to 2500 J m{sup −3} in the first composition and remains the same in the second one, while the easy direction remains the same. Measurements of the magnetostriction and the residual stresses of both ribbons allow us to explain the above mentioned results about the magnetic anisotropy and to conclude that the residual stresses via magnetostriction are the main source of magnetic anisotropy in the case of Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} ribbon but they do not influence this property in the ribbon of composition Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30}. - Highlights: • The origin of magnetic anisotropy of Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} and Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} ribbons has been studied. • The magnetic anisotropy lies in the plane of the ribbons. • A huge difference in magnetic anisotropy between two ribbons has been observed. • Magnetostriction and residual stresses explain the magnetic anisotropy in Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} ribbon.

  18. First-order theory for Earth’s inner-core anisotropy due to super-rotation and Ramachandran interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew Das Arulsamy

    2015-06-01

    Solidification mechanism at the Lehmann (inner core) boundary are postulated on the basis of Ramachandran interaction by taking the fluctuating inner core super-rotation into account. The postulates are found to be consistent with compressional or P-wave velocity obtained from seismic data analysis. We justify these postulates to be physically sound and precise, and show that the fluctuating inner core super-rotation causes significant changes to the strength of Fe–Fe Ramachandran interaction, which then leads to the observed asymmetric and anisotropic inner core. Our postulates also reliably explain that the depth-dependent anisotropic P-wave attenuation close to inner core surface (to about 100 km deep) is due to phonon excitation probability and different atomic orientation. We also discuss the consistency of our postulates with respect to asymmetric inner core anisotropy (between western and eastern inner core hemispheres).

  19. Diverse anisotropy of phonon transport in two-dimensional IV-VI compounds: A first-principles study

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Guangzhao; Fang, Wu-Zhang; Zhang, Li-Chuan; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Yan, Qing-Bo; Hu, Ming; Su, Gang

    2016-01-01

    New class two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, including layered and non-layered, and their heterostructures, are currently attracting increasing interest due to their promising applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and clean energy, where thermal transport property is one of the fundamental physical parameters. In this paper, we systematically investigated the phonon transport properties of 2D orthorhombic IV-VI compounds of $GeS$, $GeSe$, $SnS$ and $SnSe$ by solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. Despite the similar puckered (hinge-like) structure along the armchair direction as phosphorene, the four monolayer compounds possess diverse anisotropic properties in many aspects, such as group velocity, Young's modulus and lattice thermal conductivity ($\\kappa$), etc. Especially, the $\\kappa$ along the zigzag and armchair directions of monolayer $GeS$ shows the strongest anisotropy while monolayer $SnS$ and $SnSe$ shows an almost isotropy in p...

  20. IMPRINT OF A 2 MILLION YEAR OLD SOURCE ON THE COSMIC-RAY ANISOTROPY

    OpenAIRE

    Savchenko, V.; Kachelrieß, M; Semikoz, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    We study numerically the anisotropy of the cosmic ray (CR) flux emitted by a single source calculating the trajectories of individual CRs. We show that the contribution of a single source to the observed anisotropy is determined solely by the fraction the source contributes to the total CR intensity, its age and its distance, and does not depend on the CR energy at late times. Therefore the observation of a constant dipole anisotropy indicates that a single source dominates the CR flux in the...