WorldWideScience

Sample records for anisotropic thermal conduction

  1. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaopeng Fang; Yimin Xuan; Qiang Li

    2009-01-01

    Considering the forces acting on the particles and the motion of the particles, this study uses a numerical simulation to investigate the three-dimensional microstructure of the magnetic fluids in the presence of an external magnetic field. A method is proposed for predicting the anisotropic thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids. By introducing an anisotropic structure parameter which characterizes the non-uniform distribution of particles suspended in the magnetic fluids, the traditional Maxwell formula is modified and extended to calculate anisotropic thermal conductivity of the magnetic fluids. The results show that in the presence of an external magnetic field the magnetic nanoparticles form chainlike clusters along the direction of the external magnetic field, which leads to the fact that the thermal conduc-tivity of the magnetic fluid along the chain direction is bigger than that along other directions. The thermal conductivity of the magnetic fluids presents an anisotropic feature. With the increase of the magnetic field strength the chainlike clusters in the magnetic fluid appear to be more obvious, so that the anisotropic feature of heat conduction in the fluids becomes more evident.

  2. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in sheared polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shao Cong; Tanner, Roger I. [The University of Sydney, Rheology Research Group, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the anisotropy of the thermal conductivity tensor in polymer flow in this paper. Isotactic polypropylene (iPP) specimens were deformed by injection moulding at high shear rates and by steady shear at low shear rates, and were then quenched. The thermal conductivities parallel and perpendicular to the shear direction were measured using modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) in accordance with the ASTM E1952-01. The measured results showed that the thermal conductivity of the sheared polymer was anisotropic with an increase in the shear direction. The thermal conductivity can be regarded as varying either with the strain or the stress, as suggested by Van den Brule (1989). In addition to the Van den Brule mechanism, crystallization during flow also changes the thermal conductivity and this effect may often be dominant. Suggestions for procedures in processing computations, based on both effects, are given. (orig.)

  3. Thermal conductivity measurement of anisotropic material using photothermal deflection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete theoretical treatment of photothermal deflection spectroscopy has been performed for the measurement of thermal conductivities in an anisotropic medium. An analytical solution of three-dimensional heat conduction was obtained by using 2D Fourier Transforms for an anisotropic material irradiated by a laser beam. Thermal conductivity was determined by using the phase angle of deflection at relative positions between the heating and probe beams. Excellent agreement between theoretical and experimental photothermal deflections was obtained. Also, the thermal conductivity in an arbitrary measurement direction for anisotropic materials (Pyrolytic graphite) was measured

  4. Anisotropic thermal conduction in galaxy clusters with MHD in Gadget

    CERN Document Server

    Arth, Alexander; Beck, Alexander M; Petkova, Margarita; Lesch, Harald

    2014-01-01

    We present an implementation of thermal conduction including the anisotropic effects of magnetic fields for SPH. The anisotropic thermal conduction is mainly proceeding parallel to magnetic fields and suppressed perpendicular to the fields. We derive the SPH formalism for the anisotropic heat transport and solve the corresponding equation with an implicit conjugate gradient scheme. We discuss several issues of unphysical heat transport in the cases of extreme ansiotropies or unmagnetized regions and present possible numerical workarounds. We implement our algorithm into the GADGET code and study its behaviour in several test cases. In general, we reproduce the analytical solutions of our idealised test problems, and obtain good results in cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formations. Within galaxy clusters, the anisotropic conduction produces a net heat transport similar to an isotropic Spitzer conduction model with an efficiency of one per cent. In contrast to isotropic conduction our new formalism ...

  5. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, A., E-mail: abhishektiwariiitr@gmail.com [Groupe d’Etudes des Matériaux Hétérogènes (GEMH, EA 3178), Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Céramique Industrielle, 12, Rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges Cedex (France); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia); Boussois, K.; Nait-Ali, B.; Smith, D. S.; Blanchart, P. [Groupe d’Etudes des Matériaux Hétérogènes (GEMH, EA 3178), Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Céramique Industrielle, 12, Rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges Cedex (France)

    2013-11-15

    This paper reports about the development of a modified laser-flash technique and relation to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples. Thermal conductivity is then calculated with the product of diffusivity, specific heat and density. Design and operating features for evaluating in-plane thermal conductivities are described. The technique is advantageous as thin samples are not glued together to measure in-plane thermal conductivities like earlier methods reported in literature. The approach was employed to study anisotropic thermal conductivity in alumina sheet, textured kaolin ceramics and montmorillonite. Since it is rare to find in-plane thermal conductivity values for such anisotropic thin samples in literature, this technique offers a useful variant to existing techniques.

  6. Highly anisotropic thermal conductivity of arsenene: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraati, Majid; Vaez Allaei, S. Mehdi; Abdolhosseini Sarsari, I.; Pourfath, Mahdi; Donadio, Davide

    2016-02-01

    Elemental two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit intriguing heat transport and phononic properties. Here we have investigated the lattice thermal conductivity of newly proposed arsenene, the 2D honeycomb structure of arsenic, using ab initio calculations. Solving the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, we predict a highly anisotropic thermal conductivity of 30.4 and 7.8 W/mK along the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively, at room temperature. Our calculations reveal that phonons with mean free paths between 20 nm and 1 μ m provide the main contribution to the large thermal conductivity in the zigzag direction; mean free paths of phonons contributing to heat transport in the armchair directions range between 20 and 100 nm. The obtained anisotropic thermal conductivity and feasibility of synthesis, in addition to high electron mobility reported elsewhere, make arsenene a promising material for nanoelectronic applications and thermal management.

  7. Accurately simulating anisotropic thermal conduction on a moving mesh

    CERN Document Server

    Kannan, Rahul; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel implementation of an extremum preserving anisotropic diffusion solver for thermal conduction on the unstructured moving Voronoi mesh of the AREPO code. The method relies on splitting the one-sided facet fluxes into normal and oblique components, with the oblique fluxes being limited such that the total flux is both locally conservative and extremum preserving. The approach makes use of harmonic averaging points and a simple, robust interpolation scheme that works well for strong heterogeneous and anisotropic diffusion problems. Moreover, the required discretisation stencil is small. Efficient fully implicit and semi-implicit time integration schemes are also implemented. We perform several numerical tests that evaluate the stability and accuracy of the scheme, including applications such as point explosions with heat conduction and calculations of convective instabilities in conducting plasmas. The new implementation is suitable for studying important astrophysical phenomena, such as the co...

  8. Thermal conduction in single-layer black phosphorus: highly anisotropic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single-layer black phosphorus is characteristic for its puckered structure, which has led to distinct anisotropy in its optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. We use the non-equilibrium Green's function approach and the first-principles method to investigate the thermal conductance for single-layer black phosphorus in the ballistic transport regime, in which the phonon–phonon scattering is neglected. We find that the anisotropy in the thermal conduction is very weak for the single-layer black phosphorus—the difference between two in-plane directions is less than 4%. Our phonon calculations disclose that the out-of-plane acoustic phonon branch has lower group velocities in the direction perpendicular to the pucker, as the black phosphorus is softer in this direction, leading to a weakening effect for the thermal conductance in the perpendicular direction. However, the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch behaves abnormally; i.e., the group velocity of this phonon branch is higher in the perpendicular direction, although the single-layer black phosphorus is softer in this direction. The abnormal behavior of the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch is closely related to the highly anisotropic Poisson's ratio in the single-layer black phosphorus. As a result of the counteraction between the out-of-plane phonon mode and the in-plane phonon modes, the thermal conductance in the perpendicular direction is weaker than the parallel direction, but the anisotropy is pretty small. (paper)

  9. Accurately simulating anisotropic thermal conduction on a moving mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Rahul; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel implementation of an extremum preserving anisotropic diffusion solver for thermal conduction on the unstructured moving Voronoi mesh of the AREPO code. The method relies on splitting the one-sided facet fluxes into normal and oblique components, with the oblique fluxes being limited such that the total flux is both locally conservative and extremum preserving. The approach makes use of harmonic averaging points and a simple, robust interpolation scheme that works well for strong heterogeneous and anisotropic diffusion problems. Moreover, the required discretization stencil is small. Efficient fully implicit and semi-implicit time integration schemes are also implemented. We perform several numerical tests that evaluate the stability and accuracy of the scheme, including applications such as point explosions with heat conduction and calculations of convective instabilities in conducting plasmas. The new implementation is suitable for studying important astrophysical phenomena, such as the conductive heat transport in galaxy clusters, the evolution of supernova remnants, or the distribution of heat from black hole-driven jets into the intracluster medium.

  10. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, A; K. Boussois; B. Nait-Ali; Smith, D.S.; P. Blanchart

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports about the development of a modified laser-flash technique and relation to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples. Thermal conductivity is then calculated with the product of diffusivity, specific heat and density. Design and operating features for evaluating in-plane thermal conductivities are described. The technique is advantageous as thin samples are not glued together to measure in-plane thermal conductivities like earlier methods...

  11. Thermal conductivity of anisotropic snow measured by three independent methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Riche

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of snow determines the temperature gradient, and by this the rate of snow metamorphism. It is therefore a key property of snow. However, parameterizations of thermal conductivity measured with the transient needle probe and the steady-state heat-flux plate show a bias. In addition, it is not clear to which degree thermal anisotropy is relevant. Until now, no physically convincing argument for the existence of this bias could be found. In this study, we investigated three independent methods to measure snow thermal conductivity and its anisotropy: a needle probe with a long heating time, a guarded heat flux plate, and direct numerical simulation at the level of the pore and ice structure. The three methods were applied to identical snow samples, apart from the different measurement volumes of each methods. We analyzed the consistency and the difference between these methods. We found a distinct change from horizontal thermal anisotropy in small rounded grains and vertical anisotropy in depth hoar. The anisotropy between vertical and horizontal conductivity ranges between 0.5–2. This anisotropy can cause a difference of up to −25 % to + 25 % if the thermal conductivity is calculated only from a horizontally inserted needle probe. Based on these measurements, the direct numerical simulation is the most reliable method as the tensorial components of the thermal conductivity can be calculated, the corresponding microstructure is precisely known and the homogeneity of the sample can be determined.

  12. Anisotropic lattice thermal conductivity in chiral tellurium from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ab initio based calculations, we have calculated the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of chiral tellurium. We show that the interplay between the strong covalent intrachain and weak van der Waals interchain interactions gives rise to the phonon band gap between the lower and higher optical phonon branches. The underlying mechanism of the large anisotropy of the thermal conductivity is the anisotropy of the phonon group velocities and of the anharmonic interatomic force constants (IFCs), where large interchain anharmonic IFCs are associated with the lone electron pairs. We predict that tellurium has a large three-phonon scattering phase space that results in low thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity anisotropy decreases under applied hydrostatic pressure

  13. Anisotropic lattice thermal conductivity in chiral tellurium from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hua; Kioussis, Nicholas; Stewart, Derek A.

    2015-12-01

    Using ab initio based calculations, we have calculated the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of chiral tellurium. We show that the interplay between the strong covalent intrachain and weak van der Waals interchain interactions gives rise to the phonon band gap between the lower and higher optical phonon branches. The underlying mechanism of the large anisotropy of the thermal conductivity is the anisotropy of the phonon group velocities and of the anharmonic interatomic force constants (IFCs), where large interchain anharmonic IFCs are associated with the lone electron pairs. We predict that tellurium has a large three-phonon scattering phase space that results in low thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity anisotropy decreases under applied hydrostatic pressure.

  14. Anisotropic intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of phosphorene from first principles

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Guangzhao; Yan, Qing-Bo; Qin, Zhenzhen; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Hu, Ming; Su, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorene, the single layer counterpart of black phosphorus, is a novel two-dimensional semiconductor with high carrier mobility and a large fundamental direct band gap, which has attracted tremendous interest recently. Its potential applications in nano-electronics and thermoelectrics call for a fundamental study of the phonon transport. Here, we calculate the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of phosphorene by solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-princ...

  15. Effects of anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetohydrodynamics simulations of a reversed-field pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofri, M; Malara, F; Veltri, P

    2010-11-19

    A compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the reversed-field pinch is performed including anisotropic thermal conductivity. When the thermal conductivity is much larger in the direction parallel to the magnetic field than in the perpendicular direction, magnetic field lines become isothermal. As a consequence, as long as magnetic surfaces exist, a temperature distribution is observed displaying a hotter confined region, while an almost uniform temperature is produced when the magnetic field lines become chaotic. To include this effect in the numerical simulation, we use a multiple-time-scale analysis, which allows us to reproduce the effect of a large parallel thermal conductivity. The resulting temperature distribution is related to the existence of closed magnetic surfaces, as observed in experiments. The magnetic field is also affected by the presence of an anisotropic thermal conductivity. PMID:21231314

  16. Strongly Anisotropic Thermal and Electrical Conductivities of Self-assembled Silver Nanowire Network

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Zhe; Han, Meng; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Shen; Cola, Baratunde A.; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    Heat dissipation issues are the emerging challenges in the field of flexible electronics. Thermal management of flexible electronics creates a demand for flexible materials with highly anisotropic thermal conductivity, which work as heat spreaders to remove excess heat in the in-plane direction and as heat shields to protect human skin or device components under them from heating. This study proposes a self-assembled silver nanowire network with high thermal and electrical anisotropy with the...

  17. Effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on wind properties in hot accretion flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, De-Fu; Wu, Mao-Chun; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2016-06-01

    Previous works have clearly shown the existence of winds from black hole hot accretion flow and investigated their detailed properties. In extremely low accretion rate systems, the collisional mean-free path of electrons is large compared with the length-scale of the system, thus thermal conduction is dynamically important. When the magnetic field is present, the thermal conduction is anisotropic and energy transport is along magnetic field lines. In this paper, we study the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on the wind production in hot accretion flows by performing two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We find that thermal conduction has only moderate effects on the mass flux of wind. But the energy flux of wind can be increased by a factor of ˜10 due to the increase of wind velocity when thermal conduction is included. The increase of wind velocity is because of the increase of driving forces (e.g. gas pressure gradient force and centrifugal force) when thermal conduction is included. This result demonstrates that thermal conduction plays an important role in determining the properties of wind.

  18. Effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on wind properties in hot accretion flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bu, De-Fu; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Previous works have clearly shown the existence of winds from black hole hot accretion flow and investigated their detailed properties. In extremely low accretion rate systems, the collisional mean-free path of electrons is large compared with the length-scale of the system, thus thermal conduction is dynamically important. When the magnetic field is present, the thermal conduction is anisotropic and energy transport is along magnetic field lines. In this paper, we study the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on the wind production in hot accretion flows by performing two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We find that thermal conduction has only moderate effects on the mass flux of wind. But the energy flux of wind can be increased by a factor of $\\sim 10$ due to the increase of wind velocity when thermal conduction is included. The increase of wind velocity is because of the increase of driving forces (e.g. gas pressure gradient force and centrifugal force) when thermal conduction is includ...

  19. Anisotropic and inhomogeneous thermal conduction in suspended thin-film polycrystalline diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Aditya; Cho, Jungwan; Hobart, Karl D.; Feygelson, Tatyana I.; Pate, Bradford B.; Asheghi, Mehdi; Cahill, David G.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2016-05-01

    While there is a great wealth of data for thermal transport in synthetic diamond, there remains much to be learned about the impacts of grain structure and associated defects and impurities within a few microns of the nucleation region in films grown using chemical vapor deposition. Measurements of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic thermal conductivity in films thinner than 10 μm have previously been complicated by the presence of the substrate thermal boundary resistance. Here, we study thermal conduction in suspended films of polycrystalline diamond, with thicknesses ranging between 0.5 and 5.6 μm, using time-domain thermoreflectance. Measurements on both sides of the films facilitate extraction of the thickness-dependent in-plane ( κ r ) and through-plane ( κ z ) thermal conductivities in the vicinity of the coalescence and high-quality regions. The columnar grain structure makes the conductivity highly anisotropic, with κ z being nearly three to five times as large as κ r , a contrast higher than that reported previously for thicker films. In the vicinity of the high-quality region, κ r and κ z range from 77 ± 10 W/m-K and 210 ± 50 W/m-K for the 1 μm thick film to 130 ± 20 W/m-K and 710 ± 120 W/m-K for the 5.6 μm thick film, respectively. The data are interpreted using a model relating the anisotropy to the scattering on the boundaries of columnar grains and the evolution of the grain size considering their nucleation density and spatial rate of growth. This study aids in the reduction in the near-interfacial resistance of diamond films and efforts to fabricate diamond composites with silicon and GaN for power electronics.

  20. Simultaneous Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity by Means of Inverse Solution for One-Dimensional Heat Conduction (Anisotropic Thermal Properties of CFRP for FCEV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Masataka; Monde, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    For safe and fast fueling of hydrogen in a fuel cell electric vehicle at hydrogen fueling stations, an understanding of the heat transferred from the gas into the tank wall (carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) material) during hydrogen fueling is necessary. Its thermal properties are needed in estimating heat loss accurately during hydrogen fueling. The CFRP has anisotropic thermal properties, because it consists of an adhesive agent and layers of the CFRP which is wound with a carbon fiber. In this paper, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the tank wall material were measured by an inverse solution for one-dimensional unsteady heat conduction. As a result, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were 2.09 × 10^{-6}{ m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 3.06{ W}{\\cdot }{m}{\\cdot }^{-1}{K}^{-1} for the axial direction, while they were 6.03 × 10^{-7} {m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 0.93 {W}{\\cdot }{m}^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} for the radial direction. The thermal conductivity for the axial direction was about three times higher than that for the radial direction. The thermal diffusivity shows the same trend in both directions because the thermal capacity, ρ c, is independent of direction, where ρ is the density and c is the heat capacity.

  1. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide by the time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun, E-mail: junliu@illinois.edu; Choi, Gyung-Min; Cahill, David G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-21

    We use pump-probe metrology based on the magneto-optic Kerr effect to measure the anisotropic thermal conductivity of (001)-oriented MoS{sub 2} crystals. A ≈20 nm thick CoPt multilayer with perpendicular magnetization serves as the heater and thermometer in the experiment. The low thermal conductivity and small thickness of the CoPt transducer improve the sensitivity of the measurement to lateral heat flow in the MoS{sub 2} crystal. The thermal conductivity of MoS{sub 2} is highly anisotropic with basal-plane thermal conductivity varying between 85–110 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1} as a function of laser spot size. The basal-plane thermal conductivity is a factor of ≈50 larger than the c-axis thermal conductivity, 2.0±0.3 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}.

  2. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide by the time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Choi, Gyung-Min; Cahill, David G.

    2014-12-01

    We use pump-probe metrology based on the magneto-optic Kerr effect to measure the anisotropic thermal conductivity of (001)-oriented MoS2 crystals. A ≈20 nm thick CoPt multilayer with perpendicular magnetization serves as the heater and thermometer in the experiment. The low thermal conductivity and small thickness of the CoPt transducer improve the sensitivity of the measurement to lateral heat flow in the MoS2 crystal. The thermal conductivity of MoS2 is highly anisotropic with basal-plane thermal conductivity varying between 85-110 Wm -1K -1 as a function of laser spot size. The basal-plane thermal conductivity is a factor of ≈50 larger than the c-axis thermal conductivity, 2.0 ±0 .3W m -1K -1 .

  3. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide by the time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use pump-probe metrology based on the magneto-optic Kerr effect to measure the anisotropic thermal conductivity of (001)-oriented MoS2 crystals. A ≈20 nm thick CoPt multilayer with perpendicular magnetization serves as the heater and thermometer in the experiment. The low thermal conductivity and small thickness of the CoPt transducer improve the sensitivity of the measurement to lateral heat flow in the MoS2 crystal. The thermal conductivity of MoS2 is highly anisotropic with basal-plane thermal conductivity varying between 85–110 W m-1 K-1 as a function of laser spot size. The basal-plane thermal conductivity is a factor of ≈50 larger than the c-axis thermal conductivity, 2.0±0.3 W m-1 K-1

  4. Measurement of the thermal conductivity of thin insulating anisotropic material with a stationary hot strip method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a method dedicated to the thermal conductivity measurement of thin insulating anisotropic materials. The method is based on three hot-strip-type experiments in which the stationary temperature is measured at the center of the hot strip. A 3D model of the heat transfer in the system is established and simulated to determine the validity of a 2D transfer hypothesis at the center of the hot strip. A simplified 2D model is then developed leading to the definition of a geometrical factor calculable from a polynomial expression. A very simple calculation method enabling the estimation of the directional thermal conductivities from the three stationary temperature measurements and from the geometrical factor is presented. The uncertainties on each conductivity are estimated. The method is then validated by measurements on polyethylene foam and Ayous (anistropic low-density tropical wood); the estimated values of the thermal conductivities are in good agreement with the values estimated using the hot plate and the flash method. The method is finally applied on a thin super-insulating fibrous material for which no other method is able to measure the in-plane conductivity

  5. Numerical simulations of buoyancy instabilities in galaxy cluster plasmas with cosmic rays and anisotropic thermal conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rasera, Yann

    2008-01-01

    In clusters of galaxies, the specific entropy of intracluster plasma increases outwards. Nevertheless, a number of recent studies have shown that the intracluster medium is subject to buoyancy instabilities due to the effects of cosmic rays and anisotropic thermal conduction. In this paper, we present a new numerical algorithm for simulating such instabilities. This numerical method treats the cosmic rays as a fluid, accounts for the diffusion of heat and cosmic rays along magnetic field lines, and enforces the condition that the temperature and cosmic-ray pressure remain positive. We carry out several tests to ensure the accuracy of the code, including the detailed matching of analytic results for the eigenfunctions and growth rates of linear buoyancy instabilities. This numerical scheme will be useful for simulating convection driven by cosmic-ray buoyancy in galaxy cluster plasmas and may also be useful for other applications, including fusion plasmas, the interstellar medium, and supernovae remnants.

  6. Simulations of MHD Instabilities in Intracluster Medium Including Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanovic, Tamara; Balbus, Steven A; Parrish, Ian J

    2009-01-01

    We perform a suite of simulations of cooling cores in clusters of galaxies in order to investigate the effect of the recently discovered heat flux buoyancy instability (HBI) on the evolution of cores. Our models follow the 3-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of cooling cluster cores and capture the effects of anisotropic heat conduction along the lines of magnetic field, but do not account for the cosmological setting of clusters or the presence of AGN. Our model clusters can be divided into three groups according to their final thermodynamical state: catastrophically collapsing cores, isothermal cores, and an intermediate group whose final state is determined by the initial configuration of magnetic field. Modeled cores that are reminiscent of real cluster cores show evolution towards thermal collapse on a time scale which is prolonged by a factor of ~2-10 compared with the zero-conduction cases. The principal effect of the HBI is to re-orient field lines to be perpendicular to the temperature gradient....

  7. Conductivities in an anisotropic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Khimphun, Sunly; Park, Chanyong

    2016-01-01

    In order to imitate anisotropic medium of a condensed matter system, we take into account an Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion model as a dual gravity theory where the anisotropy is caused by different momentum relaxations. This gravity model allows an anisotropic charged black hole solution. On this background, we investigate how the linear responses of vector modes like electric, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivities rely on the anisotropy. We find that the electric conductivity in low frequency limit shows a Drude peak and that in the intermediate frequency regime it reveals the power law behavior. Especially, when the anisotropy increases the exponent of the power law becomes smaller. In addition, we find that there exist a critical value for the anisotropy at which the DC conductivity reaches to its maximum value.

  8. The thermal instability in a sheared magnetic field - Filament condensation with anisotropic heat conduction. [solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The condensation-mode growth rate of the thermal instability in an empirically motivated sheared field is shown to depend upon the existence of perpendicular thermal conduction. This typically very small effect (perpendicular conductivity/parallel conductivity less than about 10 to the -10th for the solar corona) increases the spatial-derivative order of the compressible temperature-perturbation equation, and thereby eliminates the singularities which appear when perpendicular conductivity = 0. The resulting growth rate is less than 1.5 times the controlling constant-density radiation rate, and has a clear maximum at a cross-field length of order 100 times and a width of about 0.1 the magnetic shear scale for solar conditions. The profiles of the observable temperature and density perturbations are independent of the thermal conductivity, and thus agree with those found previously. An analytic solution to the short-wavelength incompressible case is also given.

  9. A study of phonon anisotropic scattering effect on silicon thermal conductivity at nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that anisotropy in phonon transport exist because of the difference in phonon dispersion relation due to different lattice direction, as observed by a difference in in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivity. The directional preference (such as forward or backward scattering) in phonon propagation however, remains a relatively unexplored frontier. Our current work adopts a simple scattering probability in radiative transfer, which is called Henyey and Greenstein probability density function, and incorporates it into the phonon Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the effect of directional scattering in phonon transport. In this work, the effect of applying the anisotropy scattering is discussed, as well as its impact on the simulated thermal conductivity of silicon thin films. While the forward and backward scattering will increase and decrease thermal conductivity respectively, the extent of the effect is non-linear such that forward scattering has a more obvious effect than backward scattering

  10. Tridimensional Burning Structures Associated with Anisotropic Thermal Conductivities in Magnetically Confined and Pulsar Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, A.; Coppi, B.; Sonnino, G.

    2015-11-01

    A surprising result of the most recent theory of the thermonuclear instability, which can take place in D-T plasmas close to ignition, is that it can develop with tridimensional structures emerging from an axisymmetric toroidal confinement configurations. These structures are helical filaments (``snakes'') that are localized radially around a given rational magnetic surface. Until now well known analyses of fusion burning processes in magnetically confined plasmas, that include the thermonuclear instability, have been carried out by 1+1/2 D transport codes and, consequently, the onset of tri-dimensional structures has not been investigated. The importance of the electron thermal conductivities anisotropy is pointed out also for the inhomogeneous thermonuclear burning of plasmas on the surface of pulsars and for the formation of the observed bright spots on some of them. Sponsored in part by the U.S. DoE.

  11. Parker/buoyancy instabilities with anisotropic thermal conduction, cosmic rays, and arbitrary magnetic field strength

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a local stability analysis for a magnetized, gravitationally stratified plasma containing cosmic rays. We account for cosmic-ray diffusion and thermal conduction parallel to the magnetic field and allow beta to take any value, where p is the plasma pressure and B is the magnetic field strength. We take the gravitational acceleration to be in the -z-direction and the equilibrium magnetic field to be in the y-direction, and we derive the dispersion relation for small-amplitude instabilities and waves in the large-|k_x| limit. We use the Routh-Hurwitz criterion to show analytically that the necessary and sufficient criterion for stability in this limit is n k_B dT/dz + dp_cr/dz + (1/8pi)dB^2/dz > 0, where T is the temperature, n is the number density of thermal particles, and p_cr is the cosmic-ray pressure. We present approximate analytical solutions for the normal modes in the low- and high-diffusivity limits, show that they are consistent with the derived stability criterion, and comp...

  12. Buoyancy Instabilities in Galaxy Clusters: Convection Due to Adiabatic Cosmic Rays and Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, P; Quataert, E; Parrish, I J

    2009-01-01

    Using a linear stability analysis and two and three-dimensional nonlinear simulations, we study the physics of buoyancy instabilities in a combined thermal and relativistic (cosmic ray) plasma, motivated by the application to clusters of galaxies. We argue that cosmic ray diffusion is likely to be slow compared to the buoyancy time on large length scales, so that cosmic rays are effectively adiabatic. If the cosmic ray pressure $p_{cr}$ is $\\gtrsim 25 %$ of the thermal pressure, and the cosmic ray entropy ($p_{\\rm cr}/\\rho^{4/3}$; $\\rho$ is the thermal plasma density) decreases outwards, cosmic rays drive an adiabatic convective instability analogous to Schwarzschild convection in stars. Global simulations of galaxy cluster cores show that this instability saturates by reducing the cosmic ray entropy gradient and driving efficient convection and turbulent mixing. At larger radii in cluster cores, the thermal plasma is unstable to the heat flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI), a convective instability genera...

  13. Heat Conductance is Strongly Anisotropic for Pristine Silicon Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Brandbyge, Mads

    2008-01-01

    We compute atomistically the heat conductance for ultrathin pristine silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with diameters ranging from 1 to 5 nm. The room temperature thermal conductance is found to be highly anisotropic: wires oriented along the 110 direction have 50−75% larger conductance than wires oriented...... along the 100 and 111 directions. We show that the anisotropies can be qualitatively understood and reproduced from the bulk phonon band structure. Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the thinnest wires, but becomes computationally prohibitive for larger diameters, where we...... instead use the Tersoff empirical potential model (TEP). For the smallest wires, the thermal conductances obtained from DFT and TEP calculations agree within 10%. The presented results could be relevant for future phonon-engineering of nanowire devices....

  14. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermets have been proposed as a candidate fuel for space reactors for several reasons, including their potential for high thermal conductivity. However, there is currently no accepted model for cermet fuel thermal conductivity. The objective of the work reported in this paper was to (a) investigate the adequacy of existing models; (b) develop, if necessary, an improved model; and (c) provide recommendations for future work on cermet thermal conductivity. The results from this work indicate that further work is needed to accurately characterize cermet fuel thermal conductivity. It was determined that particle shape and orientation have a large impact on cermet thermal conductivity

  15. Thermal conductivity of HNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faubion, B.D.

    1976-03-01

    The thermal conductivity of HNS I and two samples of HNS II was determined at 222, 293, 347 and 394/sup 0/K. The thermal diffusivity of pellets of each HNS lot pressed to three densities was measured using the pulse heating method. The thermal conductivity was calculated for each pellet from the thermal diffusivity, density and the specific heat. The specific heat for each HNS sample was measured at each temperature using the DSC method.

  16. A BEM FOR TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION PROBLEM OF ANISOTROPIC FGM

    OpenAIRE

    Azis, Mohammad Ivan

    2014-01-01

    A boundary element method (BEM) for the solution of a certain class of nonlinear parabolic initial boundary value problems for a certain class of anisotropic functionally graded media is derived. The method is then used to obtain numerical values for some particular transient 2-D heat conduction problems for anisotropic functionally graded materials (FGM).

  17. Anisotropic conductivity tensor imaging using magnetic induction tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic induction tomography aims to reconstruct the electrical conductivity distribution of the human body using non-contact measurements. The potential of the method has been demonstrated by various simulation studies and a number of phantom experiments. These studies have all relied on models having isotropic distributions of conductivity, although the human body has a highly heterogeneous structure with partially anisotropic properties. Therefore, whether the conventional modeling approaches used so far are appropriate for clinical applications or not is still an open question. To investigate the problem, we performed a simulation study to investigate the feasibility of (1) imaging anisotropic perturbations within an isotropic medium and (2) imaging isotropic perturbations inside a partially anisotropic background. The first is the case for the imaging of anomalies that have anisotropic characteristics and the latter is the case e.g. in lung imaging where an anisotropic skeletal muscle tissue surrounds the lungs and the rib cage. An anisotropic solver based on the singular value decomposition was used to attain conductivity tensor images to be compared with the ones obtained from isotropic solvers. The results indicate the importance of anisotropic modeling in order to obtain satisfactory reconstructions, especially for the imaging of the anisotropic anomalies, and address the resolvability of the conductivity tensor components

  18. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  19. Thermal conductivity of nanoscale thin nickel films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Shiping; JIANG Peixue

    2005-01-01

    The inhomogeneous non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) scheme is applied to model phonon heat conduction in thin nickel films. The electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity of the film is deduced from the electrical conductivity through the use of the Wiedemann-Franz law. At the average temperature of T = 300 K, which is lower than the Debye temperature ()D = 450 K,the results show that in a film thickness range of about 1-11 nm, the calculated cross-plane thermal conductivity decreases almost linearly with the decreasing film thickness, exhibiting a remarkable reduction compared with the bulk value. The electrical and thermal conductivities are anisotropic in thin nickel films for the thickness under about 10 nm. The phonon mean free path is estimated and the size effect on the thermal conductivity is attributed to the reduction of the phonon mean free path according to the kinetic theory.

  20. Investigation of anisotropic thermal transport in cross-linked polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simavilla, David Nieto

    Thermal transport in lightly cross-linked polyisoprene and polybutadine subjected to uniaxial elongation is investigated experimentally. We employ two experimental techniques to assess the effect that deformation has on this class of materials. The first technique, which is based on Forced Rayleigh Scattering (FRS), allows us to measure the two independent components of the thermal diffusivity tensor as a function of deformation. These measurements along with independent measurements of the tensile stress and birefringence are used to evaluate the stress-thermal and stress-optic rules. The stress-thermal rule is found to be valid for the entire range of elongations applied. In contrast, the stress-optic rule fails for moderate to large stretch ratios. This suggests that the degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity depends on both orientation and tension in polymer chain segments. The second technique, which is based on infrared thermography (IRT), allows us to measure anisotropy in thermal conductivity and strain induced changes in heat capacity. We validate this method measurements of anisotropic thermal conductivity by comparing them with those obtained using FRS. We find excellent agreement between the two techniques. Uncertainty in the infrared thermography method measurements is estimated to be about 2-5 %. The accuracy of the method and its potential application to non-transparent materials makes it a good alternative to extend current research on anisotropic thermal transport in polymeric materials. A second IRT application allows us to investigate the dependence of heat capacity on deformation. We find that heat capacity increases with stretch ratio in polyisoprene specimens under uniaxial extension. The deviation from the equilibrium value of heat capacity is consistent with an independent set of experiments comparing anisotropy in thermal diffusivity and conductivity employing FRS and IRT techniques. We identify finite extensibility and strain

  1. Thermally conductive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, N. R.; Jenkins, R. K.; Lister, J. L. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A thermally conductive polymer is provided having physical and chemical properties suited to use as a medium for potting electrical components. The polymer is prepared from hydroquinone, phenol, and formaldehyde, by conventional procedures employed for the preparation of phenol-formaldehyde resins. While the proportions of the monomers can be varied, a preferred polymer is formed from the monomers in a 1:1:2.4 molar or ratio of hydroquinone:phenol:formaldehyde.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Singh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are suspensions of nanoparticles in base fluids, a new challenge for thermal sciences providedby nanotechnology. Nanofluids have unique features different from  conventional solid-liquid mixtures inwhich mm or µm sized particles of metals and non-metals are dispersed. Due to their excellent characteristics,nanofluids find wide applications in enhancing heat transfer. Research work on the concept, heat transferenhancement mechanism, and application of the nanofluids is still in its primary stage. This study providesa review of research in this field with focus on thermal conductivity studies of nanofluids.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.600-607, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1682

  3. Optimal anisotropic three-phase conducting composites: Plane problem

    CERN Document Server

    Cherkaev, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    The paper establishes tight lower bound for effective conductivity tensor $K_*$ of two-dimensional three-phase conducting anisotropic composites and defines optimal microstructures. It is assumed that three materials are mixed with fixed volume fractions and that the conductivity of one of the materials is infinite. The bound expands the Hashin-Shtrikman and Translation bounds to multiphase structures, it is derived using the technique of {\\em localized polyconvexity} that is a combination of Translation method and additional inequalities on the fields in the materials; similar technique was used by Nesi (1995) and Cherkaev (2009) for isotropic multiphase composites. This paper expands the bounds to the anisotropic composites. The lower bound of conductivity (G-closure) is a piece-wise analytic function of eigenvalues of $K_*$, that depends only on conductivities of components and their volume fractions. Also, we find optimal microstructures that realize the bounds, developing the technique suggested earlier ...

  4. Optical Conductivity of Anisotropic Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Kang-Xian; CHEN Chuan-Yu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Optical conductivity of anisotropic double-parabolic quantum dots is investigated with the memory-function approach, and the analytic expression for the optical conductivity is derived. With characteristic parameterspertaining to GaAs, the numerical results are presented. It is shown that: (1) the larger the optical phonon frequency ωLO, the stronger the peak intensity of the optical conductivity, and the more asymmetric the shape of the optical conductivity; (2) the magnetic field enhances the optical conductivity for levels l = 0 and l = 1, with or without electron-LO-phonon interactions; (3) the larger the quantum dot thickness lz, the smaller the optical conductivity σ(ω).

  5. Thermal contact conductance

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudana, Chakravarti V

    2013-01-01

    The work covers both theoretical and practical aspects of thermal contact conductance. The theoretical discussion focuses on heat transfer through spots, joints, and surfaces, as well as the role of interstitial materials (both planned and inadvertent). The practical discussion includes formulae and data that can be used in designing heat-transfer equipment for a variety of joints, including special geometries and configurations. All of the material has been updated to reflect the latest advances in the field.

  6. Interplay among Cooling, AGN Feedback and Anisotropic Conduction in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, H -Y K

    2015-01-01

    Feedback from the active galactic nuclei (AGN) is one of the most promising heating mechanisms to circumvent the cooling-flow problem in galaxy clusters. However, the role of thermal conduction remains unclear. Previous studies have shown that anisotropic thermal conduction in cluster cool cores (CC) could drive the heat-flux driven buoyancy instabilities (HBI) that re-orient the field lines in the azimuthal directions and isolate the cores from conductive heating from the outskirts. However, how the AGN interacts with the HBI is still unknown. To understand these interwined processes, we perform the first 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of isolated CC clusters that include anisotropic conduction, radiative cooling, and AGN feedback. We find that: (1) For realistic magnetic field strengths in clusters, magnetic tension can suppress a significant portion of HBI-unstable modes and thus the HBI is either completely inhibited or significantly impaired, depending on the unknown magnetic field coherence le...

  7. Thermal fluctuations and critical behavior in a magnetized, anisotropic plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Mahajan, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Thermal fluctuations in a magnetized, anisotropic plasma are studied by applying standard methods, based on the Einstein rule, to the known thermodynamic potential of the system. It is found in particular that magnetic fluctuations become critical when the anisotropy p{sub ∥}−p{sub ⊥} changes sign. By examining the critical region, additional insight on the equations of state for near-critical anisotropic plasma is obtained.

  8. Thermal Stresses in an Anisotropic Thin Plate Subjected to Moving Plane Heat Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malak Naji

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to numerically simulate the plane moving heat source through anisotropic mild steal thin plate. Heat conduction problems in anisotropic material, where the thermal conductivity varies with direction and involving a moving heat source have several industrial applications, such like metal cutting, flame or laser hardening of metals, welding and others. The parabolic heat conduction model is used for the prediction of the temperature history. The temperature distribution inside the plate is determined from the solution of heat equation. Thus, the heat equation is solved numerically using finite deference method and the temperature distributions are determined. The thermal stresses in this case are, also, investigated and computed numerically. It is found that the thermal conductivity ratio affect in both temperature and thermal stresses distributions, in additional to the speed and heat source intensity.

  9. Shape memory thermal conduction switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan (Inventor); Krishnan, Vinu (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal conduction switch includes a thermally-conductive first member having a first thermal contacting structure for securing the first member as a stationary member to a thermally regulated body or a body requiring thermal regulation. A movable thermally-conductive second member has a second thermal contacting surface. A thermally conductive coupler is interposed between the first member and the second member for thermally coupling the first member to the second member. At least one control spring is coupled between the first member and the second member. The control spring includes a NiTiFe comprising shape memory (SM) material that provides a phase change temperature <273 K, a transformation range <40 K, and a hysteresis of <10 K. A bias spring is between the first member and the second member. At the phase change the switch provides a distance change (displacement) between first and second member by at least 1 mm, such as 2 to 4 mm.

  10. Existence and uniqueness in anisotropic conductivity reconstruction with Faraday's law

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Min-Gi

    2015-03-18

    We show that three sets of internal current densities are the right amount of data that give the existence and the uniqueness at the same time in reconstructing an anisotropic conductivity in two space dimensions. The curl free equation of Faraday’s law is taken instead of the usual divergence free equation of the electrical impedance to- mography. Boundary conditions related to given current densities are introduced which complete a well determined problem for conductivity reconstruction together with Fara- day’s law.

  11. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  12. Cellulose-Templated Graphene Monoliths with Anisotropic Mechanical, Thermal, and Electrical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rujing; Chen, Qiao; Zhen, Zhen; Jiang, Xin; Zhong, Minlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2015-09-01

    Assembling particular building blocks into composites with diverse targeted structures has attracted considerable interest for understanding its new properties and expanding the potential applications. Anisotropic organization is considered as a frequently used targeted architecture and possesses many peculiar properties because of its unusual shapes. Here, we show that anisotropic graphene monoliths (AGMs), three-dimensional architectures of well-aligned graphene sheets obtained by a dip-coating method using cellulose acetate fibers as templates show thermal-insulating, fire-retardant, and anisotropic properties. They exhibit a feature of higher mechanical strength and thermal/electrical conductivities in the axial direction than in the radial direction. Elastic polymer resins are then introduced into the pores of the AGMs to form conductive and flexible composites. The composites, as AGMs, retain the unique anisotropic properties, revealing opposite resistance change under compressions in different directions. The outstanding anisotropic properties of AGMs make them possible to be applied in the fields of thermal insulation, integrated circuits, and electromechanical devices. PMID:26284380

  13. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF METALLIC WIRES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU XIANG; GU JI-HUA; CHU JUN-HAO

    2001-01-01

    The effect of radial thickness on the thermal conductivity of a free standing wire is investigated. The thermal conductivity is evaluated using the Boltzmann equation. A simple expression for the reduction in conductivity due to the increase of boundary scattering is presented. A comparison is made between the experimental results of indium wires and the theoretical calculations. It is shown that this decrease of conductivity in wires is smaller than that in film where heat flux is perpendicular to the surface.

  14. A multipoint flux approximation of the steady-state heat conduction equation in anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2013-03-20

    In this work, we introduce multipoint flux (MF) approximation method to the problem of conduction heat transfer in anisotropic media. In such media, the heat flux vector is no longer coincident with the temperature gradient vector. In this case, thermal conductivity is described as a second order tensor that usually requires, at least, six quantities to be fully defined in general three-dimensional problems. The two-point flux finite differences approximation may not handle such anisotropy and essentially more points need to be involved to describe the heat flux vector. In the framework of mixed finite element method (MFE), the MFMFE methods are locally conservative with continuous normal fluxes. We consider the lowest order Brezzi-Douglas-Marini (BDM) mixed finite element method with a special quadrature rule that allows for nodal velocity elimination resulting in a cell-centered system for the temperature. We show comparisons with some analytical solution of the problem of conduction heat transfer in anisotropic long strip. We also consider the problem of heat conduction in a bounded, rectangular domain with different anisotropy scenarios. It is noticed that the temperature field is significantly affected by such anisotropy scenarios. Also, the technique used in this work has shown that it is possible to use the finite difference settings to handle heat transfer in anisotropic media. In this case, heat flux vectors, for the case of rectangular mesh, generally require six points to be described. Copyright © 2013 by ASME.

  15. Thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Shawn A.; Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Ge, Zhenbin; Shimmin, Robert G.

    2006-04-01

    We describe an optical beam deflection technique for measurements of the thermal diffusivity of fluid mixtures and suspensions of nanoparticles with a precision of better than 1%. Our approach is tested using the thermal conductivity of ethanol-water mixtures; in nearly pure ethanol, the increase in thermal conductivity with water concentration is a factor of 2 larger than predicted by effective medium theory. Solutions of C60-C70 fullerenes in toluene and suspensions of alkanethiolate-protected Au nanoparticles were measured to maximum volume fractions of 0.6% and 0.35 vol %, respectively. We do not observe anomalous enhancements of the thermal conductivity that have been reported in previous studies of nanofluids; the largest increase in thermal conductivity we have observed is 1.3%+/-0.8% for 4 nm diam Au particles suspended in ethanol.

  16. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Segmented Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Denis L. Nika; Cocemasov, Aleksandr I.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the phonon thermal conductivity of segmented nanowires focusing on theoretical results for Si and Si/Ge structures with the constant and periodically modulated cross-sections. We describe the use of the face-centered cubic cell and Born-von Karman models of the lattice vibrations for calculating the phonon energy spectra in the segmented nanowires. Modification of the phonon spectrum in such nanostructures results in strong reduction of the phonon thermal conductivity a...

  18. Interplay Among Cooling, AGN Feedback, and Anisotropic Conduction in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.-Y. Karen; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-02-01

    Feedback from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is one of the most promising heating mechanisms to circumvent the cooling-flow problem in galaxy clusters. However, the role of thermal conduction remains unclear. Previous studies have shown that anisotropic thermal conduction in cluster cool cores (CCs) could drive the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities (HBIs) that reorient the field lines in the azimuthal directions and isolate the cores from conductive heating from the outskirts. However, how the AGN interacts with the HBI is still unknown. To understand these interwined processes, we perform the first 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of isolated CC clusters that include anisotropic conduction, radiative cooling, and AGN feedback. We find the following: (1) For realistic magnetic field strengths in clusters, magnetic tension can suppress a significant portion of HBI-unstable modes, and thus the HBI is either completely inhibited or significantly impaired, depending on the unknown magnetic field coherence length. (2) Turbulence driven by AGN jets can effectively randomize magnetic field lines and sustain conductivity at ∼1/3 of the Spitzer value; however, the AGN-driven turbulence is not volume filling. (3) Conductive heating within the cores could contribute to ∼10% of the radiative losses in Perseus-like clusters and up to ∼50% for clusters twice the mass of Perseus. (4) Thermal conduction has various impacts on the AGN activity and intracluster medium properties for the hottest clusters, which may be searched by future observations to constrain the level of conductivity in clusters. The distribution of cold gas and the implications are also discussed.

  19. Anisotropic electrical and thermal conductivity in Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ [AE = Ca, Sr1−xBax (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0)] single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ (AE represents alkaline earth), constructed by stacking of rock-salt Bi2AE2O4 and triangle CoO2 layers alternatively along c-axis, is one of promising thermoelectric oxides. The most impressive feature of Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ, as reported previously, is their electrical conductivity mainly lying along CoO2 plane, adjusting Bi2AE2O4 layer simultaneously manipulates both thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. It in turn optimizes thermoelectric performance of these materials. In this work, we characterize the anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivity along both ab-plane and c-direction of Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba, Sr1−xBax) single crystals. The results substantiate that isovalence replacement in Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ remarkably modifies their electrical property along ab-plane; while their thermal conductivity along ab-plane only has a slightly difference. At the same time, both the electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity along c-axis of these materials also have dramatic changes. Certainly, the electrical resistance along c-axis is too high to be used as thermoelectric applications. These results suggest that adjusting nano-block Bi2AE2O4 layer in Bi2AE2Co2O8+δ cannot modify the thermal conductivity along high electrical conductivity plane (ab-plane here). The evolution of electrical property is discussed by Anderson localization and electron-electron interaction U. And the modification of thermal conductivity along c-axis is attributed to the microstructure difference. This work sheds more light on the manipulation of the thermal and electrical conductivity in the layered thermoelectric materials

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used as...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...... glass types could have a significant advantage for getting low thermal conductivity when recycled for thermal insulation applications. The impact of crystallisation on the thermal conductivity of foam glasses is also discussed....

  1. Minimum Thermal Conductivity of Superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phonon thermal conductivity of a multilayer is calculated for transport perpendicular to the layers. There is a crossover between particle transport for thick layers to wave transport for thin layers. The calculations show that the conductivity has a minimum value for a layer thickness somewhat smaller then the mean free path of the phonons. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  2. Thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide of composition UO2.015 was measured from 300 to 1400 K. The phonon component of the conductivity is found to be quantitatively accounted for by the theoretical expression of Slack derived by modifying the Leibfried-Schlomann equation. (orig.)

  3. Lightweight, Thermally Conductive Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Loftin, Timothy A.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum reinforced with carbon fibers superior to copper in some respects. Lightweight composite material has high thermal conductivity. Consists of aluminum matrix containing graphite fibers, all oriented in same direction. Available as sheets, tubes, and bars. Thermal conductivity of composite along fibers rises above that of pure copper over substantial range of temperatures. Graphite/aluminum composite useful in variety of heat-transfer applications in which reduction of weight critical. Used to conduct heat in high-density, high-speed integrated-circuit packages for computers and in base plates for electronic equipment. Also used to carry heat away from leading edges of wings in high-speed airplanes.

  4. Anisotropic expansion of a thermal dipolar Bose gas

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Yijun; Burdick, Nathaniel Q; DiSciacca, Jack M; Petrov, Dmitry S; Lev, Benjamin L

    2016-01-01

    We report on the anisotropic expansion of ultracold bosonic dysprosium gases at temperatures above quantum degeneracy and develop a quantitative theory to describe this behavior. The theory expresses the post-expansion aspect ratio in terms of temperature and microscopic collisional properties by incorporating Hartree-Fock mean-field interactions, hydrodynamic effects, and Bose-enhancement factors. Our results extend the utility of expansion imaging by providing accurate thermometry for dipolar thermal Bose gases, reducing error in expansion thermometry from tens of percent to only a few percent. Furthermore, we present a simple method to determine scattering lengths in dipolar gases, including near a Feshbach resonance, through observation of thermal gas expansion.

  5. Anisotropic Thermal Behavior of Silicone Polymer, DC 745

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Jillian Cathleen [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Torres, Joseph Angelo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Volz, Heather Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gallegos, Jennifer Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    In material applications, it is important to understand how polymeric materials behave in the various environments they may encounter. One factor governing polymer behavior is processing history. Differences in fabrication will result in parts with varied or even unintended properties. In this work, the thermal expansion behavior of silicone DC 745 is studied. Thermomechanical analysis (TMA) is used to determine changes in sample dimension resulting from changes in temperature. This technique can measure thermal events such as the linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), melting, glass transitions, cure shrinkage, and internal relaxations. Using a thermomechanical analyzer (Q400 TMA), it is determined that DC 745 expands anisotropically when heated. This means that the material has a different CTE depending upon which direction is being measured. In this study, TMA experiments were designed in order to confirm anisotropic thermal behavior in multiple DC 745 samples of various ages and lots. TMA parameters such as temperature ramp rate, preload force, and temperature range were optimized in order to ensure the most accurate and useful data. A better understanding of the thermal expansion of DC 745 will allow for more accurate modeling of systems using this material.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Fedor M. Shakhov; Sergey V. Kidalov

    2009-01-01

    A major problem challenging specialists in present-day materials sciences is the development of compact, cheap to fabricate heat sinks for electronic devices, primarily for computer processors, semiconductor lasers, high-power microchips, and electronics components. The materials currently used for heat sinks of such devices are aluminum and copper, with thermal conductivities of about 250 W/(m·K) and 400 W/(m·K), respectively. Significantly, the thermal expansion coefficient of metals differ...

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedor M. Shakhov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A major problem challenging specialists in present-day materials sciences is the development of compact, cheap to fabricate heat sinks for electronic devices, primarily for computer processors, semiconductor lasers, high-power microchips, and electronics components. The materials currently used for heat sinks of such devices are aluminum and copper, with thermal conductivities of about 250 W/(m·K and 400 W/(m·K, respectively. Significantly, the thermal expansion coefficient of metals differs markedly from those of the materials employed in semiconductor electronics (mostly silicon; one should add here the low electrical resistivity metals possess. By contrast, natural single-crystal diamond is known to feature the highest thermal conductivity of all the bulk materials studied thus far, as high as 2,200 W/(m·K. Needless to say, it cannot be applied in heat removal technology because of high cost. Recently, SiC- and AlN-based ceramics have started enjoying wide use as heat sink materials; the thermal conductivity of such composites, however, is inferior to that of metals by nearly a factor two. This prompts a challenging scientific problem to develop diamond-based composites with thermal characteristics superior to those of aluminum and copper, adjustable thermal expansion coefficient, low electrical conductivity and a moderate cost, below that of the natural single-crystal diamond. The present review addresses this problem and appraises the results reached by now in studying the possibility of developing composites in diamond-containing systems with a view of obtaining materials with a high thermal conductivity.

  8. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H., E-mail: mcgaughey@cmu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  9. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  10. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Seo

    Full Text Available Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5 that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information.

  11. Invert Effective Thermal Conductivity Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivities of a repository-emplaced invert steel set and surrounding ballast material. The scope of this calculation analyzes a ballast-material thermal conductivity range of 0.10 to 0.70 W/m · K, a transverse beam spacing range of 0.75 to 1.50 meters, and beam compositions of A 516 carbon steel and plain carbon steel. Results from this calculation are intended to support calculations that identify waste package and repository thermal characteristics for Site Recommendation (SR). This calculation was developed by Waste Package Department (WPD) under Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 1, ICN 0, Calculations

  12. Anisotropic electrical properties in thermal spray metallic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct current resistivity of freestanding metallic coatings of Ni-Al alloys made by a variety of thermal spray processes was measured in-plane (=ρ ip) and through-thickness (=ρ tt), using a four-contact method. The coatings exhibited anisotropic resistivities with anisotropy (=ρ tt/ρ ip) ranging from 1.1 to 2.2 across the processes. Results are analyzed in the context of coating microstructures and chemical compositions obtained by electron microscopy. In addition, a simple electric circuit analysis approximating the coating as brick-layer structure illustrates the significance of splat interfaces to electrical behavior

  13. Anisotropic hydrodynamics and the early-thermalization puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    The framework of anisotropic hydrodynamics is used in 3+1 dimensions to analyze behavior of matter produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The model predictions for the hadronic transverse-momentum spectra, directed and elliptic flows, and the HBT radii are presented. We show that the effects of the initial anisotropy of pressure may be compensated by appropriate adjustment of the initial energy density. In this way, the final hadronic observables become insensitive to the early stage dynamics and the early thermalization puzzle may be circumvented.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower the...

  15. Estimating interfacial thermal conductivity in metamaterials through heat flux mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canbazoglu, Fatih M.; Vemuri, Krishna P.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    The variability of the thickness as well as the thermal conductivity of interfaces in composites may significantly influence thermal transport characteristics and the notion of a metamaterial as an effective medium. The consequent modulations of the heat flux passage are analytically and experimentally examined through a non-contact methodology using radiative imaging, on a model anisotropic thermal metamaterial. It was indicated that a lower Al layer/silver interfacial epoxy ratio of ∼25 compared to that of a Al layer/alumina interfacial epoxy (of ∼39) contributes to a smaller deviation of the heat flux bending angle.

  16. Thermal conductivity of niobium diselenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal conductivity measurements have been used to study the temperature dependence of the various scattering mechanisms present in single crystals of NbSe in a temperature range from 1 to 100K. Phonons are found to contribute a substantial fraction of the conduction in this temperature range and, in general, the results agree well with standard theoretical models for three-dimensional metals. The presence of van der Waals boundaries beween the layers introduces no significant boundary scattering for phonons. In addition to the usual electron and point defect scattering terms which are present in the phonon conductivity, a term which has a linear temperature dependence was found. This linear term may be caused by stacking fault scattering centers. A linear field dependence of the electrical magnetoresistance is reported and it is suggested this term may arise from magnetic breakdown at energy gaps in the Fermi surface induced by charge-density waves as suggested by Overhauser. It is noted that the ratio of the superconducting to normal state thermal conductivity is consistent with a BCS-like superconducting energy gap

  17. Anisotropic electrical and thermal conductivity in Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} [AE = Ca, Sr{sub 1−x}Ba{sub x} (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0)] single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Song-Tao [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Shan-Tao [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xiong, Ye [College of Physical Science and Technology, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Yao, Shu-Hua, E-mail: shyao@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: ybchen@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key laboratory of Crystal Material, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Chen, Y. B., E-mail: shyao@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: ybchen@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructure and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen, Yan-Feng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-09-28

    Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} (AE represents alkaline earth), constructed by stacking of rock-salt Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}O{sub 4} and triangle CoO{sub 2} layers alternatively along c-axis, is one of promising thermoelectric oxides. The most impressive feature of Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}, as reported previously, is their electrical conductivity mainly lying along CoO{sub 2} plane, adjusting Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}O{sub 4} layer simultaneously manipulates both thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. It in turn optimizes thermoelectric performance of these materials. In this work, we characterize the anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivity along both ab-plane and c-direction of Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba, Sr{sub 1−x}Ba{sub x}) single crystals. The results substantiate that isovalence replacement in Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} remarkably modifies their electrical property along ab-plane; while their thermal conductivity along ab-plane only has a slightly difference. At the same time, both the electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity along c-axis of these materials also have dramatic changes. Certainly, the electrical resistance along c-axis is too high to be used as thermoelectric applications. These results suggest that adjusting nano-block Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}O{sub 4} layer in Bi{sub 2}AE{sub 2}Co{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} cannot modify the thermal conductivity along high electrical conductivity plane (ab-plane here). The evolution of electrical property is discussed by Anderson localization and electron-electron interaction U. And the modification of thermal conductivity along c-axis is attributed to the microstructure difference. This work sheds more light on the manipulation of the thermal and electrical conductivity in the layered thermoelectric materials.

  18. Thermal Conductivity Of Rubble Piles

    CERN Document Server

    Luan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Rubble piles are a common feature of solar system bodies. They are composed of monolithic elements of ice or rock bound by gravity. Voids occupy a significant fraction of the volume of a rubble pile. They can exist up to pressure $P\\approx \\epsy\\mu$, where $\\epsy$ is the monolithic material's yield strain and $\\mu$ its rigidity. At low $P$, contacts between neighboring elements are confined to a small fraction of their surface areas. As a result, the effective thermal conductivity of a rubble pile, $\\kcon\\approx k(P/(\\epsy\\mu))^{1/2}$, can be orders of magnitude smaller than, $k$, the thermal conductivity of its monolithic elements. In a fluid-free environment, only radiation can transfer energy across voids. It contributes an additional component, $\\krad=16\\ell\\sigma T^3/3$, to the total effective conductivity, $\\keff=\\kcon +\\krad$. Here $\\ell$, the inverse of the opacity per unit volume, is of order the size of the elements and voids. An important distinction between $\\kcon$ and $\\krad$ is that the former i...

  19. Strain-Engineering Anisotropic Electrical Conductance of Phosphorene and Few-Layer Black Phosphorus

    OpenAIRE

    Fei, Ruixiang; Yang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Newly fabricated monolayer phosphorene and its few-layer structures are expected to be promising for electronic and optical applications because of their finite direct band gaps and sizable but anisotropic electronic mobility. By first-principles simulations, we show that this unique anisotropic conductance can be controlled by using simple strain conditions. With the appropriate biaxial or uniaxial strain, we can rotate the preferred conducting direction by 90 degrees. This will be of useful...

  20. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Cobalt Films Prepared by Thermal Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuttanun PANSONG

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt films on silicon substrates were prepared by thermal evaporation. By evaporating 0.05 g of cobalt for 80-240 s, a thickness from 21.1 to 67.7 nm was obtained with a deposition rate about 0.26-0.32 nm per second. The 29 nm-thick cobalt film exhibited magnetoresistance (MR ranging from -0.0793% (field perpendicular to the current to +0.0134% (field parallel to the current with saturation in a 220 mT magnetic field. This MR was attributed to anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR since changing the angle between the field and the current (θ gave rise to a change in the electrical resistance (Rθ. The results agreed with the theory since the plot between Rθ and cos2θ could be linearly fitted. AMR was not observed in non-ferromagnetic gold films whose resistance was insensitive to the angle between the current and magnetic field.

  1. Relative acceleration approach for conduction failure of cardiac excitation propagation on anisotropic curved surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, Sehun

    2012-01-01

    In cardiac electrophysiology, it is important to predict the necessary conditions for conduction failure, the failure of the cardiac excitation propagation even in the presence of normal excitable tissue, in high-dimensional anisotropic space because these conditions may provide feasible mechanisms for abnormal excitation propagations such as atrial re-entry and, subsequently, atrial fibrillation even without taking into account the time-dependent refractory region. Some conditions of conduction failure have been studied for anisotropy or simple curved surfaces, but the general conditions on anisotropic curved surfaces (anisotropic and curved surface) remain unknown. To predict and analyze conduction failure on anisotropic curved surfaces, a new analytic approach is proposed, called the relative acceleration approach borrowed from spacetime physics. Motivated by a discrete model of cardiac excitation propagation, this approach is based on the hypothesis that a large relative acceleration can translate to a dr...

  2. Anisotropic electronic conduction in stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Hu; Hui Zhang; Jiemin Wang; Zhaojin Li; Minmin Hu; Jun Tan; Pengxiang Hou; Feng Li; Xiaohui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide is an emerging conductive material for electrochemical energy storage which requires an understanding of the intrinsic electronic conduction. Here we report the electronic conduction properties of stacked Ti3C2 T 2 (T = OH, O, F) with two distinct stacking sequences (Bernal and simple hexagonal). On the basis of first-principles calculations and energy band theory analysis, both stacking sequences give rise to metallic conduction with Ti 3d electrons c...

  3. First-Principles Study of Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Td-WTe2

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Gang; Sun, Hong Yi; Zhou, Jian; Li, Qing Fang; Wan, X. G.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and thermal properties of bulk Td-WTe2 have been studied by using first-principles calculations. We find that the lattice thermal conductivity of WTe2 is anisotropic, with the highest value along a-axis and lowest one along the c-axis at 300 K. Our calculated size dependent thermal conductivity shows that nanostructuring of WTe2 can possibly further decrease the lattice thermal conductivity. Such extremely low thermal conductivity, even much lower than WSe2, makes WTe2 attracti...

  4. Boosting magnetic reconnection by viscosity and thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Imada, Shinsuke

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection is investigated by means of magnetohydrodynamic simulations including uniform resistivity, uniform viscosity, and anisotropic thermal conduction. When viscosity exceeds resistivity (the magnetic Prandtl number P r m > 1 ), the viscous dissipation dominates outflow dynamics and leads to the decrease in the plasma density inside a current sheet. The low-density current sheet supports the excitation of the vortex. The thickness of the vortex is broader than that of the current for P r m > 1 . The broader vortex flow more efficiently carries the upstream magnetic flux toward the reconnection region, and consequently, boosts the reconnection. The reconnection rate increases with viscosity provided that thermal conduction is fast enough to take away the thermal energy increased by the viscous dissipation (the fluid Prandtl number Pr < 1). The result suggests the need to control the Prandtl numbers for the reconnection against the conventional resistive model.

  5. Boosting Magnetic Reconnection by Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Minoshima, Takashi; Imada, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection is investigated by means of magnetohydrodynamic simulations including uniform resistivity, uniform viscosity, and anisotropic thermal conduction. When viscosity exceeds resistivity (the magnetic Prandtl number Prm > 1), the viscous dissipation dominates outflow dynamics and leads to the decrease in the plasma density inside a current sheet. The low-density current sheet supports the excitation of the vortex. The thickness of the vortex is broader than that of the current for Prm > 1. The broader vortex flow more efficiently carries the upstream magnetic flux toward the reconnection region, and consequently boosts the reconnection. The reconnection rate increases with viscosity provided that thermal conduction is fast enough to take away the thermal energy increased by the viscous dissipation (the fluid Prandtl number Pr < 1). The result suggests the need to control the Prandtl numbers for the reconnection against the conventional resistive model.

  6. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries. PMID:26284489

  7. Thermal diffusivity and anisotropic effects in transparent polymers using colinear mirage detection

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, G.; Boué, C.; D. Fournier; Boccara, A.

    1994-01-01

    Colinear mirage detection was found to be simple and efficient to solve the problem of thermal diffusivity measurements in transparent polymer foils. Both reliable values have been obtained and anisotropic effects revealed.

  8. Thermal Conductances of Pressed Copper Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, L.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes investigation of thermal conductivities of smooth copper contacts pressed together at liquid-helium temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for accurate thermal models for infrared detectors and other cryogenic instruments.

  9. Anisotropic thermal transport in Bi2223/Ag superconducting tape with sandwiched structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Anisotropic thermal conductivity of the Bi2223/Ag tape was measured. ► Thermal conductivity was analyzed using an equivalent heat current circuit. ► Thermal transports along the length and width directions were nearly the same. -- Abstract: The thermal conductivity, κ(T), of the Bi2223/Ag tape reinforced by metal tapes (stainless steel (SS) or copper-based alloy (CA)) from both side was evaluated along the length (l) and width (w) directions. κ(T) along the l-direction was measured directly using a single tape and that along the w-direction was estimated from the κ(T) measured for a stacked bundle which consists of several sandwiched Bi2223/Ag tapes. We analyzed the obtained κ(T) curves using an equivalent heat current circuit, and found that the heat transports along both directions were nearly the same and that the route of heat-flow depended on the species of the reinforcing metal. The absolute values of κ(T) at 77 K along the l- and w- directions for the Bi2223/Ag-SS tape were 174 and 140 W m−1 K−1 and those for the Bi2223/Ag-CA tape were 206 and 206 W m−1 K−1, respectively, the values of which were approximately 30–40% and 10–15% smaller than those of the standard Bi2223/Ag tape

  10. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Peng; Hao Zhang; Hezhu Shao; Yuchen Xu; Xiangchao Zhang; Heyuan Zhu

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal co...

  11. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Corrugated Insulating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Etsuro; Kato, Masayasu; Tomikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kaneko

    The effective thermal conductivity of corrugated insulating materials which are made by polypropylene or polycarbonate have been measured by employing steady state comparison method for several specimen having various thickness and specific weight. The thermal conductivity of them evaluated are also by using the thermal resistance models, and are compared with above measured values and raw materials' conductivity. The main results obtained in this paper are as follows: (1) In regard to the specimen in this paper, the effective thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature, but the increasing rate of them is small. (2) There are considerable differences between the measured values and the predicted ones that are estimated by using the thermal resistance model in which heat flow by conduction only. This differences increase with increasing specimens' thickness. This difference become extinct by considering the coexistence heat flow of conduction and radiation in the air phase of specimen. (3) The thermal resistance of specimen increases linearly with increasing specimens' thickness.

  12. Anisotropic thermal expansion of a 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Atsushi, E-mail: kondoa@cc.tuat.ac.jp; Maeda, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-15

    A 3D flexible metal–organic framework (MOF) with 1D hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion with relatively large thermal expansion coefficient (α{sub a}=−21×10{sup −6} K{sup −1} and α{sub c}=79×10{sup −6} K{sup −1}) between 133 K and 383 K. Temperature change gives deformation of both pores, which expand in diameter and elongate in length on cooling and vice versa. The thermally induced structural change should be derived from a unique framework topology like “lattice fence”. Silica accommodation changes not only the nature of the MOF but also thermal responsiveness of the MOF. Since the hydrophobic pores in the material are selectively blocked by the silica, the MOF with the silica is considered as a hydrophilic microporous material. Furthermore, inclusion of silica resulted in a drastic pore contraction in diameter and anisotropically changed the thermal responsiveness of the MOF. - Graphical abstract: A 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion behavior. The influence of silica filler in the hydrophobic pore was investigated. - Highlights: • Thermally induced structural change of a 3D MOF with a lattice fence topology was investigated. • The structural change was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns. • Temperature change induces anisotropic thermal expansion/contraction of the MOF. • Silica inclusion anisotropically changes the thermal responsiveness of the MOF.

  13. Anisotropic thermal expansion of a 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3D flexible metal–organic framework (MOF) with 1D hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion with relatively large thermal expansion coefficient (αa=−21×10−6 K−1 and αc=79×10−6 K−1) between 133 K and 383 K. Temperature change gives deformation of both pores, which expand in diameter and elongate in length on cooling and vice versa. The thermally induced structural change should be derived from a unique framework topology like “lattice fence”. Silica accommodation changes not only the nature of the MOF but also thermal responsiveness of the MOF. Since the hydrophobic pores in the material are selectively blocked by the silica, the MOF with the silica is considered as a hydrophilic microporous material. Furthermore, inclusion of silica resulted in a drastic pore contraction in diameter and anisotropically changed the thermal responsiveness of the MOF. - Graphical abstract: A 3D metal–organic framework with hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores shows anisotropic thermal expansion behavior. The influence of silica filler in the hydrophobic pore was investigated. - Highlights: • Thermally induced structural change of a 3D MOF with a lattice fence topology was investigated. • The structural change was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns. • Temperature change induces anisotropic thermal expansion/contraction of the MOF. • Silica inclusion anisotropically changes the thermal responsiveness of the MOF

  14. Thermal conductivity of nanostructured boron nitride materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Xiaoxia; Golberg, Dmitri

    2006-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductivity of bulky pellets made of various boron nitride (BN)-based nanomaterials, including spherical nanoparticles, perfectly structured, bamboo-like nanotubes, and collapsed nanotubes. The thermal conductivity strongly depends on the morphology of the BN nanomaterials, especially on the surface structure. Spherical BN particles have the lowest thermal conductivity while the collapsed BN nanotubes possess the best thermoconductive properties. A model was proposed to explain the experimental observations based on the heat percolation passage considerations. PMID:16722739

  15. The thermal conductivity of clustered nanocolloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Lotfizadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We quantify the effect of clustering on the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions using silane-treated silica, a system engineered to exhibit reversible clustering under well-controlled conditions. We show that the thermal conductivity increases monotonically with cluster size and spans the entire range between the two limits of Maxwell's theory. The results, corroborated by numerical simulation, demonstrate that large increases of the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions are possible, yet fully within the predictions of classical theory.

  16. Dimensional crossover of thermal conductance in nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Jian WANG; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Dimensional dependence of thermal conductance at low temperatures in nanowires is studied using the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. Our calculation shows a smooth dimensional crossover of thermal conductance in nanowire from one-dimensional to three-dimensional behavior with the increase of diameters. The results are consistent with the experimental findings that the temperature dependence of thermal conductance at low temperature for diameters from tens to hundreds nanometers ...

  17. Thermal conductivity measuring station for metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nowosielski

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the present paper an equipment applied in thermal conductivity measurements of metallic glasses was described.Design/methodology/approach: The paper describes the design solution of a measuring station, components, and idea of measurements of thermal conductivity. In order to correct measurement the calibration of presented equipment was realized. It was realized by determination of power losses and resistance of contacts. Methods of thermal conductivity measurements were also described in theoretical description.Findings: The suggested method of thermal conductivity measurement allows to avoid a procedure of solving complicated equations. The developed measuring station enables measurements of thermal conductivity of bulk metallic glasses in form of rod with diameter 3 mm.Research limitations/implications: The relationship between the thermal conductivity and the diameter of metallic glass samples is an interesting issue. In the future the authors are going to test rods with another diameters (not only 3 mm.Practical implications: The thermal conductivity of metallic glasses is necessary to calculate cooling rates during the fabrication of bulk metallic glasses. That are very important properties. These properties are indispensable for example in a computer simulation of a solidification process.Originality/value: Up to now there is very poor knowledge about thermal conductivity measurements of metallic glasses. There is not many references about this matter. There is no information about the thermal conductivity dependence on samples dimensions of metallic glasses.

  18. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA + LA/TA/ZA ↔ TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures. PMID:26838731

  19. Growth of anisotropic gold nanostructures on conducting glass surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P R Sajanlal; T Pradeep

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method for the growth of gold nanowires and nanoplates starting from a bilayer array of gold seeds, anchored on electrically conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. This is based on a seed-mediated growth approach, where the nanoparticles attached on the substrate through molecular linkages are converted to nanowires and nanoplates at certain cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) concentration. Our modified approach can be used to make nanowires of several tens of micrometers length at a lower CTAB concentration of 0.1 M. The length of the nanowires can be varied by adjusting the time of the reaction. As the concentration of CTAB was increased to 0.25 M, the nanoparticles got converted to nanoplates. These Au nanoplates are (111) oriented and are aligned parallel to the substrate.

  20. An effective thermal conductivity measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, F.; Jordà, X.; Vellvehi, M.; Guraya, C.; Coleto, J.; Rebollo, J.

    2004-11-01

    In the technical literature, there is a lack of reliable thermal parameters and, often, it is necessary to do in situ measurements for every particular material. An effective thermal conductivity measurement system has been designed and implemented to provide reliable and accurate values for that thermal parameter. The thermal conductivity of a given material is deduced from thermal resistance differential measurements of two samples. All parts of the implemented system as well as practical and theoretical solutions are described, including a power controller circuit exclusively conceived for this application. Experimental considerations to reduce the measurement error are exposed, as well as some results obtained for three different materials.

  1. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  2. Electrically conductive fibers thermally isolate temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waard, R.; Norton, B.

    1966-01-01

    Mounting assembly provides thermal isolation and an electrical path for an unbacked thermal sensor. The sensor is suspended in the center of a plastic mounting ring from four plastic fibers, two of which are coated with an electrically conductive material and connected to electrically conductive coatings on the ring.

  3. Thermal conductivity measurement of thermochemical storage materials

    OpenAIRE

    Fopah-Lele, Armand; N'Tsoukpoe, Kokouvi Edem,; Osterland, Thomas; Kuznik, Frederic; Ruck, Wolfgang K.L.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal properties related to heat and mass transfer are crucial when designing thermochemical heat storage systems. Therefore, enhancing this phenomenon lies in the thermal conductivity of the used material. The effective thermal conductivity of salt hydrates and host matrices is measured using two different methods by differential scanning calorimeter from 100 to 200 °C and radial flow apparatus called guarded hot cartridge from 20 to 70 °C, where the method effect is less than 12%. On this...

  4. The Electronic Thermal Conductivity of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Marzari, Nicola

    2016-04-13

    Graphene, as a semimetal with the largest known thermal conductivity, is an ideal system to study the interplay between electronic and lattice contributions to thermal transport. While the total electrical and thermal conductivity have been extensively investigated, a detailed first-principles study of its electronic thermal conductivity is still missing. Here, we first characterize the electron-phonon intrinsic contribution to the electronic thermal resistivity of graphene as a function of doping using electronic and phonon dispersions and electron-phonon couplings calculated from first-principles at the level of density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory (GW). Then, we include extrinsic electron-impurity scattering using low-temperature experimental estimates. Under these conditions, we find that the in-plane electronic thermal conductivity κe of doped graphene is ∼300 W/mK at room temperature, independently of doping. This result is much larger than expected and comparable to the total thermal conductivity of typical metals, contributing ∼10% to the total thermal conductivity of bulk graphene. Notably, in samples whose physical or domain sizes are of the order of few micrometers or smaller, the relative contribution coming from the electronic thermal conductivity is more important than in the bulk limit, because lattice thermal conductivity is much more sensitive to sample or grain size at these scales. Last, when electron-impurity scattering effects are included we find that the electronic thermal conductivity is reduced by 30 to 70%. We also find that the Wiedemann-Franz law is broadly satisfied at low and high temperatures but with the largest deviations of 20-50% around room temperature. PMID:26907524

  5. Anisotropic conductivity tensor imaging in MREIT using directional diffusion rate of water molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an emerging method to visualize electrical conductivity and/or current density images at low frequencies (below 1 KHz). Injecting currents into an imaging object, one component of the induced magnetic flux density is acquired using an MRI scanner for isotropic conductivity image reconstructions. Diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) measures the intrinsic three-dimensional diffusion property of water molecules within a tissue. It characterizes the anisotropic water transport by the effective diffusion tensor. Combining the DT-MRI and MREIT techniques, we propose a novel direct method for absolute conductivity tensor image reconstructions based on a linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. We first recover the projected current density, which is the best approximation of the internal current density one can obtain from the measured single component of the induced magnetic flux density. This enables us to estimate a scale factor between the diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor. Combining these values at all pixels with the acquired diffusion tensor map, we can quantitatively recover the anisotropic conductivity tensor map. From numerical simulations and experimental verifications using a biological tissue phantom, we found that the new method overcomes the limitations of each method and successfully reconstructs both the direction and magnitude of the conductivity tensor for both the anisotropic and isotropic regions. (paper)

  6. Thermally insulating and fire-retardant lightweight anisotropic foams based on nanocellulose and graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Bernd; Kocjan, Andraž; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Carosio, Federico; Camino, Giovanni; Antonietti, Markus; Bergström, Lennart

    2015-03-01

    High-performance thermally insulating materials from renewable resources are needed to improve the energy efficiency of buildings. Traditional fossil-fuel-derived insulation materials such as expanded polystyrene and polyurethane have thermal conductivities that are too high for retrofitting or for building new, surface-efficient passive houses. Tailored materials such as aerogels and vacuum insulating panels are fragile and susceptible to perforation. Here, we show that freeze-casting suspensions of cellulose nanofibres, graphene oxide and sepiolite nanorods produces super-insulating, fire-retardant and strong anisotropic foams that perform better than traditional polymer-based insulating materials. The foams are ultralight, show excellent combustion resistance and exhibit a thermal conductivity of 15 mW m-1 K-1, which is about half that of expanded polystyrene. At 30 °C and 85% relative humidity, the foams retained more than half of their initial strength. Our results show that nanoscale engineering is a promising strategy for producing foams with excellent properties using cellulose and other renewable nanosized fibrous materials.

  7. Conductivity-limiting bipolar thermal conductivity in semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanyu; Yang, Jiong; Toll, Trevor; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Tang, Xinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Intriguing experimental results raised the question about the fundamental mechanisms governing the electron-hole coupling induced bipolar thermal conduction in semiconductors. Our combined theoretical analysis and experimental measurements show that in semiconductors bipolar thermal transport is in general a "conductivity-limiting" phenomenon, and it is thus controlled by the carrier mobility ratio and by the minority carrier partial electrical conductivity for the intrinsic and extrinsic cases, respectively. Our numerical method quantifies the role of electronic band structure and carrier scattering mechanisms. We have successfully demonstrated bipolar thermal conductivity reduction in doped semiconductors via electronic band structure modulation and/or preferential minority carrier scatterings. We expect this study to be beneficial to the current interests in optimizing thermoelectric properties of narrow gap semiconductors. PMID:25970560

  8. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF RUBBERIZED GYPSUM BOARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Abu-Lebdeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The disposal of scrap tires is a challenging task and hence an innovative solution to meet these challenges is needed. Extensive work has been done on the utilization of waste tires in a variety of applications in asphalt pavements and concrete. However, previous investigations focus only on the mechanical properties of the rubberized materials, but few on the thermal performance. This is especially true for rubberized gypsum. Limited or no experimental data on the thermal performance of rubberized gypsum board are available. In this study, an experimental program is established to investigate the effect of amount and size of crumb rubber on the thermal properties of gypsum materials. Gypsum is replaced by four different percentage of crumb rubber: 10, 20, 30 and 40% by weight of gypsum and two sizes of crumb rubber (#30, #10_20 to make eight rubberized gypsum specimens. The prepared specimens were tested for thermal conductivity using an apparatus specially designed and constructed for this purpose. The experimental program was concluded by proposing an empirical equation to predict the thermal conductivity of rubberized gypsum board. Results indicated better thermal performance of the gypsum board due to the addition of crumb rubber. Thermal conductivity of the rubberized gypsum was 18-38% lower than the ordinary gypsum. It is concluded that thermal conductivity of rubberized gypsum decreases with the increase of crumb rubber regardless the size of the rubber and that thermal conductivity of mixtures contained 40% of rubber was about 38% lower than conventional mixture when crumb rubber #10_20 was added, while the thermal conductivity reduced by 22% when crumb rubber #30 was added. The study suggested for future work to investigate the effect of air voids size and ratio on the thermal conductivity of rubberized gypsum.

  9. Thermal conductivity of garnet laser crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B. S.; Jiang, H. H.; Zhang, Q. L.; Yin, S. T.

    2008-03-01

    The thermal conductivities of nine different synthetic garnet laser crystals at various temperatures, range from 273 to 393 K have been investigated by instantaneous measurement method. The results show that the thermal conductivity of each crystal decreases exponentially with the temperature increasing. It is notable that, different host crystals, such as YAG, GGG, and GSGG have different thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the crucial influence of crystal structure and composition on the absolute value of their thermal conductivity. Moreover, with respect to the same host crystals, the impurity scattering also results in the change of their thermal conductivities. This is because that a higher concentration of doped ions leads to a more phonon scattering modes, which results in a shorter mean free path of the phonons and a lower thermal conductivity. In addition, different host crystals have various dependences of thermal conductivity on dopant concentration. This works provides reliable and useful information for designing high power, high quality, and high stability laser devices.

  10. Thermal conductivity of synthetic garnet laser crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B. S.; Jiang, H. H.; Zhang, Q. L.; Yin, S. T.

    2007-07-01

    The thermal conductivities of nine different synthetic garnet laser crystals at various temperatures, range from 273 to 393K have been investigated by instantaneous measurement method. The results show that the thermal conductivity of each crystal decreases exponentially with the temperature increasing. It is notable that, different host crystals, such as YAG, GGG, and GSGG have different thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the crucial influence of crystal structure and composition on the absolute value of their thermal conductivity. Moreover, with respect to the same host crystals, the impurity scattering also results in the change of their thermal conductivities. This is because that a higher concentration of doped ions leads to a more phonon scattering modes, which results in a shorter mean free path of the phonons and a lower thermal conductivity. In addition, different host crystals have various dependences of thermal conductivity on dopant concentration. This works provides reliable and useful information for designing high power, high quality, and high stability laser devices.

  11. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil A. Khan

    2009-11-21

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  12. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 (97% TD). This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  13. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The nanoinclusion/matrix interfaces were set to completely reflect phonons to model the maximum interface-phonon-scattering scenario. The simulations with the geometrical cross section and volume fraction of the nanoinclusions matched to those of the experiment show that the experiment has already reached the theoretical limit of thermal conductivity. The frequency-dependent analysis further identifies that the thermal conductivity reduction is dominantly attributed to scattering of low frequency phonons and demonstrates mutual adaptability of nanostructuring and local disordering

  14. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Takuma [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shiomi, Junichiro, E-mail: shiomi@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-01-13

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The nanoinclusion/matrix interfaces were set to completely reflect phonons to model the maximum interface-phonon-scattering scenario. The simulations with the geometrical cross section and volume fraction of the nanoinclusions matched to those of the experiment show that the experiment has already reached the theoretical limit of thermal conductivity. The frequency-dependent analysis further identifies that the thermal conductivity reduction is dominantly attributed to scattering of low frequency phonons and demonstrates mutual adaptability of nanostructuring and local disordering.

  15. Dipole estimation errors due to not incorporating anisotropic conductivities in realistic head models for EEG source analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallez, Hans; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Institute of Broadband Technology (IBBT) Medical Image and Signal Processing (MEDISIP), Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: hans.hallez@ugent.be

    2009-10-21

    EEG source analysis is a valuable tool for brain functionality research and for diagnosing neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. It requires a geometrical representation of the human head or a head model, which is often modeled as an isotropic conductor. However, it is known that some brain tissues, such as the skull or white matter, have an anisotropic conductivity. Many studies reported that the anisotropic conductivities have an influence on the calculated electrode potentials. However, few studies have assessed the influence of anisotropic conductivities on the dipole estimations. In this study, we want to determine the dipole estimation errors due to not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull and/or brain tissues. Therefore, head models are constructed with the same geometry, but with an anisotropically conducting skull and/or brain tissue compartment. These head models are used in simulation studies where the dipole location and orientation error is calculated due to neglecting anisotropic conductivities of the skull and brain tissue. Results show that not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull yields a dipole location error between 2 and 25 mm, with an average of 10 mm. When the anisotropic conductivities of the brain tissues are neglected, the dipole location error ranges between 0 and 5 mm. In this case, the average dipole location error was 2.3 mm. In all simulations, the dipole orientation error was smaller than 10 deg. We can conclude that the anisotropic conductivities of the skull have to be incorporated to improve the accuracy of EEG source analysis. The results of the simulation, as presented here, also suggest that incorporation of the anisotropic conductivities of brain tissues is not necessary. However, more studies are needed to confirm these suggestions.

  16. Dipole estimation errors due to not incorporating anisotropic conductivities in realistic head models for EEG source analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EEG source analysis is a valuable tool for brain functionality research and for diagnosing neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. It requires a geometrical representation of the human head or a head model, which is often modeled as an isotropic conductor. However, it is known that some brain tissues, such as the skull or white matter, have an anisotropic conductivity. Many studies reported that the anisotropic conductivities have an influence on the calculated electrode potentials. However, few studies have assessed the influence of anisotropic conductivities on the dipole estimations. In this study, we want to determine the dipole estimation errors due to not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull and/or brain tissues. Therefore, head models are constructed with the same geometry, but with an anisotropically conducting skull and/or brain tissue compartment. These head models are used in simulation studies where the dipole location and orientation error is calculated due to neglecting anisotropic conductivities of the skull and brain tissue. Results show that not taking into account the anisotropic conductivities of the skull yields a dipole location error between 2 and 25 mm, with an average of 10 mm. When the anisotropic conductivities of the brain tissues are neglected, the dipole location error ranges between 0 and 5 mm. In this case, the average dipole location error was 2.3 mm. In all simulations, the dipole orientation error was smaller than 10 deg. We can conclude that the anisotropic conductivities of the skull have to be incorporated to improve the accuracy of EEG source analysis. The results of the simulation, as presented here, also suggest that incorporation of the anisotropic conductivities of brain tissues is not necessary. However, more studies are needed to confirm these suggestions.

  17. Equivalent thermal conductivity of heat pipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zesheng LU; Binghui MA

    2008-01-01

    In precision machining, the machining error from thermal distortion carries a high proportion of the total errors. If a precision machining tool can transfer heat fast, the thermal distortion will be reduced and the machining precision will be improved. A heat pipe working based on phase transitions of the inner working liquid transfers heat with high efficiency and is widely applied in spaceflight and chemical industries. In mechanics, applications of heat pipes are correspondingly less. When a heat pipe is applied to a hydrostatic motor-ized spindle, the thermal distortion cannot be solved dur-ing the heat transfer process because thermal conductivity or equivalent thermal conductivity should be provided first for special application in mechanics. An equivalent thermal conductivity model based on equivalent thermal resistances is established. Performance tests for a screen wick pipe, gravity pipe, and rotation heat pipe are done to validate the efficiency of the equivalent thermal conduc-tivity model. The proposed model provides a calculation method for the thermal distortion analysis of heat pipes applied in the motorized spindle.

  18. First-principles study of lattice thermal conductivity of Td-WTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Sun, Hong Yi; Zhou, Jian; Li, Qing Fang; Wan, Xian-Gang

    2016-03-01

    The structural and thermal properties of bulk Td-WTe2 have been studied by using first-principles calculations based on the simple Klemens model and an iterative self-consistent method. Both methods show that lattice thermal conductivity is anisotropic, with the highest value in the (001) plane, and lowest one along the c-axis at 300 K. The calculated average thermal conductivity of WTe2 is in agreement with the experimental measurement. The size dependent thermal conductivity shows that nanostructuring of WTe2 can possibly further decrease the lattice thermal conductivity, which can improve the thermoelectric efficiency. Such extremely low thermal conductivity, even much lower than WSe2, makes WTe2 having many potential applications in thermal insulation and thermoelectric materials.

  19. Conductive thermal modeling of Wyoming geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, H.P.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01

    A summary of techniques used by the Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group in defining low-temperature hydrothermal resource areas is presented. Emphasis is placed on thermal modeling techniques appropriate to Wyoming's geologic setting. Thermal parameters discussed include oil-well bottom hole temperatures, heat flow, thermal conductivity, and measured temperature-depth profiles. Examples of the use of these techniques are from the regional study of the Bighorn Basin and two site specific studies within the Basin.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Conductivity through Nanofluids

    OpenAIRE

    Abid, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The method used in this experimental work is the Temperature Oscillation Technique (TOT). Thermal conductivity measurement through Temperature Oscillation Technique is to fill the cylinder with the nanofluids, and apply the temperature oscillations at both ends of the cylinder. It measures the phase and amplitude of the temperature oscillation in the center and at both ends of the cylinder. Thermal diffusivity is calculated from the phase and amplitude values. Furthermore, thermal c...

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Nitride and Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Szpunar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electronic thermal conductivity of alternative fuels like uranium nitride and uranium carbide. We evaluate the electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity, by combining first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations with semiclassical correlations. The electronic structure of UN and UC was calculated using Quantum Espresso code. The spin polarized calculations were performed for a ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetic moments on uranium lattice and magnetic moment in UC was lower than in UN due to stronger hybridization between 2p electrons of carbon and 5f electrons of uranium. The nonmagnetic electronic structure calculations were used as an input to BolzTrap code that was used to evaluate the electronic thermal conductivity. It is predicted that the thermal conductivity should increase with the temperature increase, but to get a quantitative agreement with the experiment at higher temperatures the interaction of electrons with phonons (and electron-electron scattering needs to be included.

  2. Anomalous thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarraei, Alireza; Wang, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons under uniaxial strain along their longitudinal axis. Our simulations predict that hexagonal boron nitride shows an anomalous thermal response to the applied uniaxial strain. Contrary to three dimensional materials, under uniaxial stretching, the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanoribbons first increases rather than decreasing until it reaches its peak value and then starts decreasing. Under compressive strain, the thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride ribbons monolithically reduces rather than increasing. We use phonon spectrum and dispersion curves to investigate the mechanism responsible for the unexpected behavior. Our molecular dynamics modeling and density functional theory results show that application of longitudinal tensile strain leads to the reduction of the group velocities of longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes. Such a phonon softening mechanism acts to reduce the thermal conductivity of the nanoribbons. On the other hand, a significant increase in the group velocity (stiffening) of the flexural acoustic modes is observed, which counteracts the phonon softening effects of the longitudinal and transverse modes. The total thermal conductivity of the ribbons is a result of competition between these two mechanisms. At low tensile strain, the stiffening mechanism overcomes the softening mechanism which leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity. At higher tensile strain, the softening mechanism supersedes the stiffening and the thermal conductivity slightly reduces. Our simulations show that the decrease in the thermal conductivity under compressive strain is attributed to the formation of buckling defects which reduces the phonon mean free path.

  3. Thermal conductivity of dielectric thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct reading thermal comparator has been used to measure the thermal conductivity of dielectric thin film coatings. In the past, the thermal comparator has been used extensively to measure the thermal conductivity of bulk solids, liquids, and gases. The technique has been extended to thin film materials by making experimental improvements and by the application of an analytical heat flow model. Our technique also allows an estimation of the thermal resistance of the film/substrate interface which is shown to depend on the method of film deposition. The thermal conductivity of most thin films was found to be several orders of magnitude lower than that of the material in bulk form. This difference is attributed to structural disorder of materials deposited in thin film form. The experimentation to date has centered primarily on optical coating materials. These coatings, used to enhance the optical properties of components such as lenses and mirrors, are damaged by thermal loads applied in high-power laser applications. It has been widely postulated that there may be a correlation between the thermal conductivity and the damage threshold of these materials. 31 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Engineering thermal conductivity in polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Vahid; Coyle, Eleanor; Kieffer, John; Pipe, Kevin

    Weak inter-chain bonding in polymers is believed to be a bottleneck for both thermal conductivity and mechanical strength. Most polymers have low thermal conductivity (~0.1 W/mK), hindering their performance in applications for which thermal management is critical (e.g., electronics packaging). In this work, we use computational methods to study how hydrogen bonding between polymer chains as well as water content can be used to engineer thermal transport in bulk polymers. We examine how changes in the number of hydrogen bonds, chain elongation, density, and vibrational density of states correlate with changes in thermal conductivity for polymer blends composed of different relative constituent fractions. We also consider the effects of bond strength, tacticity, and polymer chain mass. For certain blend fractions, we observe large increases in thermal conductivity, and we analyze these increases in terms of modifications to chain chemistry (e.g., inter-chain bonding) and chain morphology (e.g., chain alignment and radius of gyration). We observe that increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the system results in better packing as well as better chain alignment and elongation that contribute to enhanced thermal conductivity. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0010.

  5. Thermal conductivity at different humidity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Finn Harken; Rode, Carsten

    1999-01-01

    The thermal conductivity (the l-value) of several alternative insulation products and a traditional product is determined under different humidity conditions in a specially constructed hot plate apparatus.The hot plate apparatus is constructed with an air gap on each side of the test specimen where...... increase of the thermal conductivity is 3-8% because of the hygroscopic uptake of humidity from the ambient air....

  6. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    OpenAIRE

    Chenhan Liu; Zhiyong Wei; Jian Wang; Kedong Bi; Juekuan Yang; Yunfei Chen

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmissio...

  7. Investigation of thermal energy transport from an anisotropic central heating element to the adjacent channels: A multipoint flux approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The multipoint flux method is used to solve the problem of heat transfer in anisotropic medium. • The anisotropy results in skewness of the temperature field. • This makes the heat flux to the two channels asymmetric. • The temperature profiles of the coolant in the two channels becomes also different. - Abstract: The problem of heat transfer from a central heating element pressed between two clad plates to cooling channels adjacent and outboard of the plates is investigated numerically. The aim of this work is to highlight the role of thermal conductivity anisotropy of the heating element and/or the encompassing plates on thermal energy transport to the fluid passing through the two channels. When the medium is anisotropic with respect to thermal conductivity; energy transport to the neighboring channels is no longer symmetric. This asymmetry in energy fluxes influence heat transfer to the coolant resulting in different patterns of temperature fields. In particular, it is found that the temperature fields are skewed towards the principal direction of anisotropy. In addition, the heat flux distributions along the edges of the heating element are also different as a manifestation of thermal conductivity anisotropy. Furthermore, the peak temperature at the channel walls change location and magnitude depending on the principal direction of anisotropy. Based on scaling arguments, it is found that, the ratio of width to the height of the heating system is a key parameter which can suggest when one may ignore the effect of the cross-diagonal terms of the full conductivity tensor. To account for anisotropy in thermal conductivity, the method of multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) is employed. Using this technique, it is possible to find a finite difference stencil which can handle full thermal conductivity tensor and in the same time enjoys the simplicity of finite difference approximation. Although the finite difference stencil based on MPFA is

  8. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina and Silica Nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Julian G. Bernal

    This thesis studies the effects of the base fluid, particle type/size, and volumetric concentration on the thermal conductivity of Alumina and Silica nanofluids. The effects of base fluid were observed by preparing samples using ethylene glycol (EG), water, and mixtures of EG/water as the base fluid and Al2O3 (10 nm) nanoparticles. The particles type/size and volumetric concentration effects were tested by preparing samples of nanofluids using Al2O3 (10nm), Al2O3 (150nm), SiO2 (15 nm), and SiO2 (80 nm) nanoparticles and ionized water as base fluid at different volumetric concentrations. All samples were mixed using a sonicator for 30 minutes and a water circulator to maintain the sample at room temperature. The thermal conductivity was measured using a Thermtest Transient Plane Source TPS 500S. The effects of gravity, Brownian motion and thermophoresis were also studied. EG produced the highest thermal conductivity enhancement out of all base fluids tested. Smaller particle size produced a higher enhancement of thermal conductivity, while the volumetric concentration did not have a significant effect in the thermal conductivity enhancement. Finally, gravity, Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis effects played a role in the total enhancement of the thermal conductivity. The nanoparticles were observed to settle rapidly after sonication suggesting gravity effects may play a significant role.

  9. Influence of finite conductivity of end walls on spectral and power characteristics of anisotropic dielectric disk resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-Q oscillations of a longitudinal-anisotropic dielectric resonator with the imperfectly conducting end walls are considered. Using the integral equation derived by the authors, the spectral characteristics of such oscillations are studied. A cylindrical anisotropic dielectric resonator with the end walls made from a high-temperature superconductor monocrystal is investigated

  10. Fuel thermal conductivity (FTHCON). Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity subcode is described which is part of the fuel rod behavior modeling task performed at EG and G Idaho, Inc. The original version was published in the Materials Properties (MATPRO) Handbook, Section A-2 (Fuel Thermal Conductivity). The improved version incorporates data which were not included in the previous work and omits some previously used data which are believed to come from cracked specimens. The models for the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and for the electronic contribution to thermal coductivity have been completely revised in order to place these models on a more mechanistic basis. As a result of modeling improvements the standard error of the model with respect to its data base has been significantly reduced

  11. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the apparent thermal conductivity of the coating to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature and the scattering and absorption properties of the coating material. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can also be derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. The model prediction is found to have good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Thermal Conduction in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Suchismita

    2009-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in thermal conductivity of materials motivated by the heat removal issues in electronics and by the need of fundamental science to understand heat conduction at nanoscale. This dissertation reports the results of the experimental investigation of heat conduction in graphene and graphene multilayers. Graphene is a planar single sheet of sp2–bonded carbon atoms arranged in honeycomb lattice. It reveals many unique properties, including the extraordinaril...

  13. Calculation of the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a quantum cascade laser active region

    OpenAIRE

    Szymaski, M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The key problem in thermal modelling of a quantum cascade laser is determining the thermal conductivity ? of its active region. The parameter is highly anisotropic. Particularly the cross-plane value ? ? is significantly reduced, which may be attributed to the presence of large number of interfaces between epitaxial layers. In this work two relatively simple models of phonon scattering at solid-solid boundary are used to calculate ? ? for the terahertz quantum cascade laser. The t...

  14. Thermal Conductivity Coefficient from Microscopic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Nemakhavhani, T E

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of hadron matter is studied using a microscopic transport model, which will be used to simulate ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at different energy densities, namely the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). The molecular dynamics simulation is performed for a system of light mesons species (pion, rho, kaon) in a box with periodic boundary conditions. The equilibrium state is investigated by studying chemical equilibrium and thermal equilibrium of the system. Particle multiplicity equilibrates with time, and the energy spectra of different light mesons species have the same slopes and common temperatures when thermal equilibrium is reached. Thermal conductivity transport coefficient is calculated from the heat current - current correlations using the Green-Kubo relations.

  15. Thermal conductivity and thermal rectification in unzipped carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the thermal transport in completely unzipped carbon nanotubes, which are called graphene nanoribbons, partially unzipped carbon nanotubes, which can be seen as carbon-nanotube-graphene-nanoribbon junctions, and carbon nanotubes by using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the thermal conductivity of a graphene nanoribbon is much less than that of its perfect carbon nanotube counterparts because of the localized phonon modes at the boundary. A partially unzipped carbon nanotube has the lowest thermal conductivity due to additional localized modes at the junction region. More strikingly, a significant thermal rectification effect is observed in both partially unzipped armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes. Our results suggest that carbon-nanotube-graphene-nanoribbon junctions can be used in thermal energy control.

  16. Low thermal conductivity superconducting metallized Mylar leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the fabrication of PbSn-coated, 2.5-μm-thick, Mylar ribbons that can be used as electrical leads in low-temperature experiments. We present measurements of the thermal conductivity of the leads and of uncoated Mylar ribbons between 0.08 and 2.0 K. At 0.1 K, a conveniently sized coated Mylar lead has the same thermal conductance as an approx.6-μm-diam manganin wire of the same length

  17. Thermal photon anisotropic flow serves as a quark-gluon plasma viscometer

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Chun; Heinz, Ulrich; Paquet, Jean-Francois; Gale, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Photons are a penetrating probe of the hot and dense medium created in heavy-ion collisions. We present state-of-the-art calculations of viscous photon emission from nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC. Thermal photons anisotropic flow coefficients v_n are computed, both with and without accounting for viscous corrections to the standard thermal emission rates. These corrections are found to have a larger effect on the v_n coefficients than the viscous suppression of hydrodynamic flow anisotro...

  18. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the most common fuel material in commercial nuclear power reactors. UO2 has the advantages of a high melting point, good high-temperature stability, good chemical compatibility with cladding and coolant, and resistance to radiation. The main disadvantage of UO2 is its low thermal conductivity. During a reactor's operation, because the thermal conductivity of UO2 is very low, for example, about 2.8 W/m-K at 1000 C [1], there is a large temperature gradient in the UO2 fuel pellet, causing a very high centerline temperature, and introducing thermal stresses, which lead to extensive fuel pellet cracking. These cracks will add to the release of fission product gases after high burnup. The high fuel operating temperature also increases the rate of fission gas release and the fuel pellet swelling caused by fission gases bubbles. The amount of fission gas release and fuel swelling limits the life time of UO2 fuel in reactor. In addition, the high centerline temperature and large temperature gradient in the fuel pellet, leading to a large amount of stored heat, increase the Zircaloy cladding temperature in a lost of coolant accident (LOCA). The rate of Zircaloy-water reaction becomes significant at the temperature above 1200 C [2]. The ZrO2 layer generated on the surface of the Zircaloy cladding will affect the heat conduction, and will cause a Zircaloy cladding rupture. The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of UO2, while not affecting the neutronic property of UO2 significantly. The concept to accomplish this goal is to incorporate another material with high thermal conductivity into the UO2 pellet. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a good candidate, because the thermal conductivity of single crystal SiC is 60 times higher than that of UO2 at room temperature and 30 times higher at 800 C [3]. Silicon carbide also has the properties of low thermal neutron absorption cross section, high melting point, good chemical stability

  19. Thermal conductivities of thin, sputtered optical films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The normal component of thin-film thermal conductivity has been measured for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, for several advanced sputtered optical materials. Included are data for single layers of boron nitride, silicon aluminum nitride, silicon aluminum oxynitride, silicon carbide, and for dielectric-enhanced metal reflectors of the form Al(SiO2/Si3N4)n and Al(Al2O3/AlN)n. Sputtered films of more conventional materials such as SiO2, Al2O3, Ta2O5, Ti, and Si have also been measured. The data show that thin-film thermal conductivities are typically 10 to 100 times lower than conductivities for the same materials in bulk form. Structural disorder in the amorphous or fine-grained films appears to account for most of the conductivity difference. Conclusive evidence for a film--substrate interface contribution is presented

  20. Thermal conductivity of high purity vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and electrical resistivity of four high purity vanadium samples have been measured as functions of temperature over the temperature range 5 to 3000K. The highest purity sample had a resistance ratio (rho/sub 2730K//rho /sub 4.20K/) of 1524. The highest purity sample had a thermal conductivity maximum of 920 W/mK at 90K and had a thermal conductivity of 35 W/mK at room temperature. At low temperatures the thermal resistivity was limited by the scattering of electrons by impurities and phonons. The thermal resistivity of vanadium departed from Matthiessen's rule at low temperatures. The electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of high purity vanadium showed no anomalous behavior above 1300K. The intrinsic electrical resistivity at low temperatures was due primarily to interband scattering of electrons. The Seebeck coefficient was positive from 10 to 2400K and had a maximum which was dependent upon sample purity. (auth)

  1. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  2. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility

  3. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, David H; Schley, Robert S; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility. PMID:26724041

  4. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-2209 (United States); Khafizov, Marat [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, The Ohio State University, 201 W. 19th Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Wendt, Brycen L. [Nuclear Science and Engineering, Idaho State University, 921 S. 8th Ave., Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8060 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  5. Thermal Conductance of Nanoscale VOx Epitaxial Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dong-Wook; Petrov, Ivan; Cahill, David

    2010-03-01

    We use time-domain thermoreflectance to measure the thermal conductance of VOx layers in epitaxial Pt/VOx/Pt structures. In particular, the metal-insulator-transition of VO2 at 70^oC allows us to systematically explore channels for heat transport between metals and correlated-electron systems. Pt/VOx/Pt layers are deposited on a sapphire substrates by reactive DC sputtering with O2 partial pressure varied from 0% to 13%. The thermal conductance has a strong dependence on thickness, 3-50 nm, and oxygen content, pure V to V2O5. The thermal conductance of ˜10 nm thick layers of V in series with the two Pt/V interfaces is 1 GW/m^2-K, comparable to what is expected based on the diffuse-mismatch model for electron transport at interfaces. The conductance of ˜10 nm thick layers of VO2 at room temperatures is remarkably high, 0.5 GW/m^2-K, for the series conductance of two metal-dielectric interfaces. At the metal-insulator-transition, the conductance of VO2 layers increases by only 10%, indicating that electrons in Pt and electrons in metallic VO2 are not strongly coupled.

  6. Investigations Regarding the Thermal Conductivity of Straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Pruteanu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of buildings heat losses and pollutants emissions is a worldwide priority. It’s intending to reduce the specific final energy consumption under limit of 120...150 kWh/m2.yr and even under 15...45 kWh/m2.yr, foreseen in 2020 for the passive houses, which is necessary for a sustainable development and for allowing to became profitable the use of unconventional energies [1]. These values can be achieved through the use of thermal insulations, for protecting the constructions fund and through making envelope elements, as much as possible, from materials with a high thermal resistance, for new buildings. With intention to substitute the conventional thermal insulations: mineral wool, expanded polystyrene, which are both great energy consumers, it’s proposed, among others unconventional technologies and materials, the use of vegetable wastes both as a thermal insulation material and as a material used for building load-bearing and in-fill straw-bale construction. In speciality literature there are presented experimental determinations of this material’s thermal conductivity. The paper proposes a simple method, adequate for the measurement of thermal conductivity for bulk’s materials as straw bales.

  7. Thermal conductivity of BN-C nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kınacı, Alper; Haskins, Justin B.; Sevik, Cem; Çaǧın, Tahir

    2012-09-01

    Chemical and structural diversity present in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene hybrid nanostructures provide avenues for tuning various properties for their technological applications. In this paper we investigate the variation of thermal conductivity (κ) of hybrid graphene/h-BN nanostructures: stripe superlattices and BN (graphene) dots embedded in graphene (BN) are investigated using equilibrium molecular dynamics. To simulate these systems, we have parametrized a Tersoff type interaction potential to reproduce the ab initio energetics of the B-C and N-C bonds for studying the various interfaces that emerge in these hybrid nanostructures. We demonstrate that both the details of the interface, including energetic stability and shape, as well as the spacing of the interfaces in the material, exert strong control on the thermal conductivity of these systems. For stripe superlattices, we find that zigzag configured interfaces produce a higher κ in the direction parallel to the interface than the armchair configuration, while the perpendicular conductivity is less prone to the details of the interface and is limited by the κ of h-BN. Additionally, the embedded dot structures, having mixed zigzag and armchair interfaces, affect the thermal transport properties more strongly than superlattices. The largest reduction in thermal conductivity is observed at 50% dot concentration, but the dot radius appears to have little effect on the magnitude of reduction around this concentration.

  8. Temperature conversion of coefficient of thermal conductivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, R.; Šifner, Oldřich

    2002/, č. 1 (2002), s. 65-70. ISSN 1211-9652. [IAPWS Meeting 2002. Argentina , 21.08.2002-26.08.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : temperature conversion * thermal conductivity Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics

  9. Thermal conductivity measurements of Pacific illite sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported for effective thermal conductivity measurements performed in situ and in core samples of illite marine sediment. The measurements were obtained during a recent oceanographic expedition to a study site in the north central region of the Pacific Ocean. This study was undertaken in support of the US Subseabed Disposal Project, the purpose of which is to investigate the scientific feasibility of using the fine grained sediments of the sea floor as a repository for high level nuclear waste. In situ measurements were made and 1.5-meter long hydrostatic piston cores were taken, under remote control, from a platform that was lowered to the sea floor, 5844 m below sea level. The in situ measurement of thermal conductivity was made at a nominal depth of 80 cm below the sediment surface using a specially developed, line source, needle probe. Thermal conductivity measurements in three piston cores and one box core (obtained several kilometers from the study site) were made on shipboard using a miniature needle probe. The in situ thermal conductivity was approximately 0.91 W/m.K. Values determined from the cores were within the range 0.81 to 0.89 W/m.K

  10. Thermal conductivity determinations for irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In evaluating fuel performance, the fuel thermal conductivity is considered a key parameter due to its influence on operating temperature, and hence important processes such as fission gas release. Fuel thermal conductivity is known to increase with burnup, and as operators push to reduce operating costs by extending fuel life to higher burn-ups, there is a need to ensure that such degradation will not compromise safety margins. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity, k, is not straightforward, however, it may be derived from measurements of thermal diffusivity, β, specific heat, Cp and density, d, via the relationship: k=β.d.Cp. Irradiated ceramic fuel is heavily cracked due to the large thermal stresses generated in-reactor, with the result that sample preparation is difficult, and often only relatively small fragments can be obtained. Despite their size, however, these samples are typically very active, necessitating the use of shielded facilities, with sample handling and equipment operation having to be carried out remotely. At AEA Technology, Windscale, a laser flash rig for the measurement of thermal diffusivity has now been operating successfully in a shielded facility for a number of years. To complement this, a Netzsch DSC-404 differential scanning calorimeter has recently been installed in an adjacent shielded cell, for which a robotic system under operator control via a closed circuit TV surveillance system has been developed to enable precise sample placement. This provides a unique capability of being able to perform both thermal diffusivity and specific heat measurements on irradiated fuel samples. This paper describes this capability, together with an example of measurements on fuel irradiated to ca. 40 GWd/tU. (author)

  11. Analytic magnetotelluric responses to a two-segment model with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linjiang, QIN; Changfu, YANG

    2016-03-01

    The rocks in the crust and the upper mantle of the Earth are believed to exhibit electrical anisotropy to some extent. It is beneficial to further understand and recognize the propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the Earth by investigating the magnetotelluric (which is one of the main geophysical techniques to probe the deep structures in the Earth) responses of the media with anisotropic conductivity structures. In the present study, we examine the magnetotelluric fields over an idealized 2-D model consisting of two segments with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor basement by a quasi-static analytic approach. The resulting analytic solution could not only contribute to the electromagnetic induction theory in the anisotropic Earth but also serve as at least an initial standard solution which could be used to validate the reliability and accuracy of the numerical algorithms developed for modeling the magnetotelluric responses of the 2-D media with much more general anisotropic conductivity.

  12. Analytic magnetotelluric responses to a two-segment model with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Linjiang; Yang, Changfu

    2016-06-01

    The rocks in the crust and the upper mantle of the Earth are believed to exhibit electrical anisotropy to some extent. It is beneficial to further understand and recognize the propagation of the electromagnetic waves in the Earth by investigating the magnetotelluric (which is one of the main geophysical techniques to probe the deep structures in the Earth) responses of the media with anisotropic conductivity structures. In this study, we examine the magnetotelluric fields over an idealized 2-D model consisting of two segments with axially anisotropic conductivity structures overlying a perfect conductor basement by a quasi-static analytic approach. The resulting analytic solution could not only contribute to the electromagnetic induction theory in the anisotropic Earth but also serve as at least an initial standard solution which could be used to validate the reliability and accuracy of the numerical algorithms developed for modelling the magnetotelluric responses of the 2-D media with much more general anisotropic conductivity.

  13. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  14. Anisotropic thermal expansion of Ni, Pd and Pt germanides and silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, F. A.; Knaepen, W.; Moens, F.; Brondeel, L.; Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Detavernier, C.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon or germanium-based transistors are nowadays used in direct contact with silicide or germanide crystalline alloys for semiconductor device applications. Since these compounds are formed at elevated temperatures, accurate knowledge of the thermal expansion of both substrate and the contact is important to address temperature depending effects such as thermal stress. Here we report the linear coefficients of thermal expansion of Ni-, Pd- and Pt-based mono-germanides, mono-silicides and di-metal-silicides as determined by powder-based x-ray diffraction between 300 and 1225 K. The investigated mono-metallic compounds, all sharing the MnP crystal structure, as well as Pd2Si and Pt2Si exhibit anisotropic expansion. By consequence, this anisotropic behaviour should be taken into account for evaluating the crystal unit’s cell at elevated temperatures.

  15. Micromechanics model for predicting anisotropic electrical conductivity of carbon fiber composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Mohammad Faisal; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Yasmeen, Farzana

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous materials, such as composites consist of clearly distinguishable constituents (or phases) that show different electrical properties. Multifunctional composites have anisotropic electrical properties that can be tailored for a particular application. The effective anisotropic electrical conductivity of composites is strongly affected by many parameters including volume fractions, distributions, and orientations of constituents. Given the electrical properties of the constituents, one important goal of micromechanics of materials consists of predicting electrical response of the heterogeneous material on the basis of the geometries and properties of the individual phases, a task known as homogenization. The benefit of homogenization is that the behavior of a heterogeneous material can be determined without resorting or testing it. Furthermore, continuum micromechanics can predict the full multi-axial properties and responses of inhomogeneous materials, which are anisotropic in nature. Effective electrical conductivity estimation is performed by using classical micromechanics techniques (composite cylinder assemblage method) that investigates the effect of the fiber/matrix electrical properties and their volume fractions on the micro scale composite response. The composite cylinder assemblage method (CCM) is an analytical theory that is based on the assumption that composites are in a state of periodic structure. The CCM was developed to extend capabilities variable fiber shape/array availability with same volume fraction, interphase analysis, etc. The CCM is a continuum-based micromechanics model that provides closed form expressions for upper level length scales such as macro-scale composite responses in terms of the properties, shapes, orientations and constituent distributions at lower length levels such as the micro-scale.

  16. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for anisotropic inhomogeneous head tissue conductivity in human head modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of an electroencephalography (EEG) forward problem partially depends on the head tissue conductivities. These conductivities are anisotropic and inhomogeneous in nature. This paper investigates the effects of conductivity uncertainty and analyses its sensitivity on an EEG forward problem for a spherical and a realistic head models. We estimate the uncertain conductivities using an efficient constraint based on an optimization method and perturb it by means of the volume and directional constraints. Assigning the uncertain conductivities, we construct spherical and realistic head models by means of a stochastic finite element method for fixed dipolar sources. We also compute EEG based on the constructed head models. We use a probabilistic sensitivity analysis method to determine the sensitivity indexes. These indexes characterize the conductivities with the most or the least effects on the computed outputs. These results demonstrate that conductivity uncertainty has significant effects on EEG. These results also show that the uncertain conductivities of the scalp, the radial direction of the skull and transversal direction in the white matter are more sensible.

  17. Thermal conductivity of lower-mantle minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Beck, Pierre; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Haugen, Benjamin D.; Jacobsen, Steven D.

    2009-05-01

    Geodynamic models of heat transport and the thermal evolution of Earth's interior require knowledge of thermal conductivity for high-pressure phases at relevant temperatures and pressures. Here we present new data on radiative and lattice heat transfer in mantle materials determined from optical spectroscopy and time-resolved optical radiometry. The pressure dependence of optical absorption in ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O, and silicate perovskite (Mg,Fe)SiO 3, has been determined in the IR through UV regions up to 133 GPa. Whereas (Mg,Fe)O exhibits a strong pressure dependence of absorption and spectral changes associated with the high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) transition of Fe 2+ [Goncharov, A.F., Struzhkin, V.V., Jacobsen, S.D. 2006. Reduced radiative conductivity of low-spin (Mg,Fe)O in the lower mantle. Science 312, 1205-1208], the pressure dependence of optical absorption in (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 is relatively weak. We observe a moderate increase in absorption with pressure for (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 in the visible and infrared spectral range due to a red-shift of absorption in ultraviolet, however the crystal-field transitions of Fe 2+ become weaker with pressure and disappear above 50 GPa as a result of the HS-LS transition in (Mg,Fe)SiO 3. Intervalence charge-transfer transitions in silicate perovskite shift to higher energies with pressure. The temperature dependence of the optical absorption of (Mg,Fe)O measured up to 65 GPa and 800 K is moderate below 30 GPa and weak above 30 GPa. Thus, the temperature correction of the radiative conductivity is insignificant. The estimated total pressure-dependent radiative conductivity (in approximation of a large grain size) is lower than expected from the pressure extrapolation of the ambient and low-pressure data [Hofmeister, A.M., 1999. Mantle values of thermal conductivity and the geotherm from phonon lifetimes. Science 283, 1699-1706; Hofmeister, A.M., 2005. Dependence of diffusive radiative transfer on grain-size, temperature, and Fe

  18. Electron beam curing of acrylated epoxy resins for anisotropic conductive film application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation curable acrylated epoxy oligomer was found to be an effective resin system for application to electron beams (EB) on curing of anisotropic conducting film. To study curing degree as a function of EB dosage, we irradiated bisphenol-A type acrylate epoxy oligomer samples with doses of 5 to 600 kGy of EB. To investigate the effect of a metal barrier for potential industrial application, a 3 mm thick Al plate was placed in front of the samples, and the curing parameters were compared with the ones irradiated without an Al plate. As the dosage of the EB irradiation was increased, the glass transition temperature of the sample ranged from 46.8 to 62.2 °C for the epoxy composites without placing an Al plate, and from 46.4 to 64.1 °C for their counterparts with a 3 mm thick Al plate. These results confirm that enhancement of the curing degree with increasing EB irradiation is possible even in the presence of a metal plate. The scanning electron microscope images of the fracture surfaces are presented as evidence of the morphological changes of the EB cured epoxy samples. - Highlights: ► Acrylated epoxy oligomer was cured by irradiation of the electron beam. ► Curing degree was increased with increasing dosage of the electron beam. ► Electron beam can be used for the bonding of anisotropic conducting films

  19. Diffraction of thermal radiation from binary anisotropic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dahan, Nir; Frischwasser, Kobi; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2010-01-01

    Thermal emission from binary grating on SiC wafer supported by phonon-polaritons is analyzed. The structure is comprised of homogeneous grating domains, whose orientation is parallel and perpendicular to the x-axis. The dispersion relation of the emitted light corresponds to translation symmetry of the structure.

  20. Estimation of the thermal conductivity of hemp based insulation material from 3D tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawalhi, R.; Lux, J.; Salagnac, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we are interested in the structural and thermal characterization of natural fiber insulation materials. The thermal performance of these materials depends on the arrangement of fibers, which is the consequence of the manufacturing process. In order to optimize these materials, thermal conductivity models can be used to correlate some relevant structural parameters with the effective thermal conductivity. However, only a few models are able to take into account the anisotropy of such material related to the fibers orientation, and these models still need realistic input data (fiber orientation distribution, porosity, etc.). The structural characteristics are here directly measured on a 3D tomographic image using advanced image analysis techniques. Critical structural parameters like porosity, pore and fiber size distribution as well as local fiber orientation distribution are measured. The results of the tested conductivity models are then compared with the conductivity tensor obtained by numerical simulation on the discretized 3D microstructure, as well as available experimental measurements. We show that 1D analytical models are generally not suitable for assessing the thermal conductivity of such anisotropic media. Yet, a few anisotropic models can still be of interest to relate some structural parameters, like the fiber orientation distribution, to the thermal properties. Finally, our results emphasize that numerical simulations on 3D realistic microstructure is a very interesting alternative to experimental measurements.

  1. Measurement of Three-Dimensional Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities for Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastics Using Lock-In Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Takuya; Nagano, Hosei

    2015-11-01

    A new measurement technique to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity, the distribution of in-plane anisotropy, and the out-of-plane thermal diffusivity has been developed to evaluate the thermal conductivity of anisotropic materials such as carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs). The measurements were conducted by using a laser-spot-periodic-heating method. The temperature of the sample is detected by using lock-in thermography. Thermography can analyze the phase difference between the periodic heat input and the temperature response of the sample. Two kinds of samples, unidirectional (UD) and cross-ply (CP) pitch-based CFRPs, were fabricated and tested in an atmospheric condition. All carbon fibers of the UD sample run in one direction [90°]. The carbon fibers of the CP sample run in two directions [0°/90°]. It is found that, by using lock-in thermography, it is able to visualize the thermal anisotropy and calculate the angular dependence of the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the CFRPs. The out-of-plane thermal diffusivity of CFRPs was also measured by analyzing the frequency dependence of the phase difference.

  2. Numerical Predictions of Effective Thermal Conductivities for Three-dimensional Four-directional Braided Composites Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Wen-Zhen; Zhang, Hu; Chen, Li; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model with an off-diagonal collision matrix was adopted to predict the effective thermal conductivities of the anisotropic heterogeneous materials whose components are also anisotropic. The half lattice division scheme was adopted to deal with the internal boundaries to guarantee the heat flux continuity at the interfaces. Accuracy of the model was confirmed by comparisons with benchmark results and existing simulation data. The present method was then adopted to numerically predict the transverse and longitudinal effective thermal conductivities of three-dimensional (3D) four-directional braided composites. Some corresponding experiments based on the Hot Disk method were conducted to measure their transverse and longitudinal effective thermal conductivities. The predicted data fit the experiment data well. Influences of fiber volume fractions and interior braiding angles on the effective thermal conductivities of 3D four-directional braided composit...

  3. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport

  4. Thermal Boundary Conductance: A Materials Science Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monachon, Christian; Weber, Ludger; Dames, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The thermal boundary conductance (TBC) of materials pairs in atomically intimate contact is reviewed as a practical guide for materials scientists. First, analytical and computational models of TBC are reviewed. Five measurement methods are then compared in terms of their sensitivity to TBC: the 3ω method, frequency- and time-domain thermoreflectance, the cut-bar method, and a composite effective thermal conductivity method. The heart of the review surveys 30 years of TBC measurements around room temperature, highlighting the materials science factors experimentally proven to influence TBC. These factors include the bulk dispersion relations, acoustic contrast, and interfacial chemistry and bonding. The measured TBCs are compared across a wide range of materials systems by using the maximum transmission limit, which with an attenuated transmission coefficient proves to be a good guideline for most clean, strongly bonded interfaces. Finally, opportunities for future research are discussed.

  5. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei, E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Design and Manufacture of Micro-Nano Biomedical Instruments, School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 211100 (China); Wang, Jian [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225002 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  6. Thermally activated conductivity in gapped bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushin, Maxim

    2012-05-01

    This is a theoretical study of electron transport in gated bilayer graphene —a novel semiconducting material with a tunable band gap. It is shown that the which-layer pseudospin coherence enhances the subgap conductivity and facilitates the thermally activated transport. The mechanism proposed can also lead to the non-monotonic conductivity vs. temperature dependence at a band gap size of the order of 10 meV. The effect can be observed in gapped bilayer graphene sandwiched in boron nitride where the electron-hole puddles and flexural phonons are strongly suppressed.

  7. Using lateral vibration for thermosonic flip-chip interconnection with anisotropic conductive film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, thermosonic flip-chip bonding with anisotropic conductive film (ACF) is considered. To shorten the ACF curing time, an ultrasonic vibration of 40 kHz in the lateral direction is applied, in addition to the thermocompression process. By measuring the internal temperature of CF, the fast curing of ACF due to ultrasonic vibration is verified. The experiments with a commercialized ACF for the interconnection of LCD driver chips exhibit a notable reduction of bonding time by 77% as well as a reduction of tool-tip temperature while ensuring the bonding reliability. Also, as a typical feature of the proposed method, the sliding phenomenon between the contact surface of the specimen and the horn tool-tip is reported, which significantly enhances the reliability of thermosonic flip-chip bonding. Through the observation of pressured conductive particle marks, the water absorption test and the shear test, the quality of interconnection is proven

  8. Spin conductivity of the two-dimensional anisotropic frustrated Heisenberg model in the honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    We use the SU(3) Schwinger's boson theory to study the spin transport properties of the two-dimensional anisotropic frustrated Heisenberg model in a honeycomb lattice at T=0. We have investigated the behavior of the spin conductivity for this model which presents a single-ion anisotropy and J1 and J2 exchange interactions. We study the spin transport in the Bose-Einstein condensation regime where we have that the tz bosons are condensed and the following condition is valid: = = t. Our results show a metallic spin transport for ω > 0 and a superconductor spin transport in the limit of DC conductivity, ω → 0, where σ(ω) tends to infinity in this limit of ω.

  9. Thermal conductivities of ortho and para hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of molecular hydrogen has been calculated using a Lennard-Jones potential added to a quadrupole-quadrupole interaction term. Large differences between ortho and para hydrogen were obtained particularly in the range about 200 K. Results for 'normal' hydrogen, here taken as a simple sum of results for the two components, were found to agree very well with recommended values for experiments on normal hydrogen. (Auth.)

  10. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of bulk thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). Design plans indicate that approximately 81 percent of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll, approximately 12 percent in the Tptpmn, and the remainder in the Tptul and Tptpln (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168370]). This report provides three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of the bulk thermal conductivity for the four stratigraphic layers of the repository horizon. The three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of matrix and lithophysal porosity, dry bulk density, and matrix thermal conductivity are also provided. This report provides input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. These models include the ''Drift Degradation Analysis, Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model, Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms, Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'', and ''Drift Scale THM Model''. These models directly or indirectly provide input to the total system performance assessment (TSPA). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large-scale (centimeters-meters) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity

  11. Thermal Conductance for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Qing-Rong; Su, Gang; Jian WANG; Guo, Hong

    2002-01-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of the phonon thermal conductance, \\kappa (T), for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCN). In a range of low temperatues up to 100K, \\kappa (T) of perfect SWCN is found to increase with temperature, approximately, in a parabolic fashion. This is qualitatively consistent with recent experimental measurements where the tube-tube interactions are negligibly weak. When the carbon-carbon bond length is slightly varied, \\kappa (T) is found to be qualitatively unaltered...

  12. Investigation of thermal energy transport from an anisotropic central heating element to the adjacent channels: A multipoint flux approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-02-01

    The problem of heat transfer from a central heating element pressed between two clad plates to cooling channels adjacent and outboard of the plates is investigated numerically. The aim of this work is to highlight the role of thermal conductivity anisotropy of the heating element and/or the encompassing plates on thermal energy transport to the fluid passing through the two channels. When the medium is anisotropic with respect to thermal conductivity; energy transport to the neighboring channels is no longer symmetric. This asymmetry in energy fluxes influence heat transfer to the coolant resulting in different patterns of temperature fields. In particular, it is found that the temperature fields are skewed towards the principal direction of anisotropy. In addition, the heat flux distributions along the edges of the heating element are also different as a manifestation of thermal conductivity anisotropy. Furthermore, the peak temperature at the channel walls change location and magnitude depending on the principal direction of anisotropy. Based on scaling arguments, it is found that, the ratio of width to the height of the heating system is a key parameter which can suggest when one may ignore the effect of the cross-diagonal terms of the full conductivity tensor. To account for anisotropy in thermal conductivity, the method of multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) is employed. Using this technique, it is possible to find a finite difference stencil which can handle full thermal conductivity tensor and in the same time enjoys the simplicity of finite difference approximation. Although the finite difference stencil based on MPFA is quite complex, in this work we apply the recently introduced experimenting field approach which construct the global problem automatically.

  13. Evaluation of New Thermally Conductive Geopolymer in Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Matěj; Uhlík, Jan; Nosek, Jaroslav; Lachman, Vladimír; Hladký, Radim; Franěk, Jan; Brož, Milan

    This paper describes an evaluation of a newly developed thermally conductive geopolymer (TCG), consisting of a mixture of sodium silicate and carbon micro-particles. The TCG is intended to be used as a component of high temperature energy storage (HTTES) to improve its thermal diffusivity. Energy storage is crucial for both ecological and economical sustainability. HTTES plays a vital role in solar energy technologies and in waste heat recovery. The most advanced HTTES technologies are based on phase change materials or molten salts, but suffer with economic and technological limitations. Rock or concrete HTTES are cheaper, but they have low thermal conductivity without incorporation of TCG. It was observed that TCG is stable up to 400 °C. The thermal conductivity was measured in range of 20-23 W m-1 K-1. The effect of TCG was tested by heating a granite block with an artificial fissure. One half of the fissure was filled with TCG and the other with ballotini. 28 thermometers, 5 dilatometers and strain sensors were installed on the block. The heat transport experiment was evaluated with COMSOL Multiphysics software.

  14. Strain-engineering the anisotropic electrical conductance in ReS2 monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng; Zhu, Hao; Eshun, Kwesi; Shi, Chen; Zeng, Min; Li, Qiliang

    2016-05-01

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1 T (Re in octahedral coordination) phase. The reduced symmetry in ReS2 leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. In this work, we performed a comprehensive first-principle computational study of strain effect on the anisotropic mechanical and electronic properties of ReS2 monolayers. We found that the anisotropic ratio in electron mobility along two principle axes is 2.36 while the ratio in hole mobility reaches 7.76. The study of strain applied along different directions shows that the elastic modulus is largest for out-of-plane direction, and the strain along a-direction induces indirect bandgap while strain along b- or c-direction does not. In addition, the carrier mobility can be significantly improved by the c-direction tensile strain. This study indicates that the ReS2 monolayer has promising applications in nanoscale strain sensor and conductance-switch FETs.

  15. Reliability of flip-chip bonded RFID die using anisotropic conductive paste hybrid material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Sik LEE; Jun-Ki KIM; Mok-Soon KIM; Namhyun KANG; Jong-Hyun LEE

    2011-01-01

    A reliability of flip-chip bonded die as a function of anisotropic conductive paste (ACP) hybrid materials. bonding conditions, and antenna pattern materials was investigated during the assembly of radio frequency identification(RFID) inlay. The optimization condition for flip-chip bonding was determined from the behavior of bonding strength. Under the optimized condition,the shear strength for the antenna printed with paste-type Ag ink was larger than that for Cu antenna. Furthermore, an identification distance was varied from the antenna materials. Comparing with the Ag antenna pattern, the as-bonded die on Cu antenna showed a larger distance of identification, However, the long-term reliability of inlay using the Cu antenna was decreased significantly as a function of aging time at room temperature because of the bended shape of Cu antenna formed during the flip-chip bonding process.

  16. THERMAL LENSING MEASUREMENTS IN THE FLASHLAMP-PUMPED ANISOTROPIC LASER CRYSTALS BY A PROBE BEAM TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Loiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The experimental setup for thermal lens properties determination (particularly, its sign, optical power, laser rod sensitivity factors and astigmatism degree in the anisotropic flashlamp-pumped laser crystals by a probe beam technique was developed. By means of this approach, thermal lensing measurements were performed in the Np -cut Nd-doped potassium gadolinium tungstate (Nd:KGdW laser crystal at the wavelength of 1,06 μm for light polarizations E || Nm и E || Ng. a 

  17. Thermalization of anisotropic quark–gluon plasma produced by decays of color flux tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic equations are used to study the thermalization of an anisotropic quark–gluon plasma produced by decays of color flux tubes possibly created during the very early stages of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The decay rates of the initial color tubes are given by the Schwinger formula, while the collision terms are taken in the relaxation time approximation. By connecting the relaxation time with viscosity we analyze production and thermalization processes in the plasma characterized by different values of the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density

  18. Estimating stomatal conductance with thermal imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, I; Grant, O M; Tagliavia, C P P; Chaves, M M; Jones, H G

    2006-08-01

    Most thermal methods for the study of drought responses in plant leaves are based on the calculation of 'stress indices'. This paper proposes and compares three main extensions of these for the direct estimation of absolute values of stomatal conductance to water vapour (gs) using infrared thermography (IRT). All methods use the measured leaf temperature and two environmental variables (air temperature and boundary layer resistance) as input. Additional variables required, depending on the method, are the temperatures of wet and dry reference surfaces, net radiation and relative humidity. The methods were compared using measured gs data from a vineyard in Southern Portugal. The errors in thermal estimates of conductance were of the same order as the measurement errors using a porometer. Observed variability was also compared with theoretical estimates of errors in estimated gs determined on the basis of the errors in the input variables (leaf temperature, boundary layer resistance, net radiation) and the partial derivatives of the energy balance equations used for the gs calculations. The full energy balance approach requires accurate estimates of net radiation absorbed, which may not be readily available in field conditions, so alternatives using reference surfaces are shown to have advantages. A new approach using a dry reference leaf is particularly robust and recommended for those studies where the specific advantages of thermal imagery, including its non-contact nature and its ability to sample large numbers of leaves, are most apparent. Although the results suggest that estimates of the absolute magnitude of gs are somewhat subjective, depending on the skill of the experimenter at selecting evenly exposed leaves, relative treatment differences in conductance are sensitively detected by different experimenters. PMID:16898014

  19. 15th International Conference on Thermal Conductivity

    CERN Document Server

    1978-01-01

    Once again, it gives me a great pleasure to pen the Foreword to the Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Thermal Conductivity. As in the past, these now biannual conferences pro­ vide a broadly based forum for those researchers actively working on this important property of matter to convene on a regular basis to exchange their experiences and report their findings. As it is apparent from the Table of Contents, the 15th Conference represents perhaps the broadest coverage of subject areas to date. This is indicative of the times as the boundaries between disciplines be­ come increasingly diffused. I am sure the time has come when Con­ ference Chairmen in coming years will be soliciting contributions not only in the physical sciences and engineering', but will actively seek contributions from the earth sciences and life sciences as well. Indeed, the thermal conductivity and related properties of geological and biological materials are becoming of increasing im­ portance to our way of life. As...

  20. THERMAL LENSING MEASUREMENTS IN THE ANISOTROPIC LASER CRYSTALS UNDER DIODE PUMPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Loiko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental setup was developed for thermal lensing measurements in the anisotropic diode-pumped laser crystals. The studied crystal is placed into the stable two-mirror laser cavity operating at the fundamental transversal mode. The output beam radius is measured with respect to the pump intensity for different meridional planes (all these planes contain the light propagation direction. These dependencies are fitted using the ABCD matrix method in order to obtain the sensitivity factors showing the change of the optical power of thermal lens due to variation of the pump intensity. The difference of the sensitivity factors for two mutually orthogonal principal meridional planes describes the thermal lens astigmatism degree. By means of this approach, thermal lensing was characterized in the diode-pumped monoclinic Np-cut Nd:KGd(WO42 laser crystal at the wavelength of 1.067 μm for light polarization E || Nm.

  1. Anisotropic TGO rumpling in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings under in-phase thermomechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Y2O3-ZrO2 thermal barrier system has been tested under in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions with thermal gradient in the through-thickness direction. Undulations in the thermally grown oxide (TGO) were observed to have clear anisotropic behavior with respect to the directions parallel and perpendicular to the loading axis. It was found that undulation wavelengths were nearly the same in both directions but the amplitude in the perpendicular direction was much larger than in the parallel direction. A recent model of TGO rumpling was adapted and used to analyze and explain the origins of the observed rumpling behavior under TMF conditions. Methods for deducing variation in the coefficient of thermal expansion with temperature and in the creep properties of the substrate from the experimental strain data are also presented in the course of the derivations. Model results show that tensile stress applied in the loading direction can overcome the compression occurring from lateral expansion during oxide formation, causing undulations to flatten; undulations perpendicular to the loading axis are unaffected. However, ratcheting in the strain cycle experienced by the substrate, which occurs naturally by substrate creep, is necessary for anisotropic rumpling under cyclic stress conditions. Model predictions for constant applied stress are also presented, demonstrating a reversal in the direction of undulation alignment under compression. A threshold stress is identified, in both tension and compression, sufficient to produce appreciable anisotropic rumpling. The model predictions provide a clear mechanism for the anisotropy and further evidence that the lateral expansion strain in the oxide is the driving force for oxide rumpling.

  2. Electronic thermal conduction in suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwana Begum, K.; Sankeshwar, N. S.

    2015-09-01

    The electronic thermal conductivity (ETC), κe, of suspended graphene (SG) is studied for 15Boltzmann transport formalism. The electrons are considered to be scattered from defects along with the intrinsic in-plane acoustic phonons, out-of-plane flexural phonons (FPs) and optical phonons. The ETC is evaluated by computing the first-order perturbation distribution function by directly solving the linearized Boltzmann equation by an iterative method. Numerical calculations of the temperature and concentration dependences of κe show the dominance of charged impurity scattering at lower temperatures (T<75 K) and of FPs at higher temperatures. The results are compared with the commonly used low-temperature and high-energy relaxation time approximations. Our calculations are in good agreement with recent κe data extracted for high-mobility SG samples. The validity of Wiedemann-Franz law is also discussed.

  3. Calculation of the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a quantum cascade laser active region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, M [Institute of Electron Technology, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-03-02

    The key problem in thermal modelling of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) is determining the thermal conductivity {lambda} of its active region. The parameter is highly anisotropic. In particular, the cross-plane value {lambda}{sub p}erpendicular is significantly reduced, which may be attributed to the presence of a large number of interfaces between epitaxial layers. In this work, two relatively simple models of phonon scattering at solid-solid boundary are used to calculate {lambda}{sub p}erpendicular for the terahertz QCL. The theoretical results are in good agreement with measurements.

  4. Calculation of the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a quantum cascade laser active region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The key problem in thermal modelling of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) is determining the thermal conductivity λ of its active region. The parameter is highly anisotropic. In particular, the cross-plane value λperpendicular is significantly reduced, which may be attributed to the presence of a large number of interfaces between epitaxial layers. In this work, two relatively simple models of phonon scattering at solid-solid boundary are used to calculate λperpendicular for the terahertz QCL. The theoretical results are in good agreement with measurements.

  5. Quasi-particle density in Sr2RuO4 probed by means of the phonon thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of Sr2RuO4 along the least conducting direction perpendicular to the RuO2 plane has been studied down to 0.3 K. In this configuration the phonons remain the dominant heat carriers down to the lowest temperature, and their conductivity in the normal state is determined by the scattering on conduction electrons. We show that the phonon mean free path in the superconducting state is sensitive to the density of the quasi-particles in the bulk. An unusual magnetic field dependence of the phonon thermal conductivity is ascribed to the anisotropic superconducting gap structure in Sr2RuO4. (author)

  6. Effect of Sintering on Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Barrier Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kai; PENG Hui; GUO Hongbo; GONG Shengkai

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are mostly applied to hot components of advanced turbine engines to insulate the components from hot gas.The effect of sintering on thermal conductivity and thermal barrier effects of conventional plasma sprayed and nanostructured yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are investigated.Remarkable increase in thermal conductivity occurs to both typical coatings after heat treatment.The change of porosity is just the opposite.The grain size of the nanostructured zirconia coating increases more drastically with annealing time compared to that of the conventional plasma sprayed coating,which indicates that coating sintering makes more contributions to the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured coating than that of the conventional coating.Thermal barrier effect tests using temperature difference technique are performed on both coatings.The thermal barrier effects decrease with the increase of thermal conductivity after heat treatment and the decline seems more drastic in low thermal conductivity range.The decline in thermal barrier effects is about 80 ℃for nanostructured coating after 100 h heat treatment,while the conventional coating reduces by less than 60 ℃ compared to the as-sprayed coating.

  7. High-Thermal Conductive Coating Used on Metal Heat Exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静; 梁剧; 刘业明

    2014-01-01

    Based on modified silicon polyester resin in addition to several functional fillers such as corro-sion-resistant fillers, heat-resistant fillers and thermal conductive fillers, a high thermal conductive coating can be made. On the basis of boronnitride (BN) and aluminum nitride (AIN) used as thermal conductive fillers and by means of the testing system of hot disk and heat transfer experiment, researches on the varieties of thermal conduc-tive fillers and the effects of the contents of high-thermal conductive coating have been done, which shows that the thermal conductivity of coating increases with the increase of the quality fraction and the coefficient of thermal conductivity of the thermal conductive fillers of coating. With guaranteeing better heat resistance, stronger corro-sion resistance and adhesive force, the coefficient of coating can reach a level as high as 3 W·m-1·K-1.

  8. On non-extensive nature of thermal conductivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Razdan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study non-extensive nature of thermal conductivity. It is observed that there is similarity between non-extensive entropic index and fractal dimension obtained for the silica aerogel thermal conductivity data at low temperature.

  9. Thermal conductivity in high critical temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measuring procedure to obtain the electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power of samples of low conductivity has been developed. The setup was designed to allow the removal of the sample in clean fashion, so that further heat treatments could be performed, and therefore no adhesives were used in the mounting of the thermocouples or heat sinks, etc. The heat equation has been analyzed with time-dependent boundary conditions, with the purpose of developing a dynamic measuring method which avoids the long delays involved in reaching thermal equilibrium above 30K. Based on this analysis, the developed measuring method allows a precise and reliable measurements, in a continuous fashion, for temperatures above 25K. The same setup is used in a stationary mode at low temperatures, so the sample needs to be mounted only once. κ(T) has been measured in two ceramic samples of La2CuO4: the first semiconducting, the other superconducting (SC) as a consequence of an oxygen annealing. Both exhibit a strong thermal resistivity due to defects, though lower in the SC, where two maxima are observed and are attributed to an AF ordering: TN' ≅ 40K and TN'' ≅ 240K. The low temperature dependence is T1.6 and T2.3 respectively. It was interpreted that the former sample presents a greater dispersion due to localized excitations, characteristic of amorphouus materials, 'tunneling two-level systems' (TS). A third syntherized sample of CuO exhibits a typical behaviour of an insulator, with T2.6 at low temperatures, a maximum at 40K and a decrease in T-1 at high temperatures. κ(T) in a SC sample of La1.85Sr1.15CuO4 with Tc=35.5K has also been measured, observing a small increase below Tc because of the diminishing of the phonon dispersion due to the condensating electrons. κ(T) is lower than in the previous samples and thus a greater number of defects was inferred. At low temperatures, its dependence is T1.4 in agreement with the greater dispersion due to TS

  10. Microscopic mechanism of low thermal conductivity in lead-telluride

    OpenAIRE

    Shiga, Takuma; Shiomi, Junichiro; Ma, Jie; Delaire, Olivier; Radzynski, Tomasz; Lusakowski, Andrzej; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2012-01-01

    The microscopic physics behind low lattice thermal conductivity of single crystal rocksalt lead telluride (PbTe) is investigated. Mode-dependent phonon (normal and umklapp) scattering rates and their impact on thermal conductivity were quantified by the first-principles-based anharmonic lattice dynamics calculations that accurately reproduce thermal conductivity in a wide temperature range. The low thermal conductivity of PbTe is attributed to the scattering of longitudinal acoustic phonons b...

  11. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity of Isotope-Doped Silicon Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Nuo; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2007-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It is found that the thermal conductivity of SiNWs can be reduced exponentially by isotopic defects at room temperature. The thermal conductivity reaches the minimum, which is about 27% of that of pure 28Si NW, when doped with fifty percent isotope atoms. The thermal conductivity of isotopic-superlattice structured SiNWs depends clearly on the period of superlattice. At a critical peri...

  12. Hydromagnetic waves in a plasma of isotropic thermal and anisotropic suprathermal components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low frequency plane waves supported by a medium containing a thermal plasma of isotropic pressure and a suprathermal collisionless plasma having anisotropic pressure are investigated. The usual Alfvacute en, slow and fast modes of isotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamics persist. In addition, a suprathermal mode appears which displays a rich variety of behavior due to an additional degree of freedom compared to the analogous mode when both the plasma components are described by collision-dominated magnetohydrodynamics. Since these modes are significant in a number of situations, they are extensively investigated by computing their phase speeds for wide-ranging numerical parameters. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. Hydromagnetic waves in a plasma of isotropic thermal and anisotropic suprathermal components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, G.L.; Ghildyal, V. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India)

    1996-10-01

    Low frequency plane waves supported by a medium containing a thermal plasma of isotropic pressure and a suprathermal collisionless plasma having anisotropic pressure are investigated. The usual Alfv{acute e}n, slow and fast modes of isotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamics persist. In addition, a suprathermal mode appears which displays a rich variety of behavior due to an additional degree of freedom compared to the analogous mode when both the plasma components are described by collision-dominated magnetohydrodynamics. Since these modes are significant in a number of situations, they are extensively investigated by computing their phase speeds for wide-ranging numerical parameters. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Anisotropic Thermal Transport in Graphene Oxide Films%氧化石墨烯膜各向异性热传输特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于伟; 谢华清; Wang Xin-Wei

    2012-01-01

    氧化石墨烯膜是一类新型的层状材料。本文报道了氧化石墨烯膜的面内和垂直于面方向的热扩散率和热导率,发现垂直于面方向的热导率比面内热导率低一个数量级,展示了明显的各向异性特征。氧化石墨烯膜的导热系数远低于单层石墨烯的导热系数,其原因主要是由于氧化石墨烯膜间的接触热租和氧化石墨烯膜本身导热系数较低造成的。%Graphene oxide film is a new kind of layered material. In this work, the anisotropic thermal transport in graphene oxide films is reported. The real thermal diffusivity along cross-plane direction is about one order of magnitude below that along in-plane direction, illustrating the strong anisotropic thermal transport at different directions. The thermal conductivity of graphene oxide film is far below than that of single layer graphene. The thermal contact resistance between the adjacent graphene oxide and the low thermal conductivity of graphene oxide may be the major factors influencing the heat transport in graphene oxide film.

  15. Interconnection of multichannel polyimide electrodes using anisotropic conductive films (ACFs) for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Dong-Hyun; Park, Ji Soo; Lee, Eun-Joong; Shin, SuJung; Moon, Jin-Hee; Pak, James Jungho; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for interconnecting soft polyimide (PI) electrodes using anisotropic conductive films (ACFs). Reliable and automated bonding was achieved through development of a desktop thermocompressive bonding device that could simultaneously deliver appropriate temperatures and pressures to the interconnection area. The bonding conditions were optimized by changing the bonding temperature and bonding pressure. The electrical properties were characterized by measuring the contact resistance of the ACF bonding area, yielding a measure that was used to optimize the applied pressure and temperature. The optimal conditions consisted of applying a pressure of 4 kg f/cm(2) and a temperature of 180 °C for 20 s. Although ACF base bonding is widely used in industry (e.g., liquid crystal display manufacturing), this study constitutes the first trial of a biomedical application. We performed a preliminary in vivo biocompatibility investigation of ACF bonded area. Using the optimized temperature and pressure conditions, we interconnected a 40-channel PI multielectrode device for measuring electroencephalography (EEG) signals from the skulls of mice. The electrical properties of electrode were characterized by measuring the impedance. Finally, EEG signals were measured from the mice skulls using the fabricated devices to investigate suitability for application to biomedical devices. PMID:21189231

  16. Development of irradiated UO2 thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal conductivity model of the irradiated UO2 pellet was developed, based upon the thermal diffusivity data of the irradiated UO2 pellet measured during thermal cycling. The model predicts the thermal conductivity by multiplying such separate correction factors as solid fission products, gaseous fission products, radiation damage and porosity. The developed model was validated by comparison with the variation of the measured thermal diffusivity data during thermal cycling and prediction of other UO2 thermal conductivity models. Since the developed model considers the effect of gaseous fission products as a separate factor, it can predict variation of thermal conductivity in the rim region of high burnup UO2 pellet where the fission gases in the matrix are precipitated into bubbles, indicating that decrease of thermal conductivity by bubble precipitation in rim region would be significantly compensated by the enhancing effect of fission gas depletion in the UO2 matrix. (author)

  17. Thermal conductivity of Cu–4.5 Ti alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Nagarjuna

    2004-02-01

    The thermal conductivity (TC) of peak aged Cu–4.5 wt% Ti alloy was measured at different temperatures and studied its variation with temperature. It was found that TC increased with increasing temperature. Phonon and electronic components of thermal conductivity were computed from the results. The alloy exhibits an electronic thermal conductivity of 46.45 W/m.K at room temperature. The phonon thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature from 17.6 at 0 K to 1.75 W/m.K at 298 K, which agrees with literature that the phonon component of thermal conductivity is insignificant at room temperature.

  18. The thermal conductivity of beds of spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Shapiro, M.; Longest, A.W.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal conductivities (k) of beds of solid and hollow microspheres were measured using two radial heat flow techniques. One technique provided k-data at 300 K for beds with the void spaces between particles filled with argon, nitrogen, or helium from 5 kPa to 30 MPa. The other technique provided k-data with air at atmospheric pressure from 300 to 1000 K. The 300 K technique was used to study bed systems with high k-values that can be varied by changing the gas type and gas pressure. Such systems can be used to control the operating temperature of an irradiation capsule. The systems studied included beds of 500 ..mu..m dia solid Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, the same Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ spheres mixed with spheres of silica--alumina or with SiC shards, carbon spheres, and nickel spheres. Both techniques were used to determine the k-value of beds of hollow spheres with solid shells of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//center dot/7 w/o Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and partially stabilized ZrO/sub 2/. The hollow microspheres had diameters from 2100 to 3500 ..mu..m and wall thicknesses from 80 to 160 ..mu..m. 12 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Measured versus calculated thermal conductivity of high-grade metamorphic rocks – inferences on the thermal properties of the lower crust at ambient and in-situ conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, Labani; Förster, Hans-Jürgen; Förster, Andrea;

    The bulk thermal conductivity (TC) of 26 rock samples representing felsic, intermediate and mafic granulites, from the Southern Granulite Province, India, is measured at dry and saturated conditions with the optical-scanning method. Thermal conductivity is also calculated from modal mineralogy...... (determined by XRD and EPMA), applying mixing models commonly used in thermal studies. Most rocks are fine- to medium -grained equigranular in texture. All samples are isotropic to weakly anisotropic and possess low porosities (< 2%). Measured TC values range between 2.5 and 3.0 W/(mK) for felsic granulites...

  20. An anisotropic numerical model for thermal hydraulic analyses: application to liquid metal flow in fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitillo, F.; Vitale Di Maio, D.; Galati, C.; Caruso, G.

    2015-11-01

    A CFD analysis has been carried out to study the thermal-hydraulic behavior of liquid metal coolant in a fuel assembly of triangular lattice. In order to obtain fast and accurate results, the isotropic two-equation RANS approach is often used in nuclear engineering applications. A different approach is provided by Non-Linear Eddy Viscosity Models (NLEVM), which try to take into account anisotropic effects by a nonlinear formulation of the Reynolds stress tensor. This approach is very promising, as it results in a very good numerical behavior and in a potentially better fluid flow description than classical isotropic models. An Anisotropic Shear Stress Transport (ASST) model, implemented into a commercial software, has been applied in previous studies, showing very trustful results for a large variety of flows and applications. In the paper, the ASST model has been used to perform an analysis of the fluid flow inside the fuel assembly of the ALFRED lead cooled fast reactor. Then, a comparison between the results of wall-resolved conjugated heat transfer computations and the results of a decoupled analysis using a suitable thermal wall-function previously implemented into the solver has been performed and presented.

  1. Thermal conductivity of magnetic insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamokostas, Georgios; Lapas, Panteleimon; Fiete, Gregory A.

    We study the influence of spin-orbit coupling on the thermal conductivity of various types of magnetic insulators. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling and orbital-degeneracy, the strong-coupling limit of Hubbard interactions at half filling can often be adequately described in terms of a pure spin Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form. However, in the presence of spin-orbit coupling the resulting exchange interaction can become highly anisotropic. The effect of the atomic spin-orbit coupling, taken into account through the effect of magnon-phonon interactions and the magnetic order and excitations, on the lattice thermal conductivity of various insulating magnetic systems is studied. We focus on the regime of low temperatures where the dominant source of scattering is two-magnon scattering to one-phonon processes. The thermal current is calculated within the Boltzmann transport theory. We are grateful for financial support from NSF Grant DMR-0955778.

  2. Determination of thermal conductivity of magnesium-alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An indirect method, Angstroms method was adopted and an instrument was designed to determine the thermal conductivity of magnesium metal and alloys. Angstroms method is an axial periodic heat flow technique by which the thermal diffusivity can be measured directly. Then thermal conductivity can be obtained with relation to thermal diffusivity. Compared with the recommended data from the literature the fitted values of the thermal diffiusivity correspond with 3%, and the credible probability of the thermal conductivity in the range of 0-450 ℃ is about 95%. The method is applicable in the given temperature range.

  3. Plane waves in a thermally conducting viscous liquid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baljeet Singh

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate plane waves in a thermally conducting viscous liquid half-space with thermal relaxation times. There exist three basic waves, namely; thermal wave, longitudinal wave and transverse wave in a thermally conducting viscous liquid half-space. Reflection of plane waves from the free surface of a thermally conducting viscous liquid half-space is studied. The results are obtained in terms of amplitude ratios and are compared with those without viscosity and thermal disturbances.

  4. Thermal Properties of Asphalt Mixtures Modified with Conductive Fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Byong Chol Bai; Dae-Wook Park; Hai Viet Vo; Samer Dessouky; Ji Sun Im

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the thermal properties of asphalt mixtures modified with conductive fillers used for snow melting and solar harvesting pavements. Two different mixing processes were adopted to mold asphalt mixtures, dry- and wet-mixing, and two conductive fillers were used in this study, graphite and carbon black. The thermal conductivity was compared to investigate the effects of asphalt mixture preparing methods, the quantity, and the distribution of conductive filler on thermal pro...

  5. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotubes Embedded in Solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Bing-Yang; HOU Quan-Wen

    2008-01-01

    @@ A carbon-nanotube-atom fixed and activated scheme of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations is put forward to extract the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in solid argon. Though a 6.5% volume fraction of CNTs increases the composite thermal conductivity to about twice as much as that of the pure basal material, the thermal conductivity of CNTs embedded in solids is found to be decreased by 1/8-1/5with reference to that of pure ones. The decrease of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the solid-embedded CNTs and the thermal interface resistance are demonstrated to be responsible for the results.

  6. The Measurement of Thermal Conductivities of Silica and Carbon Black Powders at Different pressures by Thermal COnductivity Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.G.Liang; X.S.Ge; 等

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was done to study the gas filled powder insulation and thermal conductivity probe for the measurent of thermal conductivity of powders.The mathematical analysis showed that the heat capacity of the probe itself and the thermal rsistance between the probe and powder must be considered .The authors developed a slender probe and measured the effective thermal conductivity of sillca and carbon black powders under a variety of conditions.

  7. Evaluation of a multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy tensor probe to detect the anisotropic conductivity spectra of biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements of anisotropic tissues using a 16 electrode probe and reconstruction method of estimating the anisotropic impedance spectrum in a local region just underneath the center of the probe. This may enable in-vivo surface bioimpedance measurements with similar performance to the ex-vivo gold standard that requires excising and placing the entire tissue sample in a unit measurement cell with uniform electric field. The multiple surface electrodes enable us to create a focused current pattern so that the resulting measured voltage is more sensitive to a local region and less sensitive to other areas. This is exploited in a reconstruction method to provide improved bioimpedance and anisotropy measurements. In this paper, we describe the current pattern for localized electrical energy concentration, performance with the spring loaded pin electrodes, data calibration and experimental results on anisotropic agar phantoms and different tissue types. The anisotropic conductivity spectra are able to differentiate insulating films of different thickness and detect their orientation. Bioimpedance spectra of biological tissues are in agreement with published data and reference instruments. The anisotropy expressed as the ratio of eigenvalues and the orientation of eigenfunctions were reconstructed at 45° intervals. This information is used to predict the underlying anisotropy of the region under the probe. Tissue measurements clearly demonstrate the expected higher anisotropy of muscle tissue compared to liver tissue and spectral changes. (paper)

  8. Evaluation of a multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy tensor probe to detect the anisotropic conductivity spectra of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Bishal; Wi, Hun; McEwan, Alistair; Kwon, Hyeuknam; In Oh, Tong; Woo, Eung Je; Seo, Jin Keun

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements of anisotropic tissues using a 16 electrode probe and reconstruction method of estimating the anisotropic impedance spectrum in a local region just underneath the center of the probe. This may enable in-vivo surface bioimpedance measurements with similar performance to the ex-vivo gold standard that requires excising and placing the entire tissue sample in a unit measurement cell with uniform electric field. The multiple surface electrodes enable us to create a focused current pattern so that the resulting measured voltage is more sensitive to a local region and less sensitive to other areas. This is exploited in a reconstruction method to provide improved bioimpedance and anisotropy measurements. In this paper, we describe the current pattern for localized electrical energy concentration, performance with the spring loaded pin electrodes, data calibration and experimental results on anisotropic agar phantoms and different tissue types. The anisotropic conductivity spectra are able to differentiate insulating films of different thickness and detect their orientation. Bioimpedance spectra of biological tissues are in agreement with published data and reference instruments. The anisotropy expressed as the ratio of eigenvalues and the orientation of eigenfunctions were reconstructed at 45° intervals. This information is used to predict the underlying anisotropy of the region under the probe. Tissue measurements clearly demonstrate the expected higher anisotropy of muscle tissue compared to liver tissue and spectral changes.

  9. Flexible Fabrics with High Thermal Conductivity for Advanced Spacesuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Kesterson, Matt; Connel, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Southward, Robin E.; Working, Dennis; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the effort and accomplishments for developing flexible fabrics with high thermal conductivity (FFHTC) for spacesuits to improve thermal performance, lower weight and reduce complexity. Commercial and additional space exploration applications that require substantial performance enhancements in removal and transport of heat away from equipment as well as from the human body can benefit from this technology. Improvements in thermal conductivity were achieved through the use of modified polymers containing thermally conductive additives. The objective of the FFHTC effort is to significantly improve the thermal conductivity of the liquid cooled ventilation garment by improving the thermal conductivity of the subcomponents (i.e., fabric and plastic tubes). This paper presents the initial system modeling studies, including a detailed liquid cooling garment model incorporated into the Wissler human thermal regulatory model, to quantify the necessary improvements in thermal conductivity and garment geometries needed to affect system performance. In addition, preliminary results of thermal conductivity improvements of the polymer components of the liquid cooled ventilation garment are presented. By improving thermal garment performance, major technology drivers will be addressed for lightweight, high thermal conductivity, flexible materials for spacesuits that are strategic technical challenges of the Exploration

  10. Phonon thermal conductivity of monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaonan; Tabarraei, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    We use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling using Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoribbons. We study the impact of factors such as length, edge chirality, monovacancies, and uniaxial stretching on the thermal conductivity of MoS2 nanoribbons. Our results show that longer ribbons have a higher thermal conductivity, and the thermal conductivity of infinitely long zigzag and armchair MoS2 nanoribbons is, respectively, 54 W/mK and 33 W/mK. This is significantly lower than the thermal conductivity of some other graphene-like two-dimensional materials such as graphene and boron nitride. While the presence of molybdenum or sulfur vacancies reduces the thermal conductivity of ribbons, molybdenum vacancies have a more deteriorating effect on thermal conductivities. We also have studied the impact of uniaxial stretching on the thermal conductivity of MoS2 nanoribbons. The results show that in contrast to three dimensional materials, thermal conductivity of MoS2 is fairly insensitive to stretching. We have used the phonon dispersion curves and group velocities to investigate the mechanism of this unexpected behavior. Our results show that tensile strain does not alter the phonon dispersion curves and hence the thermal conductivity does not change.

  11. Numerical study of the thermal degradation of isotropic and anisotropic polymeric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, E. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Ciencias de la Computacion, ETSI Informatica, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Ramos, J.I. [Room I-320-D, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Malaga, Plaza El Ejido, s/n, 29013 Malaga (Spain)

    2005-08-01

    The thermal degradation of two-dimensional isotropic, orthotropic and anisotropic polymeric materials is studied numerically by means of a second-order accurate (in both space and time) linearly implicit finite difference formulation which results in linear algebraic equations at each time step. It is shown that, for both isotropic and orthotropic composites, the monomer mass diffusion tensor plays a role in initiating the polymerization kinetics, the formation of a polymerization kernel and the initial front propagation, whereas the later stages of the polymerization are nearly independent of the monomer mass diffusion tensor. In anisotropic polymeric composites, it has been found that the monomer mass diffusion tensor plays a paramount role in determining the initial stages of the polymerization and the subsequent propagation of the polymerization front, the direction and speed of propagation of which are found to be related to the principal directions of both the monomer mass and the heat diffusion tensors. It is also shown that the polymerization time and temperatures depend strongly on the anisotropy of the mass and heat diffusion tensors. (authors)

  12. Thermal conductivity degradation of graphites irradiated at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the thermal conductivity degradation of new, high thermal conductivity graphites and to compare these results to more standard graphites irradiated at low temperatures. Several graphites and graphite composites (C/C`s) have been irradiated near 150{degree}C and at fluences up to a displacement level of 0.24 dpa. The materials ranged in unirradiated room temperature thermal conductivity of these materials varied from 114 W/m-K for H-451 isotropic graphite, to 670 W/m-K for unidirectional FMI-1D C/C composite. At the irradiation temperature a saturation reduction in thermal conductivity was seen to occur at displacement levels of approximately 0.1 dpa. All materials were seen to degrade to approximately 10 to 14 % of their original thermal conductivity after irradiation. The effect of post irradiation annealing on the thermal conductivity was also studied.

  13. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF RUBBERIZED GYPSUM BOARD

    OpenAIRE

    Taher Abu-Lebdeh; Ellie Fini; Ashraf Fadiel

    2014-01-01

    The disposal of scrap tires is a challenging task and hence an innovative solution to meet these challenges is needed. Extensive work has been done on the utilization of waste tires in a variety of applications in asphalt pavements and concrete. However, previous investigations focus only on the mechanical properties of the rubberized materials, but few on the thermal performance. This is especially true for rubberized gypsum. Limited or no experimental data on the thermal performance of rubb...

  14. Model for thermal conductivity of CNT-nanofluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H E Patel; K B Anoop; T Sundararajan; Sarit K Das

    2008-06-01

    This work presents a simple model for predicting the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofluids. Effects due to the high thermal conductivity of CNTs and the percolation of heat through it are considered to be the most important reasons for their anomalously high thermal conductivity enhancement. A new approach is taken for the modeling, the novelty of which lies in the prediction of the thermal behaviour of oil based as well as water based CNT nanofluids, which are quite different from each other in thermal characteristics. The model is found to correctly predict the trends observed in experimental data for different combinations of CNT nanofluids with varying concentrations.

  15. Thermal conductivity enhancement with different fillers for epoxy resin adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat dissipation is an important issue for electronic devices. In the present work, we prepared eight kinds of thermal adhesives by filling the epoxy resin with natural graphite, copper, aluminum, zinc oxide, boron nitride, aluminum oxide, diamond and silver powders, and measured the thermal conductivity of all samples. The results show the eight fillers can efficiently improve the thermal conductivity of the epoxy resin. Meanwhile, we found the layer-shape filler is more favorable than the ball-shape filler and the sharp-corner-shape filler to enhance the thermal conductivity of epoxy resin, and the low price layer-shape natural graphite-epoxy adhesive had the highest thermal conductivity up to 1.68 W m−1 K−1 at weight 44.3% of the eight thermal adhesives. All the fillers and the cross sections of thermal adhesives morphologies images were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and the thermal conductivities of all the samples were measured by Hot Disk TPS-2500 thermal constants analyzer. - Highlights: •Thermal conductive adhesives with 8 different fillers were tested. •The layer-shape filler is beneficial to form the heat pathways. •The sharp-corner-shape filler is most difficult to achieve the heat pathways. •The adhesive filled with the natural graphite has higher thermal conductivity

  16. Impacts of Atomistic Coating on Thermal Conductivity of Germanium Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2012-01-01

    By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrated that thermal conductivity of Germanium nanowires can be reduced more than 25% at room temperature by atomistic coating. There is a critical coating thickness beyond which thermal conductivity of the coated nanowire is larger than that of the host nanowire. The diameter dependent critical coating thickness and minimum thermal conductivity are explored. Moreover, we found that interface roughness can induce further reducti...

  17. Cooling history of Earth's core with high thermal conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, CJ

    2015-01-01

    Thermal evolution models of Earth's core constrain the power available to the geodynamo process that generates the geomagnetic field, the evolution of the solid inner core and the thermal history of the overlying mantle. Recent upward revision of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron mixtures by a factor of 2-3 has drastically reduced the estimated power available to generate the present-day geomagnetic field. Moreover, this high conductivity increases the amount of heat that is conducted o...

  18. Parametrisation of the niobium thermal conductivity in the superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal conductivity measurements of niobium sheets manufactured for deep-drawing of superconducting cavities have been gathered. Due to various histories of the niobium samples and a wide range of metal purities (35< RRR<1750) the data offer a large scatter of thermal conductivities. An attempt is made to obtain an analytical expression with realistic parameters for the thermal conductivity between 1.8 K and 9.25 K. (author)

  19. Experimental determination of thermal conductivity and gap conductance of fuel rod for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of fuel compacts and the gap conductance between the fuel compact and the graphite sleeve in fuel rods for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) were measured by the center heating method. These measurements were made as functions of volume percent particle loading and temperature for thermal conductivity and as functions of gap distance and gas composition for gap conductance. The thermal conductivity of fuel compacts decreases with increasing temperature and with increasing particle loading. The gap conductance increases with increasing temperature and decrease with increasing gap distance. A good gap conductance was observed with helium fill gas. It was seen that the gap conductance was dependent on the thermal conductivity of fill gas and conductance by radiation and could be neglected the conductance through solid-solid contact points of fuel compact and graphite sleeve. (author)

  20. Dependence of thermal conductivity in micro to nano silica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vangala Dhanunjana Chari; Deepala V S G K Sharma; Pinnelli S R Prasad; S Ramana Murthy

    2013-08-01

    This work presents the measurement of thermal conductivity of nano-silica particles using needle probe method. The validation test of thermal probe was conducted on ice and THF hydrates using our experimental set up and the results are satisfactory when compared with the literature data. The nano silica used in this study is with particle sizes in the range 50–1000 nm. The sand powders sieved in different sizes <75 and 75 m > > 250 m were also studied to probe the particle size dependence on thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity decreased by about 70% in silica nano powders.

  1. Reduced thermal conductivity of isotopically modulated silicon multilayer structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracht, H.; Wehmeier, N.; Eon, S.;

    2012-01-01

    -resolved x-ray scattering. Comparison of the experimental results to numerical solutions of the corresponding heat diffusion equations reveals a factor of three lower thermal conductivity of the isotope structure compared to natural Si. Our results demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of silicon can be......We report measurements of the thermal conductivity of isotopically modulated silicon that consists of alternating layers of highly enriched silicon-28 and silicon-29. A reduced thermal conductivity of the isotopically modulated silicon compared to natural silicon was measured by means of time...

  2. High thermal conductivity of hexagonal boron nitride laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Zhang, Liang; Kretinin, A. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Wang, Yi Bo; Wang, Tun; Li, Xiaojun; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Jingyu; Lu, Ching-Yu; Chen, Jia-Cing; Lu, Miao; Wang, Hui-Qiong; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional materials are characterised by a number of unique physical properties which can potentially make them useful to a wide diversity of applications. In particular, the large thermal conductivity of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has already been acknowledged and these materials have been suggested as novel core materials for thermal management in electronics. However, it was not clear if mass produced flakes of hBN would allow one to achieve an industrially-relevant value of thermal conductivity. Here we demonstrate that laminates of hBN exhibit thermal conductivity of up to 20 W/m·K, which is significantly larger than that currently used in thermal management. We also show that the thermal conductivity of laminates increases with the increasing volumetric mass density, which creates a way of fine tuning its thermal properties.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivities of superlattice nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Juekuan(杨决宽); CHEN; Yunfei(陈云飞); YAN; Jingping(颜景平)

    2003-01-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate heat transfer in superlattice nanowires. Results show that for fixed period length superlattice nanowires, the ratio of the total interfacial thermal resistance to the total thermal resistance and the effective thermal conductivities are invariant with the changes in interface numbers. Increasing the period length leads to an increase in the average interfacial thermal resistance, which indicates that the interfacial thermal resistance depends not only on the materials that constitute the alternating segments of superlattice nanowires, but also on the lattice strain throughout the segments. The modification of the lattice structure due to the lattice mismatch should be taken into account in the acoustic mismatch model. Simulation results also demonstrated the size confinement effect on the thermal conductivities for low dimensional structures, i.e. the thermal conductivities and the interfacial thermal resistance increase as the nanowire cross-sectional area increases.

  4. Modelling of MOX fuel's thermal conductivity considering its microstructural heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new mechanistic thermal conductivity model considering the heterogeneous microstructure of MOX fuel. Even though the thermal conductivity of MOX has been investigated extensively by experimental measurements and theoretical analyses, they show wide scattering making the performance analysis of MOX fuel difficult. Therefore, a thermal conductivity model that considers the heterogeneous microstructure of MOX fuel has been developed by using a general two phase thermal conductivity model. In order to apply this model to heterogeneous MOX fuel, the fuel is assumed to consist of Pu-rich particles and UO2 matrix including PuO2 in solid solution. Since little relevant data on Pu-rich particles is available, MOX data including Siemens-KWU results are only used to characterize the microstructure of un-irradiated and irradiated fuel. Philliponneau's and HALDEN models are used for the local thermal conductivities for Pu-rich particles and the UO2 matrix, respectively. By combining the two models, the overall thermal conductivity of MOX fuel is obtained. The new proposed model estimates the MOX thermal conductivity about 10% less than that of UO2 fuel, which is in the range of the MOX thermal conductivity available in the open literature. The ratio of the thermal conductivity of MOX to UO2 increases with temperature because the electronic conduction becomes dominant at high temperatures. The developed thermal conductivity model has been incorporated into KAERI fuel performance code, COSMOS, and then evaluated using the measured data of irradiated MOX fuel. A comparison of predicted centerline temperatures with the measured values shows reasonable agreement together with satisfactory results of the fission gas release and gap pressure when the amount of fission gas release is not enough to recover the irradiation damages. However, it indicates that the recovery of thermal conductivity is included to analyze more realistically after significant fission gas

  5. A study on the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonites

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Anh-Minh; Le, Trung Tinh; 10.1016/j.clay.2007.11.001

    2008-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite is one of the most important properties in the design of high-level radioactive waste repositories where this material is proposed for use as a buffer. In the work described here, a thermal probe based on the hot wire method was used to measure the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite specimens. The experimental results were analyzed to observe the effects of various factors (i.e. dry density, water content, hysteresis, degree of saturation and volumetric fraction of soil constituents) on the thermal conductivity. A linear correlation was proposed to predict the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite based on experimentally observed relationship between the volumetric fraction of air and the thermal conductivity. The relevance of this correlation was finally analyzed together with others existing methods using experimental data on several compacted bentonites.

  6. Thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the optimum design of cryogenic instruments requires accurate thermal models. The present models are limited by a lack of knowledge of the low temperature thermal conductance of the bolted joints which are typically used in the instrument-to-system interface. In connection with studies of pressed contacts, it has been found that the thermal conductance does not obey the Wiedemann-Franz law. The present investigation is concerned with the characterization of the thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium-4 temperatures, taking into account the dependence of thermal contact conductance on applied force and temperature. It is shown that for the 0.4 micron OFHC copper pressed contact pair, the thermal conductance varies roughly as the second power of the temperature, and increases with increasing applied force.

  7. Dynamical analysis of multi-layered anisotropic cylindrical panels under thermal load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased use of composite materials in aerospace and mechanical engineering structures is due to their high stiffness and strength-to-weight ratio. Studies involving the thermoelastic behavior of composite plates and shells have received great attention in recent years. Thermoelastic problems of reinforced rectangular panels was investigated by Birman. In this paper the static response of isotropic reinforced panels in non-uniform thermal field is discussed. An exact three-dimensional thermoelasticity solution for a cross-ply cylindrical panel has been obtained by Huang and Tauchert using the power series method. Three-dimensional thermal stress analysis of laminated panels have been studied by Saha and Pabitra. Analytical three-dimensional thermoelasticity solutions are presented for static problems of simply supported sandwich panels and cylindrical shells subjected to mechanical load and temperature gradient with constant intensity at inner or outer surfaces by Scott and Noor. Thermoelasticity solution of multilayer anisotropic shells was studied by Shvets and Flyachok. In this paper , the complete system of basic equations of linear dynamic theory of thermal stresses in multilayer shells is developed with the allowance for transverse anisotropy of the material for each layer. In this paper the governing differential equations of motion in term of displacements for each layer of cylindrical panel are solved by enforcing continuity conditions and using Galerkin finite element method. Refs. 5 (author)

  8. Universal thermal and electrical conductivity from holography

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Sachin

    2010-01-01

    It is known from earlier work of Iqbal, Liu (arXiv:0809.3808) that the boundary transport coefficients such as electrical conductivity (at vanishing chemical potential), shear viscosity etc. at low frequency and finite temperature can be expressed in terms of geometrical quantities evaluated at the horizon. In the case of electrical conductivity, at zero chemical potential gauge field fluctuation and metric fluctuation decouples, resulting in a trivial flow from horizon to boundary. In the presence of chemical potential, the story becomes complicated due to the fact that gauge field and metric fluctuation can no longer be decoupled. This results in a nontrivial flow from horizon to boundary. Though horizon conductivity can be expressed in terms of geometrical quantities evaluated at the horizon, there exist no such neat result for electrical conductivity at the boundary. In this paper we propose an expression for boundary conductivity expressed in terms of geometrical quantities evaluated at the horizon and t...

  9. Calculation of the thermal disadvantage factor for a reactor cell with anisotropic scattering by the Fn method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The F sub(N) method is used for the calculation of the thermal disadvantage factor in reactor cells with anisotropic scattering in the moderator. Numerical results were obtained for several reactor cells and compared with the results obtained by other methods. The results confirmed the physical conclusion, that the higher order terms in the expansion of the scattering law have an insignificant effect on the thermal disadvantage factor. (E.G.)

  10. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Wang; Wenzheng Yue; Mo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those ...

  11. The Nature of the Phonon Spectrum and the Analysis of Lattice Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of lattice thermal conductivity is presented, wherein a more realistic phonon spectrum is utilized than the usual Debye-like phonon spectrum consisting of one average acoustic branch. We have first used an anisotropic continuum dispersive model in our calculation of the temperature dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity of germanium. The approach that we have utilized in this calculation is a modified version of Callaway's formulation. Houston's six- and three-term integration procedures are used in evaluating rather formidable integrals over lattice frequencies. Suitable prevalent expressions for relaxation times for boundary and impurity scatterings and three-phonon normal and Umklapp processes are used. A good fit to the experimental data of Holland and Slack and Glassbrenner is obtained for germanium from 2 to 1000°K by adjusting the four constants occurring in the integrals. On the face of reliable neutron spectroscopic evidence, we know that germanium has very disperse transverse branches and for them an anisotropic continuum dispersive model also yields a poor representation. We therefore thought it appropriate to utilize the very elaborate shell model for the lattice dynamics of germanium put forth by Cochran. With a proper adjustment of the parameters entering in our formulation for the calculation of lattice thermal conductivity, we again find a good fit with the experimental data. We are led to a conclusion that the nature of the phonon spectrum does not greatly influence the analysis of lattice thermal conductivity data according to current approaches and the niceties of the phonon spectrum are lost in the adjustment of the various parameters involved. It is felt that instead of putting too much labour in evaluating the tedious integrals for more realistic lattice dynamical models, it is better to investigate the validity of various relaxation time assumptions that have gone into these integrals. (author)

  12. Anisotropic electrical conductivity tensor of granular high-Tc superconductors in an effective-medium theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The earliest high-Tc oxide superconductors were generally studied in the form of porous polycrystalline pellets. As material preparation technology improved, resulting in samples with orientational order and a smaller concentration of impurity phases, the effects of granular behaviour did not disappear. In both the cases of disordered and partially-ordered structures, an important question arises as to how to interpret measured low-field resistivities in terms of the underlying anisotropic single-crystal values. This paper provides the answer to this question within the context of an effective-medium theory. The authors version of the effective-medium approximation attempts to describe the electrical properties of an inhomogeneous medium, consisting of a mixture of several types of anisotropic polycrystals with different degrees of orientational order. (author)

  13. Coherent thermal conductance of 1-D photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschikin, Maria; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2012-10-01

    We present an exact calculation of coherent thermal conductance in 1-D multilayer photonic crystals using the S-matrix method. In particular, we study the thermal conductance in a bilayer structure of Si/vacuum or Al2O3/vacuum slabs by means of the exact radiative heat flux expression. Based on the results obtained for the Al2O3/vacuum structure we show by comparison with previous works that the material losses and (localized) surface modes supported by the inner layers play a fundamental role and cannot be omitted in the definition of thermal conductance. Our results could have significant implications in the conception of efficient thermal barriers.

  14. Thermal conductivity of halide solid solutions: measurement and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Poncsák, Sándor; St-Pierre, Rémi; Kiss, László I; Chartrand, Patrice

    2014-09-14

    The composition dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity in NaCl-KCl solid solutions has been measured as a function of composition and temperature. Samples with systematically varied compositions were prepared and the laser flash technique was used to determine the thermal diffusivity from 373 K to 823 K. A theoretical model, based on the Debye approximation of phonon density of state (which contains no adjustable parameters) was used to predict the thermal conductivity of both stoichiometric compounds and fully disordered solid solutions. The predictions obtained with the model agree very well with our measurement. A general method for predicting the thermal conductivity of different halide systems is discussed. PMID:25217938

  15. Superior thermal conductivity in suspended bilayer hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengru; Guo, Jie; Dong, Lan; Aiyiti, Adili; Xu, Xiangfan; Li, Baowen

    2016-05-01

    We reported the basal-plane thermal conductivity in exfoliated bilayer hexagonal boron nitride h-BN that was measured using suspended prepatterned microstructures. The h-BN sample suitable for thermal measurements was fabricated by dry-transfer method, whose sample quality, due to less polymer residues on surfaces, is believed to be superior to that of PMMA-mediated samples. The measured room temperature thermal conductivity is around 484 Wm‑1K‑1(+141 Wm‑1K‑1/ ‑24 Wm‑1K‑1) which exceeds that in bulk h-BN, providing experimental observation of the thickness-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended few-layer h-BN.

  16. Coherent thermal conductance of 1-D photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an exact calculation of coherent thermal conductance in 1-D multilayer photonic crystals using the S-matrix method. In particular, we study the thermal conductance in a bilayer structure of Si/vacuum or Al2O3/vacuum slabs by means of the exact radiative heat flux expression. Based on the results obtained for the Al2O3/vacuum structure we show by comparison with previous works that the material losses and (localized) surface modes supported by the inner layers play a fundamental role and cannot be omitted in the definition of thermal conductance. Our results could have significant implications in the conception of efficient thermal barriers.

  17. Thermal conductivity and other properties of cementitious grouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.

    1998-08-01

    The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

  18. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND OTHER PROPERTIES OF CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALLAN,M.

    1998-05-01

    The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

  19. Thermal conductivity of a strongly coupled hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ''Molecular Dynamics'' simulations has been used to compute the thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled, nearly classical hydrogen plasma. The relaxation of a suitably defined heat current is significantly faster than the decay of the microscopic electric current. Electrical and thermal conductivities are not related by a simple Wiedemann-Franz law in the dense plasma

  20. Thermal Hyper-Conductivity: radiative energy transport in hyperbolic media

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, J; Narimanov, E.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a theoretical description of radiative thermal conductivity in hyperbolic metamaterials. We demonstrate a dramatic enhancement of the radiative thermal transport due to the super-singularity of the photonic density of states in hyperbolic media, leading to the radiative heat conductivity which can be comparable to the non-radiative contribution.

  1. Thermal conductivity of reinforced soils:A literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muge Elif Orakoglu; JianKun Liu

    2014-01-01

    This-paper-aims-a-review-of-the-literature-related-to-soil-reinforcements-to-achieve-lower-soil-thermal-conductivity-(λ).-The-use-of-various-natural-and-synthetic-fibers,-polymers,-geosynthetics,-agricultural-waste/materials,-and-nanoclays-is-dis-cussed-and-existing-prediction-models-that-have-been-thought-to-affect-low-thermal-conductivity-are-presented.

  2. Development of high-thermal-conductivity silicon nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride (Si3N4 with high thermal conductivity has emerged as one of the most promising substrate materials for the next-generation power devices. This paper gives an overview on recent developments in preparing high-thermal-conductivity Si3N4 by a sintering of reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN method. Due to the reduction of lattice oxygen content, the SRBSN ceramics could attain substantially higher thermal conductivities than the Si3N4 ceramics prepared by the conventional gas-pressure sintering of silicon nitride (SSN method. Thermal conductivity could further be improved through increasing the β/α phase ratio during nitridation and enhancing grain growth during post-sintering. Studies on fracture resistance behaviors of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that they possessed high fracture toughness and exhibited obvious R-curve behaviors. Using the SRBSN method, a Si3N4 with a record-high thermal conductivity of 177 Wm−1K−1 and a fracture toughness of 11.2 MPa m1/2 was developed. Studies on the influences of two typical metallic impurity elements, Fe and Al, on thermal conductivities of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that the tolerable content limits for the two impurities were different. While 1 wt% of impurity Fe hardly degraded thermal conductivity, only 0.01 wt% of Al caused large decrease in thermal conductivity.

  3. In-Pile Thermal Conductivity Measurement Methods for Nuclear Fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Brandon S.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring nuclear fuel thermal conductivity in-pile can provide much needed data for understanding fuel performance during irradiation and yield thermophysical property data needed for simulation codes and fuel databases. The objective of this research is to develop and compare two in-pile thermal conductivity methods in a laboratory setting using surrogate fuel materials. A steady-state radial heat flow method was investigated to understand its viability as an in-pile steady-state thermal...

  4. Thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essedik Belkerk, Boubakeur; Achour, Amine; Zhang, Dongyan; Sahli, Salah; Djouadi, M.-Abdou; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, we report the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) films produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. High-quality BNNTs were synthesized at 1200 °C on fused silica substrates precoated with Pt thin-film thermometers. The thermal conductivity of the BNNTs was measured at room temperature by using a pulsed photothermal technique. The apparent thermal conductivity of the BNNT coatings increased from 55 to 170 W m‑1 K‑1 when the thickness increased from 10 to 28 µm, while the thermal conductivity attained a value as high as 2400 W m‑1 K‑1. These results suggested that BNNTs, which are highly thermally conductive, but electrically insulating, are promising materials with unique properties.

  5. Thermal Conductivity of Ce Doped Bi-2212 Superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; WU Bai-Mei; M.Ausloos

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity in Bi2Sr2 Ca1-x Cex Cu2Oy x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 is presented. With increasing Ce-doping level, the thermal conductivity peak under TC is suppressed then disappears,while another peak appears at low temperatures for the non-superconducting compounds. The numerical analysis shows that the thermal conductivity peak under TC can be well described by the normal electron relaxation-time contribution model, and the phonon-induced thermal conductivity peak could be well described within the Debye approximation of the phonon spectrum. The existence and variation of these two thermal conductivity peaks indicate the adjustability between the superconducting and insulating components in the samples with different Ce-doping levels.

  6. Thermal conductivity modeling of water containing metal oxide nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmad Azari

    2015-01-01

    The nano particles have demonstrated great potential to improve the heat transfer characteristics of heat transfer fluids. Possible parameters responsible for this increase were studied. The heat transfer profile in the nanolayer region was combined with other parameters such as volume fraction, particle radius thermal conductivity of the fluid, particle and nanolayer, to formulate a thermal conductivity model. Results predicting the thermal conductivity of nanofluids using the model were compared with experimental results as well as studies by other researchers. The comparison of the results obtained for the CuO/water and TiO2/water nanofluids studied shows that the correlation proposed is in closest proximity in predicting the experimental results for the thermal conductivity of a nanofluid. Also, a parametric study was performed to understand how a number of factors affect the thermal conductivity of nanofluids using the developed correlation.

  7. Thermal conductivities of minor actinide oxides for advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal diffusivities of americium oxide and neptunium dioxide were determined by a laser flash method. It was found that the thermal diffusivities of AmO2-x and NpO2 decreased with increasing temperature. It was also found that the decrease in O/Am ratio during the thermal diffusivity measurements under vacuum resulted in a slight decrease in thermal diffusivity of AmO2-x. The thermal conductivities of AmO2-x and NpO2 were evaluated from the measured thermal diffusivities, heat capacities and bulk densities. The thermal conductivity of AmO2-x was smaller than those of the literature values of UO2 and PuO2. On the other hand, the thermal conductivity of NpO2 from 873 to 1473 K lay between those of UO2 and PuO2. The thermal conductivities of AmO2-x and NpO2 decreased with increasing temperature in the temperature range investigated. This temperature dependence of thermal conductivities showed a similar tendency as those of UO2, PuO2 and (U0.8Pu0.2)O2-x. (authors)

  8. Enhanced thermoelectric efficiency via orthogonal electrical and thermal conductances in phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Ruixiang; Faghaninia, Alireza; Soklaski, Ryan; Yan, Jia-An; Lo, Cynthia; Yang, Li

    2014-11-12

    Thermoelectric devices that utilize the Seebeck effect convert heat flow into electrical energy and are highly desirable for the development of portable, solid state, passively powered electronic systems. The conversion efficiencies of such devices are quantified by the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT), which is proportional to the ratio of a device's electrical conductance to its thermal conductance. In this paper, a recently fabricated two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor called phosphorene (monolayer black phosphorus) is assessed for its thermoelectric capabilities. First-principles and model calculations reveal not only that phosphorene possesses a spatially anisotropic electrical conductance, but that its lattice thermal conductance exhibits a pronounced spatial-anisotropy as well. The prominent electrical and thermal conducting directions are orthogonal to one another, enhancing the ratio of these conductances. As a result, ZT may reach the criterion for commercial deployment along the armchair direction of phosphorene at T = 500 K and is close to 1 even at room temperature given moderate doping (∼2 × 10(16) m(-2) or 2 × 10(12) cm(-2)). Ultimately, phosphorene hopefully stands out as an environmentally sound thermoelectric material with unprecedented qualities. Intrinsically, it is a mechanically flexible material that converts heat energy with high efficiency at low temperatures (∼300 K), one whose performance does not require any sophisticated engineering techniques. PMID:25254626

  9. Investigations Regarding the Thermal Conductivity of Straw

    OpenAIRE

    Marian Pruteanu

    2010-01-01

    The reduction of buildings heat losses and pollutants emissions is a worldwide priority. It’s intending to reduce the specific final energy consumption under limit of 120...150 kWh/m2.yr and even under 15...45 kWh/m2.yr, foreseen in 2020 for the passive houses, which is necessary for a sustainable development and for allowing to became profitable the use of unconventional energies [1]. These values can be achieved through the use of thermal insulations, for protecting the constructions fund a...

  10. Analysis of thermal conductivity in tree-like branched networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kou Jian-Long; Lu Hang-Jun; Wu Feng-Min; Xu You-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric tree-like branched networks are explored by geometric algorithms.Based on the network,an analysis of the thermal conductivity is presented.The relationship between effective thermal conductivity and geometric structures is obtained by using the thermal-electrical analogy technique.In all studied cases,a clear behaviour is observed,where angle(δ,θ)among parent branching extended lines,branches and parameter of the geometric structures have stronger effects on the effective thermal conductivity.When the angle δ is fixed,the optical diameter ratio β* is dependent on angle θ.Moreover,γ and m are not related to β*.The longer the branch is,the smaller the effective thermal conductivity will be.It is also found that when the angle θ<δ/2,the higher the iteration m is,the lower the thermal conductivity will be and it tends to zero,otherwise,it is bigger than zero.When the diameter ratio β1<0.707 and angle δ is bigger,the optimal k of the perfect ratio increases with the increase of the angle δ;when β1>0.707,the optimal k decreases.In addition,the effective thermal conductivity is always less than that of single channel material.The present results also show that the effective thermal conductivity of the asymmetric tree-like branched networks does not obey Murray's law.

  11. Mirage technique in anisotropic solids

    OpenAIRE

    Quelin, X.; Perrin, B; Perrin, Bernard; Louis, G.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental analysis of heat diffusion in an anisotropic medium are presented. The solution of the 3D thermal conduction equation in an orthorhombic medium is calculated by the mean of a Fourier transforms method. Experiments were performed on an orthorhombic polydiacetylene single crystal sample. The temperature field at the sample surface was determined using the photothermal probe beam deflection technique. Then the 3 coefficients of the thermal conductivity tensor have be...

  12. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    To increase contact conductance between two mating surfaces, a conductive tape has been developed by growing dense arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, graphite layers folded into cylinders) on both sides of a thermally conductive metallic foil. When the two mating surfaces are brought into contact with the conductive tape in between, the CNT arrays will adhere to the mating surface. The van der Waals force between the contacting tubes and the mating surface provides adhesion between the two mating surfaces. Even though the thermal contact conductance of a single tube-to-tube contact is small, the tremendous amount of CNTs on the surface leads to a very large overall contact conductance. Interface contact thermal resistance rises from the microroughness and the macroscopic non-planar quality of mating surfaces. When two surfaces come into contact with each other, the actual contact area may be much less than the total area of the surfaces. The real area of contact depends on the load, the surface roughness, and the elastic and inelastic properties of the surface. This issue is even more important at cryogenic temperatures, where materials become hard and brittle and vacuum is used, which prevents any gas conduction through the interstitial region. A typical approach to increase thermal contact conductance is to use thermally conducting epoxies or greases, which are not always compatible with vacuum conditions. In addition, the thermal conductivities of these compounds are often relatively low. The CNTs used in this approach can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the folding angle and diameter. The electrical resistivity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been reported. MWCNTs can pass a current density and remain stable at high temperatures in air. The thermal conductivity of a MWCNT at room temperature is measured to be approximately 3,000 W/m-K, which is much larger than that of diamond. At room temperature, the thermal conductance of a 0.3 sq cm

  13. Model atmospheres and radiation of magnetic neutron stars: Anisotropic thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, G. G.; Shibanov, Yu. A.; Ventura, J.; Zavlin, V. E.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropy of the thermal radiation emitted by a surface element of a neutron star atmosphere (e.g., by a polar cap of a radio pulsar). Angular dependences of the partial fluxes at various photon energies, and spectra at various angles are obtained for different values of the effective temperature T(sub eff) and magnetic field strength B, and for different directions of the magnetic field. It is shown that the local radiation of the magnetized neutron star atmospheres is highly anisotropic, with the maximum flux emitted in the magnetic field direction. At high B the angular dependences in the soft X-ray range have two maxima, a high narrow peak along B and a lower and broader maximum at intermediate angles. The radiation is strongly polarized, the modulation of the degree of polarization due to the rotation of the neurtron star may be much higher than that for the radiative flux. The results obtained are compared with recent ROSAT observations of the thermal-like radiation from the radio pulsars PSR 1929+10 and PSR J0437-4715.

  14. Determination of Radiative Thermal Conductivity in Needlepunched Nonwovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Vallabh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation heat transfer is found to be the dominant mode of heat transfer at temperatures higher than 400-500K [11]. Convection heat transfer being negligible in nonwovens, effective thermal conductivity is given by the sum of its conduction and radiation components. In this research two methods were identified to determine radiative thermal conductivity of needlepunched samples made from Nomex fibers. The first method involved the determination of radiative thermal conductivity using effective (total thermal conductivity determined using a Guarded Hot Plate (GHP instrument. In the second method radiative thermal conductivity was estimated using the extinction coefficient of samples. The extinction coefficient was determined by using direct transmission measurements made using a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR spectrometer. Results confirmed that radiation was the dominant mode of heat transfer at temperatures higher than 535 K. The conduction component of effective thermal conductivity did not change much in the range of densities tested. Empirical models for predicting the temperature difference across thickness of the fabric and the radiative thermal conductivity with R-square values of 0.94 and 0.88 respectively showed that fabric density, fabric thickness, fiber fineness, fiber length, mean pore size and applied temperature were found to have significant effect on the effective thermal conductivity and its radiation component. Though a high correlation between the results of Method 1 (Guarded Hot Plate and Method 2 (FTIR was not seen, the absorbance measurements made using the FTIR spectrometer were found to have significant effect on the radiative thermal conductivity.

  15. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Tiancheng; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T L; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. However, to realize one advanced control function of thermal flux, one needs to design one sophisticated, multilayered and inhomogeneous thermal structure with different composition/shape at different regions of one device. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is al...

  16. Cs3W3PO13: A Tungsten Phosphate with One-Dimensional Zigzag Tunnels Exhibiting Strongly Anisotropic Thermal Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pifu; Jiang, Xingxing; Yang, Yi; Luo, Siyang; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng; Chen, Chuangtian; Lin, Zheshuai

    2016-06-01

    A new tungsten phosphate, Cs3W3PO13, is synthesized using the high-temperature flux method. Cs3W3PO13 crystallizes in the space group Pnma and contains one-dimensional zigzag tunnels, which are found for the first time in tungsten phosphate. This highly anisotropic structural feature results in a very strong anisotropic thermal expansion, with thermal expansion coefficients of 14.15 ± 1.11 and 0.72 ± 0.22 M K(-1) along the a and b axes, respectively, over the temperature range from 13 to 270 K. In addition, thermal analysis, UV-vis-near-IR diffuse reflectance, and first-principles electronic structure calculations on Cs3W3PO13 are performed. PMID:27182930

  17. Development of a thermal conductivity apparatus: Analysis and design

    OpenAIRE

    Eithun, Camilla Foyn

    2012-01-01

    This objective of this thesis has been to development and analysis a measurement apparatus designed to determine thermal conductivity of porous materials. A literature survey concerning available experimental techniques for thermal conductivity measurements was conducted. A steady state radial heat transfer method with cylindrical geometry and a centered heating element was found to be most suited technique for achieving accurate and reliable results. A side wall cooling arrangement was used ...

  18. Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube—polyamide-6,6 nanocomposites: Reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C.

    2011-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of composites of carbon nanotubes and polyamide-6,6 has been investigated using reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a full atomistic resolution. It is found, in line with experiments, that the composites have thermal conductivities, which are only moderately larger than that of pure polyamide. The composite conductivities are orders of magnitude less than what would be expected from naïve additivity arguments. This means that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of isolated nanotubes, which exceed the best-conducting metals, cannot be harnessed for heat transport, when the nanotubes are embedded in a polymer matrix. The main reason is the high interfacial thermal resistance between the nanotubes and the polymer, which was calculated in addition to the total composite thermal conductivity as well as that of the subsystem. It hinders heat to be transferred from the slow-conducting polymer into the fast-conducting nanotubes and back into the polymer. This interpretation is in line with the majority of recent simulation works. An alternative explanation, namely, the damping of the long-wavelength phonons in nanotubes by the polymer matrix is not supported by the present calculations. These modes provide most of the polymers heat conduction. An additional minor effect is caused by the anisotropic structure of the polymer phase induced by the nearby nanotube surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the polymer matrix increases slightly in the direction parallel to the nanotubes, whereas it decreases perpendicular to it.

  19. Acoustic transducer apparatus with reduced thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lierke, Ernst G. (Inventor); Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Bhat, Balakrishna T. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A horn is described for transmitting sound from a transducer to a heated chamber containing an object which is levitated by acoustic energy while it is heated to a molten state, which minimizes heat transfer to thereby minimize heating of the transducer, minimize temperature variation in the chamber, and minimize loss of heat from the chamber. The forward portion of the horn, which is the portion closest to the chamber, has holes that reduce its cross-sectional area to minimize the conduction of heat along the length of the horn, with the entire front portion of the horn being rigid and having an even front face to efficiently transfer high frequency acoustic energy to fluid in the chamber. In one arrangement, the horn has numerous rows of holes extending perpendicular to the length of horn, with alternate rows extending perpendicular to one another to form a sinuous path for the conduction of heat along the length of the horn.

  20. Thermal properties of conducting polypyrrole nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudajevová, A.; Varga, M.; Prokeš, J.; Kopecká, J.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 4 (2015), s. 730-736. ISSN 0587-4246. [ISPMA 13 - International Symposium on Physics of Materials /13./. Praha, 31.08.2014-04.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00270S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : conducting polymer * polyaniline * polypyrrole Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2014

  1. Steady heat conduction-based thermal conductivity measurement of single walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a micropipette thermal sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R.; Lee, K. M.; Chang, W. S.; Kim, D. S.; Rhee, G. H.; Choi, T. Y.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the thermal conductivity measurement of single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a laser point source-based steady state heat conduction method. A high precision micropipette thermal sensor fabricated with a sensing tip size varying from 2 μm to 5 μm and capable of measuring thermal fluctuation with resolution of ±0.01 K was used to measure the temperature gradient across the suspended carbon nanotubes (CNT) film with a thickness of 100 nm. We used a steady heat conduction model to correlate the temperature gradient to the thermal conductivity of the film. We measured the average thermal conductivity of CNT film as 74.3 ± 7.9 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature.

  2. THEORETICAL MODEL TO DETERMINE THE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF NANOFLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Mukesh Kumar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity is the key role in presenting the unique thermal properties of nanofluids. In this paper, a new thermal conductivity model is proposed based on the combination of statistical mechanism model and Brownian motion with the inclusion of particle critical size. This model is compared with Al2O3/water and CuO /water based nanofluids of spherical particles using the well known thermal conductivity models and the experimental results available in the open literature. This model is found fits well with the existing Brownian motion theoretical model and experimental results. It concludes that thermal conductivity is enhanced due to theeffect of shape, nanolayer and Brownian motion of the particles. The Brownian motion contribution is significant only when the particle size is less that that of critical size and optimum particle volume fraction.

  3. Correlations for thermal conductivity and viscosity of water based nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermo-physical properties of nanofluids such as thermal conductivity, viscosity, density and specific heat of nanofluids are required for the analysis of convection heat transfer coefficients. The density and specific heat of nanofluids can be estimated with the mixture relations in literature. Information regarding the properties at different volume concentration and temperature is required for the estimation of heat transfer coefficient. The two most fundamental properties which are, experimentally, determined, are viscosity and thermal conductivity. Investigators have been determining the properties of nanofluids at different temperatures and base liquids. The present work is an attempt to analyze the available data to develop a non-linear regression equation for the estimation of thermal conductivity and viscosity of water based nanofluids. In the present study, nanofluids are considered as a homogenous medium and the parameters influencing the thermo physical properties identified. Equations are developed for the analysis of thermo-physical properties of nanofluids as a function of parameters viz., material, concentration, temperature and particle size useful for designer. The opposing nature of thermal conductivity rise and viscosity decrease with temperature; dependence of nanofluid thermal conductivity on material properties alters the range of applicability of nanofluids for heat transfer applications. The thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al2O3, ZnO and TiO2 dispersed in water are measured to validate the proposed equations. The result shows that the equations are able to predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of different types of nanofluids of different particle diameters closely.

  4. Direct current electric potential in an anisotropic half-space with vertical contact containing a conductive 3D body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ping

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed studies of anomalous conductors in otherwise homogeneous media have been modelled. Vertical contacts form common geometries in galvanic studies when describing geological formations with different electrical conductivities on either side. However, previous studies of vertical discontinuities have been mainly concerned with isotropic environments. In this paper, we deal with the effect on the electric potentials, such as mise-à-la-masse anomalies, due to a conductor near a vertical contact between two anisotropic regions. We also demonstrate the interactive effects when the conductive body is placed across the vertical contact. This problem is normally very difficult to solve by the traditional numerical methods. The integral equations for the electric potential in anisotropic half-spaces are established. Green's function is obtained using the reflection and transmission image method in which five images are needed to fit the boundary conditions on the vertical interface and the air-earth surface. The effects of the anisotropy of the environments and the conductive body on the electric potential are illustrated with the aid of several numerical examples.

  5. Mussel-Inspired Anisotropic Nanocellulose and Silver Nanoparticle Composite with Improved Mechanical Properties, Electrical Conductivity and Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang-Linh Nguyen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Materials for wearable devices, tissue engineering and bio-sensing applications require both antibacterial activity to prevent bacterial infection and biofilm formation, and electrical conductivity to electric signals inside and outside of the human body. Recently, cellulose nanofibers have been utilized for various applications but cellulose itself has neither antibacterial activity nor conductivity. Here, an antibacterial and electrically conductive composite was formed by generating catechol mediated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs on the surface of cellulose nanofibers. The chemically immobilized catechol moiety on the nanofibrous cellulose network reduced Ag+ to form AgNPs on the cellulose nanofiber. The AgNPs cellulose composite showed excellent antibacterial efficacy against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, the catechol conjugation and the addition of AgNP induced anisotropic self-alignment of the cellulose nanofibers which enhances electrical and mechanical properties of the composite. Therefore, the composite containing AgNPs and anisotropic aligned the cellulose nanofiber may be useful for biomedical applications.

  6. Phase-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux Variation at the Core Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. M.; Ammann, M. W.; Stackhouse, S.; Wookey, J.; Brodholt, J. P.; Dobson, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    We have combined atomic scale simulations of thermal conductivity in MgSiO3 perovskite and post-perovskite with a models of texture development and temperature distribution in the lowermost mantle in order to better understand the constraints on the distribution of heat flux across the core mantle boundary (CMB). In order to calculate the thermal conductivity we make use of a simple non-equilibrium molecular dynamics scheme with the interactions between atoms described using density functional theory or one of two parameterised interatomic-potential based models. These simulations yield the thermal conductivity of the two phases as a function of pressure and temperature. Under the conditions expected in the lowermost mantle we find that the thermal conductivity of the post-perovskite phase (˜12 W/mK) is about 1.5 times larger than that of MgSiO3 perovskite (˜8.5 W/mK). This increase in conductivity is similar to that measured for the CaIrO3 analogue and sufficient, in simple models of convection, to increase the velocity of downwelling material and the asymmetry of the convective planform. The variation of thermal conductivity across the CMB, with high conductivity in cold post-perovskite bearing areas and low conductivity in hotter areas, also has implications for convection in the outer core. Effectively, areas containing post-perovskite appear even colder from the point of view of the heat flux out of the top of the core enhancing the thermal interaction between the core and mantle. The approach also yields the anisotropy of thermal conductivity tensor. We find that the perovskite phase is weakly anisotropic with conductivity along the c-axis about 10% higher than conductivity along the a-axis. In contrast the post-perovskite phase is found to be strongly anisotropic at relatively low temperature (1000 K) with conductivity along the a-axis about 40% higher than conductivity along the c-axis. However, the anisotropy decreases with increasing temperature and, by

  7. Development of high-thermal-conductivity silicon nitride ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    You Zhou; Hideki Hyuga; Dai Kusano; Yu-ichi Yoshizawa; Tatsuki Ohji; Kiyoshi Hirao

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) with high thermal conductivity has emerged as one of the most promising substrate materials for the next-generation power devices. This paper gives an overview on recent developments in preparing high-thermal-conductivity Si3N4 by a sintering of reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) method. Due to the reduction of lattice oxygen content, the SRBSN ceramics could attain substantially higher thermal conductivities than the Si3N4 ceramics prepared by the conventional ga...

  8. Remarkable Reduction of Thermal Conductivity in Silicon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2010-01-01

    We propose to reduce the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) by introducing small hole at the centre, i.e. construct silicon nanotube (SiNT) structures. Our numerical results demonstrate that a very small hole (only 1% reduction in cross section area) can induce a 35% reduction in room temperature thermal conductivity. Moreover, with the same cross section area, thermal conductivity of SiNT is only about 33% of that of SiNW at room temperature. The spatial distribution of vibrat...

  9. Fundamental physics issues of thermal conduction in nanoscale devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat dissipation is a key challenge in the development of nanoscale devices. In this paper we describe the state-of-the-art of nanoscale devices and some fundamental issues of nanoscale thermal conduction, using carbon nanotubes and graphene as examples. We then present various new interesting phenomena in this field. We also discuss the main physical mechanisms that influence the thermal conductivity of nanomaterials. An understanding of thermal conduction in low-dimensional systems is not only of fundamental interest in physics, but is also of great relevance to the development of nanoscale electronics, with a broad range of future applications. (authors)

  10. Thermal conductivity of oxide fuel under reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal conductivity and its temperature dependence for UO2 and (U,Pu) O2 under irradiation in nuclear reactor were reviewed and discussed. Fuel restructuring, oxygen redistribution, build-up of fission products and so forth occured in fuel pellets under irradiation were taken up as the facters having influence on thermal conductivity. Classifing roughly irradiation into low burn-up and high burn-up, increase or decrease of thermal conductivity due to the phenomenal changes in fuel pellets was speculated. (author)

  11. Thermal conductivity as a probe of unconventional superconducting gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubin, H. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Lab. de Phys. des Solides; Behnia, K. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Lab. de Phys. des Solides; Ribault, M. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Lab. de Phys. des Solides; Taillefer, L. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Gagnon, R. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    We have carried out a comparative study of the thermal conductivity of two rectangular single crystals: a niobium sample and a detwinned YBCO. Thermal conductivity was measured as a function of the relative orientation of the crystaline axes and a magnetic field applied parallel to the sample plane. Different angular variations, two-fold for Nb and four-fold for YBCO, were observed in the two case. We discuss the microscopic effects related to the gap structure which are at the origin of this qualitative difference in the behavior of thermal conductivity in these two superconductors. (orig.)

  12. Thermal conductivity as a probe of unconventional superconducting gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out a comparative study of the thermal conductivity of two rectangular single crystals: a niobium sample and a detwinned YBCO. Thermal conductivity was measured as a function of the relative orientation of the crystaline axes and a magnetic field applied parallel to the sample plane. Different angular variations, two-fold for Nb and four-fold for YBCO, were observed in the two case. We discuss the microscopic effects related to the gap structure which are at the origin of this qualitative difference in the behavior of thermal conductivity in these two superconductors. (orig.)

  13. Phonon Transport and Thermal Conductivity in an Acoustic Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jian-Duo; SHAO Liang; HOU Yang-Lai; YI Lin

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the phonon ballistic transmission and the thermal conductivity in a dielectric quantum structure.It is found that these observable quantities sensitively depend on geometric parameters, and are of quantum character. The total transmission coefficient as a function of the reduced waveguide-length exhibits periodical belaviour and the reduced thermal conductance decreases below the ideal universal value for the low temperature.Our results show that one can control the thermal conductivity of the structure and make all kinds of acoustic filters to match practical requirements in devices by adjustingthe geometric parameters.

  14. Laser X-ray Conversion and Electron Thermal Conductivity*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The influence of electron thermal conductivity on the laser x-ray conversion in the coupling of 3ωo laser with Au plane target has been investigated by using a non-LTE radiation hydrodynamic code. The non-local electron thermal conductivity is introduced and compared with the other two kinds of the flux-limited Spitzer-Harm description. The results show that the non-local thermal conductivity causes the increase of the laser x-ray conversion efficiency andimportant changes of the plasma state and coupling feature

  15. Parametrisation of the niobium thermal conductivity in the superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal conductivity measurements of niobium sheets manufactured for deep-drawing of superconducting cavities have been gathered. An attempt is made to obtain an analytical expression with realistic parameters for the thermal conductivity between 1.8 K and 9.25 K. The set of parameters deduced from a least square fit of experimental data is not very different from those yielded by the theory of superconducting metals, taken as a starting point. This should make possible to obtain a reasonable guess of the thermal conductivity of niobium in this temperature range, once the RRR and the past history of the metal samples have been determined. (author)

  16. Low temperature thermal hall conductivity of a nodal chiral superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Sungkit

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by Sr2RuO4, we consider a chiral superconductor where the gap is strongly suppressed along certain momentum directions. We evaluate the thermal Hall conductivity in the gapless regime, i.e., at low temperature compared with the impurity band width γ, taking the simplest model of isotropic impurity scattering. We find that, under favorable circumstances, this thermal Hall conductivity can be quite significant and is smaller than the diagonal component (the universal thermal conductivity) only by a factor of 1/{ln}(2{{{Δ }}}M/γ ), where {{{Δ }}}M is the maximum gap.

  17. The contribution of thermal radiation to the thermal conductivity of porous UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of cylindrical, spherical and ellipsoidal inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity was computed with the finite element technique. The results of these calculations were compared with equations that describe the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity. The analytical equation of Schulz that describes the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity is in good agreement with the results of the finite element computations. This good agreement shows that among a variety of porosity correction formulas, the equation of Schulz gives the best description of the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity. This equation and the results of finite element calculations allow us to compute the contribution of radiation to the overall thermal conductivity of UO2 with oblate ellipsoidal porosity. The present radiation calculations show that Hayes and Peddicord overestimated the contribution of thermal radiation to the thermal conductivity. (orig.)

  18. In-Pile Thermal Conductivity Measurement Method for Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy L. Rempe; Brandon Fox; Heng Ban; Joshua E. Daw; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie

    2009-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of advanced nuclear fuels and materials during irradiation must be known prior to their use in existing, advanced, or next generation reactors. Thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties for predicting fuel and material performance. A joint Utah State University (USU) / Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project, which is being conducted with assistance from the Institute for Energy Technology at the Norway Halden Reactor Project, is investigating in-pile fuel thermal conductivity measurement methods. This paper focuses on one of these methods – a multiple thermocouple method. This two-thermocouple method uses a surrogate fuel rod with Joule heating to simulate volumetric heat generation to gain insights about in-pile detection of thermal conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that this method can measure thermal conductivity over a specific temperature range. This paper reports the thermal conductivity values obtained by this technique and compares these values with thermal property data obtained from standard thermal property measurement techniques available at INL’s High Test Temperature Laboratory. Experimental results and material properties data are also compared to finite element analysis results.

  19. Analysis of thermal conductivity in tree-like branched networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asymmetric tree-like branched networks are explored by geometric algorithms. Based on the network, an analysis of the thermal conductivity is presented. The relationship between effective thermal conductivity and geometric structures is obtained by using the thermal-electrical analogy technique. In all studied cases, a clear behaviour is observed, where angle (δ, θ) among parent branching extended lines, branches and parameter of the geometric structures have stronger effects on the effective thermal conductivity. When the angle δ is fixed, the optical diameter ratio β* is dependent on angle θ. Moreover, γ and m are not related to β*. The longer the branch is, the smaller the effective thermal conductivity will be. It is also found that when the angle θ 1 1 > 0.707, the optimal k decreases. In addition, the effective thermal conductivity is always less than that of single channel material. The present results also show that the effective thermal conductivity of the asymmetric tree-like branched networks does not obey Murray's law. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  20. Thermal conductivity of polymer composites with oriented boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity depended on the orientation of BN in the polymer matrices. • Hexagonal boron nitride (BN) particles were treated by C27H27N3O2 and C14H6O8. • Amphiphilic-agent-treated BN particles are more easily oriented in the composite. • BN/PVA composites with C14H6O8-treated BN showed the highest thermal conductivity. • Thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with several theoretical models. - Abstract: Thermal conductivity of boron nitride (BN) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and/or polyvinyl butyral (PVB) was investigated as a function of the degree of BN orientation, the numbers of hydroxyl groups in the polymer matrices and the amphiphilic agents used. The composites with in-plane orientation of BN showed a higher thermal conductivity than the composites with out-of-plane orientation of BN due to the increase of thermal pathway. For a given BN content, the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVA showed higher thermal conductivity than the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVB. This result could be attributed to the improved degree of orientation of BN, caused by a larger number of hydroxyl groups being present. Those treated with C14H6O8 amphiphilic agent demonstrated a higher thermal conductivity than those treated by C27H27N3O2. The measured thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with that predicted by the several theoretical models

  1. Measurement of thermal conductivity of uranium silicide - aluminum dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conjunction with reducing enrichment program for JMTR, thermal conductivity of uranium silicide - aluminum (U3Si2-Al) dispersion fuel was measured in the temperature range of 25degC ∼ 400degC for the safety evaluation of low enriched uranium fuel. Since thermal conductivity is determined as the product of thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and density, these three properties were individually measured. Thermal diffusivity and heat capacity of the specimen were measured by the laser flash method. Temperature dependence of density was obtained by measuring the thermal linear expansion with differential dilatometer. Obtained results show that conductivity of the U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel slightly increases as temperature increases, and tends to reach the maximum around 300degC. (author)

  2. Thermal conductivity measurements at cryogenic temperatures at LASA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here the improvement realised to have better control of the reference junction temperature and measurements carried out on Nb3Sn cut out from 2 different coils (named LASA3 and LASA5), showing the difference between the longitudinal and the transverse thermal conductivity, is described. Two different methods of data analysis are presented, the DAM (derivative approximated method) and the TCI (thermal conductivity integral. The data analysis for the tungsten and the LASA5 coil has been done according to the two methods showing that the TCI method with polynomial functions is not adequate to describe the thermal conductivity. Only a polynomial fit based on the TCI method but limited at a lower order than the nominal, when the data are well distributed along the range of measurements, can describe reasonably the thermal conductivity dependence with the temperature. Finally the measurements on a rod of BSCCO 2212 high Tc superconductor are presented

  3. Prediction of thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks from well logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of heat-flow density in boreholes requires reliable values for the change of temperature and rock thermal conductivity with depth. As rock samples for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity (TC) are usually rare geophysical well logs are used alternatively to determine TC...... major physical parameters (i.e. thermal conductivity, density, hydrogen index, sonic interval transit time, gamma-ray response, photoelectric factor) of artificial mineral assemblages consisting 15 rock-forming minerals that are used in different combinations to typify sedimentary rocks. The predictive...... capacity of the new equations is evaluated on subsurface data from four boreholes drilled into the Mesozoic sequence of the North German Basin, including more than 1700 laboratory-measured thermal-conductivity values. Results are compared with those from other approaches published in the past. The new...

  4. Theoretical Studies of Interactions Between TATB Molecules and the Origins of Anisotropic Thermal Expansion and Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, R H; Roszak, S M; Fried, L E

    2002-03-28

    TATB containing explosives tend to permanently expand as their temperatures are increased or thermally cycled, a phenomenon known as ''ratchet-growth.'' Several mechanisms as to the cause of the non-reversible growth have been proposed, and are taken up here using various different modeling techniques. High-level quantum chemistry calculations have been used in parameterization of a classical potential function suitable for atomistic simulations of TATB. The quantum-chemistry-based force field for TATB was validated by comparing condensed phase properties obtained from molecular dynamics simulations with available experimental data. No permanent growth was manifest at the molecular level. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations were carried out in order to study the geometric packing effects on the mesoscopic scale, similar to the scales representative of Ultrafine. No permanent growth was identified when only simple packing effects were considered in the TATB model. However, non-reversible growth was displayed when crystal fracture capabilities were incorporated in the model, suggesting that crystal fracture induced by the anisotropic volume expansion of TATB is the root cause for the permanent growth seen in TATB containing explosives.

  5. Thermal conductivity of microPCMs-filled epoxy matrix composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, J.F.; Wang, X.Y; Huang, Z.; Zhao, Y.H.; Yuan, X.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The thermal conductivity of these microPCMs/matrix composites is an important property need to be considered. In this study, a series of

  6. Thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal contact conductance of a 0.4 micrometer surface finish OFHC copper sample pair has been investigated from 1.6 to 3.8 K for a range of applied contact forces up to 670 N. Experimental data have been fitted to the relation for the integral alpha T to the nth power dt by assuming that the thermal contact conductance is a simple power function of the sample temperature. It has been found that the conductance is proportional to T squared and that conductance increases with an increase in applied contact force. These results confirm earlier work

  7. Thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salerno, L.J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A.L.

    1983-05-01

    The thermal contact conductance of a 0.4 micrometer surface finish OFHC copper sample pair has been investigated from 1.6 to 3.8 K for a range of applied contact forces up to 670 N. Experimental data have been fitted to the relation for the integral alpha T to the nth power dt by assuming that the thermal contact conductance is a simple power function of the sample temperature. It has been found that the conductance is proportional to T squared and that conductance increases with an increase in applied contact force. These results confirm earlier work.

  8. Analysis of effective thermal conductivity of fibrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futschik, Michael W.; Witte, Larry C.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to gain a better understanding of the various mechanisms of heat transfer through fibrous materials and to gain insight into how fill-gas pressure influences the effective thermal conductivity. By way of first principles and some empiricism, two mathematical models are constructed to correlate experimental data. The data are obtained from a test series measuring the effective thermal conductivity of Nomex using a two-sided guarded hot-plate heater apparatus. Tests are conducted for certain mean temperatures and fill-gases over a range of pressures varying from vacuum to atmospheric conditions. The models are then evaluated to determine their effectiveness in representing the effective thermal conductivity of a fibrous material. The models presented herein predict the effective thermal conductivity of Nomex extremely well. Since the influence of gas conduction is determined to be the most influential component in predicting the effective thermal conductivity of a fibrous material, an improved representation of gas conduction is developed. Finally, some recommendations for extension to other random-oriented fiber materials are made concerning the usefulness of each model depending on their advantages and disadvantages.

  9. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF OAK IMPREGNATED WITH SOME CHEMICALS AND FINISHED

    OpenAIRE

    Hamiyet Şahin Kol; Burhanettin Uysal; Şeref Kurt; Cemal Ozcan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of some impregnation materials and varnishes on the thermal conductivity of oak wood. Ammonium sulfate, borax, boric acid, zinc chloride, diammonium phosphate, and sodium silicate as impregnation chemicals and polyurethane, cellulosic, synthetic, coloured varnishes and cellulosic, synthetic, industrial paints as finishes were used. The wood materials were impregnated by using the vacuum-pressure method. The thermal conductivity tes...

  10. Flutter interpretation of thermal conduction with application to Alcator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previously presented magnetic fluctuation interpretation of anomalous thermal conduction in Tokamaks is extended to the high field, high density regime of Alcator. Density fluctuations are fully taken into account but found not to significantly alter the predictions. If the electron parallel thermal conductivity is corrected for high Knudsen number effects, it is found that the mean squared relative magnetic fluctuation level must scale as (density)-2, to fit Alcator scaling. (author)

  11. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Tri-Isotropic (TRISO) Fuel Compacts

    OpenAIRE

    Folsom, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal conductivity is an important thermophysical property needed for effectively predicting nuclear fuel performance. As part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, the thermal conductivity of tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel needs to be measured over a temperature range characteristic of its usage. The composite nature of TRISO fuel requires that measurement be performed over the entire length of the compact in a non-destructive manner. No existing measurement system is capable of...

  12. Studies and Properties of Ceramics with High Thermal Conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The sintering technology of the AlN ceramics power were discussed. It is discussed that the compound sintering aids is consistent with the enhancement of the the thermal conductivity of AlN ceramics, and sintering technics is helped to the improvement of density. It is analyzed how to sinter machinable AlN ceramics with high thermal conductivity. And the microstructure of compound ceramics based on AlN was studied.

  13. APPLICATION OF NUMERICAL SIMULATION TO STUDY ON THERMAL CONDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Zhu; Z. Xu; D.E. Wu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, using computer simulation and mathematic experiment method to solve the simplified one dimensional thermal conduction equation and to obtain the temperature distribution in a metal bar when its one end was heated. According to principle of hot expansion, a holograph of temperature distribution in the bar by laser holotechnique was taken. The results of numerical simulation and experiments are in good agreement and a new method for study on thermal conduction by laser holo-technique was found.

  14. Thermal conductivity of color-flavor locked quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Braby, Matt; Chao, Jingyi; Schaefer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We compute the thermal conductivity of color-flavor locked (CFL) quark matter. At temperatures below the scale set by the gap in the quark spectrum, transport properties are determined by collective modes. In this work we focus on the contribution from the lightest modes, the superfluid phonon and the massive neutral kaon. The calculation is done in the framework of kinetic theory, using variational solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation. We find that the thermal conductivity due to p...

  15. Mechanism of Thermal Conductivity Reduction in Few-Layer Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Druv; Murthy, Jayathi Y.; Fisher, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Using the linearized Boltzmann transport equation and perturbation theory, we analyze the reduction in the intrinsic thermal conductivity of few-layer graphene sheets accounting for all possible three-phonon scattering events. Even with weak coupling between layers, a significant reduction in the thermal conductivity of the out-of-plane acoustic modes is apparent. The main effect of this weak coupling is to open many new three-phonon scattering channels that are otherwise absent in graphene. ...

  16. Thermal conductivity of ZnTe investigated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of ZnTe with zinc-blende structure has been computed by equilibrium molecular dynamics method based on Green-Kubo formalism. A Tersoff's potential is adopted in the simulation to model the atomic interactions. The calculations are performed as a function of temperature up to 800 K. The calculated thermal conductivities are in agreement with the experimental values between 150 K and 300 K, while the results above the room temperature are comparable with the Slack's equation.

  17. Calculation of nanowire thermal conductivity using complete phonon dispersion relations

    OpenAIRE

    Mingo, N.

    2003-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity of crystalline Si nanowires is calculated. The calculation uses complete phonon dispersions, and does not require any externally imposed frequency cutoffs. No adjustment to nanowire thermal conductivity measurements is required. Good agreement with experimental results for nanowires wider than 35 nm is obtained. A formulation in terms of the transmission function is given. Also, the use of a simpler, nondispersive "Callaway formula", is discussed from the comp...

  18. Identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weizhen; Yi, Fajun; Zhu, Yanwei; Meng, Songhe

    2016-07-01

    A modified Levenberg–Marquardt method (LMM) for the identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is proposed; the experiment and structure of the specimen for identification are also designed. The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of copper C10200 and brass C28000 are identified to verify the effectiveness of the proposed identification method. The comparison between identified results and the measured data of laser flash diffusivity apparatus indicates the fine consistency and potential usage of the proposed method.

  19. Fractional Heat Conduction Models and Thermal Diffusivity Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Žecová; Ján Terpák

    2015-01-01

    The contribution deals with the fractional heat conduction models and their use for determining thermal diffusivity. A brief historical overview of the authors who have dealt with the heat conduction equation is described in the introduction of the paper. The one-dimensional heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are listed. Analytical and numerical methods of solution of the heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are d...

  20. Effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of two layer samples in photoacoustic expermients

    OpenAIRE

    G. González de la Cruz; Gurevich, Yu. G.; Logvinov, G. N.; N. Muñoz Aguirre

    2000-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are determined in one-dimensional bounded two-layer sample within the model of photoacoustic experiments. A new approach for calculating these thermal parameters is suggested. It is shown that effective parameters depend not only on the physical properties of separate layers ,but on the manner of measuring these parameters and the points of measurements. Therefore, there exist several values of effective thermal conductivity and therm...

  1. Maneuvering thermal conductivity of magnetic nanofluids by tunable magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaykumar; Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2015-06-01

    We report an experimental investigation of magnetic field dependent thermal conductivity of a transformer oil base magnetic fluid as a function of volume fractions. In the absence of magnetic field, thermal conductivity increases linearly with an increase in volume fraction, and magnitude of thermal conductivity thus obtained is lower than that predicted by Maxwell's theory. This reveals the presence of clusters/oligomers in the system. On application of magnetic field, it exhibits a non-monotonous increase in thermal conductivity. The results are interpreted using the concept of a two-step homogenization method (which is based on differential effective medium theory). The results show a transformation of particle cluster configuration from long chain like prolate shape to the aggregated drop-like structure with increasing concentration as well as a magnetic field. The aggregated drop-like structure for concentrated system is supported by optical microscopic images. This shape change of clusters reduces thermal conductivity enhancement. Moreover, this structure formation is observed as a dynamic phenomenon, and at 226 mT field, the length of the structure extends with time, becomes maximum, and then reduces. This change results in the increase or decrease of thermal conductivity.

  2. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF OAK IMPREGNATED WITH SOME CHEMICALS AND FINISHED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamiyet Şahin Kol

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of some impregnation materials and varnishes on the thermal conductivity of oak wood. Ammonium sulfate, borax, boric acid, zinc chloride, diammonium phosphate, and sodium silicate as impregnation chemicals and polyurethane, cellulosic, synthetic, coloured varnishes and cellulosic, synthetic, industrial paints as finishes were used. The wood materials were impregnated by using the vacuum-pressure method. The thermal conductivity test was performed based on the ASTM C 1113-99 hot-wire method. Results showed that the impregnation chemicals increased the thermal conductivity. The highest values were obtained with boric acid and sodium silicate. In addition, the thermal conductivity of painted oak was higher than that of varnished oak. The lowest thermal conductivity of 0.1465 Kcal/mh°C was obtained with the oak control. The highest thermal conductivity of 0.1756 Kcal/mh°C was obtained when oak was painted with industrial paint and impregnated with boric acid.

  3. Optimization of volume to point conduction problem based on a novel thermal conductivity discretization algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjing Du; Peili Wang; Lipeng Song; Lin Cheng

    2015-01-01

    A conduction heat transfer process is enhanced by filling prescribed quantity and optimized-shaped high thermal conductivity materials to the substrate. Numerical simulations and analyses are performed on a volume to point conduction problem based on the principle of minimum entropy generation. In the optimization, the arrange-ment of high thermal conductivity materials is variable, the quantity of high thermal-conductivity material is constrained, and the objective is to obtain the maximum heat conduction rate as the entropy is the minimum. A novel algorithm of thermal conductivity discretization is proposed based on large quantity of calculations. Compared with other algorithms in literature, the average temperature in the substrate by the new algorithm is lower, while the highest temperature in the substrate is in a reasonable range. Thus the new algorithm is fea-sible. The optimization of volume to point heat conduction is carried out in a rectangular model with radiation boundary condition and constant surface temperature boundary condition. The results demonstrate that the al-gorithm of thermal conductivity discretization is applicable for volume to point heat conduction problems.

  4. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  5. Thermal conductivity of zirconia-based ceramics for thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowering the thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings used to protect blade and vane airfoils represents an important challenge for gas turbine designers and manufacturers. Dense zirconia-based materials have been prepared by solid state reaction methods to determine their thermal properties up to 1000 C. Partially stabilised zirconias having a thermal conductivity 40 % lower than the thermal conductivity of the most widely used system (ZrO2-8wt.%Y2O3) have been obtained. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Prediction of effective thermal conductivity of moist wood concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouguerra, A.

    1999-06-01

    From the set of existing models available for predicting the thermal conductivity of porous materials such as soils, building materials, etc. two models based on two different approaches have been selected in order to estimate the thermal conductivity of moist wood concrete. The first model is based on the strictly mathematical solution to the heat conduction equation using a continuous medium approximation. The second employs the Ohm's law approach. Besides the characteristics of the various phases, such as each phase's thermal conductivity and its volume fraction, both the Pande and Gori and the Jackson and Black models take into account the geometrical arrangement of the particles by introducing a morphological parameter such as the coefficient of effective continuous medium, P and the stereological concept of contiguity, respectively. A new parameter named the liquid-liquid contiguity has been introduced to preserve the validity of the model as proposed by Jackson and Black for saturation greater than 0.9. Based on the same electrical analogy as Jackson and Black, an expression for calculating the effective thermal conductivity of unsaturated material has been proposed. A new coaxial thermal probe, developed at the LTHE (France), has been used for measuring thermal conductivity at various moisture contents. One original feature of the corresponding probe is its very low mass by unit length - less than 10 g m-1. It allows for taking measurements even if the thermal contact is very poor. Calculated values of the effective thermal conductivity of these materials have been compared with experimental measurements. These models are found to yield predictions which agree quite closely with experimental data for wood concrete for different amounts of wood aggregates and saturation degrees.

  7. Analysis of measurements of the thermal conductivity of liquid urania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis was performed of the three existing measurements of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of molten uranium dioxide. A transient heat transfer code [THTB] was used for this analysis. A much smaller range of values for thermal conductivity than originally reported was found: the original values ranged from 2.4 to 11 W . m-1 . K-1, with a mean of 7.3 W . m-1 . K-1, whereas the recalculated values ranged from 4.5 to 6.75 W . m-1 . K-1, with a mean of 5.6 W . m-1 . K-1

  8. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF NON-REPOSITORY LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC LAYERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This model report addresses activities described in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport Thermal Properties and Analysis Reports Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171708]). The model develops values for thermal conductivity, and its uncertainty, for the nonrepository layers of Yucca Mountain; in addition, the model provides estimates for matrix porosity and dry bulk density for the nonrepository layers. The studied lithostratigraphic units, as identified in the ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM 2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]), are the Timber Mountain Group, the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Yucca Mountain Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, the Topopah Spring Tuff (excluding the repository layers), the Calico Hills Formation, the Prow Pass Tuff, the Bullfrog Tuff, and the Tram Tuff. The deepest model units of the GFM (Tund and Paleozoic) are excluded from this study because no data suitable for model input are available. The parameter estimates developed in this report are used as input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. Specifically, analysis model reports that use product output from this report are: (1) Drift-scale coupled processes (DST and TH seepage) models; (2) Drift degradation analysis; (3) Multiscale thermohydrologic model; and (4) Ventilation model and analysis report. In keeping with the methodology of the thermal conductivity model for the repository layers in ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]), the Hsu and others (1995 [DIRS 158073]) three-dimensional (3-D) cubic model (referred to herein as ''the Hsu model'') was used to represent the matrix thermal conductivity as a function of the four parameters (matrix porosity, thermal conductivity of the saturating fluid, thermal conductivity of the solid, and geometric connectivity of the solid). The Hsu model requires input data from each test specimen to meet three specific conditions: (1) Known value

  9. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF NON-REPOSITORY LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC LAYERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. JONES

    2004-10-22

    This model report addresses activities described in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport Thermal Properties and Analysis Reports Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171708]). The model develops values for thermal conductivity, and its uncertainty, for the nonrepository layers of Yucca Mountain; in addition, the model provides estimates for matrix porosity and dry bulk density for the nonrepository layers. The studied lithostratigraphic units, as identified in the ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM 2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]), are the Timber Mountain Group, the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Yucca Mountain Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, the Topopah Spring Tuff (excluding the repository layers), the Calico Hills Formation, the Prow Pass Tuff, the Bullfrog Tuff, and the Tram Tuff. The deepest model units of the GFM (Tund and Paleozoic) are excluded from this study because no data suitable for model input are available. The parameter estimates developed in this report are used as input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. Specifically, analysis model reports that use product output from this report are: (1) Drift-scale coupled processes (DST and TH seepage) models; (2) Drift degradation analysis; (3) Multiscale thermohydrologic model; and (4) Ventilation model and analysis report. In keeping with the methodology of the thermal conductivity model for the repository layers in ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]), the Hsu et al. (1995 [DIRS 158073]) three-dimensional (3-D) cubic model (referred to herein as ''the Hsu model'') was used to represent the matrix thermal conductivity as a function of the four parameters (matrix porosity, thermal conductivity of the saturating fluid, thermal conductivity of the solid, and geometric connectivity of the solid). The Hsu model requires input data

  10. Voltage tunability of thermal conductivity in ferroelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Hopkins, Patrick Edward

    2016-02-09

    A method to control thermal energy transport uses mobile coherent interfaces in nanoscale ferroelectric films to scatter phonons. The thermal conductivity can be actively tuned, simply by applying an electrical potential across the ferroelectric material and thereby altering the density of these coherent boundaries to directly impact thermal transport at room temperature and above. The invention eliminates the necessity of using moving components or poor efficiency methods to control heat transfer, enabling a means of thermal energy control at the micro- and nano-scales.

  11. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  12. Thermal and tensile strength testing of thermally-conductive adhesives and carbon foam

    CERN Document Server

    Chertok, Maxwell; Irving, Michael; Neher, Christian; Shi, Mengyao; Tolfa, Kirk; Tripathi, Mani; Vinson, Yasmeen; Wang, Ruby; Zheng, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Future collider detectors, including silicon tracking detectors planned for the High Luminosity LHC, will require components and mechanical structures providing unprecedented strength-to-mass ratios, thermal conductivity, and radiation tolerance. This paper studies carbon foam used in conjunction with thermally conductive epoxy and thermally conductive tape for such applications. Thermal conductivity and tensile strength measurements of aluminum-carbon foam-adhesive stacks are reported. Initial radiation damage tests are also presented. These results can inform bonding method choices for future tracking detectors.

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between nanoparticles and amorphous and crystalline polymer matrices. Bulk thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites were then estimated using an established effective medium approach. To study functionalization, oligomeric ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were chemically bonded to a single wall carbon nanotube. The results, in a poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) matrix, are similar to those obtained previously for grafted linear hydrocarbon chains. To study the effect of noncovalent functionalization, two types of polyethylene matrices. -- aligned (extended-chain crystalline) vs. amorphous (random coils) were modeled. Both matrices produced the same interfacial thermal resistance values. Finally, functionalization of edges and faces of plate-like graphite nanoparticles was found to be only modestly effective in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance and improving the composite thermal conductivity

  14. Thermal Conductivity behavior of MWCNT based PMMA and PC composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Girija; Jindal, Prashant; Bhandari, Rajiv; Dhiman, Neha; Bajaj, Chetan; Jindal, Vijay

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and Polycarbonate (PC) are low cost polymer materials which can be easily transformed into desired shapes for various applications. However they have poor mechanical, thermal and electrical properties which are required to be enhanced to widen their scope of applications specifically where along with high strength, rapid heat transfer is essential. Multi Walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are excellent new materials having extraordinary mechanical and transport properties. We will report results of fabricating composites of varying compositions of MWCNTs with PMMA and PC and their thermal conductivity behaviour using simple transient heat flow methods. The samples in disk shapes of around 2 cm diameters and 0.2 cm thickness with MWCNT compositions varying up to 10 wt% were fabricated. We found that both PMMA and PC measured high thermal conductivity with increase in the composition of CNTs. The thermal conductivity of 10wt% MWCNT/PMMA composite increased by nearly two times in comparison to pure PMMA.

  15. Low Frequency Thermal Conductivity in Micro Phononic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Virgilio; Arantes, Alison

    2015-03-01

    We study theoretically the cumulative thermal conductivity of a micro phononic crystal at low temperature regime. The phononic crystal considered presents carbon microtubes inclusions arranged periodically in a two-dimensional square lattice embebed in soft elastic matrix. Moderate and high impedance mismatch are considered concerning the material composition. The low frequency phonon spectra (up to tens of GHz) are obtained solving the generalized wave equation for inhomogeneous media within the Plane Wave Expansion method. We consider low temperatures in order to increase the participation of GHz thermal phonons. We observed suppression in the cumulative thermal conductivity at the band gap region and thus a reduction of thermal conductivity of the phononic crystal when compared with the bulk matrix. The authors would like to thank the Brazilian agencies, National Council of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq), Foundation for Research Support of Minas Gerais (FAPEMIG) and CAPES for their support.

  16. Thermal conductivity of boron carbide-boron nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that because of their preferred orientation, the addition of boron nitride dispersions to hot-pressed boron carbide was found to result in a considerable degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity of the resulting composite, indicated by an increase in the thermal conductivity perpendicular to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 3 at the highest boron nitride volume fractions of this study, and a decrease in the thermal conductivity parallel to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 2. The composite data were found to be below the values expected from composite theory, which may represent indirect evidence for the existence of an interfacial thermal barrier

  17. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers. PMID:26911859

  18. Pretest Calculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J · m-3 · K-1), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result

  19. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers.

  20. Interfacial Thermal Conductance of Thiolate-Protected Gold Nanospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Stocker, Kelsey M; Gezelter, J Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of thiolate-protected and solvated gold nanoparticles were carried out in the presence of a non-equilibrium heat flux between the solvent and the core of the particle. The interfacial thermal conductance ($G$) was computed for these interfaces, and the behavior of the thermal conductance was studied as a function of particle size, ligand flexibility, and ligand chain length. In all cases, thermal conductance of the ligand-protected particles was higher than the bare metal-solvent interface. A number of mechanisms for the enhanced conductance were investigated, including thiolate-driven corrugation of the metal surface, solvent ordering at the interface, solvent-ligand interpenetration, and ligand ordering relative to the particle surface. Only the smallest particles exhibited significant corrugation. All ligands permitted substantial solvent-ligand interpenetration, and ligand chain length has a significant influence on the orientational ordering of interfacial solvent. Solvent-...

  1. Thermal conductance of nanofluids: is the controversy over?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade nanofluids (colloidal suspensions of solid nanoparticles) sparked excitement as well as controversy. In particular, a number of researches reported dramatic increases of thermal conductivity with small nanoparticle loading, while others showed moderate increases consistent with the effective medium theories on well-dispersed conductive spheres. Accordingly, the mechanism of thermal conductivity enhancement is a hotly debated topic. We present a critical analysis of the experimental data in terms of the potential mechanisms and show that, by accounting for linear particle aggregation, the well established effective medium theories for composite materials are capable of explaining the vast majority of the reported data without resorting to novel mechanisms such as Brownian motion induced nanoconvection, liquid layering at the interface, or near-field radiation. However, particle aggregation required to significantly enhance thermal conductivity, also increases fluid viscosity rendering the benefit of nanofluids to flow based cooling applications questionable.

  2. Steady heat conduction-based thermal conductivity measurement of single walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a micropipette thermal sensor

    OpenAIRE

    R. Shrestha; Lee, K. M.; Chang, W. S.; Kim, D. S.; Rhee, G H; Choi, T. Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the thermal conductivity measurement of single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a laser point source-based steady state heat conduction method. A high precision micropipette thermal sensor fabricated with a sensing tip size varying from 2 μm to 5 μm and capable of measuring thermal fluctuation with resolution of ±0.01 K was used to measure the temperature gradient across the suspended carbon nanotubes (CNT) film with a thickness of 100 nm. We used a steady he...

  3. Electric and thermal conductivities of quenched neutron star crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Shuji; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1990-01-01

    The electric and thermal conductivities in the outer crustal matter of a neutron star quenched into a solid state by cooling are estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of freezing transition for dense plasmas. The conductivities are calculated by the precise evaluation of the scattering integrals, using the procedure of Ichimaru et al. (1983) and Iyetomi and Ichimaru (1983). The results predict the conductivities lower, by a factor of about 3, than those with the single-phonon approximation.

  4. Dependence of thermal conductivity of snow on microstructure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Satyawali; A K Singh

    2008-08-01

    A geometrical model,including different geometrical shapes in fluencing thermal conductivity of snow is proposed.The geometrical model has been assumed to comprise of unit cells having solid (ice)inclusion as an aggregation of spherical,cylindrical or cubical shapes with vertical connection, arranged in a cubic packing.From the geometrical model and one-dimensional heat transfer theory, the effective thermal conductivity has been computed.For this purpose,coupled one-dimensional heat transfer equations have been solved for steady-state condition to account for conduction in ice, conduction in air and latent heat transfer due to water vapour sublimation through air.The model demonstrates the dependency of thermal conductivity on density,grain-spacing,grain contact ratio and temperature.Spherical inclusions give highest conductivity while cubical inclusion estimates lowest value for the same density.Thermal conductivity has been found increasing sharply near to the packing density for all three shapes.Empirical model results and results obtained from existing microstructure based models have also been compared with the present model.

  5. Reduction of thermal conductivity in phononic nanomesh structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jen-Kan

    2010-07-25

    Controlling the thermal conductivity of a material independently of its electrical conductivity continues to be a goal for researchers working on thermoelectric materials for use in energy applications1,2 and in the cooling of integrated circuits3. In principle, the thermal conductivity κ and the electrical conductivity σ may be independently optimized in semiconducting nanostructures because different length scales are associated with phonons (which carry heat) and electric charges (which carry current). Phonons are scattered at surfaces and interfaces, so κ generally decreases as the surface-to-volume ratio increases. In contrast, σ is less sensitive to a decrease in nanostructure size, although at sufficiently small sizes it will degrade through the scattering of charge carriers at interfaces. Here, we demonstrate an approach to independently controlling κ based on altering the phonon band structure of a semiconductor thin film through the formation of a phononic nanomesh film. These films are patterned with periodic spacings that are comparable to, or shorter than, the phonon mean free path. The nanomesh structure exhibits a substantially lower thermal conductivity than an equivalently prepared array of silicon nanowires, even though this array has a significantly higher surface-to-volume ratio. Bulk-like electrical conductivity is preserved. We suggest that this development is a step towards a coherent mechanism for lowering thermal conductivity. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  6. Promising electron mobility and high thermal conductivity in Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xian-Hu; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yuhong; Huang, Qing; He, Jian; Francisco, Joseph S.; Luo, Kan; Du, Shiyu

    2016-03-01

    MXenes, the new 2D transition metal carbides and nitrides, have recently attracted extensive attention due to their diverse applications and excellent performances. However, the thermal and electrical properties of most MXene materials are yet to be studied. In this work, we investigate the electrical and thermal properties of semiconducting Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes using first-principles calculations. Both of the Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes are determined to show excellent carrier mobilities. The electron mobility in the Sc2CF2 MXene is found to be strongly anisotropic at room temperature, with values of 5.03 × 103 and 1.07 × 103 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. The predicted electron mobility in the zigzag direction of the Sc2CF2 is nearly four-fold that in the armchair direction of the promising semiconductor phosphorene. In contrast to Sc2CF2, Sc2C(OH)2 presents approximately isotropic electron mobility. The values at room temperature in the zigzag and armchair directions are calculated as 2.06 × 103 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 2.19 × 103 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. In regard to the thermal properties, the thermal conductivities of the Sc2CT2 (T = F, OH) MXenes have been determined. The predicted values are higher than those of most metals and semiconducting low-dimensional materials, such as monolayer MoS2 and phosphorene. In particular, the room-temperature thermal conductivity along the Sc2CF2 armchair direction has been determined to be as high as 472 W m-1 K-1 based on a flake length of 5 μm, which is even higher than that of the best traditional conductor silver. The corresponding value in the zigzag direction of Sc2CF2 is calculated to be 178 W m-1 K-1. The thermal conductivity in Sc2C(OH)2 is less anisotropic and lower compared to that in Sc2CF2. The room-temperature value in the armchair (zigzag) direction is determined to be 173 W m-1 K-1 (107 W m-1 K-1). Based on their excellent electron mobilities and high thermal

  7. Highly thermally conductive papers with percolative layered boron nitride nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongli; Li, Yuanyuan; Fang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Jiajun; Cao, Fangyu; Wan, Jiayu; Preston, Colin; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2014-04-22

    In this work, we report a dielectric nanocomposite paper with layered boron nitride (BN) nanosheets wired by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) that has superior thermal and mechanical properties. These nanocomposite papers are fabricated from a filtration of BN and NFC suspensions, in which NFC is used as a stabilizer to stabilize BN nanosheets. In these nanocomposite papers, two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets form a thermally conductive network, while 1D NFC provides mechanical strength. A high thermal conductivity has been achieved along the BN paper surface (up to 145.7 W/m K for 50 wt % of BN), which is an order of magnitude higher than that in randomly distributed BN nanosheet composites and is even comparable to the thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys. Such a high thermal conductivity is mainly attributed to the structural alignment within the BN nanosheet papers; the effects of the interfacial thermal contact resistance are minimized by the fact that the heat transfer is in the direction parallel to the interface between BN nanosheets and that a large contact area occurs between BN nanosheets. PMID:24601534

  8. Effects of lithium insertion on thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wen [Department of Physics, Centre for Advanced 2D Material and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore 117546 (Singapore); Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Zhang, Gang, E-mail: zhangg@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Li, Baowen [Department of Physics, Centre for Advanced 2D Material and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore 117546 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge, Singapore 119620 (Singapore); Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 200092 Shanghai (China)

    2015-04-27

    Recently, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been applied as high-performance Li battery anodes, since they can overcome the pulverization and mechanical fracture during lithiation. Although thermal stability is one of the most important parameters that determine safety of Li batteries, thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion remains unclear. In this letter, using molecular dynamics simulations, we study room temperature thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion. It is found that compared with the pristine SiNW, there is as much as 60% reduction in thermal conductivity with 10% concentration of inserted Li atoms, while under the same impurity concentration the reduction in thermal conductivity of the mass-disordered SiNW is only 30%. With lattice dynamics calculations and normal mode decomposition, it is revealed that the phonon lifetimes in SiNWs decrease greatly due to strong scattering of phonons by vibrational modes of Li atoms, especially for those high frequency phonons. The observed strong phonon scattering phenomenon in Li-inserted SiNWs is similar to the phonon rattling effect. Our study serves as an exploration of thermal properties of SiNWs as Li battery anodes or weakly coupled with impurity atoms.

  9. Effects of lithium insertion on thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been applied as high-performance Li battery anodes, since they can overcome the pulverization and mechanical fracture during lithiation. Although thermal stability is one of the most important parameters that determine safety of Li batteries, thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion remains unclear. In this letter, using molecular dynamics simulations, we study room temperature thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion. It is found that compared with the pristine SiNW, there is as much as 60% reduction in thermal conductivity with 10% concentration of inserted Li atoms, while under the same impurity concentration the reduction in thermal conductivity of the mass-disordered SiNW is only 30%. With lattice dynamics calculations and normal mode decomposition, it is revealed that the phonon lifetimes in SiNWs decrease greatly due to strong scattering of phonons by vibrational modes of Li atoms, especially for those high frequency phonons. The observed strong phonon scattering phenomenon in Li-inserted SiNWs is similar to the phonon rattling effect. Our study serves as an exploration of thermal properties of SiNWs as Li battery anodes or weakly coupled with impurity atoms

  10. Performance of thermal conductivity probes for planetary applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Hütter

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to contribute to the development of in situ instruments feasible for space application. Commercial as well as custom-made thermal sensors, based on the transient hot wire technique and suitable for direct measurement of the effective thermal conductivity of granular media, were tested for application under airless conditions. In order to check the ability of custom-made sensors to measure the thermal conductivity of planetary surface layers, detailed numerical simulations predicting the response of the different sensors have been performed. These simulations reveal that for investigations under high vacuum conditions (as they prevail, e.g. on the lunar surface, the derived thermal conductivity values can significantly depend on sensor geometry, axial heat flow, and the thermal contact between probe and surrounding material. Therefore, a careful calibration of each particular sensor is necessary in order to obtain reliable thermal conductivity measurements. The custom-made sensors presented in this work can serve as prototypes for payload to be flown on future planetary lander missions, in particular for airless bodies like the Moon, asteroids and comets, but also for Mars.

  11. Anisotropic thermal transport in Weyl semimetal TaAs: a first principles calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Tao; Xiao, Huaping; Tang, Chao; Hu, Ming; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-06-22

    A fundamental understanding of the phonon transport property is crucial to predict the thermal management performance in micro/nano-electronic devices. By combining first principle calculations and Boltzmann phonon transport equation, we investigate thermal transport in TaAs-a typical Weyl semimetal. The lattice thermal conductivity of TaAs at room temperature was found to be 39.26 W mK(-1) and 24.78 W mK(-1) along the a(b) and c crystal axis, respectively, showing obvious anisotropy. Detailed analyses of the mode level phonon properties further revealed that the three acoustic phonon modes dominate the overall thermal transport and the major phonon scattering channels in this typical Weyl semimetal were TA1/TA2/LA + O ↔ O and A + A ↔ O. The representative phonon mean free path of TaAs was also calculated in this paper, which provide helpful guidance for the thermal management of TaAs-based electronic devices. PMID:27271203

  12. Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity of Berberis Fruit (Berberis vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortaza Aghbashlo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberis fruit was known as a medicinal and ornamental plant in the world. It is used in medicine to cure the liver, neck and stomach cancer, blood purification and mouth scent. In order to design of equipments and facilities for the drying, preservation and processing of berberis, it is necessary to know about the specific heat and thermal conductivity. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the specific heat and thermal conductivity of berberis as well as to develop mathematical models for estimation of them. The method of mixtures and hot wire as a heating source was used for measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of berberis fruit, respectively. The selected variables to simulate variations of berberis thermal properties were moisture content and temperature. The measurements were done at 50, 60 and 70°C temperature levels and 19.3%, 38.5%, 55.4% and 74.3% (w.b moisture content levels. The results show that the specific heat and thermal conductivity of berberis increased linearly from 1.9653 to 3.2811 kJ/kg°C and 0.1324 to 0.4898 W/m°C, respectively with increase in the experimental range of the variables. However, the effect of moisture content on increasing the specific heat and thermal conductivity is more than that of temperature. Regression equations were established which could be used to reasonably estimate the values of the specific heat and thermal conductivity as a function of specified moisture content and temperature.

  13. Characterization of the thermal conductivity for ceramic pebble beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Frano, R.; Aquaro, D.; Scaletti, L.; Olivi, N.

    2015-11-01

    The evaluation of the thermal conductivity of breeder materials is one of the main goals to find the best candidate material for the fusion reactor technology. The aim of this paper is to evaluate experimentally the thermal conductivity of a ceramic material by applying the hot wire method at different temperatures, ranging from 50 to about 800°C. The updated experimental facility, available at the Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI) of the University of Pisa, used to determine the thermal conductivity of a ceramic material (alumina), will be described along with the measurement acquisition system. Moreover it will be also provided an overview of the current state of art of the ceramic pebble bed breeder thermos-mechanics R&D (e.g. Lithium Orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) and Lithium Metatitanate (Li2TiO3)) focusing on the up-to-date analysis. The methodological approach adopted is articulated in two phase: the first one aimed at the experimental evaluation of thermal conductivity of a ceramic material by means of hot wire method, to be subsequently used in the second phase that is based on the test rig method, through which is measured the thermal conductivity of pebble bed material. In this framework, the experimental procedure and the measured results obtained varying the temperature, are presented and discussed.

  14. Magnetic field induced augmented thermal conduction phenomenon in magneto nanocolloids

    OpenAIRE

    Katiyar, Ajay; Dhar, Purbarun; Nandi, Tandra; Das, Sarit K

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic field induced drastically augmented thermal conductivity of magneto nanocolloids involving magnetic oxide nanoparticles, viz. Fe2O3, Fe3O4, Nickel oxide (NiO), Cobalt oxide (Co3O4), dispersed in different base fluids (heat transfer oil, kerosene, and ethylene glycol) have been reported. Experiments reveal the augmented thermal transport under the external applied magnetic field, with kerosene based MNCs showing at relatively low magnetic field intensities as compared to the heat tran...

  15. Porous Alumina and Zirconia Ceramics With Tailored Thermal Conductivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregorová, E.; Pabst, W.; Sofer, Z.; Jankovský, O.; Matějíček, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 395, č. 1 (2012), 012022-012022. ISSN 1742-6588. [European Thermal Sciences Conference (Eurotherm)/6./. Poitiers, 04.09.2012-07.09.2012] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Ceramics * alumina * zirconia * porosity * thermal conductivity * pore-forming agent * oxide ceramics * starch * porosity Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/395/1/012022/pdf/1742-6596_395_1_012022.pdf

  16. A PC- Based Transient Method for Thermal Conductivity Measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Singh

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an indigenously developed thermal probe has been interfaced with a PC for automated measurement of thermal conductivity (K . The developed system has been calibrated and standardised by measuring K of glycerol. The maximum percentage error, for repeated sets of observations, was within 7.29 per cent of standard value reported for glycerol. This methodology has been successfully employed for measuring K of propellant oxidisers, additives, binders, etc.

  17. Determination of thermal conductivity in foundry mould mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Solenički

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For a thorough understanding of the behaviour of foundry mould mixtures, a good knowledge of thermal properties of mould materials is needed. Laboratory determination of thermal conductivity of mould mixtures enables a better control over scabbing defects which are a major problem in green sand mould mixtures. A special instrument has been designed for that purpose and it is described in this work.

  18. Thermal conductivity of MgO, MgSiO3 perovskite and post-perovskite in the Earth's deep mantle

    OpenAIRE

    Volker Haigis; Salanne, M; Sandro Jahn

    2012-01-01

    We report lattice thermal conductivities of MgO and MgSiO3 in the perovskite and post-perovskite structures at conditions of the Earth's lower mantle, obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Using an advanced ionic interaction potential, the full conductivity tensor was calculated by means of the Green-Kubo method, and the conductivity of MgSiO3 post-perovskite was found to be significantly anisotropic. The thermal conductivities of all three phases were parameterized as a f...

  19. Thermal conductivities of Zr-based transuranium nitride solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the authors prepared sintered samples of (Zr0.58Pu0.21Am0.21)N, (Zr0.80Pu0.10Am0.10)N, and (Zr0.70Np0.06Pu0.15Am0.075Cm0.015)N solid solutions. The thermal diffusivities and heat capacities of these Zr-based transuranium nitride solid solutions were measured using a laser flash method and drop calorimetry, respectively. Thermal conductivities from 473 to 1,473 K were determined from the measured thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and bulk density. The thermal conductivities of Zr-based transuranium nitride solid solutions were found to be higher than that of (Pu0.5Am0.5)N due to the high thermal conductivity of ZrN as the principal component, although they were lower than that of ZrN due to the impurifying effect of the transuranium elements. At 873 K, the thermal conductivities of ZrN, (Zr0.58Pu0.21Am0.21)N, (Zr0.80Pu0.10Am0.10)N, (Zr0.70Np0.06Pu0.15Am0.075Cm0.015)N, and (Pu0.5Am0.5)N were 63.9, 15.8, 25.5, 20.6, and 8.9 Wm-1K-1, respectively. In these results, the thermal conductivities of the Zr-based transuranium nitride solid solutions increased with increasing ZrN concentration. (author)

  20. Dynamical thermal conductivity of the spin Lieb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    In the ferromagnetic insulator with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), we have theoretically investigated the dynamical thermal conductivity (DTC). In other words, we have investigated the frequency dependence of thermal conductivity, κ, of the Lieb lattice, a face-centered square lattice, subjected to a time dependence temperature gradient. Using linear response theory and Green's function approach, DTC has been obtained in the context of Heisenberg Hamiltonian. At low frequencies, DTC is found to be monotonically increasing with DMI strength (DMIS), temperature and next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) coupling. Also we have found that DTC includes a peak for different values of temperature, DMIS and NNN coupling. Furthermore we study the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of Lieb lattice for different values of DMIS, NNN coupling and external magnetic filed. We witness a decrease in DTC with temperature due to the quantum effects in the system.

  1. Thermal conductivity at a disordered quantum critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Ramirez, David M.; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-04-01

    Strongly disordered and strongly interacting quantum critical points are difficult to access with conventional field theoretic methods. They are, however, both experimentally important and theoretically interesting. In particular, they are expected to realize universal incoherent transport. Such disordered quantum critical theories have recently been constructed holographically by deforming a CFT by marginally relevant disorder. In this paper we find additional disordered fixed points via relevant disordered deformations of a holographic CFT. Using recently developed methods in holographic transport, we characterize the thermal conductivity in both sets of theories in 1+1 dimensions. The thermal conductivity is found to tend to a constant at low temperatures in one class of fixed points, and to scale as T 0.3 in the other. Furthermore, in all cases the thermal conductivity exhibits discrete scale invariance, with logarithmic in temperature oscillations superimposed on the low temperature scaling behavior. At no point do we use the replica trick.

  2. Thermal conductivity at a disordered quantum critical point

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnoll, Sean A; Santos, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    Strongly disordered and strongly interacting quantum critical points are difficult to access with conventional field theoretic methods. They are, however, both experimentally important and theoretically interesting. In particular, they are expected to realize universal incoherent transport. Such disordered quantum critical theories have recently been constructed holographically by deforming a CFT by marginally relevant disorder. In this paper we find additional disordered fixed points via relevant disordered deformations of a holographic CFT. Using recently developed methods in holographic transport, we characterize the thermal conductivity in both sets of theories in 1+1 dimensions. The thermal conductivity is found to tend to a constant at low temperatures in one class of fixed points, and to scale as $T^{0.3}$ in the other. Furthermore, in all cases the thermal conductivity exhibits discrete scale invariance, with logarithmic in temperature oscillations superimposed on the low temperature scaling behavior....

  3. Relationship between the thermal conductivity and shear viscosity of nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yulong; Chen, Haisheng; Musina, Zenfira; Jin, Yi; Zhang, Tianfu; Witharana, Sanjeeva; Yang, Wei

    2010-05-01

    Nanofluids are dilute liquid suspensions of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles and liquid media, in such fluids, mix and interact at the nanoscale. Interactions between nanoparticles in nanofluids can lead to structuring of the particles. This paper discusses how the nanoparticle structuring affects the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids and how the two transport properties are related through the nanoparticle structuring. It is shown that the experimentally measured thermal conductivity enhancement and the viscosity increase due to the presence of nanoparticles can be interpreted by the aggregation of nanoparticles. It is also shown that modification of the conventional form of the effective medium theory by taking into account nanoparticle structuring information from the rheological analyses gives good agreement with experimentally measured thermal conductivity.

  4. Reduction of thermal conductivity by nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal. PMID:23378898

  5. Lattice thermal conductivity of nanograined half-Heusler solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Huiyuan, E-mail: genghuiyuan@hit.edu.cn; Meng, Xianfu; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-05-19

    We report a phenomenological model of atomic weight, lattice constant, temperature, and grain size to calculate the high-temperature lattice thermal conductivity of nanograined solid solutions. The theoretical treatment developed here is reasonably consistent with the experimental results of n-type MNiSn and p-type MCoSb alloys, where M is the combination of Hf, Zr, and Ti. For disordered half-Heusler alloys with moderated grain sizes, we predict that the reduction in lattice thermal conductivity due to grain boundary scattering is independent of the scattering parameter, which characterizes the phonon scattering cross section of point defects. In addition, the lattice thermal conductivity falls off with temperature as T{sup –1∕2} around the Debye temperature.

  6. Upper bound to the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalopin, Yann; Volz, Sebastian; Mingo, Natalio

    2009-04-01

    Using atomistic Green's function calculations, we find that the phonon thermal conductivity of pellets composed of ˜μm long carbon nanotubes has an upper bound of a few W/m K. This is in striking contrast with the extremely high thermal conductivity of individual nanotubes (˜3000 W/m K). We show that, at room temperature, this upper bound does not depend on the nanotube diameter. Conversely, for low temperatures, an inverse proportionality with nanotube diameter is predicted. We present concrete results as a function of nanotube length and chirality, pellet density, and temperature. These results imply that carbon nanotube pellets belong to the category of thermal insulators, contrasting with the good conducting properties of parallel nanotube arrays, or individual nanotubes.

  7. Spectral mapping of thermal conductivity through nanoscale ballistic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongjie; Zeng, Lingping; Minnich, Austin J.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Controlling thermal properties is central to many applications, such as thermoelectric energy conversion and the thermal management of integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by structuring materials at different length scales, but a clear relationship between structure size and thermal properties remains to be established. The main challenge comes from the unknown intrinsic spectral distribution of energy among heat carriers. Here, we experimentally measure this spectral distribution by probing quasi-ballistic transport near nanostructured heaters down to 30 nm using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. Our approach allows us to quantify up to 95% of the total spectral contribution to thermal conductivity from all phonon modes. The measurement agrees well with multiscale and first-principles-based simulations. We further demonstrate the direct construction of mean free path distributions. Our results provide a new fundamental understanding of thermal transport and will enable materials design in a rational way to achieve high performance.

  8. Development of a shielded pellet thermal conductivity measurement apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Hot Engineering Division, development of new PIE techniques for the study on high burnup fuel behavior have been continued. The thermal conductivity in high burnup fuel pellet is one of the most important thermophysical properties. The shielded pellet thermal conductivity apparatus using the laser flash method was developed and it became possible to calculate the thermal conductivity of high burnup fuel pellets. This report describes the results of measurement of the thermal diffusivity of the metallic tantalum and ceramic samples such as alumina, zirconia and mullite, at room temperature to 1800degC. The measured value of the thermal diffusivity with tantalum were correspond to the data of the TPRC data series published by the Purdue University in USA. The thermal diffusivity of the fan shaped tantalum samples was also measured to examine the effect of sample shape. The result of data analysis by the logarithmic method showed small difference between round and fan shaped samples. The measured value of ceramic samples were similar scatter in tantalum one. (author)

  9. Thermal computations for electronics conductive, radiative, and convective air cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary mechanisms of heat flowConductionApplication example: Silicon chip resistance calculationConvectionApplication example: Chassis panel cooled by natural convectionRadiationApplication example: Chassis panel cooled only by radiation 7Illustrative example: Simple thermal network model for a heat sinked power transistorIllustrative example: Thermal network circuit for a printed circuit boardCompact component modelsIllustrative example: Pressure and thermal circuits for a forced air cooled enclosureIllustrative example: A single chip package on a printed circuit board-the proble

  10. Thermal conductivity of model zeolites: molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashov, Vladimir V.

    1999-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of model zeolites was investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations. This type of calculation was found to overestimate the thermal conductivity of low-density silica polymorphs. A better reproduction of the experimental results was found for zeolites, and this was related to the lower phonon mean free path. The thermal conductivity of framework silicates was shown to be determined primarily by the vibrations of the continuous oxygen sublattice. Thus, the most drastic suppression of the heat transfer was related to alterations of the O-O distances; for example, a sixfold reduction in thermal conductivity compared to that of siliceous LTA zeolite was found for LTA-A1PO4. Framework cations were shown to affect the heat transfer by changing the vibrational modes of the structural building units of the framework and non-framework counter-cations, by disturbing the oxygen sublattice locally and acting as Rayleigh and resonant scatterers. A model assuming the heat transfer to be due only to non-dispersive acoustic phonons failed to reproduce the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the mass of the cations and the unit-cell dimension, thus suggesting a more sophisticated mechanism of heat transfer to be operative in framework materials. The effect of non-framework non-ionic species on the thermal conductivity was shown to be determined by their effect on the characteristics of the oxygen framework vibrations. Thus, repulsive interactions between the oxygen sublattice and Xe8 clusters, reducing the anisotropy and anharmonicity of the oxygen vibrations, give rise to enhanced heat transfer in LTA-SiO2 at ambient conditions.

  11. Ultralow thermal conductivity and high thermoelectric figure of merit in SnSe crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Dong; Lo, Shih-Han; Zhang, Yongsheng; Sun, Hui; Tan, Gangjian; Uher, Ctirad; Wolverton, C.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2014-04-01

    The thermoelectric effect enables direct and reversible conversion between thermal and electrical energy, and provides a viable route for power generation from waste heat. The efficiency of thermoelectric materials is dictated by the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT (where Z is the figure of merit and T is absolute temperature), which governs the Carnot efficiency for heat conversion. Enhancements above the generally high threshold value of 2.5 have important implications for commercial deployment, especially for compounds free of Pb and Te. Here we report an unprecedented ZT of 2.6 +/- 0.3 at 923 K, realized in SnSe single crystals measured along the b axis of the room-temperature orthorhombic unit cell. This material also shows a high ZT of 2.3 +/- 0.3 along the c axis but a significantly reduced ZT of 0.8 +/- 0.2 along the a axis. We attribute the remarkably high ZT along the b axis to the intrinsically ultralow lattice thermal conductivity in SnSe. The layered structure of SnSe derives from a distorted rock-salt structure, and features anomalously high Grüneisen parameters, which reflect the anharmonic and anisotropic bonding. We attribute the exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivity (0.23 +/- 0.03 W m-1 K-1 at 973 K) in SnSe to the anharmonicity. These findings highlight alternative strategies to nanostructuring for achieving high thermoelectric performance.

  12. Inverse temperature gradient method for estimating thermal conductivity in drillholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inverse temperature gradient method is based on Fourier's first law of heat conduction. Assuming the heat flow to be known apparent thermal conductivity can be calculated from measured temperature gradient data and the results can be applied for studies of heterogeneity and scales of variation of thermal conductivity. We present theoretical and experimental results on the method. Theoretical finite difference modeling was done with a 2D model including an inclined 10 m thick layer of higher conductivity. Drillhole measurements were simulated by picking model results along vertical and inclined drillhole paths corresponding to typical drilling geometries. The results obtained using thermal conductivity and heat flow values representative for the Olkiluoto case suggest that the method can be used for local estimation of conductivity variations in drillholes. Using conductivity contrasts of 2.8 vs. 3.2 Wm-1K-1 and heat flow of 40 mWm-2 yields gradient variations are of the order of 1 mK/m. In order to record such small variations in a borehole the temperature data must have a very good temperature resolution and be recorded at very short reading intervals. The method was tested using novel temperature data in drillhole OL-KR46 in Olkiluoto. The borehole is dominated by pegmatitic granite, veined gneiss and tonaliticgranodioritic- granitic gneiss. High resolution temperature data (1 mK in temperature, 0.02 m reading interval) was recorded as a continuous log with a memory logger probe. The data density allows detection of local gradient variations with accuracy of about 0.15 mK/m and apparent conductivity variations of the order of 0.1 Wm-1K-1 over 1 m intervals. The determined apparent conductivity logs indicate local conductivity variations with an amplitude of about 0.1 - 0.5 Wm-1K-1 in scales ranging from tens of cm to several meters. The drill core conductivity data from OL-KR46 are in agreement with apparent conductivity logs but do not fit exactly. It can be

  13. Thermal conductivity prediction of mesoporous composites (Cu/MCM-41)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Congliang; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Ge

    2014-06-01

    The thermal conductivity of the mesoporous composites Cu/MCM-41 was studied to provide some useful data for promising applications. Both of the lattice and electronic thermal conductivities of Cu nanowires with different size were predicted. With the shell of the matrix MCM-41 and the air confined in the mesochannels considered, the effective thermal conductivity (EffTC) of composites Cu/MCM-41 was obtained. The EffTC shows a great anisotropy. The EffTC along the Z direction (axial of the mesochannel) is much lower than that along directions perpendicular to the axial. It is unnecessary to further raise the filling ratio of Cu nanowires for improving the EffTC along the directions perpendicular to the axial, since the filling ratio 20% is high enough. As long as there is a void space in the mesochannel, the EffTC along the Z direction will be as low as the thermal conductivity of the matrix MCM-41, due to the large thermal resistance of the void space in mesochannels.

  14. High thermal conductivity of chain-oriented amorphous polythiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Virendra; Bougher, Thomas L; Weathers, Annie; Cai, Ye; Bi, Kedong; Pettes, Michael T; McMenamin, Sally A; Lv, Wei; Resler, Daniel P; Gattuso, Todd R; Altman, David H; Sandhage, Kenneth H; Shi, Li; Henry, Asegun; Cola, Baratunde A

    2014-05-01

    Polymers are usually considered thermal insulators, because the amorphous arrangement of the molecular chains reduces the mean free path of heat-conducting phonons. The most common method to increase thermal conductivity is to draw polymeric fibres, which increases chain alignment and crystallinity, but creates a material that currently has limited thermal applications. Here we show that pure polythiophene nanofibres can have a thermal conductivity up to ∼ 4.4 W m(-1) K(-1) (more than 20 times higher than the bulk polymer value) while remaining amorphous. This enhancement results from significant molecular chain orientation along the fibre axis that is obtained during electropolymerization using nanoscale templates. Thermal conductivity data suggest that, unlike in drawn crystalline fibres, in our fibres the dominant phonon-scattering process at room temperature is still related to structural disorder. Using vertically aligned arrays of nanofibres, we demonstrate effective heat transfer at critical contacts in electronic devices operating under high-power conditions at 200 °C over numerous cycles. PMID:24681778

  15. Flatness-dependent thermal conductivity of graphene-based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Ke, E-mail: chukelut@163.com [School of Mechatronic Engineering, Lanzhou Jiaotong University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Li, Wen-sheng; Tang, Fu-ling [Key Laboratory of Gansu Advanced Non-ferrous Metal Materials, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China)

    2013-05-03

    Since the graphene nanoplates (GNPs) are usually folded and wrinkled, we propose a factor, flatness ratio, to theoretical analyze the thermal conductivity of GNP composites. An analytical model for the thermal conductivity of GNP composites is presented, which shows an excellent agreement with the experimental data. Theoretical analysis reveals that flatness ratio acts as a dominant role in determining the influence of other factors. We further show that the two-dimensional geometry is the primary factor for GNP outperforming one-dimensional carbon nanotubes as thermal conductive filler, rather than the other factors of thickness, length and interfacial thermal resistance. -- Highlights: ► We develop a novel model for the thermal conductivity (TC) of graphene composites. ► We adopt a new concept, flatness ratio, into the theoretical model. ► TC predictions show a good agreement with reported experimental data. ► Flatness ratio acts as a dominant role in determining the effect of other factors. ► 2D geometry is the main factor for graphenes outperforming CNTs in TC enhancement.

  16. Simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurement of individual nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C.; Moon, Jaeyun; Chen, Renkun

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental phonon transport properties in semiconductor nanostructures are important for their applications in energy conversion and storage, such as thermoelectrics and photovoltaics. Thermal conductivity measurements of semiconductor nanostructures have been extensively pursued and have enhanced our understanding of phonon transport physics. Specific heat of individual nanostructures, despite being an important thermophysical parameter that reflects the thermodynamics of solids, has remained difficult to characterize. Prior measurements were limited to ensembles of nanostructures in which coupling and sample inhomogeneity could play a role. Herein we report the first simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements of individual rod-like nanostructures such as nanowires and nanofibers. This technique is demonstrated by measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of single ∼600–700 nm diameter Nylon-11 nanofibers (NFs). The results show that the thermal conductivity of the NF is increased by 50% over the bulk value, while the specific heat of the NFs exhibits bulk-like behavior. We find that the thermal diffusivity obtained from the measurement, which is related to the phonon mean free path (MFP), decreases with temperature, indicating that the intrinsic phonon Umklapp scattering plays a role in the NFs. This platform can also be applied to one- and two- dimensional semiconductor nanostructures to probe size effects on the phonon spectra and other transport physics.

  17. The Effect of Thermal Conduction on the Virgo Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, E C D; Kaiser, C R; Fangohr, H; Pope, Edward C.D.; Pavlovski, Georgi; Kaiser, Christian R.; Fangohr, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Thermal conduction has been suggested as a possible mechanism by which sufficient energy is supplied to the central regions of galaxy clusters to balance the effect of radiative cooling. Here we present the results of a simulated, high-resolution, 3-d Virgo cluster for different values of thermal conductivity (1, 1/10, 1/100, 0 times the full Spitzer value). Starting from an initially isothermal cluster atmosphere we allow the cluster to evolve freely over timescales of roughly $ 1.3-4.7 \\times 10^{9} $ yrs. Our results show that thermal conductivity at the Spitzer value can increase the central ICM radiative cooling time by a factor of roughly 3.6. In addition, for larger values of thermal conductvity the simulated temperature and density profiles match the observations significantly better than for the lower values. However, no physically meaningful value of thermal conductivity was able to postpone the cooling catastrophe (characterised by a rapid increase in the central density) for longer than a fraction...

  18. Obtaining high thermally conductive materials by pressing from the granulate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditts, A.; Revva, I.; Pautova, Y.; Pogrebenkov, V.; Nepochatov, Y.; Galashov, E.; Tarnovskiy, R.

    2015-01-01

    This work contains results of investigation of obtaining high thermally conductive ceramics from commercial powders of aluminum nitride and yttrium oxide by the method of monoaxial compaction of granulate. The principal scheme of preparation is proposed and technological properties of granulate are defined. Compaction conditions for simple items to use as heat removal in microelectronics and power electrical engineering have been established. Investigations of thermophysical properties of obtained ceramics and its structure by the XRD and SEM methods have been carried out. Ceramics with thermal conductivity from 172 to 174 W/m·K has been obtained as result of this work.

  19. A micro-convection model for thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hrishikesh E Patel; T Sundararajan; T Pradeep; A Dasgupta; N Dasgupta; Sarit K Das

    2005-11-01

    Increase in the specific surface area as well as Brownian motion are supposed to be the most significant reasons for the anomalous enhancement in thermal conductivity of nanofluids. This work presents a semi-empirical approach for the same by emphasizing the above two effects through micro-convection. A new way of modeling thermal conductivity of nanofluids has been explored which is found to agree excellently with a wide range of experimental data obtained by the present authors as well as the data published in literature.

  20. Diffusion, aggregation, and the thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Eaton, John K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-01

    The effects of nanoparticle aggregation and diffusion are difficult to separate using most nanofluid thermal conductivity data, for which the temperature dependence is collected sequentially. The present work captures the instantaneous temperature-dependent thermal conductivity using cross-sectional infrared microscopy and tracks the effects of aggregation and diffusion over time. The resulting data are strongly influenced by spatial and temperature variations in particle size and concentration and are interpreted using a Monte Carlo simulation and rate equations for particle and heat transport. These experiments improve our understanding of nanofluid behavior in practical systems including microscale heat exchangers.

  1. Thermal conductivity of nonlinear waves in disordered chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sergej Flach; Mikhail Ivanchenko; Nianbei Li

    2011-11-01

    We present computational data on the thermal conductivity of nonlinear waves in disordered chains. Disorder induces Anderson localization for linear waves and results in a vanishing conductivity. Cubic nonlinearity restores normal conductivity, but with a strongly temperature-dependent conductivity (). We find indications for an asymptotic low-temperature ∼ 4 and intermediate temperature ∼ 2 laws. These findings are in accord with theoretical studies of wave packet spreading, where a regime of strong chaos is found to be intermediate, followed by an asymptotic regime of weak chaos (Laptyeva et al, Europhys. Lett. 91, 30001 (2010)).

  2. Polymer Nanofibers with Outstanding Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Stability: Fundamental Linkage between Molecular Characteristics and Macroscopic Thermal Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Teng; Luo, Tengfei

    2014-01-01

    Polymer nanofibers with high thermal conductivities and outstanding thermal stabilities are highly desirable in heat transfer-critical applications such as thermal management, heat exchangers and energy storage. In this work, we unlock the fundamental relations between the thermal conductivity and thermal stability of polymer nanofibers and their molecular characteristics by studying the temperature-induced phase transitions and thermal transport of a series of polymer nanofibers. Ten different polymer nanofibers with systematically chosen molecular structures are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We found that high thermal conductivity and good thermal stability can be achieved in polymers with rigid backbones, exemplified by {\\pi}-conjugated polymers, due to suppressed segmental rotations and large phonon group velocities. The low probability of segmental rotation does not only prevent temperature-induced phase transition but also enables long phonon mean free paths due to reduced di...

  3. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  4. Thermal conduction in a mirror-unstable plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, S. V.; Churazov, E. M.; Kunz, M. W.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The plasma of galaxy clusters is subject to firehose and mirror instabilities at scales of order the ion Larmor radius. The mirror instability generates fluctuations of magnetic-field strength δB/B ˜ 1. These fluctuations act as magnetic traps for the heat-conducting electrons, suppressing their transport. We calculate the effective parallel thermal conductivity in the ICM in the presence of the mirror fluctuations for different stages of the evolution of the instability. The mirror fluctuations are limited in amplitude by the maximum and minimum values of the field strength, with no large deviations from the mean value. This key property leads to a finite suppression of thermal conduction at large scales. We find suppression down to ≈0.2 of the Spitzer value for the secular phase of the perturbations' growth, and ≈0.3 for their saturated phase. The effect operates in addition to other suppression mechanisms and independently of them. Globally, fluctuations δB/B ˜ 1 can be present on much larger scales, of the order of the scale of turbulent motions. However, we do not expect large suppression of thermal conduction by these, because their scale is considerably larger than the collisional mean free path of the ICM electrons. The obtained suppression of thermal conduction by a factor of ˜5 appears to be characteristic and potentially universal for a weakly collisional mirror-unstable plasma.

  5. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-06-01

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  6. Fractional Heat Conduction Models and Thermal Diffusivity Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Žecová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the fractional heat conduction models and their use for determining thermal diffusivity. A brief historical overview of the authors who have dealt with the heat conduction equation is described in the introduction of the paper. The one-dimensional heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are listed. Analytical and numerical methods of solution of the heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are described. Individual methods have been implemented in MATLAB and the examples of simulations are listed. The proposal and experimental verification of the methods for determining thermal diffusivity using half-order derivative of temperature by time are listed at the conclusion of the paper.

  7. Effects of anisotropic permeability and electrical conductivity of gas diffusion layers on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The in-plane electrical conductivity of the GDL must be captured numerically. ► Fuel cell performance is insensitive to the anisotropy in the permeability of GDL. ► The anisotropy in the in-plane electrical conductivity of the GDL can be neglected. ► For the reported conditions, the U-bend has no effect on the fuel cell performance. -- Abstract: A 3-dimensional model for an in-house proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell with serpentine channels has been developed in order to investigate the sensitivity of the fuel cell performance to the anisotropic gas permeability and electrical conductivity of gas diffusion layers (GDLs). For a realistic range of transport properties being investigated, the fuel cell performance was found to be very sensitive to the electrical conductivity but almost insensitive to the gas permeability of the GDL. For the given operating conditions, the current density was found to be a maximum in the vicinity of the edge between the flow channel and the rib of the current collector. Since the most common GDL materials present a rather significant anisotropy in the in-plane directions, the effects of such anisotropy has been evaluated. Given that the through-plane conductivity is maintained constant for all the cases investigated, for a realistic range of the in-plane electrical conductivity, the fuel cell performance was found to be almost insensitive to this parameter. Therefore such anisotropy can be practically ignored. Finally, for single phase operating conditions, the U-bend in the serpentine channel has no effect on the overall performance of the fuel cell. Hence, only a straight channel of the fuel cell may be modelled and used as a quick performance indicator.

  8. Estimating thermal diffusivity and specific heat from needle probe thermal conductivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat can be estimated from thermal conductivity measurements made using a standard needle probe and a suitably high data acquisition rate. Thermal properties are calculated from the measured temperature change in a sample subjected to heating by a needle probe. Accurate thermal conductivity measurements are obtained from a linear fit to many tens or hundreds of temperature change data points. In contrast, thermal diffusivity calculations require a nonlinear fit to the measured temperature change occurring in the first few tenths of a second of the measurement, resulting in a lower accuracy than that obtained for thermal conductivity. Specific heat is calculated from the ratio of thermal conductivity to diffusivity, and thus can have an uncertainty no better than that of the diffusivity estimate. Our thermal conductivity measurements of ice Ih and of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate, made using a 1.6 mm outer diameter needle probe and a data acquisition rate of 18.2 pointss, agree with published results. Our thermal diffusivity and specific heat results reproduce published results within 25% for ice Ih and 3% for THF hydrate. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  9. A general treatment of snow microstructure exemplified by an improved relation for thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Löwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Finding relevant microstructural parameters beyond density is a longstanding problem which hinders the formulation of accurate parameterizations of physical properties of snow. Towards a remedy, we address the effective thermal conductivity tensor of snow via anisotropic, second-order bounds. The bound provides an explicit expression for the thermal conductivity and predicts the relevance of a microstructural anisotropy parameter Q, which is given by an integral over the two-point correlation function and unambiguously defined for arbitrary snow structures. For validation we compiled a comprehensive data set of 167 snow samples. The set comprises individual samples of various snow types and entire time series of metamorphism experiments under isothermal and temperature gradient conditions. All samples were digitally reconstructed by micro-computed tomography to perform microstructure-based simulations of heat transport. The incorporation of anisotropy via Q considerably reduces the root mean square error over the usual density-based parameterization. The systematic quantification of anisotropy via the two-point correlation function suggests a generalizable route to incorporate microstructure into snowpack models. We indicate the inter-relation of the conductivity to other properties and outline a potential impact of Q on dielectric constant, permeability and adsorption rate of diffusing species in the pore space.

  10. A general treatment of snow microstructure exemplified by an improved relation for the thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Löwe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Finding relevant microstructural parameters beyond the density is a longstanding problem which hinders the formulation of accurate parametrizations of physical properties of snow. Towards a remedy we address the effective thermal conductivity tensor of snow via known anisotropic, second-order bounds. The bound provides an explicit expression for the thermal conductivity and predicts the relevance of a microstructural anisotropy parameter Q which is given by an integral over the two-point correlation function and unambiguously defined for arbitrary snow structures. For validation we compiled a comprehensive data set of 167 snow samples. The set comprises individual samples of various snow types and entire time series of metamorphism experiments under isothermal and temperature gradient conditions. All samples were digitally reconstructed by micro-computed tomography to perform microstructure-based simulations of heat transport. The incorporation of anisotropy via Q considerably reduces the root mean square error over the usual density-based parametrization. The systematic quantification of anisotropy via the two-point correlation function suggests a generalizable route to incorporate microstructure into snowpack models. We indicate the inter-relation of the conductivity to other properties and outline a potential impact of Q on dielectric constant, permeability and adsorption rate of diffusing species in the pore space.

  11. An analytical solution for transverse thermal conductivities of unidirectional fibre composites with thermal barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou Mingqing; Zhang Duanming; Yu Boming [Department of Physics and the State Key Laboratory of Laser, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)]. E-mail: yu3838@public.wh.hb.cn

    2002-08-07

    In this paper, an analytical expression for transverse thermal conductivities of unidirectional fibre composites with thermal barrier is derived based on the electrical analogy technique and on the cylindrical filament-square packing array unit cell model (C-S model). The present analytical expressions both with and without thermal barrier between fibre and matrix are presented. The present theoretical predictions without thermal barrier are found to be in excellent agreement with the existing analytical model and nomogram from the finite difference method (FDM), and in good agreement with existing experimental data. Furthermore, the present analytical predictions with thermal barrier can best fit the experimental data and can provide a higher accuracy than the finite element method (FEM). The validity of the present analytical solution is thus verified for transverse thermal conductivities of unidirectional fibre composites with thermal barrier. (author)

  12. An analytical solution for transverse thermal conductivities of unidirectional fibre composites with thermal barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, an analytical expression for transverse thermal conductivities of unidirectional fibre composites with thermal barrier is derived based on the electrical analogy technique and on the cylindrical filament-square packing array unit cell model (C-S model). The present analytical expressions both with and without thermal barrier between fibre and matrix are presented. The present theoretical predictions without thermal barrier are found to be in excellent agreement with the existing analytical model and nomogram from the finite difference method (FDM), and in good agreement with existing experimental data. Furthermore, the present analytical predictions with thermal barrier can best fit the experimental data and can provide a higher accuracy than the finite element method (FEM). The validity of the present analytical solution is thus verified for transverse thermal conductivities of unidirectional fibre composites with thermal barrier. (author)

  13. Thermally Conductive-Silicone Composites with Thermally Reversible Cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, J T; Kuczynski, J P; Boday, D J

    2016-06-01

    Thermally conductive-silicone composites that contain thermally reversible cross-links were prepared by blending diene- and dienophile-functionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with an aluminum oxide conductive filler. This class of thermally conductive-silicones are useful as thermal interface materials (TIMs) within Information Technology (IT) hardware applications to allow rework of valuable components. The composites were rendered reworkable via retro Diels-Alder cross-links when temperatures were elevated above 130 °C and required little mechanical force to remove, making them advantageous over other TIM materials. Results show high thermal conductivity (0.4 W/m·K) at low filler loadings (45 wt %) compared to other TIM solutions (>45 wt %). Additionally, the adhesion of the material was found to be ∼7 times greater at lower temperatures (25 °C) and ∼2 times greater at higher temperatures (120 °C) than commercially available TIMs. PMID:27224959

  14. Effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of nanofluids containing spherical and cylindrical nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Gu, Hua; Fujii, Motoo

    2006-08-01

    This paper reports on measurements of the effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of various nanofluids using the transient short-hot-wire technique. To remove the influences of the static charge and electrical conductance of the nanoparticles on measurement accuracy, the short-hot-wire probes are carefully coated with a pure Al2O3 thin film and only those probes that are coated well are used for measurements. In the present study, the effective thermal conductivities and thermal diffusivities of Au/toluene, Al2O3/water, and carbon nanofiber (CNF)/water nanofluids are measured and the effects of the volume fraction and thermal conductivity of the nanoparticles and temperature are clarified. The average diameters of Au and Al2O3 spherical particles are 1.65 and 20nm, respectively. The average length and diameter of CNFs are 10μm and 150nm, respectively. The uncertainty of the present measurements is estimated to be within 1% for the thermal conductivity and 5% for the thermal diffusivity. The measured results demonstrate that the effective thermal conductivities of the nanofluids show no anomalous enhancements and can be predicted accurately by the model equation of Hamilton and Crosser [Ind. Eng. Chem. Fundam. 1, 187 (1962)] for the spherical nanoparticles and by the unit-cell model equation of Yamada and Ota [Waerme-Stoffuebertrag. 13, 27 (1980)] for carbon nanofibers.

  15. Anisotropic conductivity of silver thin films grown on silicon (100) vicinal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    López-Ríos, T.; Briggs, A.; Guillet, S.; Baró, A.M.; Luna, Mónica

    1995-01-01

    The electrical conductivity between 4 and 300 K of Ag thin films (up to 30 mm grown at room temperature on Si(100) vicinal surfaces has been measured and their morphology imaged with an atomic force microscope. A noticeable anisotropy of the resistivity of the films which is related to the structure of the films has been found)

  16. Anisotropy of elasticity and minimum thermal conductivity of monocrystal M4AlC3 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic constants, elastic anisotropy index, and anisotropic fractional ratios of Ti4AlC3, Zr4AlC3, and Hf4AlC3 are studied by using a plane wave method based on density functional theory. All compounds are characterized by the elastic anisotropy index. The bond length, population, and hardness of the three compounds are calculated. The degrees of hardness are then compared. The minimum thermal conductivity at high temperature limitation in the propagation direction of [0001] (0001) is calculated by the acoustic wave velocity, which indicates that the thermal conductivity is also anisotropic. Finally, the electronic structures of the compounds are analyzed numerically. We show that the bonding of the M4AlC3 lattice exhibits mixed properties of covalent bonding, ionic bonding, and metallic bonding. Moreover, no energy gap is observed at the Fermi level, indicating that various compounds exhibit metallic conductivity at the ground state. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  17. Analysis of thermal conductivity of polymeric nanocomposites under mechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Suyoung; Yang, Seunghwa; Cho, Maenghyo

    2013-12-01

    When the plastic deformation is applied to neat polymer, the polymer chains are aligned and the thermal conductivity of neat polymer increases linearly along the loading direction. However, the thermal conductivity change of nanocomposites consisting of polymer matrix and nanofillers during plastic deformation is not simple. The volume fraction and size of nanofillers scarcely affect the structural change of polymer chains during the plastic deformation. In this study, the structural change of polymeric materials according to the mechanical loading and its effect on the thermal transport properties are investigated through a molecular dynamics simulation. To investigate the effects of nanofiller, its volume fraction, and size on the thermal transport properties, the unit cells of neat amorphous nylon 6 and nanocomposites consisting of amorphous nylon 6 matrix and spherical silica particles are prepared. The molecular unit cells are uniaxially stretched by applying constant strain along the loading directions. Then, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are performed to estimate the thermal conductivities during plastic deformation. The alignment of polymer chains is analyzed by tracing the orientation correlation function of each polymer molecule and the free volume change during the mechanical loading is also analyzed.

  18. Thermal conductivity and contact resistance of metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate information on heat transfer and temperature distribution in metal foams is necessary for design and modelling of thermal-hydraulic systems incorporating metal foams. The analysis of heat transfer requires determination of the effective thermal conductivity as well as the thermal contact resistance (TCR) associated with the interface between the metal foam and the adjacent surfaces/layers. In this study, a test bed that allows the separation of effective thermal conductivity and TCR in metal foams is described. Measurements are performed in a vacuum under varying compressive loads using ERG Duocel aluminium foam samples with different porosities and pore densities. Also, a graphical method associated with a computer code is developed to demonstrate the distribution of contact spots and estimate the real contact area at the interface. Our results show that the porosity and the effective thermal conductivity remain unchanged with the variation of compression in the range 0-2 MPa; but TCR decreases significantly with pressure due to an increase in the real contact area at the interface. Moreover, the ratio of real to nominal contact area varies between 0 and 0.013, depending upon the compressive force, porosity, pore density and surface characteristics.

  19. Physical-Statistical Model of Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Usowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A physical-statistical model for predicting the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids is proposed. The volumetric unit of nanofluids in the model consists of solid, liquid, and gas particles and is treated as a system made up of regular geometric figures, spheres, filling the volumetric unit by layers. The model assumes that connections between layers of the spheres and between neighbouring spheres in the layer are represented by serial and parallel connections of thermal resistors, respectively. This model is expressed in terms of thermal resistance of nanoparticles and fluids and the multinomial distribution of particles in the nanofluids. The results for predicted and measured effective thermal conductivity of several nanofluids (Al2O3/ethylene glycol-based and Al2O3/water-based; CuO/ethylene glycol-based and CuO/water-based; and TiO2/ethylene glycol-based are presented. The physical-statistical model shows a reasonably good agreement with the experimental results and gives more accurate predictions for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids compared to existing classical models.

  20. Engineering thermal conductance using a two-dimensional phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasilta, Ilari

    2014-03-01

    Controlling thermal transport has become very relevant in recent years, in light of the strong push to develop novel energy harvesting techniques based on thermoelectricity, the need to improve the heat dissipation out of semiconductor devices, and the push to increase the sensitivity of bolometric radiation detectors. Traditionally, this control has been achieved by tuning the scattering of phonons by including various types of scattering centers in the material (nanoparticles, impurities etc.). Recently we have taken another approach and demonstrated that one can also use coherent bandstructure effects to control phonon thermal conductance, with the help of periodically nanostructured phononic crystals. Working at around 1 Kelvin where the wavelength of the dominant thermal phonons is more than two orders of magnitude longer than at room temperature, we have created phononic crystals with a period of 1 μm that strongly reduce the thermal conduction. In addition, we performed theoretical calculations that accurately determine the ballistic thermal conductance in a phononic crystal device, showing full quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  1. Comparison of different methods for measuring thermal conductivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different methods for the measurement of the thermal conductivity have been applied to a glass (borosilicate) bulk sample. The first method was in the steady-state using an arrangement of gold wires on the sample to create a thermal gradient and to measure the temperatures locally. This allows one to calculate the in-plane thermal conductivity of the sample. The same wire arrangement was also used for a 3ω-measurement of the direction-independent bulk thermal conductivity. The 3ω-approach is based on periodical heating and a frequency dependent analysis of the temperature response. The results of both methods are in good agreement with each other for this isotropic material, if thermal and radiative losses are accounted for. Our results demonstrate that especially in the case of thin-film measurements, finite element analysis has to be applied to correct for heat losses due to geometry and radiation. In this fashion, the wire positions can be optimized in order to minimize measurement errors.

  2. Comparison of different methods for measuring thermal conductivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartung, D.; Gather, F.; Klar, P. J. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2012-06-26

    Two different methods for the measurement of the thermal conductivity have been applied to a glass (borosilicate) bulk sample. The first method was in the steady-state using an arrangement of gold wires on the sample to create a thermal gradient and to measure the temperatures locally. This allows one to calculate the in-plane thermal conductivity of the sample. The same wire arrangement was also used for a 3{omega}-measurement of the direction-independent bulk thermal conductivity. The 3{omega}-approach is based on periodical heating and a frequency dependent analysis of the temperature response. The results of both methods are in good agreement with each other for this isotropic material, if thermal and radiative losses are accounted for. Our results demonstrate that especially in the case of thin-film measurements, finite element analysis has to be applied to correct for heat losses due to geometry and radiation. In this fashion, the wire positions can be optimized in order to minimize measurement errors.

  3. Pressure effects on thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through analysis of existing data, an estimate is made of the effect of pressure or depth on the thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials which could be present in radioactive waste repositories. In the case of homogeneous dense materials, only small shifts are predicted to occur at depths less than or equal to 3 km, and these shifts will be insignificant as compared with those caused by temperature variations. As the porosity of the medium increases, the variation of conductivity and expansion with pressure becomes greater, with conductivity increasing and expansion decreasing as pressure increases. The pressure dependence of expansion can be found from data on the temperature variation of the isobaric compressibility. In a worst case estimate, a decrease in expansion of approx. 25% is predicted for 5% porous sandstone at a depth of 3 km. The thermal conductivity of a medium with gaseous inclusions increases as the porosity decreases, with the magnitude of the increase being dependent on the details of the porosity collapse. Based on analysis of existing data on tuff and sandstone, a weighted geometric mean formula is recommended for use in calculating the conductivity of porous rock. As a result of this study, it is recommended that measurement of rock porosity versus depth receive increased attention in exploration studies and that the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and expansion should be examined in more detail

  4. Simulations of thermal conductance across tilt grain boundaries in graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Bo Gong; Qiong Feng; Hong-Tao Wang

    2012-01-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) method was performed to simulate the thermal transportation process in graphene nanoribbons (GNRs).A convenient way was conceived to introduce tilt grain boundaries (GBs) into the graphene lattice by repetitive removing C atom rows along certain directions.Comprehensive MD simulations reveal that larger-angle GBs are effective thermal barriers and substantially reduce the average thermal conductivity of GNRs.The GB thermal conductivity is ~ 10 W.m-1·K-1 for a bicrystal GNR with a misorientation of 21.8°,which is ~97% less than that of a prefect GNR with the same size.The total thermal resistance has a monotonic dependence on the density of the 5-7 defects along the GBs.A theoretical model is proposed to capture this relation and resolve the contributions by both the reduction in the phonon mean free path and the defect-induced thermal resistance.

  5. Thermal characterization of screen printed conductive pastes for RFID antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal resistance is an essential aspect of electronic circuits designing. It leads to unexpected changes in electronic components during their work. In this study, new materials for screen printed RFID tag's antennas were characterized in terms of their resistance to thermal exposure. Polymer materials containing silver flakes, silver nanopowder, carbon nanotubes or conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS were elaborated and used for antenna printing on flexible materials. In order to verify their long term susceptibility to damages caused by the changing environmental conditions, the temperature cycling test was used in three different temperature ranges: +65 °C, −12 °C, −40 °C/+85 °C (3 h in each temp., dwell time 1 h). The highest durability to thermal exposure exhibited the paste with carbon nanotubes dispersed in poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA and the lowest one – the paste with conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS.

  6. Thermal characterization of screen printed conductive pastes for RFID antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janeczek, Kamil, E-mail: kamil.janeczek@itr.org.pl [Tele and Radio Research Institute, 11 Ratuszowa Street, 03-450 Warsaw (Poland); Jakubowska, Malgorzata [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska Street, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering, 8 Sankt Andrzej Bobola Street, 02-525 Warsaw (Poland); Mlozniak, Anna [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska Street, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Koziol, Grazyna [Tele and Radio Research Institute, 11 Ratuszowa Street, 03-450 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-09-01

    Thermal resistance is an essential aspect of electronic circuits designing. It leads to unexpected changes in electronic components during their work. In this study, new materials for screen printed RFID tag's antennas were characterized in terms of their resistance to thermal exposure. Polymer materials containing silver flakes, silver nanopowder, carbon nanotubes or conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS were elaborated and used for antenna printing on flexible materials. In order to verify their long term susceptibility to damages caused by the changing environmental conditions, the temperature cycling test was used in three different temperature ranges: +65 Degree-Sign C, -12 Degree-Sign C, -40 Degree-Sign C/+85 Degree-Sign C (3 h in each temp., dwell time 1 h). The highest durability to thermal exposure exhibited the paste with carbon nanotubes dispersed in poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA and the lowest one - the paste with conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS.

  7. Homogeneous thermal cloak with constant conductivity and tunable heat localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tiancheng; Yuan, Tao; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Invisible cloak has long captivated the popular conjecture and attracted intensive research in various communities of wave dynamics, e.g., optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, etc. However, their inhomogeneous and extreme parameters imposed by transformation-optic method will usually require challenging realization with metamaterials, resulting in narrow bandwidth, loss, polarization-dependence, etc. In this paper, we demonstrate that thermodynamic cloak can be achieved with homogeneous and finite conductivity only employing naturally available materials. It is demonstrated that the thermal localization inside the coating layer can be tuned and controlled robustly by anisotropy, which enables an incomplete cloak to function perfectly. Practical realization of such homogeneous thermal cloak has been suggested by using two naturally occurring conductive materials, which provides an unprecedentedly plausible way to flexibly realize thermal cloak and manipulate heat flow with phonons. PMID:23549139

  8. Metastable Lennard-Jones fluids. II. Thermal conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Protsenko, Sergey P

    2014-06-01

    The method of equilibrium molecular dynamics with the use of the Green-Kubo formalism has been used to calculate the thermal conductivity λ in stable and metastable regions of a Lennard-Jones fluid. Calculations have been made in the range of reduced temperatures 0.4 ≤ T* = k(b)T/ε ≤ 2.0 and densities 0.01 ≤ ρ* = ρσ³ ≤ 1.2 on 15 isotherms for 234 states, 130 of which refer to metastable regions: superheated and supercooled liquids, supersaturated vapor. Equations have been built up which describe the dependence of the regular part of the thermal conductivity on temperature and density, and also on temperature and pressure. It has been found that in (p, T) variables in the region of a liquid-gas phase transition a family of lines of constant value of excess thermal conductivity Δλ = λ - λ0, where λ0 is the thermal conductivity of a dilute gas, has an envelope which coincides with the spinodal. Thus, at the approach to the spinodal of a superheated liquid and supersaturated vapor (∂Δλ/∂p)T → ∞, (∂Δλ/∂T)p → ∞. PMID:24908025

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Tetryl by Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weese, R K

    2003-07-28

    We investigated the use of the Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter to measure thermal conductivity (K) of the explosive, Tetryl, using two different methods, isothermal and nonthermal. A discussion of our methods and a comparison of our measured values to literature values of K for Tetryl, which deviated by as much as 50%, will be presented.

  10. Thermal conductivity of graphene in Corbino Membrane Geometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faugeras, C.; Faugeras, B.; Orlita, Milan; Potemski, M.; Nair, R.R.; Geim, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2010), 1889-1892. ISSN 1936-0851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : graphene * graphene membrane * thermal conductivity * Raman scattering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 9.855, year: 2010

  11. Thermal conductivity measurement by the 3omega method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourlon, A.B.; Van der Tempel, L.

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The power of LEDs increases exponentially over the years,while the mean time to failure (MTTF) should remain >100000 hours. The reliability requirement limits the junction temperature and the thermo elastic stresses, which are roughly inversely proportional tothe thermal conductivity of th

  12. Well-log based prediction of thermal conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    Rock thermal conductivity (TC) is paramount for the determination of heat flow and the calculation of temperature profiles. Due to the scarcity of drill cores compared to the availability of petrophysical well logs, methods are desired to indirectly predict TC in sedimentary basins. Most of the...

  13. Thermally stimulated discharge conductivity in polymer composite thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Sangawar; P S Chikhalikar; R J Dhokne; A U Ubale; S D Meshram

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes the results of thermally stimulated discharge conductivity study of activated charcoal–polyvinyl chloride (PVC) thin film thermoelectrets. TSDC has been carried out in the temperature range 308–400°K and at four different polarizing fields. Results are discussed on the basis of mobility of activated charcoal and polyvinyl chloride chains.

  14. Decreasing the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Glass Supported Thermoelectric Layers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Bethke

    Full Text Available As thermoelectric devices begin to make their way into commercial applications, the emphasis is put on decreasing the thermal conductivity. In this purely theoretical study, finite element analysis is used to determine the effect of a supporting material on the thermal conductivity of a thermoelectric module. The simulations illustrate the heat transfer along a sample, consisting from Cu, Cu2O and PbTe thermoelectric layers on a 1 mm thick Pyrex glass substrate. The influence of two different types of heating, at a constant temperature and at a constant heat flux, is also investigated. It is revealed that the presence of a supporting material plays an important role on lowering the effective thermal conductivity of the layer-substrate ensemble. By using thinner thermoelectric layers the effective thermal conductivity is further reduced, almost down to the value of the glass substrate. As a result, the temperature gradient becomes steeper for a fixed heating temperature, which allows the production of devices with improved performance under certain conditions. Based on the simulation results, we also propose a model for a robust thin film thermoelectric device. With this suggestion, we invite the thermoelectric community to prove the applicability of the presented concept for practical purposes.

  15. Decreasing the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Glass Supported Thermoelectric Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Kevin; Andrei, Virgil; Rademann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    As thermoelectric devices begin to make their way into commercial applications, the emphasis is put on decreasing the thermal conductivity. In this purely theoretical study, finite element analysis is used to determine the effect of a supporting material on the thermal conductivity of a thermoelectric module. The simulations illustrate the heat transfer along a sample, consisting from Cu, Cu2O and PbTe thermoelectric layers on a 1 mm thick Pyrex glass substrate. The influence of two different types of heating, at a constant temperature and at a constant heat flux, is also investigated. It is revealed that the presence of a supporting material plays an important role on lowering the effective thermal conductivity of the layer-substrate ensemble. By using thinner thermoelectric layers the effective thermal conductivity is further reduced, almost down to the value of the glass substrate. As a result, the temperature gradient becomes steeper for a fixed heating temperature, which allows the production of devices with improved performance under certain conditions. Based on the simulation results, we also propose a model for a robust thin film thermoelectric device. With this suggestion, we invite the thermoelectric community to prove the applicability of the presented concept for practical purposes. PMID:26982458

  16. Viscosity and thermal conductivity of stable graphite suspensions near percolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei; Wang, Jianjian; Marconnet, Amy M; Barbati, Alexander C; McKinley, Gareth H; Liu, Wei; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-14

    Nanofluids have received much attention in part due to the range of properties possible with different combinations of nanoparticles and base fluids. In this work, we measure the viscosity of suspensions of graphite particles in ethylene glycol as a function of the volume fraction, shear rate, and temperature below and above the percolation threshold. We also measure and contrast the trends observed in the viscosity with increasing volume fraction to the thermal conductivity behavior of the same suspensions: above the percolation threshold, the slope that describes the rate of thermal conductivity enhancement with concentration reduces compared to below the percolation threshold, whereas that of the viscosity enhancement increases. While the thermal conductivity enhancement is independent of temperature, the viscosity changes show a strong dependence on temperature and exhibit different trends with respect to the temperature at different shear rates above the percolation threshold. Interpretation of the experimental observations is provided within the framework of Stokesian dynamics simulations of the suspension microstructure and suggests that although diffusive contributions are not important for the observed thermal conductivity enhancement, they are important for understanding the variations in the viscosity with changes of temperature and shear rate above the percolation threshold. The experimental results can be collapsed to a single master curve through calculation of a single dimensionless parameter (a Péclet number based on the rotary diffusivity of the graphite particles). PMID:25469709

  17. Thermal conductivity measurements of Pacific illite sediment1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported for effective thermal conductivity measurements performed in-situ and in core samples of illite marine sediment. The measurements were obtained during a recent oceanographic expedition to a study site in the north central region of the Pacific Ocean. This study was undertaken in-support of the U.S. Subseabed Disposal Project, the purpose of which is to investigate the scientific feasibility of using the fine-grained sediments of the sea floor as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. In-situ measurements were made and 1.5-m-long hydrostatic piston cores were taken, under remote control, from a platform that was lowered to the sea floor, 5844 m below sea level. The in situ measurement of thermal conductivity was made at a nominal depth of 80 cm below the sediment surface using a specially developed, line-source, needle probe. Thermal conductivity measurements in three piston cores and one box core (obtained several kilometers from the study site) were made on shipboard using a miniature needle probe. The in-situ thermal conductivity was approximately 0.91 W . m-1. K-1. Values determined from the cores were within the range 0.81 to 0.89 W . m-1. K-1

  18. Mode dependent lattice thermal conductivity of single layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Zhiyong; Yang, Juekuan; Bi, Kedong; Chen, Yunfei, E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Design and Manufacture of Micro/Nano Biomedical Instruments and School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2014-10-21

    Molecular dynamics simulation is performed to extract the phonon dispersion and phonon lifetime of single layer graphene. The mode dependent thermal conductivity is calculated from the phonon kinetic theory. The predicted thermal conductivity at room temperature exhibits important quantum effects due to the high Debye temperature of graphene. But the quantum effects are reduced significantly when the simulated temperature is as high as 1000 K. Our calculations show that out-of-plane modes contribute about 41.1% to the total thermal conductivity at room temperature. The relative contribution of out-of-plane modes has a little decrease with the increase of temperature. Contact with substrate can reduce both the total thermal conductivity of graphene and the relative contribution of out-of-plane modes, in agreement with previous experiments and theories. Increasing the coupling strength between graphene and substrate can further reduce the relative contribution of out-of-plane modes. The present investigations also show that the relative contribution of different mode phonons is not sensitive to the grain size of graphene. The obtained phonon relaxation time provides useful insight for understanding the phonon mean free path and the size effects in graphene.

  19. The effect of radiation induced electrical conductivity (RIC) on the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave heating of plasmas in fusion reactors requires the development of microwave windows through which the microwaves can pass without great losses. The degradation of the thermal conductivity of alumina in a radiation environment is an important consideration in reliability studies of these microwave windows. Several recent papers have addressed this question at higher temperatures and at low temperatures. The current paper extends the low temperature calculations to determine the effect of phonon-electron scattering on the thermal conductivity at 77 K due to RIC. These low temperature calculations are of interest because the successful application of high power (>1 MW) windows for electron cyclotron heating systems in fusion reactors will most likely require cryogenic cooling to take advantage of the low loss tangent and higher thermal conductivity of candidate window materials at these temperatures

  20. The value and cost of complexity in predictive modelling: role of tissue anisotropic conductivity and fibre tracts in neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman Shahid, Syed; Bikson, Marom; Salman, Humaira; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2014-06-01

    Objectives. Computational methods are increasingly used to optimize transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) dose strategies and yet complexities of existing approaches limit their clinical access. Since predictive modelling indicates the relevance of subject/pathology based data and hence the need for subject specific modelling, the incremental clinical value of increasingly complex modelling methods must be balanced against the computational and clinical time and costs. For example, the incorporation of multiple tissue layers and measured diffusion tensor (DTI) based conductivity estimates increase model precision but at the cost of clinical and computational resources. Costs related to such complexities aggregate when considering individual optimization and the myriad of potential montages. Here, rather than considering if additional details change current-flow prediction, we consider when added complexities influence clinical decisions. Approach. Towards developing quantitative and qualitative metrics of value/cost associated with computational model complexity, we considered field distributions generated by two 4 × 1 high-definition montages (m1 = 4 × 1 HD montage with anode at C3 and m2 = 4 × 1 HD montage with anode at C1) and a single conventional (m3 = C3-Fp2) tDCS electrode montage. We evaluated statistical methods, including residual error (RE) and relative difference measure (RDM), to consider the clinical impact and utility of increased complexities, namely the influence of skull, muscle and brain anisotropic conductivities in a volume conductor model. Main results. Anisotropy modulated current-flow in a montage and region dependent manner. However, significant statistical changes, produced within montage by anisotropy, did not change qualitative peak and topographic comparisons across montages. Thus for the examples analysed, clinical decision on which dose to select would not be altered by the omission of anisotropic brain conductivity

  1. Evaluation of Structure Influence on Thermal Conductivity of Thermal Insulating Materials from Renewable Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta VĖJELIENĖ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of new thermal insulation materials needs to evaluate properties and structure of raw material, technological factors that make influence on the thermal conductivity of material. One of the most promising raw materials for production of insulation material is straw. The use of natural fibres in insulation is closely linked to the ecological building sector, where selection of materials is based on factors including recyclable, renewable raw materials and low resource production techniques In current work results of research on structure and thermal conductivity of renewable resources for production thermal insulating materials are presented. Due to the high abundance of renewable resources and a good its structure as raw material for thermal insulation materials barley straw, reeds, cattails and bent grass stalks are used. Macro- and micro structure analysis of these substances is performed. Straw bales of these materials are used for determining thermal conductivity. It was found that the macrostructure has the greatest effect on thermal conductivity of materials. Thermal conductivity of material is determined by the formation of a bale due to the large amount of pores among the stalks of the plant, inside the stalk and inside the stalk wall.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.494

  2. Effect of Thermal Conduction on Acoustic Waves in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, T. J.

    2006-05-01

    The influence of classical (Spitzer) thermal conduction on longitudinal acoustic waves in a coronal loop is determined through an idealized but exactly solvable model. The model consists of an isothermal, stratified (constant gravity) atmosphere in which a monochromatic acoustic wave, traveling in the direction of decreasing density, is imposed throughout the lower half of the atmosphere. Based on the linearized equations of motion, the complete steady state (t-->∞) solution is obtained. In addition to the imposed driving wave, the solution also contains reflected and transmitted acoustic and thermal conduction waves. The mode transformation and mixing occurs in the vicinity of the atmospheric layer where the gas pressure passes through a critical value set by the magnitude of the thermal conduction and other model parameters. For 5 minute waves in a million degree loop, this critical pressure is on the order of 8×10-4 in cgs units. Since the apex gas pressure of many coronal loops of current interest is thought to be comfortably in excess of this value, mode mixing and transformation is not likely to be a relevant factor for understanding acoustic waves in these structures. On the other hand, enhanced thermal conductivity as a result of plasma instabilities, for example, could revive the importance of this mechanism for coronal loops. If this mixing layer is present, the calculations show that the pair of thermal conduction waves invariably gains the overwhelming majority of the energy flux of the incoming acoustic wave. This energy is rapidly dissipated in the neighborhood of the mixing layer.

  3. Experimental Study on the Effective Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Gu, H.; Fujii, M.

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports measurements of the effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of various nanofluids using the transient short-hot-wire technique. To remove the influences of the static charge and electrical conductance of the nanoparticles on measurement accuracy, the short-hot-wire probes are carefully coated with a pure Al2O3 thin film. Using distilled water and toluene as standard liquids of known thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, the length and radius of the hot wire and the thickness of the Al2O3 film are calibrated before and after application of the coating. The electrical leakage of the short-hot-wire probes is frequently checked, and only those probes that are coated well are used for measurements. In the present study, the effective thermal conductivities and thermal diffusivities of Al2O3/water, ZrO2/water, TiO2/water, and CuO/water nanofluids are measured and the effects of the volume fractions and thermal conductivities of nanoparticles and temperature are clarified. The average diameters of Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2, and CuO particles are 20, 20, 40, and 33 nm, respectively. The uncertainty of the present measurements is estimated to be within 1% for the thermal conductivity and 5% for the thermal diffusivity. The measured results demonstrate that the effective thermal conductivities of the nanofluids show no anomalous enhancement and can be predicted accurately by the model equation of Hamilton and Crosser, when the spherical nanoparticles are dispersed into fluids.

  4. Enhancing Thermal Conductivity of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Filled Thermoplastics for Thermal Interface Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prindl, John

    Hexagonal Boron Nitride has been shown to enhance thermal conductivity in polymer composites more so than conventional ceramic fillers. However, to see a significant increase in thermal conductivity a high loading level of the advanced ceramic is often needed which can have an adverse effect on the mechanical behavior of the composite part. Applications for thermal management using thermal interface materials (TIM) continue to grow with thermoplastic injection molded parts emerging as an area for market growth. There is a growing need for published technical data in this particular area of application. In the current study, the thermal conductivity and mechanical behavior of hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) loaded thermoplastic composites is investigated. The main objectives of this work is produce a novel data package which illustrates the effects of hBN, loaded at high concentrations, across several different thermoplastic resins with the ultimate goal being to find a desirable formulation for specific thermal management applications. The desired properties for such applications being high thermal conductivity and high electrical resistivity with a minimal decrease in mechanical properties. Hexagonal BN cooling filler agglomerates were compounded into polypropylene (PP), nylon-6 (PA-6), and thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) via twin-screw extruder at 3 different loading levels. Injection molded samples were produced and characterized to show varying degrees of thermal conductivity and mechanical strength. Results from this research showed that in all cases, the thermal conductivity increased with increasing levels of hBN addition. The largest increases in thermal conductivity were seen in the PA-6 and TPE systems with the possible indication of exceeding the percolation threshold in the TPE system. This is hypothesized to occur due to the preferential migration of hBN to form conduction pathways around the elastomeric domains in the TPE matrix. Though TPE produced

  5. Giant dipole moment in a triad system. mechanisms of anisotropic photoresponse in the transient dc conductivity of dipolar solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, S.N.; Braun, C.L. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Greenfield, S.R.; Svec, W.A.; Wasielewski, M.R. [Argonne National Lab.,IL (United States)

    1996-07-25

    A transient dc conductivity method was used to observe formation of a giant dipole moment for the triad molecule MA-ANI-NI (ethoxyaniline-aminonaphthalimide-dimethylphenyl-naphthalenediimide-octyl) in toluene. The independence of the dipole moment on excitation wavelength indicates high efficiency of intramolecular energy or (and) electron transfer. The effect of light polarization on the DC conductivity signal caused by a photoinduced increase in solute dipole moment is considered in detail. It is shown that the time variation of the signal includes information about structural anomalies in the angular distribution function of molecular dipoles and depends on light polarization even for zero ground state dipole moment. Nonzero ground state dipole moment and (or) electric field dependence of the charge transfer rate constants give an additional source for an anisotropic photoresponse signal. Analysis of the photoresponse and its anisotropy for the triad gives ground ({mu}{sub g}), first ({mu}{sub l}), and second ({mu}{sub 2}) excited state dipole moments as follows: {mu}{sub g} = 12{+-}5 D, {mu}{sub l} = 35{+-}10, and {mu}{sub 2} = 87{+-}6 D. The lifetime of the giant dipole state is {tau} = 290{+-}10 ns, and the molecule`s rotational time is {tau}{sub r} = 1.6{+-}0.15 ns. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. High Tg and fast curing epoxy-based anisotropic conductive paste for electronic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeratitham, Waralee; Somwangthanaroj, Anongnat

    2016-03-01

    Herein, our main objective is to prepare the fast curing epoxy system with high glass transition temperature (Tg) by incorporating the multifunctional epoxy resin into the mixture of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) as a major epoxy component and aromatic diamine as a hardener. Furthermore, the curing behavior as well as thermal and thermomechanical properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA). It was found that Tg obtained from tan δ of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system increased from 100 °C to 205 °C with the presence of 30 percentage by weight of multifunctional epoxy resin. Additionally, the isothermal DSC results showed that the multifunctional epoxy resin can accelerate the curing reaction of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system. Namely, a high degree of curing (˜90%) was achieved after a few minutes of curing at low temperature of 130 °C, owing to a large number of epoxy ring of multifunctional epoxy resin towards the active hydrogen atoms of aromatic diamine.

  7. High-precision micropipette thermal sensor for measurement of thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ramesh

    The thesis describes novel glass micropipette thermal sensor fabricated in cost-effective manner and thermal conductivity measurement of carbon nanotubes (CNT) thin film using the developed sensor. Various micrometer-sized sensors, which range from 2 microm to 30 microm, were produced and tested. The capability of the sensor in measuring thermal fluctuation at micro level with an estimated resolution of +/-0.002°C is demonstrated. The sensitivity of sensors was recorded from 3.34 to 8.86 microV/°C, which is independent of tip size and dependent on the coating of Nickel. The detailed experimental setup for thermal conductivity measurement of CNT film is discussed and 73.418 W/m°C was determined as the thermal conductivity of the CNT film at room temperature.

  8. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity measurements of salt rocks by different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal conductivity measurements are being performed on a large number of drill core samples from the boreholes for exploration of the Gorleben salt dome for nuclear waste disposal. A laboratory instrument for rapid thermal conductivity determination based on the familiar heat-flow-meter method is used for this purpose. Thermal conductivity data for selected samples from these measurements are compared with measurements on the same samples by a comparative method under steady state longitudinal heat flow conditions. In addition, thermal diffusivity measurements are made. The comparison of the different methods is made with respect to accuracy, reproducibility and possible measurement errors. Special emphasis is given to the thermal contact resistance within the experimental set-up

  9. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise

  10. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  11. Determining in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials through numerical analysis of thermal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, H.; Hamamoto, S.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems use ground or groundwater as a heat/cooling source, typically by circulating anti-freezing solution inside a vertically installed closed-loop tube known as a U-tube to transfer heat to/from the ground. Since GSHP systems are based on renewable energy and can achieve much higher coefficient of performance (COP) than conventional air source heat pump systems, use of GSHP systems has been rapidly increasing worldwide. However, environmental impacts by GSHP systems including thermal effects on subsurface physical-chemical and microbiological properties have not been fully investigated. To rigorously assess GSHP impact on the subsurface environment, ground thermal properties including thermal conductivity and heat capacity need to be accurately characterized. Ground thermal properties were investigated at two experimental sites at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TAT) and Saitama University (SA), both located in the Kanto area of Japan. Thermal properties were evaluated both by thermal probe measurements on boring core samples and by performing in-situ Thermal Response Tests (TRT) in 50-80 m deep U-tubes. At both TAT and SU sites, heat-pulse probe measurements gave unrealistic low thermal conductivities for coarse textured materials (dominated by particles > 75 micrometers). Such underestimation can be partly due to poor contact between probe and porous material and partly to markedly decreasing sample water content during drilling, carrying, and storing sandy/gravelly samples. A more reliable approach for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials is therefore needed, and may be based on the commonly used TRT test. However, analyses of TRT data is typically based on Kelvin's line source model and provides an average (effective) thermal property for the whole soil profile around the U-tube but not for each geological layer. The main objective of this study was therefore to develop a method

  12. Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Nano-filler Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.; Working, Dennis C.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, Elvax 260 was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. In an attempt to improve compatibility between the Elvax and nanofillers, MWCNTs and EGs were modified through non covalent and covalent attachment of alkyl groups. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nanofillers were aligned, and samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed using a Nanoflash technique. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction. The results of this study will be presented.

  13. Copper-based conductive composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Gaspera, Enrico; Tucker, Ryan; Star, Kurt; Lan, Esther H; Ju, Yongho Sungtaek; Dunn, Bruce

    2013-11-13

    We have devised a moderate temperature hot-pressing route for preparing metal-matrix composites which possess tunable thermal expansion coefficients in combination with high electrical and thermal conductivities. The composites are based on incorporating ZrW2O8, a material with a negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), within a continuous copper matrix. The ZrW2O8 enables us to tune the CTE in a predictable manner, while the copper phase is responsible for the electrical and thermal conductivity properties. An important consideration in the processing of these materials is to avoid the decomposition of the ZrW2O8 phase. This is accomplished by using relatively mild hot-pressing conditions of 500 °C for 1 h at 40 MPa. To ensure that these conditions enable sintering of the copper, we developed a synthesis route for the preparation of Cu nanoparticles (NPs) based on the reduction of a common copper salt in aqueous solution in the presence of a size control agent. Upon hot pressing these nanoparticles at 500 °C, we are able to achieve 92-93% of the theoretical density of copper. The resulting materials exhibit a CTE which can be tuned between the value of pure copper (16.5 ppm/°C) and less than 1 ppm/°C. Thus, by adjusting the relative amount of the two components, the properties of the composite can be designed so that a material with high electrical conductivity and a CTE that matches the relatively low CTE values of semiconductor or thermoelectric materials can be achieved. This unique combination of electrical and thermal properties enables these Cu-based metal-matrix composites to be used as electrical contacts to a variety of semiconductor and thermoelectric devices which offer stable operation under thermal cycling conditions. PMID:24175870

  14. Two-temperature radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure is studied for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. Approximate solutions are obtained, with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km/s and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities.

  15. Influence of moisture content and temperature on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of rice flours

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of four types of rice flours and one type of rice protein were determine at temperatures ranging from 4.8 to 36.8 C, bulk densities 535 to 875.8 kg/m3, and moisture contents 2.6 to 16.7 percent (w.b.), using a KD2 Thermal Properties Analyzer. It was ...

  16. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  17. Lattice dynamics and lattice thermal conductivity of thorium dicarbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Zongmeng [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Huai, Ping, E-mail: huaiping@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Qiu, Wujie [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Ke, Xuezhi, E-mail: xzke@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Zhang, Wenqing [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhu, Zhiyuan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-11-15

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ThC{sub 2} with a monoclinic symmetry have been studied by means of density functional theory and direct force-constant method. The calculated properties including the thermal expansion, the heat capacity and the elastic constants are in a good agreement with experiment. Our results show that the vibrational property of the C{sub 2} dimer in ThC{sub 2} is similar to that of a free standing C{sub 2} dimer. This indicates that the C{sub 2} dimer in ThC{sub 2} is not strongly bonded to Th atoms. The lattice thermal conductivity for ThC{sub 2} was calculated by means of the Debye–Callaway model. As a comparison, the conductivity of ThC was also calculated. Our results show that the ThC and ThC{sub 2} contributions of the lattice thermal conductivity to the total conductivity are 29% and 17%, respectively.

  18. Lattice thermal conductivity of multi-component alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, M., E-mail: magda@lanl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Béland, L.K.; Samolyuk, G.D.; Stoller, R.E. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 54321 (United States); Caro, A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-11-05

    High entropy alloys (HEA) have unique properties including the potential to be radiation tolerant. These materials with extreme disorder could resist damage because disorder, stabilized by entropy, is the equilibrium thermodynamic state. Disorder also reduces electron and phonon conductivity keeping the damage energy longer at the deposition locations, eventually favoring defect recombination. In the short time-scales related to thermal spikes induced by collision cascades, phonons become the relevant energy carrier. In this work, we perform a systematic study of phonon thermal conductivity in multiple component solid solutions represented by Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials. We explore the conditions that minimize phonon mean free path via extreme alloy complexity, by varying the composition and the elements (differing in mass, atomic radii, and cohesive energy). We show that alloy complexity can be tailored to modify the scattering mechanisms that control energy transport in the phonon subsystem. Our analysis provides a qualitative guidance for the selection criteria used in the design of HEA alloys with low phonon thermal conductivity. - Highlights: • We show coupling between phonon scattering sources in multicomponent alloys. • We find criteria for combination of atomic masses and sizes to maximize scattering. • We show that more alloy components does not necessarily reduce conductivity.

  19. Effects of thermal efficiency in DCMD and the preparation of membranes with low thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The effects on vapor flux and thermal efficiency were simulated. • The conditions favoring vapor flux also favored thermal efficiency. • Four microporous polymer membranes were compared. • The SiO2 aerogel coating reduced the thermal conductivity of polymer membranes. • A 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of membranes. - Abstract: The effects of the membrane characteristics and operational conditions on the vapor flux and thermal efficiency in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process were studied with a mathematical simulation. The membrane temperature, driving force of vapor transfer, membrane distillation coefficient, etc. were used to analyze the effects. The operating conditions that increased the vapor flux improved the thermal efficiency. The membrane characteristics of four microporous membranes and their performances in DCMD were compared. A polysulfone (PSf) membrane prepared via vapor-induced phase separation exhibited the lowest thermal conductivity. The PSf and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes were modified using SiO2 aerogel blending and coating to reduce the thermal conductivity of the membrane. The coating process was more effective than the blending process toward this end. The changes in the structure of the modified membrane were observed with a scanning electron microscope. Si was found on the modified membrane surface with an energy spectrometer. The PVDF composite and support membranes were tested during the DCMD process; the composite membrane had a higher vapor flux and a better thermal efficiency than the support. A new method based on a 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the membranes

  20. Effects of thermal efficiency in DCMD and the preparation of membranes with low thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhehao, E-mail: ccgri_lzh@163.com [Changchun Gold Research Institute, 130012 (China); Peng, Yuelian, E-mail: pyl@live.com.au [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Dong, Yajun; Fan, Hongwei [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Chen, Ping [The Research Institute of Environmental Protection, North China Pharmaceutical Group Corporation, 050015 (China); Qiu, Lin [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang, Qi [National Major Science and Technology Program Management Office for Water Pollution Control and Treatment, MEP, 100029 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The effects on vapor flux and thermal efficiency were simulated. • The conditions favoring vapor flux also favored thermal efficiency. • Four microporous polymer membranes were compared. • The SiO{sub 2} aerogel coating reduced the thermal conductivity of polymer membranes. • A 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of membranes. - Abstract: The effects of the membrane characteristics and operational conditions on the vapor flux and thermal efficiency in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process were studied with a mathematical simulation. The membrane temperature, driving force of vapor transfer, membrane distillation coefficient, etc. were used to analyze the effects. The operating conditions that increased the vapor flux improved the thermal efficiency. The membrane characteristics of four microporous membranes and their performances in DCMD were compared. A polysulfone (PSf) membrane prepared via vapor-induced phase separation exhibited the lowest thermal conductivity. The PSf and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes were modified using SiO{sub 2} aerogel blending and coating to reduce the thermal conductivity of the membrane. The coating process was more effective than the blending process toward this end. The changes in the structure of the modified membrane were observed with a scanning electron microscope. Si was found on the modified membrane surface with an energy spectrometer. The PVDF composite and support membranes were tested during the DCMD process; the composite membrane had a higher vapor flux and a better thermal efficiency than the support. A new method based on a 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the membranes.

  1. Thermal conductance of carbon nanotube contacts: Molecular dynamics simulations and general description of the contact conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaway, Richard N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-07-01

    The contact conductance of carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions is the key factor that controls the collective heat transfer through CNT networks or CNT-based materials. An improved understanding of the dependence of the intertube conductance on the contact structure and local environment is needed for predictive computational modeling or theoretical description of the effective thermal conductivity of CNT materials. To investigate the effect of local structure on the thermal conductance across CNT-CNT contact regions, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for different intertube contact configurations (parallel fully or partially overlapping CNTs and CNTs crossing each other at different angles) and local structural environments characteristic of CNT network materials. The results of MD simulations predict a stronger CNT length dependence present over a broader range of lengths than has been previously reported and suggest that the effect of neighboring junctions on the conductance of CNT-CNT junctions is weak and only present when the CNTs that make up the junctions are within the range of direct van der Waals interaction with each other. A detailed analysis of the results obtained for a diverse range of intertube contact configurations reveals a nonlinear dependence of the conductance on the contact area (or number of interatomic intertube interactions) and suggests larger contributions to the conductance from areas of the contact where the density of interatomic intertube interactions is smaller. An empirical relation accounting for these observations and expressing the conductance of an arbitrary contact configuration through the total number of interatomic intertube interactions and the average number of interatomic intertube interactions per atom in the contact region is proposed. The empirical relation is found to provide a good quantitative description of the contact conductance for various CNT configurations investigated in the MD

  2. Effective Thermal Conductivity Modeling of Sandstones: SVM Framework Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Alireza; Masoudi, Mohammad; Ghaderi-Ardakani, Alireza; Arabloo, Milad; Amani, Mahmood

    2016-06-01

    Among the most significant physical characteristics of porous media, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is used for estimating the thermal enhanced oil recovery process efficiency, hydrocarbon reservoir thermal design, and numerical simulation. This paper reports the implementation of an innovative least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm for the development of enhanced model capable of predicting the ETCs of dry sandstones. By means of several statistical parameters, the validity of the presented model was evaluated. The prediction of the developed model for determining the ETCs of dry sandstones was in excellent agreement with the reported data with a coefficient of determination value ({R}2) of 0.983 and an average absolute relative deviation of 0.35 %. Results from present research show that the proposed LS-SVM model is robust, reliable, and efficient in calculating the ETCs of sandstones.

  3. Thermal entanglement and teleportation in a two-qubit Heisenberg chain with Dzyaloshinski-Moriya anisotropic antisymmetric interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal entanglement of a two-qubit Heisenberg chain in the presence of the Dzyaloshinski-Moriya (DM) anisotropic antisymmetric interaction and entanglement teleportation when using two independent Heisenberg chains as the quantum channel are investigated. It is found that the DM interaction can excite entanglement and teleportation fidelity. The output entanglement increases linearly with increasing value of the input; its dependences on the temperature, DM interaction, and spin coupling constant are given in detail. Entanglement teleportation will be better realized via an antiferromagnetic spin chain when the DM interaction is turned off and the temperature is low. However, the introduction of the DM interaction can cause the ferromagnetic spin chain to be a better quantum channel for teleportation. A minimal entanglement of the thermal state in the model is needed to realize the entanglement teleportation regardless of whether the spin chains are antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic

  4. Supramolecular interactions induced hinge-like motion of a metal-organic framework accompanied by anisotropic thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Kuang, Xiaofei; Wu, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Wenbin; Lu, Canzhong

    2014-05-21

    A novel three-dimensional metal-organic framework (MOF), Ag4(tpt)4{δ-[Mo8O26]}·1.5H2O (A) (tpt = 2,4,6-tris(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine), possesses a ths-type topology with the hinge deformation mode. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction study shows that A and the dehydrated phase Ag4(tpt)4{δ-[Mo8O26]} (B) display distinct anisotropic thermal expansion with expansion in the b direction but contraction in the ac plane. This rare area negative thermal expansion (NTE) behavior is attributed to the hinged structure model and the supramolecular interactions (argentophilic interaction, π-π interaction) that act as the microscopic driving forces. In addition, supramolecular interactions also play a key role in thermochromic behavior of compound A. PMID:24671278

  5. Lattice thermal conductivity of filled skutterudites: An anharmonicity perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a phenomenological model to calculate the high-temperature lattice thermal conductivity of filled skutterudite antimonides. The model needs no phonon resonant scattering terms. Instead, we assume that umklapp processes dominate the high-temperature phonon scattering. In order to represent the anharmonicity introduced by the filling atom, we introduce a Gaussian term into the relaxation time of the umklapp process. The developed model agrees remarkably well with the experimental results of REfCo4Sb12 and REfFe4Sb12 (RE = Yb, Ba, and Ca) alloys. To further test the validity of our model, we calculate the lattice thermal conductivity of nanostructured or multi-filled skutterudites. The calculation results are also in good agreement with experiment, increasing our confidence in the developed anharmonicity model.

  6. On the effective thermal conductivity of metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowing the effective thermal conductivity is essential in order to design a metal foam heat transfer device. Beside the experimental characterization tests, this quantity can be deduced from empirical correlations and theoretical models. Moreover, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) and numerical modeling in general, at the pore scale, are becoming a promising alternative, especially when coupled with a realistic description of the foam structure, which can be recovered from X-ray computed microtomography (μ-CT). In this work, a review of the most relevant correlations and models published in the literature, usable for the estimation of the effective thermal conductivity of metal foams, will be outlined. In addition, a validation of the models with the experimental values available in the literature will be presented, for both air and water as working fluids. Furthermore, the results of a strategy based on μ-CT – CFD coupling at the pore level will be illustrated

  7. Thermal conductivity of VN-CrN system solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of VN-CrN system solid solutions in the temperature range from 100 to 1000 K is studied. It is shown that the Lorentz number for solid solutions from the CrN side exceeds the value of the Lorentz number L=π2/3(k/e)2, (where k is a Boltzmann constant, and e is an electron charge) which is connected with the bipolar thermodiffusion effect. The Lorentz number for solid solutions from the VN side decreases in comparison with L--π2/3(k/e)2 because of electron scattering on optical phonons. Depending on the solid solution composition observed are various temperature dependences of lattice thermal conductivity at temperatures above the Debye temperature

  8. Thermal conductivity of foam mortar; Waermeleitfaehigkeit von Porenbeton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippe, K.F.; Schwab, H. [Ytong AG, Entwicklungszentrum Schrobenhausen (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Foam mortar in its present-day form was developed during the 20s in Sweden. It consists of porosified calcium silicate hydrates. Porosification is achieved by adding aluminium powder. Optimization of the micro and macro structure of foam mortar resulted in a construction material of low apparent density, high consistency and dimension stability as well as low thermal conductivity. Foam mortar has the lowest thermal conductivity of all massive wall construction materials. (orig.) [German] Porenbeton in der heutigen Form wurde in den 20iger Jahren in Schweden entwickelt. Er besteht aus porosierten Calciumsilicathydraten. Die Porosierung erfolgt durch Zusatz von Aluminiumpulver. Durch die Optimierung der Mikro- und Makrostruktur des Porenbetons, ist ein Baustoff mit niedriger Rohdichte, hoher Festigkeit und Dimensionsstabilitaet sowie niedriger Waermeleitfaehigkeit entstanden. Porenbeton ist der wandbildende Massivbaustoff mit der niedrigsten Waermeleitfaehigkeit. (orig.)

  9. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2014-01-01

    long as the rhabdophane structure is preserved. The bound hydrate water is accommodated in the rhabdophane structure and is stable at temperatures of up to 650 oC. The thermal stability of the hydrate water and the phosphate structure are of significance for the proton conductivity. The LaPO4·0.6H2O......Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure to...... the monazite structure upon dehydration. The thermal stability of the hydrate is studied and found to contain water of two types, physically adsorbed and structurally bound hydrate water. The adsorbed water is correlated to the specific surface area and can be reversibly recovered when dehydrated as...

  10. Modeling of thermal conductivity of stainless-steelmaking dust pellets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭兵; 彭及; 余笛

    2004-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of stainless-steelmaking dust pellets, an important parameter for the direct recycling of the dust, is naturally of interest to metallurgists. The measurement of central temperature and surface temperature was taken in a furnace. The physical model and calculation model for the heating process were set up to check the thermal conductivity of the dust pellets. The physical structure parameters δ and λ of the basic unit are 0.92 and 0.45 based on the calculation. The temperature in the pellet can be expressed in a linear equation a5 Tp =a1 TN +a2 TM +a4. This is convenient to determine the central temperature of a pellet in the direct recycling process.

  11. Highly thermally conductive and mechanically strong graphene fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Guoqing; Yao, Tiankai; Sun, Hongtao; Scott, Spencer Michael; Shao, Dali; Wang, Gongkai; Lian, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms bonded in a hexagonal lattice, is the thinnest, strongest, and stiffest known material and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. However, these superior properties have yet to be realized for graphene-derived macroscopic structures such as graphene fibers. We report the fabrication of graphene fibers with high thermal and electrical conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength. The inner fiber structure consists of large-sized graphene sheets forming a highly ordered arrangement intercalated with small-sized graphene sheets filling the space and microvoids. The graphene fibers exhibit a submicrometer crystallite domain size through high-temperature treatment, achieving an enhanced thermal conductivity up to 1290 watts per meter per kelvin. The tensile strength of the graphene fiber reaches 1080 megapascals. PMID:26339027

  12. Highly thermally conductive and mechanically strong graphene fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Guoqing; Yao, Tiankai; Sun, Hongtao; Scott, Spencer Michael; Shao, Dali; Wang, Gongkai; Lian, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms bonded in a hexagonal lattice, is the thinnest, strongest, and stiffest known material and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. However, these superior properties have yet to be realized for graphene-derived macroscopic structures such as graphene fibers. We report the fabrication of graphene fibers with high thermal and electrical conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength. The inner fiber structure consists of large-sized graphene sheets forming a highly ordered arrangement intercalated with small-sized graphene sheets filling the space and microvoids. The graphene fibers exhibit a submicrometer crystallite domain size through high-temperature treatment, achieving an enhanced thermal conductivity up to 1290 watts per meter per kelvin. The tensile strength of the graphene fiber reaches 1080 megapascals.

  13. Fabrication and thermal conductivity of boron carbide/copper cermet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on fabrication and thermal conductivity of B4C/Cu cermet were made to obtain high performance neutron absorber materials for Liquid Metal-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). A mixed powder of B4C and Cu was mechanically blended at high speed thereby a coating layer of Cu was formed on the surface of B4C powder. Then the B4C powder with Cu coating was hot pressed at temperatures from 950 to 1,050degC to form a B4C cermet. A high density B4C/Cu cermet with 70 vol% of B4C and relative density higher than 90% was successfully fabricated. In spite of the low volume fraction of Cu, the B4C/Cu cermet exhibited high thermal conductivity which originated from the existence of continuous metallic phase Cu in B4C/Cu cermet. (author)

  14. Pure-oxygen radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael

    1990-01-01

    Steady state radiative shock models in gas composed entirely of oxygen are calculated with the purpose of explaining observations of fast-moving knots in Cas A and other oxygen-rich SNRs. Models with electron thermal conduction differ significantly from models in which conduction is neglected. Conduction reduces postshock electron temperatures by a factor of 7-10 and flattens temperature gradients. The O III ion, whose forbidden emission usually dominates the observed spectra, is present over a wide range of shock velocities, from 100 to 170 km/s. The electron temperature in the O III forbidden line formation region is 30,000 K, in agreement with the 20,000 K derived from observations. All models with conduction have extensive warm (T above 4000 K) photoionization zones, which provides better agreement with observed optical O I line strengths.

  15. Improvement of Thermoelectric Cooling with Inhomogeneous Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Lu, Tingyu; Li, Baowen; CenterPhononics and Thermal Energy Science Team

    2014-03-01

    Thermal rectifier with inhomogeneous thermal conductivity has been theoretically proposed [ Li, Wang, and Casati, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 184301 (2004); Segal and Nitzan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 034301 (2005); Terraneo, Peyrard, and Casati, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 094302 (2002)] and been experimentally observed in carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes which are mass-loaded externally and inhomogeneously with heavy molecules [Chang et al., Science 314, 1121 (2006)]. We theoretically investigate the thermal rectification effect on the thermoelectric cooling process with linearly changed spatial dependent thermal conductivity. We find that the dissipation of Joule heat generated in such thermoelectric devices could be inhomogeneous that is very different from the convention thermoelectric devices. Such inhomogeneity of heat dissipation could enhance the heat absorption at the cold end in cooling and therefore enhance the cooling power. The energy conversion efficiency can also be modified with a redefined thermoelectric figure-of-merit ZT. Our finding is believed to be useful for high performance of thermoelectric devices in the future.

  16. Improvement in thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the thermal conductivity of UO2 fuel, an innovative composite fuel concept of continuous metal phase with a small amount of metal in UO2 pellet, was developed. Metal candidates of W, Mo and Cr were selected, and fabrication process was conceptually designed from thermodynamic calculations. We have experimentally found that a metal phase envelops perfectly UO2 grains, forming continuous channel throughout the pellet, and improving the thermal conductivity of pellet. The fabrication process are constituted by two thermal annealing step. The microstructure characteristics results indicated that the metal phases were oxidized and melted in the first heat treatment step. The melted oxide penetrated along the grain boundary of UO2 and is interconnected with each other. Under the second reduction step, the liquid phases were transformed to solid metals, which were precipitated along the grain boundary. The thermal diffusivity of UO2-W composite is increased by about 40∼80% than that of pure UO2 sample.

  17. Thermal Contact Conductance Analysis of Nitride and Carbonitride Thin Film Coatings for Thermal Interface Material Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Shanmugan; Thing, Lee Yuan; Devarajan, Mutharasu

    2015-12-01

    In order to reduce and maintain the bond line thickness between substrate and LED package, solid thin film with good thermal conductivity is suggested as thermal interface material and the proposed film thickness is about less than 1 µ. The surface parameter such as roughness and hardness is a key factor which alters the contact conductance between the two matt surfaces. Consequently, filtered vacuum cathodic arc deposited nitride thin films (CrN, TiN, AlTiN, and TiCN) on copper substrate were tested for thermal interface material applications in electronic packaging. The thermal contact conductance of the prepared thin films was evaluated using surface properties such as microhardness and surface roughness. The results were verified with the theoretical model. The measured microhardness and surface roughness of CrN thin film are 17 GPa (low) and 0.768 µm (high), respectively. The measured thermal contact conductance of all thin films showed linear properties for applied pressure and very close to the values of theoretical model. High value in thermal contact conductance of about 256 W/m2 K was noticed with CrN thin film at 1100 kPa. The percentage of deviation for our measured contact conductance value from the theoretical model value was decreasing for the increased contact pressure and observed low value (7 pct) for CrN thin film at 1100 kPa. The thermal conductivity of all thin films was also calculated from the conductance model and observed high value (19.34 W/mK) with CrN thin film.

  18. The Thermal Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.; Campbell, Colin S.; Cardell, Greg; Foote, Marc C.; Wood, Stephen E.; Mehta, Manish

    2009-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) is a component of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) payload on the Phoenix Lander. TECP will measure the temperature, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of the regolith. It will also detect and quantify the population of mobile H2O molecules in the regolith, if any, throughout the polar summer, by measuring the electrical conductivity of the regolith, as well as the dielectric permittivity. In the vapor phase, TECP is capable of measuring the atmospheric H2O vapor abundance, as well as augment the wind velocity measurements from the meteorology instrumentation. TECP is mounted near the end of the 2.3 m Robotic Arm, and can be placed either in the regolith material or held aloft in the atmosphere. This paper describes the development and calibration of the TECP. In addition, substantial characterization of the instrument has been conducted to identify behavioral characteristics that might affect landed surface operations. The greatest potential issue identified in characterization tests is the extraordinary sensitivity of the TECP to placement. Small gaps alter the contact between the TECP and regolith, complicating data interpretation. Testing with the Phoenix Robotic Arm identified mitigation techniques that will be implemented during flight. A flight model of the instrument was also field tested in the Antarctic Dry Valleys during the 2007-2008 International Polar year. 2

  19. Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). The Tptpul is the layer directly above the repository host layers, which consist of the Tptpmn, Tptpll, and the Tptpln. Current design plans indicate that the largest portion of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll (Board et al. 2002 [157756]). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large scale (cm-m) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity and perhaps repository system performance as well. To assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity, a model is proposed that is functionally dependent on the volume fraction of lithophysae and the thermal conductivity of the matrix portion of the rock. In this model, void space characterized as lithophysae is assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions, while void space characterized as matrix may be either water- or air-saturated. Lithophysae are assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions since the units being studied are all located above the water table in the region of interest, and the relatively strong capillary forces of the matrix will, under most conditions, preferentially retain any moisture present in the rock

  20. Measurement of thermal conductivity of polymeric nanocomposite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Gannoum, Misel

    2016-01-01

    A measuring device of the thermal conductivity of Polymeric nanocomposite materials is presented. This project is a continuation of a previous master student work. The goal of this project is to build a miniaturized version of the previous device in order to overturn certain limitations and improve its overall performance. The new device uses much smaller size samples, which ensures sample integrity/rigidity and saves material which in the case of nanoadditives may be expensive or scarce. In ...

  1. Thermal conductivity of graphene mediated by strain and size

    OpenAIRE

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas; Shi, Sanqiang; Wang, Xinjiang; Guo, Ruiqiang; Huang, Baoling

    2015-01-01

    Based on first-principles calculations and full iterative solution of the linearized Boltzmann-Peierls transport equation for phonons within three-phonon scattering framework, we characterize the lattice thermal conductivities $\\kappa$ of strained and unstrained graphene. We find $\\kappa$ converges to 5450 W/m-K for infinite unstrained graphene, while $\\kappa$ diverges for strained graphene with increasing system size at room temperature. The different $\\kappa$ behaviors for these systems are...

  2. Ballistic Thermal Conduction across Acoustically Mismatched Solid Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Jian WANG; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    We derive expressions for energy flow in terms of lattice normal mode coordinates and energy transmission involving reduced group velocities. With a version of Landauer formula appropriate for lattice dynamic approach, the phonon transmission coefficients and thermal conductance are calculated for two kinds of acoustically mismatched junctions: different chirality nanotubes (11,0) to (8,0), and Si-Ge superlattice structure. Our calculation shows a mode-dependent transmission in nanotube junct...

  3. Radiative flow with variable thermal conductivity in porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shehzad, Sabir Ali [Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics; Qasim, Muhammad [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics; Alsaedi, A. [King Abdul-Aziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Mathematics

    2012-03-15

    This article considers the radiation effect on the flow of a Jeffery fluid with variable thermal conductivity. Similarity transformations are employed to convert the partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations. The resulting equations have been computed by the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The numerical values of the local Nusselt numbers are also computed. The comparison with the numerical solutions of {theta}' (0) is presented. The obtained results are displayed and physical aspects have been examined in detail. (orig.)

  4. Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance in harmonic chains with nonlinear system-bath coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yi; Li, Hui-Min; Ding, Ze-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance were realized in harmonic chains in this work. We used the generalized Caldeira-Leggett model to study the heat flow. In contrast to most previous studies considering only the linear system-bath coupling, we considered the nonlinear system-bath coupling based on recent experiment [Eichler et al., Nat. Nanotech. 6, 339 (2011), 10.1038/nnano.2011.71]. When the linear coupling constant is weak, the multiphonon processes induced by the nonlinear coupling allow more phonons transport across the system-bath interface and hence the heat current is enhanced. Consequently, thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance are achieved when the nonlinear couplings are asymmetric. However, when the linear coupling constant is strong, the umklapp processes dominate the multiphonon processes. Nonlinear coupling suppresses the heat current. Thermal rectification is also achieved. But the direction of rectification is reversed compared to the results of weak linear coupling constant.

  5. Increased Thermal Conductivity in Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Schaef, Herbert T.; Shutthanandan, V.; Nie, Zimin; Martin, Paul F.; Nune, Satish K.

    2016-06-15

    Metal organic heat carriers (MOHCs) are recently developed nanofluids containing metal organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles dispersed in various base fluids including refrigerants (R245Fa) and methanol. MOHCs utilize the MOF properties to improve the thermo-physical properties of base fluids. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of MOHCs containing nanoMIL-101(Cr) and graphene oxide (GO) in an effort to improve the thermo-physical properties of various base fluids. MOHC containing MIL-101(Cr)/GO nanocomposites showed enhanced surface area, porosity, and nitrogen adsorption compared with the intrinsic nano MIL-101(Cr) and the properties depend on the amount of GO added. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) confirmed the preserved crystallinity of MIL-101(Cr) in all nanocomposites with the absence of any unreacted GO. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the presence of near spherical MIL-101(Cr) nanoparticles in the range of 40-80 nm in diameter. MOHC nanofluids containing MIL-101(Cr)/GO in methanol exhibited significant enhancement in the thermal conductivity (by approxi-mately 50%) relative to that of the intrinsic nano MIL-101(Cr) in methanol. The thermal conductivity of base fluid (methanol) was enhanced by about 20 %. The enhancement in the thermal conductivity of nanoMIL-101(Cr) MOHCs due to graphene oxide functionalization is explained using a classical Maxwell model.

  6. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  7. Aggregate fractal dimensions and thermal conduction in nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2010-10-01

    The mechanism producing enhanced thermal conductivities of nanofluids has been the subject of much debate. The formation of aggregates allowing for percolation paths within the fluid has shown the most promise. This work studies the aggregate formation of a nanofluid and compares the results to earlier thermal conductivity measurements and Monte Carlo simulation results. Static light scattering is employed to measure the fractal dimension of aggregates formed in the nanofluid over time at various temperatures and concentrations. As expected, aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Predictions indicate that as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8.

  8. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-06-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image.

  9. Cooling history of Earth's core with high thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Christopher J.

    2015-10-01

    Thermal evolution models of Earth's core constrain the power available to the geodynamo process that generates the geomagnetic field, the evolution of the solid inner core and the thermal history of the overlying mantle. Recent upward revision of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron mixtures by a factor of 2-3 has drastically reduced the estimated power available to generate the present-day geomagnetic field. Moreover, this high conductivity increases the amount of heat that is conducted out of the core down the adiabatic gradient, bringing it into line with the highest estimates of present-day core-mantle boundary heat flow. These issues raise problems with the standard scenario of core cooling in which the core has remained completely well-mixed and relatively cool for the past 3.5 Ga. This paper presents cooling histories for Earth's core spanning the last 3.5 Ga to constrain the thermodynamic conditions corresponding to marginal dynamo evolution, i.e. where the ohmic dissipation remains just positive over time. The radial variation of core properties is represented by polynomials, which gives good agreement with radial profiles derived from seismological and mineralogical data and allows the governing energy and entropy equations to be solved analytically. Time-dependent evolution of liquid and solid light element concentrations, the melting curve, and gravitational energy are calculated for an Fe-O-S-Si model of core chemistry. A suite of cooling histories are presented by varying the inner core boundary density jump, thermal conductivity and amount of radiogenic heat production in the core. All models where the core remains superadiabatic predict an inner core age of ≲ 600Myr , about two times younger than estimates based on old (lower) thermal conductivity estimates, and core temperatures that exceed present estimates of the lower mantle solidus prior to the last 0.5-1.5 Ga. Allowing the top of the core to become strongly subadiabatic in recent times

  10. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Thermal Conductivity in Si-Ge Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiao-Peng; HUAI Xiu-Lan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Thermal conductivity of nanocomposites is calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The effect of size on thermal conductivity of nanowire composites and the temperature profiles are studied. The results indicate that the thermal conductivity of nanowire composites could be much lower than alloy value; the thermal conductivity is slightly dependent on temperature except at very low temperature.

  12. Thermal conductance of a pressed Al-Al contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, M.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal conductance of a screw-fastened joint between two blocks of Al-alloys has been measured. An AlMg4.5Mn-block, the end of which is cooled by liquid helium, constitutes the upper part of the sample and the contact is formed at the face surface of a cylindrical extension of that block onto which a cylinder, made of AlMgSi1, is pressed by means of a copper-nickel screw. Pressing of the contact was carried out at room temperature by applying a defined torque, M, to the fastening screw. Three samples of the same shape but with differently treated surfaces of contact (machined flat, electro-chemically polished, with gold plated contacts) were studied. The results showed that the machined flat surfaces yield the best contact and that the contact conductance (measured in the range 4.2 K to 1.8 K) of all samples increased with increasing torque. In addition to thermal measurements, a study of the electrical conductance would be very interesting to determine the different contributions of phonon and electron heat conduction by means of the Wiedemann-Franz law. The work is useful for the GIRL (German Infra-Red Laboratory) space experiment.

  13. A Study on distribution and thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, carbon nanotubes play a pivotal role in nanoscience and nanotechnology since their discovery in 1991. Their enforced mechanical, thermal, electrical, and optical properties have attracted material industry and academic society. Owing to their great possibilities, carbon nanotubes are expected to substitute a variety of classical materials in future. However, strong van der Waals force among carbon nanotubes and huge aspect ratio often resulted in self-agglomeration. These genuine properties have interrupted a fine dispersion of carbon nanotubes to matrix materials. To over come such obstacles, a number of research has dealt with surface modification of carbon nanotubes to improve their wettability and adhesion. In this study, for the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, two dispersion methods were used. One method is dispersing of carbon nanotubes with dispersants of polyvinyl pyrrolidone and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate, SDS, and Polyvinylpyrrolidone, PVP, and the other one is dispersing of carbon nanotubes via a direct oxidization treatment with strong acid. SDS or PVP was added in pure water. And then, MWCNT of 0.0005, 0.001, 0.002, 0.003, 0.004, 0.005, 0.01, and 0.02 vol% was dispersed respectively. The thermal conductivity and the viscosity were measured with a transient hot-wire instrument built for this study and the DV II+ Pro viscometer. The results showed that PVP had good thermal conductivity at 300 wt% and this was better than that of SDS 100 wt%. also, Oxidation MWCNT is showed best thermal conductivity than other nanofluids. The viscosity of nanofluids added SDS, PVP are higher increasing than nanofluid without additive. also, Oxidaion nanofluid's viscosity was similar that nanofluid without additive. Therefore, many industrial sectors and the working fluids heat exchanger to be used nanofluids that chemical modification methods used to produce nanofluids

  14. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of (Th,U)O2 fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India has vast reserves of thorium (> 460,000 tons) and sustained work on all aspects of thorium utilization has been initiated. In this context work on fabrication of sintered thoria and mixed (Th,U)O2 pellets and evaluation of their thermophysical properties have been taken up in Radiometallurgy Division. Thermal conductivity, being the most important thermal properties, has been calculated using the experimentally measured thermal diffusivity, density and literature values of specific heats for ThO2 and thoria containing 2,4,6,10 and 20% UO2. Thermal diffusivity was measured experimentally by the laser flash method from 600 to 1600 deg C in vacuum. It was observed that thermal conductivity of ThO2 and mixed (Th,U)O2 decrease with increase in temperature. It was also observed that the conductivity decreases with increase in UO2 content, the decrease being more at lower temperature than that at higher temperatures. Empirical relations correlating thermal conductivity to temperatures have been generated by the least square fit method and reported. (author)

  15. On the thermal conductivity of ceramic fibrous and rigid insulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter reports on an extensive experimental program performed to study the influence of pressure, temperature and coolant media on the thermal conductivities of fibrous and rigid materials. Explains that small specimens were installed between electrically heated plates, and the stationary method of Poensen was applied. Full-size systems were tested in a high pressure wind tunnel in a horizontal position at different pressures, temperatures, media, and axial pressure gradients. Determines the requirements for insulating systems of hot gas ducts. Shows the influence of heat radiation in the case of Kaowool. Finds that owing to the value of the conductivity of the gas, the results are much higher in helium than in air. Indicates that the investigations on dense rigid samples showed a small, or nearly negligible, influence of pressure and medium due to the high conductivity of the material

  16. Magnetic Cellulose Nanocrystal Based Anisotropic Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite Films: Influence on Electrical, Magnetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Prodyut; Kumar, Amit; Katiyar, Vimal

    2016-07-20

    This paper reports a single-step co-precipitation method for the fabrication of magnetic cellulose nanocrystals (MGCNCs) with high iron oxide nanoparticle content (∼51 wt % loading) adsorbed onto cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopic studies confirmed that the hydroxyl groups on the surface of CNCs (derived from the bamboo pulp) acted as anchor points for the adsorption of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The fabricated MGCNCs have a high magnetic moment, which is utilized to orient the magnetoresponsive nanofillers in parallel or perpendicular orientations inside the polylactic acid (PLA) matrix. Magnetic-field-assisted directional alignment of MGCNCs led to the incorporation of anisotropic mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties in the fabricated PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites. Thermomechanical studies showed significant improvement in the elastic modulus and glass-transition temperature for the magnetically oriented samples. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and XRD studies confirmed that the alignment of MGCNCs led to the improvement in the percentage crystallinity and, with the absence of the cold-crystallization phenomenon, finds a potential application in polymer processing in the presence of magnetic field. The tensile strength and percentage elongation for the parallel-oriented samples improved by ∼70 and 240%, respectively, and for perpendicular-oriented samples, by ∼58 and 172%, respectively, in comparison to the unoriented samples. Furthermore, its anisotropically induced electrical and magnetic properties are desirable for fabricating self-biased electronics products. We also demonstrate that the fabricated anisotropic PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites could be laminated into films with the incorporation of directionally tunable mechanical properties. Therefore, the current study provides a novel noninvasive approach of orienting nontoxic bioderived CNCs in the presence of low

  17. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas; Huang, Baoling

    2015-09-01

    Using the Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach with the inputs of interatomic force constants from the self-consistent charge density functional tight binding method, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice thermal conductivities k of multilayer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite monolayer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. For unstrained graphene systems, both the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime present a drastic dimensional transition in going from monolayer to 2-layer graphene and thereafter a gradual transition to the graphite limit. We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multilayer graphene and graphite with increasing strain with the largest enhancement amplitude ∼40%. Competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems. This study provides insights into engineering k of multilayer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems. PMID:26241731

  18. A Thermally Conductive Separator for Stable Li Metal Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Zhou, Lihui; Fu, Kun; Yang, Zhi; Wan, Jiayu; Manno, Michael; Yao, Yonggang; Zhu, Hongli; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-09-01

    Li metal anodes have attracted considerable research interest due to their low redox potential (-3.04 V vs standard hydrogen electrode) and high theoretical gravimetric capacity of 3861 mAh/g. Battery technologies using Li metal anodes have shown much higher energy density than current Li-ion batteries (LIBs) such as Li-O2 and Li-S systems. However, issues related to dendritic Li formation and low Coulombic efficiency have prevented the use of Li metal anode technology in many practical applications. In this paper, a thermally conductive separator coated with boron-nitride (BN) nanosheets has been developed to improve the stability of the Li metal anodes. It is found that using the BN-coated separator in a conventional organic carbonate-based electrolyte results in the Coulombic efficiency stabilizing at 92% over 100 cycles at a current rate of 0.5 mA/cm(2) and 88% at 1.0 mA/cm(2). The improved Coulombic efficiency and reliability of the Li metal anodes is due to the more homogeneous thermal distribution resulting from the thermally conductive BN coating and to the smaller surface area of initial Li deposition. PMID:26237519

  19. Uncertainty in the thermal conductivity of insulation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez-Munoz, Fernando; Cejudo-Lopez, Jose M.; Carrillo-Andres, Antonio [Grupo de Energetica, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Malaga, Calle Dr. Ortiz Ramos s/n, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Anderson, Brian [BRE Scotland, Orion House, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride, Glasgow G75 0RD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    Increasing attention is being paid to the application of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis methods to model validation and thermal systems simulation. The idea is to let users to apply uncertainty bands to their model input data. These bands are then propagated through the model to determine the uncertainty bands of the simulation results. One of the main difficulties the practitioner finds when trying to apply these techniques is the lack of information on the uncertainty that affects to typical input variables. This paper is a contribution to fill this gap. It quantifies the uncertainty that can be expected in the thermal conductivity of insulation materials in the lack of specific experimental measurements. Results are presented for specific materials and for groups of materials, in order to consider situations in which the material under consideration is not well defined. The proposed conductivities are derived from a large set of measurements that was compiled in a previous European project headed by the BRE Scottish Laboratory. To illustrate how the uncertainty bands can be used in practice, an example is discussed on the validation of the mathematical model of a solar thermal collector. (author)

  20. Thermal Conductance Engineering for High-Speed TES Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.; Swetz, D. S.

    2016-07-01

    Many current and future applications for superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters require significantly faster pulse response than is currently available. X-ray spectroscopy experiments at next-generation synchrotron light sources need to successfully capture very large fluxes of photons, while detectors at free-electron laser facilities need pulse response fast enough to match repetition rates of the source. Additionally, neutrino endpoint experiments such as HOLMES need enormous statistics, yet are extremely sensitive to pile-up effects that can distort spectra. These issues can be mitigated only by fast rising and falling edges. To address these needs, we have designed high-speed TES detectors with novel geometric enhancements to increase the thermal conductance of pixels suspended on silicon nitride membranes. This paper shows that the thermal conductivity can be precisely engineered to values spanning over an order of magnitude to achieve fast thermal relaxation times tailored to the relevant applications. Using these pixel prototypes, we demonstrate decay time constants faster than 100 μ s, while still maintaining spectral resolution of 3 eV FWHM at 1.5 keV. This paper also discusses the trade-offs inherent in reducing the pixel time constant, such as increased bias current leading to degradation in energy resolution, and potential modifications to improve performance.

  1. Thermal Conductance Engineering for High-Speed TES Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.; Swetz, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Many current and future applications for superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters require significantly faster pulse response than is currently available. X-ray spectroscopy experiments at next-generation synchrotron light sources need to successfully capture very large fluxes of photons, while detectors at free-electron laser facilities need pulse response fast enough to match repetition rates of the source. Additionally, neutrino endpoint experiments such as HOLMES need enormous statistics, yet are extremely sensitive to pile-up effects that can distort spectra. These issues can be mitigated only by fast rising and falling edges. To address these needs, we have designed high-speed TES detectors with novel geometric enhancements to increase the thermal conductance of pixels suspended on silicon nitride membranes. This paper shows that the thermal conductivity can be precisely engineered to values spanning over an order of magnitude to achieve fast thermal relaxation times tailored to the relevant applications. Using these pixel prototypes, we demonstrate decay time constants faster than 100 μ s, while still maintaining spectral resolution of 3 eV FWHM at 1.5 keV. This paper also discusses the trade-offs inherent in reducing the pixel time constant, such as increased bias current leading to degradation in energy resolution, and potential modifications to improve performance.

  2. Enhancement of thermal contact conductance for electronic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartre, V.; Lallemand, M. [Centre de Thermique de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5008, INSA, Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-02-01

    Experimental investigations on thermal contact resistance have been performed. The results of this study will be useful in selecting interstitial materials to enhance the thermal conductance of an electronic component/heat sink assembly. The experimental assembly consists of two specimens: a thick copper plate, electrically heated, and an aluminium water-cooled plate. The two specimens are bolted together and the load is applied using a calibrated torque wrench. Various interstitial materials (seven commercial greases and 12 foils) suitable for the thermal enhancement in electronic systems have been investigated. The variables considered are the bolt torque, the heat transfer rate and the grease or foil thickness. Results show that the most influential parameter is the applied torque. The contact resistance decreases as the heat flux or the film thickness decreases. The highest dimensionless contact conductance factors (E) are achieved with greases (3 < E < 6). Phase change material-coated foils exhibit E-values ranging from 2.5 to 3.5. Graphite or metallic foils have E-values lower than 2 and for silicone foils E is significantly reduced (E < 1). Thus, phase change material-coated foils seem to be very promising materials, since they are efficient, easy to implement and do not migrate and vaporise out of the contact area. (author)

  3. Heat Conduction in Ceramic Coatings: Relationship Between Microstructure and Effective Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachanov, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic coatings and its relation to the microstructure continued. Results (obtained in Task 1) for the three-dimensional problem of heat conduction in a solid containing an inclusion (or, in particular, cavity - thermal insulator) of the ellipsoidal shape, were further advanced in the following two directions: (1) closed form expressions of H tensor have been derived for special cases of ellipsoidal cavity geometry: spheroid, crack-like spheroidal cavity and needle shaped spheroidal cavity; (2) these results for one cavity have been incorporated to construct heat energy potential for a solid with many spheroidal cavities (in the approximation of non-interacting defects). This problem constitutes a basic building block for further analyses.

  4. Electrically and Thermally Conducting Nanocomposites for Electronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl Santos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites made up of polymer matrices and carbon nanotubes are a class of advanced materials with great application potential in electronics packaging. Nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes as fillers have been designed with the aim of exploiting the high thermal, electrical and mechanical properties characteristic of carbon nanotubes. Heat dissipation in electronic devices requires interface materials with high thermal conductivity. Here, current developments and challenges in the application of nanotubes as fillers in polymer matrices are explored. The blending together of nanotubes and polymers result in what are known as nanocomposites. Among the most pressing current issues related to nanocomposite fabrication are (i dispersion of carbon nanotubes in the polymer host, (ii carbon nanotube-polymer interaction and the nature of the interface, and (iii alignment of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix. These issues are believed to be directly related to the electrical and thermal performance of nanocomposites. The recent progress in the fabrication of nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes as fillers and their potential application in electronics packaging as thermal interface materials is also reported.

  5. Extremely High Thermal Conductivity of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Polyethylene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei; Deng, Chengcheng; Yang, Nuo

    2015-11-01

    The ultra-low thermal conductivity of bulk polymers may be enhanced by combining them with high thermal conductivity materials such as carbon nanotubes. Different from random doping, we find that the aligned carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites has a high thermal conductivity by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The analyses indicate that the aligned composite not only take advantage of the high thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes, but enhance thermal conduction of polyethylene chains.

  6. Simulation Study for Measuring Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Nanofluid Using Hot Wire—Laser Probe Beam Displacement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, W. Mahmood Mat; Ali, Faris Mohammed; Talib, Zainal Abidin

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we present thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of chromium (Cr) nanoparticle suspended in ethylene glycol at different volume fraction concentrations of nanoparticle. All samples have been prepared using single step method. The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were measured via hot wire-laser beam deflection method. A numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation and probe beam deflection has been performed to determine the effective thermal conductivity and effective thermal diffusivity of Cr nanofluids. By fitting the experimental data to the numerical data, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of chromium (Cr)-ethylene glycol was obtained. The results also show that the effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of nanofluids increases with the increasing of nanoparticle volume fraction concentration in base fluid.

  7. Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Behavior, and Seebeck Coefficient of Conductive Films for Printed Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankireddy, Krishnamraju; Menon, Akanksha K.; Iezzi, Brian; Yee, Shannon K.; Losego, Mark D.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2016-07-01

    Printed electronics is being explored as a rapid, facile means for manufacturing thermoelectric generators (TEGs) that can recover useful electrical energy from waste heat. This work examines the relevant electrical conductivity, thermal resistance, thermovoltage, and Seebeck coefficient of printed films for use in such printed flexible TEGs. The thermoelectric performance of TEGs printed using commercially relevant nickel, silver, and carbon inks is evaluated. The microstructure of the printed films is investigated to better understand why the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient are degraded. Thermal conduction is shown to be relatively insensitive to the type of metalized coating and nearly equivalent to that of an uncoated polymer substrate. Of the commercially available conductive ink materials examined, carbon-nickel TEGs are shown to exhibit the highest thermovoltage, with a value of 10.3 μV/K. However, silver-nickel TEGs produced the highest power generation of 14.6 μW [from 31 junctions with temperature difference (ΔT) of 113°C] due to their low electrical resistance. The voltage generated from the silver-nickel TEG was stable under continuous operation at 275°C for 3 h. We have also demonstrated that, after a year of storage in ambient conditions, these devices retain their performance. Notably, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measured for individual materials were consistent with those measured from actual printed TEG device structures, validating the need for further fundamental materials characterization to accelerate flexible TEG device optimization.

  8. Synthesis, sintering properties and thermal conductivity of uranium carbonitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introduction to the applications and chemistry of uranium carbonitrides is given including the potential use as a nuclear fuel. The powder synthesis of UC, UN and mixtures of UC and UN by a cyclic process is described. The correlation between the composition ratio UN/(UC+UN) in the final product and the parameters of the process is only determined qualitatively. Batch synthesis of a powder does not lead to an increase of the content of metallic impurities and oxygen. The impurity level is determined by that of the starting uranium metal and the thermal conductivity of the sintered compacts of uranium carbonitrides are determined via the measurement of the thermal diffusivity at 1100-1700 K. (Auth.)

  9. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity with LFA 447 apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Zajas, Jan Jakub; Heiselberg, Per

    2013-01-01

    The LFA 447 can be successfully used for measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity of various samples. It is especially useful when determining the properties of materials on a very small scale. The matrix measurement mode allows for determining the local properties with a fine resolution, down to 1 millimeter.Special attention needs to be taken when determining the specific heat capacity in the comparative method. First of all, the test and reference sample ...

  10. Suppression of thermal conduction in a mirror-unstable plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Komarov, S V; Kunz, M W; Schekochihin, A A

    2016-01-01

    The ICM plasma is subject to firehose and mirror instabilities at scales of order the ion Larmor radius. The mirror instability generates fluctuations of magnetic-field strength $\\delta B / B \\sim 1$. These fluctuations act as magnetic traps for the heat-conducting electrons, suppressing their transport. We calculate the effective parallel thermal conductivity in the ICM in the presence of the mirror fluctuations for different stages of the evolution of the instability. The mirror fluctuations are limited in amplitude by the maximum and minimum values of the field strength, with no large deviations from the mean value. This key property leads to a finite suppression of thermal conduction at large scales. We find suppression down to $\\approx 0.2$ of the Spitzer value for the secular phase of the perturbations' growth, and $\\approx 0.3$ for their saturated phase. The effect operates in addition to other suppression mechanisms and independently of them. Globally, fluctuations $\\delta B / B \\sim 1$ can be present...

  11. Enhancement of the cubic cell soil thermal conductivity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarnawski, V.R. [Saint Mary' s Univ., Div. of Engineering, Halifax, NS (Canada); Gori, F. [Univ. of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Rome (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    An analysis of measured soil thermal conductivity ({lambda}) data for temperatures (T) varying from 5 to 90 deg C, was conducted with respect to four soil moisture content domains, i.e. residual, transitory meniscus, micro/macro porous capillary, superfluous. It was shown that each domain has a specific behaviour of {lambda} vs solid moisture content ({theta}). For example, {lambda} varies insignificantly with {theta} and T at very low moisture contents (residual moisture domain). In the transitory meniscus and micro/macro porous capillary domains, the relation {lambda} ({theta}) shows in general a nonlinear behaviour, which is difficult to model, particularly at high T. A sensitivity analysis applied to the Gori (1983) model for dry soil showed better predictions when the model was restricted to the use of the first term only (dependent on soil porosity and thermal conductivity of air). Two linear {lambda} approximations have been tested, across the second domain (from a critical {theta} to the permanent wilting point) and across the second and third domains (from a critical {theta} to field capacity). The enhanced model has been tested against solid {lambda} data measured at moderate and high T. The numerical results show considerably improved predictions in the first three soil moisture domains. The first linear {lambda} interpolation shows better agreement with experimental data for T up to 65 deg C, while the second interpolation was much more beneficial at higher T. The original Gori model gives generally the best predictions in the superfluous domain. (Author)

  12. Thermal Conductivity of Triphenyl Phosphite's Liquid, Glassy, and Glacial States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivchikov, Alexander I; Andersson, Ove

    2016-03-17

    The thermal conductivity κ and heat capacity per unit volume ρCp of triphenyl phosphite (TPP) were measured under different pressure and temperature conditions, and with time during the sluggish liquid to glacial state transformation at temperatures about 15 K above the glass transition temperature. As the transformation slowly proceeds during several hours, ρCp decreases monotonically from that of the liquid state to a value close to that of the vitrified state. Concurrently, κ increases nonmonotonically with an intermediate local maximum followed by a minimum, before the final rise to a higher κ. The properties of the ultimately formed glacial state depend on the thermal history, which implies that the state formed under these conditions is a heterogeneous mixture of nanocrystals and mainly amorphous-like solid, and that the relative amount and microstructure depend on the conditions of the transformation. The nonmonotonic changes in phonon propagation during the liquid to glacial transformation suggest microstructural changes which are consistent with a liquid-liquid transformation and sluggish growth of nanocrystals within amorphous-like solid domains. The isobaric thermal conductivity of the as-formed glacial state shows a reversible step increase, just prior to crystallization on heating, which deviates from the typical behavior of glasses, liquids, and crystals. An increase in pressure shifts the step to higher temperatures and suppresses crystallization, which reveals another reversible rise in κ and Cp. These results show that increased molecular mobility in the glacial state increases and suggest reduced thermal resistance at boundaries or that the motions carry heat. PMID:26916579

  13. Swift heavy ion irradiation reduces porous silicon thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoud, M.; Canut, B. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Newby, P.; Frechette, L. [Centre de Recherche en Nanofabrication et Nanocaractérisation (CNR2), Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec (Canada); Chapuis, P.O. [Université de Lyon, Centre de Thermique de Lyon CETHIL-UMR5008, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Bluet, J.M. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2014-12-15

    While the electrical conductivity of semiconductors can be easily changed over order of magnitudes (8 in silicon) by playing on the doping, the thermal conductivity (TC) control is a challenging issue. Nevertheless, numerous applications require TC control in Si down to 1 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1}. Among them, there are thermal insulation requirements in MEMS, thermal management issues in 3D packaging or TC reduction for thermoelectric applications. Towards this end, the formation of nanoporous Si by electrochemical anodisation is efficient. Nevertheless, in this case the material is too fragile for MEMS application or even to withstand CMOS technological processes. In this work, we show that ion irradiation in the electronic regime is efficient for reducing TC in meso-porous Si (PSi), which is more mechanically robust than the nanoporous PSi. We have studied three different mass to energy ratios ({sup 238}U at 110 MeV and {sup 130}Xe at 91 MeV and 29 MeV) with fluences ranging from 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} to 7 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}. The sample properties, after irradiation, have been measured by infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The TC has been measured using scanning thermal microscopy. Although, bulk Si is insensitive to ion interaction in the electronic regime, we have observed the amorphisation of the PSi resulting in a TC reduction even for the low dose and energy. For the highest irradiation dose a very important reduction factor of four was obtained.

  14. Temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity in chiral carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensah, N.G. [Department of Mathematics, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Nkrumah, G. [Department of Physics, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra (Ghana) and Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: geon@ug.edu.gh; Mensah, S.Y. [Department of Physics, Laser and Fibre Optics Centre, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana); Allotey, F.K.A. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Accra (Ghana)

    2004-08-30

    The thermal conductivity of a chiral carbon nanotube (CCNT) is calculated using a tractable analytical approach. This is based on solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation with energy dispersion relation obtained in the tight binding approximation. The results obtained are numerically analysed. Unusually high electron thermal conductivity {chi}{sub ez} is observed along the tubular axis. The dependence of {chi}{sub ez} against temperature T was plotted for varying {delta}{sub z} and a given {delta}{sub s} ({delta}{sub z} and {delta}{sub s} are the overlapping integrals (exchange energy) for the jumps along the tubular axis and the base helix, respectively). It is noted that {chi}{sub ez} shows a peaking behaviour before falling off at higher temperature. As {delta}{sub z} varies from 0.010 eV to 0.048 eV for a given {delta}{sub s}=0.0150 eV, the peak values of {chi}{sub ez} shift from 40000 W/m K at 100 K to 55000 W/m K at about 300 K. Interestingly our results at 104 K which is 41000 W/m K and occurred at {delta}{sub z}=0.023 eV compares very well with that reported for a 99.9% isotopically enriched {sup 12}C diamond crystal. Another interesting result obtained is the fact that the circumferential electron thermal conductivity {chi}{sub ec} appears to be very small. The ratio of {chi}{sub ez} to {chi}{sub ec} is of the order of 2.

  15. Effect of interfacial treatment on the thermal properties of thermal conductive plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, ZnO, which is processed by different surface treatment approaches, is blended together with polypropylene to produce thermal conductive polymer composites. The composites are analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM to investigate the surface modification of filler, their distribution in the matrix and the condition of two-phase interface. Optimized content of filler surface modifier is investigated as well. The results showed that using low-molecular coupling agent produces positive effect to improve the interface adhesion between filler and matrix, and the thermal conductivity of the composite as well. Macro-molecular coupling agent can strongly improve two-phase interface, but it is not beneficial at obtaining a high thermal conductivity. The blend of ZnO without modification and polypropylene has many defects in the two-phase interface, and the thermal conductivity of the composite is between those of composites produced by previous two approaches. The surface treatment of the filler also allowed producing the composites with lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE. As for the content of low-molecular coupling agent, it obtains the best effect at 1.5 wt%.

  16. Role of Brownian Motion Hydrodynamics on Nanofluid Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Evans, J Fish, P Keblinski

    2005-11-14

    We use a simple kinetic theory based analysis of heat flow in fluid suspensions of solid nanoparticles (nanofluids) to demonstrate that the hydrodynamics effects associated with Brownian motion have a minor effect on the thermal conductivity of the nanofluid. Our conjecture is supported by the results of molecular dynamics simulations of heat flow in a model nanofluid with well-dispersed particles. Our findings are consistent with the predictions of the effective medium theory as well as with recent experimental results on well dispersed metal nanoparticle suspensions.

  17. Thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material/expanded graphite composite across the phase change temperature range and a novel thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite can improve thermal conductivity of RT44HC by 20–60 times. • Thermal conductivity of PCM/EG composites keeps constant before/after melting. • Thermal conductivity of PCMs nearly doubled during phase changing. • Thermal conductivity of composite PCM increases with density and percentage of EG. • The simple model predicts thermal conductivity of EG-based composites accurately. - Abstract: This work studies factors that affect the thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material (PCM), RT44HC/expanded graphite (EG) composite, which include: EG mass fraction, composite PCM density and temperature. The increase of EG mass fraction and bulk density will both enhance thermal conductivity of composite PCMs, by up to 60 times. Thermal conductivity of RT44HC/EG composites remains independent on temperature outside the phase change range (40–45 °C), but nearly doubles during the phase change. The narrow temperature change during the phase change allows the maximum heat flux or minimum temperature for heat source if attaching PCMs to a first (constant temperature) or second (constant heat flux) thermal boundary. At last, a simple thermal conductivity model for EG-based composites is put forward, based on only two parameters: mass fraction of EG and bulk density of the composite. This model is validated with experiment data presented in this paper and in literature, showing this model has general applicability to any composite of EG and poor thermal conductive materials

  18. Electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and rheological properties of graphene oxide-based nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadadian, Mahboobeh; Goharshadi, Elaheh K., E-mail: gohari@ferdowsi.um.ac.ir [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Department of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Youssefi, Abbas [Par-e-Tavous Research Institute (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highly stable graphene oxide (GO)-based nanofluids were simply prepared by dispersing graphite oxide with the average crystallite size of 20 nm, in polar base fluids without using any surfactant. Electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and rheological properties of the nanofluids were measured at different mass fractions and various temperatures. An enormous enhancement, 25,678 %, in electrical conductivity of distilled water was observed by loading 0.0006 mass fraction of GO at 25 °C. GO–ethylene glycol nanofluids exhibited a non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior followed by a shear-independent region. This shear-thinning behavior became more pronounced at higher GO concentrations. The maximum ratio of the viscosity of nanofluid to that of the ethylene glycol as a base fluid was 3.4 for the mass fraction of 0.005 of GO at 20 °C under shear rate of 27.5 s{sup −1}. Thermal conductivity enhancement of 30 % was obtained for GO–ethylene glycol nanofluid for mass fraction of 0.07. The measurement of the transport properties of this new kind of nanofluid showed that it could provide an ideal fluid for heat transfer and electronic applications.

  19. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzo, Monica; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes, and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing to grow the solid inner core, and on chemical convection due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing. The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat-flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat-flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent difficulties in experimentation and theory. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles- the first directly comp...

  20. Homogenization of thermal conductivity in a periodic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRISO particle is used for a high temperature gas cooled reactor. There are few billions of TRISO particles in a reactor core. It is necessary to develop a homogenization model for compact level or block level calculation. It is widely accepted to obtain a (flux-) volume average of inverse of diffusion coefficient such as the neutron diffusion coefficient or the thermal conductivity as an analogy to the neutron transport cross section. However there are large difference in the averaged conductivity when the structure is highly heterogeneous. Cho's method gives a quite reasonable result for practical application. However, Cho's method is not accurate in the sense that a Monte Carlo method is based on the Fredholm integral equation, and a diffusion equation cannot be converted into a Fredholm equation rigorously

  1. Apparent thermal conductivity measurements by an unguarded technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, R. S.; Yarbrough, D. W.; McElroy, D. L.

    An unguarded longitudinal heat flow apparatus for measuring the apparent thermal conductivity (lambda/sub a) of insulations was tested. Heat flow is provided by a horizontal electrically heated Nichrome screen sandwiched between test samples that are bounded by temperature controlled copper plates and 9 cm of mineral fiber insulation. A determinate error analysis shows lambda/sub a/ measurement uncertainty to be less than + or - 1.7% for insulating materials as thin as 3 cm. Three-dimensional thermal modeling indicates negligible error in lambda/sub a/ due to edge loss for insulations up to 7.62 cm thick when the temperature difference across the sample is measured at the screen center. System repeatability and reproducibility were determined to be + or - 0.2%. Differences of lambda/sub a/ results from the screen tester and results from the National Bureau of Standards were 0.1% for a 10-kg/m(3) Calibration Transfer Standard and 0.9% for 127-kg/m(3) fibrous glass board (SRM 1450b). Measurements on fiberglass and rock wool batt insulations showed the dependence of lambda/sub a/ on density, temperature, temperature difference, plate emittance, and heat flow direction. Results obtained for lambda/sub a/ as a function of density at 240C differed by less than 2% from values obtained with a guarded hot plate. It is demonstrated that this simple technique has the accuracy and sensitivity needed for useful lambda/sub a/ measurements on thermal insulating materials.

  2. Estimation of thermal conductivity of short pastry biscuit at different baking stages

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Cevoli; Angelo Fabbri; Simone Virginio Marai; Enrico Ferrari; Adriano Guarnieri

    2014-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of a food material is an essential physical property in mathematical modelling and computer simulation of thermal processing. Effective thermal conductivity of non-homogeneous materials, such as food matrices, can be determined experimentally or mathematically. The aim of the following research was to compare the thermal conductivity of short pastry biscuits, at different baking stages (60-160 min), measured by a line heat source thermal conductivity probe and estimated t...

  3. Thermal conductivity of color-flavor locked quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Braby, Matt; Schaefer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We compute the thermal conductivity of color-flavor locked (CFL) quark matter. At temperatures below the scale set by the gap in the quark spectrum, transport properties are determined by collective modes. In this work we focus on the contribution from the lightest modes, the superfluid phonon and the massive neutral kaon. The calculation is done in the framework of kinetic theory, using variational solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation. We find that the thermal conductivity due to phonons is \\kappa^P =1.55 10^{26} mu_{500}^8 \\Delta_{50}^{-6} erg cm^{-1} s^{-1} K^{-1}, where \\mu_{500} is the chemical potential in units of 500 MeV and \\Delta_{50} is the gap in units of 50 MeV. The contribution of kaons is \\kappa^K = 5.63 10^{21} f_{\\pi,100}^4 T_{MeV}^{1/2} m_{10}^{-5/2} erg cm^{-1} s^{-1} K^{-1}, where f_{\\pi,100} is the pion decay constant in units of 100 MeV, T_{MeV} is the temperature in units of 1 MeV, and m_{10} is the kaon mass in units of 10 MeV. These values are smaller than previous estimates...

  4. Thermal Conductivity of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate Copolymer/Nanofiller Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, S.; Watson, K. A.; Working, D. C.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Lin, Y.; Sun, Y. P.

    2007-01-01

    To reduce weight and increase the mobility, comfort, and performance of future spacesuits, flexible, thermally conductive fabrics and plastic tubes are needed for the Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment. Such improvements would allow astronauts to operate more efficiently and safely for extended extravehicular activities. As an approach to raise the thermal conductivity (TC) of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (Elvax 260), it was compounded with three types of carbon based nanofillers: multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and expanded graphite (EG). In addition, other nanofillers including metallized CNFs, nickel nanostrands, boron nitride, and powdered aluminum were also compounded with Elvax 260 in the melt at various loading levels. In an attempt to improve compatibility between Elvax 260 and the nanofillers, MWCNTs and EG were modified by surface coating and through noncovalent and covalent attachment of organic molecules containing alkyl groups. Ribbons of the nanocomposites were extruded to form samples in which the nanofillers were aligned in the direction of flow. Samples were also fabricated by compression molding to yield nanocomposites in which the nanofillers were randomly oriented. Mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing while the degree of dispersion and alignment of nanoparticles were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. TC measurements were performed using a laser flash (Nanoflash ) technique. TC of the samples was measured in the direction of, and perpendicular to, the alignment direction. Additionally, tubing was also extruded from select nanocomposite compositions and the TC and mechanical flexibility measured.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of effective thermal conductivity and study of enhanced thermal transport mechanism in nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Suranjan; Selvam, R. Panneer

    2007-10-01

    Nanofluids have been proposed as a route for surpassing the performance of currently available heat transfer liquids in the near future. In this study an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation was used to model a nanofluid system. The thermal conductivity of the base fluid and nanofluid was computed using the Green-Kubo method for various volume fractions of nanoparticle loadings. This study showed the ability of molecular dynamics to predict the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Through molecular dynamics calculation of mean square displacements for liquid phase in base fluid and for liquid and solid phases in nanofluid, this study tried to investigate the mechanisms involved in thermal transport of nanofluids at the atomic level. The result showed that the thermal transport enhancement of nanofluids was mostly due to the increased movement of liquid atoms in the presence of nanoparticle. Diffusion coefficients were also calculated for base fluid and nanofluids. Similarity of enhancement in thermal conductivity and diffusion coefficient for nanofluids indicates similar transport process for mass and heat.

  6. Experimental thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat values for mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R. A.; Cieszkiewicz, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity obtained with a transient hot-wire apparatus are reported for three mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon. Values of the specific heat, Cp, are calculated from these measured values and the density calculated with an equation of state. The measurements were made at temperatures between 65 and 303 K with pressures between 0.1 and 70 MPa. The data cover the vapor, liquid, and supercritical gas phases for the three mixtures. The total reported points are 1066 for the air mixture (78.11 percent nitrogen, 20.97 percent oxygen, and 0.92 percent argon), 1058 for the 50 percent nitrogen, 50 percent oxygen mixture, and 864 for the 25 percent nitrogen, 75 oxygen mixture. Empirical thermal conductivity correlations are provided for the three mixtures.

  7. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity with LFA 447 apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zajas, Jan Jakub; Heiselberg, Per

    properties with a fine resolution, down to 1 millimeter. Special attention needs to be taken when determining the specific heat capacity in the comparative method. First of all, the test and reference sample should be of nearly identical thickness. Secondly, their heat diffusion time should be comparable, so...... that the heat losses from both samples during the measurement are similar. Finally, the leveling of the samples is very important. Very small discrepancies can cause a massive error in the derivation of specific heat capacity and, as a result, thermal conductivity.......The LFA 447 can be successfully used for measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity of various samples. It is especially useful when determining the properties of materials on a very small scale. The matrix measurement mode allows for determining the local...

  8. Modeling conductive cooling for thermally stressed dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremedhin, Kifle G; Wu, Binxin; Perano, K

    2016-02-01

    Conductive cooling, which is based on direct contact between a cow lying down and a cooled surface (water mattress, or any other heat exchanger embedded under the bedding), allows heat transfer from the cow to the cooled surface, and thus alleviate heat stress of the cow. Conductive cooling is a novel technology that has the potential to reduce the consumption of energy and water in cooling dairy cows compared to some current practices. A three-dimensional conduction model that simulates cooling thermally-stressed dairy cows was developed. The model used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method to characterize the air-flow field surrounding the animal model. The flow field was obtained by solving the continuity and the momentum equations. The heat exchange between the animal and the cooled water mattress as well as between the animal and ambient air was determined by solving the energy equation. The relative humidity was characterized using the species transport equation. The conduction 3-D model was validated against experimental temperature data and the agreement was very good (average error is 4.4% and the range is 1.9-8.3%) for a mesh size of 1117202. Sensitivity analyses were conducted between heat losses (sensible and latent) with respect to air temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, and level of wetness of skin surface to determine which of the parameters affect heat flux more than others. Heat flux was more sensitive to air temperature and level of wetness of the skin surface and less sensitive to relative humidity. PMID:26857982

  9. Electrochemical and Thermal Studies of Prepared Conducting Chitosan Biopolymer Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, chitosan based conducting bipolymer films were prepared by casting and solvent evaporating technique. All prepared chitosan films were of pale yellow colour, transparent, and smooth. Sulphuric acid was chosen as the cross-linking agent. It enhanced conduction pathway in cross-linked chitosan films. Mechanical properties, solid-state, and thermal behavior of prepared chitosan fimls were studied by means of a material testing machine, powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). By the XRD diffraction pattern, high molecular weight of chitosan product indicates the semi-crystalline nature, but the prepared chitosan film and doped chitosan film indicate significantly lower in crystallinity prove which of the amorphous characteristics. In addition, DSC thermogram of pure chitosan film exhibited exothermic peak around at 300 C, indicating polymer decomposition of chitosan molecules in chitosan films. Furthermore, these DSC thermograms clearly showed that while pure chitosan film display exothermal decomposition, the doped chitosan films mainly endothermic characteristics. The ionic conductivity of doped chitosan films were in the order of 10 to 10 S cm , which is in the range of semi-conductor. These results showed that cross-linked chitoson films may be used as polymer electrolyte film to fabricate solid state electrochemical cells

  10. Fuel Cell Thermal Management Through Conductive Cooling Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Burke, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis was performed to evaluate the concept of utilizing conductive cooling plates to remove heat from a fuel cell stack, as opposed to a conventional internal cooling loop. The potential advantages of this type of cooling system are reduced stack complexity and weight and increased reliability through the reduction of the number of internal fluid seals. The conductive cooling plates would extract heat from the stack transferring it to an external coolant loop. The analysis was performed to determine the required thickness of these plates. The analysis was based on an energy balance between the thermal energy produced within the stack and the heat removal from the cooling plates. To accomplish the energy balance, the heat flow into and along the plates to the cooling fluid was modeled. Results were generated for various numbers of cells being cooled by a single cooling plate. The results provided cooling plate thickness, mass, and operating temperature of the plates. It was determined that utilizing high-conductivity pyrolitic graphite cooling plates can provide a specific cooling capacity (W/kg) equivalent to or potentially greater than a conventional internal cooling loop system.

  11. Preparation and thermal conductivity enhancement of composite phase change materials for electronic thermal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A kind of composite phase change material board (PCMB) is prepared and tested. • PCMB presents a large thermal storage capacity and enhanced thermal conductivity. • PCMB displays much better cooling effect in comparison to natural air cooling. • PCMB presents different cooling characteristics in comparison to ribbed radiator. - Abstract: A kind of phase change material board (PCMB) was prepared for use in the thermal management of electronics, with paraffin and expanded graphite as the phase change material and matrix, respectively. The as-prepared PCMB presented a large thermal storage capacity of 141.74 J/g and enhanced thermal conductivity of 7.654 W/(m K). As a result, PCMB displayed much better cooling effect in comparison to natural air cooling, i.e., much lower heating rate and better uniformity of temperature distribution. On the other hand, compared with ribbed radiator technology, PCMB also presented different cooling characteristics, demonstrating that they were suitable for different practical application

  12. Simultaneous determination of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat in sI methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of sI methane hydrate were measured as functions of temperature and pressure using a needle probe technique. The temperature dependence was measured between −20°C and 17°C at 31.5 MPa. The pressure dependence was measured between 31.5 and 102 MPa at 14.4°C. Only weak temperature and pressure dependencies were observed. Methane hydrate thermal conductivity differs from that of water by less than 10 per cent, too little to provide a sensitive measure of hydrate content in water-saturated systems. Thermal diffusivity of methane hydrate is more than twice that of water, however, and its specific heat is about half that of water. Thus, when drilling into or through hydrate-rich sediment, heat from the borehole can raise the formation temperature more than 20 per cent faster than if the formation's pore space contains only water. Thermal properties of methane hydrate should be considered in safety and economic assessments of hydrate-bearing sediment.

  13. Thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the importance of thermodynamics in nuclear technology, the IAEA has been carrying out a programme on the thermodynamics of nuclear materials. This programme resulted in some of the Agency publications so far produced are: Thermodynamics of Nuclear Materials (May 1962), and Thermodynamics with Emphasis on Nuclear Materials and Atomic Transport in Solids (July 1965), both in the Proceedings Series; The Uranium Carbon and Plutonium Carbon Systems A Thermochemical Assessment (Technical Reports Series No. 14); and Tables of Thermodynamic Data (Technical Reports Series No. 38). In March 1964 a panel was called to assess the thermodynamic and transport properties of uranium dioxide; the proceedings were published as Technical Reports Series No. 39. Uranium dioxide is of great practical interest in nuclear technology, being one of the major nuclear fuels. At the IAEA panel meeting, held in Vienna on 26-30 April 1965, to assess and evaluate the thermal conductivity of the uranium dioxide phase and the effects of temperature, stoichiometry, state of aggregation and irradiation. Attention was also paid to mechanisms of heat conduction. The findings of this panel are presented in the present publication. The Panel considered three specific aspects: (a) A review of all data on unirradiated UO2 with specific attention to the effects of composition and grain size, with an attempt to define the important variables; (b) A critical examination of the irradiation results compared, where appropriate, with the out-of-reactor data, and a consideration of the conditions under which it might be possible to attain increased conductivity in an operating fuel element; (c) A discussion of the experimental data in terms of the mechanisms by which heat is conducted in UO2. In their discussions the panel members emphasized the experimental aspects since the theory had not been advanced significantly during the year following the review given in the report of the Panel on

  14. Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of Five Different Steel Alloys in the Solid and Liquid Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilthan, B.; Schützenhöfer, W.; Pottlacher, G.

    2015-08-01

    The need for characterization of thermophysical properties of steel and nickel-based alloys was addressed in the FFG-Bridge Project 810999 in cooperation with a partner from industry, Böhler Edelstahl GmbH & Co KG. To optimize numerical simulations of production processes, such as remelting or plastic deformation, additional, and more accurate data were necessary for the alloys under investigation. With a fast ohmic pulse heating circuit system, the temperature-dependent specific electrical resistivity, density, and specific heat capacity for a set of five high alloyed steels were measured. Hence, using the Wiedemann-Franz law with a Lorenz number of , the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity could be calculated for the solid and liquid phases up to temperatures of 2500 K. This experimental approach is limited by the following requirements for the specimens: they have to be electrically conducting, the melting point has to be high enough for the implemented pyrometric temperature measurement, and one has to be able to draw wires of the material. The latter restriction is technologically challenging with some of the materials being very brittle. For all samples, electrical and temperature signals are recorded and a fast shadowgraph method is used to measure the volume expansion. For each material under investigation, a set of data including the chemical composition, the density at room temperature, solidus and liquidus temperatures, and the change of enthalpy, resistivity, density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature is reported.

  15. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-05-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  16. Development of an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system for exploration of the shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirila, Marian Andrei; Christoph, Benjamin; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempted to develop an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system that can be used for subsurface thermal exploration. A new thermal probe was developed for mapping both the spatial and temporal variability of thermal conductivity, via direct push methods in the unconsolidated shallow subsurface. A robust, hollow cylindrical probe was constructed and its performance was tested by carrying out thermal conductivity measurements on materials with known properties. The thermal conductivity of the investigated materials can be worked out by measuring the active power consumption (in alternating current system) and temperature of the probe over fixed time intervals. A calibration method was used to eliminate any undesired thermal effects regarding the size of the probe, based on mobile thermal analyzer thermal conductivity values. Using the hollow cylindrical probe, the thermal conductivity results obtained had an error of less than 2.5% for solid samples (such as Teflon, Agar Jelly and Nylatron).

  17. Heat capacity, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of uranium–americium mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The (U1-y,Amy)O2-x mixed oxides with y = 0.0877 and 0.1895 and x = 0.01–0.03 was studied. • Enthalpy increments measured from 425 K up to 1790 K by drop calorimetry. • Thermal diffusivity was measured from 500 to 1550 K. • Heat capacity of the (U, Am)O2-x solid solution was thus obtained for the first time. • For thermal conductivity a correlation using a classical phonon transport model is proposed. - Abstract: The enthalpy increments of (U1-y,Amy)O2-x mixed oxides with y = 0.0877 and 0.1895 and x = 0.01–0.03 were measured using drop calorimetry in the temperature range 425–1790 K and the heat capacity was obtained as differential of the obtained enthalpy increments with respect to temperature. The thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash technique from 500 to 1550 K. The thermal conductivity was calculated from the measured thermal diffusivity, density and heat capacity. Measured enthalpy increments of the (U1-y,Amy)O2-x solid solutions are very close to the end members, indicating no excess contribution. The derived heat capacities for the two intermediate compositions are slightly higher than that of UO2 and in a good agreement with literature data of AmO2 up to 1100 K. For the thermal conductivity of (U, Am)O2−x mixed oxides a correlation using the classical phonon transport model in crystal structures is proposed

  18. Low-temperature thermal conductivity of highly porous copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, G.; Martins, D.; Cooper, A.; Bonfait, G.

    2015-12-01

    The development and characterization of new materials is of extreme importance in the design of cryogenic apparatus. Recently Versarien® PLC developed a technique capable of producing copper foam with controlled porosity and pore size. Such porous materials could be interesting for cryogenic heat exchangers as well as of special interest in some devices used in microgravit.y environments where a cryogenic liquid is confined by capillarity. In the present work, a system was developed to measure the thermal conductivity by the differential steady-state mode of four copper foam samples with porosity between 58% and 73%, within the temperatures range 20 - 260 K, using a 2 W @ 20 K cryocooler. Our measurements were validated using a copper control sample and by the estimation of the Lorenz number obtained from electrical resistivity measurements at room temperature. With these measurements, the Resistivity Residual Ratio and the tortuosity were obtained.

  19. Thermally stimulated discharge conductivity study of zinc oxide thermoelectrets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijaya S Sangawar; Manisha C Golchha

    2014-10-01

    The present work deals with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermally stimulated discharge current (TSDC) study of inorganic metal oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and its thermoelectrets. The thermoelectrets were prepared by applying different electric polarizing field (P) at constant polarizing temperature (P), for constant polarization time (P). The TSDC study was carried out in the temperature region of 313–473 K. It was observed that the conductivity of ZnO samples increases with the increase in temperature and polarizing field. The dependence of TSDC data on polarizing agents, i.e. field and temperature shows Arrhenius type of behviour and is explained on the basis of variable range hopping mechanism.

  20. Thermal boundary conductance between refractory metal carbides and diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal boundary conductance (TBC) between thin films of Cr, Mo, Nb and W and diamond substrates has been measured using time domain thermoreflectance before and after a high-vacuum heat treatment at 800 °C for 2 h. While no signs of carbide formation could be detected in as-deposited layers by scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis, the heat treatment led to partial (W, Mo) or full conversion (Cr, Nb) of the film into carbide. The measured TBC values on as-deposited samples of 315, 220, 220 and 205 MW m-2K-1 measured for, respectively, the Cr, Mo, Nb and W samples, were found to not be significantly altered by the heat treatment